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1

Pain drawing as an investigative tool in hand surgery.  

PubMed

Fifty consecutive patients referred to the departments of hand surgery in Malmö and Lund were asked to chart their pain on a diagram of the body before their first visit to the clinic. Three patients never answered the questionnaire and were excluded. The drawings were evaluated separately by a senior hand surgeon without access to the case records. In 19 of 47 cases (40%) the evaluation of the pain drawings agreed with the clinical diagnosis. In another 17% (8 of 47), in which the pain drawings had indicated a condition not related to hand surgery, clinical examination failed to establish a diagnosis. The evaluation of the drawings had a false negative rate of 4% (2 of 47). In the remaining 18 cases pain drawings did not give enough information for diagnosis because of the variety of symptoms. Pain drawing seems to be valuable in the evaluation of patients with chronic pain in the upper extremity. PMID:1470874

Arner, M; Kopylov, P; Holmberg, J

1992-01-01

2

Usefulness of pain drawings in identifying real or imagined pain: Accuracy of pain professionals, nonprofessionals, and a decision model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of pain specialists, nonprofessionals, and a decision model in judging whether a pain diagram was marked by a patient with chronic pain or by a healthy volunteer. Two hundred twenty-eight pain drawings were shown in random order to 10 pain medicine physicians, 10 pain medicine fellows, 10 nonphysician specialists, and

Robert N. Jamison; Gilbert J. Fanciullo; John C. Baird

2004-01-01

3

Breakthrough pain: characteristics and impact in patients with cancer pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few surveys have been performed to define the characteristics and impact of breakthrough pain in the cancer population. In this cross-sectional survey of inpatients with cancer, patients responded to a structured interview (the Breakthrough Pain Questionnaire) designed to characterize breakthrough pain, and also completed measures of pain and mood (Memorial Pain Assessment Card (MPAC)), pain-related interference in function (Brief Pain

Russell K Portenoy; David Payne; Paul Jacobsen

1999-01-01

4

Patient education in pain control  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients' concerns about reporting pain and using analgesics have been cited as major contributors to the problem of inadequate pain management. The purpose of this paper is to describe a program of research in which we have focused on these patient concerns, or as we refer to them, \\

S. Ward; S. Hughes; H. Donovan; R. Serlin

2001-01-01

5

Behind the Veil: Mandala Drawings by Dementia Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the Mandala (circular) drawings of elderly patients diagnosed with dementia in order to explore the drawings' role in artmaking and patients' internal processes. Categorized drawings using the MARI Card Test (a projective psychological instrument). Describes the six MARI stages drawn most frequently and colors used most often. (RJM)

Couch, Janet Beaujon

1997-01-01

6

Pain drawing evaluation--the problem with the clinically biased surgeon. Intra- and interobserver agreement in 50 cases related to clinical bias.  

PubMed

To assess whether the clinical knowledge of the treating surgeon had any effect on the reliability of the pain-drawing evaluation, drawings from 50 low-back pain patients were evaluated by the treating surgeon and by three colleagues who had no clinical knowledge of the patient. The evaluation was repeated after 10 days. The treating surgeons were also blinded to clinical data. The kappa value in the evaluation when the surgeon had clinical knowledge of the patient was lower (0.29 (95% Cl 0.13-0.45)) than the kappa value in the evaluations made without clinical knowledge (0.60 (Cl 0.45-0.75)). The differences observed in interobserver reliability between open and blind evaluations suggest that clinical knowledge of a patient influences the evaluation of the pain drawings. PMID:9798452

Reigo, T; Tropp, H; Timpka, T

1998-08-01

7

Conditioned pain modulation in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) pain patients.  

