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Sample records for patient pain drawings

  1. Pain drawings in somatoform-functional pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain drawings are a diagnostic adjunct to history taking, clinical examinations, and biomedical tests in evaluating pain. We hypothesized that somatoform-functional pain, is mirrored in distinctive graphic patterns of pain drawings. Our aim was to identify the most sensitive and specific graphic criteria as a tool to help identifying somatoform-functional pain. Methods We compared 62 patients with somatoform-functional pain with a control group of 49 patients with somatic-nociceptive pain type. All patients were asked to mark their pain on a pre-printed body diagram. An investigator, blinded with regard to the patients’ diagnoses, analyzed the drawings according to a set of numeric or binary criteria. Results We identified 13 drawing criteria pointing with significance to a somatoform-functional pain disorder (all p-values???0.001). The most specific and most sensitive criteria combination for detecting somatoform-functional pain included the total number of marks, the length of the longest mark, and the presence of symmetric patterns. The area under the ROC-curve was 96.3% for this criteria combination. Conclusion Pain drawings are an easy-to-administer supplementary technique which helps to identify somatoform-functional pain in comparison to somatic-nociceptive pain. PMID:23256679

  2. Patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Salama-Hanna, Joseph; Chen, Grace

    2013-11-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic pain is important because it may lead to multidisciplinary preoperative treatment of patients' pain and a multimodal analgesia plan for effective pain control. Preoperative multidisciplinary management of chronic pain and comorbid conditions, such as depression, anxiety, deconditioning, and opioid tolerance, can improve patient satisfaction and surgical recovery. Multimodal analgesia using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies shifts the burden of analgesia away from simply increasing opioid dosing. In more complicated chronic pain patients, multidisciplinary treatment, including pain psychology, physical therapy, judicious medication management, and minimally invasive interventions by pain specialists, can improve patients' satisfaction and surgical outcome. PMID:24182727

  3. Patient Education on Pain

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... People with Pain Press Room Position Statements Patient Education on Pain AAPM Past President, Perry G. Fine, ... Member Center Patient Center Research Advocacy Practice Management Education Annual Meeting Contact Us Privacy Policy Sitemap Close ...

  4. 3-D pain drawings-mobile data collection using a PDA.

    PubMed

    Ghinea, G; Spyridonis, F; Serif, T; Frank, A O

    2008-01-01

    A large number of the adult population suffers from some kind of back pain during their lifetime. Part of the process of diagnosing and treating such back pain is for a clinician to collect information as to the type and location of the pain that is being suffered. Traditional approaches to gathering and visualizing this pain data have relied on simple 2-D representations of the human body, where different types of sensation are recorded with various monochrome symbols. Although patients have been shown to prefer such drawings to traditional questionnaires, these pain drawings can be limited in their ability to accurately record pain. The work described in this paper proposes an alternative that uses a 3-D representation of the human body, which can be marked in color to visualize and record the pain data. This study has shown that the new approach is a promising development in this area of medical practice and has been positively received by patients and clinicians alike. PMID:18270034

  5. Back Pain Patients Seek Pain Relief First, Mobility Second

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154732.html Back Pain Patients Seek Pain Relief First, Mobility Second Nearly 80 percent of patients chose easing discomfort over greater movement, research shows ...

  6. Altered pain modulation in patients with persistent postendodontic pain.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Khan, Junad; Benoliel, Rafael; Feng, Changyong; Yarnitsky, David; Kuo, Fengshen; Hirschberg, Craig; Hartwell, Gary; Huang, Ching-Yu; Heir, Gary; Korczeniewska, Olga; Diehl, Scott R; Eliav, Eli

    2015-10-01

    Persistent pain may follow nerve injuries associated with invasive therapeutic interventions. About 3% to 7% of the patients remain with chronic pain after endodontic treatment, and these are described as suffering from painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Unfortunately, we are unable to identify which patients undergoing such procedures are at increased risk of developing PTTN. Recent findings suggest that impaired endogenous analgesia may be associated with the development of postsurgical chronic pain. We hypothesized that patients with PTTN display pronociceptive pain modulation, in line with other chronic pain disorders. Dynamic (conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) and static (response to mechanical and cold stimulation) psychophysical tests were performed intraorally and in the forearm of 27 patients with PTTN and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. The dynamic sensory testing demonstrated less efficient conditioned pain modulation, suggesting reduced function of the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulatory system, in patients with PTTN, mainly in those suffering from the condition for more than a year. The static sensory testing of patients with PTTN demonstrated forearm hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation mainly in patients suffering from the condition for less than a year and prolonged painful sensation after intraoral cold stimulus mainly in patients suffering from the condition for more than a year. These findings suggest that PTTN is associated more with the inhibitory rather than the facilitatory arm of pain modulation and that the central nervous system has a role in PTTN pathophysiology, possibly in a time-dependent fashion. PMID:26098442

  7. Pain management in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Barbara; Janse, Ineke C; Sibbald, Gary R

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and painful inflammatory disease. HS patients' quality of life is severely impaired, and this impairment correlates strongly with their pain. Pain in HS can be acute or chronic and has both inflammatory and noninflammatory origins. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the existing literature regarding pain management in patients with HS. While there are no formal studies investigating pain management in HS, existing recommendations are based on general pain guidelines and expert opinion. Documentation of pain requires an assessment of the severity and timing of the pain. Although anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery for HS can alleviate pain, adjunctive pain medications are typically necessary. Topical analgesics, oral acetaminophen, and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are considered first-line agents for the treatment of pain in patients with HS. If pain management is ineffective with those agents, oral opiates can be considered. In addition, anticonvulsants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors possess neuropathic pain-relieving properties that offer not only control of HS-associated pain but beneficial effects on itch and depression. There is clearly a need for additional studies on pain management in patients with HS. PMID:26470616

  8. Pain management for the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Roche, R J; Forman, W B

    1994-01-01

    Pain is a common and complex problem in the geriatric population. Successful pain management in this patient population requires a comprehensive approach involving both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:8124655

  9. Pain management strategies used by patients with breast and gynecologic cancer with postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Kwekkeboom, K L

    2001-10-01

    Many people with cancer will experience pain when they are outside of structured care settings. Patients must provide their own self-care, drawing on instructions from healthcare providers and on independently developed plans for pain management. With growing interest in complementary therapies, the scope of nonpharmacologic interventions used by patients with cancer to manage pain may be very different than 10-15 years ago. The purpose of this study was to describe steps taken by patients with breast and gynecologic cancer to manage pain after discharge from a surgical hospitalization. A secondary analysis was completed using data from 34 women who participated in a randomized trial of guided imagery. Techniques used included positioning, distraction, relaxation, heat, and eating/drinking. Compared to results of previous studies, increased use of relaxation strategies (breathing, imagery, music, meditation) was noted in the current study. The majority of participants used nonpharmacologic strategies in addition to analgesic medications. Pain-related outcomes were similar among persons who used analgesic medications alone and those who used a combination of analgesics and nonpharmacologic strategies. Nurses may benefit from knowing which pain management strategies patients find helpful so that they can encourage their use and teach similar strategies to the patients who find them useful. PMID:11605708

  10. [Post-operative pain therapy of a chronic pain patient].

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Michael T; Ittner, Karl Peter

    2006-11-01

    Post-operative pain therapy of chronic pain patients poses a challenge. Here we report the perioperative management of a 39-year-old male under chronic therapy with oxycodon, gabapentin and tolperison. Particular the pharmacointeractions regarding premedication and postoperative dose finding of opioids with intravenous PCIA are discussed. PMID:17151986

  11. Assessment of patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Dansie, E. J.; Turk, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Chronic pain is a public health concern affecting 20–30% of the population of Western countries. Although there have been many scientific advances in the understanding of the neurophysiology of pain, precisely assessing and diagnosing a patient's chronic pain problem is not straightforward or well-defined. How chronic pain is conceptualized influences how pain is evaluated and the factors considered when making a chronic pain diagnosis. There is no one-to-one relationship between the amount or type of organic pathology and pain intensity, but instead, the chronic pain experience is shaped by a myriad of biomedical, psychosocial (e.g. patients' beliefs, expectations, and mood), and behavioural factors (e.g. context, responses by significant others). Assessing each of these three domains through a comprehensive evaluation of the person with chronic pain is essential for treatment decisions and to facilitate optimal outcomes. This evaluation should include a thorough patient history and medical evaluation and a brief screening interview where the patient's behaviour can be observed. Further assessment to address questions identified during the initial evaluation will guide decisions as to what additional assessments, if any, may be appropriate. Standardized self-reported instruments to evaluate the patient's pain intensity, functional abilities, beliefs and expectations, and emotional distress are available, and can be administered by the physician, or a referral for in depth evaluation can be made to assist in treatment planning. PMID:23794641

  12. Incidence and Location of Pain in Young, Active Patients Following Hip Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Nam, Denis; Nunley, Ryan M; Sauber, Timothy J; Johnson, Staci R; Brooks, Peter J; Barrack, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Persistent pain following hip arthroplasty remains a concern, especially in young, active patients. Four hundred twenty patients less than 60years of age with a pre-symptomatic UCLA score?6 (196 total hip arthroplasty [THA]; 224 surface replacement arthroplasty [SRA]) completed a pain-drawing questionnaire investigating the location, severity, and frequency of pain around the hip. At a mean of 2.9years of follow-up, 40% reported pain in at least one location around the hip. There was no difference in the incidence of groin pain between SRA and THA patients (32% vs. 29%, P=0.6), but THA patients had a greater incidence of anterior (25% vs. 8%, P<0.001) and lateral (20% vs. 10%, P=0.01) thigh pain. A high percentage of young, active patients experience persistent pain following hip arthroplasty. PMID:26067707

  13. Pain relief in terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Wilkinson, J M

    1989-12-01

    A systematic approach to identifying the cause of pain and rational use of drug therapy are keys to providing pain relief to cancer patients. Aspirin, acetaminophen and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are effective for mild to moderate pain, and they enhance the effectiveness of weak oral narcotics, such as codeine. For severe pain, morphine is the drug of choice. A variety of adjuvant drugs can be used to enhance the effect of narcotics and to treat specific side effects of the disease or of therapy. For the terminally ill patient, a peaceful death with dignity should always be possible. PMID:2573995

  14. Pain Drawing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Models and Initiatives Diversifying Practice Revenue Advocacy Federal Health Care Reform MACRA Post-Acute Care GME & Workforce Reimbursement Advocacy ... Worsowicz, MD, MBA Diversifying Practice Revenue Advocacy Federal Health Care Reform MACRA Post-Acute Care GME & Workforce Reimbursement Advocacy ...

  15. 6. Photocopy of a 1943 architectural drawing titled: 'Patients & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of a 1943 architectural drawing titled: 'Patients & Detachment Mess, MESS-Z-H. Floor Plan, Part B.' 1-13-43 - Madigan Hospital, Patients' & Medical Detachments, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  16. [Treatment of pain in patients after tonsillectomy].

    PubMed

    Zagólski, Olaf; Kulisiewicz, Jan; Berna?, Marek; Keku?, Jerzy

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate post-operative pain in patients after tonsillectomy, treated with non-steroid anti-inflammatory and opioid drugs. A group of 57 patients aged from 16 to 53 years was examined. 32 of them were treated with ketoprofen (Ketonal, Lek) in a dose 100 mg, 3 times a day and the remaining 25 with tramadol hydrochloride (Tramal) in daily doses 150-200 mg. The numerical 0 to 10 (VAS) and 6-grade verbal scales were used to assess pain intensity. Pain intensity was highest 3-4 days after tonsillectomy. The scores below 5 points (VAS) were noted by 65% of patients treated with ketoprofen and 90% of patients treated with tramadol after the first 24 postoperative hours. The pain reacted relatively well to oral analgesics and did not require prolonged hospitalisation. A double mechanism of reducing pain by tramadol--central and spinal--may be more effective in patients after tonsillectomy than ketoprofen that blocks production of arachidonic acid cascade. In the course of the first few postoperative days, inflammation is aggravated due to infection of the wound in the throat and the latter mechanism alone may be insufficient. Effectiveness of either ketoprofen or tramadol in treatment of post-tonsillectomy pain is good but better in the case of tramadol. Patients must be informed in advance about a possibility of more intense pain a few days after tonsillectomy, in order to avoid unjustified fear. PMID:17642138

  17. PAIN INTENSITY MODERATES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE AND PAIN INTERFERENCE IN CHRONIC OROFACIAL PAIN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Boggero, Ian A.; Geiger, Paul J.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Carlson, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Study Context Chronic pain is associated with increased interference in daily functioning that becomes more pronounced as pain intensity increases. Based on previous research showing that older adults maintain well-being in the face of pain as well as or better than their younger counterparts, the current study examined the interaction of age and pain intensity on interference in a sample of chronic orofacial pain patients. Methods Data were obtained from the records of 508 chronic orofacial pain patients being seen for an initial evaluation from 2008 to 2012. Collected data included age (range: 18–78) and self-reported measures of pain intensity and pain interference. Bivariate correlations and regression models were used to assess for statistical interactions. Results Regression analyses revealed that pain intensity positively predicted pain interference (R2 = .35, B = 10.40, SE = 0.62, t(507) = 16.70, p < .001). A significant interaction supported the primary hypothesis that aging was associated with reduced interference at high levels of pain intensity (?R2 = .01, B = ?1.31, SE = 0.63, t(505) = ?2.90, p = .04). Conclusion At high levels of pain intensity, interference decreased with age, although the age by pain intensity interaction effect was small. This evidence converges with aging theories, including socioemotional selectivity theory, which posits that as people age, they become more motivated to maximize positive emotions and minimize negative ones. The results highlight the importance of studying the mechanisms older adults use to successfully cope with pain. PMID:26214102

  18. Alzheimer patients report less pain intensity and pain affect than non-demented elderly.

    PubMed

    Scherder, E; Bouma, A; Borkent, M; Rahman, O

    1999-01-01

    Pain assessment for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is generally aimed at quantifying pain, i.e., the intensity and locations of pain. Based on the extensive neuropathology in limbic brain areas with this disorder, we hypothesized that, compared to control patients, AD patients would report an additional loss of qualitative aspects of pain, i.e., pain affect. This hypothesis was tested by administering specific parts of three pain questionnaires and comparing the use of analgesics in 19 AD patients with that of 18 elderly patients without dementia who were matched for the presence of painful conditions. Results reveal that AD patients, compared to controls, experience less intense pain and less pain affect. In contrast, the number of AD patients using analgesics did not differ from the number of controls. These findings suggest that pain assessment for patients with AD should be focused on both quantitative and qualitative aspects of pain. PMID:10612117

  19. Care of the older patient with pain.

    PubMed

    Goodlin, Sarah J

    2004-08-01

    The numbers of older people, particularly those older than 85 years of age, are increasing rapidly. Aging and chronic conditions contribute to the limitation in response to stress or insults in the elderly and impact assessment and management of pain. In older patients, careful evaluation of cognition is imperative to pain management, as is assessment of effectiveness and adverse reaction to treatments. Physiological alteration in body composition and renal and hepatic function alter distribution and elimination of medications and metabolites. Non-medical treatments also may be effective in managing pain and should be considered for older patients. PMID:15228885

  20. Effective pain management and improvements in patients' outcomes and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Diane

    2015-06-01

    Adequate pain management is a compelling and universal requirement in health care. Despite considerable advancements, the adverse physiological and psychological implications of unmanaged pain remain substantially unresolved. Ineffective pain management can lead to a marked decrease in desirable clinical and psychological outcomes and patients' overall quality of life. Effective management of acute pain results in improved patient outcomes and increased patient satisfaction. Although research and advanced treatments in improved practice protocols have documented progressive improvements in management of acute and postoperative pain, little awareness of the effectiveness of best practices persists. Improved interventions can enhance patients' attitudes to and perceptions of pain. What a patient believes and understands about pain is critical in influencing the patient's reaction to the pain therapy provided. Use of interdisciplinary pain teams can lead to improvements in patients' pain management, pain education, outcomes, and satisfaction. PMID:26033099

  1. Evaluating Patients with Left Upper Quadrant Pain.

    PubMed

    Ecanow, Jacob S; Gore, Richard M

    2015-11-01

    Imaging plays a major role in the evaluation of patients who present to the emergency department with acute left upper quadrant (LUQ) pain. Multidetector computed tomography is currently the primary modality used for imaging these patients. The peritoneal reflections, subperitoneal compartment, and peritoneal spaces of the LUQ are key anatomic features in understanding the imaging appearance of acute diseases in this area. Diseases of the stomach, spleen, pancreas, and splenic flexure are encountered in patients with acute LUQ pain. Optimization of the imaging protocol is vital for accurate diagnosis and characterization of these diseases in the acute setting. PMID:26526430

  2. Section 4: treating the patient in pain.

    PubMed

    Katz, Warren A; Rothenberg, Russell

    2005-04-01

    Physicians may choose from a variety of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options to treat patients with painful rheumatic diseases. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis requiring pain management. New disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologic response modifiers can improve disease states in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). After the inflammatory component of RA is minimized with such agents, treatment goals shift to those similar to secondary OA and other degenerative joint diseases. Relief of pain and improvement in functional status are essential components of effective therapy. A pure analgesic such as acetaminophen and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, including the cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors for those at risk for gastrointestinal side effects, may be used at the lowest effective doses. Combination therapy for acetaminophen and an opioid may maximize pain relief and provide greater speed and duration of action than the separate components. Use of the atypical opioid tramadol with acetaminophen often results in an improved side-effect profile compared with stronger opioids, with similar levels of pain relief. Adjunctive therapy with agents such as topical analgesics, intraarticular hyaluron, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, muscle relaxants, and anxiolytics may also be helpful. Nonpharmacologic therapies such as exercise, physical therapy, and psychologic counseling may also diminish pain and improve outcome in patients with rheumatic diseases. One may also consider yoga, acupuncture, biofeedback, massage, relaxation techniques, and other alternative therapies. PMID:16357724

  3. Improving pain assessment and managment in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Nesbitt, Julian; Moxham, Sian; ramadurai, gopinath; Williams, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Stroke patients can experience a variety of pain. Many stroke patients have co-morbidities such as osteoporosis, arthritis or diabetes causing diabetic neuropathy. As well as pain from other long term conditions, stroke patients can experience central post-stroke pain, headaches, and musculoskeletal issues such as hypertonia, contractures, spasticity, and subluxations. These stroke patients can also have communication difficulties in the form of expressive dysphasia and/or global aphasia. Communication difficulties can result in these patients not expressing their pain and therefore not having it assessed, leading to inadequate pain relief that could impact their rehabilitation and recovery. By implementing an observational measurement of pain such as the Abbey pain scale, patients with communication difficulties can have their pain assessed and recorded. Initially 30% of patients on the acute stroke ward did not have their pain assessed and adequately recorded and 15% of patients had inadequate pain relief. The patient was assessed if they were in pain and therefore not receiving adequate pain relief by measuring their pain on the Abbey pain scale. After introducing the Abbey pain scale and creating a nurse advocate, an improvement was shown such that only 5% of patients did not have their pain recorded and all had adequate pain relief.

  4. Minimum detectable and minimal clinically important changes for pain in patients with nonspecific neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Francisco M; Abraira, Víctor; Royuela, Ana; Corcoll, Josep; Alegre, Luis; Tomás, Miquel; Mir, María Antonia; Cano, Alejandra; Muriel, Alfonso; Zamora, Javier; del Real, María Teresa Gil; Gestoso, Mario; Mufraggi, Nicole

    2008-01-01

    Background The minimal detectable change (MDC) and the minimal clinically important changes (MCIC) have been explored for nonspecific low back pain patients and are similar across different cultural settings. No data on MDC and MCIC for pain severity are available for neck pain patients. The objectives of this study were to estimate MDC and MCIC for pain severity in subacute and chronic neck pain (NP) patients, to assess if MDC and MCIC values are influenced by baseline values and to explore if they are different in the subset of patients reporting referred pain, and in subacute versus chronic patients. Methods Subacute and chronic patients treated in routine clinical practice of the Spanish National Health Service for neck pain, with or without pain referred to the arm, and a pain severity ? 3 points on a pain intensity number rating scale (PI-NRS), were included in this study. Patients' own "global perceived effect" over a 3 month period was used as the external criterion. The minimal detectable change (MDC) was estimated by means of the standard error of measurement in patients who self-assess as unchanged. MCIC were estimated by the mean value of change score in patients who self-assess as improved (mean change score, MCS), and by the optimal cutoff point in receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC). The effect on MDC and MCIC of initial scores, duration of pain, and existence of referred pain were assessed. Results 658 patients were included, 487 of them with referred pain. MDC was 4.0 PI-NRS points for neck pain in the entire sample, 4.2 for neck pain in patients who also had referred pain, and 6.2 for referred pain. MCS was 4.1 and ROC was 1.5 for referred and for neck pain, both in the entire sample and in patients who also complained of referred pain. ROC was lower (0.5 PI-NRS points) for subacute than for chronic patients (1.5 points). MCS was higher for patients with more intense baseline pain, ranging from 2.4 to 4.9 PI-NRS for neck pain and from 2.4 to 5.3 for referred pain. Conclusion In general, improvements ? 1.5 PI-NRS points could be seen as irrelevant. Above that value, the cutoff point for clinical relevance depends on the methods used to estimate MCIC and on the patient's baseline severity of pain. MDC and MCIC values in neck pain patients are similar to those for low back pain and other painful conditions. PMID:18402665

  5. The accuracy of pain drawing in identifying psychological distress in low back pain—systematic review and meta-analysis of diagnostic studies

    PubMed Central

    Bertozzi, Lucia; Rosso, Anna; Romeo, Antonio; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Guccione, Andrew A.; Pillastrini, Paolo; Vanti, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to estimate the accuracy of qualitative pain drawings (PDs) in identifying psychological distress in subacute and chronic low back pain (LBP) patients. [Subjects and Methods] Data were obtained from searches of PubMed, EBSCO, Scopus, PsycINFO and ISI Web of Science from their inception to July 2014. Quality assessments of bias and applicability were conducted using the Quality of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2 (QUADAS-2). [Results] The summary estimates were: sensitivity=0.45 (95% CI 0.34, 0.61), specificity=0.66 (95% CI 0.53, 0.82), positive likelihood ratio=1.23 (95% CI 0.93, 1.62), negative likelihood ratio=0.84 (95% CI 0.70, 1.01), and diagnostic odds ratio=1.46 (95% CI 0.79, 2.68). The area under the curve was 78% (CI, 57 to 99%). [Conclusion] The results of this systematic review do not show broad and unqualified support for the accuracy of PDs in detecting psychological distress in subacute and chronic LBP. PMID:26644701

  6. Effective pain management of older adult hospice patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Scott A

    2013-05-01

    Pain is subjective and a unique and individual experience. For those involved in the care of hospice patients, pain management can be challenging and is not always effectively managed. This case study explores an older adult cancer patient's pain experience at the end of her life with implementation of pain management strategies from hospice. PMID:23652974

  7. The Impact of Pain Assessment on Critically Ill Patients' Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Georgiou, Evanthia; Hadjibalassi, Maria; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Andreou, Panayiota; Papathanassoglou, Elizabeth D. E.

    2015-01-01

    In critically ill patients, pain is a major problem. Efficient pain management depends on a systematic, comprehensive assessment of pain. We aimed to review and synthesize current evidence on the impact of a systematic approach to pain assessment on critically ill patients' outcomes. A systematic review of published studies (CINAHL, PUBMED, SCOPUS, EMBASE, and COCHRANE databases) with predetermined eligibility criteria was undertaken. Methodological quality was assessed by the EPHPP quality assessment tool. A total of 10 eligible studies were identified. Due to big heterogeneity, quantitative synthesis was not feasible. Most studies indicated the frequency, duration of pain assessment, and types of pain assessment tools. Methodological quality assessment yielded “strong” ratings for 5/10 and “weak” ratings for 3/10 studies. Implementation of systematic approaches to pain assessment appears to associate with more frequent documented reports of pain and more efficient decisions for pain management. There was evidence of favorable effects on pain intensity, duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay, mortality, adverse events, and complications. This systematic review demonstrates a link between systematic pain assessment and outcome in critical illness. However, the current level of evidence is insufficient to draw firm conclusions. More high quality randomized clinical studies are needed. PMID:26558273

  8. Knee muscle forces during walking and running in patellofemoral pain patients and pain-free controls

    E-print Network

    Delp, Scott

    Knee muscle forces during walking and running in patellofemoral pain patients and pain Article history: Accepted 19 January 2009 Keywords: Muscle force Patellofemoral pain a b s t r a c t One proposed mechanism of patellofemoral pain, increased stress in the joint, is dependent on forces generated

  9. Effects of mood on pain responses and pain tolerance: an experimental study in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nicole K Y; Salkovskis, Paul M; Hodges, Amy; Wright, Kelly J; Hanna, Magdi; Hester, Joan

    2008-08-31

    Although chronic pain and depression commonly co-occur, causal relationships have yet to be established. A reciprocal relationship, with depression increasing pain and vice versa, is most frequently suggested, but experimental evidence is needed to validate such a view. The most straightforward approach would be a demonstration that increasing or decreasing depressed mood predictably modifies pain responses. The current experiment tested whether experimentally induced depressed and happy mood have differential effects on pain ratings and tolerance in 55 patients suffering from chronic back pain. Participants were randomly assigned to depressed, neutral (control) or elated mood induction conditions. They completed a physically passive baseline task prior to receiving mood induction, then a clinically relevant physically active task (holding a heavy bag) to elicit pain responses and tolerance. Measures were taken immediately after the baseline task and immediately after the mood induction to assess the changes in mood, pain ratings and tolerance before and after the experimental manipulation. Results indicate that the induction of depressed mood resulted in significantly higher pain ratings at rest and lower pain tolerance, whilst induced happy mood resulted in significantly lower pain ratings at rest and greater pain tolerance. Correlations between changes in mood on the one hand and changes in pain response and pain tolerance on the other hand were consistent with these findings. It is concluded that, in chronic back pain patients, experimentally induced negative mood increases self-reported pain and decreases tolerance for a pain-relevant task, with positive mood having the opposite effect. PMID:18325674

  10. Somatosensory assessment and conditioned pain modulation in temporomandibular disorders pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Simple Futarmal; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Oono, Yuka; Svensson, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The pathophysiology and underlying pain mechanisms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are poorly understood. The aims were to assess somatosensory function at the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) and to examine whether conditioned pain modulation (CPM) differs between TMD pain patients (n = 34) and healthy controls (n = 34). Quantitative sensory testing was used to assess the somatosensory function. Z-scores were calculated for patients based on reference data. Conditioned pain modulation was tested by comparing pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before, during, and after the application of painful and nonpainful cold stimuli. Pressure pain thresholds were measured at the most painful TMJ and thenar muscle (control). Data were analyzed with analyses of variance. Most (85.3%) of the patients exhibited at least 1 or more somatosensory abnormalities at the most painful TMJ with somatosensory gain with regard to PPT and punctate mechanical pain stimuli, and somatosensory loss with regard to mechanical detection and vibration detection stimuli as the most frequent abnormalities. There was a significant CPM effect (increased PPT) at both test sites during painful cold application in healthy controls and patients (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the relative CPM effect during painful cold application between groups (P = 0.227). In conclusion, somatosensory abnormalities were commonly detected in TMD pain patients and CPM effects were similar in TMD pain patients and healthy controls. PMID:26307861

  11. Nurses Managing Patients' Pain May Experience Moral Distress.

    PubMed

    Bernhofer, Esther I; Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2015-08-01

    Bedside nurses care for patients with pain every day but the task is often challenging. A previous qualitative study that investigated nurses' experiences as they treated patients with pain suggested that nurses may suffer from moral distress if they are unsuccessful in providing adequate pain relief. As 20 of the original 48 nurses interviewed described frustration and distress when constrained from doing the right thing to provide pain relief for their patients, the purpose of this secondary qualitative analysis was to answer new research questions on nurse moral distress related to managing pain. Findings indicated that difficulties in nurse/physician communication and lack of pain education were contributors to nurses' frustrations and provided barriers to optimal pain management. Many participants indicated a need for interprofessional pain management education. Further investigation is needed to clarify the impact of moral distress on nurses managing hospitalized patients' pain. PMID:24836821

  12. [Pain school. Therapeutic offers to patients with fibromyalgia and other non-malignant pain problems].

    PubMed

    Kogstad, O; Hintringer, F; Jonsson, Y M

    1991-05-30

    A prospective study of 71 patients with fibromyalgia (Yunus 1981 criteria) experience improved quality of life and management of pain after treatment at a pain school for one year. There was no significant improvement in total pain score (VAS) and sickness impact profile (SIP) for these patients compared with 71 paired controls with fibromyalgia matched by age and sex. The need for health care services was reduced and more patients from the pain school group returned to work. The main programme in the pain school classes consisted of information on chronic, non-malignant pain, psychomotoric physiotherapy and group therapy. The pupils evaluated all three items as important, with group dynamics as most beneficial. Good results have also been achieved in other chronic, non-malignant patients. Organized and structural pain management programmes in pain school classes have a favourable cost benefit profile and we recommend more use of such classes in the Norwegian health care system. PMID:2063381

  13. Assessing and managing pain in AIDS care: the patient perspective.

    PubMed

    Holzemer, W L; Henry, S B; Reilly, C A

    1998-01-01

    Although the prevalence and complexity of pain management in HIV/AIDS has been described in the literature, little is known about the management of pain from the patient perspective. This study used a set of standardized instruments, a medication chart audit, and a semistructured interview to elicit patients' self-reports of pain and patients' perceptions of nursing and self-care pain management strategies and examined potential physiological and psychosocial correlates of pain. The sample of 249 AIDS patients from three types of care settings (hospital, home care, skilled nursing facility) reported a modest overall current pain intensity (M = .14, range = 0-1). They reported experiencing pain in all body parts as measured by a body outline and characterized their pain with an average of 8.96 words from a list of 67 words. A lower pain rating was correlated with higher ratings on quality of life and perceived psychological support. An audit of the medication record revealed that the study sample received the following medications: narcotic analgesics (49%), nonnarcotic analgesics (47%), and antidepressants (22%). In a semistructured interview, medications were rated as effective by 80% of patients experiencing pain who stated that their health care providers included pain medications as part of the patient's pain management plan. Patients reported few nonpharmacologic self-care or health care provider interventions to manage their pain, and the effectiveness ratings of the interventions demonstrated wide variability. The study findings suggest that because pain was related to quality of life ratings and the pain management strategies reported by patients were not completely effective, further work is needed to examine pain management strategies that incorporate both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions with particular attention to self-care interventions. In addition, the data suggest that nursing assessments should include questions aimed at eliciting potentially harmful (e.g., street drugs, self-prescribed medications) strategies that patients may be using to manage their pain. PMID:9436165

  14. Childhood sexual abuse among chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Wurtele, S K; Kaplan, G M; Keairnes, M

    1990-06-01

    Recent literature indicates a relationship between history of sexual abuse and subsequent psychological and social dysfunction. Less thoroughly examined are the possible abuse-related physical effects. This article examines the prevalence of sexual abuse among 135 chronic pain patients. History of abuse for all patients was determined during initial interview. Twenty-eight percent reported child sexual abuse, with history of victimization more significant for women (39%) than men (7%). The abused and nonabused groups of women differed on such variables as marital status, occupation, history of rape and substance abuse, and age of hospitalization. The relationship between sexual abuse and chronic somatic reactions was discussed. PMID:2135003

  15. Medical Marijuana Seems Safe for Chronic Pain Patients, Study Finds

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_155032.html Medical Marijuana Seems Safe for Chronic Pain Patients, Study Finds ... 7, 2015 WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Medical marijuana appears mostly safe for treating chronic pain, at ...

  16. Pain volatility and prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (n = 149) who received buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multisite clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least 2 of the previous 3 weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = -0.36, p < .001). Patients with greater pain volatility were less likely to have a good treatment outcome (odds ratio = 0.55, p < .05), controlling for baseline pain severity and rate of change in pain over time. A 1 standard deviation increase in pain volatility was associated with a 44% reduction in the probability of endpoint abstinence. The significant reduction in subjective pain during treatment provides observational support for the analgesic effects of BUP/NLX in patients with chronic pain and opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk of returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP/NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26302337

  17. The effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise on abdominal muscle thickness and Oswestry disability index in subjects with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seong-Doo; Yu, Seong-Hun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise with 4 weeks using the musculoskeletal ultrasonography on muscle thickness and disability in subjects with low back pain. Twenty patients with nonspecific back pain (abdominal draw-in maneuver group: n= 10, core exercise group: n= 10) were recruited in the study. Both group received exercise intervention 3 times a week for 4weeks. The test were based on muscle thickness (transversus abdominis; Tra, internal oblique; IO and external oblique; EO), disability (Oswestry disability index; ODI) measured immediately before and after intervention. The data was measured by SPSS program 12.0 version and analyzed by Paired t-test and Independent t-test. The following results were obtained. The thickness of IO, EO for both group significantly improved except for muscle thickness of Tra. The ODI were significant difference for both groups. As the results of this study, we suggest that it may be effective method to apply to increase for the thickness of Tra, EO using abdominal draw-in maneuver and thickness of IO using core exercise. PMID:24278873

  18. The effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise on abdominal muscle thickness and Oswestry disability index in subjects with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Doo; Yu, Seong-Hun

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to effects of abdominal draw-in maneuver and core exercise with 4 weeks using the musculoskeletal ultrasonography on muscle thickness and disability in subjects with low back pain. Twenty patients with nonspecific back pain (abdominal draw-in maneuver group: n= 10, core exercise group: n= 10) were recruited in the study. Both group received exercise intervention 3 times a week for 4weeks. The test were based on muscle thickness (transversus abdominis; Tra, internal oblique; IO and external oblique; EO), disability (Oswestry disability index; ODI) measured immediately before and after intervention. The data was measured by SPSS program 12.0 version and analyzed by Paired t-test and Independent t-test. The following results were obtained. The thickness of IO, EO for both group significantly improved except for muscle thickness of Tra. The ODI were significant difference for both groups. As the results of this study, we suggest that it may be effective method to apply to increase for the thickness of Tra, EO using abdominal draw-in maneuver and thickness of IO using core exercise. PMID:24278873

  19. Foot massage: effectiveness on postoperative pain in breast surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ucuzal, Meral; Kanan, Nevin

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of foot massage on pain after breast surgery, and provide guidance for nurses in nonpharmacologic interventions for pain relief. This was a quasiexperimental study with a total of 70 patients who had undergone breast surgery (35 in the experimental group and 35 in the control group). Patients in the control group received only analgesic treatment, whereas those in the experimental group received foot massage in addition to analgesic treatment. Patients received the first dose of analgesics during surgery. As soon as patients came from the operating room, they were evaluated for pain severity. Patients whose pain severity scored ?4 according to the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire were accepted into the study. In the experimental group, pain and vital signs (arterial blood pressure, pulse, and respiration) were evaluated before foot massage at the time patients complained about pain (time 0) and then 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes after foot massage. In the control group, pain and vital signs were also evaluated when the patients complained about pain (time 0) and again at 5, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes, in sync with the times when foot massage was completed in the experimental group. A patient information form was used to collect descriptive characteristics data of the patients, and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire was used to determine pain severity. Data were analyzed for frequencies, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, Student t, Pillai trace, and Bonferroni test. The results of the statistical analyses showed that patients in the experimental group experienced significantly less pain (p ? .001). Especially notable, patients in the experimental group showed a decrease in all vital signs 5 minutes after foot massage, but patients in the control group showed increases in vital signs except for heart rate at 5 minutes. The data obtained showed that foot massage in breast surgery patients was effective in postoperative pain management. PMID:24882025

  20. A Novel Quantitative Pain Assessment Instrument That Provides Means of Comparing Patient’s Pain Magnitude With a Measurement of Their Pain Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lanny L.; Pittsley, Andrew; Becker, Ruth; Young, Allison De

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditional pain assessment instruments are subjective in nature. They are limited to subjective reporting of the presence and magnitude of pain. There is no means of validating their response or assessing their pain tolerance. The objective of this study was to determine the potential value of a novel addition to the traditional physical examination concerning a patient’s pain and more importantly their pain tolerance. Methods Extensive preliminary data were collected on 359 consecutive private practice knee patients referable the subject’s pain, including the magnitude, the most pain ever experienced, and their opinion of personal pain tolerance. The novel evaluation included physical testing of a series of small ball drops through a vertical tube from various fixed levels on the index finger and patella. The patient’s response to this impact testing provided quantitative information, from which a comparison was made to their pain opinion and also to that of other patients with similar demographics. Results Nine percent of the patients rated their pain tolerance below the midpoint on the visual analog scale. Seventy-one percent thought they were above the midpoint on the scale in regards to pain tolerance. There were discrepancies in both directions between the subject’s opinion on pain tolerance and their rating of their pain experience to the ball drop testing. Twenty-eight percent of the entire patient group rated themselves above 5 on tolerance, but experienced above the average discomfort compared to other subjects reporting on the finger impact testing. Conclusions This report introduces a novel method for collecting data concerning pain that can be subjected to quantification. The database included quantitative measures providing the opportunity to confirm, validate or refute the patient’s assertions concerning pain magnitude and tolerance. This method is best described as a patient pain profile. It has the potential to give both the patient and the physician quantified objective information rendering insight not otherwise available. PMID:26346200

  1. Prefrontal cortical hyperactivity in patients with sympathetically mediated chronic pain

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    Prefrontal cortical hyperactivity in patients with sympathetically mediated chronic pain A. Vania form 12 July 2001; accepted 12 July 2001 Abstract Chronic pain continues to impose a large burden of suffering, yet its neural correlates remain poorly understood. In sympathetically mediated chronic pain (SMP

  2. Biopsychosocial Approach to Assessing and Managing Patients with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cheatle, Martin D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain affects nearly one-third of the American population. Chronic pain can lead to a variety of problems for a pain sufferer, including developing secondary medical problems, depression, functional and vocational disability, opioid abuse and suicide. Current pain care models are deficient in providing a necessary comprehensive approach. Most patients with chronic pain are managed by primary care clinicians who are typically ill prepared to effectively and efficiently manage these cases. A biopsychosocial approach to evaluate and treat chronic pain is clinically and economically efficacious, but unique delivery systems are required to meet the challenge of access to specialty care. PMID:26614718

  3. Pain assessment and management strategies for elderly patients.

    PubMed

    MacSorley, Robyn; White, Jill; Conerly, Vicki H; Walker, Jean T; Lofton, Susan; Ragland, Gaye; Davey, DeBrynda; Robertson, Amy

    2014-05-01

    Home healthcare nurses play a critical role in pain assessment and management in elderly patients. People 65 years of age and older are the largest consumers of prescription and nonprescription pain medications in the United States and are at increased risk for adverse reactions and inadequate pain management. This article seeks to explore strategies to assist hospice and home healthcare nurses in assessing and managing elderly patients' pain. The goal is to provide tools to assist nurses in streamlining elderly patient care and improving quality of life while decreasing mortality and morbidity for this patient population. PMID:24802598

  4. Pain sensitivity and tactile spatial acuity are altered in healthy musicians as in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, Anna M; Riquelme, Inmaculada; Kleber, Boris; Altenmüller, Eckart; Hatem, Samar M; Montoya, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements, as it occurs in professional classical musicians, may lead to changes in tactile sensitivity and corresponding cortical reorganization of somatosensory cortices. It is also known that professional musicians frequently experience musculoskeletal pain and pain-related symptoms during their careers. The present study aimed at understanding the complex interaction between chronic pain and music training with respect to somatosensory processing. For this purpose, tactile thresholds (mechanical detection, grating orientation, two-point discrimination) and subjective ratings to thermal and pressure pain stimuli were assessed in 17 professional musicians with chronic pain, 30 pain-free musicians, 20 non-musicians with chronic pain, and 18 pain-free non-musicians. We found that pain-free musicians displayed greater touch sensitivity (i.e., lower mechanical detection thresholds), lower tactile spatial acuity (i.e., higher grating orientation thresholds) and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. Moreover, we also found that musicians and non-musicians with chronic pain presented lower tactile spatial acuity and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. The significant increment of pain sensitivity together with decreased spatial discrimination in pain-free musicians and the similarity of results found in chronic pain patients, suggests that the extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements in classical musicians could be considered as a risk factor for developing chronic pain, probably due to use-dependent plastic changes elicited in somatosensory pathways. PMID:25610384

  5. Pain sensitivity and tactile spatial acuity are altered in healthy musicians as in chronic pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Zamorano, Anna M.; Riquelme, Inmaculada; Kleber, Boris; Altenmüller, Eckart; Hatem, Samar M.; Montoya, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements, as it occurs in professional classical musicians, may lead to changes in tactile sensitivity and corresponding cortical reorganization of somatosensory cortices. It is also known that professional musicians frequently experience musculoskeletal pain and pain-related symptoms during their careers. The present study aimed at understanding the complex interaction between chronic pain and music training with respect to somatosensory processing. For this purpose, tactile thresholds (mechanical detection, grating orientation, two-point discrimination) and subjective ratings to thermal and pressure pain stimuli were assessed in 17 professional musicians with chronic pain, 30 pain-free musicians, 20 non-musicians with chronic pain, and 18 pain-free non-musicians. We found that pain-free musicians displayed greater touch sensitivity (i.e., lower mechanical detection thresholds), lower tactile spatial acuity (i.e., higher grating orientation thresholds) and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. Moreover, we also found that musicians and non-musicians with chronic pain presented lower tactile spatial acuity and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. The significant increment of pain sensitivity together with decreased spatial discrimination in pain-free musicians and the similarity of results found in chronic pain patients, suggests that the extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements in classical musicians could be considered as a risk factor for developing chronic pain, probably due to use-dependent plastic changes elicited in somatosensory pathways. PMID:25610384

  6. Pain catastrophizing predicts poor response to topical analgesics in patients with neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Mankovsky, Tsipora; Lynch, Mary E; Clark, AJ; Sawynok, J; Sullivan, Michael JL

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests that high levels of pain catastrophizing might predict poorer response to pharmacological interventions for neuropathic pain. OBJECTIVE: The present study sought to examine the clinical relevance of the relation between catastrophizing and analgesic response in individuals with neuropathic pain. Clinically meaningful reductions were defined in terms of the magnitude of reductions in pain through the course of treatment, and in terms of the number of patients whose end-of-treatment pain ratings were below 4/10. METHODS: Patients (n=82) with neuropathic pain conditions completed a measure of pain catastrophizing at the beginning of a three-week trial examining the efficacy of topical analgesics for neuropathic pain. RESULTS: Consistent with previous research, high scores on the measure of pain catastrophizing prospectively predicted poorer response to treatment. Fewer catastrophizers than noncatastrophizers showed moderate (?2 points) or substantial reductions in pain ratings through the course of treatment. Fewer catastrophizers than noncatastrophizers achieved end-of-treatment pain ratings below 4/10. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest that the development of brief interventions specifically targeting catastrophic thinking might be useful for enhancing the effects of pharmacological interventions for neuropathic pain. Furthermore, failure to account for the level of catastrophizing might contribute to null findings in clinical trials of analgesic medication. PMID:22518362

  7. The management of chronic pain in important patient subgroups.

    PubMed

    Cherubino, Paolo; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo; Zuccaro, Stefano Maria; Labianca, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    Chronic pain is a major healthcare issue in Europe and globally, and inadequate or undertreated pain significantly reduces the ability of many patients to participate in ordinary daily activities, adversely affects their employment status and contributes to a substantial rate of depression and anxiety in patients with chronic pain. There is a broad distinction of chronic pain into chronic non-cancer pain and chronic cancer pain, and important subgroups of these include patients with rheumatic and/or orthopaedic diseases, pain syndromes caused by cancer itself and caused by cancer treatment. Despite comprising the majority of non-cancer pain in Europe, chronic non-cancer pain associated with rheumatic diseases and/or orthopaedic conditions is often inadequately managed. Although paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a continuing role in the treatment of chronic rheumatic diseases, accumulating evidence of potential toxicity with both traditional non-selective NSAIDs and selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors has prompted a reassessment of their use. This has particular resonance for the elderly, who are more likely to have significant pain issues than younger patients and are at high risk of NSAID-related adverse events. The use of mild opioids, such as codeine and tramadol, and strong opioids, such as morphine, hydromorphone and oxycodone, may be appropriate where paracetamol and other non-opioid analgesics are ineffective in chronic non-cancer pain. Cancer pain, either related to the underlying disease or caused by cancer treatment, is also a common cause of chronic pain in the elderly. An understanding of individual needs is essential in providing adequate pain relief, which is a central goal of care in all patients with chronic pain. PMID:23389874

  8. Rehabilitation of scoliosis patients with pain after surgery.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf

    2002-01-01

    In our centre, the postoperative scoliosis rehabilitation consists in stabilizing postural and respiratory exercises lasting several hours a day (5 1/2 to 7 hours). Additionally to pain treatment, we apply pain physiotherapy, physical therapy, acupuncture and besides manual medicine, also a psychological intervention and pain treatment by medication. 46 patients suffered from heavier pain 10 or more years after scoliosis surgery. The patients reported their pain at the beginning and at the end of 3-6 week in-patient rehabilitation programme. We applied a visual analogous scale (VAS), a numerical scale (NS), a standardized adjective scale (VRS), and a pain frequency scale. All the patients with an average age of 36 years old (SD=16) and an average curve angle of 35 degrees thoracic (SD=36) and 26 degrees lumbar (SD=22) showed a decrease of the values on the pain intensity scale. Pain reduction was highly significant, as well as pain frequency. Chronic pain as a late result following scoliosis surgery can be reduced by an intensive in-patient rehabilitation, at least in the short term. There are further necessary studies in order to follow-up the long-term effect of postoperative rehabilitation. PMID:15456044

  9. Why Psychotherapy Helps the Patient in Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Psychiatrists frequently see patients in their practices who struggle with issues of chronic physical pain. This can present diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. These patients require an approach that allows them to talk about their pain and feel supported while simultaneously being nudged to develop a meaningful life alongside their pain. This article addresses an approach to accomplish this difficult balancing act over the course of time and includes case examples. PMID:19724773

  10. Neuropathic Pain Components in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    An, Howard S; Moon, Seong Hwan; Lee, Hwan Mo; Suh, Seung Woo; Chen, Ding; Jeon, Jin Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and characteristics of neuropathic pain (NP) in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) according to subgroup analysis of symptoms. Materials and Methods We prospectively enrolled subjects with LSS (n=86) who were scheduled to undergo spinal surgery. The patients were divided into two groups according to a chief complaint of radicular pain or neurogenic claudication. We measured patient's pain score using the visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Leads Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS). According to LANSS value, the prevalence of NP component pain in patients with LSS was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed to find the relationship between LANSS scores and the other scores. Results From our sample of 86 patients, 31 (36.0%) had a NP component, with 24 (63.4%) in the radicular pain group having NP. However, only seven patients (15.6%) in the neurogenic claudication group had NP. The LANSS pain score was not significantly correlated with VAS scores for back pain, but did correlate with VAS scores for leg pain (R=0.73, p<0.001) and with ODI back pain scores (R=0.54, p<0.01). Conclusion One-third of the patients with LSS had a NP component. The presence of radicular pain correlated strongly with NP. The severity of leg pain and ODI score were also closely related to a NP component. This data may prove useful to understanding the pain characteristics of LSS and in better designing clinical trials for NP treatment in patients with LSS. PMID:26069129

  11. ‘Two Pains Together’: Patient Perspectives on Psychological Aspects of Chronic Pain while Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, Jessica S.; Walcott, Melonie; Ritchie, Christine; Herbey, Ivan; Kertesz, Stefan G.; Chamot, Eric; Saag, Michael; Turan, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Chronic pain is common in HIV-infected individuals. Understanding HIV-infected patients’ chronic pain experience not just from a biological, but also from a psychological perspective, is a critical first step toward improving care for this population. Our objective was to explore HIV-infected patients’ perspectives on psychological aspects of chronic pain using in-depth qualitative interviews. Methods Investigators engaged in an iterative process of independent and group coding until theme saturation was reached. Results Of the 25 patients with chronic pain interviewed, 20 were male, 15 were younger than age 50, and 15 were African-American. Key themes that emerged included the close relationship between mood and pain; mood and pain in the context of living with HIV; use of alcohol/drugs to self-medicate for pain; and the challenge of receiving prescription pain medications while dealing with substance use disorders. Conclusions The results suggest that psychological approaches to chronic pain treatment may be well received by HIV-infected patients. PMID:25365306

  12. Pain patients and who they live with: A correlational study of coresidence patterns and pain interference

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Jacob M; Pendleton, Patricia; Coulombe, Patrick; Vowles, Kevin E; Alcock, Joe; Smith, Bruce W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mixed associations have been observed between various aspects of ‘social support’ and patient pain experiences OBJECTIVE: To explore the possibility that more basic social factors, namely coresidence patterns, may be associated with variability in patient pain experiences. METHODS: Relationships between coresidence partners and self-reported pain that interferes with activities were examined in a large representative sample of home health care patients (n=11,436; age range 18 to 107 years, mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.1 years; 55% females). RESULTS: After controlling for sex, age and behavioural risks, compared with living alone, coresidence with an intimate affiliate (eg, spouse, relative) predicted greater pain interference (Cohen’s d = 0.10 to 1.72), and coresidence with a less intimate type of affiliate (eg, friend, paid help) predicted lower pain interference (Cohen’s d = ?0.21 tö0.83). In general, however, coresidence patterns accounted for small proportions of variance in pain interference, and the magnitudes of these effects varied widely according to patients’ sex, age and diagnosis. DISCUSSION: The findings suggest that fundamental components of patient’s home-living environment may be associated with potential costs and benefits related to clinically relevant pain functioning for some subgroups of patients. CONCLUSION: Further research that incorporates quantitative and qualitative assessments of patient pain functioning is warranted to better understand how objective and subjective characteristics of patients’ home-living environment may inform the development of more individualized pain treatment options for patients with differing social circumstances. PMID:25106029

  13. Amantadine sulfate reduces experimental sensitization and pain in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kleinböhl, Dieter; Görtelmeyer, Roman; Bender, Hans-Joachim; Hölzl, Rupert

    2006-03-01

    We investigated if established psychophysical measures of enhanced experimental sensitization in chronic musculoskeletal pain can be reduced by adjuvant treatment with a N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, amantadine sulfate, and whether a reduction in sensitization might be accompanied by a concurrent improvement in clinical pain. Sensitization was evaluated by an experimental tonic heat model of short-term sensitization with concurrent subjective and behavioral psychophysical scaling. Twenty-six patients with chronic back pain were included in the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study and received daily dosages of either placebo or 100 mg of amantadine sulfate during a 1-wk treatment. Participants completed quantitative sensory testing of pain thresholds and experimental sensitization before and after treatment and clinical pain ratings before, during, and after treatment. Experimental sensitization and clinical pain were reduced in patients receiving verum. Initially, experimental sensitization was enhanced in patients, with early sensitization at nonpainful intensities of contact heat and enhanced sensitization at painful intensities, as shown previously. After 1 wk of treatment, experimental sensitization was reduced with amantadine sulfate but not with placebo. We conclude that adjuvant chronic pain treatment with N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists might be beneficial for chronic pain if enhanced sensitization is involved and that the quantitative sensory test of temporal summation may be used to verify this. PMID:16492838

  14. American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N.

    2013-01-01

    The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations. PMID:22929604

  15. The effects of music therapy on pain in patients with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Korhan, Esra Ak?n; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Hakverdio?lu Yönt, Gülendam; Çelik, Serkan; Khorsh?d, Leyla

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxing music on pain intensity in patients with neuropathic pain. A quasi-experimental study, repeated measures design was used. Thirty patients, aged 18-70 years, with neuropathic pain and hospitalized in an Algology clinic were identified as a convenience sample. Participants received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical Turkish music was played to patients using a media player (MP3) and headphones. Participants had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention. Data were collected over a 6-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by music, and that decrease was progressive over the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of music therapy in the routine care of patients with neuropathic pain could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing patients' pain intensity. PMID:23375348

  16. Pain management in veterinary patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Timothy M

    2014-09-01

    Pain is a widespread clinical symptom in companion animals with cancer, and its aggressive management should be a priority. Education and skills can be acquired by health care professionals and caregivers to better understand, recognize, and treat cancer-associated pain. The early and rational institution of multimodality analgesic protocols can be highly effective and maximize the chances of improving quality of life in dogs and cats with cancer. This article describes the pathophysiology of pain in companion animals diagnosed with cancer. The foundational causes of cancer-associated pain and treatment strategies for alleviating discomfort in companion animals with cancer are discussed. PMID:25174912

  17. Non-Coronary Patients with Severe Chest Pain Show More Irrational Beliefs Compared to Patients with Mild Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bahremand, Mostafa; Saeidi, Mozhgan

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite providing insufficient medical evidence of the existence of a real cardiac condition, patients with non-coronary chest pain still interpret their pain incorrectly. The present study, therefore, sought to compare the irrational beliefs in non-coronary patients with mild chest pain against those with severe chest pain. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. The statistical population comprised non-coronary patients who presented to the Heart Emergency Center of Kermanshah city, Iran. Using a matching method, 96 participants were selected and studied in two groups of 48. The instruments used were the Comorbidity Index, Brief Pain Index, and the Jones Irrational Beliefs Test (short-form). The multivariate analysis of variance, chi-square test, and t-test were used for data analysis. Results Controlling for the effects of age and comorbid conditions, the severity of three types of irrational beliefs, including emotional irresponsibility (P<0.001), hopelessness changes (P<0.001), and problem avoiding (P=0.002) was higher among patients with severe chest pain (according to effect level). However, in terms of demand for approval, no difference was seen between the two groups (P=0.180). Conclusion Non-coronary patients with severe chest pain showed a greater number of irrational beliefs in comparison to patients with mild pain. Irrational beliefs are common mental occurrences in patients with non-coronary chest pain, and they should be attended to by health professionals, especially in severe non-coronary chest pain. Further investigation to determine the association between irrational beliefs and non-coronary chest pain is necessary. PMID:26217482

  18. Nurse-led pain management program: effect on self-efficacy, pain intensity, pain-related disability, and depressive symptoms in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, Carol; Arnstein, Paul; Caudill, Margaret

    2002-12-01

    Nurses routinely use a variety of nonpharmacologic and patient education interventions designed to reduce pain and promote independence. Research on group programs that combine these nursing strategies in a systematic approach provides evidence that chronic pain patients can realize an enhanced confidence in their ability to manage pain (improved self-efficacy) in addition to reductions in pain, emotional distress, and disability. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of participating in a nurse-led cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) pain management program on self-efficacy, pain intensity, pain-related disability, and depressive symptoms among patients with chronic pain. Pre- and postprogram data from 154 participants were examined to identify changes in pain intensity, self-efficacy, disability, and depressive symptoms. Mean differences, effect sizes, and 95% confidence intervals were computed for the study variables and paired t-tests were done to determine if changes were significant. Z-scores were then calculated. Pearson product moment correlations were examined to test the association between changes in self-efficacy and changes in the other variables of interest. Patients in this study reported significant improvements in all scores postprogram. Self-efficacy, pain-intensity, pain-related disability, and symptoms of depression can be changed through participation in a nurse-led outpatient CBT program. In concert with results from other research on CBT pain programs this study provides further evidence that reduction in suffering and improved sense of well-being is possible even for people who have experienced pain for many years. PMID:12454805

  19. Pain Management Issues for the Geriatric Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    McKeown, Jason L

    2015-09-01

    Adequate treatment of pain is of utmost importance in making uncomplicated the perioperative course for geriatric surgical patients. Effective analgesia reduces morbidity, improves patient and family satisfaction, and is a natural expectation of high-quality care. Pain treatment in older adults is more complicated than in younger counterparts, and great consideration must be given to age-related changes in physiology and pharmacokinetics. Pain treatment must be individualized based on each patient's profile. Side effects must be minimized and organ toxicity avoided. When complications occur they may be more severe, and treatment must be prompt. Alternative plans for analgesia must be readily enacted. PMID:26315638

  20. Nursing attitudes toward patients with substance use disorders in pain.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Betty D

    2014-03-01

    The problem of inadequate pain management in hospitals is well documented. Patients who have substance use disorders (SUD) have many medical problems and are often in pain as a result of these problems. Nurses often lack knowledge of appropriate treatment of both pain and SUD, and have been identified as having negative attitudes toward patients with SUD. The negative attitudes may affect the quality of care delivered to patients with problems of pain and SUD. The purpose of this study was to identify and explore nurses' attitudes toward hospitalized patients with SUD who are in pain, to expand the knowledge about nurses' attitudes and interactions with patients with SUD in pain, and to generate theory that will contribute to a greater understanding of the problem. Grounded theory methodology was used to interview hospital-based nurses who work with patients with SUD who are in pain. Individual interviews, using a semistructured interview guide, were conducted with 14 nurses who worked with this population. Additionally, an expert addictions nurse was interviewed at the end of the study to validate the findings. Interviews were analyzed and coded with the use of grounded theory concepts. A model illustrating the categories and their relationships was developed based on the theory generated as a result of the study. The implications for nursing practice, education, research, and policy are discussed. PMID:24602434

  1. Changes in proprioception and pain in patients with neck pain after upper thoracic manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinmo; Lee, Byoungkwon; Kim, Changbeom

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to conduct cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain and then investigate the changes of cervical proprioception and pain. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects were 30 workers with mechanical neck pain, who were randomly divided into an upper thoracic manipulation group and a cervical stability training group. Upper thoracic manipulation after cervical stability training was conducted for the upper thoracic manipulation group, and only stability training was conducted for the cervical stability training group. The intervention period was six weeks, and consisted of three sessions a week, each of which lasted for 30 minutes. For proprioception measurement, an electro-goniometer was used to measure reposition sense before and after the intervention. The visual analogue scale was used to assess pain. [Results] After the intervention, the error angle was significantly smaller in flexion and right left side-bending, and pain was significantly reduced in the upper thoracic manipulation group. According to the post intervention comparison of the two groups, there were significant differences in the proprioception and pain values. [Conclusion] Conducting both cervical stability training and upper thoracic manipulation for patients with chronic neck pain was more helpful for the improvement of proprioception and pain than cervical stability training alone. PMID:25931733

  2. The Pain Medical Home: A Patient-Centered Medical Home Model of Care for Patients with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Pryzbylkowski, Peter; Ashburn, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Chronic pain affects an estimated 100 million people a year in the United States and costs society anywhere from $560 to $635 billion annually. The patient-centered medical home and the patient-centered medical home-neighbor models of care have been advocated to improve patient outcomes. These models of care advocate improved coordination of care within the primary care and specialty care setting. The authors present the patient-centered medical home model of care and suggest how this model of care might be used to improve patient outcomes for patients with chronic pain. PMID:26610630

  3. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Cancer.gov

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  4. Active and passive coping strategies in chronic pain patients 

    E-print Network

    Snow-Turek, Andrea Lynn

    1994-01-01

    This study assessed the validity of an active/passive conceptualization of coping in a sample of chronic pain patients (N = 84). The validity of active and passive coping dimensions was supported. The Coping Strategies ...

  5. Slow Temporal Summation of Pain for Assessment of Central Pain Sensitivity and Clinical Pain of Fibromyalgia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Staud, Roland; Weyl, Elizabeth E.; Riley, Joseph L.; Fillingim, Roger B.

    2014-01-01

    Background In healthy individuals slow temporal summation of pain or wind-up (WU) can be evoked by repetitive heat-pulses at frequencies of ?.33 Hz. Previous WU studies have used various stimulus frequencies and intensities to characterize central sensitization of human subjects including fibromyalgia (FM) patients. However, many trials demonstrated considerable WU-variability including zero WU or even wind-down (WD) at stimulus intensities sufficient for activating C-nociceptors. Additionally, few WU-protocols have controlled for contributions of individual pain sensitivity to WU-magnitude, which is critical for WU-comparisons. We hypothesized that integration of 3 different WU-trains into a single WU-response function (WU-RF) would not only control for individuals’ pain sensitivity but also better characterize their central pain responding including WU and WD. Methods 33 normal controls (NC) and 38 FM patients participated in a study of heat-WU. We systematically varied stimulus intensities of.4 Hz heat-pulse trains applied to the hands. Pain summation was calculated as difference scores of 1st and 5th heat-pulse ratings. WU-difference (WU-?) scores related to 3 heat-pulse trains (44°C, 46°C, 48°C) were integrated into WU-response functions whose slopes were used to assess group differences in central pain sensitivity. WU-aftersensations (WU-AS) at 15 s and 30 s were used to predict clinical FM pain intensity. Results WU-? scores linearly accelerated with increasing stimulus intensity (p<.001) in both groups of subjects (FM>NC) from WD to WU. Slope of WU-RF, which is representative of central pain sensitivity, was significantly steeper in FM patients than NC (p<.003). WU-AS predicted clinical FM pain intensity (Pearson’s r?=?.4; p<.04). Conclusions Compared to single WU series, WU-RFs integrate individuals’ pain sensitivity as well as WU and WD. Slope of WU-RFs was significantly different between FM patients and NC. Therefore WU-RF may be useful for assessing central sensitization of chronic pain patients in research and clinical practice. PMID:24558475

  6. A Simple and Effective Daily Pain Management Method for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Andrade, Regiane S.; Proctor, Julian W.; Slack, Robert; Marlowe, Ursula; Ashby, Karlotta R.; Schenken, Larry L.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: The incidence of painful bone metastases increases with longer survival times. Although external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is an effective palliative treatment, it often requires several days from the start of treatment to produce a measurable reduction in pain scores and a qualitative amelioration of patient pain levels. Meanwhile, the use of analgesics remains the best approach early on in the treatment course. We investigated the role of radiation therapists as key personnel for collecting daily pain scores to supplement assessments by physician and oncology nursing staff and manage pain more effectively during radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Daily pain scores were obtained by the radiation therapists for 89 patients undertaking a total of 124 courses of EBRT for bone metastases and compared with pretreatment pain scores. The majority of patients (71%) were treated to 30 Gy (range, 20-37.5) in 10 fractions (range, 8-15 fractions). Results: One hundred nineteen treatment courses (96%) were completed. Pain scores declined rapidly to 37.5%, 50%, and 75% of the pretreatment levels by Days 2, 4, and 10, respectively. Pain was improved in 91% of patients with only 4% of worse pain at the end of treatment. Improved pain scores were maintained in 83% of patients at 1-month follow-up, but in 35% of them, the pain was worse than at the end of treatment. Conclusions: Collection of daily pain scores by radiation therapists was associated with an effective reduction in pain scores early on during EBRT of painful osseous metastases.