PubMed

The aims were to investigate (1) if temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain had different conditioned pain modulation (CPM) compared with healthy subjects and, (2) if clinical pain characteristics influenced CPM. Sixteen TMD pain patients and 16 age-matched healthy subjects were participated. A mechanical conditioning stimulus (CS) was applied to pericranial muscles provoking a pain intensity of 5/10 on a visual analogue scale. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and pressure pain tolerance thresholds (PPTol) were assessed at masseter, forearm and painful TMJ (only PPT) before, during, and 20 min after CS. Data were analyzed with ANOVAs. The correlations between CPM effect and ratings of TMD pain intensity on a numerical rating scale (NRS) or the pain duration were calculated (correlation coefficient; R). The relative PPT and PPTol increases (mean for the three assessment sites) during CS were significantly higher than baseline in healthy subjects (43.0 ± 3.6, 33.0 ± 4.0 %; P < 0.001, P < 0.001) but not in the TMD pain patients (4.9 ± 2.7, -1.4 ± 4.1 %; P = 0.492, P = 1.000) with significant differences between groups (P < 0.001). In the patients, the relative PPT changes during CS were not significantly higher than baseline at TMJ (5.3 ± 3.8 %, P = 0.981) and masseter (-2.8 ± 4.8 %, P = 1.000) but significantly higher at forearm (12.3 ± 4.7 %, P = 0.039). No correlation was detected between TMD pain intensity and CPM effect (R = -0.261; P = 0.337) or between pain duration and CPM effect (R = -0.423; P = 0.103) at painful TMJ. These findings indicate that CPM is impaired in TMD pain patients especially at sites with chronic pain but not at pain-free sites and that the clinical pain characteristics do not influence CPM. PMID:24897946

Oono, Yuka; Wang, Kelun; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Futarmal, Simple; Kohase, Hikaru; Svensson, Peter; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

2014-10-01

8

Chronic low back pain patients with accompanying leg pain: the relationship between pain extent and pain intensity, disability and health status.  

PubMed

Accompanying leg pain is commonly observed in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and is assumed to be an indicator for the disorder severity. However, it is still unknown whether it is possible to estimate a patient's functional status by the extent of leg pain present. In a post rehabilitation cohort of 132 patients with CLBP (mean age 44.3 years) the relationship between pain extent and functional status was determined using pain drawings scored for pain extent by a simplified scoring system (Lower Extremity Region: LER) and several function related questionnaires. Primary outcomes were pain extent, pain intensity ratings (Visual Analog Scale: VAS), disability status (Oswestry Disability Index: ODI) and physical and mental health (Short Format 12: SF-12). Statistically significant differences between patients with low (1-2) and high (? 3) LER scores were found in VAS, ODI and SF-12 physical health scores, however, the LER score has a poor diagnostic accuracy in predicting desirable versus undesirable VAS, ODI and SF-12 scores. Pain intensity (VAS), back disability (ODI) and physical health are worse in CLBP patients with high LER scores. However LER scores cannot be used to predict elevated VAS, ODI and SF-12 scores in an individual patient. PMID:23411649

Prins, Maarten R; van der Wurff, Peter; Groen, Gerbrand J

2013-01-01

9

Pain Coping Strategies in Osteoarthritis Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated the relation of pain coping strategies to pain, health status, and psychological distress in a group of osteoarthritis patients with chronic pain. Patients completed various questionnaires. Medical status variables were also used. The Pain Control and Rational Thinking factor derived from the Coping Strategies Questionnaire proved to…

Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

1987-01-01

10

Chest pain in primary care: is the localization of pain diagnostically helpful in the critical evaluation of patients? - A cross sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Chest pain is a common complaint and reason for consultation in primary care. Traditional textbooks still assign pain localization a certain discriminative role in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. The aim of our study was to synthesize pain drawings from a large sample of chest pain patients and to examine whether pain localizations differ for different underlying etiologies. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including 1212 consecutive patients with chest pain recruited in 74 primary care offices in Germany. Primary care providers (PCPs) marked pain localization and radiation of each patient on a pictogram. After 6 months, an independent interdisciplinary reference panel reviewed clinical data of every patient, deciding on the etiology of chest pain at the time of patient recruitment. PCP drawings were entered in a specially designed computer program to produce merged pain charts for different etiologies. Dissimilarities between individual pain localizations and differences on the level of diagnostic groups were analyzed using the Hausdorff distance and the C-index. Results Pain location in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) did not differ from the combined group of all other patients, including patients with chest wall syndrome (CWS), gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) or psychogenic chest pain. There was also no difference in chest pain location between male and female CHD patients. Conclusions Pain localization is not helpful in discriminating CHD from other common chest pain etiologies. PMID:24138299