  7. Barriers to cancer pain management in Danish and Lithuanian patients treated in pain and palliative care units.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Samsanaviciene, Jurgita; Liubarskiene, Zita; Sjøgren, Per; Møldrup, Claus; Christrup, Lona; Sciupokas, Arunas; Hansen, Ole Bo

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of cancer-related pain is high despite available guidelines for the effective assessment and management of that pain. Barriers to the use of opioid analgesics partially cause undertreatment of cancer pain. The aim of this study was to compare pain management outcomes and patient-related barriers to cancer pain management in patient samples from Denmark and Lithuania. Thirty-three Danish and 30 Lithuanian patients responded to, respectively, Danish and Lithuanian versions of the Brief Pain Inventory pain scale, the Barriers Questionnaire II, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Specific Questionnaire On Pain Communication, and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Emotional distress and patient attitudes toward opioid analgesics in cancer patient samples from both countries explained pain management outcomes in the multivariate regression models. Pain relief and pain medication adherence were better in Denmark, and the country of origin significantly explained the difference in the regression models for these outcomes. In conclusion, interventions in emotional distress and patient attitudes toward opioid analgesics may result in better pain management outcomes generally, whereas poor adherence to pain medication and poor pain relief appear to be more country-specific problems. PMID:24602424

  8. Practical management strategies for the chronic pain patient.

    PubMed

    Forde, Grace; Stanos, Steven

    2007-08-01

    When presented with a chronic pain patient, a thorough diagnostic workup and clinical assessment are essential. A key component of this initial evaluation is to obtain the information necessary to identify the underlying cause of the pain. Although a definitive diagnosis is not always possible, pain is most effectively managed when the underlying cause is identified. Chronic pain is now viewed as a biopsychosocial phenomenon, in which biological, psychological, and social factors are at work. Although one or more chronic diseases may be responsible for at least some of the pain experienced by chronic pain patients, psychological factors also play a prominent role. According to several published reports, major depression occurs in up to 60% of chronic pain patients, and an adjustment disorder with anxious mood can be found in up to nearly a third. In addition, numerous studies have identified a high rate of substance abuse in those suffering from chronic pain, with lifetime prevalence rates ranging from 23% to 41%, according to one source. A pain history is another essential component of the initial workup. A thorough pain history includes questions on any previous therapies tried (including nonpharmacologic interventions) and the success rate of those therapies, an assessment of patient function and overall quality of life, and a review of any personal or family history of substance abuse. One of the complexities of pain diagnosis is the subjective nature of the condition. Simple validated measures, such as the 0 to 10 numerical scale, pictorial scales (eg, faces), and visual analog scales can assist in the assessment of pain intensity and the guidance of subsequent treatments. Of no less relevance in the initial workup of a patient with chronic pain is the establishment of a secure physician-patient relationship. Open and clear communication between these parties is a key component in the treatment process and will help guide the therapy more safely and efficaciously. Realistic expectations and exit strategies for each therapeutic intervention should also be discussed at the initial evaluation and again at the onset of treatment. PMID:18667140

  9. Pain Catastrophizing, Pain Intensity, and Dyadic Adjustment Influence Patient and Partner Depression in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Hoda; Shen, Megan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Metastatic breast cancer can be challenging for couples given the significant pain and distress caused by the disease and its treatment. While the use of catastrophizing (e.g., ruminating, exaggerating) as a pain coping strategy has been associated with depression in breast cancer patients, little is known about the effects of pain intensity on this association. Moreover, even though social relationships are a fundamental resource for couples coping with cancer, no studies have examined whether the quality of the spousal relationship affects the association between catastrophizing and depression. This study prospectively examined these associations. Methods Couples (N=191) completed surveys at the start of treatment for metastatic breast cancer (baseline), and 3 and 6 months later. Results Multilevel models using the couple as the unit of analysis showed patients and partners (i.e., spouses or significant others) who had high levels (+1SD) of dyadic adjustment (DAS7) experienced fewer depressive symptoms than those who had low levels (?1SD) of dyadic adjustment (ps<.01). Moreover, at low levels of dyadic adjustment, when patients engaged in high levels of catastrophizing and had high levels of pain, both patients and their partners reported significantly (p=.002) higher levels of depression than when patients engaged in high levels of catastrophizing but had low levels of pain. Discussion Findings showed that catastrophizing and pain exacerbate depression in couples experiencing marital distress. Programs that seek to alleviate pain and depressive symptoms in metastatic breast cancer may benefit from targeting both members of the couple, screening for marital distress, and teaching more adaptive pain coping strategies. PMID:24402001

  10. Care of the patient with chronic pain: Part I.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, C L

    1999-07-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain is estimated to affect over 50 million Americans. It frequently results in significant physical, behavioral, psychological, social, and spiritual problems for patients and their families. In spite of its prevalence and consequences, chronic pain is often misunderstood and inadequately managed by healthcare professionals. Advanced practice nurses who are knowledgeable about chronic pain and the complex biopsychosocial-spiritual needs of this patient population serve an important role in recognizing these patients and intervening appropriately in their care. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide that information. Part I outlines the pathophysiology, assessment, biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects, and pharmacological treatment of chronic pain. Part II addresses a variety of nonpharmacologic and self-management interventions one can use in the primary care setting to treat these difficult health problems. PMID:10711057

  11. Facet joint pain--advances in patient selection and treatment.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven P; Huang, Julie H Y; Brummett, Chad

    2013-02-01

    Facetogenic pain, also known as zygapophysial joint pain, is a frequent cause of mechanical spine pain. Diagnostic blocks (for example, medial branch blocks [MBBs]) are the only reliable approach to identify facet joints as the source of neck or back pain. In the absence of a reference standard, MBBs actually serve more of a prognostic than diagnostic role, enabling the selection of patients who might respond to radiofrequency denervation treatment--the standard treatment for facet joint pain. Using double blocks reduces the false-positive rate of MBBs, but will invariably reduce the overall treatment success rate. No studies have evaluated non-interventional treatments for confirmed facetogenic pain, but data from studies in non-specific back pain suggest a modest, short-term beneficial effect for pharmacotherapy and some non-traditional treatments. Trials of intra-articular steroid injections for lumbar and cervical facet joint pain have yielded disappointing results, but evidence suggests that a subpopulation of patients with acute inflammation derive intermediate-term benefit from this therapy. Radiofrequency denervation provides some benefit for up to a year in approximately 60% of individuals. Increasing this success rate might involve enhancing diagnostic specificity and phenotyping, as well as techniques that increase the likelihood of successful nerve ablation, such as maximizing lesion size. PMID:23165358

  12. Evaluation of abdominal pain in the AIDS patient.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, D A; Danforth, D N; Macher, A M; Longo, D L; Stewart, L; Masur, H

    1984-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a recently recognized entity characterized by a deficiency in cell mediated immune response. The syndrome is manifested by the development of otherwise rare malignant neoplasms and severe life-threatening opportunistic infections. Case histories of five AIDS patients evaluated for abdominal pain are presented to demonstrate the unusual spectrum of intra-abdominal pathology that may be encountered in the AIDS patient. As the number of patients with AIDS continues to escalate, surgical evaluation and intervention will be required more frequently. An understanding of this syndrome and its complications is mandatory for the surgeon to adequately evaluate AIDS patients with abdominal pain. PMID:6322708

  13. Neurotic tendencies among chronic pain patients: an MMPI item analysis.

    PubMed

    Watson, D

    1982-01-01

    Previous research has shown chronic pain patients to have elevated scores on the Hypochondriasis (Hs), Depression (D), and Hysteria (Hy) scales of the MMPI. While high scores on these scales are generally considered to reflect neurotic symptomatology and emotional disturbance, their interpretation is more ambiguous within this patient population. Item-level and subscale analyses of these scales and the K scale (a measure of defensiveness) were performed in order to clarify the meaning of these elevated scores. In these analyses a pain group's endorsement of each item was compared with the responses of two control groups, one a general medical patient sample, the other consisting of first year college students. Items showing group endorsement differences of 10% or greater were interpreted as providing significant information about the pain sample. Analysis of the Hs items indicated that a significant portion of the pain group exhibited the vague and diffuse somatic complaining characteristic of hypochondriasis. While the D scale results revealed a considerable amount of depressive symptomatology (such as sleep disturbance, poor self-esteem, apathy, and feelings of unhappiness, anxiety, and dissatisfaction), they did not support the notion that pain patients have the personality characteristics associated with severe depression. Analyses of the Hy and K scales indicated that the pain patients were no more defensive than were either of the control groups, and that their responses did not conform to the classic hysterical pattern. PMID:7162839

  14. Assessing and Treating Patients With Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Paul M; Harden, R Norman

    2015-11-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) is a significant source of suffering, disability, and impairment, as well as an enormous cost to society. Historically, pharmacologic treatment has been limited to drugs approved for other conditions, including anticonvulsants, antidepressants, antiarrhythmics, and opioids, but in the past 2 decades several drugs have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for NP. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology and clinical presentation of the various causes of NP states facilitates a rational selection of pharmacologic, interventional, rehabilitative, and psychological options for reducing pain and maximizing function. PMID:26568505

  15. Characteristics and associations of pain intensity in patients referred to a specialist cancer pain clinic

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Paulo; Sabri, Elham; Lawlor, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncontrolled cancer pain (CP) may impair quality of life. Given the multidimensional nature of CP, its poor control is often attributed to poor assessment and classification. OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics and associations of pain intensity in a specialist CP clinic. METHODS: Consecutive patients referred to the CP clinic of the Portuguese Cancer Institute (Lisbon, Portugal) had standardized initial assessments and status documentation of the following: Brief Pain Inventory ratings for ‘pain now’ as the outcome variable; initial pain intensity (iPI) on a 0 to 10 scale; pain mechanism (using the Douleur Neuropathique 4 tool to assess neuropathic pain); episodic pain; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group rating; oral morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD); Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale and Emotional Thermometer scores; and cancer diagnosis, metastases, treatment and pain duration. Univariable analyses were conducted to test the association of independent variables with iPI. Variables with P<0.1 were entered into a multivariable regression model, using backward elimination and a cut-point of P=0.2 for final model selection. RESULTS: Of 371 participants, 285 (77%) had moderate (4 to 6) or severe (7 to 10) iPI. The initial median MEDD was relatively low (30 mg [range 20 mg to 60 mg]). In the multivariable model, higher income, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group rating 3 to 4, cancer diagnosis (head and neck, genitourinary and gastrointestinal), adjuvant use and initial MEDD were associated with iPI (P<0.05). The model’s R2 was 18.6, which explained only 19% of iPI variance. CONCLUSIONS: The diversity of factors associated with pain intensity and their limited explanation of its variance underscore the biopsychosocial complexity of CP. Adequacy of CP management warrants further exploration. PMID:26291125

  16. Differences in Pain, Psychological Symptoms, and Gender Distribution Among Patients with Left vs. Right-Sided Chronic Spinal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Wasan, Ajay D.; Anderson, Nina K.; Giddon, Donald B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine pain levels, function, and psychological symptoms in relation to predominant sidedness of pain (right or left) and gender in patients being treated for chronic spinal pain. Design Prospective cohort study Patients Patients with chronic neck or low back pain undergoing a nerve block procedure in a speciality pain medicine clinic Interventions/Outcomes Patients completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Brief Pain Inventory just prior to the procedure. Pain history and demographic variables were collected from a chart review. Chi-square, Pearson correlations, and multivariate statistics were used to characterize the relationships between side of pain, gender, pain levels, pain interference, and psychological symptoms. Results Among 519 subjects, men with left-sided pain (n=98) were found to have significantly greater depression and anxiety symptoms and worse pain-related quality of life (p<.01), despite having similar pain levels as men with right-sided pain (n=91) or women with left or right-sided pain (n=289). In men, psychological symptoms had a significantly greater correlation with pain levels than in women (p<.01). Conclusion In this sample, men with left-sided spinal pain report worse quality of life and more psychological symptoms than women. These data provide clinical evidence corroborating basic neuroscience findings indicating that the right cerebral hemisphere is preferentially involved in the processing of pain and negative affect. These data suggest that men appear more right hemisphere dominant in pain and affect processing. These findings have implications for multidisciplinary assessment and treatment planning in men. PMID:20667025

  17. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients.

  18. Spinal cord stimulation for treatment of pain in a patient with post thoracotomy pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Graybill, Jordan; Conermann, Till; Kabazie, Abraham J; Chandy, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    Post Thoracotomy Pain Syndrome (PTPS) is defined as pain that occurs or persists in the area of the thoracotomy incision for at least 2 months following the initial procedure.  The true incidence of PTPS is hard to define as literature reports a wide range of occurrence from 5% to 90%.  Thoracotomy is associated with a high risk of severe chronic postoperative pain.  Presenting symptoms include both neuropathic pain in the area of the incision, as well as myofascial pain commonly in the ipsilateral scapula and shoulder.  Pain management can be challenging in these patients.  Multiple treatments have been described including conservative treatments with oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); topically applied, peripherally acting drugs; neuromodulating agents; physical therapy; transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation as well as more invasive treatments including intercostal nerve blocks, trigger point steroid injections, epidural steroid injections, radiofrequency nerve ablation, cryoablation, and one case report of spinal cord stimulation.  Unfortunately, a portion of these patients will have persistent pain in spite of multiple treatment modalities, and in some cases will experience worsening of pain. This case report describes the novel utility and complete resolution of symptoms with spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in treatment of a patient with persistent PTPS. In the operating room, a percutaneous octet electrode lead was placed using sterile technique under fluoroscopic guidance and loss-of-resistance technique.  The octet electrode lead was subsequently advanced with the aid of fluoroscopy to the level of the T3 superior endplate just right of midline.  The patient's pain distribution was captured optimally with stimulation at this level.  With the assistance of a neurosurgeon, the lead was anchored, tunneled, and connected to a generator, which was implanted over the right iliac crest.  The patient tolerated the procedure well with no complications. We report the successful use of SCS as well as complete resolution of symptoms at 4 months follow-up, in a patient with persistent PTPS, which was resistant to other modalities. In conclusion, studies designed to evaluate the effectiveness of SCS for PTPS may be warranted. PMID:21927048

  19. Topical preparations for pain relief: efficacy and patient adherence

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Liliana L; Feres, Caroline C; Teles, Vitor EP

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increasing focus on development of new routes of drug administration to provide tailored treatments for patients, without decreasing efficacy of analgesia, in proportion to the progression of the knowledge of pain mechanisms. While acute pain acts as an alarm, chronic pain is a syndrome requiring meticulous selection of analgesic drugs of high bioavailability for long-term use. Such criteria are challenges that topical medications aim to overcome, allowing progressive delivery of active component, maintaining stable plasma levels, with a good safety profile. This review presents recent findings regarding topical formulations of the most widely used drugs for pain treatment, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, anesthetics, and capsaicin, and the role of physical agents as delivery enhancers (phonophoresis and iontophoresis). Although the number of topical agents is limited for use in peripheral conditions, increasing evidence supports the efficacy of these preparations in blocking nociceptive and neuropathic pain. Patient adherence to medical treatment is also a challenge, especially in chronic painful conditions. It is known that reduction of treatment complexity and pill burden are good strategies to increase patient compliance, as discussed here. However, the role of topical presentations, when compared to traditional routes, has not yet been fully explored and thus remains unclear. PMID:21386951

  20. Breakthrough pain in elderly patients with cancer: treatment options.

    PubMed

    Pautex, Sophie; Vogt-Ferrier, Nicole; Zulian, Gilbert B

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of pain is high in the elderly and increases with the occurrence of cancer. Pain treatment is challenging because of age-related factors such as co-morbidities, and over half of the patients with cancer pain experience transient exacerbation of pain that is known as breakthrough pain (BTP). As with background pain, BTP should be properly assessed before being treated. The first step to be taken is optimizing around-the-clock analgesia with expert titration of the painkiller. Rescue medication should then be provided as per the requested need, while at the same time preventing identified potential precipitating factors. In the elderly, starting treatment with a lower dose of analgesics may be justified because of age-related physiological changes such as decreased hepatic and renal function. Whenever possible, oral medication should be provided prior to a painful maneuver. In the case of unpredictable BTP, immediate rescue medication is mandatory and the subcutaneous route is preferred unless patient-controlled analgesia via continuous drug infusion is available. Recently, transmucosal preparations have appeared in the medical armamentarium but it is not yet known whether they represent a truly efficient alternative, although their rapid onset of activity is already well recognized. Adjuvant analgesics, topical analgesics, anesthetic techniques and interventional techniques are all valid methods to help in the difficult management of pain and BTP in elderly patients with cancer. However, none has reached a satisfying scientific level of evidence as to nowadays make the development of undisputed best practice guidelines possible. Further research is therefore on the agenda. PMID:24817569

  1. Providers' roles in enhancing patients' adherence to pain self management.

    PubMed

    Dorflinger, Lindsey; Kerns, Robert D; Auerbach, Stephen M

    2013-03-01

    Practice guidelines and empirical research related to pain management encourage clinicians to take active roles in providing education about self management and promoting adoption of a self-management approach. The purpose of the study was to review the relevant literature, summarize aspects of the patient-provider interaction that influence patient engagement in self management for chronic pain, and outline practice recommendations in this area. Review of the literature on aspects of the patient-provider interaction that promote engagement in pain self-management was used. Findings are synthesized into recommendations for providers. Patients benefit from a biopsychosocial and patient-centered approach. Patients are more likely to fully disclose when providers respond empathically, which can improve conceptualization and treatment. Patient education and motivation play important roles in engaging patients in self management. Self management is influenced in part by the patient-provider communication process. Suggestions for communication strategies to facilitate patient engagement in self-management techniques, including empathic discussion of barriers and motivation enhancement, are provided. PMID:24073159

  2. Care of the patient with chronic pain: part II.

    PubMed

    Wells-Federman, C L

    2000-01-01

    Chronic nonmalignant pain frequently results in significant physical, behavioral, psychological, social, and spiritual issues for patients and their families. It is often misunderstood and unsuccessfully managed. Advanced practice nurses who are knowledgeable about chronic pain and the complex biopsychosocial-spiritual needs of this patient population serve an important role in recognizing these patients and intervening appropriately in their care. The purpose of this two-part article is to provide that information. Part I [Clinical Excellence for Nurse Practitioners, 3 (4), 192-204] outlined the pathophysiology, assessment, biopsychosocial-spiritual aspects, and pharmacologic treatment of chronic pain. In Part II, a variety of nonpharmacologic and self-management interventions one can use in the primary care setting to treat these difficult health problems are introduced. PMID:11858295

  3. A patient presenting with stress-induced epigastric pain.

    PubMed

    Duckheim, Martin; Geisler, Tobias; Zuern, Christine Stefanie; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2015-01-01

    The median arcuate ligament passes the truncus coeliacus superior to its ostium. If it is thickened and located too low, it can cause external compression and stenosis of the truncus coeliacus, leading to postprandial abdominal pain and vomiting. This combination of symptoms is called median arcuate ligament syndrome. We report the case of a 79-year-old patient who suffered from chronic epigastric pain, which was initially assumed to be caused by either coronary artery disease or atherosclerotic stenosis of the coeliac artery. Angiography excluded coronary artery disease, but showed severe external stenosis of the truncus. The patient underwent laparoscopic release of the median arcuate ligament, which resulted in relief of his symptoms. The median arcuate ligament syndrome should be considered in patients with epigastric stress-induced pain. Further underlying pathologies, especially coronary artery disease, as life-threatening diagnosis have to be initially excluded. PMID:25678616

  4. Optimising postoperative pain management in the ambulatory patient.

    PubMed

    Shang, Allan B; Gan, Tong J

    2003-01-01

    Over 60% of surgery is now performed in an ambulatory setting. Despite improved analgesics and sophisticated drug delivery systems, surveys indicate that over 80% of patients experience moderate to severe pain postoperatively. Inadequate postoperative pain relief can prolong recovery, precipitate or increase the duration of hospital stay, increase healthcare costs, and reduce patient satisfaction. Effective postoperative pain management involves a multimodal approach and the use of various drugs with different mechanisms of action. Local anaesthetics are widely administered in the ambulatory setting using techniques such as local injection, field block, regional nerve block or neuraxial block. Continuous wound infusion pumps may have great potential in an ambulatory setting. Regional anaesthesia (involving anaesthetising regional areas of the body, including single extremities, multiple extremities, the torso, and the face or jaw) allows surgery to be performed in a specific location, usually an extremity, without the use of general anaesthesia, and potentially with little or no sedation. Opioids remain an important component of any analgesic regimen in treating moderate to severe acute postoperative pain. However, the incorporation of non-opioids, local anaesthetics and regional techniques will enhance current postoperative analgesic regimens. The development of new modalities of treatment, such as patient controlled analgesia, and newer drugs, such as cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, provide additional choices for the practitioner. While there are different routes of administration for analgesics (e.g. oral, parenteral, intramuscular, transmucosal, transdermal and sublingual), oral delivery of medications has remained the mainstay for postoperative pain control. The oral route is effective, the simplest to use and typically the least expensive. The intravenous route has the advantages of a rapid onset of action and easier titratibility, and so is recommended for the treatment of acute pain.Non-pharmacological methods for the management of postoperative pain include acupuncture, electromagnetic millimetre waves, hypnosis and the use of music during surgery. However, further research of these techniques is warranted to elucidate their effectiveness in this indication. Pain is a multifactorial experience, not just a sensation. Emotion, perception and past experience all affect an individual's response to noxious stimuli. Improved postoperative pain control through innovation and creativity may improve compliance, ease of delivery, reduce length of hospital stay and improve patient satisfaction. Patient education, early diagnosis of symptoms and aggressive treatment of pain using an integrative approach, combining pharmacotherapy as well as complementary technique, should serve us well in dealing with this complex problem. PMID:12678572

  5. Implementation of Later Morning Specimen Draws to Improve Patient Health and Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ramarajan, Vasundara; Chima, Harjinder S; Young, LaWanda

    2016-02-01

    Traditionally, morning blood draws are collected by hospital staff from 3:00 AM through 6:00 AM to have the results ready by 9:00 AM for physician rounds. These laboratory results help physicians to make important patient disposition decisions, including discharging patients within the daily hospital cutoff times. However, morning draws can adversely impact patient care due to sleep disruption. In this paper, we describe the systematic implementation of later-morning blood draw times at our large urban hospital. The sustainability of this shift was of special concern to us, so we used the rapid improvement model (RIM) of change to ensure that every aspect was tested and that the changes were viable. The RIM model enabled us to successfully implement the change in 6 months and sustained this change until the present time. PMID:26656891

  6. Improvement in Anxiety and Pain After Whole Body Whirlpool Hydrotherapy Among Patients With Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Im, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of the Whirlpool hydrotherapy on pain and anxiety in chronic myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) patients, compared to the conventional hydrocollator pack therapy. Methods Forty-one subjects who have MPS in the upper trapezius muscles without depression were recruited. The patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the whirlpool therapy group whose bodies were immersed in a whirlpool bath at 34?-36? for 30 minutes; the hydrocollator group who took a 30-minute application of a standard hot hydrocollator pack. Patients in both groups received therapy three days a week for 2 weeks and underwent several evaluations at baseline and after treatment. The variables we analyzed during evaluations were as follows: the primary outcome we considered was pain severity using a visual analogue scale. And the secondary outcomes examined included anxiety using the Korean version of the Beck Anxiety Inventory and quality of life (QoL) using the Korean version of the World Health Organization QoL Assessment, Brief Form. All follow-up values were compared with the baseline values. Results The baseline parameters did not show significant differences between two groups. And after 2-week treatment, both groups revealed significant improvement in anxiety levels and QoL, as well as in pain. However, the improvement on pain (p=0.002) and anxiety (p=0.010) was significantly greater in the whirlpool group, compared to the hydrocollator group. Conclusion The whirlpool hydrotherapy can be used as a more effective therapeutic method to reduce pain and anxiety in chronic MPS patients without depression. PMID:24020034

  7. [Treatment of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rathleff, Michael Skovdal; Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Simonsen, Ole

    2014-03-17

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is common among adolescents and adults. As the long-term prognosis is poor, optimal treatment is the key. The current evidence suggests that treatment should include training of the quadriceps and hip muscles with focus on correct alignment of the lower extremity. A positive short-term effect of foot orthotics is also documented and there is limited evidence of a positive effect of patella taping. There is no evidence for routine knee arthroscopy in the treating of PFP. PMID:25096213

  8. Perioperative pain management in the opioid-tolerant patient with chronic pain: an evidence-based practice project.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Karen M

    2012-12-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on pain, chronic pain affects an estimated 116 million American adults and costs the nation more than $600 billion each year in medical treatment and lost worker productivity. Many individuals with chronic pain undergo surgical procedures. Safe and effective treatment of their postoperative pain can present a significant challenge to the health care team but is essential to their optimal recovery. Administrators in a community hospital in central Pennsylvania identified a need to improve the care of their patients with chronic pain and supported a hospital-wide initiative to address various aspects of this population's hospital experience. This article presents the first phase of an evidence-based practice project that focused on improving the perioperative pain management in patients with chronic pain who receive long-acting opioids for the treatment of chronic pain before admission for surgery. PMID:23164203

  9. Chronic abdominal pain in a patient with escobar syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ural, Ülkü Mete; Tek?n, Ye?im Bayo?lu; Kir ?ah?n, Figen; Erd?vanli, Ba?ar; Kazdal, H?z?r

    2015-01-01

    Escobar syndrome is characterized with multiple pterygia or webs of the skin and multiple congenital anomalies. We present a 15-year-old patient with Escobar syndrome who complained of persistent blunt abdominal pain for 1 year. Preoperative evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of imperforate hymen, and the patient underwent hymenectomy under intravenous sedation. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and her complaints resolved completely. After a 3-month follow-up, she reported having normal menstrual bleeding intervals each month without any complications. Patients with Escobar syndrome may suffer from abdominal pain due to imperforate hymen. Careful evaluation of these patients must include a complete gynaecological assessment and, if indicated, surgical treatment must be performed without delay. PMID:25196531

  10. Pain relief at the end of life: nurses' experiences regarding end-of-life pain relief in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Hanna; Plymoth, Henrietta; Örmon, Karin; Bolmsjö, Ingrid

    2014-03-01

    Patients with dementia receive suboptimal palliative care, and this patient group is at risk to have pain at the end of life. Because communicative impairments are common in this patient group, nurses play an important caregiver role in identifying, assessing, and relieving patients' pain. This study aimed to describe nurses' experiences regarding end-of-life pain relief in patients with dementia. This descriptive exploratory qualitative study was based on seven semistructured interviews. Burnard's content analysis inspired the data analysis. Two main categories were identified: (1) nurses' experience of difficulties concerning pain relief and (2) nurses' experience of resources concerning pain relief. Nurses experienced difficulties, such as feeling of powerlessness because of difficulties in obtaining adequate prescriptions for analgesics, ethical dilemmas, feeling of inadequacy because analgesia did not have the desired effect, and a feeling of not being able to connect with the patient. Factors, including knowledge about the patient, professional experience, utilization of pain assessment tools, interpersonal relationships, and interprofessional cooperation, served as resources and enabled end-of-life pain relief. The results of this study highlight the complexity of pain relief in patients with dementia at the end of life from a nursing perspective. The inability of patients with dementia to verbally communicate their pain makes them a vulnerable patient group, dependent on their caregivers. Knowing the life story of the patient, professional experience, teamwork based on good communication, and use of a pain assessment tool were reported by the nurses to improve pain relief at the end of life for patients with dementia. PMID:23453467

  11. [Patient-controlled analgesia and postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Langlade, A; Briard, C; Bouguet, D; Blanchard, F; Conan, F

    1994-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia improves titration of analgesic drugs, minimizing individual pharmacodynamic differences between patients, during the postoperative period. We describe the efficacy and the safety of intravenous PCA, based on the follow-up of 300 patients, recovering from upper and lower abdominal surgery. Successful use of PCA requires the choice of two important parameters: the PCA bolus and the lock-out period. In our experience, we only prescribed morphine, with a PCA bolus of 0.5 or 1 mg and a lock-out period of 5 or 10 minutes. Nurses were educated to change the syringes and to assess analgesia and the respiratory function. Patients were mostly hospitalized in surgical wards and only 16% of patients were treated in an intensive care unit. Patient's acceptance proved to be excellent and only 4 patients were not satisfied with PCA therapy. The incidence of respiratory depression was low (0.02%) and only one patient required naloxone. The side effects were dysphoria, nausea, pruritus and urinary retention; their incidence was low. PMID:8087635

  12. The MOBID-2 pain scale: Reliability and responsiveness to pain in patients with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Husebo, BS; Ostelo, R; Strand, LI

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobilization-Observation-Behavior-Intensity-Dementia-2 (MOBID-2) pain scale is a staff-administered pain tool for patients with dementia. This study explores MOBID-2's test–retest reliability, measurement error and responsiveness to change. Methods Analyses are based upon data from a cluster randomized trial including 352 patients with advanced dementia from 18 Norwegian nursing homes. Test–retest reliability between baseline and week 2 (n = 163), and weeks 2 and 4 (n = 159) was examined in patients not expected to change (controls), using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2.1), standard error of measurement (SEM) and smallest detectable change (SDC). Responsiveness was examined by testing six priori-formulated hypotheses about the association between change scores on MOBID-2 and other outcome measures. Results ICCs of the total MOBID-2 scores were 0.81 (0–2 weeks) and 0.85 (2–4 weeks). SEM and SDC were 1.9 and 3.1 (0–2 weeks) and 1.4 and 2.3 (2–4 weeks), respectively. Five out of six hypotheses were confirmed: MOBID-2 discriminated (p < 0.001) between change in patients with and without a stepwise protocol for treatment of pain (SPTP). Moderate association (r = 0.35) was demonstrated with Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, and no association with Mini-Mental State Examination, Functional Assessment Staging and Activity of Daily Living. Expected associations between change scores of MOBID-2 and Neuropsychiatric Inventory – Nursing Home version were not confirmed. Conclusion The SEM and SDC in connection with the MOBID-2 pain scale indicate that the instrument is responsive to a decrease in pain after a SPTP. Satisfactory test–retest reliability across test periods was demonstrated. Change scores ? 3 on total and subscales are clinically relevant and are beyond measurement error. PMID:24799157

  13. Uncomplicated mechanically induced pelvic pain and organic dysfunction in low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Browning, James E

    1991-01-01

    Mechanical disorders of the lumbar spine have been given much attention in the literature. Short of an acute cauda equina syndrome, few reports exist detailing the findings and clinical course of patients with pelvic and disorders of bladder, bowel and gynecologic/sexual function of spinal origin. Two uncomplicated representative cases of mechanically induced pelvic pain and organic dysfunction (PPOD) in patients presenting with low back pain are detailed. These patients typically reveal a wide range of individual symptoms and demonstrate clinical features characteristic of a mechanical disorder of the lumbar spine as the cause of their PPOD. The clinical features of the mechanically induced PPOD syndrome are reviewed and the response to distractive decompressive manipulation of the lumbar spine is presented.

  14. Tough guys or sensitive guys? Disentangling the role of examiner sex on patient pain reports

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Jacob M; Alcock, Joe

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental and clinical pain studies are conflicting regarding whether individuals report heightened or dampened pain sensitivity in the presence of other men or women. OBJECTIVES: In the present preliminary study, two small medical record reviews of patients admitted for emergency care were conducted to examine the possibility that patients may report differential pain intensity to male and female health care examiners. The study also sought to determine whether these effects are moderated by and, thus, only detectable by examining patients at different pain (debilitation) levels. METHODS: Pain intensity scores were extracted from two medical record reviews of patients admitted for emergency care (n=64 and n=135, respectively). Pain intensity was measured using an 11-point numerical scale during standard triage assessments and the sex of the examiner was recorded. RESULTS: Mean pain scores reported to male and female emergency staff did not differ in either set of medical records. However, when patients were split between low and high pain levels, male patients reported higher pain scores to male practitioners when experiencing relatively low pain levels, and both male and female patients reported higher pain scores to female practitioners when experiencing relatively high pain levels. DISCUSSION: The statistical magnitudes of these effects were large, suggesting that this phenomenon may be a pervasive feature in clinical settings and experimental pain studies. CONCLUSION: These preliminary findings warrant larger-scale investigations of social contextual influences on patient pain reports, which are necessary for creating more standardized protocols for reliably assessing and treating patient pain experiences. PMID:24511573

  15. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  16. Treating Pain in Addicted Patients: Recommendations from an Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Cheatle, Martin; Wunsch, Martha; Skoufalos, Alexis; Reddy, Yeshwant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Clinicians may face pragmatic, ethical, and legal issues when treating addicted patients. Equal pressures exist for clinicians to always address the health care needs of these patients in addition to their addiction. Although controversial, mainly because of the lack of evidence regarding their long-term efficacy, the use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain management is widespread. Their use for pain management in the addicted population can present even more challenges, especially when evaluating the likelihood of drug-seeking behavior. As the misuse and abuse of opioids continues to burgeon, clinicians must be particularly vigilant when prescribing chronic opioid therapy. The purpose of this article is to summarize recommendations from a recent meeting of experts convened to recommend how primary care physicians should approach treatment of chronic pain for addicted patients when an addiction specialist is not available for a referral. As there is a significant gap in guidelines and recommendations in this specific area of care, this article serves to create a foundation for expanding chronic pain guidelines in the area of treating the addicted population. This summary is designed to be a practical how-to guide for primary care physicians, discussing risk assessment, patient stratification, and recommended therapeutic approaches. (Population Health Management 2014;17:79–89) PMID:24138341

  17. Patient Flow Analysis in Pain Rehabilitation Care , N. Kortbeek123

    E-print Network

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Patient Flow Analysis in Pain Rehabilitation Care N. Baer12 , N. Kortbeek123 , N. Litvak12 , O: We use mathematical models based on techniques from Operations Research and Management Science by the management that multidisciplinary care cannot function with 100% efficiency, because of the necessity

  18. Assessing the relationship between the level of pain control and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Shay; Gift, Maja; Gelot, Shyam; Duong, Minh; Tapp, Hazel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary assessment tool used by hospitals to measure the outcomes of pain management programs is the 0–10 numerical pain rating scale. However, it is unclear if this assessment should be used as the sole indicator of positive outcomes by pain management programs. Although it is assumed that pain intensity scores would be correlated with patient satisfaction, few studies have evaluated the association between pain intensity scores and patient satisfaction. Methods In this pilot study, we investigated the relationship between pain intensity and patient satisfaction by evaluating 88 patients who received opioid analgesics at a 1018-bed acute care institution. A 14-question survey was adapted from a questionnaire developed by the American Pain Society to assess patient pain control and overall satisfaction with our institution’s pain management strategies. Results This study found no association between pain intensity score and patient satisfaction with overall pain management (Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient = ?0.31; 95% confidence interval = ?0.79 to 0.39). The majority of the surveyed patients were satisfied or very satisfied with their overall pain management, regardless of their pain intensity score. Conclusion These findings contribute to the general understanding that institutions should use pain intensity scores together with a measure of patient pain satisfaction when assessing regulatory and quality control programs. PMID:24049457

  19. What is the pain source? A case report of a patient with low back pain and bilateral hip osteonecrosis

    PubMed Central

    Minkalis, Amy L.; Vining, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low back pain is a common symptom arising from many possible sources and includes the possibility of the contribution of remote pathology. This report describes a patient with bilateral osteonecrosis of the femoral heads presenting with a primary symptom of low back pain. Case presentation: A 37-year-old male presented for evaluation of dominant pain that existed for approximately 6–12 months and was located in the right low back. Milder pain was also reported in the right hip. Low back and hip pain were both aggravated by weight-bearing activities. An evidence-based diagnostic evaluation revealed little indication for a primary pain source originating from low back structures. Radiographs revealed bilateral osteonecrosis with evidence of left femoral head collapse. Conclusion: Hip osteonecrosis may have contributed to an atypical presentation of low back pain due to aberrant localization of pain and/or combined with altered biomechanical loading of musculoskeletal structures. PMID:26500365

  20. Pain in patients with COPD: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Dam van Isselt, Eléonore F; Groenewegen-Sipkema, Karin H; Spruit-van Eijk, Monica; Chavannes, Niels H; de Waal, Margot W M; Janssen, Daisy J A; Achterberg, Wilco P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To systematically investigate the prevalence of pain, factors related with pain and pain management interventions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources and study eligibility criteria PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychINFO from 1966 to December 2013. Studies were included if they presented clinical data on pain or symptom burden in patients with COPD, or pain as a domain of quality of life (QoL). All types of study designs were included. Results Of the 1571 articles that were identified, 39 met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review. Fourteen studies focused on pain and symptom burden (including pain) in patients with COPD and 25 studies focused on QoL using a questionnaire that included a separate pain domain. Reported pain prevalence in high-quality studies ranged from 32 to 60%. Included studies report that pain is more prevalent in patients with COPD compared to participants from the general population. Comorbidity, nutritional status, QoL and several symptoms were related to pain. None of the included studies reported a significant relationship between lung function and pain prevalence or severity. However, studies investigating pain in patients with moderate COPD reported higher pain prevalence compared to studies in patients with severe of very severe COPD. Conclusions Although literature on this topic is limited and shows substantial heterogeneity, pain seems to be a significant problem in patients with COPD and is related to several other symptoms, comorbidity and QoL. Data synthesis suggests that pain is more prevalent in patients with moderate COPD compared to patients with severe or very severe COPD. Further research is needed and should focus on determining a more accurate pain prevalence, investigating the relationship between pain prevalence, disease severity and comorbidity and explore implementation and efficacy of pain management interventions in patients with COPD. PMID:25260370

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of patients with patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Fulkerson, John P

    2002-01-01

    The patient-athlete with patellofemoral pain requires precise physical examination based on a thorough history. The nature of injury and specific physical findings, including detailed examination of the retinacular structure around the patella, will most accurately pinpoint the specific source of anterior knee pain or instability. Radiographs should include a standard 30 degrees to 45 degrees axial view of the patellae and a precise lateral radiograph. Nonoperative treatment is effective in most patients. Prone quadriceps muscle stretches, balanced strengthening, proprioceptive training, hip external rotator strengthening, patellar taping, orthotic devices, and effective bracing will help most patients avoid surgery. When surgery becomes necessary, indications must be specific. Lateral release is appropriate for patella tilt (abnormal rotation). Painful scar or retinaculum, neuromas, and pathologic plicae may require resection. Proximal patellar realignment may be accomplished using arthroscopic or a combined arthroscopic/mini-open approach. Symptomatic articular lesions and more profound malalignments may require medial or anteromedial tibial tubercle transfer. Clinicians should be particularly alert for symptoms of medial subluxation in postoperative patients and should use the provocative medial subluxation test followed by lateral displacement patellar bracing to confirm a diagnosis of medial patellar subluxation. This problem may be corrected in most patients using a lateral patellar tenodesis. Current thinking emphasizes precise diagnosis, rehabilitation involving the entire kinetic chain, restoration of patella homeostasis, minimal surgical intervention, and precise indications for more definitive corrective surgery. PMID:12016090

  2. Reflecting on pain management for patients with osteoarthritis and other rheumatic disorders: there's more to pain management than managing pain

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Danielle; Chang, Eric Y; Pang, Winnie; Shinada, Shuntaro; Panush, Richard S

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Medical progress is measured by advances in science and technology. The pace of discovery will surely accelerate. We are increasingly challenged not only to assimilate new information, but also to reconcile our learning with our art. We present the common clinical problem of managing pain in osteoarthritis as a paradigm for this dilemma in contemporary patient care. We do not yet have the understanding and interventions to do this optimally for all with osteoarthritis, leaving us with uncertainties as we struggle to care for these patients. In a world of growing complexity and sophistication we must not overlook the person who is our patient. It is easy to be seduced by electronic and informational advances, to be entranced by machinery, and to forget the unique individuality and needs of each patient. Osler taught that “the practice of medicine is an art, based on science”. This doesn't change. PMID:24654815

  3. Pain assessment and management for a dialysis patient with diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Innis, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    More than 50% of all patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) have pain, and this pain is often due to diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Using a case study of a dialysis patient who has neuropathic pain, this article examines the assessment and management of this pain. Assessment is the essential first step. Patients' self-report of pain is the most reliable and valid indicator of pain intensity. Pain may be managed through the use of non-opioids, opioids and adjuvants. However, for patients with ESRD on dialysis, certain considerations concerning drugs used to manage pain need to be taken into account. Complementary therapies have also been used in pain management in patients with ESRD, and there is a need for greater research in this area. PMID:16875290

  4. Hospice care and patients' pain: communication between patients, relatives, nurses and doctors.

    PubMed

    Ashby, M E; Dowding, C

    2001-02-01

    This article describes a study that sought to assess how patients, relatives, doctors and nurses in a palliative care unit viewed pain and pain management, and how standards and expectations for pain relief can be raised by upholding statements of care and agreed partnership values. The results showed that research-based pain management enables the provision of pain control that is acceptable to patients, relatives, doctors and nurses. By valuing patient-centred care, where assessment tools assist communication and information sharing, a partnership of care is established in which patient and professional autonomy are recognized and respected, international recommendations for pain relief are practised and professional codes of conduct upheld. Good pain management requires accurate assessment that is best achieved by open and honest discussion in a supportive environment. Hospices provide specialist symptom control aimed at improving quality of life for patients with advanced disease. They are not only an ideal setting to provide evidence for practice, but also a learning environment for specialist understanding of symptom control and a resource base for other professionals. PMID:12271251

  5. The Prevalence and Characteristics of Pain in Critically Ill Cancer Patients: A Prospective Nonrandomized Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mayank; Sahi, Malvinder Singh; Bhargava, AK; Talwar, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pain is a distressing symptom common to all stages and ubiquitous at all levels of care in cancer patients. However, there is a lack of scientific literature on prevalence, severity, predictors, and the quality of pain in cancer patients admitted to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Objectives: To elucidate the prevalence of pain, moderate to severe pain, neuropathic pain, chronic pain, and pain as the most distressing symptom in critically ill-cancer patients at the time of ICU admission. Methods: We prospectively interviewed 126 patients within first 24 h of admission to a medical ICU. The patients were assessed for the presence of pain, its severity, sites, duration, nature, and its impact as a distressing symptom. Numerical Rating Scale and self-report version of Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Signs and Symptoms were used to elucidate intensity of pain and neuropathic pain, respectively. Demographic characteristics such as age and sex, primary site, and stage of cancer were considered for a possible correlation with the prevalence of pain. Results: Of 126 patients included in the study 95 (75.40%), 79 (62.70%), 34 (26.98%), and 17 (13.49%) patients had pain, moderate-severe, chronic, and neuropathic pain, respectively. The average duration of pain was 171.16 ± 716.50 days. Totally, 58 (46.03%) and 42 (42.01%) patients had at least one and more than equal to 2 neuropathic pain symptoms, respectively. The primary malignancies associated with the highest prevalence of pain were genitourinary, hematological, and head and neck whereas breast and lung cancers were associated with the highest prevalence of neuropathic and chronic pain, respectively. Conclusion: The prevalence of pain among critically ill-cancer patients is high. Assessment for pain at the time of ICU admission would ensure appropriate assessment for the presence, type, severity, and the significance imparted to it. PMID:26600692

  6. LACK OF CORRELATION BETWEEN OPIOID DOSE ADJUSTMENT AND PAIN SCORE CHANGE IN A GROUP OF CHRONIC PAIN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lucy; Vo, Trang; Seefeld, Lindsey; Malarick, Charlene; Houghton, Mary; Ahmed, Shihab; Zhang, Yi; Cohen, Abigail; Retamozo, Cynthia; Hilaire, Kristen St.; Zhang, Vivian; Mao, Jianren

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of opioid analgesics for chronic pain management, it is unclear whether opioid dose escalation leads to better pain relief during chronic opioid therapy. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed clinical data collected from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Center for Pain Medicine over a 7-year period. We examined 1) the impact of opioid dose adjustment (increase or decrease) on clinical pain score, 2) gender and age differences in response to opioid therapy, and 3) the influence of clinical pain conditions on the opioid analgesic efficacy. A total of 109 subjects met the criteria for data collection. We found that neither opioid dose increase, nor decrease, correlated with point changes in clinical pain score in a subset of chronic pain patients over a prolonged course of opioid therapy (an average of 704 days). This lack of correlation was consistent regardless of the type of chronic pain including neuropathic, nociceptive, or mixed pain conditions. Neither gender nor age differences showed a significant influence on the clinical response to opioid therapy in these subjects. These results suggest that dose adjustment during opioid therapy may not necessarily alter long-term clinical pain score in a group of chronic pain patients and that individualized opioid therapy based on the clinical effectiveness should be considered to optimize the treatment outcome. Perspectives The study reports a relationship, or lack thereof, between opioid dose change and clinical pain score in a group of chronic pain patients. The study also calls for further investigation into the effectiveness of opioid therapy in the management of chronic non-malignant pain conditions. PMID:23452826

  7. Chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and the relationship between sleep disorder and pain level, quality of life, and disability

    PubMed Central

    Aytekin, Ebru; Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Komut, Ece Akyol; Okur, Sibel Caglar; Burnaz, Ozer; Caglar, Nil Sayiner; Demiryontar, Dilay Yilmaz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to ascertain the prevalence of chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and to assess the relationship between sleep disorder and pain, quality of life, and disability. [Subjects and Methods] Seventy-four patients were included in the study and classified as having mild, moderate, or severe obstructive sleep apnea. Chronic widespread pain, quality of life, and disability were evaluated. [Results] Forty-one patients (55.4%) had chronic widespread pain. Female patients had a higher incidence of chronic pain, and female patients with chronic pain had higher body mass indexes, pain levels, and disability scores than did male patients. Physical component scores of female patients with chronic pain were lower than those of male patients. No correlation was observed between the degree of sleep disorder and severity of pain, pain duration, disability, or quality of life in obstructive sleep apnea patients with pain. [Conclusion] This study showed a 55.4% prevalence of chronic widespread pain in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and a greater risk of chronic pain in female than in male patients. Female patients with obstructive sleep apnea and chronic pain have higher pain and disability levels and a lower quality of life. PMID:26504332

  8. Translation of random painful stimuli into numerical responses in fibromyalgia and perioperative patients.

    PubMed

    Oudejans, Linda; van Velzen, Monique; Olofsen, Erik; Beun, Robert; Dahan, Albert; Niesters, Marieke

    2016-01-01

    Number-based assessment tools are used to evaluate pain perception in patients and determine the effect of pain management. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of chronic and acute pain patients to score their response to randomly applied noxious stimuli and assess the effect of opioid treatment. Thirty-seven healthy controls, 30 fibromyalgia patients, and 62 postoperative patients with acute pain received random heat pain (Hp) and electrical pain (Ep) stimuli. All subjects rated their pain on an 11-point numerical rating scale (NRS). The data were analyzed using a penalty score system, based on the assumption that stimuli of higher intensity are scored with a greater NRS, and stratified into cohorts corresponding to "good," "mediocre," and "poor" scoring. Healthy controls were well able to score pain with 73% (Hp) and 81% (Ep) of subjects classified into cohort "good." Fibromyalgia had a negative effect on scoring with 45% (Hp, P = 0.03 vs controls) and 67% (Ep) of patients in cohort "good." In controls, scoring deteriorated during opioid administration leaving just 40% (Hp, P = 0.015 vs baseline) and 70% (Ep) of subjects in the cohort "good." Similar observations were made in fibromyalgia patients (P = 0.02) but not in surgical patients with postoperative pain. Consistency to grade pain using an NRS is high in healthy volunteers but deteriorates in chronic pain and during opioid administration to volunteers and chronic pain patients but not to acute pain patients. PMID:26307857

  9. Experience with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for relief of intractable pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Avellanosa, A M; West, C R

    1982-01-01

    Sixty patients with intractable cancer pain were subjected to transcutaneous electrical stimulation for pain control. Evaluation, after two weeks of treatment, revealed: 17 (28.3%) excellent response, 22 (36.2%) fair and 21 (35.0%) no relief. Re-assessment after 3 months revealed 9 (15%) excellent responses, 11 (18.3%) fair and 40 (67%) failures. Extremity and trunk pains appeared to be most rewarding to patient pain, so far as pain relief is concerned. Perineal and pelvic pains were most difficult to control, only 5 of 12 (41%) cases obtained some short term relief. Pain location and sources correlated with treatment results. PMID:6983553

  10. Synergistic effect of a rehabilitation program and treadmill exercise on pain and dysfunction in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Ki; Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Seong, Jun-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study examined the influence of treadmill exercise added to a low back pain rehabilitation program on low back extensor strength, pain, and dysfunction in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty men aged 22–36?years with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into experimental and control groups of 10 patients each. Both groups underwent a low back pain rehabilitation program lasting 30?min each, thrice/week for 8 weeks. The experimental group was prescribed an additional 30?min of treadmill exercise without a slope at a speed of 3.0–3.5?km/h, at which patients could walk comfortably. Low back extensor strength was tested using the Medx lumbar extension machine, pain level was tested, using the visual analog scale, and dysfunction was tested, using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire. [Results] Changes in low back extensor strength by angle showed significant interaction effects between measurement time and group at 12°, 24°, and 36°. The results of the visual analog scale and Oswestry Questionnaire showed a decreasing trend after the experiment in both groups. However, there was no interaction effect of the additional treadmill exercise in the experimental group. [Conclusion] The combination of a low back pain rehabilitation program and treadmill exercise has a synergistic effect, to some extent, on the improvement of low back extensor strength and should be considered for treatment and rehabilitation of low back pain patients. PMID:25995585

  11. Synergistic effect of a rehabilitation program and treadmill exercise on pain and dysfunction in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Ki; Kim, Dae-Young; Jung, Sun-Young; Seong, Jun-Hyuk

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The present study examined the influence of treadmill exercise added to a low back pain rehabilitation program on low back extensor strength, pain, and dysfunction in chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty men aged 22-36?years with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into experimental and control groups of 10 patients each. Both groups underwent a low back pain rehabilitation program lasting 30?min each, thrice/week for 8 weeks. The experimental group was prescribed an additional 30?min of treadmill exercise without a slope at a speed of 3.0-3.5?km/h, at which patients could walk comfortably. Low back extensor strength was tested using the Medx lumbar extension machine, pain level was tested, using the visual analog scale, and dysfunction was tested, using the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire. [Results] Changes in low back extensor strength by angle showed significant interaction effects between measurement time and group at 12°, 24°, and 36°. The results of the visual analog scale and Oswestry Questionnaire showed a decreasing trend after the experiment in both groups. However, there was no interaction effect of the additional treadmill exercise in the experimental group. [Conclusion] The combination of a low back pain rehabilitation program and treadmill exercise has a synergistic effect, to some extent, on the improvement of low back extensor strength and should be considered for treatment and rehabilitation of low back pain patients. PMID:25995585

  12. Patellar Tilt Correlates with Vastus Lateralis:Vastus Medialis Activation Ratio in Maltracking Patellofemoral Pain Patients

    E-print Network

    Delp, Scott

    Patellofemoral Pain Patients Saikat Pal,1 Thor F. Besier,2 Christine E. Draper,3 Michael Fredericson,4 Garry E ABSTRACT: Patellofemoral (PF) pain is a common ailment of the lower extremity. A theorized cause for pain:VM activation ratio and patellar tracking measures, patellar tilt and bisect offset, in PF pain subjects

  13. [Multimodal pain management in a patient with atypical cervicogenic headache].

    PubMed

    Flöther, Lilit; Raspé, Christoph; Bucher, Michael; Benndorf, Ralf A

    2015-11-01

    A 45-year-old patient presented with an eight-year history of persistent unilateral headache associated with recurrent episodes of ipsilateral conjunctival injections, eyelid edema and ptosis. Prior ineffective pharmacological treatment strategies included tramadol, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and triptans. Palpation of right suboccipital trigger points revealed tenderness in the area of the greater occipital nerve and reinforced the symptoms. The diagnosis of cervicogenic headache was confirmed by symptom resolution following right greater occipital nerve blockade. A multimodal treatment strategy (physical therapy, nerve blockade, pharmacological treatment) was chosen and an emphasis was put on optimizing pharmacological pain relief using the opioid analgesic tapentadol and the tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline as an adjuvant analgesic. Importantly, the patient reported a substantial and consistent pain reduction and considerable quality of life improvement during implementation of the treatment regimen. PMID:26742212

  14. Implementation of a portable electronic system for providing pain relief to patellofemoral pain syndrome patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang Chien, Jia-Ren; Lin, Guo-Hong; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, a portable electromyogram (EMG) system and a stimulator are developed for patellofemoral pain syndrome patients, with the objective of reducing the pain experienced by these patients; the patellar pain is caused by an imbalance between the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and the vastus lateralis (VL). The EMG measurement circuit and the electrical stimulation device proposed in this study are specifically designed for the VMO and the VL; they are capable of real-time waveform recording, possess analyzing functions, and can upload their measurement data to a computer for storage and analysis. The system can calculate and record the time difference between the EMGs of the VMO and the VL, as well as the signal strengths of both the EMGs. As soon as the system detects the generation of the EMG of the VL, it quickly calculates and processes the event and stimulates the VMO as feedback through electrical stimulation units, in order to induce its contraction. The system can adjust the signal strength, time length, and the sequence of the electrical stimulation, both manually and automatically. The output waveform of the electrical stimulation circuit is a dual-phase asymmetrical pulse waveform. The primary function of the electrical simulation circuit is to ensure that the muscles contract effectively. The performance of the device can be seen that the width of each pulse is 20-1000 ?s, the frequency of each pulse is 10-100 Hz, and current strength is 10-60 mA.

  15. What's the risk? Assessment of patients with stable chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Cubukcu, Arzu; Anderson, Simon

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the National Institute for Heath and Clinical Excellence published guidelines for the management of stable chest pain of recent onset. Implementation has occurred to various degrees throughout the NHS; however, its effectiveness has yet to be proved. A retrospective study was undertaken to assess the impact and relevance of this guideline, comparing the estimated risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) with angiographic outcomes. Findings were compared with the recently published equivalent European guideline. A total of 457 patients who attended a Rapid Access Chest Pain Clinic were retrospectively reviewed. CAD risk was assessed according to NICE guidelines and patients were separated into typical, atypical and non-anginal chest pain groups. Risk stratification using typicality of symptoms in conjunction with NICE risk scoring and exercise tolerance testing was used to determine the best clinical course for each patient. The results include non-anginal chest pain – 92% discharged without needing further testing; atypical angina – 15% discharged, 40% referred for stress echocardiography, 35% referred for angiogram and significant CAD revealed in 8%; typical angina – 4% discharged, 19% referred for stress echocardiography, 71% referred for angiogram and 40% demonstrated CAD. Both guidelines appear to overestimate the risk of CAD leading to an excessive number of coronary angiograms being undertaken to investigate patients with typical or atypical sounding angina, with a low pick up rate of CAD. Given the high negative predictive value of stress echocardiography and the confidence this brings, there is much scope for expanding its use and potentially reduce the numbers going for invasive angiography. PMID:26693332

  16. Observer trait anxiety is associated with response bias to patient facial pain expression independent of pain catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Rash, Joshua A; Prkachin, Kenneth M; Campbell, Tavis S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Top-down characteristics of an observer influence the detection and estimation of a sufferer’s pain. A comprehensive understanding of these characteristics is important because they influence observer helping behaviours and the sufferer’s experience of pain. OBJECTIVES: To examine the hypothesis that individuals who score high in trait anxiety would perceive more intense pain in others, as indicated by a larger negative response bias, and that this association would persist after adjusting for pain catastrophizing. METHODS: Healthy young adult participants (n=99; 50 male) watched videos containing excerpts of facial expressions taken from patients with shoulder pain and were asked to rate how much pain the patient was experiencing using an 11-point numerical rating scale. Sensitivity and response bias were calculated using signal detection methods. RESULTS: Trait anxiety was a predictor of response bias after statistically adjusting for pain catastrophizing and observer sex. More anxious individuals had a proclivity toward imputing greater pain to a sufferer. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals scoring higher on trait anxiety were more likely to impute pain to a sufferer. Anxious caregivers may be better able to respond with appropriate intervention once pain behaviour is detected, or they may exacerbate symptoms by engaging in excessive palliative care and solicitous behaviour. PMID:25299592

  17. Attentional bias to pain and social threat in pediatric patients with functional abdominal pain and pain-free youth before and after performance evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beck, Joy E; Lipani, Tricia A; Baber, Kari F; Dufton, Lynette; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A; Walker, Lynn S

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated attentional biases for pain and social threat versus neutral stimuli in 54 youth with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and 53 healthy control subjects (ages 10 to 16 years). We assessed attentional bias using a visual probe detection task (PDT) that presented pain and social threat words in comparison to neutral words at conscious (1250 ms) and preconscious (20 ms) presentation rates. We administered the PDT before and after random assignment of participants to a laboratory stressor--failure versus success feedback regarding their performance on a challenging computer game. All analyses controlled for trait anxiety. At the conscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients exhibited preferential attention toward pain compared with neutral stimuli and compared with the control group. FAP patients maintained preferential attention toward conscious pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. At the preconscious rate of stimulus presentation, FAP patients' attention was neutral at baseline but increased significantly toward pain stimuli after performance feedback in both failure and success conditions. FAP patients' somatic symptoms increased in both failure and success conditions; control youth's somatic symptoms only increased after failure. Regarding social threat, neither FAP nor control youth exhibited attentional bias toward social threat compared with neutral stimuli at baseline, but both FAP and control youth in the failure condition significantly increased attention away from social threat after failure feedback. Results suggest that FAP patients preferentially attend to pain stimuli in conscious awareness. Moreover, performance evaluation may activate their preconscious attention to pain stimuli. PMID:21420789

  18. Neuropathic Pain in Elderly Patients with Chronic Low Back Painand Effects of Pregabalin: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Kenyu; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Sadayuki; Harada, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Preliminary study. Purpose To assess the association of neuropathic pain with chronic low back pain (LBP) and the effect of pregabalin on neuropathic pain in the elderly. Overview of Literature Of those with chronic LBP, 37% were predominantly presenting with neuropathic pain in young adults. Pregabalin is effective for pain in patients with diabetic neuropathy and peripheral neuralgia. No study has reported on the effects of pregabalin for chronic LBP in elderly patients yet. Methods Pregabalin was administered to 32 patients (age, ?65 years) with chronic LBP for 4 weeks. Pain and activities of daily living were assessed using the Neuropathic Pain Screening Questionnaire (NePSQ), the pain DETECT questionnaire, visual analog scale, the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, the short form of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. Modic change and spinal canal stenosis were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging. Results Altogether, 43.3% of patients had neuropathic pain according to the NePSQ and 15.6% patients had pain according to the pain DETECT. The efficacy rate of pregabalin was 73.3%. A significant effect was observed in patients with neuropathic pain after 4 weeks of administration. Conclusions Neuropathic pain was slightly less frequently associated with chronic LBP in the elderly. Pregabalin was effective in reducing pain in patients with chronic LBP accompanied with neuropathic pain. Lumbar spinal stenosis and lower limb symptoms were observed in patients with neuropathic pain. We recommend the use of pregabalin for patients after evaluating a screening score, clinical symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:25901238

  19. Special needs related to the pain and discomfort of patients with gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Miaskowski, C

    1996-02-01

    Patients with gynecologic malignancies can experience pain associated with a variety of causes. Chronic pain associated with the disease or treatment presents the most problems. Chronic cancer-related pain is associated with negative mood states and a decrease in the patient's quality of life. Clinicians must conduct pain assessments on a routine basis to accurately diagnose the specific pain syndrome in patients with gynecologic cancer. An overview of how to conduct a pain assessment with such patients is provided. The etiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment strategies for the most common pain syndromes seen in patients with gynecologic cancer are reviewed. The use of nonpharmacologic interventions with this patient population is discussed. PMID:8656310

  20. Minority Patients in ER Less Likely to Get Painkillers for Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Minority Patients in ER Less Likely to Get Painkillers for Abdominal Pain ER waits are also longer ... to 30 percent less likely to receive narcotic painkillers. Overall, pain medications were given to 57 percent ...

  1. The effects of whole body vibration on static balance, spinal curvature, pain, and disability of patients with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinmo; Seo, Dongkwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of whole body vibration (WBV) on static balance, spinal curvature, pain, and the disability of patients with chronic lower back pain. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were of 40 patients, who were randomly assigned to WBV and control groups. Twenty-five minutes of lumbar stability training and 5 minutes of WBV were conducted for the WBV group, and 30 minutes of lumbar stability training was conducted for the control group. The training was conducted three times per week for a total of 6 weeks. Static balance, spinal curvature, pain, and disability were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] After the intervention, the WBV group showed a significant differences in static balance, spinal curvature, pain, and disability. The control group presented significant differences in pain, and disability. In the comparison of the two groups, the WBV group showed more significant improvements in the fall index and pain. [Conclusion] WBV can be recommended for the improvement of the balance ability and pain of chronic lower back pain patients. PMID:25931735

  2. Pain Associated with Wound Care Treatment among Buruli Ulcer Patients from Ghana and Benin

    PubMed Central

    Alferink, Marike; de Zeeuw, Janine; Sopoh, Ghislain; Agossadou, Chantal; Abass, Karibu M.; Phillips, Richard O.; Loth, Susanne; Jutten, Emma; Barogui, Yves T.; Stewart, Roy E.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje; Ranchor, Adelita V.

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU) is a necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. People living in remote areas in tropical Sub Saharan Africa are mostly affected. Wound care is an important component of BU management; this often needs to be extended for months after the initial antibiotic treatment. BU is reported in the literature as being painless, however clinical observations revealed that some patients experienced pain during wound care. This was the first study on pain intensity during and after wound care in BU patients and factors associated with pain. In Ghana and Benin, 52 BU patients above 5 years of age and their relatives were included between December 2012 and May 2014. Information on pain intensity during and after wound care was obtained during two consecutive weeks using the Wong-Baker Pain Scale. Median pain intensity during wound care was in the lower range (Mdn = 2, CV = 1), but severe pain (score > 6) was reported in nearly 30% of the patients. Nevertheless, only one patient received pain medication. Pain declined over time to low scores 2 hours after treatment. Factors associated with higher self-reported pain scores were; male gender, fear prior to treatment, pain during the night prior to treatment, and pain caused by cleaning the wound. The general idea that BU is painless is incorrect for the wound care procedure. This procedural pain deserves attention and appropriate intervention. PMID:26030764

  3. Pain relief is associated with decreasing postural sway in patients with non-specific low back pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased postural sway is well documented in patients suffering from non-specific low back pain, whereby a linear relationship between higher pain intensities and increasing postural sway has been described. No investigation has been conducted to evaluate whether this relationship is maintained if pain levels change in adults with non-specific low back pain. Methods Thirty-eight patients with non-specific low back pain and a matching number of healthy controls were enrolled. Postural sway was measured by three identical static bipedal standing tasks of 90 sec duration with eyes closed in narrow stance on a firm surface. The perceived pain intensity was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS-11). The patients received three manual interventions (e.g. manipulation, mobilization or soft tissue techniques) at 3-4 day intervals, postural sway measures were obtained at each occasion. Results A clinically relevant decrease of four NRS scores in associated with manual interventions correlated with a significant decrease in postural sway. In contrast, if no clinically relevant change in intensity occurred (? 1 level), postural sway remained similar compared to baseline. The postural sway measures obtained at follow-up sessions 2 and 3 associated with specific NRS level showed no significant differences compared to reference values for the same pain score. Conclusions Alterations in self-reported pain intensities are closely related to changes in postural sway. The previously reported linear relationship between the two variables is maintained as pain levels change. Pain interference appears responsible for the altered sway in pain sufferers. This underlines the clinical use of sway measures as an objective monitoring tool during treatment or rehabilitation. PMID:22436337

  4. Escitalopram is associated with reductions in pain severity and pain interference in opioid dependent patients with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Judith I; Herman, Debra S; Kettavong, Malyna; Anderson, Bradley J; Stein, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    Pain is common among opioid-dependent patients, yet pharmacologic strategies are limited. The aim of this study was to explore whether escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was associated with reductions in pain. The study used longitudinal data from a randomized, controlled trial that evaluated the effects of escitalopram on treatment retention in patients with depressive symptoms who were initiating buprenorphine/naloxone for treatment of opioid dependence. Participants were randomized to receive escitalopram 10 mg or placebo daily. Changes in pain severity, pain interference, and depression were assessed at 1-, 2-, and 3-month visits with the visual analog scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory II, respectively. Fixed-effects estimators for panel regression models were used to assess the effects of intervention on changes in outcomes over time. Additional models were estimated to explore whether the intervention effect was mediated by within-person changes in depression. In this sample of 147 adults, we found that participants randomized to escitalopram had significantly larger reductions on both pain severity (b=-14.34, t=-2.66, P<.01) and pain interference (b=-1.20, t=-2.23, P<.05) between baseline and follow-up. After adjusting for within-subject changes in depression, the estimated effects of escitalopram on pain severity and pain interference were virtually identical to the unadjusted effects. This study of opioid-dependent patients with depressive symptoms found that treatment with escitalopram was associated with clinically meaningful reductions in pain severity and pain interference during the first 3 months of therapy. PMID:21924552

  5. Escitalopram is Associated with Reductions in Pain Severity and Pain Interference in Opioid Dependent Patients with Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Judith I.; Herman, Debra S.; Kettavong, Malyna; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Pain is common among opioid dependent patients, yet pharmacologic strategies are limited. The aim of this study was to explore whether escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was associated with reductions in pain. The study used longitudinal data from a randomized, controlled trial that evaluated the effects of escitalopram on treatment retention in patients with depressive symptoms who were initiating buprenorphine/naloxone for treatment of opioid dependence. Participants were randomized to take escitalopram 10mg or placebo daily. Changes in pain severity, pain interference and depression were assessed at 1, 2 and 3 months visits using the Visual Analog Scale, Brief Pain Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory II, respectively. Fixed-effects estimator for panel regression models were used to assess the effects of intervention on changes in outcomes over time. Additional models were estimated to explore whether the intervention effect was mediated by within-person changes in depression. In this sample of 147 adults, we found that participants randomized to escitalopram had significantly larger reductions on both pain severity (b = ?14.34, t = ?2.66, p < .01) and pain interference (b = ?1.20, t = ?2.23, p < .05) between baseline and follow-up. After adjusting for within-subject changes in depression, the estimated effects of escitalopram on pain severity and pain interference were virtually identical to the unadjusted effects. In summary, this study of opioid-dependent patients with depressive symptoms found that treatment with escitalopram was associated with clinically meaningful reductions in pain severity and pain interference during the first three months of therapy. PMID:21924552

  6. Innate Immune Signalling Genetics of Pain, Cognitive Dysfunction and Sickness Symptoms in Cancer Pain Patients Treated with Transdermal Fentanyl

    PubMed Central

    Barratt, Daniel T.; Klepstad, Pål; Dale, Ola; Kaasa, Stein; Somogyi, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    Common adverse symptoms of cancer and chemotherapy are a major health burden; chief among these is pain, with opioids including transdermal fentanyl the mainstay of treatment. Innate immune activation has been implicated generally in pain, opioid analgesia, cognitive dysfunction, and sickness type symptoms reported by cancer patients. We aimed to determine if genetic polymorphisms in neuroimmune activation pathways alter the serum fentanyl concentration-response relationships for pain control, cognitive dysfunction, and other adverse symptoms, in cancer pain patients. Cancer pain patients (468) receiving transdermal fentanyl were genotyped for 31 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 19 genes: CASP1, BDNF, CRP, LY96, IL6, IL1B, TGFB1, TNF, IL10, IL2, TLR2, TLR4, MYD88, IL6R, OPRM1, ARRB2, COMT, STAT6 and ABCB1. Lasso and backward stepwise generalised linear regression were used to identify non-genetic and genetic predictors, respectively, of pain control (average Brief Pain Inventory < 4), cognitive dysfunction (Mini-Mental State Examination ? 23), sickness response and opioid adverse event complaint. Serum fentanyl concentrations did not predict between-patient variability in these outcomes, nor did genetic factors predict pain control, sickness response or opioid adverse event complaint. Carriers of the MYD88 rs6853 variant were half as likely to have cognitive dysfunction (11/111) than wild-type patients (69/325), with a relative risk of 0.45 (95% CI: 0.27 to 0.76) when accounting for major non-genetic predictors (age, Karnofsky functional score). This supports the involvement of innate immune signalling in cognitive dysfunction, and identifies MyD88 signalling pathways as a potential focus for predicting and reducing the burden of cognitive dysfunction in cancer pain patients. PMID:26332828

  7. Early maladaptive schema factors, chronic pain and depressiveness: a study with 271 chronic pain patients and 331 control participants.