2013-01-01

11

Patient Education on Pain  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Health 06. Safe Use of Over-the-Counter Medicine 07. What Does "Safe and Effective" Mean? 08. Medications - Aspirin 09. Medications - Acetaminophen 10. Medications - NSAIDS 11. Medications - Opioids 12. Side Effects of Opioids 13. Topical Anesthetics 14. Physician-Patient ...

12

Postoperative Pain Trajectories in Cardiac Surgery Patients  

PubMed Central

Poorly controlled postoperative pain is a longstanding and costly problem in medicine. The purposes of this study were to characterize the acute pain trajectories over the first four postoperative days in 83 cardiac surgery patients with a mixed effects model of linear growth to determine whether statistically significant individual differences exist in these pain trajectories, and to compare the quality of measurement by trajectory with conventional pain measurement practices. The data conformed to a linear model that provided slope (rate of change) as a basis for comparing patients. Slopes varied significantly across patients, indicating that the direction and rate of change in pain during the first four days of recovery from surgery differed systematically across individuals. Of the 83 patients, 24 had decreasing pain after surgery, 24 had increasing pain, and the remaining 35 had approximately constant levels of pain over the four postoperative days. PMID:22448322

Chapman, C. Richard; Zaslansky, Ruth; Donaldson, Gary W.; Shinfeld, Amihay

2012-01-01

13

Chronic Pain Patients: Implications for Rehabilitation Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chronic pain syndrome appears to have certain dimensions which make it unique as a disabling condition. When pain persists, the resulting anxiety and depression, others' reactions to the patient's sick role behaviors, and situational variables such as disability benefits may all contribute to the pain syndrome and complicate the rehabilitation…

Scott, Lori T.

14

Pain in cognitively impaired nursing home patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain is an understudied problem in frail elderly patients, especially those with cognitive impairment, delirium, or dementia. The focus of this study was to describe the pain experienced by patients in skilled nursing homes, which have a high prevalence of cognitive impairment. A random sample of 325 subjects was selected from ten community skilled nursing homes. Subjects underwent a cross-sectional

Bruce A. Ferrell; Betty R. Ferrell; Lynne Rivera

1995-01-01

15

Nonfearful Panic Disorder in Chest Pain Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of nonfearful panic disorder (panic attacks without the experience of fear) was estimated in 199 patients consecutively referred to outpatient cardiac investigation for chest pain. Fifty-nine patients met the criteria for panic disorder, and 17 patients fulfilled the criteria for nonfearful panic disorder. The patients with nonfearful panic disorder had lower scores on self- reported panic symptoms and

CHRISTINE BULL BRINGAGER; TORIL DAMMEN; D. SVEIN FRIIS

2004-01-01

16

Breakthrough pain characteristics and syndromes in patients with cancer pain. An international survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Breakthrough pain (BKP) is a transitory flare of pain that occurs on a background of relatively well controlled baseline pain. Previous surveys have found that BKP is highly prevalent among patients with cancer pain and predicts more severe pain, pain-related distress and functional impairment, and relatively poor quality of life. An international group of investigators assembled by a task force