    PubMed

    Saariaho, Tom; Saariaho, Anita; Karila, Irma; Joukamaa, Matti

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain and depression are coexisting entities with high simultaneous prevalence. Both are linked with early adversities. Early maladaptive schemas (EMS) can be seen as a reflection of these adversities. EMSs extensively indicate underlying psychic patterns and provide a good opportunity to detect covert processes and psychic shapes (latent factors), which create the basis of how people rate their schemas. The purpose of this study was to explore these latent, higher order schema factors (SF) and to find out how they are associated with pain intensity or depression in chronic pain patients and a control sample. The study subjects consisted of 271 first-visit pain patients and 331 control participants. Sociodemographic and pain data were gathered by questionnaire; 18 EMSs were measured with the Young Schema Questionnaire (short form) and depressiveness was measured with the Beck Depression Inventory, Version II. Exploratory factor and regression analyses were used. The chronic pain patient group showed two SFs. The first SF showed a shameful, defective, socially isolated, failure, emotionally inhibited, deprived, submissive and resigned pattern. The second SF showed a demanding, approval seeking, self-sacrificing and punitive pattern. SF1 predicted more than half of the depressiveness in the pain patient sample. A three-factor structure was found in the control sample, and SFs 1 and 3 together predicted almost one-third of depressiveness. The pain patient and the control groups had a different, higher order factor structure. We assume that SF1 in the pain patients reflected a rather serious, undefined early psychic trauma and was also associated with their depressiveness. PMID:21210495

  8. Somatosensory and Affective Contributions to Emotional, Social, and Daily Functioning in Chronic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boggero, Ian A; Carlson, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study tested the independent and interactive contributions of the somatosensory component of pain (pain intensity) and the affective component of pain (pain unpleasantness) on emotional, social, and daily functioning in chronic pain patients. Subjects Participants were 472 patients seeking treatment for chronic orofacial pain. Mean age of the sample was 46.0 years (standard deviation [SD] = 14.67, range 18–78), with 82.2% female. Average pain duration at the time of initial appointment was 75.7 months (SD = 106.66). Methods Participants completed self-report measures of pain intensity, unpleasantness, and functional outcomes at the time of their first appointment. These data were later extracted from participant’s de-identified medical records. Multivariate linear regression was used to test the interaction of pain intensity and unpleasantness on outcome measures of emotional, social, and daily functioning. Results Results revealed that pain intensity contributed to poorer functional outcomes but higher levels of social support even after controlling for pain unpleasantness. After controlling for pain intensity, unpleasantness was associated with higher pain interference and affective distress. There was also pain intensity by unpleasantness interaction on pain interference. Specifically, at lower levels of pain unpleasantness, changes in pain intensity produced greater changes in pain interference than they did at higher levels of pain unpleasantness. Conclusions Results suggest that both intensity and unpleasantness contribute unique variance to functional outcomes. The results highlight the importance of interventions that not only try to reduce pain levels but also reduce levels of pain unpleasantness. PMID:25351790

  9. Effectiveness of mindfulness meditation on pain and quality of life of patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Banth, Sudha; Ardebil, Maryam Didehdar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Recovery of patients with chronic low back pain (LBP) is depended on several physical and psychological factors. Therefore, the authors aimed to examine the efficacy of mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) as a mind-body intervention on quality of life and pain severity of female patients with nonspecific chronic LBP (NSCLBP). Methods: Eighty-eight patients diagnosed as NSCLBP by physician and randomly assigned to experimental (MBSR+ usual medical care) and the control group (usual medical care only). The subjects assessed in 3 times frames; before, after and 4 weeks after intervention by Mac Gil pain and standard brief quality of life scales. Data obtained from the final sample analyzed by ANCOVA using SPSS software. Results: The findings showed MBSR was effective in reduction of pain severity and the patients who practiced 8 sessions meditation reported significantly lower pain than patients who only received usual medical care. There was a significant effect of the between subject factor group (F [1, 45] = 16.45, P < 0.001) and (F [1, 45] = 21.51, P < 0.001) for physical quality of life and (F [1, 45] = 13.80, P < 0.001) and (F [1, 45] = 25.07, P < 0.001) mental quality of life respectively. Conclusion: MBSR as a mind-body therapy including body scan, sitting and walking meditation was effective intervention on reduction of pain severity and improvement of physical and mental quality of life of female patients with NSCLBP. PMID:26170592

  10. [Pain patients in street traffic. Do analgesics impair driving safety?].

    PubMed

    Sohn, W

    2003-06-01

    Analgesics--in particular when self-prescribed or taken over the long term--may have a negative effect on safety on the road. This applies not only to vehicle drivers, but also to cyclists and pedestrians. Psychotropic effects of analgesics of all three WHO categories play a major causal role. Impairments may take the form of sleepiness, impaired vision, giddiness, loss of muscular tone or cardiovascular reactions. On the other hand, untreated severe pain has a high risk potential, since it may reduce both cognitive and psychomotoric performance. During the stabilization phase or dose adjustment of opioids, the patient must cautioned not to drive, and particular care must be taken in patients on concomitant or long-term medication or drinking excessive alcohol. In the last resort, the prescription of an analgesic is an individual decision involving both physician and patient. PMID:12854223

  11. Chest pain in lupus patients: the emergency department experience.

    PubMed

    Modi, Masoom; Ishimori, Mariko L; Sandhu, Vaneet K; Wallace, Daniel J; Weisman, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    Heart disease, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE patients, often manifests as chest pain (CP). Our goal was to understand the prevalence and outcome of CP presentations for SLE patients in the emergency department (ED). Billing records of patients who presented to Cedars-Sinai Medical Center ED with ICD-9 codes for SLE and secondary ICD-9 codes for CP (786.50-786.59) between March 2009 and October 2013 were reviewed. Two study groups were formed: discharge from ED versus hospital admission. Visits were evaluated for basic cardiac work-up with an electrocardiogram (EKG) and cardiac enzymes; hospital admissions were evaluated for CP etiology and discharge diagnoses. Of 2675 ED visits with ICD-9 codes for SLE, 397 visits had secondary codes for CP (15 %); 173 were discharged and 224 became hospital admissions. While 92 % of admissions had basic cardiac work-up, over 50 % had chest pain attributed to non-cardiac causes. Only 7.2 % had a discharge diagnosis related to cardiovascular disease. Fifteen percent of all SLE coded patients had complaints of CP, a figure higher than the national average for non-SLE CP (10 %). There is a majority of non-cardiac diagnoses given to SLE patients at discharge. CP is likely to be a window of opportunity to address the known cardiac morbidity and mortality in SLE patients perhaps at an early stage of development of this complication. Our study strengthens the need for more investigations to assess the etiology of CP in this population. PMID:25912215

  12. Perceptions of disability and occupational stress as discriminators of work disability in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, M; Thebarge, R W

    1991-09-01

    Pain-related work disability can be influenced by a number of medical, physical, and psychosocial factors. The present study investigated the role of perceived disability, occupational stress, pain, and distress in patients with chronic pain disorders who work despite pain and patients who are work disabled. A total of 165 patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain treatment center for chronic pain (> 6 months) were studied. The two groups were compared on age, gender, education, marital status, duration of pain problem, pain severity, psychological distress, perceived disability, and perception of the work environment. A discriminant function analysis was computed entering pain severity, distress, perceived disability (physical and psychosocial) and work environment variables. The two groups were equivalent on age, gender, education, marital status, and duration of pain problem. The groups differed on diagnosis and insurance coverage with the work-disabled group diagnosed with low back pain and receiving Workers Compensation coverage more frequently than working controls. Univariate analyses indicated that the work-disabled group reported higher pain severity, perceived physical and psychosocial disability, and job stress than their working cohorts. The discriminant function analysis indicated that the perception of physical disability, supervisor support, distress, and work pressure were capable of correctly classifying patients with chronic pain who continued to work from those who were work disabled. These findings indicate the importance of evaluating perceived disability and job stress, and if present, directing intervention effort at these factors in order to facilitate work re-entry. PMID:24242740

  13. In Lumbar Fusion Patients, How Does Establishing a Comfort Function Goal Preoperatively Impact Postoperative Pain Scores?

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Winnie; Wagner, Elizabeth; Dumas, Bonnie P; Handley, Patricia

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this feasibility study was to determine the impact of establishing a comfort function goal preoperatively on postoperative pain scores and opiate requirements in lumbar fusion patients. A comfort function goal is defined as the pain score identified by the patient describing the level of pain tolerance to participate in healing activities such as deep breathing, ambulation and participation in activities of daily living. The design was prospective, nonrandomized, intervention group (n = 30) compared with retrospective chart review as control group (n = 30). Sample included patients scheduled for routine lumbar fusion in an urban southeastern hospital. The study intervention established a comfort function goal during a routine preoperative patient education class. No significant difference in pain score or opiate requirement was found for these data. However, a fundamental clinical question arose surrounding opiate requirements and dosing management. In our hospital, the norm for postoperative pain management is to categorize pain scores as mild (1-3), moderate (4-6), and severe (7-10) pain. Physician orders commonly use this differential to order opiate dose ranges. In this sample, the mean pain score for the intervention group at home is 5.8 and the mean comfort function goal is 4.9. Based on normative categories of pain scores, if a patient's baseline of tolerable pain is 4.9, this has potential impact on clinician responses to managing pain, as 4.9-5.8 is, for this patient, perhaps a mild range of pain, not moderate. If a patient reports a pain score of 7, and their norm is 5.8, the delta is only 1.2. Does this imply that the patient is experiencing mild or severe pain? Does the nurse deliver a dose of pain medication that is in the mild or severe dose range? PMID:26293197

  14. Nurses Use of Critical Care Pain Observational Tool in Patients with Low Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Asadi-Noghabi, Ahmad-Ali; Gholizadeh, Mohammad; Zolfaghari, Mitra; Mehran, Abbas; Sohrabi, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The diagnosis of pain in patients with low consciousness is a major challenge in the intensive care unit (ICU). Therefore, the use of behavioral tools for pain assessment could be an effective tool to manage pain in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to determine the effects on pain management by nurses using a critical care pain observational tool in patients with a decreased level of consciousness.? Methods Our research used a before and after design to evaluate the ability of nurses to manage pain in patients with low consciousness. A total of 106 ICU nurses were included in the study. The study was divided into three phases: pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. The researchers first observed the nurses management of pain in their patients; this was done three times using a checklist following tracheal suctioning and position change procedures. The nurses were then taught how to apply the critical-care pain observational tool (CPOT). Post-implementation of the tool, the researchers re-evaluated trained the nurses’ pain management.? Results Performance scores after training improved with relation to the nurses diagnosis of pain, pharmacological and nonpharmacological actions, reassessment of pain, and re-relieving of any pain. However, use of the tool did not improve the recording of the patient’s pain and the relief measures used.? Conclusion Use of the CPOT can increase nurse’s sensitivity to pain in non-conscious patients and drive them to track and perform pain management. PMID:26366262

  15. Evaluating the influence of perceived pain control on patient satisfaction in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Craig, Angela R; Otani, Koichiro; Herrmann, Patrick A

    2015-01-01

    The authors evaluated whether a patient's perceived pain control influenced the relationships between four attributes (nursing, physician, staff, and environment) and patient satisfaction. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine overall satisfaction and intention to recommend, controlling for race, gender, age, and education. The authors found that no matter the level of pain control, nursing was always the most influential attribute in patient satisfaction. The influence of the other attributes varied, depending on the patients' pain control. Hospital managers may improve patient satisfaction by focusing on pain management nursing care. PMID:25839349

  16. Functional abdominal pain patient subtypes in childhood predict functional gastrointestinal disorders with chronic pain and psychiatric comorbidities in adolescence and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Walker, Lynn S; Sherman, Amanda L; Bruehl, Stephen; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

    2012-09-01

    Although pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP) has been linked to abdominal pain later in life, childhood predictors of long-term outcomes have not been identified. This study evaluated whether distinct FAP profiles based on patterns of pain and adaptation in childhood could be identified and whether these profiles predicted differences in clinical outcomes and central sensitization (wind-up) on average 9years later. In 843 pediatric FAP patients, cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups at initial FAP evaluation based on profiles of pain severity, gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI symptoms, pain threat appraisal, pain coping efficacy, catastrophizing, negative affect, and activity impairment. Three profiles were identified: high pain dysfunctional, high pain adaptive, and low pain adaptive. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age and sex showed that, compared with pediatric patients with the low pain adaptive profile, those with the high pain dysfunctional profile were significantly more likely at long-term follow-up to meet criteria for pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) (odds ratio: 3.45, confidence interval: 1.95 to 6.11), FGID with comorbid nonabdominal chronic pain (odds ratio: 2.6, confidence interval: 1.45 to 4.66), and FGID with comorbid anxiety or depressive psychiatric disorder (odds ratio: 2.84, confidence interval: 1.35 to 6.00). Pediatric patients with the high pain adaptive profile had baseline pain severity comparable to that of the high pain dysfunctional profile, but had outcomes as favorable as the low pain adaptive profile. In laboratory pain testing at follow-up, high pain dysfunctional patients showed significantly greater thermal wind-up than low pain adaptive patients, suggesting that a subgroup of FAP patients has outcomes consistent with widespread effects of heightened central sensitization. PMID:22721910

  17. "Sleepless nights and sore operation site": patients' experiences of nursing pain management after surgery in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Shoqirat, Noordeen

    2014-09-01

    Internationally, it is agreed that pain management is a central component of nursing care. Although much has been written about pain prevalence among patients after surgery, research is scant on patients' experiences of nursing pain management and factors involved. This study explores patients' experiences of nursing pain management in Jordan and identifies contributing factors. A qualitative research design was used. Data were collected through focus group discussions (n = 4). A total of 31 patients were purposively selected. Two main themes emerged. The first theme was living in pain and comprised two categories: from sleep disturbances to the fear of addiction and from dependence to uncertainty. The second theme was about barriers that affect nursing pain management. Patients' experiences of nursing pain management were not up to their expectations; their needs were largely ignored and were dealt with in a mechanistic way. Barriers precipitating this situation were referred to in this study as the three "nots," including not being well-informed, not being believed, and not being privileged. The study concluded that patients' experiences of nursing pain management are a complex world that goes beyond medically orientated care. Nurses, therefore, are urged to look beyond standardized assessment tools and use patients' experiences and voices as valuable evidence contributing to more effective pain management. Unless this occurs in their daily encounters with patients, another decade will pass with little change in the practice of pain management. PMID:23911911

  18. Mobile Pain Coping Skills Training for Stem Cell Transplant Patients | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Persistent pain is a major challenge for patients who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and is related to more fatigue, more physical disability, poorer quality of life, and poorer medical adherence. There is a need to examine strategies for managing pain in HSCT patients that can complement existing analgesic regimens. Strong evidence suggests that cognitive and behavioral factors play an important role in HSCT patients' ability to manage their pain.

  19. The Use of Analgesic Drugs in Patients with Sickle Cell Painful Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, I; Gossell-Williams, M; Lee, MG

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine the drug options used for pain in patients with acute sickle cell painful crisis at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI), Jamaica. Method: This retrospective study assessed all patients admitted to the UHWI between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2010, with acute sickle cell anaemia painful crisis and the data obtained regarding site, severity, outcome and drug options selected for pain. Results: There were 101 patients with a mean age (± SD) of 18.6 (± 14.3) years; there was no difference in gender (42 females, 59 males). Eight sites of pain were reported, with the most common site being the lower limbs (44.6%) and 60.3% experienced pain in more than one site. Most of the patients (75.2%) were diagnosed with severe pain. Drug options included opioid, non-opioid or a combination, with pethidine (76) and paracetamol (79) being the most common chosen opioid and non-opioid drugs selected for therapy. There was low correlation between pain severity and appropriate first-line treatment (Spearman's rho = 0.344; p < 0.000). All patients with “mild” and “mild to moderate” pain were initially treated and obtained resolution of pain with non-opioid based therapy. However, most of the patients with severe pain (55.3%) required a second-line and some third line (14.5%) of therapy for resolution at the time of discharge from the hospital. Conclusion: Painful crisis in patients with sickle cell anaemia is associated with severe pain in 75% and most will require second-line therapy for adequate resolution. Physicians need to provide adequate pain relief to decrease morbidity in these patients. PMID:25781286

  20. A web-based neurological pain classifier tool utilizing Bayesian decision theory for pain classification in spinal cord injury patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Chun, Sophia; Liu, Brent J.

    2014-03-01

    Pain is a common complication after spinal cord injury with prevalence estimates ranging 77% to 81%, which highly affects a patient's lifestyle and well-being. In the current clinical setting paper-based forms are used to classify pain correctly, however, the accuracy of diagnoses and optimal management of pain largely depend on the expert reviewer, which in many cases is not possible because of very few experts in this field. The need for a clinical decision support system that can be used by expert and non-expert clinicians has been cited in literature, but such a system has not been developed. We have designed and developed a stand-alone tool for correctly classifying pain type in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, using Bayesian decision theory. Various machine learning simulation methods are used to verify the algorithm using a pilot study data set, which consists of 48 patients data set. The data set consists of the paper-based forms, collected at Long Beach VA clinic with pain classification done by expert in the field. Using the WEKA as the machine learning tool we have tested on the 48 patient dataset that the hypothesis that attributes collected on the forms and the pain location marked by patients have very significant impact on the pain type classification. This tool will be integrated with an imaging informatics system to support a clinical study that will test the effectiveness of using Proton Beam radiotherapy for treating spinal cord injury (SCI) related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning.

  1. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC ABDOMINAL PAIN.

    PubMed

    Omran, Eman Kh; Mohammad, Asmaa N

    2015-08-01

    Information about intestinal parasites in Sohag (Upper Egypt) in patients with chronic abdominal pain is scarce. This study determined the intestinal parasites symptoms in 130 patients with chronic abdominal pain and cross-matched 20 healthy persons. Parasitic infection was confirmed by stool analysis.The most commonest clinical data with stool analysis was as following: 1-Entamoeba histolytica associated with nausea 20 (3 7.74%) followed by anorexia 19 (35.85%), 2-Entamoeba coli associated with diarrhea 3 (100%) followed by nausea 2 (66.67%) and vomiting 2 (66.67%), 3-Enetrobius vermicularis associated with nausea 2 (66.67%), diarrhea 2 (66.67%) followed by flatulence 1(33.33%), 4-Giardia lamblia associated with anorexia 3 (42.86%), vomiting 3 (42.86%) followed by diarrhea 2 (28.57%)., 6-Hymenolepis nana associated with anorexia 10 (40.00%) followed by flatulence 9 (36.00%), 7-Taenia saginata associated with dyspepsia 3 (60.00%) followed by flatulence 2 (40.00%), and 8-Ancylostoma duodenal associated with anorexia 2 (66.67%) and diarrhea 2 (66.67%). PMID:26485858

  2. White Cancer Patients’ Perception of Gender and Ethnic Differences in Pain Experience

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok

    2008-01-01

    Not considering cancer patients’ own views and experience with pain, especially gender and ethnic differences in their cancer pain experience, was reported to be a major contributor to the miscommunication that frequently results in inadequate cancer pain management. The purpose of this study was to explore white cancer patients’ perception of gender and ethnic differences in pain experience through an online forum. This was a descriptive qualitative study among 29 white cancer patients based on a feminist approach. Nine topics related to cancer pain experience were used. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis: 5 themes were identified. First, the participants perceived that pain accompanies cancer throughout the diagnosis and treatment process. Second, the specific characteristics of the participants’ individual culture and its view of pain and cancer could result in different cancer pain experience even among white cancer patients. Third, the participants complained that women’s pain was not taken seriously by health care providers. Fourth, the participants reported highly individualized pain experience with emotional pain. Finally, the participants wanted to have a control of their own pain management process. Based on the findings, implications for nursing research and practice are proposed. PMID:17135816

  3. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on pain, disability, and depression of chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hyeonjee; Lee, Daehee; Lee, Sangyong; Jeon, Chunbae; Kim, Taehoon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on pain, disability, and depression of chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects] In this study, 30 chronic low back pain patients were divided into an extracorporeal shock wave therapy group (ESWTG, n=15) and a conservative physical therapy group (CPTG, n=15). [Methods] The ESWTG received extracorporeal shock wave therapy and the CPTG received general conservative physical therapy two times per week for six weeks. Pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), the degree of disability of the patients was assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and their degree of depression was measured using the Beck depression index (BDI). [Results] In intra-group comparisons, ESWTG and CPTG showed significant decreases in VAS, ODI, and BDI scores. Intergroup comparisons revealed that these decreases in VAS, ODI, and BDI scores were significantly larger in ESWTG than in CPTG. [Conclusion] Extracorporeal shock wave therapy is an effective intervention for the treatment of pain, disability, and depression in chronic low back pain patients. PMID:25729177

  4. Process evaluation of podiatric treatment of patients with forefoot pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Foot pain is a common problem for people aged 50 and over and occurs more often in women than in men. About 60% of the foot problems are forefoot problems and slightly more than half of these patients seek medical help, mainly in the form of podiatric care. Podiatric treatment of forefoot problems is known to be heterogeneous. The aims of the present study are to describe the podiatric treatment of patients with forefoot pain and to evaluate the podiatric examination and treatment using an expert panel. Method We invited twenty-five randomly selected subjects with forefoot problems who had received podiatric treatment in a pragmatic randomised clinical trial to participate in an analysis of their treatment by an expert panel. The panel retrospectively established the cause of the foot problem as well as the therapeutic goals and evaluated the treatment. These findings were compared to those reported by the treating podiatrist. Results Two fundamentally different approaches were found in approach of podiatric examination; a functional approach (n?=13) and a non-functional approach (n?=12). In nine cases the expert panel agreed with the cause recorded by the podiatrist. In five other cases the expert panel concluded that the treatment of the podiatrist was not consistent with the cause of the problem recorded by the podiatrist. Of the 10 patients for whom the podiatrist had recorded to have given shoe advice, only two were able to recollect the proper advice. Three patients did not remember receiving advice at all. Conclusion In this study almost half of the podiatrists worked according to a non-functional approach where the other half (like the expert panel) chose a functional strategy that analyses the underlying problem. Fundamental differences in treatment plans and thus heterogeneous treatments could be a consequence. PMID:23919765

  5. Prognostic Value of Preoperative Coping Strategies for Pain in Patients with Residual Neuropathic Pain after Laminoplasty for Compressive Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single-center retrospective cohort study. Purpose To clarify the prognostic value of preoperative coping strategies for pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. Overview of Literature Preoperative physical function, imaging and electrophysiological findings are known predictors of surgical outcomes. However, coping strategies for pain have not been considered. Methods Postoperative questionnaires, concerning health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and daily living activities, were sent to 78 patients with compressive cervical myelopathy who had suffered from neuropathic pain before laminoplasty, and been preoperatively assessed with respect to their physical and mental status and coping strategies for pain. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was performed to clarify the extent to which the patient's preoperative coping strategies could explain the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity levels. Results Forty-two patients with residual neuropathic pain after laminoplasty were analyzed by questionnaires (28 men, 14 women; mean age, 62.7±10.2 years; symptom duration, 48.0±66.0 months). The valid response rate was 53.8%. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that preoperative coping strategies, which involved coping self-statements, diverting attention, and catastrophizing, were independently associated with postoperative HRQOL and activity level, and could explain 7% to 11% of their variance. Combinations of the coping strategies for pain and upper/lower motor functions could explain 26% to 36% of the variance in postoperative HRQOL and activity level. Conclusions Preoperative coping strategies for pain are good predictors of postoperative HRQOL and activities of daily living in patients with postoperative residual neuropathic pain due to compressive cervical myelopathy. PMID:26435783

  6. The Utility of the Faces Pain Scale in the Assessment of Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Its Relation with Quality of Life and Psychologic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Sebnem Koldas; Ay, Saime; Oztuna, Derya; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Evcik, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the utility of the vertical Faces Pain Scale (FPS) in the assessment of pain in stroke patients using the shoulder pain model and to assess its utility in the Turkish patient population. The secondary aim was to analyze the association of FPS with the quality of life and depression in the study population.…

  7. Suicidal ideation and the risk of suicide in patients with fibromyalgia: a comparison with non-pain controls and patients suffering from low-back pain

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Rodríguez, Irene; Garcia-Leiva, Juan Miguel; Jimenez-Rodriguez, Beatriz M; Condés-Moreno, Emilia; Rico-Villademoros, Fernando; Calandre, Elena P

    2014-01-01

    Fibromyalgia is associated with an increased rate of mortality from suicide. In fact, this disease is associated with several characteristics that are linked to an increased risk of suicidal behaviors, such as being female and experiencing chronic pain, psychological distress, and sleep disturbances. However, the literature concerning suicidal behaviors and their risk factors in fibromyalgia is sparse. The objectives of the present study were to evaluate the prevalence of suicidal ideation and the risk of suicide in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia compared with a sample of healthy subjects and a sample of patients with chronic low-back pain. We also aimed to evaluate the relevance of pain intensity, depression, and sleep quality as variables related to suicidal ideation and risks. Logistic regression was applied to estimate the likelihood of suicidal ideation and the risk of suicide adjusted by age and sex. We also used two logistic regression models using age, sex, pain severity score, depression severity, sleep quality, and disease state as independent variables and using the control group as a reference. Forty-four patients with fibromyalgia, 32 patients with low-back pain, and 50 controls were included. Suicidal ideation, measured with item 9 of the Beck Depression Inventory, was almost absent among the controls and was low among patients with low-back pain; however, suicidal ideation was prominent among patients with fibromyalgia (P<0.0001). The risk of suicide, measured with the Plutchik Suicide Risk Scale, was also higher among patients with fibromyalgia than in patients with low-back pain or in controls (P<0.0001). The likelihood for suicidal ideation and the risk of suicide were higher among patients with fibromyalgia (odds ratios of 26.9 and 48.0, respectively) than in patients with low-back pain (odds ratios 4.6 and 4.7, respectively). Depression was the only factor associated with suicidal ideation or the risk of suicide. PMID:24790444

  8. Self-reports of medication side effects and pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Martel, Marc O; Finan, Patrick H; Dolman, Andrew J; Subramanian, Subu; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Jamison, Robert N

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the association between self-reports of medication side effects and pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain. The potential moderators of the association between reports of side effects and pain-related activity interference were also examined. A total of 111 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain were asked to provide, once a month for a period of 6 months, self-reports of medication use and the presence of any perceived side effects (eg, nausea, dizziness, headaches) associated with their medications. At each of these time points, patients were also asked to provide self-reports of pain intensity, negative affect, and pain-related activity interference. Multilevel modeling analyses revealed that month-to-month increases in perceived medication side effects were associated with heightened pain-related activity interference (P < 0.05). Importantly, multilevel models revealed that perceived medication side effects were associated with heightened pain-related activity interference even after controlling for the influence of patient demographics, pain intensity, and negative affect. This study provides preliminary evidence that reports of medication side effects are associated with heightened pain-related activity interference in patients with chronic pain beyond the influence of other pain-relevant variables. The implications of our findings for clinical practice and the management of patients with chronic pain conditions are discussed. PMID:25782367

  9. Repetition-induced activity-related summation of pain in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Lambin, Dorothée Ialongo; Thibault, Pascal; Simmonds, Maureen; Lariviere, Christian; Sullivan, Michael J L

    2011-06-01

    This study compared individuals with fibromyalgia (FM) and individuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP) on repetition-induced summation of activity-related pain (RISP). Fear of movement, pain catastrophizing and depression were examined as potential mediators of group differences. The sample consisted of 50 women with FM and 50 women with CLBP who were matched on age, pain severity and pain duration. Participants were asked to lift a series of 18 weighted canisters. In one trial, participants were asked to rate their pain after each lift. In a second trial, participants estimated the weight of each of the canisters. An index of repetition-induced summation of pain was derived as the change in pain ratings across repeated lifts. Analyses revealed that women with FM obtained higher scores on the index of RISP than women with CLBP. The heightened sensitivity to RISP in individuals with FM was not due to generalized hyperalgesia or a greater work output. Consistent with previous research, fear of movement was positively correlated with RISP. Pain disability was also associated with greater RISP, but not pain catastrophizing or depression. Discussion addresses the processes by which individuals with FM might have increased RISP responses. The findings of this study point to possible neurophysiological mechanisms that could help explain the high levels of pain-related disability seen in individuals with FM. Patients with fibromyalgia showed greater activity-related summation of pain than patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:21439730

  10. Improving Physician-Patient Communication About Cancer Pain With a Tailored Education-Coaching Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Street, Richard L.; Slee, Christina; Kalauokalani, Donna K; Dean, Dionne Evans; Tancredi, Daniel J; Kravitz, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examined the effect of a theoretically grounded, tailored education-coaching intervention to help patients more effectively discuss their pain-related questions, concerns, and preferences with physicians. Methods Grounded in social-cognitive and communication theory, a tailored education coaching (TEC) intervention was developed to help patients learn pain management and communication skills. In a RCT, 148 cancer patients agreed to have their consultations audio-recorded and were assigned to the intervention or a control group. The recordings were used to code for patients’ questions, acts of assertiveness, and expressed concerns and to rate the quality of physicians’ communication. Results Patients in the TEC group discussed their pain concerns more than did patients in the control group. More active patients also had more baseline pain and interacted with physicians using participatory decision-making. Ratings of physicians’ information about pain were higher when patients talked more about their pain concerns. Conclusions The study demonstrates the efficacy of a theoretically grounded, coaching intervention to help cancer patients talk about pain control. Practice implications Coaching interventions can be effective resources for helping cancer patients communicate about their pain concerns if they are theoretically grounded, can be integrated within clinical routines, and lead to improve health outcomes. PMID:19962845

  11. Recognizing Myofascial Pelvic Pain in the Female Patient with Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Elizabeth Anne; Katzman, Wendy B.

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain (MFPP) is a major component of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and often is not properly identified by healthcare providers. The hallmark diagnostic indicator of MFPP is myofascial trigger points in the pelvic floor musculature that refer pain to adjacent sites. Effective treatments are available to reduce MFPP, including myofascial trigger point release, PMID:22862153

  12. Barriers and enablers to emergency department nurses' management of patients' pain.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Annatjie; Searle, Judy; Marshall, Bob

    2015-06-01

    Pain is the most common reason for presentation to the emergency department (ED). On presentation patients expect rapid pain relief, yet this is often not met. Despite extensive improvements in analgesia medication there are still barriers to nurses' assessment, management, documentation, and reassessment of pain. The aim of this study is to identify barriers, enablers, and current nursing knowledge regarding pain management. Using an anonymous quantitative web-based survey, members of the College of Emergency Nurses New Zealand were invited to complete a questionnaire on pain assessment and management. The questionnaires were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Enablers to ED nurses' improved management of pain were the provision of nurse-initiated analgesic protocols and pain management champions. Common barriers perceived by the respondents were the responsibility of caring for acutely ill patients as well as a patient with pain. Similar barriers to previous research were identified and included lack of time, workload, reluctance of clinicians to prescribe analgesia, and the lack of nursing knowledge regarding opioid administration. Raising awareness that oligoanalgesia exists in the ED is essential. This research suggested that nurses would benefit from ongoing education on the usage of opioids. Nurses' attitude regarding patients' right to expect total pain relief as a consequence of treatment was also an issue. ED nurses, by virtue of their role, are in a unique position to be leaders in pain assessment and pain management. PMID:25440235

  13. Effect of Music Therapy on Postoperative Pain Management in Gynecological Patients: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Sin, Wai Man; Chow, Ka Ming

    2015-12-01

    Unrelieved postoperative pain may have a negative impact on the physiological and psychological well-being of patients. Pharmacological methods are currently used to relieve such pain in gynecological patients; however, inadequate pain control is still reported, and the use of nonpharmacological pain-relieving methods is increasingly being advocated, one of which is music therapy. The purpose of this literature review was to identify, summarize, and critically appraise current evidence on music therapy and postoperative pain management among gynecological patients. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index, and Allied and Complementary Medicine was conducted using the search terms music, gynecological, pain, surgery, operative, and post-operative to identify relevant articles in English from 1995 to the present. All identified articles were assessed independently for inclusion into review. A total of 7 articles were included after removal of duplicates and exclusion of irrelevant studies. All the included studies assessed the effects of music therapy on postoperative pain intensity, and three of them measured pain-related physiological symptoms. The findings indicated that music therapy, in general, was effective in reducing pain intensity, fatigue, anxiety, and analgesic consumption in gynecological patients during the postoperative period. It is recommended as an adjunct to pharmacological pain-relieving methods in reducing postoperative pain. Future researches on music therapy to identify the most effective application and evaluate its effect by qualitative study are recommended. PMID:26697822

  14. Physician-to-physician telephone consultations for chronic pain patients: A pragmatic randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alexander J; Taenzer, Paul; Drummond, Neil; Spanswick, Christopher C; Montgomery, Lori S; Findlay, Ted; Pereira, John X; Williamson, Tyler; Palacios-Derflingher, Luz; Braun, Ted

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of telephone consultations between pain specialists and primary care physicians regarding the care of patients with chronic pain is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of telephone consultations between pain specialists and primary care physicians regarding the care of patients with chronic pain. METHODS: Patients referred to an interdisciplinary chronic pain service were randomly assigned to either receive usual care by the primary care physician, or to have their case discussed in a telephone consultation between a pain specialist and the referring primary care physician. Patients completed a numerical rating scale for pain, the Pain Disability Index and the Short Form-36 on referral, as well as three and six months later. Primary care physicians completed a brief survey to assess their impressions of the telephone consultation. RESULTS: Eighty patients were randomly assigned to either the usual care group or the standard telephone consultation group, and 67 completed the study protocol. Patients were comparable on baseline pain and demographic characteristics. No differences were found between the groups at six months after referral in regard to pain, disability or quality of life measures. Eighty percent of primary care physicians indicated that they learned new patient care strategies from the telephone consultation, and 97% reported that the consultation answered their questions and helped in the care of their patient. DISCUSSION: Most primary care physicians reported that a telephone consultation with a pain specialist answered their questions, improved their patients’ care and resulted in new learning. Differences in patient status compared with a usual care control group were not detectable at six-month follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: While telephone consultations are clearly an acceptable strategy for knowledge translation, additional strategies may be required to actually impact patient outcomes. PMID:26474380

  15. Acceptance of pain is an independent predictor of mental well-being in patients with chronic pain: empirical evidence and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Viane, Ilse; Crombez, Geert; Eccleston, Christopher; Poppe, Carine; Devulder, Jacques; Van Houdenhove, Boudewijn; De Corte, Wilfried

    2003-11-01

    This paper reports upon: (1) the value of acceptance of pain in predicting well-being in patients suffering from chronic pain and (2) the construct validity of acceptance by comparing two questionnaires designed to measure acceptance (the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, CPAQ, unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, 1992 and the Illness Cognitions Questionnaire, ICQ, J Consult Clin Psychol 69 (2001) 1026). The results of two independent cross-sectional studies are reported. Study 1 included 120 patients seeking help in tertiary care settings. In Study 2, 66 patients were recruited from a self-support group for fibromyalgia patients and from a pain clinic. Both studies revealed that acceptance of pain predicted mental well-being beyond pain severity and pain catastrophizing, but did not account for physical functioning. In both instruments, it was found that acceptance of pain was strongly related to engagement in normal life activities and the recognition that pain may not change. Acceptance in both instruments was strongly related to a cognitive control over pain. Study 2 further revealed that the correlation between the CPAQ and the ICQ is moderate, indicating that both instruments measured different aspects of acceptance. It is concluded that acceptance of chronic pain is best conceived of as the shift away from pain to non-pain aspects of life, and the shift away from a search for a cure with an acknowledgement that pain may not change. PMID:14581112

  16. Hypnotherapy in management of pain and reexperiencing of trauma in burn patients.

    PubMed

    Shakibaei, Fereshteh; Harandi, Ali Amini; Gholamrezaei, Ali; Samoei, Raheleh; Salehi, Pejman

    2008-04-01

    This study examined the effects of hypnosis on both pain and reexperiencing of trauma in burn patients. Forty-four patients hospitalized for burn care were randomly assigned to either hypnotherapy or a control group. Direct and indirect hypnotic suggestions were used to reduce pain and reexperiencing of trauma. All patients received routine burn care. Pain reports were quantified by using a self-report numeric rating scale ranging from 0 to 5. The number of recalled vivid, troubling events of the trauma in 24-hour intervals was used for rating the reexperiencing of trauma. The hypnotherapy group showed significantly lower pain ratings than the control group and reported a significant reduction in pain from baseline. There was a significant reduction in trauma reexperience scores in the hypnotherapy group but not the control group. The findings support the efficacy of hypnotherapy in the management of both pain and reexperiencing of trauma in burn patients. PMID:18307128

  17. Allopathic, complementary, and alternative medical treatment utilization for pain among methadone-maintained patients: An exploratory study1

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Declan T.; Beitel, Mark; Cutter, Christopher J.; Garnet, Brian; Joshi, Dipa; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed 150 methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) patients about pain, pain treatment utilization, perceived efficacy of prior pain treatment, and interest in pursuing pain treatment at the MMTP. Respondents with chronic severe pain (CSP) (i.e., pain lasting at least 6 months with moderate to severe pain intensity or significant pain interference) and “some pain” (i.e., pain reported in the previous week but not CSP) endorsed similar rates of past-week and lifetime allopathic or standard medical (with the exception of lifetime medical use of non-opiate medication) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization for pain reduction. Prior pain treatments were perceived to be less effective by CSP than SP patients but both groups had equivalent high rates of interest in pain treatment associated with the MMTP. These findings may have implications for resource and program planning in MMT programs. PMID:19874157

  18. Managed care and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among patients with pain or depressive symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Grembowski, David; Paschane, David; Diehr, Paula; Katon, Wayne; Martin, Diane; Patrick, Donald L

    2007-01-01

    Background Managed care efforts to regulate access to specialists and reduce costs may lower quality of care. Few studies have examined whether managed care is associated with patient perceptions of the quality of care provided by physician and non-physician specialists. Aim is to determine whether associations exist between managed care controls and patient ratings of the quality of specialty care among primary care patients with pain and depressive symptoms who received specialty care for those conditions. Methods A prospective cohort study design was conducted in the offices of 261 primary physicians in private practice in Seattle in 1997. Patients (N = 17,187) were screened in waiting rooms, yielding a sample of 1,514 patients with pain only, 575 patients with depressive symptoms only, and 761 patients with pain and depressive symptoms. Patients (n = 1,995) completed a 6-month follow-up survey. Of these, 691 patients received specialty care for pain, and 356 patients saw mental health specialists. For each patient, managed care was measured by the intensity of managed care controls in the patient's health plan and primary care office. Quality of specialty care at follow-up was measured by patient rating of care provided by the specialists. Outcomes were pain interference and bothersomeness, Symptom Checklist for Depression, and restricted activity days. Results The intensity of managed care controls in health plans and primary care offices was generally not associated with patient ratings of the quality of specialty care. However, pain patients in more-managed primary care offices had lower ratings of the quality of specialty care from physician specialists and ancillary providers. Conclusion For primary care patients with pain or depressive symptoms and who see specialists, managed care controls may influence ratings of specialty care for patients with pain but not patients with depressive symptoms. PMID:17306028

  19. Active Despite Pain: Patient Experiences With Guided Imagery With Relaxation Compared to Planned Rest.

    PubMed

    Adeola, Mope T; Baird, Carol L; Sands, Laura; Longoria, Nancy; Henry, Una; Nielsen, Jacqueline; Shields, Cleveland G

    2015-12-01

    Inadequate pain control remains a threat to the quality of life of patients with cancer. Guided imagery with relaxation (GIR) is a mind-body therapy that has shown promise in reducing chronic pain. This article discusses a qualitative, descriptive study for which the objective was to compare the experiences of patients with cancer with reported pain using GIR compared to planned rest.?. PMID:26583627

  20. Minimally Painful Local Anesthetic Injection for Cleft Lip/Nasal Repair in Grown Patients

    PubMed Central

    Price, Christopher; Wong, Alison L.; Chokotho, Tilinde

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: There has been a recent interest in injecting large body and face areas with local anesthetic in a minimally painful manner. The method includes adherence to minimal pain injection details as well feedback from the patient who counts the number of times he feels pain during the injection process. This article describes the successes and limitations of this technique as applied to primary cleft lip/nasal repair in grown patients. Methods: Thirty-two primary cleft lip patients were injected with local anesthesia by 3 surgeons and then underwent surgical correction of their deformity. At the beginning of the injection of the local anesthetic, patients were instructed to clearly inform the injector each and every time they felt pain during the entire injection process. Results: The average patient felt pain only 1.6 times during the injection process. This included the first sting of the first 27-gauge needle poke. The only pain that 51% of the patients felt was that first poke of the first needle; 24% of the patients only felt pain twice during the whole injection process. The worst pain score occurred in a patient who felt pain 6 times during the injection process. Ninety-one percent of the patients felt no pain at all after the injection of the local anesthetic and did not require a top-up. Conclusion: It is possible to successfully and reliably inject local anesthesia in a minimally painful manner for cleft lip and nasal repair in the fully grown cleft patient. PMID:25289364

  1. Pain.

    PubMed

    Melzack, Ronald; Katz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Pain has many valuable functions. It often signals injury or disease, generates a wide range of adaptive behaviors, and promotes healing through rest. Despite these beneficial aspects of pain, there are negative features that challenge our understanding of the puzzle of pain, including persistent phantom limb pain after amputation or total spinal cord transection. Pain is a personal, subjective experience influenced by cultural learning, the meaning of the situation, attention, and other psychological variables. Pain processes do not begin with the stimulation of receptors. Rather, injury or disease produces neural signals that enter an active nervous system that (in the adult organism) is the substrate of past experience, culture, and a host of other environmental and personal factors. These brain processes actively participate in the selection, abstraction, and synthesis of information from the total sensory input. Pain is not simply the end product of a linear sensory transmission system; it is a dynamic process that involves continuous interactions among complex ascending and descending systems. The neuromatrix theory guides us away from the Cartesian concept of pain as a sensation produced by injury, inflammation, or other tissue pathology and toward the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience produced by multiple influences. These influences range from the existing synaptic architecture of the neuromatrix-which is determined by genetic and sensory factors-to influences from within the body and from other areas in the brain. Genetic influences on synaptic architecture may determine-or predispose toward-the development of chronic pain syndromes. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:1-15. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1201 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304172

  2. The impact of pain control on physical and psychiatric functions of cancer patients: a nation-wide survey in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Jen-Shi; Wu, Hung-Bo; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Huang, Ming-Lih; Wang, Cyuan-Jheng; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Hwang, Wen-Li; Lu, Yin-Che; Chan, Chung-Huang; Hsieh, Ruey Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of pain in cancer patients at different disease statuses, the impact of pain on physical and psychiatric functions of patients and the satisfaction of pain control of patients at outpatient clinic department in Taiwan. Methods Short form of the Brief Pain Inventory was used as the outcome questionnaire. Unselected patients of different cancers and different disease statuses at outpatient clinic department were included. The impacts of their current pain control on physical function, psychiatric function and the satisfaction of doctors were evaluated. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate whether the interference scale performed identically in the different analgesic ladders. The dependent variables were satisfaction toward physician and treatment. Results A total of 14 sites enrolled 2075 patients in the study. One thousand and fifty-one patients reported pain within the last 1 week. In patients whose diseases deteriorated, >60% of them need analgesics for pain control. Pain influenced physical and psychiatric functions of patients, especially in the deteriorated status. More than 80% of patients were satisfied about current pain control, satisfaction rate related to disease status, pain intensities and treatments for pain. Conclusion Our study found that different cancers at different statuses had pain at variable severity. Pain can influence physical and psychological functions significantly. More than 75% of subjects reported satisfaction over physician and pain management in outpatient clinic department patients with cancer pain in Taiwan. PMID:26292698

  3. Effects of the active release technique on pain and range of motion of patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Ho; Lee, Han Suk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To compare the influences of the active release technique (ART) and joint mobilization (JM) on the visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, pressure pain threshold (PPT), and neck range of motion (ROM) of patients with chronic neck pain. [Subjects] Twenty-four individuals with chronic neck pain were randomly and equally assigned to 3 groups: an ART group, a joint mobilization (JM) group, and a control group. Before and after the intervention, the degree of pain, PPT, and ROM of the neck were measured using a VAS, algometer, and goniometer, respectively. [Results] The ART group and JM group demonstrated significant changes in VAS and ROM between pre and post-intervention, while no significant change was observed in the control group. Significant differences in the PPT of all muscles were found in the ART group, while significant differences in all muscles other than the trapezius were found in the JM group. No significant difference in PPT was observed in any muscle of the control group. The posthoc test indicated no statistically significant difference between the ART and JM group, but the differences of variation in VAS, PPT, and ROM were greater in the ART group than in the JM and control groups. [Conclusion] ART for the treatment of chronic neck pain may be beneficial for neck pain and movement. PMID:26357426

  4. Nonpharmacologic treatment of pain.

    PubMed

    Titler, M G; Rakel, B A

    2001-06-01

    Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain treatment are important complementary therapies but are not substitutes for pharmacologic management of pain. Use of nonpharmacologic pain treatments in critical care settings is helpful to decrease pain, but the challenge remains for nurses to have the knowledge, time, and skill to use these interventions in a busy daily practice with severely ill patients. Although numerous studies testing the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management are available, the varying methods and interventions used in these studies make it difficult to draw conclusions. Further research on the use of these interventions for pain reduction is necessary to determine the most effective treatments and the conditions under which they should be used. PMID:11866404

  5. Correlation between pain response and improvements in patient-reported outcomes and health-related quality of life in duloxetine-treated patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Kei; Fujikoshi, Shinji; Montgomery, William; Alev, Levent

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed whether quality of life (QoL) improvement in duloxetine-treated patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP) correlates with the extent of pain relief. Methods Pooled data from three multicountry, double-blind, 12-week, placebo-controlled trials of duloxetine-treated (duloxetine 60 mg once daily; total number =335) patients with DPNP were analyzed. Based on improvement in 24-hour average pain scores, patients were stratified into four groups. Improvement in QoL, which was measured as the change from baseline in two patient-reported health outcome measures (Short Form [SF]-36 and five-dimension version of the EuroQol Questionnaire [EQ-5D]), was evaluated and compared among the four groups. Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the correlation between improvement in pain scores and improvement in QoL. Results The group with more pain improvement generally showed greater mean change from baseline in all of the SF-36 scale scores and on the EQ-5D index. Pearson’s correlation coefficients ranged from 0.114 to 0.401 for the SF-36 scale scores (P<0.05), and it was 0.271 for the EQ-5D (P<0.001). Conclusion Improvement in pain scores was positively correlated with improvement in QoL and patient-reported outcomes in duloxetine-treated patients. PMID:26316756

  6. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia in chronic pain patients and the mitigating effects of gabapentin

    PubMed Central

    Stoicea, Nicoleta; Russell, Daric; Weidner, Greg; Durda, Michael; Joseph, Nicholas C.; Yu, Jeffrey; Bergese, Sergio D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain patients receiving opioid drugs are at risk for opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), wherein opioid pain medication leads to a paradoxical pain state. OIH involves central sensitization of primary and secondary afferent neurons in the dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglion, similar to neuropathic pain. Gabapentin, a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analog anticonvulsant used to treat neuropathic pain, has been shown in animal models to reduce fentanyl hyperalgesia without compromising analgesic effect. Chronic pain patients have also exhibited lower opioid consumption and improved pain response when given gabapentin. However, few human studies investigating gabapentin use in OIH have been performed in recent years. In this review, we discuss the potential mechanisms that underlie OIH and provide a critical overview of interventional therapeutic strategies, especially the clinically-successful drug gabapentin, which may reduce OIH. PMID:26074817

  7. The effects of stabilization exercise with an oral assistive device on pain and functionality of low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Ho; Park, Young-Han; Jang, Sang-Hun

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined low back pain patients’ decrease in pain and improvement in functionality after performance of a lumbar stabilization exercise using an oral assistive device, which can replace a lumbar assistive device. [Subjects and Methods] The experimental group (n=12) conducted a stabilization exercise using an oral assistive device after conventional physical therapy. The control group (n=12) received conventional physical therapy. In order to objectively measure pain in this study, a visual analogue scale (VAS) was used. In order to evaluate the subjects’ functional aspects while living with low back pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was used. [Results] There were statistically significant improvements in the comparison of the VAS and ODI of the experimental group and the control group. The experimental group’s VAS and ODI significantly improved after the intervention compared to the control group. [Conclusion] The stabilization exercise using the assistive device after conventional physical therapy in the rehabilitation of low back pain patients reduced subjects’ pain and increased their functional activities. PMID:26644637

  8. Prevalence of heroin markers in urine for pain management patients.

    PubMed

    Knight, Julie; Puet, Brandi L; DePriest, Anne; Heltsley, Rebecca; Hild, Cheryl; Black, David L; Robert, Timothy; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

    2014-10-01

    Surveys of current trends indicate heroin abuse is associated with nonmedical use of pain relievers. Consequently, there is an interest in evaluating the presence of heroin-specific markers in chronic pain patients who are prescribed controlled substances. A total of 926,084 urine specimens from chronic pain patients were tested for heroin/diacetylmorphine (DAM), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), codeine (COD), and morphine (MOR). Heroin and markers were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Opiates were analyzed following hydrolysis using LC-MS-MS. The prevalence of heroin use was 0.31%, as 2871 were positive for one or more heroin-specific markers including DAM, 6AM, or 6AC (a known contaminant of illicit heroin). Of these, 1884 were additionally tested for the following markers of illicit drug use: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methamphetamine (MAMP), 11-nor-9-carboxy-?(9)-tetracannabinol (THCCOOH), and benzoylecgonine (BZE); 654 (34.7%) had positive findings for one or more of these analytes. The overall prevalence of heroin markers were as follows: DAM 1203 (41.9%), 6AM 2570 (89.5%), 6AC 1082 (37.7%). MOR was present in 2194 (76.4%) and absent (

  9. Overcoming the Influence of Chronic Pain on Older Patients' Difficulty with Recommended Self-Management Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krein, Sarah L.; Heisler, Michele; Piette, John D.; Butchart, Amy; Kerr, Eve A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Many older patients with common chronic conditions also experience chronic pain. We examined how chronic pain affects patients' difficulty with recommended self-management activities and the potential intervening role of self-efficacy (the level of confidence in one's own ability to perform a specific task). Design and Methods: We…

  10. Prior History of Back Pain in Patients with Compensable and Non-Compensable Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellecchia, Geraldine L.

    1993-01-01

    Data were collected retrospectively from insurance information forms and histories of 111 patients (ages 14-84) referred to physical therapy for evaluation of back and/or neck pain. Analysis indicated that patients with compensable (work-related or motor vehicle accident) injuries infrequently acknowledged prior episodes of back or neck pain. (JDD)

  11. Cognitive-Behavioral Classifications of Chronic Pain in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Fary; Pallant, Julie F.; Amatya, Bhasker; Young, Kevin; Gibson, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to replicate, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), the three-cluster cognitive-behavioral classification proposed by Turk and Rudy. Sixty-two patients attending a tertiary MS rehabilitation center completed the Pain Impact Rating questionnaire measuring activity interference, pain intensity, social support, and…

  12. FACTORS RELATED TO ABDOMINAL PAIN IN GASTROPARESIS: CONTRAST TO PATIENTS WITH PREDOMINANT NAUSEA AND VOMITING

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Factors associated with abdominal pain in gastroparesis are incompletely evaluated and comparisons of pain versus other symptoms are limited. This study related pain to clinical factors in gastroparesis and contrasted pain/discomfort- with nausea/vomiting-predominant disease. Methods Clinical and scintigraphy data were compared in 393 patients from 7 centers of the NIDDK Gastroparesis Clinical Research Consortium with moderate-severe (Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Disorders Symptoms [PAGI-SYM] score ?3) vs. none-mild (PAGI-SYM <3) upper abdominal pain and predominant pain/discomfort vs. nausea/vomiting. Key Results Upper abdominal pain was moderate-severe in 261 (66%). Pain/discomfort was predominant in 81 (21%); nausea/vomiting was predominant in 172 (44%). Moderate-severe pain was more prevalent with idiopathic gastroparesis and with lack of infectious prodrome (P?0.05) and correlated with scores for nausea/vomiting, bloating, lower abdominal pain/discomfort, bowel disturbances, and opiate and antiemetic use (P<0.05) but not gastric emptying or diabetic neuropathy or control. Gastroparesis severity, quality of life, and depression and anxiety were worse with moderate-severe pain (P?0.008). Factors associated with moderate-severe pain were similar in diabetic and idiopathic gastroparesis. Compared to predominant nausea/vomiting, predominant pain/discomfort was associated with impaired quality of life, greater opiate, and less antiemetic use (P<0.01), but similar severity and gastric retention. Conclusions & Inferences Moderate-severe abdominal pain is prevalent in gastroparesis, impairs quality of life, and is associated with idiopathic etiology, lack of infectious prodrome, and opiate use. Pain is predominant in one fifth of gastroparetics. Predominant pain has at least as great an impact on disease severity and quality of life as predominant nausea/vomiting. PMID:23414452

  13. Massage Impact on Pain in Opioid-dependent Patients in Substance Use Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wiest, Katharina L.; Asphaug, Victoria J.; Carr, Kathryn E.; Gowen, Emily A.; Hartnett, Timothy T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain is a common cause of health care utilization and high levels of pain are pronounced in individuals engaged in methadone maintenance treatment. Although massage has been demonstrated to alleviate chronic pain symptoms, its use as an adjunctive therapy to modify pain during opioid-replacement treatment is absent from the literature. Purpose: To consider the efficacy of Swedish massage in reducing pain in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain receiving methadone treatment. Setting: Trial was conducted at a nonprofit methadone treatment center serving low-income patients. Research Design: A randomized clinical trial with randomized to either 1) massage plus treatment-as-usual (TAU) (n = 27) or 2) TAU (n = 24). Durability of treatment effect was evaluated at Week 12. Intervention: Eight weekly 50-minute Swedish massage sessions plus TAU or TAU alone. Main Outcome Measures: Pain, anxiety, depression, physical functioning, decreased substance use, and improvement in treatment engagement. Results: Randomized participants were comparable at Baseline for demographic, pain, physical, and emotional variables. Massage group reported improved pain scores; worst pain had a clinically significant 2-point improvement while the other pain scores did not. Overall improvements were not observed in treatment engagement or levels of anxiety, depression, or physical functioning. A subgroup of the participants, who felt they could be pain-free, consistently reported improvements in pain from Baseline to Week 8, and this was most pronounced and clinically significant in the massage group. Conclusions: These preliminary findings do not support an overall clinically significant positive effect of Swedish massage on reduction in pain ratings or improvement in anxiety, depression, or treatment engagement in a substance-using, opioid-dependent population with chronic pain. Future nonpharmacologic pain research in marginalized substance-using populations may wish to consider some of the challenges and limitations faced in this project. PMID:25780471

  14. Home Delivery of Pain Therapy to Elderly Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietrich, Coralie

    Chronic pain occurs most frequently in the elderly. Unfortunately, most pain clinics are located in large urban areas and are not readily accessible to the rural elderly. Recent advances in behavioral medicine have provided pain relief techniques that can be used by a wide variety of professional and paraprofessional workers who do not have…

  15. Do surrogates have a right to refuse pain medications for incompetent patients?

    PubMed

    Blinderman, Craig D

    2012-02-01

    The relief of pain is widely considered to be a basic human right. Physicians are expected to make every attempt to relieve pain and suffering, especially in patients who do not have capacity. This article presents a case in which the family of a woman with severe somatic pain from metastatic breast cancer requests that pain medications be reduced and, at times, held. The ethical issues associated with surrogate decision making and the refusal of medical treatments are reviewed. The obligation to treat pain remains paramount despite family objections. PMID:22248789

  16. Assessment and Management of Pain in Patients With Disorders of Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Schnakers, Caroline; Zasler, Nathan

    2015-11-01

    Pain is a first-person experience that must be reported, verbally or nonverbally, to be correctly assessed. How, then, is pain perception determined in persons who are noncommunicative? This determination is a major clinical challenge because patients with disorders of consciousness are unable to communicate their feelings and possible pain experiences. This review will describe the current knowledge of evaluating pain perception in a minimally conscious state compared with an unconscious state (also known as vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) and how to approach the management of pain in these 2 populations. PMID:26568506

  17. Simplified approach for delivering medicine to patients with severe pain shows promise.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    A new study suggests that in a busy emergency environment, a protocol based on simply asking patients if they need more pain medicine at 30-minute intervals can be effective at controlling pain, although some experts urge stricter limits on the automatic authorization of hydromorphone, and a mechanism to keep physicians more involved in care. Experts suggest that soliciting patient input is more effective than relying on numbered pain scales to gauge whether pain has been adequately controlled. For non-elderly patients in severe pain, the protocol includes an automatic authorization for an additional milligram of hydromorphone up to four times at 30-minute intervals. Study results indicate that all but two of 207 study participants achieved satisfactory pain control at one or more points in the study, and that most were satisfied with their treatment. PMID:26258202

  18. The effects of isometric exercise types on pain and muscle activity in patients with low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Hyun-Seung; Park, Hun-Kyung; Park, Jung-Sub; Park, Hye-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the effects of isometric exercise types on low back pain (LBP) patients. Isometric exercise types were mat exercise and I-Zer exercise. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: LBP control group, LBP mat exercise group, and LBP I-Zer exercise group in 23–25 aged men. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the degree of pain and the muscle activity in LBP patients. Root mean square (RMS), median frequency (MDF), and mean frequency (MNF) were checked by EMG power spectrum analysis on longissimus thoracic (LT), iliocostalis lumborum (IL), mulitifidus (M), and rectus abdominis (RA). LBP mat exercise program and LBP I-Zer exercise program were conducted 5 sets once time, 3 times per week during 6 weeks. The two-way ANOVA with repeated measure was used to check the pain degree and muscle activity. The present results showed that muscle activity in the LBP I-Zer exercise group was increased compared to the LBP mat exercise group and LBP control group (P<0.05). LBP I-Zer exercise group and LBP mat exercise group showed increased mean frequency in LT, IL, M, and RA muscles than the LBP control group. Therefore, LBP patients performed isometric exercise may have positive effect to reduce pain degree and to increase muscle activity. Especially, LBP I-Zer exercise type showed more effectiveness in reducing pain degree and enhancing muscle activity. PMID:26331136

  19. Pain-only complaint about cochlear implant device: A five-patient pediatric experience.

    PubMed

    Todd, Norman Wendell; Fainberg, Jolie C; Ukatu, CeIsha Chinwe; Venable, Claudia Y; Segel, Phil

    2015-09-01

    Objectives To present the case histories and management of five pediatric patients who experienced pain at the receiver-stimulator site, but no other indication that the device was failing. Patients were from a sole-surgeon pediatric practice (600 + implant surgeries before June 2013; about even proportions of Advanced Bionics, Cochlear Corporation, and MED-EL devices). Methods The University Institutional Review Board-approved review of sole-surgeon pediatric case series. Results The onset of pain ranged from 2 to 16 years post implantation. Pain, not amenable to conventional medical therapy, was present regardless of whether or not the external appliance was 'on', or even being worn on the head. Four of the five patients were bilaterally implanted, but pain was only at one receiver-stimulator package. Clinical management ultimately included revision surgery in all five cases, with immediate resolution of the pain in four. For those four, the replacement cochlear implant (CI) performed well; the other patient fears pain if her replacement device is used, but continues enjoying her contralateral implant. At analysis by the company, two of five explanted devices exhibited problems: loss of hermeticity; insulation failure. Discussion Though infrequently reported, pain-only complaint by a CI user is a challenging dilemma. Conclusion Pain may be the sole clinical manifestation of cochlear implant device failure. We offer a flowchart for the care of CI patients with pain, encourage a worldwide registry of such cases, and offer ideas to try to understand better the problem. PMID:25563523

  20. Practical considerations and patient selection for intrathecal drug delivery in the management of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Saulino, Michael; Kim, Philip S; Shaw, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain continues to pose substantial and growing challenges for patients, caregivers, health care professionals, and health care systems. By the time a patient with severe refractory pain sees a pain specialist for evaluation and management, that patient has likely tried and failed several nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches to pain treatment. Although relegated to one of the interventions of "last resort", intrathecal drug delivery can be useful for improving pain control, optimizing patient functionality, and minimizing the use of systemic pain medications in appropriately selected patients. Due to its clinical and logistical requirements, however, intrathecal drug delivery may fit poorly into the classic pain clinic/interventional model and may be perceived as a "critical mass" intervention that is feasible only for large practices that have specialized staff and appropriate office resources. Potentially, intrathecal drug delivery may be more readily adopted into larger practices that can commit the necessary staff and resources to support patients' needs through the trialing, initiation, monitoring, maintenance, and troubleshooting phases of this therapy. Currently, two agents - morphine and ziconotide - are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for long-term intrathecal delivery. The efficacy and safety profiles of morphine have been assessed in long-term, open-label, and retrospective studies of >400 patients with chronic cancer and noncancer pain types. The efficacy and safety profiles of ziconotide have been assessed in three double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of 457 patients, and safety has been assessed in 1,254 patients overall, with severe chronic cancer, noncancer, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome pain types. Both agents are highlighted as first-line intrathecal therapy for the management of neuropathic or nociceptive pain. The purpose of this review is to discuss practical considerations for intrathecal drug delivery, delineate criteria for the identification and selection of candidates for intrathecal drug delivery, and consider which agent may be more appropriate for individual patients. PMID:25419158

  1. Practical considerations and patient selection for intrathecal drug delivery in the management of chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Saulino, Michael; Kim, Philip S; Shaw, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain continues to pose substantial and growing challenges for patients, caregivers, health care professionals, and health care systems. By the time a patient with severe refractory pain sees a pain specialist for evaluation and management, that patient has likely tried and failed several nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches to pain treatment. Although relegated to one of the interventions of “last resort”, intrathecal drug delivery can be useful for improving pain control, optimizing patient functionality, and minimizing the use of systemic pain medications in appropriately selected patients. Due to its clinical and logistical requirements, however, intrathecal drug delivery may fit poorly into the classic pain clinic/interventional model and may be perceived as a “critical mass” intervention that is feasible only for large practices that have specialized staff and appropriate office resources. Potentially, intrathecal drug delivery may be more readily adopted into larger practices that can commit the necessary staff and resources to support patients’ needs through the trialing, initiation, monitoring, maintenance, and troubleshooting phases of this therapy. Currently, two agents – morphine and ziconotide – are approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for long-term intrathecal delivery. The efficacy and safety profiles of morphine have been assessed in long-term, open-label, and retrospective studies of >400 patients with chronic cancer and noncancer pain types. The efficacy and safety profiles of ziconotide have been assessed in three double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of 457 patients, and safety has been assessed in 1,254 patients overall, with severe chronic cancer, noncancer, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome pain types. Both agents are highlighted as first-line intrathecal therapy for the management of neuropathic or nociceptive pain. The purpose of this review is to discuss practical considerations for intrathecal drug delivery, delineate criteria for the identification and selection of candidates for intrathecal drug delivery, and consider which agent may be more appropriate for individual patients. PMID:25419158

  2. [Advances in the research of effects of music therapy on pain and anxiety in burn patients].