Augusto Caraceni; Cinzia Martini; Ernesto Zecca; Russell K Portenoy; M. A. Ashby; G. Hawson; K. A. Jackson; N. Lickiss; N. Muirden; M. Pisasale; D. Moulin; V. N. Schulz; M. A. Rico Pazo; J. A. Serrano; H. S. Andersen; H. T. Henriksen; I. Mejholm; P. M. Sjogren; T. Heiskanen; E. Kalso; P. Pere; R. Poyhia; E. Vuorinen; I. Tigerstedt; P. Ruismaki; M. Bertolino; F. Larue; J. Y. Ranchere; G. Hege-Scheuing; I. Bowdler; F. Helbing; E. Kostner; L. Radbruch; K. Kastrinaki; S. Shah; S. Vijayaram; K. S. Sharma; P. S. Devi; P. N. Jain; P. V. Ramamani; A. Beny; C. Brunelli; M. Maltoni; S. Mercadante; R. Plancarte; S. Schug; P. Engstrand; A. F. Ovalle; X. Wang; M. F. Alves; M. R. Abrunhosa; W. Z. Sun; L. Zhang; A. Gazizov; M. Vaisman; S. Rudoy; M. G. Sancho; P. Vila; J. Trelis; P. Chaudakshetrin; M. L. Koh; R. T. M. van Dongen; A. Vielvoye-Kerkmeer; M. V. Boswell; T. Elliott; E. Hargus; L. Lutz

2004-01-01

17

[Pain management of cognitively impaired patients].  

PubMed

Pain is a significant problem in clinical practice and its control is one of the most important challenging aspects as pain has a major impact on patients' quality of life and health care costs. Particularly vulnerable persons, like cognitively impaired patients are challenging for pain management and underline its increasing relevance.National and international studies showed significant differences concerning pain therapy between cognitively impaired and cognitively intact patients. A possible cause of this may be that patients who are cognitively impaired are only in a restricted way able to express their pain. Furthermore, knowledge gaps and reservations concerning the effect and dosage of analgesics among cognitively impaired patients could be identified on the involved professions.Further investigations in Germany are needed as deficient treatment remains a persistent problem and evidence-based data are missing. These investigations should describe the status quo of pain management for cognitively impaired patients and provide information which processes have to be adapted to the needs of these vulnerable patients. PMID:24668438

Czarnecki, K; Brauer, H; Köberlein, J

2014-04-01

18

Nursing Pain Management—A Qualitative Interview Study of Patients with Pain, Hospitalized for Cancer Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain is a significant symptom in cancer patients. Understanding of patients' experiences in relation to pain management is important in evidence-based nursing in the field of pain. The aim of this study was to explore cancer patients' experiences of nursing pain management during hospitalization for cancer treatment. Eighteen cancer patients participated in the study, all with advanced cancer, including skeleton

Tone Rustøen; Torill Gaardsrud; Marit Leegaard; Astrid K. Wahl

2009-01-01

19

Drug management of pain in cancer patients.  

PubMed Central

Chronic severe cancer pain is often not well controlled because both patient and physician have a poor understanding of the nature of the pain and of the actions of various potent analgesics. Physicians often fail to tailor analgesic dosages to the needs of the individual and unnecessarily limit the dosage because they have an ill founded fear that the patient will become addicted. The basis of rational management of cancer pain with drugs is an appropriate analgesic given regularly in doses adequate to suppress pain continuously. This review compares the potent analgesics and identifies and discusses those that have a role in treating chronic cancer pain. It emphasizes the value of morphine sulfate and gives information on starting and individualizing dosages and managing side effects. PMID:2856896

Tuttle, C B

1985-01-01

20

Acceptance of pain: A study in patients with advanced cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain, among the most common symptoms of cancer, impacts on multiple domains of wellbeing. Significant numbers of patients continue to experience pain despite pharmacological interventions. Although there is evidence to suggest that acceptance of pain is related to better wellbeing among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain, little is known about acceptance of cancer pain. The purpose of this cross-sectional study

Lynn R. Gauthier; Gary Rodin; Camilla Zimmermann; David Warr; Malcolm Moore; Frances Shepherd; Lucia Gagliese

2009-01-01

21

Study of experimental pain measures and nociceptive reflex in chronic pain patients and normal subjects.  

PubMed

This study evaluates (i) the effect of heterotopic chronic pain on various experimental pain measures, (ii) the relationship between experimental pain measures and chronic pain symptomatology assessment, and (iii) the influence of the various pain aetiologies on experimental pain measures. Fifty-three chronic pain patients were compared to 17 pain-free subjects with the following psychophysical and physiological indices: pain threshold (PTh), pain tolerance (PTol), verbal estimation of intensity and unpleasantness (intensity scale, IS; unpleasantness scale, US), threshold for intensity and unpleasantness (ITh and UTh), lower limb RIII nociceptive reflex (RIIITh and RIII frequency of occurrence). Chronic pain syndromes included neuropathic pain (n = 12), iodopathic pain (n = 12), myofascial syndromes (n = 9), headache (n = 9), and miscellaneous pain (n = 11). Chronic pain symptomatology was assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS), a French MPQ adaptation (QDSA), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Spielberger State Trait Inventory (STAI) and Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI). No significant difference was observed between chronic pain patients and pain-free control groups and between patient subgroups for PTh, PTol and RIIITh. No significant correlation was found between experimental pain measures and clinical pain, anxiety or depression scores. However, the chronic pain patients had a higher threshold for unpleasantness and judged the suprathreshold stimuli significantly less intense and less unpleasant than the control group. These results are discussed in relation to diffuse noxious inhibitory controls and the adaptation level theory of chronic pain experience. PMID:2052379

Boureau, F; Luu, M; Doubrère, J F

1991-02-01

22

Assessment of pain threshold in haemophilic patients.  

PubMed

Many patients with haemophilia (PWH) live with persistent end-stage arthritis, as a result of multiple joint haemarthrosis, and experience daily pain. For these people, pain becomes a central aspect of life. The aim of this study was to use mechanical pain thresholds (MPT) to characterize pain perception in different PWH groups. The groups tested were characterized by age, previous bleeding into joints, Hemophilia Joint Health Score (HJHS) and PAIN perception score in the HJHS scoring. A total of 23 PWH (haemophilia A) were included in this study (10 children, 13 adults). A total of 12 PWH suffered from repeated bleeding into some of the tested joints. Data were compared to those collected from 15 age-matched control subjects. The most significant differences in MPTs were found when the PWH were compared to the controls, based on the differences in PAIN score (PAIN score 1 and 2) in all the tested joints, except for the right knee. Similarly, the difference in MPT in ankle joints was confirmed when PWH with and without bleeding were compared to controls. Summarizing the outcomes, we can emphasize the potential usefulness of MPT as an objective tool in evaluating the pain of PWH. PMID:24533950

Teyssler, P; Kolostova, K; Bobek, V

2014-03-01

23

A typology of pain coping strategies in pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study aimed to identify clinically meaningful profiles of pain coping strategies used by youth with chronic abdominal pain (CAP). Participants (n=699) were pediatric patients (ages 8–18 years) and their parents. Patients completed the Pain Response Inventory (PRI) and measures of somatic and depressive symptoms, disability, pain severity and pain efficacy, and perceived competence. Parents rated their children’s pain severity

Lynn S. Walker; Kari Freeman Baber; Judy Garber; Craig A. Smith

2008-01-01

24

Patients' Responses to a Drawing Experience in a Hemodialysis Unit: A Step towards Healing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigates patients' responses to drawing experiences while in a hemodialysis unit. It was postulated that patients would be stimulated to talk about issues and experiences and improve their confidence and self-esteem. Results indicate that all patients enjoyed the experience of drawing; they became focused on doing the drawings and the hours…

Weldt, Cristina

2003-01-01

25

Evoked Pain Analgesia in Chronic Pelvic Pain Patients Using Respiratory-Gated Auricular  

E-print Network

with respiratory events to better optimize bs_bs_banner Pain Medicine 2012; *: **­** Wiley Periodicals, Inc. 1 #12Evoked Pain Analgesia in Chronic Pelvic Pain Patients Using Respiratory-Gated Auricular Vagal pain (CPP) due to endometriosis in a specialty pain clinic. Interventions/Outcomes. We evaluated evoked

Napadow, Vitaly

26

Prognosis of patients with "chest pain ?cause".  