    PubMed

    Jinyi, Li; Yungui, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Pain and anxiety engender major psychic problems during all phases of treatment for burn patients. Analgesic alone does not allay these problems satisfactorily in these patients. Music therapy, as an important complementary and alternative therapy, has been widely used in multiple medical fields. However, its positive effect on alleviation of pain and anxiety in burn patients is undefined. The objective of this review is to summarize the feasibility, application fields, methods, and the effectiveness of music therapy in allaying pain and anxiety of burn patients during the whole course of treatment. PMID:26564564

  3. Pain treatment and antiretroviral medication adherence among vulnerable HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Surratt, Hilary L; Kurtz, Steven P; Levi-Minzi, Maria A; Cicero, Theodore J; Tsuyuki, Kiyomi; O'Grady, Catherine L

    2015-04-01

    Pain represents a significant source of morbidity, function loss, and decreased quality of life among people living with HIV. The present study examined the associations among pain, pain treatment, and ARV adherence among indigent, HIV-positive substance abusers. Participants were recruited via targeted sampling strategies, and completed a one-time computer-assisted personal interview. ANOVA and chi-square tests were used to analyze differences in demographics, health and psychological status, health behaviors, by pain and pain treatment status; a multivariate logistic regression model was constructed to examine the contribution of pain/treatment status to recent ARV adherence. Results indicated that those with untreated pain had lower odds of achieving gold-standard 95% ARV adherence as compared to the pain-free and treated pain groups; higher substance dependence symptoms were also associated with significantly lower odds of 95% ARV adherence. Findings suggest that pain management is critical to the health of people living with HIV, specifically those with high levels of co-morbid health and psychological problems. The prevalence of untreated pain was elevated among this group, and contributed to reduced ARV adherence. Providers of clinical care to disadvantaged HIV-positive patients should emphasize routine assessment and appropriate treatment of pain in order to provide comprehensive HIV care. PMID:24984142

  4. Patients visiting the complementary medicine clinic for pain: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pain is one of the most common reasons for seeking medical care. The purpose of this study was to characterize patients visiting the complementary medicine clinic for a pain complaint. Methods This is a cross-sectional study. The study took place at Clalit Health Services (CHS) complementary clinic in Beer-Sheva, Israel. Patients visiting the complementary clinic, aged 18 years old and older, Hebrew speakers, with a main complaint of pain were included. Patients were recruited consecutively on random days of the month during a period of six months. Main outcome measures were: pain levels, location of pain, and interference with daily activities. Once informed consent was signed patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire by a qualified nurse. The questionnaire included socio-demographic data, and the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Results Three-hundred and ninety-five patients were seen at the complementary medicine clinic during the study period, 201 (50.8%) of them met the inclusion criteria. Of them, 163 (81.1%) agreed to participate in the study and were interviewed. Pain complaints included: 69 patients (46.6%) with back pain, 65 (43.9%) knee pain, and 28 (32.4%) other limbs pain. Eighty-two patients (50.3%) treated their pain with complementary medicine as a supplement for their conventional treatment, and 55 (33.7%) felt disappointed from the conventional medicine experience. Eighty-three patients (50.9%) claimed that complementary medicine can result in better physical strength, or better mental state 51 (31.3%). Thirty-seven patients (22.7%) were hoping that complementary medicine will prevent invasive procedures. Conclusion Given the high proportion of patients with unsatisfactory pain relief using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), general practitioners should gain knowledge about CAM and CAM providers should gain training in pain topics to improve communication and counsel patients. More clinical research to evaluate safety and efficiency of CAM for pain is needed to provide evidence based counseling. PMID:21545733

  5. Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

  6. Post-Operative Pain Management Practices in Patients with Dementia - The Current Situation in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe current post-operative pain management practices for patients with dementia and hip fracture in Finland. Older adults with hip fracture are at high risk of under treatment for pain, especially if they also have a cognitive disorder at the stage of dementia. Previous studies have provided limited information about the quality of acute pain treatment for persons with dementia. In this study data concerning current pain management practices was collected by questionnaire from 333 nursing staff. They worked in surgical wards of seven universities and ten city-centre hospitals. The response rate to the questionnaire was 53%. The data was analysed using factor analysis and parametric methods. Half the respondents (53%) considered that post-operative pain management was sufficient for patients with dementia. Less than one third of respondent nurses reported that pain scales were in use on their unit: the most commonly used scale was VAS. The use of pain scales was significantly related to the respondents’ opinion of the sufficiency of post-operative pain management in this patient group (p<0.001). The findings can be utilised in nursing practice and research when planning suitable complementary educational interventions for nursing staff of surgical wards. Further research is needed to explain the current situation of pain management practices from the viewpoint of patients with dementia. PMID:22723810

  7. Management of chronic pain with chronic opioid therapy in patients with substance use disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs), whether active or in remission, are often encountered in patients with chronic nonmalignant pain. Clinicians are challenged when managing chronic pain while facing substance abuse issues during the course of chronic opioid therapy (COT). Further, the interrelated behavioral symptomatology of addiction and chronic pain suggests that if one disorder is untreated, effective treatment of the other in not possible. Incomplete understanding of the overlapping presentations of the two disorders, coupled with insufficient management of both conditions, leads to undertreated pain and premature discharge of SUD patients from pain treatment. In order to achieve pain relief and optimal functionality, both conditions need to be carefully managed. This paper reviews the prevalence of SUDs in chronic pain patents; the overlapping presentation of the two disorders; risk factors and stratification for addiction; identification of addiction in the chronic pain population; and suggestions for treating patients with COT, with an emphasis on relapse prevention. With appropriate assessment and treatment, COT for chronic pain patients with a history of SUD can be successful, leading to improved functionality and quality of life. PMID:24341916

  8. Comparison of Transforaminal and Parasagittal Epidural Steroid Injections in Patients With Radicular Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Aryani, Mohamad Reza; Momenzadeh, Sirus; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Esmilijah, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESI), including transforaminal (TF) epidural injections and interlaminar (IL) epidural steroid injections are commonly performed procedures for the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. Parasagittal interlaminar (PIL) approach could enable higher ventral epidural spread, with fewer complications than TF. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effectiveness of PIL and TF ESI in relieving the pain and disability of patients with lumbosacral pain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 64 patients, aged between 18 to 75 years, with a diagnosis of low back pain and unilateral lumbosacral radicular pain. The patients were randomized to receive fluoroscopically guided epidural injection, through either the PIL or TF approach. Patients were evaluated for effective pain relief [numerical rating scale (NRS) < 3] by 0 - 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) and functional improvement by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Effective pain relief [numeric rating scale (NRS) < 3] was observed in 77.3% (95% CI: 67?90.5%) of patients in PIL group and 74.2% (95% CI: 62.4 - 89.4%) of patients in the TF group (P = 0.34), at 4 weeks. Mean NRS score was not significantly different between the PIL group compared to the TF group, at 4 weeks (P = 0.19). Number of patients with improved disability (measured by ODI < 20%) was not significantly different in PIL group (78% of cases) compared to the TF group (76% of cases), at 4 weeks (P = 0.21). There were no adverse effects observed in any of our patients. Conclusions: The PIL epidural injection is as effective as TF epidural injection in improving pain and functional status, in patients with chronic lumbosacral low back pain, due to disc degeneration. PMID:26587400

  9. Chronic Pain in Patients With HIV Infection: What Clinicians Need To Know.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Jessica S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain is common in individuals with HIV infection. The primary goal of treatment of chronic pain is not only to improve pain but also to improve physical and emotional function. Patients with chronic pain should be assessed for concurrent psychiatric and substance use disorders, as these conditions often coexist. Treatment of chronic pain may have limited success in the absence of treatment of psychiatric disorders. Treatments for chronic pain include nonopioid pharmacologic therapies and nonpharmacologic therapies (eg, cognitive and behavioral therapy, physical therapy), and the latter option is often the most effective for improving patient function. Care must be taken when initiating or continuing treatment with opioids, and the risks and benefits of treatment with opioids should be regularly assessed. This article summarizes a presentation by Jessica S. Merlin, MD, MBA, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in New York, New York, in March 2015. PMID:26518396

  10. The Efficacy of a Perceptive Rehabilitation on Postural Control in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paolucci, Teresa; Fusco, Augusto; Iosa, Marco; Grasso, Maria R.; Spadini, Ennio; Paolucci, Stefano; Saraceni, Vincenzo M.; Morone, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic low back pain have a worse posture, probably related to poor control of the back muscles and altered perception of the trunk midline. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a perceptive rehabilitation in terms of stability and pain relief in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients were…

  11. A cross-sectional survey to investigate the prevalence of pain in Japanese patients with major depressive disorder and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Mukai, Tomohiko; Matsunaga, Shinji; Yasue, Ichiro; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Okochi, Tomo; Hirano, Shigeki; Kajio, Yusuke; Funahashi, Toshihiko; Akamatsu, Kaku; Ino, Kei; Okuda, Momoko; Tabuse, Hideaki; Iwata, Nakao

    2015-05-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional survey to assess the prevalence of physical pain in Japanese major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SZ) patients as well as in healthy controls (HCs). We also examined the association between their psychopathology and characteristics of pain according to a face-to-face survey by an experienced psychiatrist and psychologist. We analyzed 233 HCs, 94 MDD patients, and 75 SZ patients using the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and SF-8 (all participants), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale 21 items (MDD patients), and the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (SZ patients). Although MDD patients experienced more pain than HCs, there was no difference in the prevalence of pain between SZ patients and HCs. Moreover, HCs with pain did not have higher SF-8 total scores than those without pain, whereas both MDD and SZ patients with pain had higher SF-8 total scores than those without pain. The severity of psychopathology in MDD and SZ patients was also positively associated with both the prevalence of pain and MPQ scores. MPQ scores were also associated with positive symptoms in SZ patients. Considering these results, physicians need to query MDD patients about physical pain during examination if they are to ensure a favorable and quick response to treatment. The severity of positive symptoms (i.e., clinical status) in SZ patients might also be associated with pain sensitivity, and warrants further investigation. PMID:25724075

  12. Ethnocultural and sex characteristics of patients attending a tertiary care pain clinic in Toronto, Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Mailis-Gagnon, Angela; Yegneswaran, Balaji; Nicholson, Keith; Lakha, SF; Papagapiou, Marios; Steiman, Amanda J; Ng, Danny; Cohodarevic, Tea; Umana, Margarita; Zurowski, Mateusz

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ethnocultural factors and sex may greatly affect pain perception and expression. Emerging literature is also documenting racial and ethnic differences in pain access and care. OBJECTIVE: To define the sex and ethnocultural characteristics of patients attending a tertiary care, university-affiliated pain clinic in Toronto, Ontario. METHODS: Data were collected on 1242 consecutive, new patients seen over a three-year period at the Comprehensive Pain Program (CPP) in downtown Toronto. Data were compared with the Canada 2001 Census. RESULTS: English-speaking, Canadian-born patients constituted 58.6% of the CPP population, similar to the 2001 Canadian Census data for the Greater Toronto Area. Certain visible minority groups (Indo-Pakistani and Chinese) were significantly under-represented, while European groups were over-represented. While women outnumbered men, they presented with lower levels of physical pathology in general, particularly in certain ethnic groups. Patients from Europe (representing primarily immigrants who arrived in Canada before 1960), were older, by 10 years to 15 years, than the average CPP population, and had a much higher incidence of physical or medical disorders. CONCLUSIONS: The implications of the study and the importance of sex and ethnicity in terms of presentation to Canadian pain clinics are discussed. Future well-designed studies are needed to shed light on the role of both patients’ and physicians’ ethnicity and sex in pain perception and expression, decision-making regarding pain treatments and acceptance of pain treatments. PMID:17505571

  13. Applications of virtual reality for pain management in burn-injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William; Teeley, Aubriana; Soltani, Maryam; Hoffman, Hunter G; Jensen, Mark P; Patterson, David R

    2009-01-01

    The pain associated with burn injuries is intense, unremitting and often exacerbated by anxiety, depression and other complicating patient factors. On top of this, modern burn care involves the repetitive performance – often on a daily basis for weeks to months – of painful and anxiety-provoking procedures that create additional treatment-related pain, such as wound care, dressing changes and rehabilitation activities. Pain management in burn patients is primarily achieved by potent pharmacologic analgesics (e.g., opioids), but is necessarily complemented by nonpharmacologic techniques, including distraction or hypnosis. Immersive virtual reality provides a particularly intense form of cognitive distraction during such brief, painful procedures, and has undergone preliminary study by several research groups treating burn patients over the past decade. Initial reports from these groups are consistent in suggesting that immersive virtual reality is logistically feasible, safe and effective in ameliorating the pain and anxiety experienced in various settings of post-burn pain. Furthermore, the technique appears applicable to a wide age range of patients and may be particularly well-adapted for use in children, one of the most challenging populations of burn victims to treat. However, confirmation and extension of these results in larger numbers of patients in various types of burn-related pain is necessary to more clearly define the specific benefits and limitations of virtual reality analgesia in the burn care setting. PMID:18986237

  14. Treatment for Chronic Pain in Patients With Advanced Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-11-07

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Pain; Precancerous/Nonmalignant Condition; Small Intestine Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  15. The Complexity of Pain Management in Patients with Erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neha; Chen, Emily; Cucchiaro, Giovanni

    2015-11-01

    A 15-year-old girl diagnosed with erythromelalgia was admitted to the hospital with severe pain in her feet associated with burning, pruritus, erythema, and swelling. She had not responded to conventional management and received some relief only from cold bath immersions, which resulted in chronic blistering and multiple episodes of superinfection. After a successful trial of spinal cord stimulation, she had a permanent implantation procedure. The spinal cord stimulator relieved her pain and improved function but not the sensation of burning pain. However, this pain resolved after she started daily mexiletine. This case demonstrates that erythromelalgia sometimes can be managed successfully with a combination of pharmacologic and interventional procedures. PMID:26528699

  16. The effects of extracorporeal shock wave therapy on pain patients.

    PubMed

    Fricová, Jitka; Rokyta, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The method of shock wave therapy (ESWT) was used for the treatment of several symptoms of chronic pain. There were especially: cervical syndromes, lumbago, plantar fasciitis, achillodynia, metatarsalgia and humeral epicondylitis. We confirmed the positive effect of shock wave therapy for pain relief on these syndromes. This method is also effective in other pain syndromes. The effect of this application is very individual and therefore it is necessary to indicate differing numbers of therapeutic applications. We recommend this method as a very useful tool for completion possibilities in the treatment of chronic pain. PMID:26071587

  17. Evaluating the Patient with Left Lower Quadrant Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Bodmer, Nicholas A; Thakrar, Kiran H

    2015-11-01

    Left lower quadrant pain is a frequent indication for imaging in the emergency department. Most causes of pain originate from the colon, including diverticulitis, colitis, fecal impaction, and epiploic appendagitis. Left-sided urolithiasis and spontaneous hemorrhage in the retroperitoneum or rectus sheath are additional causes of pain. Computed tomography is the preferred imaging modality in the emergent setting for all of these pathologic conditions. Gynecologic, testicular, and neoplastic pathology may also cause left lower quadrant pain but are not discussed in this article. PMID:26526432

  18. Pain Management in Cancer Patients Using a Mobile App: Study Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kamdar, Mihir; Flanagan, Clare; Searl, Meghan; Traeger, Lara; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of effective medications and clinical guidelines for pain management, pain control is suboptimal in a sizeable proportion of patients with cancer pain. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend a comprehensive and multimodal approach for management of cancer pain. We developed a mobile phone application, ePAL, based on clinical guidelines to empower patients for cancer pain management by prompting regular pain assessments and coaching for self-management. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a multidimensional mobile phone-based pain management application, ePAL, on controlling cancer pain and improving quality of life in patients with cancer pain being treated at an academic palliative care clinic. Methods The study will be implemented as a 2-arm randomized controlled trial with 110 adult patients with CP who own a mobile phone over a follow-up period of two months. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group receiving ePAL and usual care or to a control group receiving only usual care. The brief pain inventory will be used to assess our primary outcome which is pain intensity. We will also evaluate the effect of the intervention on secondary outcomes which include the effect of the intervention on hospital utilization for pain crisis, quality of life, adherence to analgesic medications, barriers to pain control, anxiety and patient engagement. Instruments that will be used in evaluating secondary outcomes include the Brief Pain Inventory, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, Barriers Questionnaire-II, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General, Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue. The intention-to-treat approach will be used to evaluate outcomes. Our primary outcome, pain intensity, measured longitudinally over eight weeks, will be assessed by mixed model repeated analysis. Effect sizes will be calculated as mean group differences with standard deviations. Results The study is still in progress. We hope to have results by the end of 2015. Conclusions The multidimensional approach to pain management implemented on a mobile phone application could lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02069743; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02069743 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Qb65XGGA). PMID:25500281

  19. Benefits of treating highly disabled migraine patients with zolmitriptan while pain is mild.

    PubMed

    Klapper, J; Lucas, C; Røsjø, Ø; Charlesworth, B

    2004-11-01

    Clinical trials of migraine therapy often require treatment when migraine pain intensity is moderate or severe, but many physicians find this practice artificial and patients often prefer to treat while pain is mild. This randomized, placebo-controlled study assessed the efficacy of zolmitriptan 2.5 mg in treating migraine while pain is mild, in patients who typically experience migraine attacks that are initially mild, but progress to moderate or severe. The intent-to-treat population comprised 280 patients (138 zolmitriptan; 148 placebo), with mean MIDAS grades of 29.6 (zolmitriptan) and 27.6 (placebo). Zolmitriptan 2.5 mg provided a significantly higher pain-free rate at 2 h (43.4% vs. 18.4% placebo; P < 0.0001). Significantly fewer zolmitriptan patients reported progression of headache pain to moderate or severe intensity 2 h postdose (53.7% vs. 70.4% placebo; P < 0.01), or required further medication within 24 h (46.4% vs. 71.1% placebo; P < 0.0001). The efficacy of zolmitriptan was more pronounced in patients treating during the first 15 min following pain onset. Adverse events were reported in 31.2% of patients treated with zolmitriptan (vs. 11.3% for placebo), and the incidence was lower in patients who treated early after attack onset. Zolmitriptan provides high efficacy when treating migraine while pain is mild, with the clinical benefits being more pronounced when treating early after migraine onset. PMID:15482352

  20. Psychological characteristics of Japanese patients with chronic pain assessed by the Rorschach test

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing number of patients with chronic pain in Japan has become a major issue in terms of the patient's quality of life, medical costs, and related social problems. Pain is a multi-dimensional experience with physiological, affective, cognitive, behavioral and social components, and recommended to be managed via a combination of bio-psycho-social aspects. However, a biomedical approach is still the dominant method of pain treatment in Japan. The current study aimed to evaluate comprehensive psychological functions and processes in Japanese chronic pain patients. Methods The Rorschach Comprehensive System was administered to 49 in-patients with non-malignant chronic pain. Major variables and frequencies from the test were then compared to normative data from non-patient Japanese adults by way of the t-test and chi-square test. Results Patients exhibited high levels of emotional distress with a sense of helplessness with regard to situational stress, confusion, and ambivalent feelings. These emotions were managed by the patients in an inappropriate manner. Cognitive functions resulted in moderate dysfunction in all stages. Information processing tended to focus upon minute features in an inflexible manner. Mediational dysfunction was likely to occur with unstable affective conditions. Ideation was marked by pessimistic and less effective thinking. Since patients exhibited negative self-perception, their interpersonal relationship skills tended to be ineffective. Originally, our patients displayed average psychological resources for control, stress tolerance, and social skills for interpersonal relationships. However, patient coping styles were either situation- or emotion-dependent, and patients were more likely to exhibit emotional instability influenced by external stimuli, resulting in increased vulnerability to pain. Conclusions Data gathered from the Rorschach test suggested psychological approaches to support chronic pain patients that are likely to be highly beneficial, and we thus recommend their incorporation into the course of current pain treatments. PMID:21110860

  1. Case Report: Neuropathic pain in a patient with congenital insensitivity to pain

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Daniel W.; Lee, Michael C.H.; Harrison, E. Katherine; Menon, David K.; Woods, C. Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    We report a unique case of a woman with Channelopathy-associated Insensitivity to Pain (CIP) Syndrome, who developed features of neuropathic pain after sustaining pelvic fractures and an epidural hematoma that impinged on the right fifth lumbar (L5) nerve root. Her pelvic injuries were sustained during painless labor, which culminated in a Cesarean section. She had been diagnosed with CIP as child, which was later confirmed when she was found to have null mutations of the SCN9A gene that encodes the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. She now complains of troubling continuous buzzing in both legs and a vice-like squeezing in the pelvis on walking. Quantitative sensory testing showed that sensory thresholds to mechanical stimulation of the dorsum of both feet had increased more than 10-fold on both sides compared with tests performed before her pregnancy. These findings fulfill the diagnostic criteria for neuropathic pain. Notably, she mostly only experiences the negative symptoms (such as numbness and tingling, but also electric shocks), and she has not reported sharp or burning sensations, although the value of verbal descriptors is somewhat limited in a person who has never felt pain before. However, her case strongly suggests that at least some of the symptoms of neuropathic pain can persist despite the absence of the Nav1.7 channel. Pain is a subjective experience and this case sheds light on the transmission of neuropathic pain in humans that cannot be learned from knockout mice.

  2. Pain Coping Skills Training for Patients with Elevated Pain Catastrophizing who are Scheduled for Knee Arthroplasty: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Riddle, Daniel L.; Keefe, Francis J.; Nay, William T.; McKee, Daphne; Attarian, David E.; Jensen, Mark P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To (1) describe a behavioral intervention designed for patients with elevated pain catastrophizing who are scheduled for knee arthroplasty, and (2) use a quasi-experimental design to evaluate the potential efficacy of the intervention on pain severity, catastrophizing cognitions, and disability. Design Quasi-experimental non-equivalent control group design with a 2 month follow-up. Setting Two university-based Orthopedic Surgery departments. Participants Adults scheduled for knee replacement surgery who reported elevated levels of pain catastrophizing. Patients were recruited from two clinics and were assessed prior to surgery and 2 months following surgery. Intervention A group of 18 patients received a psychologist directed pain coping skills training intervention comprising 8 sessions and the other group, a historical cohort of 45 patients, received usual care. Main Outcome Measures WOMAC Pain and Disability scores as well as scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Results Two months following surgery, the patients who received pain coping skills training reported significantly greater reductions in pain severity and catastrophizing, and greater improvements in function as compared to the usual care cohort. Conclusion Pain catastrophizing is known to increase risk of poor outcome following knee arthroplasty. The findings provide preliminary evidence that the treatment may be highly efficacious for reducing pain, catastrophizing, and disability, in patients reporting elevated catastrophizing prior to knee arthroplasty. A randomized clinical trial is warranted to confirm these effects. PMID:21530943

  3. Persistent postoperative pain and sensory changes following lymph node excision in melanoma patients: a topical review.

    PubMed

    Slagelse, Charlotte; Petersen, Karin L; Dahl, Jørgen B; Finnerup, Kenneth; Greene, Kaitlin; Leong, Stanley P; Levine, Jon; Rowbotham, Michael; Werner, Mads U; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2014-04-01

    Studies on complications related to chronic nerve injury following sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) and complete lymph node dissection (CLND) for melanoma are sparse. This review summarizes the existing literature on pain and neuropathic complications in melanoma patients undergoing SLNB with or without CLND. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Embase and PubMed databases were searched. Full-text English language articles published before June 2013 were included. Prospective and retrospective studies assessing persistent (>1 month) sensory nerve injury, postoperative pain, neuropathic pain, and sensory disturbances following SLNB with or without CLND in melanoma patients were eligible. Nine studies (six prospective and three retrospective) including data for 3632 patients met our inclusion criteria. Outcome parameters were too heterogeneous to conduct a quantitative analysis, and few studies systematically evaluated pain and sensory abnormalities. Persistent postoperative pain was reported in 1-14% of patients following SLNB and in 6-34% following CLND and sensory abnormalities in 0.1-32 and 2-82%, respectively. In the one study that assessed the type of pain, neuropathic pain was suggested to explain persistent pain in 31-66% of patients with SLNB and 82-89% of patients with CLND. Sensory-nerve-related complications in melanoma patients seem to be less pronounced following SLNB compared with CLND. Prospective observational studies are necessary to identify predictors of persistent pain, to evaluate the prevalence and impact of pain and sensory abnormalities, and to develop strategies for prevention of long-term complications. PMID:24346167

  4. Experience of Barriers to Pain Management in Patients Receiving Outpatient Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung Hye; Hui, David; Chisholm, Gary; Hong, Woo Taik; Nguyen, Linh

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Patient-reported barriers are an important obstacle to cancer pain management. For effective pain management, exploring patient-reported barriers and related factors is important. Objectives The study's objective is to determine factors associated with patient-reported barriers to cancer pain management. Method We conducted a secondary analysis of data from a prospective observational study examining opioid adherence in palliative care outpatients. We evaluated the association between high score on patient-reported barriers to cancer pain management, on the Barriers Questionnaire II (BQ-II), and patients' race, sex, smoking history, pain intensity, opioid dose, and depression. Results Of 196 patients evaluated (median age 55 years), 147 (75%) were white, 41 (21%) had gastrointestinal cancer, and 121 (62%) were receiving anticancer treatment when data were collected. The median pain score was 4 (interquartile range [IQR] 3–7); 98% were receiving strong opioids; and 63% were satisfied with their pain medication. The median Edmonton symptom assessment scale (ESAS) depression score was 1 (IQR 0–3). Mean (SD) BQ-II scores were 1.8 (0.9) for physiologic effects, 1.6 (0.9) for fatalism, 0.9 (0.9) for communication, 2.3 (1.1) for harmful effects, and 1.7 (0.8) in total. Only racial differences were associated with high total BQ-II score in multivariable analysis (R2=0.05, overall F test significance=0.02). Pain related factors including opioids dose, pain intensity, and satisfaction were not associated with high BQ-II score. Conclusion Patients receiving palliative care expressed low barriers to pain control. There were minimal associations of BQ-II score with demographics and clinical factors. PMID:23758527

  5. Pelvic Belt Effects on Health Outcomes and Functional Parameters of Patients with Sacroiliac Joint Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Niels; Möbius, Robert; Schleifenbaum, Stefan; Hammer, Karl-Heinz; Klima, Stefan; Lange, Justin S.; Soisson, Odette; Winkler, Dirk; Milani, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a common source of low back pain. However, clinical and functional signs and symptoms correlating with SIJ pain are widely unknown. Pelvic belts are routinely applied to treat SIJ pain but without sound evidence of their pain-relieving effects. This case-control study compares clinical and functional data of SIJ patients and healthy control subjects and evaluates belt effects on SIJ pain. Methods 17 SIJ patients and 17 healthy controls were included in this prospective study. The short-form 36 survey and the numerical rating scale were used to characterize health-related quality of life in patients in a six-week follow-up and the pain-reducing effects of pelvic belts. Electromyography data were obtained from the gluteus maximus, biceps femoris, rectus femoris and medial vastus. Alterations of muscle activity, variability and gait patterns were compared in patients and controls along with the belts’ effects in a dynamic setting when walking. Results Significant improvements were observed in the short-form 36 survey of the SIJ patients, especially in the physical health subscores. Minor declines were also observed in the numerical rating scale on pain. Belt-related changes of muscle activity and variability were similar in patients and controls with one exception: the rectus femoris activity decreased significantly in patients with belt application when walking. Further belt effects include improved cadence and gait velocity in patients and controls. Conclusions Pelvic belts improve health-related quality of life and are potentially attributed to decreased SIJ-related pain. Belt effects include decreased rectus femoris activity in patients and improved postural steadiness during locomotion. Pelvic belts may therefore be considered as a cost-effective and low-risk treatment of SIJ pain. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02027038 PMID:26305790

  6. The Association between Patient-Reported Pain and Doctors' Language Proficiency in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Mustajoki, Marianne; Forsén, Tom; Kauppila, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Patients' limited literacy and language fluency of different kinds cause them problems in navigating the medical interview. However, it is not known how physicians' native language skills affect the reported intensity of pain among Finnish emergency patients. Data were collected with two consecutive questionnaires in 16 healthcare centres and outpatient departments along the Finnish coast. Swedish and Finnish speaking 18–65-year-old emergency patients were eligible for this study. Our patients were predominantly Finnish speakers. Patient-rated poor language skills in Finnish among the physicians in ED setting increased statistically significantly pain reported by the Finnish speaking patients and their dissatisfaction with the health service. These patients were also less motivated to adhere to the instructions given by their physician. Patients speaking various languages reported less degree of pain. Foreign physicians' poor language proficiency in Finnish was expected to explain only some of the patients' pain experience. Physicians' good native language skills may help to reduce pain experience. Despite concordant language communication, other unknown barriers in the interaction might reduce the magnitude of pain reported. PMID:26483976

  7. Patient and nurse assessment of quality of care in postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Idvall, E; Hamrin, E; Sjostrom, B; Unosson, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe and compare patient and nurse assessments of the quality of care in postoperative pain management, to investigate differences between subgroups of patients, and to compare patient assessments in different departments. Design: Patient and nurse questionnaires. Setting: Five surgical wards in general surgery, orthopaedics, and gynaecology in a central county hospital in Sweden. Sample: Two hundred and nine inpatients and 64 registered nurses. The response rates were 96% for the patients and 99% for the nurses; there were 196 paired patient-nurse assessments. Method: The Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management patient questionnaire was used which comprises14 items in four subscales (communication, action, trust, and environment). The items were scored on a 5 point scale with higher values indicating a higher quality of care. Five complementary questions on levels of pain intensity and overall satisfaction with pain relief were scored on an 11 point scale. Twelve of the 14 items in the patient questionnaire and two of the complementary questions were adjusted for use in the nurse questionnaire. Results: The patients' mean (SD) score on the total scale (scale range 14–70) was 58.6 (8.9) and the nurses' mean (SD) score (scale range 12–60) was 48.1 (6.2). The percentage of patients who scored 1 or 2 for an individual item (disagreement) ranged from 0.5% to 52.0%, while for nurses the percentage ranged from 0.0% to 34.8%. Forty two patients (24%) reported more pain than they expected; these patients assessed the quality of care lower. There were differences between patient and nurse assessments concerning the environment subscale, the question on overall satisfaction, and patients' experience of worst possible pain intensity. Conclusion: The results provided valuable baseline data and identified important areas for quality improvement in postoperative pain management. PMID:12468692

  8. [Acute inpatient multimodal pain therapy and rehabilitation : Framework conditions, tasks and differentiated patient allocation].

    PubMed

    Arnold, B; Casser, H-R; Klimczyk, K; Lutz, J; Brinkschmidt, T; Gralow, I; Irnich, D; Kaiser, U; Nagel, B; Schiltenwolf, M; Pfingsten, M; Sabatowski, R; Söllner, W

    2015-12-01

    Multimodal pain treatment programs are widely accepted as the medical treatment standard in the management of patients with chronic pain syndromes. The concepts and treatment strategies are based on the biopsychosocial model of pain and programs for early restoration of function. Although this concept is primarily implemented in the curative field, i.e. in hospitals for the treatment of patients with chronic pain diseases, modified programs based on the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) can now also be found in rehabilitation clinics. Despite the assumed similarities, significant differences in, for example the aims of the therapy and relevant structural and process variables have to be kept in mind when allocating patients to a program as provided by a hospital or a rehabilitation clinic. The aim of this article is to present the framework structures of both treatment levels with respect to the implementation of multimodal pain therapy programs and to elucidate the differential diagnostic approach to the indications. PMID:26452370

  9. [Comparable disorder of the body schema in patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) and phantom pain].

    PubMed

    Reinersmann, A; Haarmeyer, G S; Blankenburg, M; Frettlöh, J; Krumova, E K; Ocklenburg, S; Maier, C

    2011-09-01

    In patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) a disruption of the body schema has been shown in an altered cortical representation of the hand and in delayed reaction times (RT) in the hand laterality recognition task. However, the role of attentional processes or the effect of isolated limb laterality training has not yet been clarified. The performance of healthy subjects (n = 38), CRPS patients (n = 12) and phantom limb pain (PLP) patients (n = 12) in a test battery of attentional performance (TAP) and in a limb laterality recognition task was compared and the effect of limb laterality training in CRPS patients and healthy subjects evaluated. The RTs of both CRPS and PLP patients were significantly slower than those of healthy subjects despite normal TAP values. The CRPS and PLP patients showed bilaterally delayed RTs. Through training RTs improved significantly but the RTs of CRPS patients remained slower than those of healthy subjects. In this study an equal disruption of the body schema was found in both CRPS and PLP patients which cannot be accounted for by attentional processes. For CRPS patients this disorder cannot be fully reversed by isolated limb laterality recognition training. PMID:21739258

  10. Use of Transversus Abdominis Plane (TAP) Blocks for Pain Management in Elderly Surgical Patients.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Gay; Ritchey, William

    2015-11-01

    Elderly patients who require surgical interventions often have multiple comorbidities that complicate their intraoperative and postoperative care. Surgical team members should consider all potential problems that elderly patients may experience and base perioperative care on their assessment. This article discusses the use of the transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in elderly patients undergoing surgical procedures to relieve pain and reduce the use of narcotics or sedatives during the immediate and extended postoperative recovery period. By reducing postoperative pain and the use of sedatives and narcotics, the TAP block improves pain management and helps reduce the incidence of postoperative delirium, pneumonia, urinary retention, and falls. PMID:26514706

  11. Substance P and Chronic Pain in Patients with Chronic Inflammation of Connective Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that substance P (SP) is involved in chronic joint inflammation, such as the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The goal of the research was to evaluate the correlation between chronic pain and changes in the SP level in patients with chronic inflammation of the connective tissue. Methods Patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis were enrolled in this study. The relationship between chronic pain intensity and the serum SP concentration was evaluated in these groups of patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Results The results showed a positive correlation between the serum SP concentrations and chronic pain intensity. Conclusions 1. The SP serum concentration was significantly different between the groups of patients with OA and RA. 2. There was a positive correlation between the serum SP concentration and chronic pain intensity in OA and RA patients. PMID:26444559

  12. Elderly Patients With Painful Bone Metastases Should be Offered Palliative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Sarah; Presutti, Roseanna; Zhang Liying; Salvo, Nadia; Hird, Amanda; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Danjoux, Cyril; Sahgal, Arjun; Mitera, Gunita; Sinclair, Emily; DeAngelis, Carlo; Nguyen, Janet; Napolskikh, Julie; Chow, Edward

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of palliative radiotherapy (RT) in relieving metastatic bone pain in elderly patients. Methods and Materials: The response to RT for palliation of metastatic bone pain was evaluated from a prospective database of 558 patients between 1999 and 2008. The pain scores and analgesic intake were used to calculate the response according to the International Bone Metastases Consensus Working Party palliative RT endpoints. Subgroup analyses for age and other demographic information were performed. Results: No significant difference was found in the response rate in patients aged >=65, >=70, and >=75 years compared with younger patients at 1, 2, or 3 months after RT. The response was found to be significantly related to the performance status. Conclusion: Age alone did not affect the response to palliative RT for bone metastases. Elderly patients should be referred for palliative RT for their painful bone metastases, regardless of age, because they receive equal benefit from the treatment.

  13. Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to play a role in causing the pain Chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms • long-lasting fatigue that doesn’t get ... painfoundation. org Phone number: (888) 615-7246 The Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome Association of America PO Box 220398 Charlotte, NC ...

  14. Perioperative Pain Management for Patients on Chronic Buprenorphine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chern, Sy-Yeu S; Isserman, Rebecca; Chen, Linda; Ashburn, Michael; Liu, Renyu

    2013-01-01

    Here we present a patient with a Type I Chiari malformation who was receiving buprenorphine for chronic pain who underwent two separate urogynecologic procedures for removal of vaginal mesh with two different pain management regimens. For the first procedure at an outside hospital, the patient’s usual dose of buprenorphine (8 mg sublingual every 8 hours) was continued up through her surgery and then a full opioid receptor agonist was used for postoperative pain management. The patient complained that this resulted in very poor pain control for her in the postoperative period. Prior to her second procedure, which was performed at our institution, buprenorphine was switched to a full opioid agonist (oral hydromorphone 4 mg every 4 to 6 hours, maximum 20 mg per day) for 5 days prior to surgery; postoperative pain was managed with full opioid receptor agonists. The patient again reported suboptimal pain control in spite of substantially increased doses of opioids. This case report highlights the difficulty of perioperative pain management for patients on chronic buprenorphine and emphasizes the need for additional investigation. PMID:24307971

  15. Influence of Dopaminergic Medication on Conditioned Pain Modulation in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Buhmann, Carsten; Forkmann, Katarina; Diedrich, Sabrina; Wesemann, Katharina; Bingel, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain is highly prevalent in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), but little is known about the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. The susceptibility to pain is known to depend on ascending and descending pathways. Because parts of the descending pain inhibitory system involve dopaminergic pathways, dysregulations in dopaminergic transmission might contribute to altered pain processing in PD. Deficits in endogenous pain inhibition can be assessed using conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigms. Methods Applying such a paradigm, we investigated i) whether CPM responses differ between PD patients and healthy controls, ii) whether they are influenced by dopaminergic medication and iii) whether there are effects of disease-specific factors. 25 patients with idiopathic PD and 30 healthy age- and gender-matched controls underwent an established CPM paradigm combining heat pain test stimuli at the forearm and the cold pressor task on the contralateral foot as the conditioning stimulus. PD patients were tested under dopaminergic medication and after at least 12 hours of medication withdrawal. Results No significant differences between CPM responses of PD patients and healthy controls or between PD patients “on” and “off” medication were found. These findings suggest (i) that CPM is insensitive to dopaminergic modulations and (ii) that PD is not related to general deficits in descending pain inhibition beyond the known age-related decline. However, at a trend level, we found differences between PD subtypes (akinetic-rigid, tremor-dominant, mixed) with the strongest impairment of pain inhibition in the akinetic-rigid subtype. Conclusions There were no significant differences between CPM responses of patients compared to healthy controls or between patients “on” and “off” medication. Differences between PD subtypes at a trend level point towards different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the three PD subtypes which warrant further investigation and potentially differential therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:26270817

  16. PAin SoluTions In the Emergency Setting (PASTIES)—patient controlled analgesia versus routine care in emergency department patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Mark; Creanor, Siobhan; Squire, Rosalyn; Hayward, Chris; Ewings, Paul; Barton, Andy; Pritchard, Colin; Eyre, Victoria; Cocking, Laura; Benger, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is better than routine care in providing effective analgesia for patients presenting to emergency departments with moderate to severe non-traumatic abdominal pain. Design Pragmatic, multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial Setting Five English hospitals. Participants 200 adults (66% (n=130) female), aged 18 to 75 years, who presented to the emergency department requiring intravenous opioid analgesia for the treatment of moderate to severe non-traumatic abdominal pain and were expected to be admitted to hospital for at least 12 hours. Interventions Patient controlled analgesia or nurse titrated analgesia (treatment as usual). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was total pain experienced over the 12 hour study period, derived by standardised area under the curve (scaled from 0 to 100) of each participant’s hourly pain scores, captured using a visual analogue scale. Pre-specified secondary outcomes included total morphine use, percentage of study period in moderate or severe pain, percentage of study period asleep, length of hospital stay, and satisfaction with pain management. Results 196 participants were included in the primary analyses (99 allocated to PCA and 97 to treatment as usual). Mean total pain experienced was 35.3 (SD 25.8) in the PCA group compared with 47.3 (24.7) in the treatment as usual group. The adjusted between group difference was 6.3 (95% confidence interval 0.7 to 11.9). Participants in the PCA group received significantly more morphine (mean 36.1 (SD 22.4) v 23.6 (13.1) mg; mean difference 12.3 (95% confidence interval 7.2 to 17.4) mg), spent less of the study period in moderate or severe pain (32.6% v 46.9%; mean difference 14.5% (5.6% to 23.5%)), and were more likely to be perfectly or very satisfied with the management of their pain (83% (73/88) v 66% (57/87); adjusted odds ratio 2.56 (1.25 to 5.23)) in comparison with participants in the treatment as usual group. Conclusions Significant reductions in pain can be achieved by PCA compared with treatment as usual in patients presenting to the emergency department with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Trial registration European Clinical Trials Database EudraCT2011-000194-31; Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN25343280. PMID:26094712

  17. Self-efficacy in multimorbid elderly patients with osteoarthritis in primary care-influence on pain-related disability.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Sven; Brenk-Franz, Katja; Kratz, Anne; Petersen, Juliana J; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Schäfer, Ingmar; Weyerer, Siegfried; Wiese, Birgitt; Fuchs, Angela; Maier, Wolfgang; Bickel, Horst; König, Hans-Helmut; Scherer, Martin; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Gensichen, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    The impact of self-efficacy on pain-related disability in multimorbid elderly patients in primary care is not known. The aim of our study was to analyze the influence of self-efficacy on the relation between pain intensity and pain-related disability, controlled for age and disease count, in aged multimorbid primary care patients with osteoarthritis and chronic pain. Patients were recruited in the German MultiCare study (trial registration: ISRCTN89818205). Pain was assessed using the Graded Chronic Pain Scale, and self-efficacy using the General Self-Efficacy Scale. We employed SPSS for statistical analysis. One thousand eighteen primary care patients were included in the study. Correlation analyses showed significant correlations between pain intensity and pain-related disability (r?=?0.591, p?pain intensity and general self-efficacy (r?=?0.078, p?pain-related disability (r?=?0.153, p?pain intensity and pain-related disability. In our results, we found little evidence that self-efficacy partially mediates the relation between pain intensity and pain-related disability in aged multimorbid primary care patients with osteoarthritis and chronic pain. Further research is necessary to prove the effect. PMID:25190365

  18. Orofacial pain: patient satisfaction and delay of urgent care.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, Joseph L.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Heft, Marc W.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Accomplishing the Healthy People 2010 goal of eliminating disparities in oral disease will require a better understanding of the patterns of health care associated with orofacial pain. This study examined factors associated with pain-related acute oral health care. METHODS: The authors used data on 698 participants in the Florida Dental Care Study, a study of oral health among dentate adults aged 45 years and older at baseline. RESULTS: Fifteen percent of the respondents reported having had at least one dental visit as the result of orofacial pain. The majority of the respondents reportedly delayed contacting a dentist for at least one day; however, there was no difference between respondents reporting pain as the initiating symptom and those with other problems. Once respondents decided that dental services were needed, those with a painful symptom were nearly twice as likely as those without pain to want to be seen immediately. Rural adults were more likely than urban adults to report having received urgent dental care for a painful symptom. When orofacial pain occurred, those who identified as non-Hispanic African American were more likely than those who identified as non-Hispanic white to delay care rather than to seek treatment immediately, and women were more likely then men. Having a pain-related oral problem was associated with significantly less satisfaction with the services provided; non-Hispanic African American respondents were less likely than non-Hispanic white respondents to report being very satisfied, and rural residents were less likely than urban residents. Furthermore, men were more likely than women to suffer with orofacial pain without receiving either scheduled dental care or an urgent visit. CONCLUSIONS: Barriers to care are complex and likely to be interactive, but must be understood before the goals of Healthy People 2010 can be accomplished. PMID:15842115

  19. Differences between patients with chronic widespread pain and local chronic low back pain in primary care - a comparative cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic pain is a common reason for consultation in general practice. Current research distinguishes between chronic localized pain (CLP) and chronic widespread pain (CWP). The aim of this study was to identify differences between CWP and chronic low back pain (CLBP), a common type of CLP, in primary care settings. Methods Fifty-eight German general practitioners (GPs) consecutively recruited all eligible patients who consulted for chronic low back pain during a 5-month period. All patients received a questionnaire on sociodemographic data, pain characteristics, comorbidities, psychosomatic symptoms, and previous therapies. Results GPs recruited 647 eligible patients where of a quarter (n?=?163, 25.2%) met the CWP criteria according to the American College of Rheumatology. CWP patients had significantly more comorbidities and psychosomatic symptoms, showed longer pain duration, and suffered predominantly from permanent pain instead of distinguishable pain attacks. CWP patients were more often females, are less working and reported a current pension application or a state-approved grade of disability more frequently. We found no other differences in demographic parameters such as age, nationality, marital status, number of persons in household, education, health insurance status, or in health care utilization data. Conclusions This project is the largest study performed to date which analyzes differences between CLBP and CWP in primary care settings. Our results showed that CWP is a frequent and particularly severe pain syndrome. Trial registration German Clinical Trial Register, DRKS00003123. PMID:24330525

  20. The Kinetic Family Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packman, Wendy L.; Crittenden, Mary R.; Fischer, Jodie B. Rieger; Cowan, Morton J.; Long, Janet K.; Gruenert, Carol; Schaeffer, Evonne; Bongar, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Utilizes the Kinetic Family Drawings-Revised (KFD-R) to measure siblings' (N=44) feelings and attitudes toward bone marrow transplants. Data from drawings and discussions with siblings underscore that not all children are affected by stress in the same way. How a particular child responds depends on factors such as life history, personality,…

  1. Strategies for Coping with Chronic Lower Back Pain in Patients with Long Physiotherapy Wait Time.

    PubMed

    Cabak, Anna; D?browska-Zimakowska, Anna; Truszczy?ska, Aleksandra; Rogala, Patryk; Laprus, Katarzyna; Tomaszewski, Wies?aw

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Treatment efficacy for the increasing prevalence of back pain is a great challenge for both health care providers and individuals coping with this problem. This study aimed to evaluate pain coping strategies used by primary care patients with chronic lower back pain (CLBP) as a supplementation of medical diagnosis before a physiotherapy programme. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 88 people were divided into 3 age groups: young adults (21-40 years old), middle-aged adults (41-60 years old), and the elderly (over 60 years old). Data was gathered from rehabilitation centers and primary medical care facilities. A cross-sectional design was used. The Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) was completed before the physiotherapy course. RESULTS Patients complained of CLBP for 11.32±6.81 years on average. The most common strategies to cope with back pain included declaring that the pain is manageable, praying and hoping, as well as increased behavioral activity. Statistically significant differences in coping strategies were found between age groups. The elderly patients were more likely to "declare coping with pain" in comparison to the younger age groups (p<0.01). People over 60 years of age were more likely to declare active coping with pain, while young people reported catastrophizing. CONCLUSIONS Patients in different age groups had various difficulties in pain coping. Most of them required support in self-management of pain in addition to physiotherapy. The basic assessment of pain coping strategies should be consistently taken into account and included in rehabilitation protocols in chronic pain treatment. PMID:26670743

  2. Drawing/s

    E-print Network

    Sammis, Kim

    1986-01-01

    Drawing has become essential to the making of architecture. Though some of the most magnificent structures were created without documentation, testified by The Pyramids, the Parthenon, primitive dwellings, treehouses and ...

  3. Impact of a multidisciplinary pain program for the management of chronic low back pain in patients undergoing spine surgery and primary total hip replacement: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a very common disorder. In this field chronic low back pain represents a special challenge. The management of chronic low back pain consists of a range of different intervention strategies. Usually operative intervention should be avoided if possible. However, there are constellations were surgical therapy in patients with chronic low back pain seems to be meaningful. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes after spine surgery and hip replacement in patients with chronic low back pain after undergoing a structured rehabilitation program including cognitive – behavioral therapy. Methods From January 1, 2007 to January 1, 2010 patients were indicated for total hip replacement (THA) or spine surgery after receiving inpatient multidisciplinary pain programs including cognitive – behavioral therapy at our orthopedic institute with a specialized unit for the rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Indications for surgery were based on the synopsis of clinical and imaging findings and on positive effects after local injections during the multidisciplinary pain program. The tools for assessment included follow-up at 6 and 12 months and analyses of pain, chronicity, physical functioning and depression. Results Of the 256 patients admitted for multidisciplinary pain program, fifteen were indicated to benefit from a surgical intervention during multidisciplinary pain program. Ten patients received spine surgery. THA was indicated in five patients. In all cases, the peri- and postoperative clinical courses were uneventful. Only two of the patients subjected to spine surgery and three patients who had THA were improved after 12 months. One patient reported a worsened condition. All patients presented with good functional outcomes and normal radiological findings. Conclusions The indication for surgical intervention in patients with chronic low back pain and degenerative diseases must be critically assessed. THA in this cohort should focus on functional aspects, such as the improvement of range of motion, rather than the reduction of pain. Spine surgery in chronic low back pain patients after multidisciplinary pain program including cognitive – behavioral therapy cannot be recommended due to its questionable success. PMID:25473419

  4. Cancer Patients with Pain: The Spouse/Partner Relationship and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Mary Ann; Small, Brent J.; Donovan, Kristine A.; Overcash, Janine; McMillan, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Background A diagnosis of cancer affects not only the patient, but also their spouse/partner. In addition to facing a life-threatening illness, changes in role and financial threats can impact the dyad. Objective This dyadic study examined effects of financial concerns and pain on cancer patients’ and their partners’ quality of life (QOL). The partner relationship and the partners’ coping style were explored for mediating the couples’ outcomes. Methods Participants consisted of 177 dyads with both genders as patients and partners in committed, heterosexual relationships. Patients had a mix of cancer diagnoses and were in various phases of treatment. Each participant completed four of the same instruments. Partners also completed coping and financial concerns measures and patients completed pain and symptom distress measures. Results Pathway analysis, using Structural Equation Modeling, examined effects of pain and financial concerns on relationship quality, partners’ coping style and QOL for the dyad. Partners’ coping style affected only their own QOL .16 (p=0.05). Pain had a significantly negative direct effect -.51 (p=0.05) on patients’ QOL and no direct relationship to the partner’s QOL. Financial concerns affected both participants; patient -.13 (p=0.05) and partner QOL -.36 (p=0.05). The relationship mediated a decrease in patient pain from -.51 to -.58, a significant total effect (p=0.05). Conclusions The partners’ relationship lessened pain’s negative effect. Financial concerns were a significant issue for both dyad members, but the quality of the relationship was not compromised. Implications for Practice Patientspain may be affected by the quality of the marital relationship. PMID:21139453

  5. Gabapentin-Induced Urinary Incontinence: A Rare Side Effect in Patients with Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Kibar, Sibel; Demir, Sibel; Sezer, Nebahat; Köseo?lu, Belma Füsun; Dalyan Aras, Meltem; Kesikburun, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    Gabapentin is a first-line agent for neuropathic pain management and has a favorable safety profile. The literature includes a few cases of gabapentin-induced incontinence, and most of them involved patients with epilepsy who were between the ages of 12 and 43 years. Herein, we present three patients with neuropathic pain due to different diagnoses, and, to our knowledge, these are the oldest reported cases of urinary incontinence caused by gabapentin therapy. A 56-year-old female patient who underwent hip arthroplasty developed a sciatic nerve injury and neuropathic pain postoperatively. Ten days after she began taking gabapentin to relieve her pain, she experienced daily urinary incontinence. In another instance, a 63-year-old female patient was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome, and seven days after the initiation of gabapentin therapy, urinary incontinence developed. In addition, a 66-year-old male patient with neuropathic pain due to cervical disc pathology complained of urinary incontinence after the onset of gabapentin therapy. After discontinuing this drug, the incontinence symptoms resolved in these patients on the seventh, the first, and the second days, respectively. Physicians who administer gabapentin should inform their patients about the potential risk of gabapentin-induced incontinence and its negative impact on quality of life. PMID:26351600

  6. Is Response to Radiotherapy in Patients Related to the Severity of Pretreatment Pain?

    SciTech Connect

    Kirou-Mauro, Andrea; Hird, Amanda; Wong, Jennifer; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril; Chow, Edward

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the severity of pretreatment pain and response to palliative radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: The database for patients with bone metastases seen at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program at the Odette Cancer Center from 1999 to 2006 was analyzed. The proportion of patients with mild (scores 1-4), moderate (scores 5-6), or severe (scores 7-10) pain at baseline who experienced a complete response, partial response, stable response, or progressive response after palliative RT was determined according to International Bone Metastases Consensus definitions. Results: During the 7-year study period 1,053 patients received palliative radiation for bone metastases. The median age was 68 years and the median Karnofsky performance status was 70. Of the patients, 53% had a complete or partial response at 1 month, 52% at 2 months, and 54% at 3 months post-RT. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in terms of the proportion of responders (patients with complete or partial response) and nonresponders in terms of painful bone metastases among patients presenting with mild, moderate, or severe pain. Patients with moderate pain should be referred for palliative RT.

  7. Management of Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Zyga, Sofia; Alikari, Victoria; Sachlas, Athanasios; Stathoulis, John; Aroni, Adamantia; Theofilou, Paraskevi; Panoutsopoulos, Georgios

    2015-10-01

    An important dimension that influences the quality of life of hemodialysis patients is the pain they experience. Quality of life and self-efficacy in pain can play an important role in chronic kidney disease and treatment outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine self-efficacy in pain and quality of life among patients with end stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis. Between April 2013 and June 2013, 224 hemodialysis patients completed the Missoula-VITAS Quality of Life Index-15 and the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire. The study was conducted in four dialysis units in hospitals of the Peloponnese region. Sociodemographic data of patients and their individual medical history were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 19. The more effective the self-efficacy in pain, the lower the quality of life enjoyed by hemodialysis patients. The majority of respondents described the overall quality of life as "moderate," while the self-efficacy in pain depended on comorbidity or complications that accompany the process of hemodialysis. The findings of this study can be used in the development and improvement of health services for the management of patients. Healthcare professionals should understand the concerns and treat the symptoms of patients that affect quality of life, providing thereby holistic health care. PMID:26162558

  8. Gabapentin-Induced Urinary Incontinence: A Rare Side Effect in Patients with Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kibar, Sibel; Demir, Sibel; Sezer, Nebahat; Köseo?lu, Belma Füsun; Dalyan Aras, Meltem; Kesikburun, Bilge

    2015-01-01

    Gabapentin is a first-line agent for neuropathic pain management and has a favorable safety profile. The literature includes a few cases of gabapentin-induced incontinence, and most of them involved patients with epilepsy who were between the ages of 12 and 43 years. Herein, we present three patients with neuropathic pain due to different diagnoses, and, to our knowledge, these are the oldest reported cases of urinary incontinence caused by gabapentin therapy. A 56-year-old female patient who underwent hip arthroplasty developed a sciatic nerve injury and neuropathic pain postoperatively. Ten days after she began taking gabapentin to relieve her pain, she experienced daily urinary incontinence. In another instance, a 63-year-old female patient was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome, and seven days after the initiation of gabapentin therapy, urinary incontinence developed. In addition, a 66-year-old male patient with neuropathic pain due to cervical disc pathology complained of urinary incontinence after the onset of gabapentin therapy. After discontinuing this drug, the incontinence symptoms resolved in these patients on the seventh, the first, and the second days, respectively. Physicians who administer gabapentin should inform their patients about the potential risk of gabapentin-induced incontinence and its negative impact on quality of life. PMID:26351600

  9. New Insights Found in Pain Processing and Sleep Disturbance Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have lower thresholds for pain and may have deficits in a central nervous system (CNS) mechanism that helps to modulate how the ...

  10. Editorial Commentary: Platelet-Rich Plasma Improves Knee Pain and Function in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubowitz, James H

    2015-11-01

    Systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses shows that platelet-rich plasma improves knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Ultimately, biologics hold promise for chondroprotection in addition to symptomatic relief. PMID:26542203

  11. The effect of reflexology applied on haemodialysis patients with fatigue, pain and cramps.

    PubMed

    Ozdemir, Gülistan; Ovayolu, Nimet; Ovayolu, Ozlem

    2013-06-01

    The research was conducted to evaluate the effect of foot reflexology on fatigue, pain and cramps in haemodialysis patients. The sample consisted of 80 patients in total, 40 intervention and 40 control patients, receiving treatment in the haemodialysis units of two institutions. Data were collected by using a questionnaire, Piper Fatigue Scale and visual analogue scale for measuring the severity of cramp and pain. The intervention group received reflexology treatment for 1 week in three sessions following haemodialysis, each session lasting approximately 30?min. Parametric and non-parametric tests were used in data analysis. It was determined that reflexology reduced the fatigue subscale scores and total scale scores as well as pain and cramp mean scores in the intervention group. The research results revealed that the severity of fatigue, pain and cramp decreased in patients receiving reflexology. PMID:23730858

  12. Effect of Music on Postoperative Pain in Patients Under Open Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Neda; Mohammadi, Abouzar; Najaran, Hamed; Khazaei, Shala

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music, as a non-pharmacological and inexpensive nursing intervention, can be used easily as a complementary technique in reducing pain along with other methods. While some studies have demonstrated pain to decrease after music, others found music to be ineffective on pain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music on postoperative pain in patients under open heart surgery. Patients and Methods: A quasi-experimental study was performed on 60 patients under open heart surgery referred to ICU of Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan city. Patients were randomly divided into two groups including experimental and control groups. Patients in music group listened to nonverbal music for 30 minutes after surgery by headphones. The control group did not receive any intervention other than routine care. Before and after intervention, pain intensity was measured and recorded by visual analog scale in two groups. Data was analyzed using Chi-Square and t-tests. Results: Before intervention, the mean of pain intensity was 6.32 ± 0.21 and 6.10 ± 0.21 for experimental and control groups, respectively; and the difference was not significant (P = 0.21). After intervention, the mean of pain intensity was 3.11 ± 0.12 and 5.81 ± 0.38 for experimental and control groups, respectively; and the difference was significant (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Listening to the relaxant music can reduce postoperative pain. It is suggested that relaxant music be used as a complementary method in patients in order to reduce prospective pain. PMID:25699280

  13. Ultrasound Detection of a Renal Mass in a Patient with Flank Pain and Hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Marzec, Karl; Mailhot, Thomas; Perera, Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Flank pain with hematuria is a common chief complaint in the emergency department (ED). Patients are often diagnosed with renal calculi or pyelonephritis and discharged with analgesics or antibiotics and follow-up. This case study describes a patient who presented to the ED with a 1 week history of flank pain and hematuria and was subsequently found to have a large renal mass on bedside ultrasound. PMID:23599845

  14. Reducing Cancer Patients' Painful Treatment - Duration: 3 minutes, 7 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA light technology originally developed to aid plant growth experiments in space has proved to reduce the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marro...

  15. Drawing Inventors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, George

    2012-01-01

    Children are drawing inventors. Their art is certainly not what most adults think of as drawing. Almost instinctively, kids know that drawing is everywhere--that they can draw with almost anything, and that innumerable surfaces can be converted for art use. Teaching drawing is showing interest and enthusiasm for kids' drawing inventions--instead…

  16. Calibration and Validation of the Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Pain Interference Item Bank in Patients with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Crins, Martine H. P.; Roorda, Leo D.; Smits, Niels; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Westhovens, Rene; Cella, David; Cook, Karon F.; Revicki, Dennis; van Leeuwen, Jaap; Boers, Maarten; Dekker, Joost; Terwee, Caroline B.

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Group translated the adult PROMIS Pain Interference item bank into Dutch-Flemish. The aims of the current study were to calibrate the parameters of these items using an item response theory (IRT) model, to evaluate the cross-cultural validity of the Dutch-Flemish translations compared to the original English items, and to evaluate their reliability and construct validity. The 40 items in the bank were completed by 1085 Dutch chronic pain patients. Before calibrating the items, IRT model assumptions were evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Items were calibrated using the graded response model (GRM), an IRT model appropriate for items with more than two response options. To evaluate cross-cultural validity, differential item functioning (DIF) for language (Dutch vs. English) was examined. Reliability was evaluated based on standard errors and Cronbach’s alpha. To evaluate construct validity correlations with scores on legacy instruments (e.g., the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire) were calculated. Unidimensionality of the Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Pain Interference item bank was supported by CFA tests of model fit (CFI = 0.986, TLI = 0.986). Furthermore, the data fit the GRM and showed good coverage across the pain interference continuum (threshold-parameters range: -3.04 to 3.44). The Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Pain Interference item bank has good cross-cultural validity (only two out of 40 items showing DIF), good reliability (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.98), and good construct validity (Pearson correlations between 0.62 and 0.75). A computer adaptive test (CAT) and Dutch-Flemish PROMIS short forms of the Dutch-Flemish PROMIS Pain Interference item bank can now be developed. PMID:26214178

  17. Effects of Natural Sounds on Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial with Patients Receiving Mechanical Ventilation Support.