PubMed Central

All 662 patients admitted to the two coronary care units in Nottingham during 12 consecutive months were followed up prospectively for one year. At the time of discharge from hospital they were categorised according to set criteria into the following diagnostic groups: definite, probable, or possible myocardial infarction; ischaemia heart disease without infarction; chest pain ?cause; and other diagnoses. Eighty-nine patients (13% of admissions) were categorised as having chest pain ?cause. No deaths occurred among these patients during the observation period, although two were readmitted with myocardial infarction. Patients with chest pain ?cause had few problems during the year after admission, and at the end of that time 75% were in their original employment. Patients admitted with ischaemic heart disease had a similar death rate (between six weeks and one year after admission) to those with myocardial infarction, and only 36% were in their original employment one year after admission. Chest pain ?cause is a clinically useful diagnostic category to which patients may be allocated after only simple investigations. PMID:6780059

Wilcox, R G; Roland, J M; Hampton, J R

1981-01-01

27

Physical and emotional functioning of adult patients with chronic abdominal pain: Comparison with patients with chronic back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adults with chronic abdominal pain remain a poorly defined population, despite the debilitation and depression associated with this therapeutically challenging condition. This study compared patients with chronic abdominal pain with an empirically well-known group of patients with chronic pain (back pain) to investigate similarities and differences in their physical and mental functioning. This retrospective, cross-sectional study included 136 patients with

Cynthia O. Townsend; Christopher D. Sletten; Barbara K. Bruce; Jeffrey D. Rome; Connie A. Luedtke; John E. Hodgson

2005-01-01

28

Burn patients’ experience of pain management: A qualitative study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain is a major problem after burns and researchers continue to report that pain from burns remains undertreated. The inadequate pain control results in adverse sequalae physically and psychologically in the burn victims. A better understanding of a burn patient's experience is important in identifying the factors responsible for undertreated pain and establishing effective pain management guidelines or recommendation in

Li Yuxiang; Zhou Lingjun; Tang Lu; Liu Mengjie; Ming Xing; Shen Fengping; Cui Jing; Meng Xianli; Zhao Jijun

29

Somatization symptoms in pediatric abdominal pain patients: Relation to chronicity of abdominal pain and parent somatization  

Microsoft Academic Search

Symptoms of somatization were investigated in pediatric patients with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) and comparison groups of patients with organic etiology for abdominal pain and well patients. Somatization scores were higher in RAP patients than well patients at the clinic visit, and higher than in either well patients or organic patients at a 3- month followup. Higher somatization scores in

Lynn S. Walker; Judy Garber; John W. Greene

1991-01-01

30

Breakthrough pain in patients with controlled or uncontrolled pain: An observational study  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Breakthrough pain (BTP) is traditionally defined as a pain exacerbation in patients with chronic controlled pain. However, this definition has recently been challenged. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of unsatisfactory control in patients with chronic cancer pain, and investigate the frequency and intensity of BTP episodes. METHODS: A total of 665 patients with chronic cancer pain attending 21 pain therapy units in Italy were evaluated for baseline pain intensity and number of BTP episodes over a 30-day period. All patients started, continued or modified treatment for BTP at enrollment, according to medical judgment. RESULTS: The number of BTP events was higher in patients with uncontrolled baseline pain, although the intensity and duration of episodes were similar. In patients with uncontrolled baseline pain, the number of events decreased with time and reached values comparable with those reported in patients with controlled pain. Both the intensity of the pain and the duration of the BTP events exhibited similar values in the two groups at all time points, following increased monitoring and the prescription of analgesic medication. CONCLUSION: Patients with uncontrolled baseline pain experienced BTP flares with higher frequency, but similar intensity and duration with respect to patients with controlled pain at baseline. Notably, a close follow-up and adequate management of the BTP episodes led to an improvement of BTP in the observed patients. PMID:24945289

Gatti, Antonio; Gentili, Marta; Baciarello, Marco; Lazzari, Marzia; Marzi, Rossella; Palombo, Elisa; Sabato, Alessandro F; Fanelli, Guido

2014-01-01

31

Acceptance of pain: a study in patients with advanced cancer.  

PubMed

Pain, among the most common symptoms of cancer, impacts on multiple domains of wellbeing. Significant numbers of patients continue to experience pain despite pharmacological interventions. Although there is evidence to suggest that acceptance of pain is related to better wellbeing among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain, little is known about acceptance of cancer pain. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to determine the correlates of pain acceptance in 81 patients with advanced cancer and pain. Demographic, disease, and treatment-related information was collected, and patients completed measures of pain, physical, psychological, and social/relational wellbeing and pain acceptance. Multivariate regression models, using backward elimination, determined the correlates of each subscale of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire separately. Activity Engagement was negatively associated with depressive symptoms. Pain Willingness was negatively associated with pain catastrophizing. Parents living with children had lower Pain Willingness scores than non-parents. These relationships were independent of pain severity and physical functioning. These preliminary results suggest that acceptance of cancer pain is related to better psychological wellbeing and that there may be a relational element, with parents at risk of experiencing difficulty in adapting to ongoing cancer pain. These data lay the groundwork for future research and interventions designed to enhance quality of life for patients with advanced cancer and pain. PMID:19321264

Gauthier, Lynn R; Rodin, Gary; Zimmermann, Camilla; Warr, David; Moore, Malcolm; Shepherd, Frances; Gagliese, Lucia

2009-05-01

32

Pain. Author manuscript A patient-based national survey on postoperative pain management in  

E-print Network

Pain. Author manuscript Page /1 18 A patient-based national survey on postoperative pain management.fletcher@rpc.aphp.fr> Abstract We carried out a national survey on postoperative pain (POP) management in a representative sample pain, evaluation, treatment and side effects. A local consultant provided information about POP

Boyer, Edmond

33

Identifying potential predictors of pain–related disability in Turkish patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder pain  

PubMed Central

Background The aims of this study were to examine whether patients’ psychosocial profiles influence the location of pain, and to identify the clinical and psychosocial predictors of high levels of pain-related disability in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients with chronic pain at least 6?months in duration. Methods The Research Diagnostic Criteria of TMD (RDC/TMD) data for Axis I and II were obtained for 104 consecutive patients seeking treatment. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-test, Mann–Whitney U-test, chi-square test, One-way ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test, and binary multiple logistic regression tests. Patients were classified into two groups according to Graded Chronic Pain Scale scores: Grade III and IV were scored for patients with high levels of pain-related disability, whereas Grade I and II were scored for patients with low disability. Results Muscle and joint pain were found in 64.9% and 31.8% of the patients, respectively, and 27.3% of the patients suffered from both muscle and joint pain. Psychosocial disability was found in 26% of patients. There were no statistically significant differences among the diagnostic subgroups with regards to the demographic, behavioral, psychological, and psychosocial characteristics. Patients with high levels of pain-related disability had significantly higher depression, somatization, pain intensity and jaw disability scores than those with low levels of pain-related disability. Patients with high levels of pain-related disability were more likely to have higher pain intensity, to report higher somatization symptoms and functional impairment, and were less likely to have joint pain than those with low levels of pain related disability. Conclusion In conclusion, the Turkish version RDC/TMD, based on a dual axis system, may be used to screen chronic TMD patients at high-risk for pain-related disability who need comprehensive care treatment program. PMID:23565825

2013-01-01

34

Pain acceptance moderates the relation between pain and negative affect in female osteoarthritis and fibromyalgia patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic pain is often intractable despite advanced medical and psychotherapeutic treatments. Pain acceptance is emerging\\u000a as a promising complement to control-based pain management strategies and a likely approach to maintaining quality of life\\u000a for chronic pain patients.Purpose: This theoretically based analysis of an existing database examined the extent to which pain acceptance predicted weekly reports\\u000a of positive affect (PA)

Anna L. Kratz; Mary C. Davis; Alex J. Zautra

2007-01-01

35

The impact of group singing on mood, coping and perceived pain in chronic pain patients attending a multidisciplinary pain clinic  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the impact of group singing on mood, coping, and perceived pain in chronic pain patients attending a multi- disciplinary pain clinic. Singers participated in nine 30-minute sessions of small group singing, while comparisons listened to music while exercising. A short form of The Profi le of Mood States (POMS) was administered before and after selected singing sessions

Dianna T. Kenny; Gavin Faunce

36

Pressure pain thresholds, clinical assessment, and differential diagnosis: reliability and validity in patients with myogenic pain.  