    PubMed

    Saadatmand, Vahid; Rejeh, Nahid; Heravi-Karimooi, Majideh; Tadrisi, Sayed Davood; Vaismoradi, Mojtaba; Jordan, Sue

    2015-08-01

    Nonpharmacologic pain management in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support in critical care units is under investigated. Natural sounds may help reduce the potentially harmful effects of anxiety and pain in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of pleasant, natural sounds on self-reported pain in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support, using a pragmatic parallel-arm, randomized controlled trial. The study was conducted in a general adult intensive care unit of a high-turnover teaching hospital, in Tehran, Iran. Between October 2011 and June 2012, we recruited 60 patients receiving mechanical ventilation support to the intervention (n = 30) and control arms (n = 30) of a pragmatic parallel-group, randomized controlled trial. Participants in both arms wore headphones for 90 minutes. Those in the intervention arm heard pleasant, natural sounds, whereas those in the control arm heard nothing. Outcome measures included the self-reported visual analog scale for pain at baseline; 30, 60, and 90 minutes into the intervention; and 30 minutes post-intervention. All patients approached agreed to participate. The trial arms were similar at baseline. Pain scores in the intervention arm fell and were significantly lower than in the control arm at each time point (p < .05). Administration of pleasant, natural sounds via headphones is a simple, safe, nonpharmacologic nursing intervention that may be used to allay pain for up to 120 minutes in patients receiving mechanical ventilation support. PMID:26092195

  18. Bilateral heel pain in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

    PubMed

    Charles, Loren T R; Mehdi, Adil M S; Baker, Dennis; Edwards, Max R

    2015-06-01

    A rare case of bilateral calcaneal stress fractures in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia is described. This has not been previously reported in the literature. A calcaneal stress fracture is an important differential diagnosis in a patient presenting with heel pain. Bilaterality of symptoms should not exclude this diagnosis and clinicians should be especially vigilant with predisposed patients. PMID:26004126

  19. PAin SoluTions In the Emergency Setting (PASTIES)—patient controlled analgesia versus routine care in emergency department patients with pain from traumatic injuries: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Mark; Squire, Rosalyn; Hayward, Chris; Ewings, Paul; Barton, Andy; Pritchard, Colin; Eyre, Victoria; Cocking, Laura; Benger, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether patient controlled analgesia (PCA) is better than routine care in patients presenting to emergency departments with moderate to severe pain from traumatic injuries. Design Pragmatic, multicentre, parallel group, randomised controlled trial. Setting Five English hospitals. Participants 200 adults (71% (n=142) male), aged 18 to 75 years, who presented to the emergency department requiring intravenous opioid analgesia for the treatment of moderate to severe pain from traumatic injuries and were expected to be admitted to hospital for at least 12 hours. Interventions PCA (n=99) or nurse titrated analgesia (treatment as usual; n=101). Main outcome measures The primary outcome was total pain experienced over the 12 hour study period, derived by standardised area under the curve (scaled from 0 to 100) of each participant’s hourly pain scores, captured using a visual analogue scale. Pre-specified secondary outcomes included total morphine use, percentage of study period in moderate/severe pain, percentage of study period asleep, length of hospital stay, and satisfaction with pain management. Results 200 participants were included in the primary analyses. Mean total pain experienced was 47.2 (SD 21.9) for the treatment as usual group and 44.0 (24.0) for the PCA group. Adjusted analyses indicated slightly (but not statistically significantly) lower total pain experienced in the PCA group than in the routine care group (mean difference 2.7, 95% confidence interval ?2.4 to 7.8). Participants allocated to PCA used more morphine in total than did participants in the treatment as usual group (mean 44.3 (23.2) v 27.2 (18.2) mg; mean difference 17.0, 11.3 to 22.7). PCA participants spent, on average, less time in moderate/severe pain (36.2% (31.0) v 44.1% (31.6)), but the difference was not statistically significant. A higher proportion of PCA participants reported being perfectly or very satisfied compared with the treatment as usual group (86% (78/91) v 76% (74/98)), but this was also not statistically significant. Conclusions PCA provided no statistically significant reduction in pain compared with routine care for emergency department patients with traumatic injuries. Trial registration European Clinical Trials Database EudraCT2011-000194-31; Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN25343280. PMID:26094763

  20. Pain is Independently Associated with Impaired Physical Function in HIV-infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Merlin, Jessica S.; Westfall, Andrew O.; Chamot, Eric; Overton, E. Turner; Willig, James H.; Ritchie, Christine; Saag, Michael S.; Mugavero, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV-infected patients in the current treatment era can achieve normal life expectancies, but experience a high degree of medical and psychiatric comorbidity. Impaired physical function and pain, often in the context of mood disorders and substance abuse, are common in HIV-infected patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship of pain, a modifiable condition, to functional impairment in HIV-infected patients, independent of mood disorders and substance abuse. Methods Participants in a prospective cohort of HIV-infected patients at the University of Alabama at Birmingham were included. Patient-reported outcome measures were used to cross-sectionally assess pain and physical function (EuroQOL), mood disorders (PHQ), and substance abuse (ASSIST). Univariate and multivariable models were built with pain as the principal independent variable of interest and 3 domains of physical function (mobility, self-care, and usual activities) as outcomes. Covariates included mood, substance abuse, age, race, sex, insurance status, HIV transmission risk factor, and CD4+ T-cell count. Results Among 1903 participants, 693 (37%) reported pain; 509 (27%) had a mood disorder; and 157 (8.4%) reported current substance abuse. In multivariable models, pain was independently associated with increased odds of impairment in all three domains of physical function investigated – mobility (aOR 10.5, 95% CI 7.6–14.6), self-care (aOR 4.1, 95% CI 2.2–7.4), and usual activities (aOR 5.4, 95% CI 4.0–7.4). Discussion Pain was associated with substantially increased odds of impairment in physical function. Pain should be an important consideration in HIV primary care. Interventions to address pain and impaired physical function should be investigated. PMID:24119077

  1. Virtual reality as an adjunctive pain control during burn wound care in adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, H G; Doctor, J N; Patterson, D R; Carrougher, G J; Furness, T A

    2000-03-01

    For daily burn wound care procedures, opioid analgesics alone are often inadequate. Since most burn patients experience severe to excruciating pain during wound care, analgesics that can be used in addition to opioids are needed. This case report provides the first evidence that entering an immersive virtual environment can serve as a powerful adjunctive, nonpharmacologic analgesic. Two patients received virtual reality (VR) to distract them from high levels of pain during wound care. The first was a 16-year-old male with a deep flash burn on his right leg requiring surgery and staple placement. On two occasions, the patient spent some of his wound care in VR, and some playing a video game. On a 100 mm scale, he provided sensory and affective pain ratings, anxiety and subjective estimates of time spent thinking about his pain during the procedure. For the first session of wound care, these scores decreased 80 mm, 80 mm, 58 mm, and 93 mm, respectively, during VR treatment compared with the video game control condition. For the second session involving staple removal, scores also decreased. The second patient was a 17-year-old male with 33.5% total body surface area deep flash burns on his face, neck, back, arms, hands and legs. He had difficulty tolerating wound care pain with traditional opioids alone and showed dramatic drops in pain ratings during VR compared to the video game (e.g. a 47 mm drop in pain intensity during wound care). We contend that VR is a uniquely attention-capturing medium capable of maximizing the amount of attention drawn away from the 'real world', allowing patients to tolerate painful procedures. These preliminary results suggest that immersive VR merits more attention as a potentially viable form of treatment for acute pain. PMID:10692634

  2. Pain and Body Awareness: Evidence from Brain-Damaged Patients with Delusional Body Ownership

    PubMed Central

    Pia, Lorenzo; Garbarini, Francesca; Fossataro, Carlotta; Fornia, Luca; Berti, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A crucial aspect for the cognitive neuroscience of pain is the interplay between pain perception and body awareness. Here we report a novel neuropsychological condition in which right brain-damaged patients displayed a selective monothematic delusion of body ownership. Specifically, when both their own and the co-experimenter’s left arms were present, these patients claimed that the latter belonged to them. We reasoned that this was an ideal condition to examine whether pain perception can be “referred” to an alien arm subjectively experienced as one’s own. Seventeen patients (11 with, 6 without the delusion), and 10 healthy controls were administered a nociceptive stimulation protocol to assess pain perception. In the OWN condition, participants placed their arms on a table in front of them. In the ALIEN condition, the co-experimenter’s left (or right) arm was placed alongside the participants’ left (or right) arm, respectively. In the OWN condition, left (or right) participants’ hand dorsum were stimulated. In the ALIEN condition, left (or right) co-experimenter’s hand dorsum was stimulated. Participants had to rate the perceived pain on a 0–5 Likert scale (0?=?no pain, 5?=?maximal imaginable pain). Results showed that healthy controls and patients without delusion gave scores higher than zero only when their own hands were stimulated. On the contrary, patients with delusion gave scores higher than zero both when their own hands (left or right) were stimulated and when the co-experimenter’s left hand was stimulated. Our results show that in pathological conditions, a body part of another person can become so deeply embedded in one’s own somatosensory representation to effect the subjective feeling of pain. More in general, our findings are in line with a growing number of evidence emphasizing the role of the special and unique perceptual status of body ownership in giving rise to the phenomenological experience of pain. PMID:23801958

  3. Pregabalin and placebo responders show different effects on central pain processing in chronic pancreatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bouwense, Stefan AW; Olesen, Søren S; Drewes, Asbjørn M; van Goor, Harry; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG

    2015-01-01

    Background Pain control in chronic pancreatitis is a major challenge; the mechanisms behind analgesic treatment are poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the differences in pain sensitivity and modulation in chronic pancreatitis patients, based on their clinical response (responders vs nonresponders) to placebo or pregabalin treatment. Methods This study was part of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluating the analgesic effects of pregabalin and placebo in chronic pancreatitis. Post hoc, patients were assigned to one of four groups, ie, responders and nonresponders to pregabalin (n=16; n=15) or placebo (n=12; n=17) treatment. Responders were defined as patients with >30% pain reduction after 3 weeks of treatment. We measured change in pain sensitivity before and after the treatment using electric pain detection thresholds (ePDT) in dermatomes C5 (generalized effects) and Ventral T10 (segmental effects). Descending endogenous pain modulation was quantified via conditioned pain modulation (CPM) paradigm. Results Sixty patients were analyzed in a per-protocol analysis. ePDT change in C5 was significant vs baseline and greater in pregabalin (1.3 mA) vs placebo responders (?0.1 mA; P=0.015). This was not so for ePDT in Ventral T10. CPM increased more in pregabalin (9%) vs placebo responders (?17%; P<0.001). CPM changed significantly vs baseline only for pregabalin responders (P=0.006). Conclusion This hypothesis-generating study provides the first evidence that pain relief with pregabalin is associated with anti-hyperalgesic effects and increased endogenous inhibitory modulation. No such effects were observed in patients experiencing pain relief with the placebo treatment. The mechanisms underlying analgesic response to placebo vs drug treatments are different and, together with their interactions, deserve further study. PMID:26203273

  4. Patterns and clinical correlates of pain among brain injury patients in critical care assessed with the critical care pain observation tool.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kangim; Oh, Hyunsoo; Suh, Yeonok; Seo, Whasook

    2013-12-01

    This study was conducted to assess the patterns and clinical correlates of acute pain in brain injury patients during the critical care period using the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool (CPOT). Data were collected from 31 brain-injury patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) at a university hospital located in Incheon, Republic of Korea. Glasgow Coma Scale and CPOT scores were assessed on days 1, 3, 6, 9, and 14 after ICU admission. Results showed that temporal changes in pain intensity displayed a consistent pattern in critical care patients with a brain injury during the first 14 days of ICU admission. Mean pain score was highest on day 1, decreased rapidly to reach a minimum on day 3 or 6, and then increased on day 9. In most patients, pain reduced slightly on day 14. Mean CPOT scores were significantly higher in the nonsurgery group than in the surgery group. There was also a nonsignificant trend of higher pain intensity scores among patients with moderate brain injury compared with those with severe injury. CPOT scores immediately after endotracheal suctioning were significantly higher than before endotracheal suctioning, but CPOT scores 20 minutes after suctioning were similar to those before suctioning. The present study may be meaningful in terms of presenting valid clinical information regarding the patterns and characteristics of acute pain in brain injury patients who are often unable to self-report on the presence and intensity of pain. PMID:24315249

  5. The effect of spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) on pain reduction and range of motion in patients with acute unilateral neck pain: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pikula, John R

    1999-01-01

    Objective: This experiment evaluated the response of acute neck pain patients to an intervention utilizing a single manipulation to either a) the same side of pain (ipsilateral) or b) opposite side (contralateral) and compared the results to a placebo group. Design: In this pre-test — post-test study, 36 subjects were randomly allocated to one of the three groups: (1) SMT applied to the same side as the pain (ipsilateral) (2) SMT applied to the side opposite the pain (contralateral) (3) A placebo group receiving only detuned ultrasound therapy Subjects: In a private chiropractic office, patients with acute unilateral neck pain and stiffness were studied. Inclusion criteria included the presence of acute unilateral neck pain, no prior similar history, no history of trauma, and no neurological deficit. Subjects had no previous chiropractic treatment of the cervical spine. Intervention: Patients in the two manipulation groups received a single cervical manipulation. Patients in the placebo group received detuned ultrasound therapy over the area of pain. Main Outcome Measures: There were two outcome measures. Pain intensity was rated on the 100 mm. visual analog scale (VAS) prior to and immediately following the intervention. Pre and Post test measurements of cervical spine range of motion utilizing the CROM instrument were also taken. Results: Degrees of ipsilateral lateral flexion, contralateral flexion, and VAS improved when ipsilateral versus contralateral spinal manipulative therapy was applied. Conclusions: Immediately following a single manipulation to acute neck pain patients there is less pain intensity and a greater range of motion when spinal manipulative therapy is applied to the side of neck pain versus manipulation on the side opposite the pain or to a placebo group.

  6. Abnormal brain processing of cutaneous pain in patients with chronic migraine.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Valeriani, Massimiliano; Guido, Marco; Libro, Giuseppe; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Tonali, Pietro; Puca, Francomichele

    2003-01-01

    Syndromes with chronic daily headache include chronic migraine (CM). The reason for the transformation of migraine into chronic daily headache is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to evaluate heat pain thresholds and event-related potentials following CO(2)-laser thermal stimulation (LEPS) in hand and facial regions in patients with CM, to show changes in nociceptive brain responses related to dysfunction of pain elaboration at the cortical level. The results were compared with findings from normal control subjects and from subjects who suffer from migraine without aura. The effects of stimulus intensity, subjective pain perception and attention were monitored and compared with features of the LEPS. Twenty-five CM patients, 15 subjects suffering from migraine without aura and 15 normal control subjects were enrolled in the study. LEPS amplitude variation was reduced in CM patients with respect to the perceived stimulus intensity, in comparison with migraine without aura patients and control subjects. In both headache groups, the distraction from the painful laser stimulus induced by an arithmetic task failed to suppress the LEPS amplitude, in comparison with control subjects. These results suggest an abnormal cortical processing of nociceptive input in CM patients, which could lead to the chronic state of pain. In both headache groups, an inability to reduce pain elaboration during an alternative cognitive task emerged as an abnormal behaviour probably predisposing to migraine. PMID:12507697

  7. Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy and painful peripheral neuropathy in Turkish diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Erbas, Tomris; Ertas, Mustafa; Yucel, Aysen; Keskinaslan, Abdulkadir; Senocak, Mustafa

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and neuropathic pain in diabetic patients attending university outpatient clinics in Turkey. In this multicenter cross-sectional study, neurologic examinations and nerve conduction studies along with clinical diabetic neuropathy score, and Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale were performed on 1,113 patients (46.2% male) from 14 centers. Prevalence of DPN determined only by clinical examination was 40.4% and increased to 62.2%, by combining nerve conduction studies with clinical examination. According to Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs scores, neuropathic pain prevalence was 16.0% in those who reported pain. Poor glycemic control, retinopathy, microalbuminuria, hyperlipidemia, diabetic foot, and foot amputation were more commonly observed in patients with DPN. Clinical DPN affected 40.4% of diabetic patients, and neuropathic pain prevalence in diabetic patient population was 14.0%. Clinical examinations and nerve conduction studies are important components for early detection and accurate diagnosis of DPN and painful DPN. PMID:21221008

  8. Biospectral analysis of the bladder channel point in chronic low back pain patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Alberto Espinosa; Nava, Juan José Godina; Segura, Miguel Ángel Rodriguez; Bastida, Albino Villegas

    2012-10-01

    Chronic pain is the main cause of disability in the productive age people and is a public health problem that affects both the patient and society. On the other hand, there isn't any instrument to measure it; this is only estimated using subjective variables. The healthy cells generate a known membrane potential which is part of a network of biologically closed electric circuits still unstudied. It is proposed a biospectral analysis of a bladder channel point as a diagnosis method for chronic low back pain patients. Materials and methods: We employed a study group with chronic low back pain patients and a control group without low back pain patients. The visual analog scale (VAS) to determine the level of pain was applied. Bioelectric variables were measured for 10 seconds and the respective biostatistical analyses were made. Results: Biospectral analysis on frequency domain shows a depression in the 60-300 Hz frequency range proportional to the chronicity of low back pain compared against healthy patients.

  9. Short-Term Effects of Patellar Kinesio Taping on Pain and Hop Function in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Scott R.; Brody, Lori Thein; Rosenthal, Michael; Wise, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is the most prevalent orthopaedic condition among physically active individuals, contributing to an estimated 30% to 40% of all sports medicine visits. Techniques using Kinesio Tape (KT) have become increasingly popular; however, there has been scant research supporting its use on patients with PFPS. Hypothesis: The use of patellar KT to treat patients with PFPS will provide a statistically significant improvement in short-term pain and single-leg hop measures as compared with sham placement of KT. Study Design: Nonrandomized controlled clinical trial with repeated-measures design. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: Forty-nine subjects (41 females, 8 males) between the ages of 12 and 24 years with PFPS participated in this study. Each subject underwent patellar kinesio taping with both experimental and sham applications while completing 4 functional tasks and the single-leg triple jump test (STJT). The treatment outcome was analyzed using separate paired t tests to measure improvement on a numeric pain rating scale. A 2-way, 2 × 2 analysis of variance was used to analyze the relationship between taping condition (experimental vs sham) and side (involved vs uninvolved) for STJT scores. Results: Separate paired t tests found step-up, step-down, and STJT pain improvement statistically significant between taping conditions. The 2-factor analysis of variance yielded a significant main effect for taping condition, but the main effect for side was not significant. The interaction between taping condition and side was significant. This showed there was little change in STJT distance between repeated measures performed on the untaped, noninvolved leg. However, subjects’ STJT distances were significantly greater for the experimental KT application than the sham application for the involved side. Conclusion: Patellar kinesio taping provided an immediate and statistically significant improvement in pain and single-leg hop function in patients with PFPS when compared with a sham application. However, improvement in STJT scores did not surpass the minimally detectable change value, and therefore, the clinical effectiveness of KT for improving single-leg hop function was not established in the current study. Clinical Relevance: Kinesio Tape provides a viable, short-term method to control pain. PMID:24982700

  10. Cancer Pain Control for Advanced Cancer Patients by Using Autonomic Nerve Pharmacopuncture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hwi-joong; Yoon, Jung-won; Park, Ji-hye; Cho, Chong-kwan; Yoo, Hwa-seung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to report a case series of advanced cancer patients whose cancer pain was relieved by using autonomic nerve pharmacopuncture (ANP) treatment. ANP is a subcutaneous injection therapy of mountain ginseng pharmacopuncture (MGP) along the acupoints on the spine (Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue; 0.5 cun lateral to the lower border of the spinous processes of vertebrae) to enhance the immune system and to balance autonomic nerve function. Methods: Patients with three different types of cancer (gastric cancer, lung cancer, colon cancer with distant metastases) with cancer pain were treated with ANP. 1 mL of MGP was injected into the bilateral Hua-Tuo-Jia-Ji-Xue on the T1-L5 sites (total 12 ? 20 mL injection) of each patient’s dorsum by using the principle of symptom differentiation. During ANP treatment, the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain was used to assess their levels of cancer pain; also, the dosage and the frequency of analgesic use were measured. Results: The cancer pain levels of all three patients improved with treatment using ANP. The VAS scores of the three patients decreased as the treatment progressed. The dosage and the frequency of analgesics also gradually decreased during the treatment period. Significantly, no related adverse events were found. Conclusion: ANP has shown benefit in controlling cancer pain for the three different types of cancer investigated in this study and in reducing the dosage and the frequency of analgesics. ANP is expected to be beneficial for reducing cancer pain and, thus, to be a promising new treatment for cancer pain. PMID:25780711

  11. Effects of Therapy in Patients Suffering from Chronic Back Pain Treated with Spinal Cord Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mosiewicz, Anna; Rutkowska, El?bieta; Matacz, Monika; Mosiewicz, Barbara; Kaczmarczyk, Robert; Trojanowski, Tomasz

    2015-10-01

    Pain in the lumbosacral part of the spine in the course of degenerative disease is the most common cause of physical activity limitation in adults. Treatment includes pharmacotherapy, physiotherapy, psychotherapy, health promotion, and sometimes surgery. Surgical treatment is not always successful, and the various clinical and psychosomatic symptoms that result from surgical treatment failure are known as failed back surgery syndrome. For some patients with this condition, spinal cord stimulation can provide relief. The aim of the work was to define subjective and objective spinal cord stimulation effects by assessing chosen disability and physical activity limitation ratios. Pain intensity, level of disability, and presence of neurological symptoms were assessed. The examination was performed twice: before the stimulator implantation and at least 6 months postimplantation. The study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery and Paediatric Neurosurgery in Lublin. Thirty-six patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were recruited for this study. The Visual Analog Scale, modified Laitinen's pain questionnaire, and Oswestry Disability Index were used in this work. The study showed that spinal cord stimulation was effective in treating spinal and lower limb pain in 64% of patients, similar to results obtained in other departments. Although back pain and neuropathic pain radiating to the lower limbs decreased, moderate physical activity impairment was still observed according to the Oswestry Disability Index scale. The decrease in neuropathic pain radiating to the lower limbs had the most significant influence on reducing physical activity impairment. PMID:26187548

  12. Electrocortical Analysis of Patients with Intercostobrachial Pain Treated with TENS after Breast Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Julio Guilherme; Santana, Camila Gonçalves; Inocêncio, Kelly Rosane; Orsini, Marco; Machado, Sergio; Bergmann, Anke

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Among the physical therapeutic procedures to decrease pain, there is transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation (TENS). There is no consensus about its efficacy for oncological patients, especially for post-mastectomy pain and eletrocortical changes in somatosensory areas. The aim of this study was to analyze acute electrocortical changes after TENS treatment of patients with intercostobrachial post mastectomy pain. [Subjects] Eighteen patients were divided into acupuncture (A) and burst (B) group. [Methods] In this pre and post-intervention study each group was measured for EEG analysis in absulte power in alpha band (8–14?Hz). Outcomes variables were the alpha waveband in the sensorymotor cortex and pain pre-and-post TENS intervention. Data were analyzed using ANOVA to compare times (rest, 10 and 15?min), group and electrodes. Pain was analyzed using percentual pain evaluation (PPE) in both groups. [Results] Outcomes indicate main effects of time and electrodes because of slow (8–10?Hz) and fast alpha (10–12?Hz) wavebands decreased. PPE reduced 88.4% in A and 66.3% in G. [Conclusion] TENS promoted electrical modification in the parietal region and a decrease in pain. Future studies should investigate other wave must be proposed for other bands and use different methods of EEG analysis to elucidate the actual mechanisms behind the efficacy of TENS treatment. PMID:24707082

  13. Relationship of inflammatory markers and pain in patients with head and neck cancer prior to anticancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, K.G.; von Zeidler, S.V.; Lamas, A.Z.; de Podestá, J.R.V.; Sena, A.; Souza, E.D.; Lenzi, J.; Lemos, E.M.; Gouvea, S.A.; Bissoli, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common symptom in patients with cancer, including those with head and neck cancer (HNC). While studies suggest an association between chronic inflammation and pain, levels of inflammatory cytokines, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?), have not been correlated with pain in HNC patients who are not currently undergoing anticancer treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between these inflammatory markers and perceived pain in HNC patients prior to anticancer therapy. The study group consisted of 127 HNC patients and 9 healthy controls. Pain was assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and serum levels of CRP and TNF-? were determined using the particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and ELISA techniques, respectively. Patients experiencing pain had significantly higher levels of CRP (P<0.01) and TNF-? (P<0.05) compared with controls and with patients reporting no pain. There were significantly positive associations between pain, CRP level, and tumor stage. This is the first study to report a positive association between perceived pain and CRP in HNC patients at the time of diagnosis. The current findings suggest important associations between pain and inflammatory processes in HNC patients, with potential implications for future treatment strategies. PMID:25003634

  14. Parental substance abuse, reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher; Whitfield, Keith; Sudhakar, Shiv; Pearce, Michele; Byrd, Goldie; Wood, Mary; Feliu, Miriam; Leach-Beale, Brittani; DeCastro, Laura; Whitworth, Elaine; Abrams, Mary; Jonassaint, Jude; Harrison, M. Ojinga; Mathis, Markece; Scott, Lydia; Johnson, Stephanie; Durant, Lauren; Holmes, Anita; Presnell, Katherine; Bennett, Gary; Shelby, Rebecca; Robinson, Elwood

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing interest from a social learning perspective in understanding the role of parental factors on adult health behaviors and health outcomes. Our review revealed no studies, to date, that have evaluated the effects of parental substance abuse on reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We explored the effects of parental substance (alcohol or drug) abuse on reports of the sensory, affective and summary indices of pain in 67 adult patients, mean age 38.9 (13.5), with SCD. We also explored the effects of parental substance abuse on psychopathology associated with pain and active coping. Twenty-four percent of patients reported that their parent(s) abused substances. Patients whose parent(s) were characterized as substance abusers reported greater sensory (p=0.02), affective (p=0.01) and summary (VAS; p=0.02) indices of pain as compared to their counterparts, whose parent(s) were not characterized as substance abusers. Patients did not differ in average age, education or the propensity to respond in a socially acceptable manner. There was a significant trend towards patients who characterized their parents as abusers scoring higher than their counterparts on active coping. We propose a Social Learning Theory to explain the current findings and suggest a need for additional prospective research to simultaneously explore biological (genetic) and social factors that influence the interpretation, experience and reporting of chronic pain in adult patients with chronic disease. PMID:16573309

  15. Pain Affects Clinical Patterns and Treatment Outcomes for Patients With Major Depressive Disorder Taking Fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huey-Shyan; Wang, Fu-Chiang; Lin, Ching-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether baseline pain was associated with discernible clinical features and treatment outcomes for patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) receiving 6-week fluoxetine treatment. A total of 131 inpatients with acutely ill MDD were enrolled to receive 20 mg of fluoxetine daily for 6 weeks. Pain was measured by the Short-Form 36 body pain index. Symptom severity, functional impairment, and severity of adverse events were assessed at baseline and again at weeks 1 to 4 and 6 using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Modified Work and Social Adjustment Scale, and Utvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser Side Effect Rating Scale, respectively. Simple linear regression was employed to examine the clinical variables significantly associated with pain. The generalized estimating equations method was used to analyze the influence of pain on the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Modified Work and Social Adjustment Scale, and Utvalg for Kliniske Undersogelser Side Effect Rating Scale over time. Of the 131 participants, 119 (90.8%) who completed baseline pain measurements and had at least 1 postbaseline assessment were included in the analysis. Patients experiencing greater pain were more likely to have more severe depression, to be at greater risk of suicide, to have functional impairment, to experience stressful life events, and to have poor treatment outcomes. These findings suggest that pain was significantly associated with multiple aspects of patients with MDD. Patients with MDD with higher levels of pain were clinically useful in predicting poor outcomes after acute fluoxetine treatment. PMID:26479220

  16. Attentional Bias For Prescription Opioid Cues Among Opioid Dependent Chronic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Garland, Eric L.; Froeliger, Brett; Passik, Steven D.; Howard, Matthew O.

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent use of prescription opioid analgesics by chronic pain patients may result in opioid dependence, which involves implicit neurocognitive operations that organize and impel craving states and compulsive drug taking behavior. Prior studies have identified an attentional bias (AB) towards heroin among heroin dependent individuals. The aim of this study was to determine whether opioid-dependent chronic pain patients exhibit an AB towards prescription opioidrelated cues. Opioid-dependent chronic pain patients (n = 32) and a comparison group of non-dependent opioid users with chronic pain (n = 33) completed a dot probe task designed to measure opioid AB. Participants also rated their opioid craving and self-reported arousal associated with opioid-related and neutral images, pain severity, and relief from pain treatments. Repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant group (opioid-dependent vs. non-dependent opioid user) × presentation duration (200 ms. vs. 2000 ms.) interaction, such that opioid-dependent individuals evidenced a significant AB towards opioid cues presented for 200 ms but not for cues presented for 2000 ms, whereas non-dependent opioid users did not exhibit a significant mean AB at either stimulus duration. Among opioid-dependent individuals, 200 ms opioid AB was significantly associated with opioid craving, while among non-dependent opioid users, 200 ms opioid AB was significantly associated with relief from pain treatments. Furthermore, dependent and non-dependent opioid users experienced opioid cues as significantly more arousing than neutral cues. Opioid dependence among chronic pain patients appears to involve an automatic AB towards opioid-related cues. When coupled with chronic pain, attentional fixation on opioid cues may promote compulsive drug use and addictive behavior. PMID:22968666

  17. A Learning and Teaching Resource on Patient Self-Management of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lin; Bundy, Anita; Ronaldson, Sue; McKenzie, Heather; Lewis, Peter; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To develop, pilot test, and evaluate an instructional module on patient self-management for undergraduate pharmacy students in an Australian university. Design. Learning outcomes and associated content and assessment tasks were developed, featuring lecture and readings, in-class discussions, and online delivery of in-depth interviews with patients who were living with chronic pain. Assessment. Students completed a premodule and postmodule questionnaire and were further assessed by multiple-choice questions following completion of the module and again at the end of the semester. Positive changes were identified in the students’ discourse surrounding patient self-management of chronic pain. Responses to multiple-choice questions showed that knowledge was sustained over the course of the semester. Conclusions. Completion of a comprehensive module on patient self-management increased undergraduate pharmacy students’ understanding and knowledge of patients experiencing chronic pain. The module could be implemented across other healthcare disciplines. PMID:23518902

  18. Recommendations to the primary care practitioners and the patients for managing pelvic pain, especially in painful bladder syndrome for early and better prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung Jin; Han, Adelaide Na Yeon; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2015-01-01

    Painful bladder syndrome (PBS) is a common disease presenting with chronic pelvic pain and discomfort with at least one urinary symptom with no identifiable cause. The etiology is still unknown, and the medication has limited effects on pelvic pain or other urinary symptoms. This article presents advanced insight regarding the approach to PBS, particularly pelvic pain for primary care practitioners and patients. We suggest six tips for medical staff and suspected patients for easy diagnosis and proper treatment of pelvic pain. These six tips cover: Self-awareness of the disease; immediate urine culture test; specifying the location of pain urinary incontinence; frequency, or urgency without functional disorder of an overactive bladder helpful dietary control; complementary, and alternative medicine, and finding an expert. These tips might be helpful in advancing the schematic approach and in achieving better prognosis of PBS. Further study should be conducted to achieve better treatment for this disease, including development of a definitive test and diagnosis. PMID:26535214

  19. Recommendations to the primary care practitioners and the patients for managing pelvic pain, especially in painful bladder syndrome for early and better prognosis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyung Jin; Han, Adelaide Na Yeon; Kim, Khae Hawn

    2015-10-01

    Painful bladder syndrome (PBS) is a common disease presenting with chronic pelvic pain and discomfort with at least one urinary symptom with no identifiable cause. The etiology is still unknown, and the medication has limited effects on pelvic pain or other urinary symptoms. This article presents advanced insight regarding the approach to PBS, particularly pelvic pain for primary care practitioners and patients. We suggest six tips for medical staff and suspected patients for easy diagnosis and proper treatment of pelvic pain. These six tips cover: Self-awareness of the disease; immediate urine culture test; specifying the location of pain urinary incontinence; frequency, or urgency without functional disorder of an overactive bladder helpful dietary control; complementary, and alternative medicine, and finding an expert. These tips might be helpful in advancing the schematic approach and in achieving better prognosis of PBS. Further study should be conducted to achieve better treatment for this disease, including development of a definitive test and diagnosis. PMID:26535214

  20. The relationship of pathogenetic mechanisms to treatment in patients with pain.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, R A

    1984-01-01

    Pain is the somatic symptom par excellence, legitimizing more than any other the sick role and illness behavior. The functions and implications of pain are clearest in situations of acute illness or injury or in chronic, organically based conditions in which actual or threatened tissue damage is signaled by its report. Much greater complexity is found in a variety of clinical presentations (conversion hysteria, hypochondriasis, chronic pain syndromes, Briquet's syndrome, Munchausen's syndrome) in which pain may form part or all of the clinical picture. In such conditions the relationship of the patient's report of pain to other phenomena (tissue damage, physiopathology, perceptual and cognitive styles, personality type, individual and family psychodynamics, anxiety, depression, behavioral patterns, social and economic factors, cultural influences) is important in elucidating pathogenetic mechanisms of which several may be operating in any one case. Awareness of the existence and interaction of these mechanisms facilitates the development and integration of treatment approaches. PMID:6514972

  1. Orofacial pain related to traumatic neuroma in a patient with multiple TMJ operations.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yasumitsu; Seo, Kenji; Hayashi, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Takanori; Niwano, Masahiro; Koyama, Takahiro; Murayama, Masaaki; Takagi, Ritsuo

    2012-07-01

    The diagnosis of orofacial pain associated with temporomandibular disorders after repeated temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgeries can be quite difficult. This case report describes a 52-year-old woman who had previously undergone five TMJ surgeries and developed divergent pain caused by a trigger point in the left preauricular area. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could not be used to identify a lesion because of metallic artifacts from a TMJ prosthesis. However, sonography indicated the location of the suspected lesion. Moreover, a neurological examination performed with local anesthesia was clinically effective in ruling out other diagnoses of orofacial pain. Ultimately, a histopathological examination of a biopsy specimen from the painful site confirmed the lesion to be a traumatic neuroma. This case report suggests the value of including traumatic neuroma in the differential diagnosis of patients with a history of previous TMJ surgery who present with orofacial pain in the region of the TMJ. PMID:22916670

  2. Differences on the projective hand test among chronic pain patients reporting three different pain experiences.

    PubMed

    Panek, Paul E; Skowronski, John J; Wagner, Edwin E

    2002-10-01

    This study examined personality differences among individuals experiencing 3 different types of pain. The projective Hand Test was administered to 90 individuals who were seeking treatment at a pain clinic in an urban area of the southeast United States. These people were seeking treatment for either arthritis (n = 31), fibromyalgia (n = 29), or migraine headaches (n = 30). A 2 (gender) x 3 (pain group) x Age Group multivariate analysis of variance was conducted using the quantitative Hand Test scoring variables as dependent measures. Results indicated that individuals who were seeking treatment for migraine headaches had a higher production rate of responses involving exhibitionistic displays (EXH) than individuals in the other 2 groups. Individuals who were seeking treatment for fibromyalgia had a higher production rate of responses indicating fear and phobic concerns (FEAR) than individuals in the other 2 groups. Individuals who were seeking treatment for arthritis had a higher production rate of Active (ACT) responses than individuals in the other 2 groups. Possible causes and consequences of these effects are discussed. PMID:12425388

  3. Younger and older chronic somatoform pain patients in psycho-diagnostics, physician-patient relationship and treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patients with chronic pain are found with highly variable clinical presentation and differing physical complaints. They are seen as a heterogenic group. Based on clinical observations, elderly patients seem to differ from younger patients with chronic pain. We examined whether there were systematic differences between young and old pain patients. Methods As part of a routine evaluation of university hospital care, a newly developed psychosomatic treatment model for chronic somatoform pain disorders was examined. The basis for treatment efficacy was a target-oriented, specific somatic and psychological intervention that included a stable physician-patient relationship. Particular attention was paid to differences in treatment outcome with regard to changes in both physical and psychopathological symptom levels. We hypothesised that younger pain patients had higher psychological burden and benefitted more from our treatment than older pain patients. Results Overall, 179 inpatients (57.5% women) with chronic pain were examined (age between 16 and 79 years). The group as a whole yielded high scores on the somatisation dimension (SCL-90) and showed a considerable amount of psychopathological symptoms, such as depressive mood and anxiety (HADS) and a great emotional instability (FPI-R). Age differences were only found with regards to patients’ degree of aggression (SCl-90): younger patients showed higher aggressive tendencies than older ones (p< 0.05). The treatment offered helped patients in both age groups especially with regard to reduction of depressive mood (HADS, p< 0.01) and anxiety levels (HADS, p< 0.01). Regression analysis showed different age groups and gender as significant predictors of anxiety reduction under therapy (R2=.108; model: p< 0.01). Discussion and conclusion Results show that younger chronic pain patients suffer more from a considerable amount of psychological distress than older ones, but our treatment approach was equally effective in both groups. However, age and gender differences, as well as the patient’s baseline level of anxiety influenced the outcome. These factors need to be studied in future research. PMID:23379640

  4. Improvement in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score predicts improvement in skin pain over time in patients with psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Ljosaa, Tone Marte; Stubhaug, Audun; Mork, Cato; Moum, Torbjorn; Wahl, Astrid K

    2013-05-01

    Pain and discomfort are common and often severe skin symptoms in patients with psoriasis. However, no studies have investigated skin pain and discomfort over time, or factors that explain changes in these symptoms. The aims of the present study were to describe the changes in skin pain, skin discomfort and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) over time, and to investigate whether change in PASI predicted change in skin pain intensity. A total of 129 patients participated in this exploratory, longitudinal study. Data were obtained through interviews and questionnaires. The results indicated reduction in skin symptoms and psoriasis severity over a period of 3 months. However, a majority of patients with skin pain at baseline reported also skin pain at follow-up. Furthermore, changes in PASI predicted changes in skin pain intensity. In conclusion, improvement in psoriasis severity predicts improvement in skin pain. PMID:23007130

  5. Pain Analysis in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Irreversible Electroporation versus Radiofrequency Ablation-Initial Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, Govindarajan Froud, Tatiana; Lo, Kaming; Barbery, Katuska J. Perez-Rojas, Evelyn Yrizarry, Jose

    2013-02-15

    To retrospectively compare the postprocedure pain of hepatocellular carcinoma treated with irreversible electroporation (IRE) with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, institutional review board-approved study compared postprocedure pain in 21 patients (15 men, six women; mean age 61.5 years) who underwent IRE of 29 intrahepatic lesions (mean size 2.20 cm) in 28 IRE sessions with 22 patients (16 men, six women; mean age 60.2 years) who underwent RFA of 27 lesions (mean size 3.38 cm) in 25 RFA sessions. Pain was determined by patient-disclosed scores with an 11-point numerical rating scale and 24 h cumulative hydromorphone use from patient-controlled analgesia pump. Complications were noted. Statistical significance was evaluated by Fisher's exact test, the Chi-square test, and Student's t test. There was no significant difference in the cumulative hydromorphone dose (1.54 mg (IRE) vs. 1.24 mg (RFA); P = 0.52) and in the mean pain score (1.96 (IRE) vs. 2.25 (RFA); P = 0.70). In nine (32.14 %) of 28 IRE sessions and 11 (44.0 %) of 25 RFA sessions, patients reported no pain. Complications occurred in three (10.7 %) of 28 IRE treatments and included pneumothorax (n = 1), pleural effusion (n = 1), and bleeding in the form of hemothorax (n = 1); one (4 %) of 25 RFA treatments included burn. IRE is comparable to RFA in the amount of pain that patients experience and the amount of pain medication self-administered. Both modalities were well tolerated by patients. Prospective, randomized trials are necessary to further evaluate these findings.

  6. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain in patients with spinal cord injury: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xia; Lv, Hong; Chen, Bin-Lin; Li, Xin; Wang, Xue-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on pain in patients with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-two spinal cord injury patients with central pain were randomly allocated into two groups TENS and control with 26 subjects per group. The patients in TENS and control groups were treated with TENS and sham TENS for 20?min (three times a week) for 12 consecutive weeks, respectively. The two group's pain was assessed using visual analog scale (VAS) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (including pain rating index-total, pain rating index-affective, pain rating index-sensory, present pain intensity, and number of words chosen) before and after the treatment. [Results] After the intervention, we found significant differences in VAS, pain rating index-total, pain rating index-affective, pain rating index-sensory, present pain intensity, and number of words chosen between the TENS group and the control group. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that TENS effectively decreases pain in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:25642029

  7. Effect of patient position on pain scales during transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeong Uk; Ji, Yoon Seob; Ko, Young Hwii

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy is the most useful technique for the diagnosis of prostate cancer; however, many patients describe the procedure as uncomfortable and painful. We investigated the effect of the patient's position on pain scales during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and Methods Between July 2012 and June 2013, a total of 128 consecutive patients who underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were included in this study. Seventy patients underwent the procedure in the lithotomy position performed by a urologist and the other patients (n=58) underwent the procedure in the left lateral decubitus (LLD) position performed by a radiologist. Pain was assessed by using visual analogue scale (VAS) scores from 0 to 10. Using a linear regression model, we analyzed the correlation between pain scale score and clinical variables with a focus on patient position. Results No significant differences related to age, body mass index, prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), hematuria, pyuria, International Prostate Symptom Score, or the cancer detection rate were observed between the lithotomy and the LLD groups. In the correlation analysis, VAS score showed a significant correlation with diabetes mellitus, PSA level, and lithotomy position (p<0.05). In the multiple linear regression model, VAS score showed a significant correlation with lithotomy position (?=-0.772, p=0.003) and diabetes mellitus (?=-0.803, p=0.033). Conclusions We suggest that the lithotomy position may be the proper way to reduce pain during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. PMID:26078842

  8. Assessment of Patient Pain Experience during Intravitreal 27-Gauge Bevacizumab and 30-Gauge Ranibizumab Injection

    PubMed Central

    Bilgin, Burak; Çapk?n, Musa; ?im?ek, Ali; Bilak, ?emsettin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare pain scores of patients during intravitreal 27-gauge bevacizumab and 30-gauge ranibizumab injection procedures. Methods Seventy eyes of 70 patients who had not previously undergone intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy were included in this study. Thirty-five patients received ranibizumab and 35 patients received bevacizumab. The diagnoses of the patients were: 27 age related macular degeneration, 15 diabetic macular edema, 9 diabetic vitreous hemorrhage, 6 central retinal vein occlusion, 11 branch retinal vein occlusion and 2 central serous chorioretinopathy. Bevacizumab (1.25 mg/0.05 mL) was injected into the vitreous cavity using a 27-gauge needle, and ranibizumab (0.5 mg/0.05 mL) was injected with 30-gauge needle. Patients were asked just after the injection to rate their perceived pain during the injection using the visual analogue scale (VAS) of 0 (no pain) to 10 (unbearable/worst pain). The average of these scores was used as the primary outcome. Results The VAS pain scores in the ranibizumab and bevacizumab groups were 1.06 ± 0.91 (range, 0 to 3) and 1.94 ± 1.55 (range, 0 to 7), respectively, a significant difference (p = 0.005). Patients <65 and ?65 years of age in both the ranibizumab and bevacizumab groups were then compared. For patients <65, there was a significant difference in the average VAS pain scores between groups (p = 0.003). However, for patients ?65 years, there was not a significant difference in the average VAS pain scores between groups (p = 0.238). Female and male patients in both ranibizumab and bevacizumab groups were also compared. For female patients, there was a significant difference in the average VAS pain scores between groups (p = 0.016), although not for male patients (p = 0.078). Conclusions Thirty-gauge intravitreal injection is more comfortable than 27-gauge injection. Injection of bevacizumab with 30-gauge needle syringes may be more tolerable for patients. PMID:26028948

  9. Association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Sup; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Buxton, Orfeu M.; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Boden, Leslie I.; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence suggests that work-family conflict is an important risk factor for workers' health and well-being. The goal of this study is to examine association between work-family conflict and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers. Methods We analyzed a cross-sectional survey of 1119 hospital patient care workers in 105 units in two urban, academic hospitals. Work-family conflict was measured by 5-item Work-Family Conflict Scale questionnaire. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to examine associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pain in the past 3 months, adjusting for confounders including work-related psychosocial factors and physical work factors. Results In fully adjusted models, high work-family conflict was strongly associated with neck or shoulder pain (OR: 2.34, 95% CI: 1.64 - 3.34), arm pain (OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.64 - 4.75), lower extremity pain (OR: 2.20, 95% CI: 1.54- 3.15) and any musculoskeletal pain (OR: 2.45, 95% CI: 1.56 - 3.85), and a number of body areas in pain (OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.82 - 3.36) in the past 3 months. The association with low back pain was attenuated and became non-significant after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Given the consistent associations between work-family conflict and self-reported musculoskeletal pains, the results suggest that work-family conflict could be an important domain for health promotion and workplace policy development among hospital patient care workers. PMID:23019044

  10. Telephone Consultation Partially Based on a Cognitive-Behavioral Approach Decreases Pain and Improves Quality of Life in Patients With Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ikemoto, Kayo; Yamagata, Yumiko; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Kawai, Takashi; Aono, Syuichi; Arai, Young-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic pain tends to be difficult to manage because of its complex natural history and poor response to therapy. Recently, it has been reported that telecare management by nurses improved outcomes of patients with chronic pain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a telephone consultation approach partially based on a cognitive-behavioral approach on pain and quality of life (QOL) in patients with chronic pain in Japan. Patients and Methods: Telephonic consultation was provided by nurse care managers for the management of pain. They informed the patients how to correct or eliminate excessive fear of pain, improper thinking for treating pain, as well as how to control activity levels by appropriate pacing. We received 463 consultations about chronic pain; however, 153 patients allowed us to recall for follow-up assessment. Finally, we could evaluate the pain intensity for 121 patients and the EuroQOL 5 dimension (EQ-5D) for 37 patients at the initial call and on their condition at 3 to 6 months after that. Wilcoxon signed-rank test and Cohens’d were used for both analyses. We also asked them to rate, by feeling, marked signs of improvement, some improvement, no improvement, or deterioration in pain and QOL, depending on their condition 3 to 6 months after the initial call (n = 121). Results: The pain intensities were significantly decreased from 7.6 ± 2.0 at baseline to 5.7 ± 2.9 on follow-ups assessed by a numerical rating scale (range; 0 - 10, P < 0.001, effect size (ES); 0.76). The EuroQOL 5 dimension scores were also significantly improved after telephone intervention; 0.5 ± 0.2 to 0.6 ± 0.2 (range; 0 - 1, P < 0.001, ES; 0.65). Moreover, as a result of the consultation, approximately half of the participants felt an improvement in the intensity of pain and QOL. Conclusions: Telephone consultation partially based on a cognitive-behavioral approach significantly reduced the intensity of pain and improved the QOL in patients with chronic pain in Japan. PMID:26705530

  11. [Minimum requirements in medical expert assessment of occupational disability of patients with chronic nonspecific pain].

    PubMed

    Raspe, H H

    1997-08-01

    Assessing working capacity in patients with chronic nonspecific pain disorders applying for disability pensions is a core tasks of practical social medicine. Traditionally the evaluation focused on the nosological classification and clinical description of the pain disorder with rather vague concepts of its consequences in terms of disabilities and handicaps. The author proposes to reverse the sequence. Following the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (WHO 1980) work incapacity can be seen as an "occupational handicap". Its qualities, severity and credibility depend on the existence of objectifyable disabilities (especially behaviour, locomotor, body disposition, dexterity and situational disabilities). These may be attributed to clinical impairments and an underlying disease process. Among impairments pain has to be assessed multidimensionally. As in clinical medicine a nosological diagnosis is a useful but neither necessary nor sufficient prerequisite for a sociomedical evaluation of pain patients. PMID:9340912

  12. A comparative study between different pain rating scales in patients of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Mohammed Shakeel Mohammed; Khade, Ajay; Borkar, Praful; Saleem, Mohammed; Lingaswamy, Vanteddu; Reddy, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Study was conducted to assess the sensitivity and simplicity of various pain rating scales in patients of osteoarthritis with chronic pain so that most appropriate scale can be identified. Scales included were Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale (WBS), Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), Faces Pain Scale- Revised (FPS-R), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Verbal Rating Scale (VRS). Patients were asked to indicate their pain on these scales and comment about the simplicity of scales. Median mark for WBS, NRS, FPS-R, VAS and VRS was 10, 10, 10, 9.1 and 10 respectively. P value between WBS, NRS, FPS-R, VAS and VRS was insignificant. Most simple, easy to answer scale (83%) was WBS followed by FPS-R (17%). We conclude that all the scales are sensitive for assessment of the chronic osteoarthritis pain and are not different from each others. The most simple and preferred pain rating scale is WBS for the regional population. PMID:24617173

  13. Ergonomic practices within patient care units are associated with musculoskeletal pain and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Dennerlein, Jack T.; Hopcia, Karen; Sembajwe, Grace; Kenwood, Christopher; Stoddard, Anne M.; Tveito, T. Helene; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2013-01-01

    Background With the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) for patient care unit workers, prevention efforts through ergonomic practices within units may be related to symptoms associated with typical work-related MSDs. Methods We completed a cross-sectional survey of patient care workers (n=1572) in two large academic hospitals in order to evaluate relationships between self-reported musculoskeletal pain, work interference due to this pain, and limitations during activities of daily living (functional limitations) and with ergonomic practices and other organizational policy and practices metrics within the unit. Bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses tested the significance of these associations. Results Prevalence of self-reported musculoskeletal symptoms in the past 3-months was 74% with 53% reporting pain in the low back. 32.8% reported that this pain interfered with their work duties and 17.7% reported functional limitations in the prior week. Decreased ergonomic practices were significantly associated with reporting pain in four body areas (low back, neck/shoulder, arms, and lower extremity) in the previous 3-months, interference with work caused by this pain, symptom severity and limitations in completing activities of daily living in the past week. Except for low back pain and work interference, these associations remained significant when psychosocial covariates such as psychological demands were included in multiple logistic regressions, Conclusions Ergonomic practices appear to be associated with many of the musculoskeletal symptoms denoting their importance for prevention efforts in acute health care settings. PMID:22113975

  14. Assessment and management of pain in older patients receiving palliative care.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Lloyd D

    2012-07-01

    This article aims to outline the principles that underpin good practice in the assessment and management of pain syndromes in older patients with advanced, life-limiting illnesses. Older patients receiving palliative care can be nursed in a variety of settings, including acute hospitals and in the community either at home, in nursing homes or hospices. An understanding of pain and approaches to treating it will help ensure that nurses in different clinical settings are able to support patients receiving palliative care and their families. PMID:22900393

  15. The Human Figure Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packman, Wendy L.; Beck, Vanessa L.; VanZutphen, Kelly H.; Long, Janet K.; Spengler, Gisele

    2003-01-01

    There is little research on the psychological impact of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on family members. This study uses the Human Figure Drawing (HFD) to measure siblings' emotional distress toward BMT. Among the siblings, feelings of isolation, anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem emerged as major themes. Findings indicate the…

  16. Management of Persistent Pain in the Older Patient A Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Una E.; Abrams, Robert C.; Gurland, Barry; Reid, M. Carrington

    2015-01-01

    Importance Persistent pain is highly prevalent, costly, and frequently disabling in later life. Objective To describe barriers to the management of persistent pain among older adults, summarize current management approaches, including pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic modalities; present rehabilitative approaches; and highlight aspects of the patient-physician relationship that can help to improve treatment outcomes. This review is relevant for physicians who seek an age-appropriate approach to delivering pain care for the older adult. Evidence Acquisition Search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane database from January 1990 through May 2014, using the search terms older adults, senior, ages 65 and above, elderly, and aged along with non-cancer pain, chronic pain, persistent pain, pain management, intractable pain, and refractory pain to identify English-language peer-reviewed systematic reviews, meta-analyses, Cochrane reviews, consensus statements, and guidelines relevant to the management of persistent pain in older adults. Findings Of the 92 identified studies, 35 evaluated pharmacologic interventions, whereas 57 examined nonpharmacologic modalities; the majority (n = 50) focused on older adults with osteoarthritis. This evidence base supports a stepwise approach with acetaminophen as first-line therapy. If treatment goals are not met, a trial of a topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, tramadol, or both is recommended. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended for long-term use. Careful surveillance to monitor for toxicity and efficacy is critical, given that advancing age increases risk for adverse effects. A multimodal approach is strongly recommended–emphasizing a combination of both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments to include physical and occupational rehabilitation, as well as cognitive-behavioral and movement-based interventions. An integrated pain management approach is ideally achieved by cultivating a strong therapeutic alliance between the older patient and the physician. Conclusions and Relevance Treatment planning for persistent pain in later life requires a clear understanding of the patient's treatment goals and expectations, comorbidities, and cognitive and functional status, as well as coordinating community resources and family support when available. A combination of pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and rehabilitative approaches in addition to a strong therapeutic alliance between the patient and physician is essential in setting, adjusting, and achieving realistic goals of therapy. PMID:25157726

  17. Treatment of Extraspinal Painful Bone Metastases with Percutaneous Cementoplasty: A Prospective Study of 50 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo Manca, Antonio; Ortega, Cinzia; Grignani, Giovanni; DeBernardi, Felicino; Regge, Daniele

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of percutaneous cementoplasty (PC) with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in painful extravertebral lytic bone metastases not responding to conventional therapy. Fifty patients (25 females), mean age 64.7 {+-} 11.2 years, underwent PC after giving informed consent. Procedures were performed under fluoroscopy (1/50) or combined fluoroscopy-CT (49/50) guidance in local anesthesia or under deep sedation in 7 patients with large metastases who underwent radiofrequency thermoablation (RFA) in the same session. Seventy lesions were treated (1-6 per patient; average, 1.4 {+-} 0.9), arranging in size from 1 to 10 cm (average, 3.6 {+-} 2.1 cm). Mean volume of PMMA per lesion was 5.9 {+-} 3.2 ml (range, 1.5-15.0 ml). Pain was prospectively evaluated on an 11-point visual analog scale (VAS) before and after the procedure (follow-up, 15 to 36 months). Mean VAS score dropped from 9.1 {+-} 1.2 (range: 6-10) to 2.1 {+-} 2.5 (range: 0-9). Mean VAS difference was 7.0 {+-} 2.3 (range, 1-10; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Forty-seven of the 50 patients (94%) suspended narcotic drugs, in 22 (44%) pain was controlled with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in 25 (50%) analgesic therapy was suspended, and 13 of 50 (26%) had complete pain regression. In 3 of the 50 patients (6%) pain was not improved. No statistical difference between osteoplasty and osteoplasty plus RFA was found (p = 0.8338, Mann-Whitney test). No complications arose during the procedure. Two patients with metastases in the femoral diaphysis reported a fracture 1 month after treatment. PC is effective to obtain pain regression in painful bone metastases not responding to conventional analgesic therapy; bone consolidation cannot be obtained in the diaphysis of long weight-bearing bones.

  18. Identifying Patients for Early Discharge: Performance of Decision Rules Among Patients with Acute Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Simon A.; Miller, Chadwick D.; Hollander, Judd E.; Nagurney, John T.; Birkhahn, Robert; Singer, Adam J.; Shapiro, Nathan I.; Glynn, Ted; Nowak, Richard; Safdar, Basmah; Peberdy, Mary; Counselman, Francis L.; Chandra, Abhinav; Kosowsky, Joshua; Neuenschwander, James; Schrock, Jon W.; Plantholt, Stephen; Diercks, Deborah B.; Peacock, W. Frank

    2012-01-01

    Background The HEART score and North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR) are decision rules designed to identify acute chest pain patients for early discharge without stress testing or cardiac imaging. This study compares the clinical utility of these decision rules combined with serial troponin determinations. Methods and Results A secondary analysis was conducted of 1005 participants in the Myeloperoxidase In the Diagnosis of Acute coronary syndromes Study (MIDAS). MIDAS is a prospective observational cohort of Emergency Department (ED) patients enrolled from 18 US sites with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The ability to identify participants for early discharge and the sensitivity for ACS at 30 days were compared among an unstructured assessment, NACPR, and HEART score, each combined with troponin measures at 0 and 3 hours. ACS, defined as cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, or unstable angina, occurred in 22% of the cohort. The unstructured assessment identified 13.5% (95% CI 11.5-16%) of participants for early discharge with 98% (95% CI 95-99%) sensitivity for ACS. The NACPR identified 4.4% (95% CI 3-6%) for early discharge with 100% (95% CI 98-100%) sensitivity for ACS. The HEART score identified 20% (95% CI 18-23%) for early discharge with 99% (95% CI 97-100%) sensitivity for ACS. The HEART score had a net reclassification improvement of 10% (95% CI 8-12%) versus unstructured assessment and 19% (95% CI 17-21%) versus NACPR. Conclusions The HEART score with 0 and 3 hour serial troponin measures identifies a substantial number of patients for early discharge while maintaining high sensitivity for ACS. PMID:23117012

  19. Magnetic Resonance–Guided Focused Ultrasound for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Phase III Trial Results

    PubMed Central

    Ghanouni, Pejman; Kanaev, Sergey V.; Iozeffi, Dmitri; Gianfelice, David; Fennessy, Fiona Mary; Kuten, Abraham; Meyer, Joshua E.; LeBlang, Suzanne D.; Roberts, Ann; Choi, Junsung; Larner, James M.; Napoli, Alessandro; Turkevich, Vladimir G.; Inbar, Yael; Tempany, Clare Mary C.; Pfeffer, Raphael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain due to bone metastases is a common cause of cancer-related morbidity, with few options available for patients refractory to medical therapies and who do not respond to radiation therapy. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS), a noninvasive method of thermal tissue ablation for palliation of pain due to bone metastases. Methods Patients with painful bone metastases were randomly assigned 3:1 to receive MRgFUS sonication or placebo. The primary endpoint was improvement in self-reported pain score without increase of pain medication 3 months after treatment and was analyzed by Fisher’s exact test. Components of the response composite, Numerical Rating Scale for pain (NRS) and morphine equivalent daily dose intake, were analyzed by t test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test, respectively. Brief Pain Inventory (BPI-QoL), a measure of functional interference of pain on quality of life, was compared between MRgFUS and placebo by t test. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results One hundred forty-seven subjects were enrolled, with 112 and 35 randomly assigned to MRgFUS and placebo treatments, respectively. Response rate for the primary endpoint was 64.3% in the MRgFUS arm and 20.0% in the placebo arm (P < .001). MRgFUS was also superior to placebo at 3 months on the secondary endpoints assessing worst score NRS (P < .001) and the BPI-QoL (P < .001). The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was sonication pain, which occurred in 32.1% of MRgFUS patients. Two patients had pathological fractures, one patient had third-degree skin burn, and one patient suffered from neuropathy. Overall 60.3% of all AEs resolved on the treatment day. Conclusions This multicenter phase III trial demonstrated that MRgFUS is a safe and effective, noninvasive treatment for alleviating pain resulting from bone metastases in patients that have failed standard treatments. PMID:24760791

  20. Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

  1. Experiences by patients and health professionals of a multidisciplinary intervention for long-term orofacial pain

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Håkan; Samuelsson, Mats; Ekdahl, Susanne; Halling, Yvonne; Öster, Anders; Perseius, Kent-Inge

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe patients’ and health professionals’ experiences of a multidisciplinary stress-focused clinical evaluation with prolonged engagement as an intervention for patients with long-term orofacial pain. Data in the patient part of this study were collected by free-text questionnaires using open-ended questions. Data were collected by group interview in the part of the study concerning health professionals. All data were analyzed according to qualitative content analysis. Data from patients revealed three categories for the intervention, ie, “helpful for most and crucial for some”, “being listened to, respected and validated”, and “gives important coping strategies”. The results showed that a vast majority of patients described themselves as having been helped by the intervention. Some patients reported that meeting with the orofacial pain consultant team was crucial to the future course of their lives. Most patients described still having residual pain and symptoms, and only a few described their pain as being fully remitted. However, because of the intervention, the patients reported being able to adopt more constructive coping strategies. They also described their perception of the pain as being different, in that it was not so frightening once they had been given a model with which to understand it. Data from the health professionals revealed similar categories. Concordance between the patients’ and health professionals’ experiences was striking. In their descriptions, the health professionals and patients underscored the same components as being effective, with understanding, respect, and validation being the most important. The multidisciplinary approach was highlighted as being key to success by both the patients and health professionals. PMID:24082788

  2. An Easy Tool to Predict Survival in Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Westhoff, Paulien G.; Graeff, Alexander de; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Bollen, Laurens; Dijkstra, Sander P.; Steen-Banasik, Elzbieta M. van der; Vulpen, Marco van; Leer, Jan Willem H.; Marijnen, Corrie A.; Linden, Yvette M. van der

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with bone metastases have a widely varying survival. A reliable estimation of survival is needed for appropriate treatment strategies. Our goal was to assess the value of simple prognostic factors, namely, patient and tumor characteristics, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), and patient-reported scores of pain and quality of life, to predict survival in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: In the Dutch Bone Metastasis Study, 1157 patients were treated with radiation therapy for painful bone metastases. At randomization, physicians determined the KPS; patients rated general health on a visual analogue scale (VAS-gh), valuation of life on a verbal rating scale (VRS-vl) and pain intensity. To assess the predictive value of the variables, we used multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses and C-statistics for discriminative value. Of the final model, calibration was assessed. External validation was performed on a dataset of 934 patients who were treated with radiation therapy for vertebral metastases. Results: Patients had mainly breast (39%), prostate (23%), or lung cancer (25%). After a maximum of 142 weeks' follow-up, 74% of patients had died. The best predictive model included sex, primary tumor, visceral metastases, KPS, VAS-gh, and VRS-vl (C-statistic = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.70-0.74). A reduced model, with only KPS and primary tumor, showed comparable discriminative capacity (C-statistic = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.69-0.72). External validation showed a C-statistic of 0.72 (95% CI = 0.70-0.73). Calibration of the derivation and the validation dataset showed underestimation of survival. Conclusion: In predicting survival in patients with painful bone metastases, KPS combined with primary tumor was comparable to a more complex model. Considering the amount of variables in complex models and the additional burden on patients, the simple model is preferred for daily use. In addition, a risk table for survival is provided.

  3. Patient Experience, Pain, and Quality of Life after Lower Limb Angioplasty: A Multisite Prospective Cohort Study

    SciTech Connect

    Culverwell, A. D.; Tapping, C. R.; Ettles, D. F.; Kessel, D.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To explore the experience of patients undergoing endovascular lower limb angioplasty and evaluate the improvements in quality of life and disease-related symptoms after the procedure. Methods: Patients completed a questionnaire before treatment and three questionnaires after the procedure (immediately after the procedure, and again 4 weeks and 3 months later). Anxiety, patient understanding, procedure-related pain, and disease-related pain were assessed by a visual analog score (VAS). Complications, analgesic requirements, and satisfaction were recorded. Changes to quality of life were assessed by the validated SF36 questionnaire. Results: A total of 88 patients (41%) responded. Overall, disease-related pain decreased over 3 months after the procedure. Smokers had more pain both before and after the procedure (P < 0.05). Explanation was considered better if provided by radiologist (P < 0.05). Sixty-nine percent of patients found the procedures less painful (mean VAS 2.5) than they had anticipated (VAS 5.5). Fifty percent of patients experienced adverse effects related to their puncture site, but this was highest among patients who had undergone the procedure before and smokers. The greatest quality-of-life improvements were in emotional and general health. Higher levels of disease-related pain were associated with worse general, emotional, and physical health (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Lower limb angioplasty provides symptomatic and quality-of-life improvements. Implementation of simple measures could improve patient satisfaction-for example, treatment should be explained by the radiologist in advance. Routine prescription of analgesics with particular attention to smokers and those undergoing repeat interventions is suggested.

  4. Nurses' Experiences of Patients with Substance-Use Disorder in Pain: A Phenomenological Study.

    PubMed

    Morley, Georgina; Briggs, Emma; Chumbley, Gillian

    2015-10-01

    Patients with substance-use disorder and pain are at risk of having their pain underestimated and undertreated. Unrelieved pain can exacerbate characteristics that are believed to be 'drug-seeking' and in turn, perceived drug-seeking behavior can contribute to a patient being stigmatized and labeled 'difficult'. Previous literature has indicated that negative attitudes towards patients with substance-use disorder may affect their pain management but little is known about the specific barriers. This study explored nurses' experiences of working with patients with substance-use disorder in pain, providing an in-depth insight into their perspective. Descriptive phenomenology was employed as a framework for conducting semi-structured interviews to reveal the experiences of registered nurses. A convenience sample of registered nurses from a variety of clinical backgrounds were recruited and interviewed. This rich data was analyzed according to Giorgi's five-stage approach. Participants described feelings of powerlessness and frustration due to patient non-compliance, discrepancies in patient management amongst team members and external pressures effecting pain management. Participants described characteristics believed to be common, including psychosocial factors such as complex social backgrounds or mental health issues. Nurses' education and support needs were identified. Stereotyping and stigmatism were found to potentially still exist, yet there was also a general awareness of some specific clinical issues such as opioid tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Further emphasis is required on interprofessional education and communication to improve patient management, alongside an appreciation of patient's rights facilitated by a concordance model of care. PMID:25979457

  5. Changes in Quality of Life after 3 months of Usual Care in a Large Sample of Patients with Noncancer Pain: The "QOOL: Quality of Life and Pain" Study.

    PubMed

    Velázquez Rivera, Ignacio; García Escobar, Modesto; Moya Riera, Jorge Juan; Del Saz de la Torre, Javier Manuel; Fenollosa Vázquez, Pedro; González Mesa, José Manuel; Casado, Alfonso; Martín Fuentes, Mayte; de Andrés Ares, Javier

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale observational studies can provide useful information on changes in health outcomes over time. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 3 months of usual care on quality of life (QOL) and pain outcomes in noncancer chronic pain patients managed by pain specialists and to examine factors associated with changes in QOL. This was assessed using the EQ-5D and pain outcomes using the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Changes in QOL and pain were studied for the overall sample and in subgroups defined by baseline pain severity. Multivariate regression was used to investigate factors associated with change on EQ-5D. Three thousand and twenty-nine patients were included for analysis. After 3 months of usual care, a mean of 40.9% of patients showed improvement on individual EQ-5D dimensions, with the highest rates of improvement seen on the pain/discomfort (50.8%) and anxiety/depression (48.3%) dimensions. The EQ-5D Index increased from a mean (SD) of 0.35 (0.2) to 0.58 (0.21) points between baseline and month 3, and the thermometer from 41.5 (19.4) to 58.7 (17.8), indicating a large effect. Improvements in QOL were larger in those with severe baseline pain. The BPI severity summary score improved from a mean (SD) of 6.5 (1.4) to 4.1 (1.7) and the interference summary score from 6.6 (1.5) to 4.2 (1.9). Changes on the BPI severity and interference scores were associated with changes in the EQ-5D Index and thermometer. In conclusion, 3 months of usual care in noncancer pain patients led to substantial improvements in QOL and pain outcomes. PMID:25244352

  6. [The Perioperative Management of Pain in Patients Who Are Addicted to Heroin].

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Yi; Weng, Chia-Hsing; Hsu, Yu-Ping; Lin, Pao-Chen

    2015-06-01

    Heroin addicts admitted to the hospital for surgery should be treated as high-risk patients because these patients face a significantly higher risk of experiencing severe drug withdrawal symptoms and of pain management complications during hospitalization. The lack of proper pain management often suffered by heroin addicts during hospitalization has been attributed to care providers' insufficient knowledge regarding opioid medications and their addicting effects as well as fears that opioid medications may cause addiction symptoms to reemerge. The objective of this article is to illustrate the pain management process across the entire hospitalization period for heroin-addicted patients undergoing surgical procedures. This process includes management of the heroin-related physical and psychological reactions from surgery, of the mechanism of pain induced specifically from surgery, and of the heroin addiction during the surgical procedure and subsequent clinical management and nursing care. It is hoped that this article assists healthcare providers to better understand the need for the proper pain management and care of heroin-addicted surgical patients over the entire period of hospitalization and thus the enhancement of the overall quality and safety of patient care management procedures. PMID:26073959

  7. Risk Assessment of Opioid Misuse in Italian Patients with Chronic Noncancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Renata; Duse, Genni; Capraro, Michela; Visentin, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Opioid therapy in patients with chronic noncancer pain must be preceded by evaluation of the risk of opioid misuse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of the Italian translation of the Pain Medication Questionnaire (PMQ) and of the Diagnosis Intractability Risk and Efficacy Score (DIRE) in chronic pain patients. Design. 75 chronic noncancer pain patients treated with opioids were enrolled and followed longitudinally. Risk of opioid misuse was evaluated through PMQ, DIRE, and the physician's clinical evaluation. Pain experience and psychological characteristics were assessed through specific self-report instruments. At follow-ups, pain intensity, aberrant drug behaviors, and presence of the prescribed opioid and of illegal substances in urine were also checked. Results. PMQ demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's ? = 0.77) and test-retest reliability (r = 0.86). Significant correlations were found between higher PMQ scores and the number of aberrant drug behaviors detected at 2-, 4-, and 6-month follow-ups (P < 0.01). Also the DIRE demonstrated good predictive validity. Conclusions. The results obtained with specific tools are more reliable than the clinician's evaluation alone in predicting the risk of opioid misuse; regular monitoring and psychological intervention will contribute to improving compliance and outcome of long-term opioid use. PMID:25177499

  8. Translating Research into Practice Intervention Improves Management of Acute Pain in Older Hip Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Titler, Marita G; Herr, Keela; Brooks, John M; Xie, Xian-Jin; Ardery, Gail; Schilling, Margo L; Marsh, J Lawrence; Everett, Linda Q; Clarke, William R

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test an interdisciplinary, multifaceted, translating research into practice (TRIP) intervention to (a) promote adoption, by physicians and nurses, of evidence-based (EB) acute pain management practices in hospitalized older adults, (b) decrease barriers to use of EB acute pain management practices, and (c) decrease pain intensity of older hospitalized adults. Study Design Experimental design with the hospital as the unit of randomization. Study Setting Twelve acute care hospitals in the Midwest. Data Sources (a) Medical records (MRs) of patients ?65 years or older with a hip fracture admitted before and following implementation of the TRIP intervention and (b) physicians and nurses who care for those patients. Data Collection Data were abstracted from MRs and questions distributed to nurses and physicians. Principal Findings The Summative Index for Quality of Acute Pain Care (0–18 scale) was significantly higher for the experimental (10.1) than comparison group (8.4) at the end of the TRIP implementation phase. At the end of the TRIP implementation phase, patients in the experimental group had a lower mean pain intensity rating than those in the comparison group (p<.0001). Conclusion The TRIP intervention improved quality of acute pain management of older adults hospitalized with a hip fracture. PMID:19146568

  9. Effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patellofemoral pain syndrome patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Thiago R. T.; Oliveira, Bárbara A.; Ocarino, Juliana M.; Holt, Kenneth G.; Fonseca, Sérgio T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is characterized by anterior knee pain, which may limit the performance of functional activities. The influence of hip joint motion on the development of this syndrome has already been documented in the literature. In this regard, studies have investigated the effectiveness of hip muscle strengthening in patients with PFPS. Objectives: The aims of this systematic review were (1) to summarize the literature related to the effects of hip muscle strengthening on pain intensity, muscle strength, and function in individuals with PFPS and (2) to evaluate the methodological quality of the selected studies. Method: A search for randomized controlled clinical trials was conducted using the following databases: Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PEDro, LILACS, and SciELO. The selected studies had to distinguish the effects of hip muscle strengthening in a group of patients with PFPS, as compared to non-intervention or other kinds of intervention, and had to investigate the following outcomes: pain, muscle strength, and function. The methodological quality of the selected studies was analyzed by means of the PEDro scale. Results: Seven studies were selected. These studies demonstrated that hip muscle strengthening was effective in reducing pain. However, the studies disagreed regarding the treatments' ability to improve muscle strength. Improvement in functional capabilities after hip muscle strengthening was found in five studies. Conclusion: Hip muscle strengthening is effective in reducing the intensity of pain and improving functional capabilities in patients with PFPS, despite the lack of evidence for its ability to increase muscle strength. PMID:26039034

  10. Psychological profile and self-administered relaxation in patients with craniofacial pain: a prospective in-office study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychological profile of craniofacial pain sufferers and the impact of patient subtype classification on the short-time effectiveness of a self-administered relaxation training. Methods One hundred unselected in-office patients (67% females) suffering from chronic facial pain and/or headache with the presumptive diagnose of temporo-mandibular disorder (TMD) completed a questionnaire battery comprising craniofacial pain perception, somatic complaints, irrational beliefs, and pain behavior and were classified into subtypes using cluster analysis. They underwent a self-administered progressive relaxation training and were re-evaluated for pain perception after 3 months. Results Pain was mild to moderate in the majority of patients. Symptom domains comprised parafunctional activities, temporo-mandibular pain and dysfunction, fronto-temporal headache, head/neck and neck/back pain. Three patient subtypes were identified regarding symptom/dysfunction level: (i) low burden (mild/moderate), (ii) psychosocial dysfunction (moderate/high), (iii) adaptive coping (moderate/mild). Self-rated adherence to the recommended relaxation training was moderate throughout the sample, but self-rated relief was significantly different between clusters. At follow-up, pain intensity was significantly decreased in all patients, whereas pain-related interference was improved only in dysfunctional and adaptive patients. Improvement of symptom domains varied between clusters and was most comprehensive in adaptive patients. Conclusions In conclusion, craniofacial pain sufferers can be divided in meaningful subtypes based on their pain perception, irrational beliefs, and pain behaviour. A self-administered relaxation training generally yielded positive effects on pain perception, however the benefit may be greater in patients with more marked symptom impact (both dysfunctional and adaptive). PMID:24382096

  11. Evaluating the Patient with Right Lower Quadrant Pain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Neel B; Wenzke, Daniel R

    2015-11-01

    Right lower quadrant pain is one of the most common indications for imaging evaluation of the abdomen in the emergency department setting. This article reviews important imaging findings associated with acute appendicitis as well as major differential considerations including: mesenteric adenitis, Meckel diverticulum, neutropenic colitis, right-sided diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, and inflammatory bowel diseaseRight lower quadrant pain is one of the most common indications for imaging evaluation of the abdomen in the emergency department setting. This article reviews important imaging findings associated with acute appendicitis as well as major differential considerations including: mesenteric adenitis, Meckel diverticulum, neutropenic colitis, right-sided diverticulitis, epiploic appendagitis, omental infarction, and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26526431

  12. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validity of the Korean version of the pain sensitivity questionnaire in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Yeo, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Hyeon-Guk; Yi, Je-Min; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate pain sensitivity questionnaires (PSQ) into the Korean language, perform a cross-cultural adaption of the PSQ, and validate the Korean version of PSQ in patients with degenerative spinal disease. The PSQ was translated forward and backward, cross-culturally adapted by 2 independent translators, and approved by an expert committee. The final Korean version of the PSQ was tested on 72 patients with degenerative spinal disease. Test-retest reliability was evaluated for 60 patients (83%) who completed the second assessment in an interval of 4 weeks. The mean PSQ-minor, PSQ-moderate, and PSQ-total (standard deviation [SD]) were 5.40 (2.02), 6.46 (1.98), and 5.93 (1.93), respectively. The PSQ-total, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate of the Korean version showed very good internal consistencies determined by the Cronbach's ? of 0.926, 0.869, and 0.877, respectively. For convergent validity, the PSQ scores of the Korean version showed significant correlations with pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) (r = 0.377, P = 0.002; r = 0.365, P = 0.003; r = 0.362, P = 0.003 for PSQ-total, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate of the Korean version, respectively). For test-retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.782 for PSQ-total, 0.752 for PSQ-minor, and 0.793 for PSQ-moderate. In conclusion, the validated Korean version of PSQ is a transculturally equivalent, reliable, and valid tool to assess individual pain sensitivity. PMID:24131768

  13. Chronic pain patients are impaired on an emotional decision-making task A. Vania Apkariana,*, Yamaya Sosaa

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    Chronic pain patients are impaired on an emotional decision-making task A. Vania Apkariana pain can result in anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life. However, its effects on cognitive abilities have remained unclear although many studies attempted to psychologically profile chronic pain. We

  14. Spinal cord stimulation, conception, pregnancy, and labor: case study in a complex regional pain syndrome patient.

    PubMed

    Segal, R

    1999-01-01

    Introduction. Interventional modalities for pain treatment are reserved for patients failing multidisciplinary pain management, including psychological, physical, pharmacological, and anesthetic techniques. Objective. Medications for intractable pain may be unacceptable because the risk of teratogenic effects. The purpose of this study is to find out whether spinal cord stimulation may be safe during conception, pregnancy, and delivery. Materials and Methods. We report a 30-year old, female, neonatal nurse who developed left hand burning pain, swelling, coldness, and weakness following a mild brachial plexus injury in a motor vehicle accident. The patient responded well to a combination of Neurontin, Trazadone, Ultram, and Vicodin. A year later, the patient married and wanted to become pregnant but was afraid of possible teratogenic effects of the medications. Therefore, she requested an interventional modality for control of her symptoms. We recommended spinal cord stimulation (SCS) based on our excellent experience with this modality in the management of complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS). However, we did inform the patient that no data had been published regarding the safety of this modality in pregnancy and labor. Results. Cervical SCS resulted in excellent pain control and discontinuation of the medications. Thirteen months later, she delivered a healthy five pound baby girl. Mother and baby were discharged home in two days. The SCS was not turned off at any time during the labor and delivery. Conclusion. SCS was safe for implantation in our case study of a pregnant woman. This may constitute a new indication for SCS in patients otherwise successfully managed with non-interventional modalities for pain control. PMID:22151061

  15. Lack of effect of chronic dextromethorphan on experimental pain tolerance in methadone-maintained patients

    PubMed Central

    Compton, Peggy A.; Ling, Walter; Torrington, Matt A.

    2014-01-01

    Good evidence exists to suggest that individuals on opioid maintenance for the treatment of addiction (i.e. methadone) are less tolerant of experimental pain than are matched controls or ex-opioid addicts, a phenomenon theorized to reflect opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Agonist activity at the excitatory ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on dorsal horn neurons has been implicated in the development of both OIH and its putative expression at the clinical level—opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of the NMDA-receptor antagonist, dextromethorphan (DEX), to reverse or treat OIH in methadone-maintenance (MM) patients. Utilizing a clinical trial design and double-blind conditions, changes in pain threshold and tolerance [cold pressor (CP) and electrical stimulation (ES)] following a 5-week trial of DEX (titrated to 480 mg/day) in comparison with placebo was evaluated in a well-characterized sample of MM patients. The sample (n = 40) was 53% male and ethnically diverse (53% Latino, 28% African American, 10% White, 9% other), with a mean age of 48.0 years (SD = 6.97). Based on t-test analyses, no difference was found between groups on CP pain threshold, CP pain tolerance, ES pain threshold or ES pain tolerance, both pre- and postmedication. Notably, DEX-related changes significantly differed by gender, with women tending to show diminished tolerance for pain with DEX therapy. These results support that chronic high-dose NMDA antagonism does not improve tolerance for pain in MM patients, although a gender effect on DEX response is suggested. PMID:18507735

  16. The Effect of Traditional Cupping on Pain and Mechanical Thresholds in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomised Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lauche, Romy; Cramer, Holger; Hohmann, Claudia; Choi, Kyung-Eun; Rampp, Thomas; Saha, Felix Joyonto; Musial, Frauke; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Cupping has been used since antiquity in the treatment of pain conditions. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of traditional cupping therapy on chronic nonspecific neck pain (CNP) and mechanical sensory thresholds. Methods. Fifty CNP patients were randomly assigned to treatment (TG, n = 25) or waiting list control group (WL, n = 25). TG received a single cupping treatment. Pain at rest (PR), pain related to movement (PM), quality of life (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), mechanical detection (MDT), vibration detection (MDT), and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were measured before and three days after a single cupping treatment. Patients also kept a pain and medication diary (PaDi, MeDi) during the study. Results. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. After cupping TG reported significantly less pain (PR: ?17.9?mm VAS, 95%CI ?29.2 to ?6.6; PM: ?19.7, 95%CI ?32.2 to ?7.2; PaDi: ?1.5 points on NRS, 95%CI ?2.5 to ?0.4; all P < 0.05) and higher quality of life than WL (SF-36, Physical Functioning: 7.5, 95%CI 1.4 to 13.5; Bodily Pain: 14.9, 95%CI 4.4 to 25.4; Physical Component Score: 5.0, 95%CI 1.4 to 8.5; all P < 0.05). No significant effect was found for NDI, MDT, or VDT, but TG showed significantly higher PPT at pain-areas than WL (in lg(kPa); pain-maximum: 0.088, 95%CI 0.029 to 0.148, pain-adjacent: 0.118, 95%CI 0.038 to 0.199; both P < 0.01). Conclusion. A single application of traditional cupping might be an effective treatment for improving pain, quality of life, and hyperalgesia in CNP. PMID:22203873

  17. Comparison of muscle and joint pressure-pain thresholds in patients with complex regional pain syndrome and upper limb pain of other origin.

    PubMed

    Mainka, Tina; Bischoff, Florian S; Baron, Ralf; Krumova, Elena K; Nicolas, Volkmar; Pennekamp, Werner; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vollert, Jan; Westermann, Andrea; Maier, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    Pain localized in the deep tissues occurs frequently in complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). In addition, hyperalgesia to blunt pressure over muscles is common in CRPS, but it often appears in limb pain of other origin as well. Considering that 3-phase bone scintigraphy (TPBS) reveals periarticular enhanced bone metabolism in CRPS, joint-associated hyperalgesia to blunt pressure might be a more specific finding than hyperalgesia over muscles. In 34 patients with upper limb pain (18 CRPS, 16 non-CRPS; diagnosed in accordance to the Budapest criteria) and in 18 healthy controls, pressure-pain thresholds (PPT) were assessed bilaterally over the thenar (PPTThenar), the metacarpophalangeal (PPTMCP), and the proximal interphalangeal (PPTPIP) joints using a pressure algometer (Somedic, Sweden). Beforehand, all patients had received TPBS for diagnostic purposes independently of the study. Region-of-interest (ROI) ratios (mineralization phase) for the MCP and PIP, excluding fracture sites, were correlated with the PPT. In CRPS, all ROI ratios were significantly increased and all PPT of the affected hand were decreased compared to non-CRPS (PPTThenar: 243±150kPa vs 358±197kPa, PPTMCP: 80±67kPa vs 159±93kPa, PPTPIP: 80±56kPa vs 184±110kPa; P<.01) and controls (PPTThenar: 478±106kPa, PPTMCP: 254±50kPa, PPTPIP: 275±76kPa; P<.01). A PPTThenar below 293kPa revealed 77% sensitivity but only 63% specificity, whereas a PPTPIP below 102kPa had 82% sensitivity and 94% specificity to identify CRPS. Only in CRPS were PPTMCP and PPTPIP correlated significantly inversely with the ROI ratio (MCP: r=-0.439, PIP: r=-0.447). PPTPIP shows higher specificity for CRPS type I than PPTThenar without loss of sensitivity. Therefore, measurement of joint PPT could be a noninvasive diagnostic tool reflecting increased bone metabolism assessed by TPBS as a sign of bone pathophysiology. PMID:24333949

  18. Ethical quandaries in caring for primary-care patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Patricia J; Rickard, Julie A

    2013-03-01

    In the past decade, more and more behavioral health providers have begun consultation practices in primary-care settings. Their availability makes multidisciplinary care a reality and the possibility of improved outcomes for patients with chronic pain more feasible. However, behavioral health providers encounter new ethical quandaries in providing services to patients with chronic pain and to the primary-care providers who plan their treatment. This article presents two cases to illustrate the questions that arise in delivery of primary-care behavioral health services to patients with chronic pain. Relevant professional ethical guidelines for psychologists, social workers, and physicians are examined and recommendations for addressing the gaps in extant guides are offered. PMID:23566128

  19. Chronic opioid induced constipation in patients with nonmalignant pain: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alfred D.

    2015-01-01

    With the recent introduction and approval of medications directed at the treatment of opioid induced constipation (OIC) in patients with nonmalignant pain, there is increased interest and understanding of the unmet need and opportunities to enhance patient management. The high incidence of OIC is associated with rapid increase of narcotic analgesic prescriptions for nonmalignant chronic pain. This review addresses briefly the mechanisms of action of opioids that lead to OIC, the differential tolerance of gastrointestinal organs to the effects of opioids, the size and scope of the problem, the definition and outcome measures for OIC, current differential diagnosis and management algorithms, and the pharmacology and efficacy of treatments for OIC in patients with nonmalignant pain. PMID:26136838

  20. Anxiety and depression are independent predictors of quality of life of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Orenius, Tage; Koskela, Taru; Koho, Petteri; Pohjolainen, Timo; Kautiainen, Hannu; Haanpää, Maija; Hurri, Heikki

    2013-02-01

    We examined the relative impact of baseline anxiety, depression and fear of movement on health related quality of life at 12-month follow-up after a multidisciplinary pain management programme. One hundred and eleven patients who had chronic musculoskeletal pain (mean age 45 years, 65% women) attended during 2003-2005 a multidisciplinary three-phase pain management programme with a total time frame of six to seven months, totalling 19 days. The Beck Anxiety Inventory was used to rate anxiety, the Beck Depression Inventory depression, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia fear of movement. The generic 15D questionnaire was used to assess health related quality of life. Baseline data were collected at admission, follow-up data at 12 months. Mean health related quality of life increased significantly from baseline to 12-month follow-up. Anxiety at baseline predicted significant negative change in the health related quality of life, depression predicted significant positive change in the health related quality of life. Fear of movement did not predict any significant change in the health related quality of life. We concluded that patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and mild to moderate depression benefit from a multidisciplinary pain management programme in contrast to anxious patients. The findings imply further research with bigger sample sizes, other than HRQoL outcome measures as well as with other groups of patients. PMID:22453165

  1. Theory of Mind and Emotional Awareness in Chronic Somatoform Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zunhammer, Matthias; Halski, Agnes; Eichhammer, Peter; Busch, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Objective The present study aimed at investigating whether chronic pain patients are impaired in Theory of Mind (ToM), or Emotional Awareness. Methods Thirty inpatients suffering from chronic somatoform pain, as well as thirty healthy controls matched for age, sex, and education were recruited. ToM abilities were measured using the Frith-Happé animation task, in which participants interpret video-clips depicting moving geometric forms that mimic social interactions. The responses given were scored for appropriateness and the degree of inferred intentionality according to established protocols. Emotional awareness was measured using the Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS), for which participants provide written descriptions of feelings in imaginary emotional situations. Standardized scoring was performed to capture the number and quality of emotional terms used. Results Responses lengths were similar in both groups and for both tasks. Patients attained significantly lower intentionality but not appropriateness scores when interpreting ToM interactions. No significant group differences were found when interpreting goal directed interactions. Emotional awareness scores were significantly lower in patients compared to healthy controls. Conclusions Our results suggest that chronic pain patients are impaired in mentalizing and emotional awareness. Future studies are needed to determine whether these ToM and emotional awareness deficits contribute to the etiology of somatoform pain and whether addressing these deficits in therapeutic interventions can improve polymodal pain therapy. PMID:26445110

  2. Investigation in patients with previous myocardial infarction who present with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Selwyn, A.P.; Fox, K.; Forse, G.; Pratt, T.; Steiner, R.

    1981-12-01

    Thirty-five patients who presented with chest pain underwent mapping of the ECG with exercise and angiocardiography. Krypton-81m was used to assess regional myocardial perfusion before, during and after atrial pacing. Twelve of the 35 patients had negative exercise tests. Eight of these 12 had normal coronary arteries and four had less than or equal to 50% stenosis of at least one major coronary artery. All 12 patients had uniform increases in regional myocardial perfusion (98 plus/minus 14.0%) during atrial pacing. Thirteen of the 35 patients had a history of myocardial infarction and precordial areas of Q waves. During exercise, all 13 patients complained of chest pain and showed precordial areas of both ST-segment elevation and depression. These 13 patients had greater than or equal to 70% stenosis of at least one major coronary artery. Myocardial blood flow studies showed fixed defects of perfusion corresponding to the Q waves and ST-segment elevation. In addition, there were separate transient decreases of regional myocardial perfusion (70 plus/minus 9.0%) during atrial pacing corresponding to ST-segment depression and chest pain. Ten of the 35 patients had a history of myocardial infarction and precordial areas of Q waves. These areas showed no changes during atrial pacing. All the patients showed at least one remote region of myocardium that increased perfusion (74 plus/minus 170%) throughout pacing. Patients with a history of myocardial infarction may present with chest pain. In this study, ST-segment elevation during an exercise ECG was not associated with chest pain or detectable myocardial ischemia. Regional perfusion in infarcted segments of myocardium did not change with atrial pacing.

  3. A novel use for testosterone to treat central sensitization of chronic pain in fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    White, Hillary D; Robinson, Thomas D

    2015-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a diffuse chronic pain condition that occurs predominantly in women and may be under-reported in men. Symptoms include a loss of feeling of well-being and generalized widespread flu-like muscle aches and pain that fail to resolve due to central sensitization of nociceptive neurons. It has commonalities with a myriad of other chronic pain conditions which include PTSD, "Gulf War Syndrome", and various stress-induced conditions caused, for example, by viral infection, emotional or physical stress, trauma, combat, accident or surgery. It is not understood why some individuals are susceptible to this condition and others are not. White et al., elsewhere in this issue, present a clinical feasibility study designed to test the hypothesis that 1) low or deficient testosterone serum levels are linked to a high risk for an inflamed nociceptive nervous system and resultant chronic pain states, and 2) a testosterone transdermal gel applied once a day by fibromyalgia patients can be an effective therapeutic against chronic pain. Here, a short profile of fibromyalgia is provided along with a brief summary of best practices currently recommended by clinical specialists. The link between testosterone and pain is then discussed, with an overview of scientific studies that lay the foundation for testosterone as a possible important additional therapeutic that has the potential to be safely administered and effective but also avoid the adverse effects of other therapeutics. Finally, novel mechanisms by which testosterone therapy is likely to down-modulate pain signaling are proposed. PMID:26004314

  4. The influence of offset analgesia on the onset and offset of pain in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Oudejans, Linda C J; Smit, Jeff M; van Velzen, Monique; Dahan, Albert; Niesters, Marieke

    2015-12-01

    Offset analgesia (OA) is a form of endogenous pain inhibition characterized by a disproportionately large reduction in pain perception after a small decrease in temperature during noxious thermal stimulation. In this study, the presence of OA was evaluated in patients with fibromyalgia and compared with healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls. Offset analgesia was induced by noxious thermal stimulation on the arm, causing a visual analog score (VAS) of about 50 mm, followed by a 1°C temperature decrease. The OA response is defined by the reduction in VAS induced by the 1°C stimulus decrease. To assess whether the OA response could be enhanced, 2 tests were applied: repetition of the OA paradigm and 1°C temperature downward steps after an initial OA test (downward step test). To assess whether OA affects onset of pain, OA steps at increasing temperatures (upward OA step test) were applied. Patients with fibromyalgia had reduced OA responses with a reduction in VAS of 65.3 ± 4.5% (mean ± SD) vs controls 97.8 ± 4.6% (P < 0.001). Decreased OA responses were not enhanced or restored by repeating the OA paradigm or by the downward step test. Defective engagement of OA had a significant effect on pain onset, as observed from the upward OA step test, with less tolerability to noxious pain stimulation in patients with fibromyalgia. In conclusion, patients with fibromyalgia showed less pain inhibition as measured by the OA paradigm, which influenced both the onset and offset of pain. PMID:26270589

  5. A Randomized Trial of Chiropractic Manipulation and Mobilization for Patients With Neck Pain: Clinical Outcomes From the UCLA Neck-Pain Study

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Eric L.; Morgenstern, Hal; Harber, Philip; Kominski, Gerald F.; Yu, Fei; Adams, Alan H.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. This study compared the relative effectiveness of cervical spine manipulation and mobilization for neck pain. Methods. Neck-pain patients were randomized to the following conditions: manipulation with or without heat, manipulation with or without electrical muscle stimulation, mobilization with or without heat, and mobilization with or without electrical muscle stimulation. Results. Of 960 eligible patients, 336 enrolled in the study. Mean reductions in pain and disability were similar in the manipulation and mobilization groups through 6 months. Conclusions. Cervical spine manipulation and mobilization yield comparable clinical outcomes. PMID:12356613

  6. Development of a bedside pain assessment kit for the classification of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Eric; Trudeau, Jeremiah J; Eaton, Thomas A; Jensen, Mark P; Gammaitoni, Arnold; Simon, Lee S; Katz, Nathaniel

    2015-06-01

    There are no standardized bedside assessments for subtyping patients with osteoarthritis (OA) based on pain mechanisms. Thus, we developed a bedside sensory testing kit (BSTK) to classify OA patients based on sensory profiles potentially indicative of pain mechanism. After usability and informal reliability testing (n = 22), the kit was tested in a formal reliability study (n = 20). Patients completed questionnaires and sensory testing: pressure algometry to detect hyperalgesia; repeat algometry after heterotopic noxious conditioning stimulation to measure diffuse noxious inhibitory control (DNIC); light touch using Von Frey filaments; and cold allodynia using a brass rod. The procedure was brief and well tolerated. Algometry and filament testing were highly reliable [intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) 0.71-0.91]; DNIC was acceptably reliable (ICCs 0.53-0.91); brass rod reliability was inconclusive. Patients were classified empirically into four groups: "All abnormal findings" (primary and secondary hyperalgesia and dysfunctional DNIC); "all normal findings"; and two intermediate groups. The "all abnormal findings" group had more neuropathic pain symptoms, and lower WOMAC total, stiffness, and activity scores than the "all normal findings" group. Simple BSTK procedures, consolidated in a kit, reliably classified OA patients into subgroups based on sensory profile, suggesting that OA patients differ in underlying pain mechanisms. Further research is needed to confirm these subgroups and determine their validity in predicting response to treatment. PMID:25510290

  7. Specific rehabilitation exercise for the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Tomanova, Michaela; Lippert-Grüner, Marcela; Lhotska, Lenka

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the efficacy of our special rehabilitation method for patients with low back pain (LBP). [Subjects and Methods] All participants (n=33) received at least five individual 30-minute therapy sessions per week using the INFINITY method(®) and six group therapy sessions per week in a gymnasium and swimming pool, each lasting 30 minutes and including the INFINITY method(®). The treatment lasted between four to seven weeks. Plantar function using a graphic method (computer plantography), graphical quantification of postural control during static standing (posturography), and pain were measured and evaluated before and after rehabilitation therapy. The INFINITY method(®) is a special rehabilitation method for patients with musculoskeletal problems. The method focuses on stabilization and strengthening of the trunk, dorsal and abdominal muscles, including the deep stabilization system which is closely linked with diaphragmatic breathing. It teaches the central nervous system to control muscles more precisely. [Results] Plantar functions, postural control in the upright stance and pain of LBP patients were significantly improved by 4-7 weeks of rehabilitation treatment with the INFINITY method(®). There were significant differences in all measured dependent variables of the patients between before and after treatment. [Conclusion] Rehabilitation therapy with the INFINITY method(®) positively influences body stabilization and pain in patients with problems of the lumbar spine. This method presents a new improved approach (with enhanced effect) to rehabilitation therapy for LBP patients. PMID:26356065

  8. Specific rehabilitation exercise for the treatment of patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Tomanova, Michaela; Lippert-Grüner, Marcela; Lhotska, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the efficacy of our special rehabilitation method for patients with low back pain (LBP). [Subjects and Methods] All participants (n=33) received at least five individual 30-minute therapy sessions per week using the INFINITY method® and six group therapy sessions per week in a gymnasium and swimming pool, each lasting 30 minutes and including the INFINITY method®. The treatment lasted between four to seven weeks. Plantar function using a graphic method (computer plantography), graphical quantification of postural control during static standing (posturography), and pain were measured and evaluated before and after rehabilitation therapy. The INFINITY method® is a special rehabilitation method for patients with musculoskeletal problems. The method focuses on stabilization and strengthening of the trunk, dorsal and abdominal muscles, including the deep stabilization system which is closely linked with diaphragmatic breathing. It teaches the central nervous system to control muscles more precisely. [Results] Plantar functions, postural control in the upright stance and pain of LBP patients were significantly improved by 4?7 weeks of rehabilitation treatment with the INFINITY method®. There were significant differences in all measured dependent variables of the patients between before and after treatment. [Conclusion] Rehabilitation therapy with the INFINITY method® positively influences body stabilization and pain in patients with problems of the lumbar spine. This method presents a new improved approach (with enhanced effect) to rehabilitation therapy for LBP patients. PMID:26356065

  9. Analgesic effects of dextromethorphan and morphine in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, Tarja; Härtel, Brita; Dahl, Marja-Liisa; Seppälä, Timo; Kalso, Eija

    2002-04-01

    N-methyl-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been shown to improve opioid analgesia in the animal model. The cough suppressant dextromethorphan is a clinically available NMDA-receptor antagonist. In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study 20 patients with chronic pain of several years duration were given 100 mg of oral dextromethorphan or matching placebo 4 h prior to an intravenous infusion of morphine 15 mg. Pain intensity and adverse effects were assessed at 0, 4, 5 and 7 h. Dextromethorphan had no effect on morphine analgesia: the mean (+/-SEM) visual analogue scores for pain relief (VAS, 0-100 mm) at the end of the morphine infusion were 38 (+/-6) for dextromethorphan+morphine and 38 (+/-7) for placebo+morphine. VAS scores for pain intensity were comparable both at rest and at movement at all time points. The most common adverse effects reported were dizziness, nausea and sedation. There were no significant differences in either the incidence or severity of adverse effects. In conclusion, oral dextromethorphan 100 mg had no effect on pain relief by intravenous morphine 15 mg in patients with chronic pain. PMID:11972998

  10. Functional Network Architecture Predicts Psychologically Mediated Analgesia Related to Treatment in Chronic Knee Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jian; Spaeth, Rosa; Khan, Sheraz; Kaptchuk, Ted J.

    2014-01-01

    Placebo analgesia is an indicator of how efficiently the brain translates psychological signals conveyed by a treatment procedure into pain relief. It has been demonstrated that functional connectivity between distributed brain regions predicts placebo analgesia in chronic back pain patients. Greater network efficiency in baseline brain networks may allow better information transfer and facilitate adaptive physiological responses to psychological aspects of treatment. Here, we theorized that topological network alignments in resting state scans predict psychologically conditioned analgesic responses to acupuncture treatment in chronic knee osteoarthritis pain patients (n = 45). Analgesia was induced by building positive expectations toward acupuncture treatment with verbal suggestion and heat pain conditioning on a test site of the arm. This procedure induced significantly more analgesia after sham or real acupuncture on the test site than in a control site. The psychologically conditioned analgesia was invariant to sham versus real treatment. Efficiency of information transfer within local networks calculated with graph-theoretic measures (local efficiency and clustering coefficients) significantly predicted conditioned analgesia. Clustering coefficients in regions associated with memory, motivation, and pain modulation were closely involved in predicting analgesia. Moreover, women showed higher clustering coefficients and marginally greater pain reduction than men. Overall, analgesic response to placebo cues can be predicted from a priori resting state data by observing local network topology. Such low-cost synchronizations may represent preparatory resources that facilitate subsequent performance of brain circuits in responding to adaptive environmental cues. This suggests a potential utility of network measures in predicting placebo response for clinical use. PMID:24623770

  11. Chiropractic management of a patient with lumbar spine pain due to synovial cyst: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to report the findings resulting from chiropractic care using flexion distraction spinal manipulation for a patient with low back and radicular pain due to spinal stenosis caused by a synovial cyst. Case Report A 75-year-old man presented with low back pain radiating to the right anterior thigh and down the left posterior leg of 3 years' duration. Physical and imaging examinations showed a synovial cyst–induced spinal stenosis at the right L3-L4 level and bilateral L4-L5 spinal stenosis. Intervention and Outcomes Flexion distraction spinal manipulation and physiological therapeutics were applied at the levels of stenosis. After 4 visits, the patient noted total absence of the right and left lower extremity pain and no adverse reaction to treatment. After 3 months of treatment and 16 visits, his low back and buttock pain were minimal; and he had no leg pain. Conclusion Lumbar synovial cyst and stenosis–generated low back and radicular pain was 80% relieved in a 75-year-old man following Cox flexion distraction spinal manipulation. PMID:22942836

  12. Low back pain patients' experiences of work modifications; a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Research indicates that work modifications can reduce sickness absence and work disability due to low back pain. However, there are few studies that have described modified work from the perspective of patients. A greater understanding of their experiences may inform future workplace management of employees with this condition. Methods Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-five employed patients who had been referred for back pain rehabilitation. All had expressed concern about their ability to work due to low back pain. Data was analysed thematically. Results Many participants had made their own work modifications, which were guided by the extent of control they had over their hours and duties, colleague support, and their own beliefs and attitudes about working with back pain. A minority of the participants had received advice or support with work modifications through occupational health. Access to these services was limited and usually followed lengthy sickness absence. Implementation largely rested with the manager and over-cautious approaches were common. Conclusions There was little evidence of compliance with occupational health guidance on modified work. There appears to be insufficient expertise among managers and occupational health in modifying work for employees with low back pain and little indication of joint planning. On the whole, workers make their own modifications, or arrange them informally with their manager and colleagues, but remain concerned about working with back pain. More effective and appropriate application of modifications may increase employees' confidence in their ability to work. PMID:21134248

  13. Randomised trial of a brief physiotherapy intervention compared with usual physiotherapy for neck pain patients: outcomes and patients' preference

    PubMed Central

    Klaber Moffett, Jennifer A; Jackson, David A; Richmond, Stewart; Hahn, Seokyung; Coulton, Simon; Farrin, Amanda; Manca, Andrea; Torgerson, David J

    2005-01-01

    Objectives Firstly, to compare the effectiveness of a brief physiotherapy intervention with “usual” physiotherapy for patients with neck pain. Secondly, to evaluate the effect of patients' preferences on outcome. Design Non-inferiority randomised controlled trial eliciting preferences independently of randomisation. Setting Physiotherapy departments in a community setting in Yorkshire and north Lincolnshire. Participants 268 patients (mean age 48 years) with subacute and chronic neck pain, who were referred by their general practitioner and randomly assigned to a brief physiotherapy intervention (one to three sessions) using cognitive behaviour principles to encourage self management and return to normal function or usual physiotherapy, at the discretion of the physiotherapist concerned. Main outcome measures The Northwick Park neck pain questionnaire (NPQ), a specific measure of functional disability resulting from neck pain. Also, the short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire, a generic, health related, quality of life measure; and the Tampa scale for kinesophobia, a measure of fear and avoidance of movement. Results At 12 months, patients allocated to usual physiotherapy had a small but significant improvement in NPQ scores compared with patients in the brief intervention group (mean difference 1.99, 95% confidence interval 0.45 to 3.52; P = 0.01). Although the result shows a significant inferiority of the intervention, the confidence interval shows that the effect could be in the non-inferiority range for the brief intervention (below 1.2 points of NPQ score). Patients who preferred the brief intervention and received this treatment had similar outcomes to patients receiving usual physiotherapy. Conclusions Usual physiotherapy may be only marginally better than a brief physiotherapy intervention for neck pain. Patients with a preference for the brief intervention may do at least as well with this approach. Additional training for the physiotherapists in cognitive behaviour techniques might improve this approach further. PMID:15585539

  14. Battlefield anesthesia: advances in patient care and pain management.

    PubMed

    Baker, Bruce C; Buckenmaier, Chester; Narine, Nalan; Compeggie, Michael E; Brand, George J; Mongan, Paul D

    2007-03-01

    Expeditionary maneuver warfare and the asymmetric battlefield have forced changes in the traditional methods with which we deliver anesthesia and surgery to the wounded. Although in many ways similar to how we have operated on the wounded for the past half century, new advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and doctrinal shifts have changed the face of the battlefield hospital. In this article, the authors discuss these changes in regard to anesthetic care for surgical and pain management for wounded airmen, sailors, soldiers, and marines. PMID:17400161

  15. Long term recurrence, pain and patient satisfaction after ventral hernia mesh repair

    PubMed Central

    Langbach, Odd; Bukholm, Ida; Benth, J?rat? Šaltyt?; Røkke, Ola

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare long term outcomes of laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair with respect to recurrence, pain and satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a single-centre follow-up study of 194 consecutive patients after laparoscopic and open ventral hernia mesh repair between March 2000 and June 2010. Of these, 27 patients (13.9%) died and 12 (6.2%) failed to attend their follow-up appointment. One hundred and fifty-three (78.9%) patients attended for follow-up and two patients (1.0%) were interviewed by telephone. Of those who attended the follow-up appointment, 82 (52.9%) patients had received laparoscopic ventral hernia mesh repair (LVHR) while 73 (47.1%) patients had undergone open ventral hernia mesh repair (OVHR), including 11 conversions. The follow-up study included analyses of medical records, clinical interviews, examination of hernia recurrence and assessment of pain using a 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS) ruler anchored by word descriptors. Overall patient satisfaction was also determined. Patients with signs of recurrence were examined by magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography scan. RESULTS: Median time from hernia mesh repair to follow-up was 48 and 52 mo after LVHR and OVHR respectively. Overall recurrence rates were 17.1% after LVHR and 23.3% after OVHR. Recurrence after LVHR was associated with higher body mass index. Smoking was associated with recurrence after OVHR. Chronic pain (VAS > 30 mm) was reported by 23.5% in the laparoscopic cohort and by 27.8% in the open surgery cohort. Recurrence and late complications were predictors of chronic pain after LVHR. Smoking was associated with chronic pain after OVHR. Sixty point five percent were satisfied with the outcome after LVHR and 49.3% after OVHR. Predictors for satisfaction were absence of chronic pain and recurrence. Old age and short time to follow-up also predicted satisfaction after LVHR. CONCLUSION: LVHR and OVHR give similar long term results for recurrence, pain and overall satisfaction. Chronic pain is frequent and is therefore important for explaining dissatisfaction.

  16. Erdheim–Chester disease and knee pain in a dialysis patient

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Sibylle; Anagnostopoulos, Joannis; Luft, Friedrich C.; Kettritz, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Erdheim–Chester disease is a rare inflammatory condition characterized by a non-Langerhans histiocytic infiltration, involving the skeleton, nervous system, viscera, retroperitoneum and elsewhere. The aetiology is unknown. Positron emission tomography shows areas of involvement. We managed a dialysis patient with knee pain; a bone marrow specimen showed typical CD68 positive, but CD1a negative cells. We initiated interferon-? therapy although other options remain open. In our patient, the simultaneous presence of secondary hyperparathyroidism with tumorous calcifications provided an interesting additional differential diagnostic possibility regarding skeletal pain. PMID:25852919

  17. Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data for three pharmacological treatments: pregabalin, lidocaine plaster, and duloxetine, which are typically used at 2nd line or later in UK patients with neuropathic pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and CCTR was carried out and supplemented with extensive conference and grey literature searching. Studies of any design (except single patient case studies) that enrolled adult patients with refractory NeP were included in the review and qualitatively assessed. Results Seventeen studies were included in the review: nine of pregabalin, seven of the lidocaine plaster, and one of duloxetine. No head-to-head studies of these treatments were identified. Only six studies included treatments within UK licensed indications and dose ranges. Reported efficacy outcomes were not consistent between studies. Pain scores were most commonly assessed in studies including pregabalin; trials of pregabalin and the lidocaine plaster reported the proportion of responders. Significant improvements in the total, sensory and affective scores of the Short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and in function interference, sleep interference and pain associated distress, were associated with pregabalin treatment; limited or no quality of life data were available for the other two interventions. Limitations to the review are the small number of included studies, which are generally small, of poor quality and heterogeneous in patient population and study design. Conclusions Little evidence is available relevant to the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain despite the clinical need. There is a notable lack of high-quality comparative studies. It is evident that there is a need for future, high quality trials, particularly "gold-standard" RCTs in this refractory patient population. PMID:21092100

  18. Abnormal brain processing of cutaneous pain in migraine patients during the attack.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Guido, Marco; Libro, Giuseppe; Losito, Luciana; Sciruicchio, Vittorio; Monetti, Carlo; Puca, Francomichele

    2002-11-15

    We examined cutaneous pain thresholds using CO(2) laser stimuli during migraine attacks, and defined the evoked cortical potential characteristics. Ten patients without aura were studied during attacks and for at least 72 h subsequently. Pain stimuli were generated on the dorsum of both hands and the right and left supraorbital zones, using pulses from a CO(2) laser. Absolute latencies of scalp potentials were measured at the highest peak of each response component, and the peak-to-peak amplitudes of N2a-P2 components were recorded. Cutaneous pain thresholds were significantly reduced on both the symptomatic and non-symptomatic sides during the attack, in comparison with the headache-free phase. The N2a-P2 complexes also increased in amplitude during attacks in comparison with the pain-free side. Thus, cutaneous hyperalgesia occurs during migraine attack, and is subtended by central sensitization phenomena, probably involving the cortex. PMID:12401553

  19. The effects of electroacupuncture on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds in patients with burn scar pain.

    PubMed

    Cuignet, Olivier; Pirlot, A; Ortiz, S; Rose, T

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to observe if the effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) on analgesia and peripheral sensory thresholds are transposable from the model of heat pain in volunteers to the clinical setting of burn scar pain. After severe burns, pathological burn scars (PPBS) may occur with excruciating pain that respond poorly to treatment and prevent patients from wearing their pressure garments, thereby leading to unesthetic and function-limiting scars. EA might be of greater benefit in terms of analgesia and functional recovery, should it interrupt this vicious circle by counteracting the peripheral hyperalgesia characterizing PPBS. Therefore we enrolled 32 patients (22 males/10 females) aged of 46±11 years with clinical signs of PPBS and of neuropathic pain despite treatment. The study protocol consisted in 3 weekly 30-min sessions of standardized EA with extra individual needles in accordance to Traditional Chinese Medicine, in addition of previous treatments. We assessed VAS for pain and quantitative sensory testing (QST) twice: one week before and one after protocol. QST measured electrical thresholds for non-nociceptive A-beta fibers, nociceptive A-delta and C fibers in 2 dermatomes, respectively from the PPBS and from the contralateral pain-free areas. Based on heat pain studies, EA consisted in sessions at the extremity points of the main meridian flowing through PPBS (0.300s, 5Hz, sub noxious intensity, 15min) and at the bilateral paravertebral points corresponding to the same metameric level, 15min. VAS reduction of 3 points or below 3 on a 10 points scale was considered clinically relevant. Paired t-test compared thresholds (mean [SD]) and Wilcoxon test compared VAS (median [IQR]) pre and after treatment, significant p<0.05. The reduction of VAS for pain reached statistical but not clinical relevance (6.8 [3] vs. 4.5 [3.6]). This was due to a large subgroup of 14 non-responders whose VAS did not change after treatment (6.6 [2.7] vs. 7.2 [3.8]). That subgroup exhibited significant differences in sensory thresholds when compared to the 18 responders (VAS from 7 [3] to 3 [1]). First, responders' thresholds for A-delta and C fibers in the PPBS area were significantly lower than those in the pain-free area before treatment but corrected after acupuncture (from respectively 60 [30] and 63 [10]% to 91 [11] and 106 [36]%). That might account for a nociceptive hypersensitivity in the PPBS that corrected after treatment. On the contrary, in non-responders nociceptive thresholds were similar in both the PPBS and the pain-free areas before treatment and did not change after EA. However, absolute values for thresholds in the pain-free areas where significantly lower for non-responders than for responders. The fact that non-responders had significant pain scores while presenting with lowered nociceptive thresholds even in the pain-free areas might evoke the possibility of a generalized supra-spinal hyperalgesia. The fact that acupuncture did not correct the pain nor the nociceptive thresholds in this subgroup requires further investigation. We also observed a statistically and clinically relevant reduction in VAS for pruritus for all patients - even those from the subgroup of non-responders to pain - that is worth to be mentioned and requires further studies to be confirmed. This observational study is the first that confirms the effects of acupuncture on analgesia and nociceptive thresholds in the clinical setting of burn pain only for patients presenting with a burn-localized but not a generalized hyperalgesia. PMID:26188894

  20. A preliminary study comparing methadone and buprenorphine in patients with chronic pain and coexistent opioid addiction.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Anne M; Blondell, Richard D; Jaanimägi, Urmo; Giambrone, Amanda K; Homish, Gregory G; Lozano, Jacqueline R; Kowalik, Urszula; Azadfard, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Patients with opioid addiction who receive prescription opioids for treatment of nonmalignant chronic pain present a therapeutic challenge. Fifty-four participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction were randomized to receive methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. At the 6-month follow-up examination, 26 (48.1%) participants who remained in the study noted a 12.75% reduction in pain (P = 0.043), and no participants in the methadone group compared to 5 in the buprenorphine group reported illicit opioid use (P = 0.039). Other differences between the two conditions were not found. Long-term, low-dose methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone treatment produced analgesia in participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction. PMID:23480249

  1. Pain Phenotype in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: Classification and Measurement Properties of painDETECT and Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs Scale in a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Moreton, Bryan J; Tew, Victoria; das Nair, Roshan; Wheeler, Maggie; Walsh, David A; Lincoln, Nadina B

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple mechanisms are involved in pain associated with osteoarthritis (OA). The painDETECT and Self-Report Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS) questionnaires screen for neuropathic pain and may also identify individuals with musculoskeletal pain who exhibit abnormal central pain processing. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate painDETECT and S-LANSS for classification agreement and fit to the Rasch model, and to explore their relationship to pain severity and pain mechanisms in OA. Methods A total of 192 patients with knee OA completed questionnaires covering different aspects of pain. Another group of 77 patients with knee OA completed questionnaires and underwent quantitative sensory testing for pressure–pain thresholds (PPTs). Agreement between painDETECT and S-LANSS was evaluated using kappa coefficients and receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves. Rasch analysis of both questionnaires was conducted. Relationships between screening questionnaires and measures of pain severity or PPTs were calculated using correlations. Results PainDETECT and S-LANSS shared a stronger correlation with each other than with measures of pain severity. ROC curves identified optimal cutoff scores for painDETECT and S-LANSS to maximize agreement, but the kappa coefficient was low (? = 0.33–0.46). Rasch analysis supported the measurement properties of painDETECT but not those of S-LANSS. Higher painDETECT scores were associated with widespread reductions in PPTs. Conclusion The data suggest that painDETECT assesses pain quality associated with augmented central pain processing in patients with OA. Although developed as a screening questionnaire, painDETECT may also function as a measure of characteristics that indicate augmented central pain processing. Agreement between painDETECT and S-LANSS for pain classification was low, and it is currently unknown which tool may best predict treatment outcome. PMID:25155472

  2. Prevalence of illicit drug use in patients without controlled substance abuse in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Damron, Kim S; Beyer, Carla D; Barnhill, Renee C

    2003-04-01

    Drug abuse with illicit drugs and licit drugs has been increasing steadily over the past decade. A recent National Household Survey on Drug Abuse found statistically significant increases between 2000 and 2001 in the use of multiple drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, and non-medical use of pain relievers and tranquilizers. Prescription controlled substance abuse is a major issue in chronic pain management. Various means suggested to avoid or monitor abuse in patients in treatment include urine/serum drug screening whenever requested, along with other precautions including one prescribing physician and one designated pharmacy, etc. Based on the present evidence, physicians assume that patients adhering to controlled substance agreements and without obvious dependency behavior do not abuse either illicit or licit drugs. Thus, it is accepted that there is no necessity to perform routine urine/drug testing in this specific group of the patient population. One hundred patients undergoing interventional pain management and receiving controlled substances were randomly selected for evaluation of illicit drug abuse by urine drug testing. They were selected from a total of 250 patients who were identified as non-abusers of prescription drugs. Results showed that illicit drug abuse in patients without history of controlled substance abuse was seen in 16 patients. Thirteen of the 16 patients tested positive for marijuana and 3 patients tested positive for cocaine. Only one patient tested positive for a combined use of both marijuana and cocaine. This study showed that, in an interventional pain management setting, there is significant use of illicit drugs (16%) with 13% use of marijuana and 3% use of cocaine in patients who are considered as non-abusers of prescription controlled substances and those who are adherent to controlled substance agreements. However, if cocaine is considered as a hardcore drug in contrast to marijuana, abuse of hardcore illicit drugs is only 3%. PMID:16883377

  3. Infrared thermography and acupuncture of the lobe of the outer ear in patients with facial pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Ricardo; Lluesma, Eliseo G.

    2001-03-01

    We have assessed the thermal camera to complement the clinical odontology with the clinical assistance of acupuncture. Relevant cases of study were those of patients with facial pain. This work has registered the temperatures of the microsystem of the lobe of the outer ear. The recordings were made before, during and after removing the needles. Measurements of patients' temperatures were made very two minutes for 20 minutes, and a gradual increase of temperature was observed. The thermal camera allowed to register maps (thermography) that show an area affected with pain. After thermograms were performed to odontology patients treated with acupuncture, we were able to compare the temperature distribution maps and we found that they were quasi repetitive in the same zones in several patients for a specific illness. We made this technique available to different patients with lack of good irrigation on face and neck with the aim to establish patterns.

  4. Effect of hospice nonprofessional caregiver barriers to pain management on adherence to analgesic administration recommendations and patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mayahara, Masako; Foreman, Marquis D; Wilbur, JoEllen; Paice, Judith A; Fogg, Louis F

    2015-06-01

    Nonprofessional caregivers frequently experience barriers to using analgesics for pain in patients in home hospice settings, and patients in pain may suffer needlessly. For example, caregiver adherence to the administration of analgesics is lower for as-needed (PRN) regimens than for standard around-the-clock regimens. But little is known about the barriers caregivers experience and the effects of those barriers. Accordingly, we determined caregiver barriers to using analgesics to manage the pain of patients in the home hospice care setting, and how such barriers affected caregiver adherence and patient quality of life. To this end, we measured barriers, caregiver adherence to PRN analgesic regimens, and patient health outcomes (pain, depression, quality of life [QoL]). A 3-day longitudinal design was used. We recruited 46 hospice nonprofessional caregiver-patient dyads from a local community hospice agency. Barriers were measured with the Barrier Questionnaire II. Adherence to the PRN analgesic regimen was obtained with a 3-day pain and medication diary. Patient outcome measures included pain intensity, the Hospital Depression Scale, and the Brief Hospice Inventory for QoL. Barrier scores were moderate to low. Caregivers adhered to PRN analgesic regimens approximately 51% of the time. Higher caregiver adherence to PRN analgesic regimens was associated with lower patient pain intensity and higher patient QoL, but not, surprisingly, with barriers to pain management. Longitudinal studies are now needed to identify factors besides caregiver barriers that may unduly lower caregiver adherence to PRN analgesic regimens. PMID:25434499

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Channel Polymorphisms Are Associated with the Somatosensory Function in Neuropathic Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Tölle, Thomas R.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Berthele, Achim; Faltraco, Frank; Flor, Herta; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haenisch, Sierk; Huge, Volker; Magerl, Walter; Maihöfner, Christian; Richter, Helmut; Rolke, Roman; Scherens, Andrea; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Ufer, Mike; Wasner, Gunnar; Zhu, Jihong; Cascorbi, Ingolf

    2011-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz) 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K) was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p?=?0.03), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V) with cold hypoalgesia (p?=?0.0035). Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1) and impaired (2) sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p?=?0.006, p?=?0.005 and p<0.001) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1103C>G (rs222747, M315I) to cold hypaesthesia (p?=?0.002), but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In this study we found no evidence that genetic variants of transient receptor potential channels are involved in the expression of neuropathic pain, but transient receptor potential channel polymorphisms contributed significantly to the somatosensory abnormalities of neuropathic pain patients. PMID:21468319

  6. Effects on postoperative salivary cortisol of relaxation/music and patient teaching about pain management.

    PubMed

    Good, Marion; Albert, Jeffrey M; Arafah, Baha; Anderson, Gene Cranston; Wotman, Stephen; Cong, Xiaomei; Lane, Deforia; Ahn, Sukhee

    2013-07-01

    The physiological and psychological stress of surgery and postoperative pain can leave patients more susceptible to infection and complications. The present study was designed to determine whether two interventions, patient teaching (PT) for pain management and relaxation/music (RM), reduced cortisol levels, an indicator of stress, following abdominal surgery. Patients (18-75 years) were randomly assigned to receive PT, RM, a combination of the two, or usual care; the 205 patients with both pre- and posttest cortisol values were analyzed. A 2 × 2 factorial design was used to compare groups for PT effects and RM effects. Stress was measured by salivary cortisol before and after 20-min tests of the interventions in the morning and afternoon of postoperative Day 2. Saliva was stimulated with lemon juice and analyzed with high-sensitivity salivary cortisol enzyme immunoassay. Comparisons using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), controlling for baseline levels, showed no PT effect or RM effect on cortisol in the morning or afternoon. Post hoc ANCOVA showed no significant effects when intervention groups were compared to the control group. Although in previous studies, RM reduced pain and music reduced cortisol on Day 1, in the present study the cortisol response to surgery was not attenuated by PT or RM on Day 2. The RM intervention can be used for pain but needs to be further tested for effects on plasma cortisol in abdominal surgery patients on their first postoperative day. PMID:22472905

  7. Efficacy of acupunture in patients with chronic neck pain--a randomised, sham controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Nilay; Ozcan, Emel; Sezen, Kasim; Karatas, Omer; Issever, Halim

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of electroacupuncture and sham acupuncture in the treatment of patients with chronic neck pain. 31 patients with chronic neck pain were included in a randomised, controlled trial. Electric stimulation was given for 30 minutes at low frequency (1-4Hz), pulse width of 200 micros, interrupted wave form. Of the 29 patients who completed the therapy, 13 were assigned to conventional acupuncture and 16 to sham acupuncture groups, receiving 3 sessions a week for a total of 10 sessions, each lasting for 30 minutes. Patients were evaluated before and after therapy and 3 months later by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the bodily pain subscale of the Short Form Health Survey-36 scale. The treating physician was different from the evaluating physician who, like the patient, was blinded. VAS scores in both groups significantly reduced after therapy and at 3 months post-therapy, but the difference between groups was not significant. In respect of bodily pain, there was a significant improvement in the acupuncture group after therapy (P<0.01). Stimulation of conventional acupuncture points was not generally superior to needling ofnonspecific points on the neck, and both treatments were associated with improvement of symptoms. Needles inserted into the neck are likely to be an inappropriate sham control for acupuncture. PMID:20578644

  8. Evaluation of concomitant methylphenidate and opioid use in patients with pain.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Joy Y; Best, Brookie M; Morello, Candis M; Atayee, Rabia S; Ma, Joseph D

    2014-09-01

    Methylphenidate is a central nervous system simulant that is used for management of opioid-induced sedation. Sparse data exist regarding use patterns of methylphenidate and opioids in patients with pain. This retrospective data analysis evaluated concomitant methylphenidate and opioid use from physician-reported medication lists and in urine specimens of patients with pain. All specimens were analyzed and quantified with LC-MS-MS. Concomitant methylphenidate and opioid use (e.g., sample population) were compared with a baseline population of patients taking opioids. There were 3,326 patients with physician-reported use of methylphenidate. Of these, 1,089 patients were tested for the presence of methylphenidate in urine. Methylphenidate was positive in urine for 551 patients (detection rate of 50.6%). Ritalinic acid was positive in 776 patients (detection rate of 71.3%). The current study observed differences in the use pattern of methylphenidate based on opioid type. Physician-reported use revealed methadone had the highest percent difference between the sample and baseline populations (77%, P ? 0.05). Fentanyl, morphine and hydromorphone also had higher percent differences of 19.6, 25.3 and 32.3%, respectively. Further studies need to examine the apparent discrepancies between the physician-reported medication lists and urine drug testing of concomitant methylphenidate and opioid use in patients with pain. PMID:24907143

  9. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty for Pain Management in Patients with Multiple Myeloma: Is Radiofrequency Ablation Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Orgera, Gianluigi; Krokidis, Miltiadis; Matteoli, Marco; Varano, Gianluca Maria; La Verde, Giacinto; David, Vincenzo; Rossi, Michele

    2013-05-08

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate the added role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) to vertebroplasty on the pain management of patients with multiple myeloma (MM).MethodsThirty-six patients (51–82 years) with vertebral localization of MM were randomly divided into two groups: 18 patients (group A) who underwent RFA and then vertebroplasty, and 18 patients (group B) who underwent only vertebroplasty. Primary endpoints were technical success and pain relief score rate measured by the visual analogue pain scores (VAS) and Roland–Morris Questionnaire (RMQ); secondary endpoint was the amount of administered analgesia. Survival and complications were compared.ResultsTechnical success was 100 % in both groups. The VAS score (at 24 h and 6 weeks postprocedure) decreased in equal manner for both groups from a mean of 9.1–3.4 and 2.0 for group A and from a mean of 9.3–3.0 and 2.3 for group B; RMQ mean score was 19.8 for group A and 19.9 for group B and decreased to a mean of 9.6 and 8.2 for group A and 9.5 and 8.7 for group B. The amount of medication was equally decreased in the two groups. No statistically significant difference was noted. No major complication occurred and two patients died from other causes.ConclusionsThe use of percutaneous vertebroplasty alone appears to be effective for the pain management of the patients with vertebral involvement of multiple myeloma. The use of RFA that includes cost and time does not offer any clear added benefit on the midterm pain management of such patients.

  10. Current practices in cancer pain management in Asia: a survey of patients and physicians across 10 countries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Chul; Ahn, Jin Seok; Calimag, Maria Minerva P; Chao, Ta Chung; Ho, Kok Yuen; Tho, Lye Mun; Xia, Zhong-Jun; Ward, Lois; Moon, Hanlim; Bhagat, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    In order to implement more effective policies for cancer pain management, a better understanding of current practices is needed. Physicians managing cancer pain and patients experiencing cancer pain were randomly surveyed across 10 Asian countries to assess attitudes and perceptions toward cancer pain management. A total of 463 physicians (77.3% oncologists) with a median experience of 13 years were included. Medical school training on opioid use was considered inadequate by 30.5% of physicians and 55.9% indicated ?10 h of continuing medical education (CME). Of the 1190 patients included, 1026 reported moderate-to-severe pain (median duration, 12 months). Discordance was observed between physician and patient outcomes on pain assessment with 88.3% of physicians reporting pain quantification, while 49.5% of patients claimed that no scale was used. Inadequate assessment of pain was recognized as a barrier to therapy optimization by 49.7% of physicians. Additional barriers identified were patients’ reluctance owing to fear of addiction (67.2%) and adverse events (65.0%), patients’ reluctance to report pain (52.5%), excessive regulations (48.0%) and reluctance to prescribe opioids (42.8%). Opioid use was confirmed only in 53.2% (286/538) of patients remembering their medication. Pain affected the activities of daily living for 81.3% of patients. These findings highlight the need for better training and CME opportunities for cancer pain management in Asia. Collaborative efforts between physicians, patients, policy makers, and related parties may assist in overcoming the barriers identified. Addressing the opioid stigma and enhancing awareness is vital to improving current standards of patient care. PMID:25914253

  11. Capsaicin failed in suppressing cortical processing of CO2 laser pain in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Losito, Luciana; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Sardaro, Michele; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Lamberti, Paolo; Livrea, Paolo

    The aim of this study was to compare the properties of the nociceptive system in eight migraine without aura patients in the pain-free phase with 10 healthy controls, by evaluating the topography and the source of the CO2 laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) obtained by the right supraorbital skin, during and after capsaicin topical application. In healthy subjects the acute cutaneous pain induced by capsaicin reduced the amplitude of the vertex LEPs and induced a posterior shifting of the P2 wave dipolar source within the anterior cingulate cortex. These functional changes seemed significantly reduced in migraine patients, for a disturbed pattern of pain modulation at the cortical level, which may subtend the onset and persistence of migraine. PMID:15927376

  12. Expert insights on the design and implementation of interactive patient websites for people with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Merolli, Mark; Gray, Kathleen; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Schulz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a burden on an individual, social and economic level. Growing published research outlines various innovative online solutions aimed at addressing this issue, including interactive patient websites. This paper presents expert insights regarding an existing interactive chronic pain website, 'ONESELF', operating in Switzerland. Based on their experience, members of the research team involved in the 'ONESELF' project were asked to reflect about what they understood to be key considerations salient to designing and implementing such interventions. Thematic analysis uncovered five main themes that these experts used to interpret what worked, when and why in 'ONESELF' design and implementation: health literacy, Internet literacy, access to healthcare, adherence and attrition, and health outcomes. These findings may serves as a base to assist Australian health researchers and practitioners working toward developing effective interactive patient websites for people with chronic pain. PMID:25087536

  13. The effects of music on pain perception of stroke patients during upper extremity joint exercises.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Ji; Koh, Iljoo

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on pain perception of stroke patients during upper extremity joint exercises. Ten stroke patients (1 male and 9 females) ranging in age from 61 to 73 participated in the study. Music conditions used in the study consisted of: (a) song, (b) karaoke accompaniment (same music to condition A except singers' voices), and (c) no music. Exercise movements in this study included hand, wrist, and shoulder joints. During the 8-week period music therapy sessions, subjects repeated 3 conditions according to the randomized orders and subjects rated their perceived pain on a scale immediately after each condition. The General Linear Model (GLM) Repeated Measures ANOVA revealed that there were no significant differences in pain rating across the three music conditions. However, positive affects and verbal responses, while performing upper extremity exercises with both music and karaoke accompaniment music, were observed using video observations. PMID:15839735

  14. Impact of a stepwise protocol for treating pain on pain intensity in nursing home patients with dementia: A cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Sandvik, RK; Selbaek, G; Seifert, R; Aarsland, D; Ballard, C; Corbett, A; Husebo, BS

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is frequent and distressing in people with dementia, but no randomized controlled trials have evaluated the effect of analgesic treatment on pain intensity as a key outcome. Methods Three hundred fifty-two people with dementia and significant agitation from 60 nursing home units were included in this study. These units, representing 18 nursing homes in western Norway, were randomized to a stepwise protocol of treating pain (SPTP) or usual care. The SPTP group received acetaminophen, morphine, buprenorphine transdermal patch and pregabalin for 8 weeks, with a 4-week washout period. Medications were governed by the SPTP and each participant's existing prescriptions. We obtained pain intensity scores from 327 patients (intervention n?=?164, control n?=?163) at five time points assessed by the primary outcome measure, Mobilization-Observation-Behaviour-Intensity-Dementia-2 (MOBID-2) Pain Scale. The secondary outcome was activities of daily living (ADL). We used a linear intercept mixed model in a two-way repeated measures configuration to assess change over time and between groups. Results The SPTP conferred significant benefit in MOBID-2 scores compared with the control group [average treatment effect (ATE) ?1.388; p?patients receiving acetaminophen compared with the controls at week 2 (ATE?=??0.663; p?=?0.010), continuing to increase until week 8 (ATE?=??1.297; p?Pain medication significantly improved pain in the intervention group, with indications that acetaminophen also improved ADL function. What's already known about this topic? Many people with dementia experience pain regularly, but are not able to communicate this to their carers or physicians due to the limited self-report capacity inherent in the symptomatology of dementia. Few studies have investigated the direct effect of pain treatment on pain intensity in patients suffering from dementia, with previous studies using proxy measures of behavioural symptoms. What does this study add? A stepwise protocol to treat pain in nursing home residents with moderate to severe dementia significantly reduced pain intensity. Pain treatment by acetaminophen improved activities of daily living. There is an urgent need for a standardized approach to assessment and treatment of pain for nursing home residents with dementia. PMID:24819710

  15. Cortisol awakening response and pain-related fear-avoidance versus endurance in patients six months after lumbar disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Sudhaus, Sigrid; Möllenberg, Thomas; Plaas, Heike; Willburger, Roland; Schmieder, Kirsten; Hasenbring, Monika

    2012-06-01

    Recent research indicates that stress-induced, prolonged deviations in basal adrenocortical activity might contribute to ongoing/recurrent pain following lumbar disc surgery. Further, fear-avoidance and endurance responses to pain (FAR and ER) are regarded as important risk factors for pain after surgery. In patients with non-specific low back pain, FAR appear to possibly increase pain-related arousal, whereas ER may have an arousal-lowering effect, indicated by adrenocortical activity. The current study explores the relationship between basal adrenocortical activity and FAR and ER. Thirty-six patients 6 months after lumbar disc surgery participated. Basal adrenocortical activity was assessed through the cortisol awakening response (CAR), using salivary samples collected on two consecutive days. FAR and ER were estimated using questionnaires. While the ER variables pain-persistence behavior and positive mood despite pain showed negative associations with the CAR, the FAR variables fear-avoidance beliefs and avoidance of social activity were positively correlated with it. Additionally, higher CAR levels were found in patients with high versus patients with low fear-avoidance beliefs and, conversely, in patients with low versus high positive mood and pain persistence. These results indicate that FAR may increase the individuals' level of pain-related stress among patients after disc surgery, while ER may lower it. PMID:22395425

  16. Testing of Low-Risk Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Amsterdam, Ezra A.; Kirk, J. Douglas; Bluemke, David A.; Diercks, Deborah; Farkouh, Michael E.; Garvey, J. Lee; Kontos, Michael C.; McCord, James; Miller, Todd D.; Morise, Anthony; Newby, L. Kristin; Ruberg, Frederick L.; Scordo, Kristine Anne; Thompson, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    The management of low-risk patients presenting to emergency departments is a common and challenging clinical problem entailing 8 million emergency department visits annually. Although a majority of these patients do not have a life-threatening condition, the clinician must distinguish between those who require urgent treatment of a serious problem and those with more benign entities who do not require admission. Inadvertent discharge of patients with acute coronary syndrome from the emergency department is associated with increased mortality and liability, whereas inappropriate admission of patients without serious disease is neither indicated nor cost-effective. Clinical judgment and basic clinical tools (history, physical examination, and electrocardiogram) remain primary in meeting this challenge and affording early identification of low-risk patients with chest pain. Additionally, established and newer diagnostic methods have extended clinicians' diagnostic capacity in this setting. Low-risk patients presenting with chest pain are increasingly managed in chest pain units in which accelerated diagnostic protocols are performed, comprising serial electrocardiograms and cardiac injury markers to exclude acute coronary syndrome. Patients with negative findings usually complete the accelerated diagnostic protocol with a confirmatory test to exclude ischemia. This is typically an exercise treadmill test or a cardiac imaging study if the exercise treadmill test is not applicable. Rest myocardial perfusion imaging has assumed an important role in this setting. Computed tomography coronary angiography has also shown promise in this setting. A negative accelerated diagnostic protocol evaluation allows discharge, whereas patients with positive findings are admitted. This approach has been found to be safe, accurate, and cost-effective in low-risk patients presenting with chest pain. PMID:20660809

  17. Does Opioid Pain Medication Use Affect the Outcome of Patients with Lumbar Disk Herniation?

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kris; Freedman, Mitchell; Hilibrand, Alan; Isaac, Roman; Lurie, Jon D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Vaccaro, Alex; Albert, Todd; Weinstein, James

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Subgroup analysis of prospective, randomized cohort Objective To review the results of patients who received opioid pain medications during treatment compared to patients who did not receive opioid medications. Summary of Background Data The SPORT trial is a prospective, multicenter study of surgical treatment versus nonoperative treatment for lumbar intervertebral disk herniation (IDH). Methods The study population includes patients enrolled in SPORT for treatment of IDH in combined randomized and observational cohorts. Patients who received opioid medications at baseline (Opioid) were compared to those who did not. (No-Opioid) Results There were 520 patients in the Non-Opioid group and 542 patients in the Opioid group. Among the opioid medication group there were significantly (p<0.001) worse baseline scores in primary and secondary outcome measures. There was an increased percentage of patients in the opioid medication group with the perception of worsening symptoms and neurological deficit (p<0.001). A higher percentage of the opioid patients received surgery (p<0.001) At four years follow-up, there were no significant differences in primary or secondary outcome measures or treatment effect of surgery between opioid and non-opioid medication patients. Opioid medications were associated with increased crossover to surgical treatment (p=0.005) and decreased surgical avoidance. (p=0.01)The incidence of opioid use at four years was 16% among patients who were using opioids at baseline and 5% among patients who were not using opioids at baseline. Conclusion Patients who were treated with opioids had significantly worse baseline pain and quality of life. At final follow-up, there was no long term difference in outcome associated with opioid pain medication use. Opioid medications were not associated with surgical avoidance. The majority of patients who use opioids during the study did not continue usage at four years. PMID:23591657

  18. Relationship between Sleep Disorders, Pain and Quality of Life in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Purabdollah, Majid; Lakdizaji, Sima; Rahmani, Azad; Hajalilu, Mehrzad; Ansarin, Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis as one of the most common autoimmune diseases is known to be one of the leading causes of disability. Sleep disorders have direct influence on patient’s life. According to studies, sleep problems are known to have negative impact on well-being and functioning, but the exact nature of relationship between sleep disorders and Rheumatoid arthritis is not completely understood. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between sleep disorders, pain and quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis patients. Methods: In a descriptive -correlative study, 210 patients with rheumatoid arthritis referred to Tabriz medical university clinics selected by convenience sampling and were assessed by Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), SF-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire and Visual Analog Scale (VAS). Data were analyzed using SPSS-13 by descriptive statistics such as frequency, mean (SD) and inferential statistics including Spearman correlation analysis, linear regression, ?2,t-test and ANOVA. Results: The mean age of participants was 48.41(12.92) years in which most of them (74%) were female. The mean (SD) quality of life was 40.51(22.94), sleepiness 13.14 (5.6) and pain 6.09 (2.14). There was significant negative relationship between some sleep disorders such as (naps, apnea, asphyxia,…) and pain with quality of life but pain severity had more effect on QOL compared to sleep problems. Furthermore, participants had low quality of life with more restriction in physical (mean=34.71) and general health (mean=34.42). Conclusion: Sleep problems and pain were associated with poor quality of life in Rheumatoid Arthritis patients. PMID:26464840

  19. Use of spinal manipulation in a rheumatoid patient presenting with acute thoracic pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chadwick L. R.; Mior, Silvano A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is limited research related to spinal manipulation of uncomplicated thoracic spine pain and even less when pain is associated with comorbid conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. In the absence of trial evidence, clinical experience and appropriate selection of the type of intervention is important to informing the appropriate management of these cases. Case presentation: We present a case of a patient with long standing rheumatoid arthritis who presented with acute thoracic pain. The patient was diagnosed with costovertebral joint dysfunction and a myofascial strain of the surrounding musculature. The patient was unresponsive to treatment involving a generalized manipulative technique; however, improved following the administration of a specific applied manipulation with modified forces. The patient was deemed recovered and discharged with ergonomic and home care recommendations. Discussion: This case demonstrates a clinical situation where there is a paucity of research to guide management, thus clinicians must rely on experience and patient preferences in the selection of an appropriate and safe therapeutic intervention. The case highlights the need to contextualize the apparent contraindication of manipulation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and calls for further research. Finally the paper advances evidence based decision making that balances the available research, clinical experience, as well as patient preferences. PMID:26136606

  20. Effects of remote cutaneous pain on trigeminal laser-evoked potentials in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Sardaro, Michele; Libro, Giuseppe; Pecoraro, Carla; Serpino, Claudia; Lamberti, Paolo; Livrea, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate heat pain thresholds and evoked potentials following CO(2) laser thermal stimulation (laser-evoked potentials, LEPs), during remote application of capsaicin, in migraine patients vs. non-migraine healthy controls. Twelve outpatients suffering from migraine without aura were compared with 10 healthy controls. The LEPs were recorded by 6 scalp electrodes, stimulating the dorsum of the right hand and the right supraorbital zone in basal condition, during the application of 3% capsaicin on the dorsum of the left hand and after capsaicin removal. In normal subjects, the laser pain and the N2-P2 vertex complex obtained by the hand and face stimulation were significantly reduced during remote capsaicin application, with respect to pre-and post-capsaicin conditions, while in migraine LEPs and laser pain were not significantly modified during remote painful stimulation. In migraine a defective brainstem inhibiting control may coexist with cognitive factors of focalised attention to facial pain, less sensitive to distraction by a second pain. PMID:17563842

  1. [Small fiber neuropathy in a patient with complete Heerfordt syndrome manifesting as refractory facial pain].

    PubMed

    Hirai, Toshiaki; Miyagawa, Shinji; Matsui, Kazutaka; Kurita, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of complete Heerfordt syndrome accompanied by the involvement of small fiber neuropathy (SFN) manifesting as refracory facial pain. A 30-year-old man presented with pyrexia, a 2-week history of facial burning pain, and difficulty of mastication. After admission to our hospital, neurological examinations showed bilateral facial pain, trigeminal motor palsy, left facial nerve palsy, bilateral sensory neural deafness, uveitis and swelling of the parotid gland. Other examinations revealed bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, high serum titer of angiotensin coenzyme, and no response in a tuberculin-tested, non-caseating epithelioid granuloma from lip biopsy, leading to the diagnosis of complete Heerfordt syndrome. Mandibular skin biopsy with immunostaining for PGP 9.5 showed SFN. High-dose corticosteroids proved somewhat effective against SFN as facial pain, but reducing the corticosteroid dose proved difficult, as symptoms were refractory to other immunosuppressants and pain-control drugs such as anti-epileptics and anti-depressants. The patient died of acute pancreatitis 3 years after disease onset. Autopsy showed no granuloma in hilar lymph node, trigeminal nerve, cranial base, nerve root, and muscle. SFN in this case probably represent a cause of refractory facial pain. PMID:25087562

  2. Qualitative Investigation of a Brief Chronic Pain Screening Tool in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Walcott, Melonie M.; Herbey, Ivan; Chamot, Eric; Ritchie, Christine; Saag, Michael S.; Kertesz, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Chronic pain in HIV-infected patients is prevalent but understudied. A limitation of HIV/chronic pain research to date is the lack of a widely used chronic pain screening tool. A Brief Chronic Pain Screening tool (BCPS) has been described, but has not yet been tested in a clinical population. This study sought to evaluate how the BCPS is experienced by HIV-infected individuals, and adapt its questions if necessary. We conducted cognitive interviews using cognitive inquiry in participants from the UAB 1917 HIV Clinic Cohort. Data were analyzed using a process of inductive, iterative coding by three investigators. Results: Of 30 participants, most were male, African American, and less than 50 years old. Participants reported that the questions were understandable; however, feedback suggested concerns regarding lack of specificity in regard to the intensity and consistency of pain. An introductory statement aimed at improving clarity resulted in more divergent responses. This research team concluded that the version of the BCPS used in the first 30 interviews was optimum. Its inclusive language allows the respondent to decide what pain merits reporting. This study is the first investigation of the BCPS in a clinical population, and should lead to further quantitative validation studies of this tool. PMID:24621145

  3. Creating Mandalas for the Management of Acute Pain Symptoms in Pediatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinley, Nora E.; Norris, Deborah O.; Hinds, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial explored the feasibility of implementing a fast-acting mandala intervention to reduce physical pain and psychological anxiety experienced during needle sticks. Forty pediatric patients participated in this two-group study: 20 participants created a mandala on an iPad (Treatment Group) and 20 participants…

  4. [Abdominal mass and colicky pain in a 16-years-old patient].

    PubMed

    Michel, S C A; Keerl, A; Kubik-Huch, R A; Geyer, M

    2009-10-01

    We report about a 16-years-old patient with a newly developed palpable mass and pain in the epigastrium. On computed tomography, a trichobezoar was diagnosed. Complementary history, gathered retrospectively, revealed trichophagia and swallowing of chewing gum. Gastroscopic disintegration of the trichobezoar was unsuccessful and it therefore had to be removed by open surgery. PMID:19809981

  5. Demographic and Psycho-Social Implications for Assessment and Treatment of Chronic Pain Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auvenshine, Dwight

    Several demographic and psychosocial variables affect assessment and treatment of chronic pain patients. The variables include demographic characteristics, life styles, family constellations, job conditions, financial status, support networks, and leisure activities. In recent years clinics and programs have emerged in a variety of configurations.…

  6. Hysteria Scale Elevations in Low Back Pain Patients: A Risk Factor for Misdiagnosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Charles K.

    1986-01-01

    Examined the nature of elevations on the Hysteria scale of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in low back pain patients. Subscales reflecting somatic complaints were more powerful predictors of diagnostic status than were subscales with nonsomatic content. Overlapping and nonoverlapping items on the Hysteria and Hypochondriasis scales…

  7. Cranial Treatment and Spinal Manipulation for a Patient With Low Back Pain: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Wayne; Knaap, Simone F.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to present chiropractic management of a patient with chronic low back pain by focusing on the craniomandibular system. Clinical Features A 37-year-old man consulted a chiropractor for pain in the lumbosacral area with radiation down the anterolateral side of the upper left leg. The symptoms started after a fall the previous year. Examination showed a post-traumatic chronic L4-L5 facet dysfunction and left sacro-iliac joint dysfunction. Chiropractic spinal manipulation to the lumbar spine and pelvis gave only temporary relief from the pain. Intervention and Outcome A year later a bone scintigraphy was conducted, in which a lesion was found over the right sphenoid area. Cranial treatment of this area was added to the chiropractic treatment plan. After this treatment, the patient reported that he was pain free and could return to normal activities of daily living. Conclusion The clinical progress of this case suggests that for some patients, adding craniosacral therapy may be helpful in patients with low back symptoms. PMID:26644786

  8. DETECTION OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES IN CHEST PAIN PATIENTS USING NEURAL NETWORK ENSEMBLES

    E-print Network

    Lunds Universitet,

    in Xuea et al. [7] where a hybrid machine learning approach was used, combining neural networks and decision trees. Artificial neural networks (ANN) represents one ma- chine learning tool that have turnedDETECTION OF ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES IN CHEST PAIN PATIENTS USING NEURAL NETWORK ENSEMBLES M

  9. Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Are Deconditioned and Have An Increased Body Fat Percentage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodselmans, Audy P.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare data on the level of aerobic capacity and body composition of nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients with normative data matched for sex, age and level of sporting activity. The study population consisted of 101 outpatients with nonspecific CLBP who had entered a rehabilitation…

  10. "We need to get you focused": general practitioners' representations of chronic low back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Macneela, Pádraig; Gibbons, Andrea; McGuire, Brian; Murphy, Andrew

    2010-07-01

    Although subject to considerable research from perspectives including general practitioners, patients, and perspective guidelines, chronic low back pain (CLBP) continues to be a common but contentious condition in primary care. We used medical consultation records, critical incident interviews, and a think-aloud problem-solving task to examine how general practitioners applied professional knowledge of the condition, especially in relation to psychosocial care. Using qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis, we identified a pragmatic, goal-focused approach to patients, a schema based on biomedical knowledge and tacit theories of motivation. The doctors' expectations for CLBP included uncertainty over symptoms and doubts over patient credibility, which helped to explain an autonomous rather than collaborative approach to managing back pain patients. The findings are discussed in light of social representations theory, self-determination, and research on the therapeutic relationship. PMID:20335499

  11. Costs of moderate to severe chronic pain in primary care patients – a study of the ACCORD Program

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, Lyne; Choinière, Manon; Martin, Élisabeth; Berbiche, Djamal; Perreault, Sylvie; Lussier, David

    2014-01-01

    Background The economic burden of chronic noncancer pain (CNCP) remains insufficiently documented in primary care. Purpose To evaluate the annual direct health care costs and productivity costs associated with moderate to severe CNCP in primary care patients taking into account their pain disability. Materials and methods Patients reporting noncancer pain for at least 6 months, at a pain intensity of 4 or more on a 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst possible pain) intensity scale, and at a frequency of at least 2 days a week, were recruited from community pharmacies. Patients’ characteristics, health care utilization, and productivity losses (absenteeism and presenteeism) were documented using administrative databases, pharmacies’ renewal charts, telephone, and self-administered questionnaires. Patients were stratified by tertile of pain disability measured by the Brief Pain Inventory questionnaire. Results Patients (number =483) were, on average, 59 years old, mainly women (67.5%), and suffered from CNCP for a mean of 12 years at an average pain intensity of 6.5±1.9. The annual direct health care costs and productivity costs averaged CAD $9,565 (±$13,993) and CAD $7,072 (±$11,716), respectively. The use of complementary health care services accounted for almost 50% of the direct health care costs. The mean adjusted total direct health care costs (considering pain-related hospitalizations only) and productivity costs increased with more pain disability: low disability, CAD $12,118; moderate, CAD $18,278; and severe, CAD $19,216; P=0.001. Conclusion The economic burden of CNCP is substantial and increases with the level of pain disability, which suggests the need for and potential benefits of improving CNCP management through specific and adapted treatment plans targeting the impact of pain on daily functioning. PMID:25045282

  12. The bothersomeness of sciatica: patients’ self-report of paresthesia, weakness and leg pain

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grotle, Margreth

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how patients with sciatica due to disc herniation rate the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness as compared to leg pain, and how these symptoms are associated with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 411 patients with clinical signs of radiculopathy. Items from the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (0 = none to 6 = extremely) were used to establish values for paresthesia, weakness and leg pain. Associations with socio-demographic and clinical variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Mean scores (SD) were 4.5 (1.5) for leg pain, 3.4 (1.8) for paresthesia and 2.6 (2.0) for weakness. Women reported higher levels of bothersomeness for all three symptoms with mean scores approximately 10% higher than men. In the multivariate models, more severe symptoms were associated with lower physical function and higher emotional distress. Muscular paresis explained 19% of the variability in self-reported weakness, sensory findings explained 10% of the variability in paresthesia, and straight leg raising test explained 9% of the variability in leg pain. In addition to leg pain, paresthesia and weakness should be assessed when measuring symptom severity in sciatica. PMID:19488793

  13. The bothersomeness of sciatica: patients' self-report of paresthesia, weakness and leg pain.

    PubMed

    Grøvle, Lars; Haugen, Anne Julsrud; Keller, Anne; Natvig, Bård; Brox, Jens Ivar; Grotle, Margreth

    2010-02-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate how patients with sciatica due to disc herniation rate the bothersomeness of paresthesia and weakness as compared to leg pain, and how these symptoms are associated with socio-demographic and clinical characteristics. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 411 patients with clinical signs of radiculopathy. Items from the Sciatica Bothersomeness Index (0 = none to 6 = extremely) were used to establish values for paresthesia, weakness and leg pain. Associations with socio-demographic and clinical variables were analyzed by multiple linear regression. Mean scores (SD) were 4.5 (1.5) for leg pain, 3.4 (1.8) for paresthesia and 2.6 (2.0) for weakness. Women reported higher levels of bothersomeness for all three symptoms with mean scores approximately 10% higher than men. In the multivariate models, more severe symptoms were associated with lower physical function and higher emotional distress. Muscular paresis explained 19% of the variability in self-reported weakness, sensory findings explained 10% of the variability in paresthesia, and straight leg raising test explained 9% of the variability in leg pain. In addition to leg pain, paresthesia and weakness should be assessed when measuring symptom severity in sciatica. PMID:19488793

  14. Median Nerve Stimulation in a Patient with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ik-Chan; Kim, Min-Su

    2009-01-01

    A 54-year-old man experienced injury to the second finger of his left hand due to damage from a paintball gun shot 8 years prior, and the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was amputated. He gradually developed mechanical allodynia and burning pain, and there were trophic changes of the thenar muscle and he reported coldness on his left hand and forearm. A neuroma was found on the left second common digital nerve and was removed, but his symptoms continued despite various conservative treatments including a morphine infusion pump on his left arm. We therefore attempted median nerve stimulation to treat the chronic pain. The procedure was performed in two stages. The first procedure involved exposure of the median nerve on the mid-humerus level and placing of the electrode. The trial stimulation lasted for 7 days and the patient's symptoms improved. The second procedure involved implantation of a pulse generator on the left subclavian area. The mechanical allodynia and pain relief score, based on the visual analogue scale, decreased from 9 before surgery to 4 after surgery. The patient's activity improved markedly, but trophic changes and vasomotor symptom recovered only moderately. In conclusion, median nerve stimulation can improve chronic pain from complex regional pain syndrome type II. PMID:19844632

  15. Median Nerve Stimulation in a Patient with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ik-Chan; Kim, Min-Su; Kim, Seong-Ho

    2009-09-01

    A 54-year-old man experienced injury to the second finger of his left hand due to damage from a paintball gun shot 8 years prior, and the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was amputated. He gradually developed mechanical allodynia and burning pain, and there were trophic changes of the thenar muscle and he reported coldness on his left hand and forearm. A neuroma was found on the left second common digital nerve and was removed, but his symptoms continued despite various conservative treatments including a morphine infusion pump on his left arm. We therefore attempted median nerve stimulation to treat the chronic pain. The procedure was performed in two stages. The first procedure involved exposure of the median nerve on the mid-humerus level and placing of the electrode. The trial stimulation lasted for 7 days and the patient's symptoms improved. The second procedure involved implantation of a pulse generator on the left subclavian area. The mechanical allodynia and pain relief score, based on the visual analogue scale, decreased from 9 before surgery to 4 after surgery. The patient's activity improved markedly, but trophic changes and vasomotor symptom recovered only moderately. In conclusion, median nerve stimulation can improve chronic pain from complex regional pain syndrome type II. PMID:19844632

  16. Discharge Communication in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain: Defining the Ideal Content.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Selina; Heierle, Anette; Bingisser, Martina-Barbara; Hertwig, Ralph; Padiyath, Rakesh; Nickel, Christian Hans; Langewitz, Wolf; Bingisser, Roland

    2016-05-01

    In an emergency department (ED), discharge communication represents a crucial step in medical care. In theory, it fosters patient satisfaction and adherence to medication, reduces anxiety, and ultimately promotes better outcomes. In practice, little is known about the extent to which patients receiving discharge information understand their medical condition and are able to memorize and retrieve instructions. Even less is known about the ideal content of these instructions. Focusing on patients with chest pain, we systematically assessed physicians' and patients' informational preferences and created a memory aid to support both the provision of information (physicians) and its retrieval (patients). In an iterative process, physicians of different specialties (N = 47) first chose which of 81 items to include in an ED discharge communication for patients with acute chest pain. A condensed list of 34 items was then presented to 51 such patients to gauge patients' preferences. Patients' and physicians' ratings of importance converged in 32 of the 34 items. Finally, three experts grouped the 34 items into five categories: (1) information on diagnosis; (2) follow-up suggestions; (3) advice on self-care; (4) red flags; and (5) complete treatment, from which we generated the mnemonic acronym "InFARcT." Defining and structuring the content of discharge information seems especially important for ED physicians and patients, as stress and time constraints jeopardize effective communication in this context. Chest pain accounts for up to 10% of all patient presentations in emergency departments (EDs) (Konkelberg & Esterman, 2003). The majority of these patients will usually be discharged within hours, after exclusion of serious conditions such as myocardial infarction (Goodacre et al., 2011). A comprehensive workup of low- to intermediate-risk patients is not feasible in the ED (Reichlin et al., 2009). Yet many of these patients go on to suffer from repeated episodes of chest pain, associated with anxiety and uncertainty about diagnosis and outcome (Jones & Mountain, 2009). Effective discharge communication, empowering patients to understand and memorize medical information, should therefore be an integral part of patient care. It is a likely contributor to better outcomes (Bishop, Barlow, Hartley, & William, 1997; Kessels, 2003), higher patient satisfaction (Kessels, 2003), better adherence to medication (Cameron, 1996; Kessels, 2003), more adequate disease management, and reduced anxiety (Galloway et al., 1997; Mossman, Boudioni, & Slevin, 1999). PMID:26503453

  17. Somatoform pain disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain disorder ... thought to be related to emotional stress. The pain was often said to be "all in their head." However, patients with somatoform pain disorder seem to experience painful sensations in a ...

  18. Chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy for a geriatric patient with low back pain and comorbidities of cancer, compression fractures, and osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jan A.; Wolfe, Tristy M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this report is to describe the response of a geriatric patient with low back pain and a history of leukemia, multiple compression fractures, osteoporosis, and degenerative joint disease using Activator chiropractic technique. Case Report An 83-year-old man who is the primary caretaker for his disabled wife had low back pain after lifting her into a truck. The patient had a history of leukemia, multiple compression fractures, osteoporosis, and degenerative joint disease. His Revised Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire was 26%, with a 10/10 pain rating at its worst on the Numeric Pain Scale. The patient presented with a left head tilt, right high shoulder, and right high ilium with anterior translation and flexion of the torso and spasm and tenderness from the lower thoracic spine to lumbar spine. Intervention and Outcome The patient was cared for using Activator Methods protocol. After 8 treatments, the patient was stable and remained stable for 4 months without spasm or tenderness in his spine. His Revised Oswestry score dropped to 6%, with a 4/10 Numeric Pain Scale pain rating when at its worst; and the patient reported being able to take care of his wife. Conclusion The findings of this case suggest that Activator-assisted spinal manipulative therapy had a positive effect on low back pain and function in an elderly patient with a complex clinical history. PMID:22942837

  19. The Effect of the Modified Lateral Suprascapular Block on Shoulder Function in Patients With Chronic Shoulder Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Christian; Rumpold-Seitlinger, Gudrun; Farzi, Sylvia; Auer, Johann; Bornemann-Cimenti, Helmar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) is commonly used in pain therapy for patients with chronic shoulder pain. The effect of SSNB on shoulder function has, however, not been investigated so far. If in shoulder function, i.e. the range of motion is increased after application of the nerve block, it can be expected that subsequent physiotherapy, besides being less painful, is also more effective in terms of restoring shoulder mobility. Objectives: Our aim was to evaluate the effect of SSNB on shoulder function, in patients with chronic shoulder pain. Patients and Methods: Patients were evaluated using the Constant-Murley Score (CMS) and number rating scale values for pain. The SSN was blocked using the Feigl approach, with 5 ml ropivacaine 0.5%. Shoulder function and pain were assessed 60 minutes and 24 hours after the block. Results: Totally, 20 patients completed the study. The CMS and pain scores significantly improved after the block. Conclusions: The use of the modified lateral SSNB of Feigl significantly reduces pain and increases shoulder function, in chronic shoulder pain. PMID:26705528

  20. Procedural pain does not raise plasma levels of cortisol or catecholamines in adult intensive care patients after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    van Gulik, L; Ahlers, Sjgm; van Dijk, M; Bruins, P; Meima, M E; de Rijke, Y B; Biemond-Moeniralam, H S; Tibboel, D; Knibbe, Caj

    2016-01-01

    The gold standard for quantification of pain is a person's self-report. However, we need objective parameters for pain measurement when intensive care patients, for example, are not able to report pain themselves. An increase in pain is currently thought to coincide with an increase in stress hormones. This observational study investigated whether procedure-related pain is associated with an increase of plasma cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline. In 59 patients receiving intensive care after cardiac surgery, cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline plasma levels were measured immediately before and immediately after patients were turned for washing, either combined with the removal of chest tubes or not. Numeric rating scale scores were obtained before, during, and after the procedure. Unacceptably severe pain (numeric rating scale ?4) was reported by seven (12%), 26 (44%), and nine (15%) patients, before, during and after the procedure, respectively. There was no statistically significant association between numeric rating scale scores and change in cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline plasma levels during the procedure. Despite current convictions that pain coincides with an increase in stress hormones, procedural pain was not associated with a significant increase in plasma stress hormone levels in patients who had undergone cardiac surgery. Thus, plasma levels of cortisol, adrenaline, and noradrenaline seem unsuitable for further research on the measurement of procedural pain. PMID:26673589

  1. Counseling, quality of life, and acute postoperative pain in elderly patients with hip fracture

    PubMed Central

    Gambatesa, Maria; D’Ambrosio, Alessandro; D’Antini, Davide; Mirabella, Lucia; De Capraris, Antonella; Iuso, Salvatore; Bellomo, Antonello; Macchiarola, Antonio; Dambrosio, Michele; Cinnella, Gilda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hip fractures represent one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly people. Anxiety and depression affect their quality of life and increase pain severity, and have adverse effects on functional recovery. Recent World Health Organization guidelines emphasize that therapeutic regimes need to be individualized and combined with psychological support. This study was launched with the primary endpoint of assessing if and to what extent client-centered therapy affects the perception of pain, reduces anxiety and depression, and increases the quality of life of elderly patients with hip fracture. Materials and methods Forty patients were admitted to the Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery ward for hip fracture. Patients were randomly divided into two subgroups: (1) case (group C), had to receive patient-centered counseling throughout the hospitalization; and (2) control (group NC), receiving the analgesic treatment without receiving counseling. Short Form-36-item Health Survey Questionnaire, State–Trait Anxiety Inventory, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression scores were recorded before any treatment, at discharge, and after 30 days. Pain levels were evaluated by means of Visual Analog Scale every 12 hours during the hospitalization from the day of surgery until day 5. Results The hierarchical clustering analysis identified before any treatment were two clusters based on different physical functioning perceptions and role limitations, which were due to physical and emotional problems. Counseling did have a positive impact on quality of life on all patients, but in a more relevant way if patients were low functioning upon admittance to the ward. Anxiety and depression decreased in patients undergoing counseling, and their pain levels were lower than among patients not receiving it. Conclusion This study reveals that hip fracture patients can be clustered on the basis of Short Form-36 baseline scores. Counseling affects the evolution of mental and physical status in these patients, and the major benefit is reported in patients whose quality of life perception is worse after the trauma. Decreasing anxiety and depression levels, as well as more satisfying pain management, assessed by means of specific tests, confirm the effectiveness of counseling in elderly patients with hip fracture. PMID:24082786

  2. A Traditional Chinese Medicine Xiao-Ai-Tong Suppresses Pain through Modulation of Cytokines and Prevents Adverse Reactions of Morphine Treatment in Bone Cancer Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Yan; Sun, Kefu; He, Xueming; Li, Jinxuan; Dong, Yanbin; Zheng, Bin; Tan, Xiao; Song, Xue-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Treating cancer pain continues to possess a major challenge. Here, we report that a traditional Chinese medicine Xiao-Ai-Tong (XAT) can effectively suppress pain and adverse reactions following morphine treatment in patients with bone cancer pain. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were used for patient's self-evaluation of pain intensity and evaluating changes of adverse reactions including constipation, nausea, fatigue, and anorexia, respectively, before and after treatment prescriptions. The clinical trials showed that repetitive oral administration of XAT (200?mL, bid, for 7 consecutive days) alone greatly reduced cancer pain. Repetitive treatment with a combination of XAT and morphine (20?mg and 30?mg, resp.) produced significant synergistic analgesic effects. Meanwhile, XAT greatly reduced the adverse reactions associated with cancer and/or morphine treatment. In addition, XAT treatment significantly reduced the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1? and tumor necrosis factor-? and increased the endogenous anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 in blood. These findings demonstrate that XAT can effectively reduce bone cancer pain probably mediated by the cytokine mechanisms, facilitate analgesic effect of morphine, and prevent or reduce the associated adverse reactions, supporting a use of XAT, alone or with morphine, in treating bone cancer pain in clinic. PMID:26617438

  3. [Pain related impairment and the ability to function in herniated disc patients during rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Kitze, K; Rust, V; Angermeyer, M C

    2007-12-01

    Herniated discs usually occur in middle aged persons. For some the pain is so serious that an operation is necessary. Yet despite modern micro-surgical methods for operations, approximately one-third of the patients continue to report ongoing limitations. The reasons for insufficient success of therapy however lie not only in the illness as such. This study is intended to examine the changes in the subjective success parameters of pain-related impairment and the ability to function in herniated disc patients during rehabilitation. Using multivariate analyses, the influence of sociodemographic, illness-specific, work-related and mental variables on changes in goal variables is shown. 214 herniated disc patients were interviewed before the operation, after post-operative therapy, and six months after surgery. Before their operation, herniated disc patients experienced a severe limitation of activity and ability in everyday function due to pain. About three-fourth of the patients experienced significant improvement in both variables after the operation and post-operative therapy. The influence factors for a successful therapy outcome were male gender and higher educational level. Risk factors were increasing age, a desire for a pension, severe illness symptoms and severe pre-operative depression. In addition to somatic therapy, higher risk patients should receive psychological or social and employment counselling as a support to post-operative therapy. PMID:18188804

  4. Evaluation of an evidence based quality improvement innovation for patients with musculoskeletal low back pain in an accident and emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    Potier, Tara; Tims, Emily; Kilbride, Cherry; Rantell, Khadija

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a five stage pilot study which initially consisted of a review of 75 case notes of people attending an emergency department (ED) in an inner London Teaching Hospital with musculoskeletal (MSK) low back pain (LBP). This review highlighted inconsistencies in how they were assessed and managed across and within different staff groups. We found patient documentation was often incomplete and that a biomedical model approach to the management of these patients was common. As a result, four further stages in the project were conducted. Our primary aim was to evaluate the impact of implementing a locally developed quality improvement intervention for the assessment and treatment of MSK LBP in this ED. Secondary aims were to explore the user experience of the new pathway, measured by the patient experience questionnaire (PEQ), and any associated health economic costs of changes in practice. The quality improvement intervention consisted of an evidence based low back pain pathway (EBLBPP), a staff educational program, and a patient education booklet. We undertook a retrospective baseline audit of 100 clinical records of patients was undertaken prior to the instigation of the quality improvement intervention, and four months post implementation. The pre-defined variables of interest were: documentation of the case history, examination, classification of back pain (and if correct), prescribed management and if the documentation was compliant with medico-legal standards. All patients in the study were sent a PEQ to complete and return in a self-addressed envelope. Estimated health costs associated with each patient episode of care were calculated including re-attendance episodes for any people presenting with MSK LBP within a four week period. There was a significant improvement in all areas evaluated post implementation in all groups (simple, referred and simple, referred and serious spinal pathology combined). In particular; screening for red flags (22%) and biopsychosocial factors (29%), as well as noting the prevalence of previous symptoms (44%), observation of the painful area (57%), and analysis classification (59%) at a at 95% confidence interval (CI). In terms of management, an increase in adherence to the analgesic ladder, patients receiving reassurance and appropriate referral back to their GP's increased 45%, 23% and 44% at 95% CI respectively. Unfortunately, there was insufficient data to draw any meaningful conclusions from the patient experience data due to a low response rate. In conclusion, the introduction of the EBLBPP, patient education leaflet and teaching training for staff involved in the treatment of MSK LBP patients has improved the quality and consistency of the documented assessment and subsequent management of MSK LBP patients.

  5. A particular effect of sleep, but not pain or depression, on the blood-oxygen-level dependent response during working memory tasks in patients with chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Elvemo, Nicolas A; Landrø, Nils I; Borchgrevink, Petter C; Håberg, Asta K

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic pain (CP) are often reported to have deficits in working memory. Pain impairs working memory, but so do depression and sleep problems, which are also common in CP. Depression has been linked to changes in brain activity in CP during working memory tasks, but the effect of sleep problems on working memory performance and brain activity remains to be investigated. Methods Fifteen CP patients and 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched controls underwent blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while performing block design 0-back, 2-back, and paced visual serial addition test paradigms. Subjects also reported their level of pain (Brief Pain Inventory), depression (Beck Depression Inventory II), and sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and were tested outside the scanner with neuropsychological tests of working memory. Results The CP group reported significantly higher levels of pain, depression, and sleep problems. No significant performance difference was found on the neuropsychological tests in or outside the scanner between the two groups. There were no correlations between level of pain, depression, and sleep problems or between these and the neuropsychological test scores. CP patients exhibited significantly less brain activation and deactivation than controls in parietal and frontal lobes, which are the brain areas that normally show activation and deactivation during working memory tasks. Sleep problems independently and significantly modulated the BOLD response to the complex working memory tasks and were associated with decreased brain activation in task-positive regions and decreased deactivation in the default mode network in the CP group compared to the control group. The pain and depression scores covaried with working memory activation. Discussion Sleep problems in CP patients had a significant impact on the BOLD response during working memory tasks, independent of pain level and depression, even when performance was shown not to be significantly affected. PMID:26185465

  6. A Serious Exergame for Patients Suffering from Chronic Musculoskeletal Back and Neck Pain: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Huis in ’t Veld, Rianne M.H.A.; Schönauer, Christian; Kaufmann, Hannes; Hermens, Hermie J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Over recent years, the popularity of videogames has gone beyond youth and gamers and is slowly entering the field of professional healthcare. Exergames are an attractive alternative to physical therapy. The primary aim of this pilot study was to explore the user experience (usability, satisfaction, level of motivation, and game experience) of the patient with the “PlayMancer” exergame. The secondary aim was to explore the progression of the performed motor skills (walking velocity, overhead reach ability, and cervical range of motion) and the clinical changes (to physical condition, disability, and pain intensity) in a group of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain using an exergame for 4 weeks. Materials and Methods In the European PlayMancer project, an exergame for physical rehabilitation of chronic pain patients was developed. This exergame is controlled by relevant motions of the patient's body captured by a motion suit and several infrared cameras. In three different integrated minigames, the patient can train the following motor skills: Walking velocity, overhead reaching, and neck mobility. Results Ten patients participated in this study and completed the 4 weeks of gaming. Patients rated the usability of the exergames as good (score of 78.5 [standard deviation 9.7; range, 60.0–97.5]) on the System Usability Scale, and the game motivated all patients to perform their exercises. Patients enjoyed playing and were pleased with both the game environment and the game play. Overall, the patients made a progression in the examined motor skills during the minigames over the 4 weeks of gaming. Conclusions The “PlayMancer” exergame is a potential tool for achieving physical rehabilitation because it motivates patients to perform their exercises and as a result increases their motor skills and physical condition. PMID:24761327

  7. Managed Care, Access to Specialists, and Outcomes among Primary Care Patients with Pain

    PubMed Central

    Grembowski, David E; Martin, Diane; Diehr, Paula; Patrick, Donald L; Williams, Barbara; Novak, Louise; Deyo, Richard; Katon, Wayne; Dickstein, Deborah; Engelberg, Ruth; Goldberg, Harold

    2003-01-01

    Objective To determine whether managed care controls were associated with reduced access to specialists and worse outcomes among primary care patients with pain. Data Sources/Study Setting Patient, physician, and office manager questionnaires collected in the Seattle area in 1996–1997, plus data abstracted from patient records and health plans. Study Design A prospective cohort study of 2,275 adult patients with common pain problems recruited in the offices of 261 primary care physicians in Seattle. Data Collection Patients completed a waiting room questionnaire and follow-up surveys at the end of the first and sixth months to measure access to specialists and outcomes. Intensity of managed care controls measured by plan managed care index and benefit/cost-sharing indexes, office managed care index, physician compensation, financial incentives, and use of clinical guidelines. Principal Findings A financial withhold for referral was associated with a lower likelihood of referral to a physician specialist, a greater likelihood of seeing a specialist without referral, and a lower patient rating of care from the primary physician. Otherwise, patients in more managed offices and with greater out-of-network plan benefits had greater access to specialists. Patients with more versus less managed care had similar health outcomes, but patients in more managed offices had lower ratings of care provided by their primary physicians. Conclusions Increased managed care controls were generally not associated with reduced access to specialists and worse health outcomes for primary care patients with pain, but patients in more managed offices had lower ratings of care provided by their primary physicians. PMID:12650378

  8. Sedation with sufentanil and midazolam decreases pain in patients undergoing upper limb surgery under multiple nerve block.

    PubMed

    Kinirons, B P; Bouaziz, H; Paqueron, X; Ababou, A; Jandard, C; Cao, M M; Bur, M L; Laxenaire, M C; Benhamou, D

    2000-05-01

    Multiple nerve blocks may be painful and a source of discomfort. We assessed the efficacy of sufentanil 5 microg combined with midazolam 1 mg in decreasing pain in outpatients after a midhumeral multiple nerve stimulation technique. Visual analog scores for pain were significantly lower in those patients who received sedation before the block, both at the time of block performance (14 +/- 1 vs 27 +/- 2 mm, P < 0.0001) and at discharge (11 +/- 1 vs 24 +/- 2 mm, P < 0. 0001). We conclude that the association of sufentanil and midazolam produced minimal sedation while significantly reducing pain experienced by patients undergoing multiple nerve stimulation. PMID:10781464

  9. [The influence of culture in the oral expression of pain: comparative study between French and Syrian cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lebreuilly, Romain; Sakkour, Sam; Lebreuilly, Joëlle

    2013-03-01

    This study examines the role of culture in the perception and the verbal expression of pain among syrian and french blood-related cancer patients. The level of intensity (AVS scale) and the different aspects (Saint-Antoine Pain Questionnaire [SAPQ]) of their pain were studied. The sensory and emotional descriptors chosen by the Syrian possessed a stronger semantic content in comparison to those used by the French. The patient's cultural background, which affect the perception and verbal expression of pain should be a new indicator in the optimization of global medical management. PMID:23548892

  10. The Contribution of Pain and Depression to Self-Reported Sleep Disturbance in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nicassio, Perry M.; Ormseth, Sarah R.; Kay, Morgan; Custodio, Mara; Irwin, Michael R.; Olmstead, Richard; Weisman, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the contribution of disease activity, pain, and psychological factors to self-reported sleep disturbance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to evaluate whether depression mediates the effects of pain on sleep disturbance. The sample included 106 patients with confirmed RA participated in an assessment of their disease activity, pain, psychological functioning, and sleep disturbance during a baseline evaluation prior to participating in a prospective study to help them manage their RA. Self-measures included the Rapid Assessment of Disease Activity in Rheumatology (RADAR), the SF-36 Pain Scale, the Helplessness and Internality Subscales of the Arthritis Helplessness Index (AHI), the Active and Passive Pain Coping Scales of the Pain Management Inventory (PMI), the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Hierarchical multiple regression analysis confirmed that higher income, pain, internality, and depression contributed independently to higher sleep disturbance. A mediational analysis demonstrated that depression acted as a significant mechanism through which pain contributed to sleep disturbance. Cross-sectional findings indicate that pain and depression play significant roles in self-reported sleep disturbance among patients with RA. The data suggest the importance of interventions that target pain and depression to improve sleep in this medical condition. PMID:22051047

  11. The contribution of pain and depression to self-reported sleep disturbance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nicassio, Perry M; Ormseth, Sarah R; Kay, Morgan; Custodio, Mara; Irwin, Michael R; Olmstead, Richard; Weisman, Michael H

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this article is to assess the contribution of disease activity, pain, and psychological factors to self-reported sleep disturbance in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and to evaluate whether depression mediates the effects of pain on sleep disturbance. The sample included 106 patients with confirmed RA who participated in an assessment of their disease activity, pain, psychological functioning, and sleep disturbance during a baseline evaluation prior to participating in a prospective study to help them manage their RA. Self-measures included the Rapid Assessment of Disease Activity in Rheumatology, the SF-36 Pain Scale, the Helplessness and Internality Subscales of the Arthritis Helplessness Index, the Active and Passive Pain Coping Scales of the Pain Management Inventory, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis confirmed that higher income, pain, internality, and depression contributed independently to higher sleep disturbance. A mediational analysis demonstrated that depression acted as a significant mechanism through which pain contributed to sleep disturbance. Cross-sectional findings indicate that pain and depression play significant roles in self-reported sleep disturbance among patients with RA. The data suggest the importance of interventions that target pain and depression to improve sleep in this medical condition. PMID:22051047

  12. Treatment of Acute Painful Thyroiditis with Low Dose Prednisolone: A Study on Patients from Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Thyroiditis is a disorder that involves inflammation of the thyroid gland. Subacute thyroiditis is the most common cause of acute painful thyroiditis. It is thought to be a viral inflammatory disorder. Subacute thyroiditis has been treated with either nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or high dose corticosteroids. The response to steroids is more dramatic and quicker than the NSAIDs. Prednisolone is the most commonly used corticosteroid to treat subacute thyroiditis. The usual dose is one mg/kg/day tapered over six weeks although the basis for this dose has not been established yet by prospective studies. Aim The current research was carried out to study if prednisolone in lower initial dose (20 mg/day tapered over four weeks) is effective in patients with acute painful thyroiditis. Materials and Methods This study was a prospective, cross sectional, observational study carried out at Pokhara, Nepal. All the patients presenting with anterior neck pain of less than 1 week with tender thyroid on palpation and ESR more than 30mm/h were included in the study. The patients were administered prednisolone in a starting dose of 20 mg/day tapered over four weeks. Data were collected, analysed and the results were interpreted. Results One hundred and twenty two patients of acute painful thyroiditis were included in our study. Age of the patients ranged from 19 years to 69 years with the mean age of 36.58 years. Female to Male ratio was 10:1. Mean ESR was 57.03 at the time of presentation. ESR decreased to 29.63 at two weeks and 17.03 mm per hour (normal) at 4 weeks after continuation of the drug. All the patients reported with severe pain in the anterior neck at the time of presentation. Pain was completely relieved in 115 patients (94%) at 2 weeks after starting the treatment and it was better than previous in seven patients. Conclusion Twenty mg of prednisolone daily tapered over 4 weeks is an adequate treatment of subacute thyroiditis. However, dose can be drastically tapered after 2 weeks. PMID:26500930

  13. Patients with chronic pain lack somatic markers during decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Elvemo, Nicolas-Andreas; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard; Landrø, Nils Inge; Borchgrevink, Petter Christian; Håberg, Asta Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain have impaired cognitive functions, including decision making, as shown with the Iowa gambling task (IGT). The main aim of this study was to elucidate whether patients’ decision making is associated with a lack of the anticipatory skin conductance response (SCR). An increase in anticipatory SCR before making unfavorable choices is known to guide decisions in healthy controls during the IGT. Since several brain regions involved in decision making are reported to have altered morphology in patients with chronic pain, the second aim was to explore the associations between IGT performance and brain structure volumes. Eighteen patients with chronic pain of mixed etiology and 19 healthy controls matched in terms of age, sex, and education were investigated with a computerized IGT during the recording of SCR, heart rate, and blood pressure. The participants also underwent neuropsychological testing, and three-dimensional T1-weighted cerebral magnetic resonance images were obtained. Contrary to controls, patients did not generate anticipatory SCRs before making unfavorable choices, and they switched between decks of cards during the late phase of the IGT significantly more often, and this was still observed after adjusting for depression scores. None of the other autonomic measures differed during IGT performance in either group or between groups. In patients, IGT scores correlated positively with total cortical grey matter volume. In controls, there was no such association, but their IGT scores correlated with the anticipatory SCR. It may be speculated that the reduction in anticipatory SCRs makes the chronic pain patients rely more on cortical resources during decision making. PMID:25075199

  14. Utility of coronary artery calcium scoring in the evaluation of patients with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Tota-Maharaj, Rajesh; McEvoy, John W; Blaha, Michael J; Silverman, Michael G; Nasir, Khurram; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2012-09-01

    Although coronary artery calcium (CAC) scoring has an established role in risk-stratifying asymptomatic patients at intermediate risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), its utility in the evaluation of patients with chest pain is uncertain. We conducted a literature review of articles investigating the utility of: (1) CAC scoring in elective patients with indeterminate chest pain symptoms, (2) CAC as a "gatekeeper" in the triage of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain, and (3) the cost-effectiveness of the use of CAC scoring in the ED. We also evaluated the predictive accuracy of the absence of CAC in a pooled analysis of applicable studies. Only studies evaluating patients classified as low or intermediate risk were included. Low to intermediate risk was established by Framingham risk scores, Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction scores, Diamond-Forrester classification, or by the absence of typical angina symptoms, ischemic electrocardiogram, positive cardiac biomarkers, or a prior history of CHD. In our pooled analysis, the presence of any CAC resulted in a high sensitivity (range 70%-100%) for predicting the presence of obstructive coronary disease among symptomatic patients subsequently referred for coronary angiography. More importantly, a CAC score of 0 in low- and intermediate-risk ED populations with chest pain had a high negative predictive value (99.4%) for CHD events over an average follow-up of 21 months. CAC scoring also seems cost-effective in this population. Although further research is needed, carefully selected ED patients with a normal electrocardiogram, normal cardiac biomarkers, and CAC = 0 may be considered for early discharge without further testing. PMID:22825529

  15. The Major Brain Endocannabinoid 2-AG Controls Neuropathic Pain and Mechanical Hyperalgesia in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica

    PubMed Central

    Pellkofer, Hannah L.; Havla, Joachim; Hauer, Daniela; Schelling, Gustav; Azad, Shahnaz C.; Kuempfel, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent myelitis is one of the predominant characteristics in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO). While paresis, visual loss, sensory deficits, and bladder dysfunction are well known symptoms in NMO patients, pain has been recognized only recently as another key symptom of the disease. Although spinal cord inflammation is a defining aspect of neuromyelitis, there is an almost complete lack of data on altered somatosensory function, including pain. Therefore, eleven consecutive patients with NMO were investigated regarding the presence and clinical characteristics of pain. All patients were examined clinically as well as by Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) following the protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS). Additionally, plasma endocannabinoid levels and signs of chronic stress and depression were determined. Almost all patients (10/11) suffered from NMO-associated neuropathic pain for the last three months, and 8 out of 11 patients indicated relevant pain at the time of examination. Symptoms of neuropathic pain were reported in the vast majority of patients with NMO. Psychological testing revealed signs of marked depression. Compared to age and gender-matched healthy controls, QST revealed pronounced mechanical and thermal sensory loss, strongly correlated to ongoing pain suggesting the presence of deafferentation-induced neuropathic pain. Thermal hyperalgesia correlated to MRI-verified signs of spinal cord lesion. Heat hyperalgesia was highly correlated to the time since last relapse of NMO. Patients with NMO exhibited significant mechanical and thermal dysesthesia, namely dynamic mechanical allodynia and paradoxical heat sensation. Moreover, they presented frequently with either abnormal mechanical hypoalgesia or hyperalgesia, which depended significantly on plasma levels of the endogenous cannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerole (2-AG). These data emphasize the high prevalence of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia in patients with NMO. The degree of mechanical hyperalgesia reflecting central sensitization of nociceptive pathways seems to be controlled by the major brain endocannabinoid 2-AG. PMID:23951176

  16. [Use of on-call service by patients with pain in the county of Aarhus].

    PubMed

    Christensen, M B; Olesen, F

    1997-04-14

    The aim of the study was to describe the numbers and other characteristics of patients who contacted the general practitioners (GP) out-of-hours on-call service with pain as the most important or major contributing reason for the contact. Data were collected from a questionnaire entered in the GPs' computer system. About 80% of the GPs participated. Over a 14 day period 10,653 contacts were registered, and of these 4718 were analyzed, consisting of 2080 telephone consultations, 1316 consultations and 1322 home visits. The results showed that 30% of the telephone calls, 37% of the consultations and 41% of the home visits concerned a patient with pain problems. Of these contacts concerning pain patients, the physicians estimated that 33% of the consultations and home visits and 55% of the telephone calls were "less necessary" or "unnecessary". It is concluded that pain is a major reason for contacting the GPs' on-call service, and that physicians deem many of these contacts "less necessary" of "unnecessary". Better information to citizens and better education of the physicians might enable some of these contacts to be transferred to normal working hours. PMID:9163113

  17. The interaction between the oxytocin and pain modulation in headache patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Liang; Yuan, Yan; Yang, Jun; Wang, Chang-Hong; Pan, Yan-Juan; Lu, Lu; Wu, Yu-Quan; Wang, Da-Xin; Lv, Lu-Xian; Li, Ren-Ren; Xue, Lei; Wang, Xin-Hua; Bi, Jian-Wei; Liu, Xin-Feng; Qian, Yan-Ning; Deng, Zhi-Kuan; Zhang, Zhi-Jian; Zhai, Xin-Huan; Zhou, Xin-Jian; Wang, Guo-Liang; Zhai, Jian-Xin; Liu, Wen-Yan

    2013-04-01

    Oxytocin (OXT), a nonapeptide hormone of posterior pituitary, reaches the central nervous system from systemic blood circulation with a difficulty because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The interest has been expressed in the use of the nasal route for delivery of OXT to the brain directly, exploiting the olfactory pathway. Our previous study has demonstrated that OXT in the central nervous system rather than the blood circulation plays an important role in rat pain modulation. The communication tried to investigate the interaction between the OXT and pain modulation in Chinese patients with headache to understand the OXT effect on human pain modulation. The results showed that (1) intranasal OXT could relieve the human headache in a dose-dependent manner; (2) OXT concentration in both plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) increased significantly in headache patients in relation with the pain level; and (3) there was a positive relationship between plasma and CSF OXT concentration in headache patients. The data suggested that intranasal OXT, which was delivered to the central nervous system through olfactory region, could treat human headache and OXT might be a potential drug of headache relief by intranasal administration. PMID:23375440

  18. Validation of a Brief Opioid Compliance Checklist for Patients with Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Robert N.; Martel, Marc O.; Edwards, Robert R.; Qian, Jing; Sheehan, Kerry Anne; Ross, Edgar L.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a need for a brief assessment tool to determine compliance with use of prescribed opioids for pain. The purpose of this study was to develop and begin the validation of a brief and simple compliance checklist (Opioid Compliance Checklist; OCC) for chronic pain patients prescribed long-term opioid therapy. A review of the literature of opioid therapy agreements led to a 12-item OCC that was repeatedly administered to 157 patients who were taking opioids for chronic pain and followed for six months. Validation of the OCC was conducted by identifying those patients exhibiting aberrant drug-related behavior as determined by any of the following: positive urine toxicology screen, a positive score on the Prescription Drug Use Questionnaire (PDUQ) interview or Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM), and/or ratings by staff on the Addiction Behavior Checklist (ABC). Of the original 12 items, 5 OCC items appeared to best predict subsequent aberrant behaviors based on multivariate logistic regression analyses (cross-validated AUC=.67). Although further testing is needed, these results suggest that the OCC is an easy-to-use, promising measure in monitoring opioid adherence among persons with chronic pain. PMID:25092233

  19. Pain Relief Following Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Results of a Series of 283 Consecutive Patients Treated in a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo Corrao, Giovanni; Monica, Patrizia Della; Tartaglia, Vincenzo; Manca, Antonio; Eminefendic, Haris; Russo, Filippo; Tosetti, Irene; Regge, Daniele

    2007-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess if percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) could relieve back pain, reduce drug consumption, and improve the mobility of patients with metastases and vertebral compression fractures. From August 2002 to July 2004, 283 patients (216 females; mean age: 73.8 {+-} 9.9 years) underwent PVP on 749 vertebrae. Pain was evaluated with the pain intensity numeric rating scale (PI-NRS) (0 = no pain; 10 = worst pain) before the procedure and at the end point in September 2004 (follow-up:1-24 months; median: 7 months). A reduction of at least two points of the PI-NRS score was considered clinically relevant. Two hundred four patients were available for evaluation at the end point. Overall results showed a reduction of the median pain score from 8 at baseline to 1 at the end point (p < 0.0001); a clinically relevant pain reduction was observed in 176/205 patients (86%); 89/147 patients (61%) gave up a brace support (p < 0.0001); and 117/190 patients (62%) gave up drug therapy. Results were similar in different subgroups stratified according to age, underlying pathology, number of fractured or treated vertebrae, and length of follow-up. This study adds evidence that PVP is effective in treating painful vertebral fractures. A significant reduction in drug assumption and significant mobility improvement can also be achieved.

  20. Hip pain in the young, active patient: surgical strategies.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Michael R; Erickson, Jill A; McCarthy, Joseph C; Mont, Michael A; Mulkey, Patrick; Peters, Christopher L; Pivec, Robert; Austin, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Hip disorders in young patients likely exist as a spectrum of prearthritic and arthritic conditions. With the increasing recognition of these disorders, surgical options are being popularized and more patients are being treated at a younger age. Hip surgeons must develop a careful set of evidenced-based indications and follow surgical outcomes in a rigorous, scientific manner. Hip arthroscopy can be used to successfully treat some hip disorders, including labral tears, with or without femoroacetabular impingement, resulting in mechanical symptoms. Long-term outcomes after arthroscopy are determined by the condition of the cartilage at the time of surgery. Patients with preoperative radiographic evidence of moderate to severe arthritis have poor outcomes when treated with arthroscopy. Open joint preservation procedures (including periacetabular osteotomy and surgical hip dislocation with osteochondroplasty) can be done in the absence of substantial arthritis to treat hip dysplasia, femoroacetabular impingement, and related conditions. The results of these procedures are good in appropriately selected patients at short-term to midterm follow-ups. In the presence of severe arthritis, joint replacement is the treatment of choice. Total hip arthroplasty using uncemented acetabular and femoral fixation provides reliable osseointegration; however, long-term results in young patients have historically been compromised by bearing surface wear, osteolysis, and component loosening. Contemporary, highly cross-linked polyethylene and ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have durable results, low complication rates, and offer the potential of long-term survivorship in this high-demand population. In general, metal-on-metal implants have higher complication rates versus other bearing surface options and should be avoided. The best results of hip resurfacing are seen in men younger than 55 years with large femoral head sizes. Although implant survivorship is comparable to that of total hip arthroplasty, the sequelae of metal wear debris continue to cause concern. PMID:24720303

  1. Characteristics of Evoked Potential Multiple EEG Recordings in Patients with Chronic Pain by Means of Parallel Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Li, Xiaoli; Lu, Chengbiao; Voss, Logan J.; Barnard, John P. M.; Sleigh, Jamie W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative method, called as parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) with a continuous wavelet transform, to analyze of brain activity in patients with chronic pain in the time-frequency-channel domain and quantifies differences between chronic pain patients and controls in these domains. The event related multiple EEG recordings of the chronic pain patients and non-pain controls with somatosensory stimuli (pain, random pain, touch, random touch) are analyzed. Multiple linear regression (MLR) is applied to describe the effects of aging on the frequency response differences between patients and controls. The results show that the somatosensory cortical responses occurred around 250?ms in both groups. In the frequency domain, the neural response frequency in the pain group (around 4?Hz) was less than that in the control group (around 5.5?Hz) under the somatosensory stimuli. In the channel domain, cortical activation was predominant in the frontal region for the chronic pain group and in the central region for controls. The indices of active ratios were statistical significant between the two groups in the frontal and central regions. These findings demonstrate that the PARAFAC is an interesting method to understanding the pathophysiological characteristics of chronic pain. PMID:22400048

  2. Efficacy of the Pilates method for pain and disability in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review with meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Gisela C.; Costa, Leonardo O. P.; Cabral, Cristina M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the available evidence on the efficacy of the Pilates method in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Method Searches were performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, SciELO, LILACS, CINAHL and CENTRAL in March 2013. Randomized controlled trials that tested the effectiveness of the Pilates method (against a nontreatment group, minimal intervention or other types of interventions) in adults with chronic low back pain were included regardless the language of publication. The outcome data were extracted from the eligible studies and were combined using a meta-analysis approach. Results The searches identified a total of 1,545 articles. From these, eight trials were considered eligible, and seven trials were combined in the meta-analysis. The comparison groups were as follows: Pilates versus other types of exercises (n=2 trials), and Pilates versus no treatment group or minimal intervention (n=4 trials) for short term pain; Pilates versus minimal intervention for short-term disability (n=4).We determined that Pilates was not better than other types of exercises for reducing pain intensity. However, Pilates was better than a minimal intervention for reducing short-term pain and disability (pain: pooled mean difference=1.6 points; 95% CI 1.4 to 1.8; disability: pooled mean difference=5.2 points; 95% CI 4.3 to 6.1). Conclusions Pilates was better than a minimal intervention for reducing pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Pilates was not better than other types of exercise for short-term pain reduction. PMID:24346291

  3. What effect can manual therapy have on a patient's pain experience?

    PubMed

    Bishop, Mark D; Torres-Cueco, Rafael; Gay, Charles W; Lluch-Girbés, Enrique; Beneciuk, Jason M; Bialosky, Joel E

    2015-11-01

    Manual therapy (MT) is a passive, skilled movement applied by clinicians that directly or indirectly targets a variety of anatomical structures or systems, which is utilized with the intent to create beneficial changes in some aspect of the patient pain experience. Collectively, the process of MT is grounded on clinical reasoning to enhance patient management for musculoskeletal pain by influencing factors from a multidimensional perspective that have potential to positively impact clinical outcomes. The influence of biomechanical, neurophysiological, psychological and nonspecific patient factors as treatment mediators and/or moderators provides additional information related to the process and potential mechanisms by which MT may be effective. As healthcare delivery advances toward personalized approaches there is a crucial need to advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms associated with MT effectiveness. PMID:26401979

  4. Postoperative oxycodone toxicity in a patient with chronic pain and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bryant W; Kohan, Lynn R; Vorenkamp, Kevin E

    2015-02-15

    We present this case to review the metabolism of oxycodone and the effects of end-stage renal disease on the elimination of oxycodone and its metabolites. A 42-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who was dependent on hemodialysis presented for left hamstring posterior capsule release. She had been receiving methadone for 2 years for chronic leg pain. On postoperative day 1, the patient's medication was changed from IV hydromorphone to oral oxycodone to treat breakthrough pain. By the next day, the patient was unarousable with notable respiratory depression. She did not fully recover after urgent hemodialysis but did have full recovery after receiving an IV naloxone infusion for 22 hours. Further study of the safety of oxycodone in hemodialysis patients is warranted. PMID:25689360

  5. [Chronic noncancer pain and patient education: a place for e-learning?].

    PubMed

    Braillard, Olivia; Cedraschi, Christine; Jesaimani, Ameena; Piguet, Valérie

    2015-06-24

    Chronic non cancerous pain considerably limits the patients' quality of life. Yet, chronic non cancerous pain has a prevalence as high as 25% to 35%, Therapeutic education allows to work on the knowledge and know-how about the disease, the treatment, the management of health resources and health behaviors. E-learning uses new technologies of communication to improve the quality of learning by facilitating access to the resources and favoring the interactivity. It is attractive by its wide accessibility and its limited logistic needs. The level of proof of its efficacy is weak, mainly because of methodological limitations. Some good quality studies are promising, with a positive effect of e-learning programs on pain intensity, disability, autonomy and medication misuse. PMID:26267947

  6. Negative effects of smoking, workers’ compensation, and litigation on pain/disability scores for spine patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasarn, Mark L.; Horodyski, Mary B.; Behrend, Caleb; Wright, John; Rechtine, Glenn R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: When initiating treatment for patients with spinal disorders, we examined the impact of smoking, workers compensation, and litigation on disability and pain scores. Methods: With Institutional Review Board approval, the medical records of 13,704 consecutive patients with spinal disorders treated at two university spine centers were reviewed. Particular attention was focused on the pretreatment impact of three variables: smoking, workers compensation, and litigation. All patients completed a questionnaire that included a modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), a visual analog pain scale (VAS) and a history of smoking, workers compensation, and/or litigation issues. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni (when appropriate) was used to analyze the data. Results: ODI scores significantly correlated with a smoking history: Current Smoker > Previous Smoker > Never Smoked (44.22 > 38.11 > 36.02, respectively). Pain scores and ODI scores had a direct correlation to workers compensation and litigation status. Workers compensation, litigation and smoking combined created even higher scores. There was no significant difference between previous smokers and nonsmokers. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that a history of smoking, workers compensation, and/or litigation, considered alone or worse, combined, negatively impacted outcomes for patients seeking treatment at our spine centers. For optimal outcomes in spine patients, cessation of smoking and treatment of attendant psychological and social factors prove critical. PMID:23248756

  7. Impact of Osteopathic Treatment on Pain in Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis – A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Dominique; Soubeiran, Lucile; Gourmelon, Fabrice; Grenet, Dominique; Serreau, Raphaël; Perrodeau, Elodie; Zegarra-Parodi, Rafael; Boutron, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is a common complication in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with shorter survival. We evaluated the impact of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on pain in adults with CF. Methods A pilot multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted with three parallel arms: OMT (group A, 16 patients), sham OMT (sham treatment, group B, 8 patients) and no treatment (group C, 8 patients). Medical investigators and patients were double-blind to treatment for groups A and B, who received OMT or sham OMT monthly for 6 months. Pain was rated as a composite of its intensity and duration over the previous month. The evolution of chest/back pain after 6 months was compared between group A and groups B+C combined (control group). The evolution of cervical pain, headache and quality of life (QOL) were similarly evaluated. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the treatment and control groups in the decrease of chest/back pain (difference?=??2.20 IC95% [?4.81; 0.42], p?=?0.098); also, group A did not differ from group B. However, chest/back pain decreased more in groups A (p?=?0.002) and B (p?=?0.006) than in group C. Cervical pain, headache and QOL scores did not differ between the treatment and control groups. Conclusion This pilot study demonstrated the feasibility of evaluating the efficacy of OMT to treat the pain of patients with CF. The lack of difference between the group treated with OMT and the control group may be due to the small number of patients included in this trial, which also precludes any definitive conclusion about the greater decrease of pain in patients receiving OMT or sham OMT than in those with no intervention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01293019 PMID:25029347

  8. Chronic pain in patients with the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: evidence for generalized hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Rombaut, Lies; Scheper, Mark; De Wandele, Inge; De Vries, Janneke; Meeus, Mira; Malfait, Fransiska; Engelbert, Raoul; Calders, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Chronic widespread pain is highly present in patients with the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (EDS-HT), but up to now, evidence for generalized hyperalgesia is lacking. The aim of this study is to investigate whether pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) at both symptomatic and asymptomatic body areas differ in EDS-HT patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty-three women with EDS-HT and 23 gender- and age-matched healthy controls participated. All subjects marked on Margolis Pain Diagram where they felt pain lasting longer than 24 h in the past 4 weeks. Then, they completed several questionnaires assessing pain cognitions, fatigue, disability, and general health status, in order to take the possible influence of these factors on PPTs into account. Patients also completed a form concerning the type of pain they experienced. Thereupon, a blinded researcher assessed PPTs at 14 body locations on the trunk and extremities. PPTs were compared for the two complete groups. In addition, PPTs of patients and controls who did not report pain in a respective zone were compared. PPTs of the patients were significantly lower compared to those of the control group, also when pain-free samples per zone were compared. The mean (SD) PPT was 2.9 (1.62) kg/cm(2) in the EDS-HT patients and 5.2 (1.88) kg/cm(2) in the controls (P?patient group, a predominantly neuropathic pain component was likely present. This study provides evidence for the existence of hyperalgesia even in asymptomatic areas (generalized secondary hyperalgesia). The generalized hyperalgesia may represent the involvement of a sensitized central nervous system, which inquires an adapted pain management for this patient group. PMID:24487572

  9. Selected Aspects of Mental Health of Elderly Patients with Chronic Back Pain Treated in Primary Care Centers.

    PubMed

    Cabak, Anna; D?browska-Zimakowska, Anna; Tomaszewski, Pawe?; ?yp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Tomaszewski, Wies?aw; Fija?kowska, Barbara; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Improvement of the effectiveness and efficiency of chronic back pain therapy is a continuing challenge on an international scale. The aim of the present study was to tentatively assess mental health of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care centers. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study enrolled 100 persons over 50 years of age. The back pain group consisted of 53 patients with chronic back pain and the control group consisted of 47 pain-free persons. The assessment of mental health used a Polish version of the international Goldberger's General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). ANOVA (1- and 2-factor) analysis of variance, Tukey's test, and Pearson's simple correlation were used to analyze the significance of differences, with the significance level set at ?=0.05. RESULTS All patients with chronic back pain, regardless of their age and gender, displayed poorer mental well-being compared to the control group: their overall score was higher by over 7 points than in persons without back pain (F1.96=14.8; p<0.001). Men with back pain were significantly more susceptible to depression than women (F2.96=5.5; p<0.05), compared to the control group. The duration of back pain also showed a significant (p<0.05) direct correlation with the overall mental health score from the questionnaire. Mental health was considerably poorer among patients occasionally (p<0.001) and regularly (p<0.05) consuming analgesics than among persons who did not do so. CONCLUSIONS The study revealed that mental health was markedly poorer in patients with chronic back pain than in healthy controls. A preliminary assessment of aspects of mental health should be given more attention in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care center outpatient clinics. PMID:26522877

  10. Selected Aspects of Mental Health of Elderly Patients with Chronic Back Pain Treated in Primary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Cabak, Anna; D?browska-Zimakowska, Anna; Tomaszewski, Pawe?; ?yp, Marek; Kaczor, Ryszard; Tomaszewski, Wies?aw; Fija?kowska, Barbara; Kotela, Ireneusz

    2015-01-01

    Background Improvement of the effectiveness and efficiency of chronic back pain therapy is a continuing challenge on an international scale. The aim of the present study was to tentatively assess mental health of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care centers. Material/Methods The study enrolled 100 persons over 50 years of age. The back pain group consisted of 53 patients with chronic back pain and the control group consisted of 47 pain-free persons. The assessment of mental health used a Polish version of the international Goldberger’s General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28). ANOVA (1- and 2-factor) analysis of variance, Tukey’s test, and Pearson’s simple correlation were used to analyze the significance of differences, with the significance level set at ?=0.05. Results All patients with chronic back pain, regardless of their age and gender, displayed poorer mental well-being compared to the control group: their overall score was higher by over 7 points than in persons without back pain (F1.96=14.8; p<0.001). Men with back pain were significantly more susceptible to depression than women (F2.96=5.5; p<0.05), compared to the control group. The duration of back pain also showed a significant (p<0.05) direct correlation with the overall mental health score from the questionnaire. Mental health was considerably poorer among patients occasionally (p<0.001) and regularly (p<0.05) consuming analgesics than among persons who did not do so. Conclusions The study revealed that mental health was markedly poorer in patients with chronic back pain than in healthy controls. A preliminary assessment of aspects of mental health should be given more attention in the rehabilitation of patients with chronic back pain treated in primary care center outpatient clinics. PMID:26522877

  11. Pain Intensity and Patients’ Acceptance of Surgical Complication Risks With Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bono, Christopher M.; Harris, Mitchel B.; Warholic, Natalie; Katz, Jeffrey N.; Carreras, Edward; White, Andrew; Schmitz, Miguel; Wood, Kirkham B.; Losina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study with prospective recruitment Objective To determine the relationship of pain intensity (back and leg) on patients’ acceptance of surgical complication risks when deciding whether or not to undergo lumbar spinal fusion. Background To formulate informed decisions regarding lumbar fusion surgery, preoperative discussions should include a review of the risk of complications balanced with the likelihood of symptom relief. Pain intensity has the potential to influence a patient’s decision to consent to lumbar fusion. We hypothesized that pain intensity is associated with a patient’s acceptance of surgical complication risks. Methods Patients being seen for the first time by a spine surgeon for treatment of a non-traumatic or non-neoplastic spinal disorder completed a structured questionnaire. It posed 24 scenarios, each presenting a combination of risks of 3 complications (nerve damage, wound infection, nonunion) and probabilities of symptom relief. For each scenario, the patient indicated whether he/she would/would not consent to a fusion for low back pain (LBP). The sum of the scenarios in which the patient responded that he or she would elect surgery was calculated to represent acceptance of surgical complication risks. A variety of other data were also recorded, including age, gender, education level, race, history of non-spinal surgery, duration of pain, and history of spinal injections. Data were analyzed using bivariate analyses and multivariate regression analyses. Results The mean number of scenarios accepted by 118 enrolled subjects was 10.2 (median 8, standard deviation 8.5, range 0 to 24, or 42.5% of scenarios). In general, subjects were more likely to accept scenarios with lower risks and higher efficacy. Spearman’s rank correlation estimates demonstrated a moderate association between the LBP intensity and acceptance of surgical complication risks (r=0.37, p=0.0001) while leg pain intensity had a weak but positive correlation (r=0.19, p=0.04). In bivariate analyses history of prior spinal injections was strongly associated with patients’ acceptance of surgical complication risks and willingness to proceed with surgery (54.5% of scenarios accepted for those who had injections versus 27.6% for those with no prior spinal injections, p=0.0001). White patients were more willing to accept surgery (45.9% of scenarios) than non-whites (28.4%, p=0.03). With the available numbers, age, gender, history of previous non-spinal surgery, education, and the duration of pain demonstrated no clear association with acceptance of surgical complication risks. While education overall was not influential, more educated men had greater risk tolerance than less educated men while more educated women had less risk tolerance than less educated women (p=.023). In multivariate analysis, LBP intensity remained a highly statistically significant correlate (p=0.001) of the proportion of scenarios accepted, as did a history of prior spinal injections (p=0.001) and white race (0.03). Conclusions The current investigation indicates that the intensity of LBP is the most influential factor affecting a patient’s decision to accept risk of complication and symptom persistence when considering lumbar fusion. This relationship has not been previously shown for any surgical procedure. These data could potentially change the manner in which patients are counseled to make informed choices about spinal surgery. With growing interest in adverse events and complications, these data could be important in establishing guidelines for patient-directed surgical decision-making. PMID:23124256

  12. Predominant Leg Pain Is Associated With Better Surgical Outcomes in Degenerative Spondylolisthesis and Spinal Stenosis: Results from the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Adam; Blood, Emily; Lurie, Jon; Abdu, William; Sengupta, Dilip; Frymoyer, John W.; Weinstein, James

    2010-01-01

    Study Design As-treated analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Objective To compare baseline characteristics and surgical and nonoperative outcomes in degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SpS) patients stratified by predominant pain location (i.e. leg vs. back). Summary of Background Data Evidence suggests that degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and spinal stenosis (SpS) patients with predominant leg pain may have better surgical outcomes than patients with predominant low back pain (LBP). Methods The DS cohort included 591 patients (62% underwent surgery), and the SpS cohort included 615 patients (62% underwent surgery). Patients were classified as leg pain predominant, LBP predominant or having equal pain according to baseline pain scores. Baseline characteristics were compared between the three predominant pain location groups within each diagnostic category, and changes in surgical and nonoperative outcome scores were compared through two years. Longitudinal regression models including baseline covariates were used to control for confounders. Results Among DS patients at baseline, 34% had predominant leg pain, 26% had predominant LBP, and 40% had equal pain. Similarly, 32% of SpS patients had predominant leg pain, 26% had predominant LBP, and 42% had equal pain. DS and SpS patients with predominant leg pain had baseline scores indicative of less severe symptoms. Leg pain predominant DS and SpS patients treated surgically improved significantly more than LBP predominant patients on all primary outcome measures at one and two years. Surgical outcomes for the equal pain groups were intermediate to those of the predominant leg pain and LBP groups. The differences in nonoperative outcomes were less consistent. Conclusions Predominant leg pain patients improved significantly more with surgery than predominant LBP patients. However, predominant LBP patients still improved significantly more with surgery than with nonoperative treatment. PMID:21124260

  13. The effect of neurac training in patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Soo; Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the effects of neurac training on pain, function, balance, fatigability, and quality of life. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects with chronic neck pain who were treated in S hospital were included in this study; they were randomly allocated into two groups, i.e., the experimental group (n = 10) and the control group (n = 10). Both groups received traditional physical therapy for 3 sessions for 30?min per week for 4 weeks. The experimental group practiced additional neurac training for 30?min/day, for 3 days per week for 4 weeks. All subjects were evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the neck disability index (NDI), the biorescue (balance), the questionnaire for fatigue symptoms (fatigue), and the medical outcome 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) pre- and post-intervention. [Results] The experimental group effectively improved their pain, function, balance, fatigability, and quality of life. [Conclusion] Neurac training is thus considered an effective training program that enhances body functionality by improving pain, function, balance ability, fatigability, and quality of life in patients with chronic neck pain. PMID:26157206

  14. Critical appraisal of extended-release hydrocodone for chronic pain: patient considerations

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Harry J; Paul, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Opioid analgesics are currently the most effective pharmacologic option for the management of both acute and chronic forms of moderate-to-severe pain. Although the “as-needed” use of immediate-release formulations is considered optimum for treating acute, painful episodes of limited duration, the scheduled dosing of extended-release formulations with immediate-release supplementation for breakthrough pain is regarded to be most effective for managing chronic conditions requiring around-the-clock treatment. The recent introduction of extended-release formulations of the opioid analgesic hydrocodone potentially broadened the possibility of providing pain relief for individuals for whom current formulations are either ineffective or not tolerated. However, reaction to the approval of the new formulations has fueled controversy over the general safety and need for opioid medications, in light of their potential for misuse, abuse, diversion, and addiction. Here, we discuss how the approval of extended-release formulations of hydrocodone and the emotionally charged controversy over their release may affect physician prescribing and the care available to patients in need of chronic opioid therapy for the management of pain. PMID:26543371

  15. Treatment of patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain in China: a double-blind randomised trial of duloxetine vs. placebo

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Y; Guo, X; Han, P; Li, Q; Yang, G; Qu, S; Yue, L; Wang, C-N; Skljarevski, V; Dueñas, H; Raskin, J; Gu, L

    2015-01-01

    Background Duloxetine has been approved in the United States, European Union and some Asian countries for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathic pain (DPNP). We assessed the efficacy and safety of duloxetine (60 mg once daily) compared with placebo in Chinese patients suffering from DPNP. Methods This was a phase 3, multicenter, randomised, double-blind, parallel, placebo-controlled, 12-week trial of the treatment of DPNP with duloxetine. Subjects were male and female outpatients ? 18 years of age with DPNP, as assessed by the Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument, and had a rating of ? 4 on the Brief Pain Inventory-Modified Short Form-Severity weekly average pain item. The primary efficacy measure was the reduction in pain severity from baseline to 12 weeks, as measured by the weekly mean of 24-h average pain ratings recorded in the patient’s diary. Mean changes from baseline in efficacy measures were analysed by a restricted maximum likelihood-based, mixed-effects model repeated measures approach and by analysis of covariance. Results Of the 405 patients randomised, 203 patients were assigned to duloxetine 60 mg once daily and 202 patients were assigned to placebo. Duloxetine-treated patients showed significantly greater pain relief on 24-h average pain ratings compared with placebo-treated patients each week of the 12-week study period [week 12: least squares (LS) mean change duloxetine: ?2.40, placebo: ?1.97; LS mean change difference (95% confidence interval) = ?0.43 (?0.82, ?0.04), p = 0.030]. Compared with placebo, patients treated with duloxetine experienced higher rates of nausea (p = 0.010), somnolence (p < 0.001) and asthenia (p = 0.002). Conclusions Duloxetine-treated patients showed significantly greater pain relief compared with placebo-treated patients over the 12-week study period. Duloxetine was shown in Chinese patients to have a safety profile similar to that found in previous duloxetine trials. PMID:25939897

  16. [Emergency ultrasound in patients with abdominal pain - where should we "look"].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Tanja; Heinz, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound is without doubt the imaging technique of choice in patients with acute abdominal pain. Point-of-care ultrasound examinations can help to reduce the number of possible differential diagnoses by exclusion or - as a best case scenario - show us directly the correct diagnosis. Hence patients can benefit from a very early appropriate therapeutic approach. This article illustrates where and how we should "look". After focusing on basic technical settings, typical pathological sonomorphologic changes in patients with some of the most important illnesses are characterized (e.?g. acute appendicitis, acute cholecystitis, acute diverticulitis, acute pancreatitis and urinary tract occlusion). Ultrasound beginners are the target group of this survey. PMID:26488100

  17. Pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Zachariae, Robert; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Kasch, Helge; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S.; Vase, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain frequency has been shown to influence sensitization, psychological distress, and pain modulation. The present study examined if pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain. Method: A non-clinical (247 students) and a clinical (223 pain patients) sample completed the Danish versions of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Beck Depression Inventory, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and rated pain intensity, unpleasantness and frequency. Results: In both samples, high pain frequency was found to moderate the association between pain catastrophizing and pain intensity, whereas low pain frequency did not. The psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Danish version of the PCS were confirmed. Conclusions: This is the first study to validate the Danish version of the PCS and to show that pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and reported pain in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:25646089

  18. A warm water pool-based exercise program decreases immediate pain in female fibromyalgia patients: uncontrolled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Segura-Jiménez, V; Carbonell-Baeza, A; Aparicio, V A; Samos, B; Femia, P; Ruiz, J R; Delgado-Fernández, M

    2013-07-01

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic and extended musculoskeletal pain. The combination of exercise therapy with the warm water may be an appropriate treatment. However, studies focusing on the analysis of immediate pain during and after an exercise session are rare. This study aimed to determine the immediate changes of a warm water pool-based exercise program (12 weeks) on pain (before vs. after session) in female fibromyalgia patients. 33 Spanish women with fibromyalgia were selected to participate in a 12 weeks (2 sessions/week) low-moderate intensity warm water pool-based program. We assessed pain by means of a Visual Analogue Scale before and after each single session (i. e., 24 sessions). We observed immediate benefits on pain with a mean decrease ~15% in all sessions, except in the fourth one. There was an association of pain difference (pre-post) session with pain pre session (p=0.005; ?=0.097±0.034) and with age (p<0.001; ?=0.032±0.008). There were no significant accumulative differences on pain, pre session, post session, and pre-post changes (all p>0.05). Therefore this study showed that a warm water pool-based exercise program for 12 weeks (2 times/week) led to a positive immediate decrease in level of pain in female patients with fibromyalgia. Improvements were higher in older women and in those with more intense pain. PMID:23258608

  19. Pain-Induced Pulsograph Changes in Patients with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wan-hong; Zhao, Yan; Zeng, Chang-chun; Zhang, Dao-ning; Wang, Yan-ping; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Xiao-mei; Wang, Tian-fang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate changes in pulsograph caused by pain in primary dysmenorrhea (PD) patients. Methods. Pulsograph and pain level of PD patients were detected using electropulsograph and Visual-Analogue Scale (VAS), respectively, at four time points, 7–10 days before menstruation (T0), maximal pain during menstruation (T1), immediately after acupuncture analgesia (T2), and 30?mins after acupuncture analgesia (T3). Parameters (t, h, w) and normalized time parameters (t?) of pulsograph were analyzed. Results. VAS pain scores decreased from 6.40 ± 1.13 at T1 to 0.70 ± 0.75 at T2 to 0.11 ± 0.32 at T3 (P < 0.001 and 0.001). At T1, compared with those at T0, w1, h3, and h4 significantly increased (P < 0.01), and t2, t2?, t3?, and h(d) significantly decreased (P < 0.01, 0.001, 0.05, and 0.001). At T2, compared with those at T1, t1, w1, w2, h2, h3, t1?, and t4? significantly decreased (P < 0.05, 0.01, 0.01, 0.001, 0.01, 0.001, and 0.05), and h(d) significantly increased (P < 0.001). There was no difference between T2 and T3. Conclusions. There are almost opposite changing trends in pulsographic parameters when pain occurs and when it is relieved in PD patients. PMID:26495011

  20. The Effects on the Pain Index and Lumbar Flexibility of Obese Patients with Low Back Pain after PNF Scapular and PNF Pelvic Patterns.

    PubMed

    Park, KwangYong; Seo, KyoChul

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine whether exercises using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) scapular and pelvic patterns might decrease the pain index and increase the lumbar flexibility of obese patients with low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty obese patients with low back pain were randomly assigned to an experimetal group (n=15) and a control group (n=15). The exercise program of the experimental group consisted of scapular patterns (anterior depression - posterior elevation) and pelvic patterns (anterior elevation - posterior depression). The control group performed neutral back muscle strengthening exercises. Over the course of four weeks, the groups participated in PNF or performed strengthening exercises for 30 minutes, three times per week. Subjects were assessed a pre-test and post-test using measurements of pain and lumbar flexibility. [Results] The results show that lumbar flexion and lumbar extension significantly improved in the experimental group, had significant improvement and that the Oswestry Disability index (ODI) significantly decreased. However, there were no significant changes in the control group. The experimental group also showed significant differences in the pain index and lumbar flexibility from the control group. [Conclusion] This study showed that PNF can be used to improve pain index rating and lumbar flexibility. The findings indicate that the experimental group experienced greater improvement than the control group by participating in the PNF lumbar stabilization program. PMID:25364115

  1. Determinants of Pain Treatment Response and Non-Response: Identification of TMD Patient Subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Mark D.; Porto, Felipe B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if we could identify a specific subtype of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) pain patients that does not respond to treatment. Patients were 101 men and women with chronic TMD pain recruited from the community and randomly assigned to one of two treatment conditions: a standard conservative care (STD) condition or a standard care plus cognitive-behavioral treatment condition (STD+CBT) in which patients received all elements of STD, but also received cognitive-behavioral coping skills training. Growth mixture modeling, incorporating a series of treatment-related predictors, was used to distinguish several distinct classes of responders or non-responders to treatment based on reported pain over a one-year follow-up period. Results indicated that treatment non-responders accounted for 16% of the sample, and did not differ from treatment responders on demographics or temporomandibular joint pathology, but that they reported more psychiatric symptoms, poorer coping, and higher levels of catastrophizing. Treatment-related predictors of membership in treatment responder groups versus the non-responder group included the addition of CBT to standard treatment, treatment attendance, and decreasing catastrophization. It was concluded that CBT may be made more efficacious for TMD patients by placing further emphasis on decreasing catastrophization and on individualizing care. PMID:24094979

  2. Comparison of chronic low-back pain patients hip range of motion with lumbar instability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang wk; Kim, Suhn Yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare differences in hip range of motion between a lumbar stability group and a lumbar instability group of patients with chronic low-back pain. [Subjects] Sixty-nine patients with chronic low-back pain were divided into two groups: a lumbar stability group (n=39) and a lumbar instability group (n=30). [Methods] The patients were assessed using a goniometer to evaluate the hip range of motion at pre-test. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 software for Windows. The experimental data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA, repeated one-way ANOVA, and the t-test, and a significance level of 0.05. [Results] The limitation of hip range of motion of the lumbar instability group was significantly greater than that of the lumbar stability group. [Conclusion] The chronic low-back pain patients showed greater limitation of hip range of motion than healthy persons, and among them, those who had lumbar instability showed greater limitation than those with lumbar stability. PMID:25729165

  3. [Opioid use disorder in patients with chronic non-cancer pain].

    PubMed

    Brabant, Michel; Brissette, Suzanne; Lauzon, Pierre; Marsan, Stéphanie; Ouellet-Plamondon, Clairélaine; Pelletier, Marie-Chantal

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiology Canada now has the second highest number of opioid prescriptions per capita in the world. The rate of prescriptions has increased over the last decade, most notably in adults over 55 years of age. A recognition of the importance of treating pain has influenced this increase, but higher rates of opioid prescribing have produced undesirable outcomes including the misuse of medication as well as an increased number of deaths and emergency department visits attributable to opioids. Diverse psychiatric disorders, such as major depression, now also occur in 40% of those with an opioid use disorder (OUD). Neuroscience We now understand that addictive behaviors are caused by both environmental and genetic factors. Although OUD has historically been perceived as a weakness of character, it is now clear that it is a chronic disease, which results from a complex interaction between a substance, such as opioid, environmental factors, and an individual's genotype. Unfortunately, this evidence has yet to be successfully translated into clinical practice and most physicians are unable to diagnose and manage OUD patients appropriately.Clinical guidelines Many clinical guidelines for the management of chronic, non-cancer pain are available. All guidelines identify the need to assess the patient appropriately and screen for factors associated with misuse before prescribing opioids. Guidelines generally acknowledge that patients should not be denied appropriate pain management, but that some patients will require close supervision and frequent follow-up to prevent the misuse of prescription opioids. PMID:25590547

  4. Effects of Interscalene Nerve Block for Postoperative Pain Management in Patients after Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsiu-Pin; Shen, Shih-Jyun; Tsai, Hsin-I; Kao, Sheng-Chin; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Shoulder surgery can produce severe postoperative pain and movement limitations. Evidence has shown that regional nerve block is an effective management for postoperative shoulder pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the postoperative analgesic effect of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) combined with interscalene nerve block in comparison to PCA alone after shoulder surgery. Methods. In this study, 103 patients receiving PCA combined with interscalene nerve block (PCAIB) and 48 patients receiving PCA alone after shoulder surgery were included. Patients' characteristics, preoperative shoulder score and range of motion, surgical and anesthetic condition in addition to visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, postoperative PCA consumption, and adverse outcomes were evaluated. Results. The results showed that PCA combined with interscalene nerve block (PCAIB) group required less volume of analgesics than PCA alone group in 24 hours (57.76 ± 23.29?mL versus 87.29 ± 33.73?mL, p < 0.001) and 48 hours (114.86 ± 40.97?mL versus 183.63 ± 44.83?mL, p < 0.001) postoperatively. The incidence of dizziness in PCAIB group was significantly lower than PCA group (resp., 1.9% and 14.6%, p = 0.005). VAS, nausea, and vomiting were less in group PCAIB, but in the absence of significant statistical correlation. Conclusion. Interscalene nerve block is effective postoperatively in reducing the demand for PCA analgesics and decreasing opioids-induced adverse events following shoulder surgery. PMID:26688821

  5. Patients' treatment beliefs in low back pain: development and validation of a questionnaire in primary care.

    PubMed

    Dima, Alexandra; Lewith, George T; Little, Paul; Moss-Morris, Rona; Foster, Nadine E; Hankins, Matthew; Surtees, George; Bishop, Felicity L

    2015-08-01

    Choosing the most appropriate treatment for individual patients with low back pain (LBP) can be challenging, and clinical guidelines recommend taking into account patients' preferences. However, no tools exist to assess or compare patients' views about LBP treatments. We report the development and validation of the Low Back Pain Treatment Beliefs Questionnaire (LBP-TBQ) for use across different treatments in clinical practice and research. Using qualitative data, we developed a pool of items assessing perceived credibility, effectiveness, concerns about, and individual "fit" of specific treatments. These items were included in a survey completed by 429 primary care patients with LBP, of whom 115 completed it again 1 to 2 weeks later. We performed psychometric analyses using nonparametric item response theory and classical test theory. The 4 subscales of the resulting 16-item LBP-TBQ showed good homogeneity (H = 0.46-0.76), internal consistency (? = 0.73-0.94), and stability (r = 0.63-0.83), confirmed most convergent and discriminant validity hypotheses, and had acceptable structural validity for 4 guideline-recommended treatments: pain medication, exercise, manual therapy, and acupuncture. Participants with stronger positive treatment beliefs were more likely to rank that treatment as their first choice, indicating good criterion validity (t values = 3.11-9.80, all P < 0.01, except pain medication effectiveness beliefs, t(339) = 1.35; P = 0.18). A short 4-item version also displayed good homogeneity (H = 0.43-0.66), internal consistency (? = 0.70-0.86), and stability (r = 0.82-0.85) and was significantly related to treatment choice (t values = 4.33-9.25, all P < 0.01). The LBP-TBQ can be used to assess treatment beliefs in primary care patients with LBP and to investigate the effects of treatment beliefs on treatment uptake and adherence. PMID:25906346

  6. Diminished neurokinin-1 receptor availability in patients with two forms of chronic visceral pain

    PubMed Central

    Jarcho, Johanna M.; Feier, Natasha A.; Bert, Alberto; Labus, Jennifer A.; Lee, Maunoo; Stains, Jean; Ebrat, Bahar; Groman, Stephanie M.; Tillisch, Kirsten; Brody, Arthur L.; London, Edythe D.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Mayer, Emeran A.

    2014-01-01

    Central sensitization and dysregulation of peripheral substance P and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) signaling are associated with chronic abdominal pain in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Although positron emission tomography (PET) has demonstrated that patients with injury-related chronic pain have diminished NK-1R availability in the brain, it is unknown whether these deficits are present in IBD and IBS patients, who have etiologically distinct forms of non-injury-related chronic pain. This study's aim was to determine if patients with IBD or IBS exhibit deficits in brain expression of NK-1Rs relative to healthy controls (HCs), the extent to which expression patterns differ across patient populations, and if these patterns differentially relate to clinical parameters. PET with [18F]SPA-RQ was used to measure NK-1R availability by quantifying binding potential (BP) in the 3 groups. Exploratory correlation analyses were performed to detect associations between NK-1R BP and physical symptoms. Compared to HCs, IBD patients had NK-1R BP deficits across a widespread network of cortical and subcortical regions. IBS patients had similar, but less pronounced deficits. BP in a subset of these regions was robustly related to discrete clinical parameters in each patient population. Widespread deficits in NK-1R BP occur in IBD and, to a lesser extent, IBS; however, discrete clinical parameters relate to NK-1R BP in each patient population. This suggests that potential pharmacological interventions that target NK-1R signaling may be most effective for treating distinct symptoms in IBD and IBS. PMID:23582152

  7. Pain Coping Skills Training and Lifestyle Behavioral Weight Management in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Somers, Tamara J.; Blumenthal, James A.; Guilak, Farshid; Kraus, Virginia B.; Schmitt, Daniel O.; Babyak, Michael A.; Craighead, Linda W.; Caldwell, David S.; Rice, John R.; McKee, Daphne C.; Shelby, Rebecca A.; Campbell, Lisa C.; Pells, Jennifer J.; Sims, Ershela L.; Queen, Robin; Carson, James W.; Connelly, Mark; Dixon, Kim E.; LaCaille, Lara J.; Huebner, Janet L.; Rejeski, W. Jack; Keefe, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    Overweight and obese patients with osteoarthritis (OA) experience more OA pain and disability than patients who are not overweight. This study examined the long-term efficacy of a combined pain coping skills training (PCST) and lifestyle behavioral weight management (BWM) intervention in overweight and obese OA patients. Patients (N=232) were randomized to a 6-month program of: 1) PCST + BWM; 2) PCST-only; 3) BWM-only; or 4) standard care control. Assessments of pain, physical disability (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales [AIMS] physical disability, stiffness, activity, and gait), psychological disability (AIMS psychological disability, pain catastrophizing, arthritis self-efficacy, weight self-efficacy), and body weight were collected at four time points (pretreatment, post-treatment, and 6 months and 12 months after the completion of treatment). Patients randomized to PCST+ BWM demonstrated significantly better treatment outcomes (average of all three post-treatment values) in terms of pain, physical disability, stiffness, activity, weight self-efficacy, and weight when compared to the other three conditions (p’s <.05). PCST+BWM also did significantly better than at least one of the other conditions (i.e., PCST-only, BWM-only, or standard care) in terms of psychological disability, pain catastrophizing, and arthritis self-efficacy. Interventions teaching overweight and obese OA patients pain coping skills and weight management simultaneously may provide the more comprehensive long-term benefits. PMID:22503223

  8. Patient-tailored combinations of systemic and topical preparations for localized peripheral neuropathic pain: a two-case report.

    PubMed

    Weinbroum, Avi A; Zur, Eyal

    2015-03-01

    This report describes two patients with peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP): a 43-year-old man with upper leg PNP and a 75-year-old woman with post herpetic neuralgia of the perineum and vagina. Pain was inadequately managed in both patients for a long time. A patient-tailored approach, including a combination of systemic and topical compounds, required multiple adjustments for each patient before finally achieving adequate pain control. The first patient achieved pain control with a combination of systemically-administered drugs: dipyrone (1 g 3 times a day), pregabalin (300 mg twice a day), duloxetine (60 mg once daily in the morning), and dextromethorphan (60 mg 3 times/day), plus topical compounds (10% ketamine, 5% lidocaine, and 10% ketoprofen) in penetrating enhancing gel, and sublingual ketamine (10 mg) for breakthrough pain. The second patient achieved optimal pain control with dipyrone (500 mg three times per day), pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), dextromethorphan (60 mg three times per day), plus topical compounds (10% ketamine, 0.3% clonidine, 5% diclofenac) in a penetrating enhancing gel. Notably, the individualized approach described herein was made possible through collaboration between a public health pain specialist and a private sector compounding pharmacist, highlighting the importance of such infrequent but, highly desirable collaborations. PMID:25594152

  9. Pain Levels Within 24 Hours After UFE: A Comparison of Morphine and Fentanyl Patient-Controlled Analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun S. Czuczman, Gregory J.; Nicholson, Wanda K.; Pham, Luu D.; Richman, Jeffrey M.

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the presence and severity of pain levels during 24 h after uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) for symptomatic leiomyomata and compare the effectiveness and adverse effects of morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) versus fentanyl PCA. We carried out a prospective, nonrandomized study of 200 consecutive women who received UFE and morphine or fentanyl PCA after UFE. Pain perception levels were obtained on a 0-10 scale for the 24-h period after UFE. Linear regression methods were used to determine pain trends and differences in pain trends between two groups and the association between pain scores and patient covariates. One hundred eighty-five patients (92.5%) reported greater-than-baseline pain after UFE, and 198 patients (99%) required IV opioid PCA. One hundred thirty-six patients (68.0%) developed nausea during the 24-h period. Seventy-two patients (36%) received morphine PCA and 128 (64%) received fentanyl PCA, without demographic differences. The mean dose of morphine used was 33.8 {+-} 26.7 mg, while the mean dose of fentanyl was 698.7 {+-} 537.4 {mu}g. Using this regimen, patients who received morphine PCA had significantly lower pain levels than those who received fentanyl PCA (p < 0.0001). We conclude that patients develop pain requiring IV opioid PCA within 24 h after UFE. Morphine PCA is more effective in reducing post-uterine artery embolization pain than fentanyl PCA. Nausea is a significant adverse effect from opioid PCA.

  10. Metal sensitivities among TJA patients with post-operative pain: indications for multi-metal LTT testing.

    PubMed

    Caicedo, Marco S; Solver, Edward; Coleman, Latasha; Hallab, Nadim James

    2014-01-01

    Metal sensitivity testing is generally the diagnosis method of last resort for aseptic painful implants with elevated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between implant-related pain and implant-debris-related metal sensitization remains incompletely understood. Although a sensitivity to nickel alone has been used as a general measure of metal allergy, it may lack the specificity to correlate sensitivity to specific implant metals and thus to select a biologically appropriate implant material. In this retrospective study, we report the incidence of pain and nickel sensitivity in patients with total joint arthroplasties (TJAs) referred for metal sensitivity testing (n=2018). We also correlated the degree of nickel hypersensitivity to implant pain levels (none, mild, moderate, and high, using a scale of 0-10) and the incidence of sensitivity to alternative implant metals in highly nickel-reactive subjects. Most patients (>79%) reported pain levels that were moderate to high regardless of implant age, whereas patients with severely painful TJAs had a statistically greater incidence of nickel sensitivity over the short-term post-operative period (?4 years). Patients with moderate pain scores (4-7) and high pain scores (?8) also exhibited significantly higher sensitivity to nickel compared to patients with no pain and no implant (controls) (p<0.05). Highly nickel-sensitive subjects (SI>8) also showed incidences of sensitization to alternative materials such as cobalt, chromium, or molybdenum (57%) or aluminum or vanadium alloy (52%). These data suggest that painful TJAs caused by metal sensitivity more likely occur relatively early in the post-operative period (?4 years). The incidences of sensitivity to alternative implant metals in only a subset of nickel-reactive patients highlights the importance of testing for sensitization to all potential revision implant materials. PMID:24941404

  11. Minimal injection site pain and high patient satisfaction during treatment with long-acting risperidone.

    PubMed

    Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Jarboe, Kathleen; Bossie, Cynthia A; Zhu, Young; Mehnert, Angelika; Lasser, Robert

    2005-07-01

    Long-acting injectable antipsychotic formulations of conventional antipsychotics were developed to address the problem of partial adherence among patients with schizophrenia. Injection site pain, other skin reactions and patient satisfaction with treatment were assessed in two large, multicentre studies of long-acting injectable risperidone (Risperdal CONSTA, Janssen Pharmaceutica Products, Titusville, New Jersey, USA), the first available long-acting atypical antipsychotic agent. Patients rated injection site pain using a 100-mm Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), and investigators rated injection site pain, redness, swelling and induration. Patient satisfaction with treatment was assessed with the Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI). VAS pain ratings were low at all visits across all doses in both studies, and decreased from first to final injection. In the 12-week, double-blind study, mean +/- SD VAS scores at the first and final injections were 15.6 +/- 20.7 and 12.5 +/- 18.3 for placebo-treated patients, and 11.8 +/- 14.4 (first) and 10.0 +/- 12.4 (final) for 25 mg; 16.3+/-21.9 (first) and 13.6 +/- 21.7 (final) for 50 mg; and 16.0 +/- 17.9 (first) and 9.6 +/- 16.0 (final, P<0.01) for 75 mg of long-acting risperidone. Mean VAS scores in the 50-week, open-label study at the first and final injection were: 17.9 +/- 22.2 (first) and 9.5 +/- 16.7 (final, P<0.0001) for 25 mg; 18.1 +/- 19.7 (first) and 10.4 +/- 14.8 (final, P<0.0001) for 50 mg; and 18.5 +/- 21.6 (first) and 13.6 +/- 19.9 (final, P = 0.0001) for 75 mg of long-acting risperidone. Overall, there was no or minimal injection site pain and skin reactions were rare. Mean DAI ratings were available for the 50-week study and indicated high patient satisfaction throughout the trial (baseline = 7.30; endpoint = 7.70; P<0.0001 versus baseline). These findings may positively affect patient and clinician attitudes towards long-term therapy with long-acting injectable risperidone. PMID:15933482

  12. Characterization of functional biliary pain and dyspeptic symptoms in patients with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction: Effect of papillotomy

    PubMed Central

    Madácsy, László; Fejes, Roland; Kurucsai, Gábor; Joó, Ildikó; Székely, András; Bertalan, Viktória; Szepes, Attila; Lonovics, János

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize functional biliary pain and other gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in postcholecystectomy syndrome (PCS) patients with and without sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (SOD) proved by endoscopic sphincter of Oddi manometry (ESOM), and to assess the post-endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) outcome. METHODS: We prospectively investigated 85 cholecystectomized patients referred for ERCP because of PCS and suspected SOD. On admission, all patients completed our questionnaire. Physical examination, laboratory tests, abdominal ultrasound, quantitative hepatobiliary scintigraphy (QHBS), and ERCP were performed in all patients. Based on clinical and ERCP findings 15 patients had unexpected bile duct stone disease and 15 patients had SOD biliary typeI. ESOM demonstrated an elevated basal pressure in 25 patients with SOD biliary-type III. In the remaining 30 cholecystectomized patients without SOD, the liver function tests, ERCP, QHBS and ESOM were all normal. As a control group, 30 ‘asymptomatic’ cholecystectomized volunteers (attended to our hospital for general cardiovascular screening) completed our questionnaire, which is consisted of 50 separate questions on GI symptoms and abdominal pain characteristics. Severity of the abdominal pain (frequency and intensity) was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS). In 40 of 80 patients having definite SOD (i.e. patients with SOD biliary typeIand those with elevated SO basal pressure on ESOM), an EST was performed just after ERCP. In these patients repeated questionnaires were filled at each follow-up visit (at 3 and 6 mo) and a second look QHBS was performed 3 mo after the EST to assess the functional response to EST. RESULTS: The analysis of characteristics of the abdominal pain demonstrated that patients with common bile duct stone and definite SOD had a significantly higher score of symptomatic agreement with previously determined biliary-like pain features than patient groups of PCS without SOD and controls. In contrary, no significant differences were found when the pain severity scores were compared in different groups of PCS patients. In patients with definite SOD, EST induced a significant acceleration of the transpapillary bile flow; and based on the comparison of VASs obtained from the pre- and post-EST questionnaires, the severity scores of abdominal pain were significantly improved, however, only 15 of 35 (43%) patients became completely pain free. Post-EST severity of abdominal pain by VASs was significantly higher in patients with predominant dyspepsia at initial presentation as compared to those without dyspeptic symptoms. CONCLUSION: Persistent GI symptoms and general patient dissatisfaction is a rather common finding after EST in patients with SOD, and correlated with the presence of predominant dyspeptic symptoms at the initial presentation, but does not depend on the technical and functional success of EST. PMID:17106935

  13. Correlations between the Hand Test Pathology score and Personality Assessment Inventory scales for pain clinic patients.

    PubMed

    George, J M; Wagner, E E

    1995-06-01

    Pearson correlations between the Hand Test Pathology (PATH) score and Personality Assessment Inventory scales produced a cluster of relationships characteristic of an antisocial orientation. Likewise, PATH significantly differentiated between a "P" (Pathology) group flagged by a high Negative Impression score on the inventory, and an "N" (Normal) group of 100 pain patients. It was suggested that the interpretive simplicity of Hand Test scores renders the scores amenable to further correlational studies involving the inventory. PMID:7478899

  14. False-positive indium-111 labeled leukocyte scintigram in a patient with a painful hip prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, N.; Makler, P.T. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-01-01

    A Tronzo hip prosthesis is designed to elicit an inflammatory reaction in order to promote prosthesis stability. A three-phased bone scan and Ga-67 imaging in conjunction with physical examination and laboratory findings failed to demonstrate evidence for osteomyelitis in a patient with a painful hip prosthesis, in whom images obtained with In-111-labeled leukocytes were positive. This observation demonstrated that the interpretation of the latter technique in demonstrating inflammation can cause a false impression of an infectious process.

  15. Photoplethysmography variability as an alternative approach to obtain heart rate variability information in chronic pain patient.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chiung-Cheng; Ye, Jing-Jhao; Lin, Wan-Chun; Lee, Kuan-Ting; Tai, Yu-Ting

    2015-12-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) is a well-known method for the assessment of autonomic nervous function of the heart. Previous study suggested that pulse rate variability (PRV) determined by photoplethysmography could be used instead of HRV to more simply assess autonomic nervous function. However, most research studies included healthy subjects. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility for PRV as a surrogate index for patients with chronic pain. This study investigated the correlation coefficient (by Pearson correlation) and agreement (by Bland-Altman analysis) between PRV and HRV in chronic pain patients in the clinical setting. The results showed high significant correlations (p < 0.001, r > 0.86) between all the HRV and PRV parameters and good agreements (ratio < 0.1) between the parameters in terms of HR, mean RR, VLF, LF, nLF, nHF, and SD1/SD2. Our study suggests that HRV can also be reliably estimated using the photoplethysmography-based PP interval in elderly patients with chronic pain. PMID:25708672

  16. Effect of Lumbar Stabilization and Dynamic Lumbar Strengthening Exercises in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Hye Jin; Kim, Dae Ha; Kim, Ha Jeong; Cho, Young Ki; Lee, Kwang Hee; Kim, Jung Hoo; Choi, Yoo Jung

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises and lumbar dynamic strengthening exercises on the maximal isometric strength of the lumbar extensors, pain severity and functional disability in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). Methods Patients suffering nonspecific LBP for more than 3 months were included prospectively and randomized into lumbar stabilization exercise group (n=11) or lumbar dynamic strengthening exercise group (n=10). Exercises were performed for 1 hour, twice weekly, for 8 weeks. The strength of the lumbar extensors was measured at various angles ranging from 0° to 72° at intervals of 12°, using a MedX. The visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire (ODQ) were used to measure the severity of LBP and functional disability before and after the exercise. Results Compared with the baseline, lumbar extension strength at all angles improved significantly in both groups after 8 weeks. The improvements were significantly greater in the lumbar stabilization exercise group at 0° and 12° of lumbar flexion. VAS decreased significantly after treatment; however, the changes were not significantly different between the groups. ODQ scores improved significantly in the stabilization exercise group only. Conclusion Both lumbar stabilization and dynamic strengthening exercise strengthened the lumbar extensors and reduced LBP. However, the lumbar stabilization exercise was more effective in lumbar extensor strengthening and functional improvement in patients with nonspecific chronic LBP. PMID:23525973

  17. [Nurse's experience of using music therapy to relieve acute pain in a post-orthopedic surgery patient].

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Tsai-Yun; Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang

    2009-08-01

    This article describes the experience of a nurse who used music therapy as the intervention to reduce a patient's pain during wound care after orthopedic surgery. The intervention was applied between April 8th and April 29th 2008. The nurse applied Roy's adaptation model as the assessment tool. The major and primary health problem identified was acute pain accelerated by wound care. The pain of this client not only triggered negative feelings, but also affected negatively on his daily life and feelings of self-belongingness. Through an individual-tailored music therapy, the client's pain during wound care was greatly reduced and even completely disappeared. The ultimate outcome of decrease in pain included reductions in negative feelings and increased positive spiritual strength. It is recommended that nurses who are responsible for wound care use this simple and economical music intervention to reduce acute postoperative pain. PMID:19634107

  18. Hearing New Voices: Registered Nurses and Health Technicians Experience Caring for Chronic Pain Patients in Primary Care Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Pellico, Linda H.; Gilliam, Wesley P.; Lee, Allison W.; Kerns, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent national estimates from the U.S. reveal that as many as one-third of all Americans experience chronic pain resulting in high prevalence rates of visits to primary care clinics (PCC). Indeed, chronic pain appears to be an emerging global health problem. Research has largely ignored the perspective of PCC staff other than physicians in providing care for patients with chronic pain. We wanted to gain insights from the experiences of Registered Nurses (RNs) and Health Technicians (HTs) who care for this patient population. Krippendorff’s method for content analysis was used to analyze comments written in an open-ended survey from fifty-seven primary care clinic staff (RNs-N=27 and HTs-N=30) respondents. This represented an overall response rate of 75%. Five themes emerged related to the experience of RNs and HTs caring for patients with chronic pain: 1) Primacy of Medications and Accompanying Clinical Quandaries; 2) System Barriers; 3) Dealing with Failure; 4) Primacy of Patient Centered Care; and 5) Importance of Team Based Care. This study demonstrates that nursing staff provide patient-centered care, recognize the importance of their role within an interdisciplinary team and can offer valuable insight about the care of patients with chronic pain. This study provides insight into strategies that can mitigate barriers to chronic pain management while sustaining those aspects that RNs and HTs view as essential for improving patient care for this vulnerable population in PCCs. PMID:25246996

  19. The use of functional and traditional mobilization interventions in a patient with chronic thoracic pain: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, David L; Vaughn, Dan

    2013-01-01

    There is little information in the literature regarding the efficacy of spinal manual therapy (SMT) interventions for patients with chronic thoracic spinal pain. In addition, information regarding the clinical decision-making associated with the application of SMT for this patient population is deficient. The purpose of this case report is to present the rationale for and results of applying specific SMT interventions on a patient with chronic spinal pain. A 51-year-old female with 9 months of significant thoracic, chest, sternal, and left shoulder pain was managed with both mobilization with movement and spinal manipulative procedures. The report offers insight into the decisions that guided the selection of these SMT techniques in this case. The outcome provides preliminary support for using these specific SMT procedures in patients with chronic thoracic spinal pain. PMID:24421624

  20. Chest CT examinations in patients presenting with acute chest pain: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Sebastiaan; Kroft, Lucia J; Hidalgo, Alberto L; Leta, Ruben; de Roos, Albert

    2015-12-01

    Acute chest pain (ACP) is one of the most common presenting symptoms at the emergency department. The differential diagnosis is vast. To exclude life-threatening causes, radiologists encounter an increasing amount of thoracic computed tomography (CT) examinations including CT angiography of the heart and great vessels. The dual- and triple-rule CT examinations are currently implemented in clinical practice. We retrospectively identified chest CT examinations in the setting of acute chest pain in our hospitals and collected a variety of common and uncommon cases. In this pictorial essay, we present the most educative cases from patients who presented with acute chest pain in the emergency department of our hospitals and for whom a thoracic CT was ordered. When aortic emergencies, acute coronary syndrome, and pulmonary embolism are excluded, these cases may help the radiologist to suggest alternative diagnoses in the diagnostic challenge of acute chest pain. Teaching Points • The number of chest CT examinations for ACP is increasing.• Chest CT examinations may help suggesting alternative diagnosis in ACP.• Radiologists should be aware of the differential diagnosis of ACP. PMID:26373647

  1. Effects of double air-cushion biofeedback exercises in a patient with sacroiliac joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We developed a double air-cushion biofeedback device to be used for sacroiliac (SI) joint exercises and investigated the effects of exercising using the device in a patient with SI joint pain. [Subject] A 40-year-old man, who complained of pain in the left posterior iliac crest area and SI joints over a 6-month period participated. [Methods] After a 4-week exercise program using the double air-cushion biofeedback device, the subject was assessed using the Gaenslen, Patrick, posterior shear (POSH), and resisted abduction (REAB) tests. [Results] After performing exercise designed to strengthen subdivisions of the gluteus medius, the subject had no pain in the Gaenslen, Patrick, POSH, or REAB tests of the SI joint. The visual analog scale (VAS) score for pain on palpation of the left posterior iliac crest area decreased to 4/10 from an initial score of 7/10. [Conclusion] Exercises with the double air-cushion biofeedback device improved hip asymmetry, SI joint mobility, and muscle strength.

  2. Physician introduction to opioids for pain among patients with opioid dependence and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Judith I; Herman, Debra S; Kettavong, Malyna; Alford, Daniel; Anderson, Bradley J; Stein, Michael D

    2010-12-01

    This study determined the frequency of reporting being introduced to opioids by a physician among opioid-dependent patients. Cross-sectional analyses were performed using baseline data from a cohort of opioid addicts seeking treatment with buprenorphine. The primary outcome was a response to the question: "Who introduced you to opiates?" Covariates included sociodemographics, depression, pain, and current and prior substance use. Of 140 participants, 29% reported that they had been introduced to opioids by a physician. Of those who were introduced to opioids by a physician, all indicated that they had initially used opioids for pain, versus only 11% of those who did not report being introduced to opioids by a physician (p < .01). There was no difference in current pain (78% vs. 85%, p = .29); however, participants who were introduced to opioids by a physician were more likely to have chronic pain (63% vs. 43%, p = .04). A substantial proportion of individuals with opioid dependence seeking treatment may have been introduced to opioids by a physician. PMID:20727704

  3. A preliminary report on prevalence of acetabular labrum tears in sports patients with groin pain.

    PubMed

    Narvani, A A; Tsiridis, E; Kendall, S; Chaudhuri, R; Thomas, P

    2003-11-01

    To the best of our knowledge, this prospective study is the first to investigate the prevalence of acetabular labrum tears in athletes presenting with groin pain. Eighteen athletes who presented to our sports clinic with groin pain, underwent clinical assessment and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRa) to detect presence or absence of acetabular labrum tears. Ethical committee approval and informed consent was obtained from each patient. In four out of these eighteen athletes (22%) the MRa demonstrated the presence of acetabular labrum tear. Three of them underwent arthroscopic debridement of their acetabular labrum tears and returned to their sporting activities within 8 months. Clicking sensation of the hip was a sensitive (100%) and specific (85%) clinical symptom to predict labral tears. The internal rotation-flexion-axial compression manoeuvre was sensitive (75%) but not specific (43%). The Thomas test was neither sensitive nor specific. The conclusion of the study is that acetabular labrum tears can be a common cause of groin pain in athletes. Sports clinicians managing athletes with groin pain have to be well aware of the condition. PMID:12897984

  4. Physician Introduction to Opioids for Pain Among Patients with Opioid Dependence and Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Judith I.; Herman, Debra S.; Kettavong, Malyna; Alford, Daniel; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the frequency of reporting being introduced to opioids by a physician among opioid dependent patients. Cross-sectional analyses were performed using baseline data from a cohort of opioid addicts seeking treatment with buprenorphine. The primary outcome was response to the question: “Who introduced you to opiates?” Covariates included sociodemographics, depression, pain, current and prior substance use. Of 140 participants, 29% reported that they had been introduced to opioids by a physician. Of those who were introduced to opioids by a physician, all indicated that they had initially used opioids for pain, versus only 11% of those who did not report being introduced to opioids by a physician (p<0.01). There was no difference in current pain (78% vs. 85%, p=0.29), however participants who were introduced to opioids by a physician were more likely to have chronic pain (63% vs. 43%, p=0.04). A substantial proportion of individuals with opioid dependence seeking treatment may have been introduced to opioids by a physician. PMID:20727704

  5. Reduced habituation to experimental pain in migraine patients: a CO(2) laser evoked potential study.

    PubMed

    Valeriani, M; de Tommaso, M; Restuccia, D; Le Pera, D; Guido, M; Iannetti, G D; Libro, G; Truini, A; Di Trapani, G; Puca, F; Tonali, P; Cruccu, G

    2003-09-01

    The habituation to sensory stimuli of different modalities is reduced in migraine patients. However, the habituation to pain has never been evaluated. Our aim was to assess the nociceptive pathway function and the habituation to experimental pain in patients with migraine. Scalp potentials were evoked by CO(2) laser stimulation (laser evoked potentials, LEPs) of the hand and facial skin in 24 patients with migraine without aura (MO), 19 patients with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH), and 28 control subjects (CS). The habituation was studied by measuring the changes of LEP amplitudes across three consecutive repetitions of 30 trials each (the repetitions lasted 5 min and were separated by 5-min intervals). The slope of the regression line between LEP amplitude and number of repetitions was taken as an index of habituation. The LEPs consisted of middle-latency, low-amplitude responses (N1, contralateral temporal region, and P1, frontal region) followed by a late, high-amplitude, negative-positive complex (N2/P2, vertex). The latency and amplitude of these responses were similar in both patients and controls. While CS and CTTH patients showed a significant habituation of the N2/P2 response, in MO patients this LEP component did not develop any habituation at all after face stimulation and showed a significantly lower habituation than in CS after hand stimulation. The habituation index of the vertex N2/P2 complex exceeded the normal limits in 13 out of the 24 MO patients and in none of the 19 CTTH patients (P<0.0001; Fisher's exact test). Moreover, while the N1-P1 amplitude showed a significant habituation in CS after hand stimulation, it did not change across repetitions in MO patients. In conclusion, no functional impairment of the nociceptive pathways, including the trigeminal pathways, was found in either MO or CTTH patients. But patients with migraine had a reduced habituation, which probably reflects an abnormal excitability of the cortical areas involved in pain processing. PMID:14499420

  6. Back Pain and Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Prospective Natural History Study

    PubMed Central

    Pour, Aidin E.; Hillibrand, Alan; Goldberg, Grigory; Sharkey, Peter F.; Rothman, Richard H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Many patients with degenerative joint disease of the hip have substantial degeneration of the lumbar spine. These patients may have back and lower extremity pain develop after THA and it may be difficult to determine whether the source of the pain is the hip or spine. Questions/purposes We therefore: (1) identified the incidence/prevalence of pain in the lower back in a group of patients with end-stage arthritis of the hip undergoing THA; (2) described the natural history of low back pain in this cohort undergoing THA; and (3) determined factors that were predictive of persistent low back pain after THA. Methods We administered a detailed questionnaire and a diagram of the human body on which the patients could draw the site of their pain, to 344 patients preoperatively, at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1-year after THA. Before the THA, 170 patients (49.4%) reported pain localized to the lower lumbar region, whereas 174 patients did not have low back pain. Results Low back pain was variable in location. Postoperatively, the low back pain resolved in 113 (66.4%) of the 170 patients. Thirty-seven of the remaining 57 patients had known spine disorders. Thirty-five of the 174 patients (20%) without prior low back pain had low back pain develop within 1 year postoperatively. The low back pain improved in 17 of these 35 patients; 12 of the remaining 18 patients had preexistent spine disorders. Pain radiating below the knee was associated most closely with preexisting spine disorders. Conclusions Hip and spine arthritis often coexist. Most patients who presented with hip arthritis and lower lumbar pain experienced resolution or improvement of their pain after THA. Level of Evidence Level II, prognostic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:20127429

  7. Introducing a chest pain pathway in the emergency department to improve quality of care for patients with possible cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Chest pain is a common reason for patients to present to an emergency department (ED). It is crucial not to miss presentations of the potentially life-threatening acute coronary syndrome (ACS), although often these people present with a non-diagnostic ECG. This makes recognition of a history consistent with ACS very important. We noted inconsistencies in assessment, with many admissions to cardiology beds who did not prove to have ACS and some erroneous discharges who subsequently did have an ACS. We introduced a history based risk tool as part of a chest pain pathway into the ED for use by medical staff assessing patients presenting with chest pain. The intervention involved a nurse from cardiology engaging with clerical, nursing, and medical staff in the ED to ensure success of this quality improvement project. The project showed a reduction in admissions to cardiology with suspected ACS from 29% to 15%, with a projected saving of £889 per patient who was prevented from being admitted. In addition, admissions became more appropriate, with an increase in the proportion of patients with a final diagnosis of ACS from 25% to 46% and a reduction in admissions with atypical chest pain from 75% to 54%.

  8. Conceptualizing a subtype of patients with chronic pain: The necessity of obtaining a history of sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, David R; Shaukat, Ayesha M; Mccroskey, Aidan L; Chatterjee, Aparna; Ahmadi, Tamana; Simmelink, Drew; Oldfield, Edward C; Pryor, Christopher R; Faschan, Michael; Raulli, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Lifetime history of sexual abuse is estimated to range between 15% and 25% in the general female population. Cross-sectional studies have shown that sexual assault survivors frequently report chronic musculoskeletal pain and functional somatic syndromes. Treating chronic pain with opioids went from being largely discouraged to being included in standards of care and titrating doses until patients self-report adequate control has become common practice, with 8% to 30% of patients with chronic noncancer pain receiving opioids. In this clinical review, we will discuss the association between survivors of sexual assault and chronic pain/functional somatic syndromes. We will further review evidence-based treatment strategies for this "pain-prone phenotype." PMID:26681238

  9. Gender differences in pain characteristics of chronic stable angina and perceived physical limitation in patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Kimble, Laura P.; McGuire, Deborah B.; Dunbar, Sandra B.; Fazio, Sharon; De, Anindya; Weintraub, William S.; Strickland, Ora S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stable angina pectoris, the chest pain associated with reversible myocardial ischemia has detrimental effects on health-related quality of life, particularly in women. The limited research on gender differences in chronic stable angina suggests that angina may be experienced differently in women and that women report greater functional disability related to angina symptoms. No studies have examined gender differences in chronic stable angina from a multidimensional pain perspective or have included reliable and valid measures of pain that would facilitate comparing chronic angina patients with other chronic pain populations. The purpose of this descriptive study was to examine gender differences in characteristics of chronic stable angina using the short-form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and to explore relationships among these pain characteristics and perceived limitation in performing physical activities in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) (physical limitation subscale of the Seattle angina questionnaire). One hundred and twenty-eight subjects (30.5% women) with stable CAD and angina pectoris documented by a cardiologist completed study questionnaires in an outpatient cardiology clinic. Results of the study suggest that men and women with chronic stable angina had more similarities than differences in chest pain characteristics. No significant gender differences were demonstrated in total sensory or affective intensity scores, the present pain intensity index, or the number of pain words chosen. However, women did report significantly greater pain intensity on the SF-MPQ visual analogue scale. Women were also significantly more likely to describe their chronic angina as ‘hot-burning’ and ‘tender’ and to have greater intensity of pain for these two descriptors. Despite the similarities in pain characteristics, women reported greater physical limitation related to anginal pain. The variables of social status and years diagnosed with CAD significantly interacted with gender in predicting physical limitation suggesting that gender-specific models of physical limitation in angina patients need to be explored. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies that has assessed chronic anginal pain using a reliable and valid generic pain instrument. More research is needed to better understand the nature of gender differences in functional limitation secondary to anginal pain and the physiologic, cognitive-perceptual and psychosocial mechanisms that lead to angina-related functional disability. PMID:12507699

  10. A new quantitative evaluation method of spiral drawing for patients with Parkinson’s disease based on a polar coordinate system with varying origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Wang, Bei; Zou, Junzhong; Nakamura, Masatoshi

    2012-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common disease of the central nervous system among the elderly, and its complex symptoms bring up challenges for the clinical diagnosis. In this paper, a new method based on a polar coordinate system with varying origin was proposed in order to quantitatively evaluate the performance in spiral drawing tasks for patients with Parkinson's disease, since this method can assess the movement ability of spiral drawing before and after deep brain stimulation (DBS) among the patients. In this paper, three normal subjects and twelve PD patients participated in spiral drawing experiment. The hand movements of patients, before and after DBS, were recorded by a digitized tablet respectively in this experiment. And the variation of origin, radius, degree and other characteristics of hand movements were evaluated by introducing a set of parameters for feature extraction. The result showed that the proposed polar coordinate system embraced good performance in the quantitative evaluation of spiral drawing. Therefore, the proposed method overcame the limitation of data processes with fixed origin for diagnosis and evaluation, and by combining with extraction and analysis of characteristic parameters it had clinical significance in measuring the effectiveness of operation or treatment for the PD patients.

  11. Prevalence of Gastrointestinal Diseases and Treatment Status in Noncardiac Chest Pain Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hun; Choi, Ja Yeon; Park, Eun Jin; Lee, Jae Joong; Lee, Sunki; Na, Jin Oh; Choi, Cheol Ung; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Seo, Hong Seog; Oh, Dong Joo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives We evaluated the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux diseases (GERD) in noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) patients, risk factors for GERD, and status of prescriptions for GERD in Korean population. Subjects and Methods This was a retrospective non-interventional observational nation-wide 45-center study. Patients with a normal coronary angiogram (CAG) and upper gastroendoscopy within 2 years after CAG were enrolled. The prevalence of GERD was examined. Other gastrointestinal diseases including peptic ulcer diseases or gastritis were also examined. Risk factors for GERD were compared between the GERD group and non-GERD group. The ratio of patients medicated for gastrointestinal diseases (antacids or proton-pump inhibitor) was also examined. Results Nine hundred four patients were enrolled. Among the NCCP patients, GERD was present in 436 (48.2%), peptic ulcer disease in 154 patients (17.0%), and gastritis in 659 (72.9%). There was no difference in risk factors for GERD between the GERD and non-GERD patients. Medications for GERD and other gastrointestinal diseases were prescribed in 742 (82.1%) patients. Conclusion GERD was common (42.8%) in Korean NCCP patients and most (82.1%) received the prescription of gastrointestinal medications. No differences were evident in risk factors between GERD and non-GERD patients. PMID:26617648

  12. Prognostic value of real time dobutamine stress myocardial contrast echocardiography in patients with chest pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Geu-Ru; Park, Jong-Seon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Shin, Dong-Gu; Kim, Ung; Choi, Jung Hyun; Abdelmalik, Robin; Vera, Jesús A.; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Narula, Jagat

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to evaluate the prognostic value of negative wall motion (WM) and myocardial perfusion during contrast-dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE), (2) to determine whether WM-myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) had incremental prognostic value over just WM during DSE in patients with chest pain in the emergency room(ER), and (3) to compare the prognostic value of negative DSE-WM, and DSE-WM-MCE to nuclear-myocardial perfusion imaging (N-MPI) in a similar patient population over the same time period. We retrospectively studied 569 patients with real time contrast DSE, and 147 patients underwent N-MPI for evaluation of chest pain. Follow-up for cardiac events was obtained between 12 and 25 months. The cumulative cardiac event-free survival was 94.5% in negative DSE-WM, 97.1% in negative DSE-WM-MCE and 96.7% in negative N-MPI group. Cardiac event-free survival of the negative DSE-WM-MCE group was significantly higher than the DSE-WM group (log rank P < 0.01), and similar in the DSE-WM-MCE group compared to the N-MPI group. Combined WM and perfusion during DSE was the strongest independent predictor for cardiac events. The negative predictive power of DSE-WM-MCE is superior to that of just negative DSE-WM and is comparable to that of N-MPI. Myocardial perfusion and WM analysis during DSE provide independent information for predicting cardiac events in patients with chest pain syndrome in the ER. PMID:22143170

  13. WE-E-BRE-09: Investigation of the Association Between Radiation-Induced Pain and Radiation Dose in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, H; Dyk, P; Mullen, D; Eschen, L; Fergus, S; Chin, R; Thors