PubMed

Four studies are presented testing the validity and reliability of pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and of examination parameters believed to be important in the clinical assessment of sites commonly used for such measures in patient samples. Forty-five patients with a myogenous temporomandibular disorder were examined clinically prior to PPT measures. Criteria for history and examination included functional aspects of the pain, tissue quality of the pain site, and the type of pain elicited from palpation. Control sites within the same muscle and in the contralateral muscle were also examined. PPTs were measured as an index of tenderness using a strain gauge algometer at these sites. The data from the 5 male subjects were excluded from subsequent analyses due to the higher PPT in the males and to their unequal distribution among the various factorial conditions. The first study demonstrated strong validity in PPT measures between patients (using pain sites replicating the patients' pain) and matched controls (n = 11). The PPT was not significantly different between the primary pain site (referred pain and non-referred pain collapsed) and the no-pain control site in the same muscle (n = 16). The PPT was significantly lower at the pain site compared to the no-pain control site in the contralateral muscle (n = 13). The second study indicated adequate reliability in patient samples of the PPT measures. In the third study, the PPT was significantly lower at sites producing referred pain on palpation compared to sites producing localized pain on palpation. The PPT findings from the control sites were inconsistent on this factor. The fourth study presented preliminary evidence that palpable bands and nodular areas in muscle were most commonly associated with muscle regions that produce pain; such muscle findings were not specific, however, for regions that produce pain. Further, the intraexaminer reliability in reassessing these pain sites qualitatively was only fair. Referred pain had a poor association with the pain pattern and physical findings, which may suggest a need to reevaluate part of the theory regarding referred muscle pain. The reliability of PPT measures was better overall than the reliability of the signs and site-specific symptoms, suggesting that pressure pain thresholds may be an important tool in clinical studies of pain. PPT measures demonstrate a high within-subject variability in pain patient subjects as well as non-pain subjects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:2594394

Ohrbach, R; Gale, E N

1989-11-01

37

Scrambler Therapy for Patients with Cancer Pain - Case Series -  

PubMed Central

More than 80% of cancer patients experience cancer pain. Among them, more than 50% experience moderate to severe pain. To control cancer pain, a variety of methods have been used, including medications and nerve blocks. In some patients, however, it is impossible to perform nerve blocks due to caner metastasis into the epidural space, while in other patients, opioid dose escalation is impossible due to opioid side effects; thus, cancer pain management is difficult. Scrambler therapy is a novel approach for pain control that uses EKG-like pads, which are applied above and below the site of pain. Scrambler therapy synthesizes 16 different types of nerve action potentials that provide "non-pain" information via cutaneous nerves. The advantages of this treatment are that it is non-invasive and safe and has no significant side effects. In this case series, we report the treatment results of using scrambler therapy in three cancer patients with intractable pain. PMID:23342211

Park, Hong Sik; Sin, Woo Kyung; Kim, Hye Young; Park, Soo Young; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Sang Chul

2013-01-01

38

JAMA Patient Page: Steroid Injections to Treat Back Pain  

MedlinePLUS

JAMA PATIENT PAGE Steroid Injections to Treat Back Pain Example of epidural steroid injection for back pain SIDE VIEW (CROSS SECTION) Needle inserted using fluoroscopic guidance Steroid Epidural space Dura (membrane covering ...

39

Reduced Cold Pain Tolerance in Chronic Pain Patients Following Opioid Detoxification  

PubMed Central

Objective One potential consequence of chronic opioid analgesic administration is a paradoxical increase of pain sensitivity over time. Little scientific attention has been given to how cessation of opioid medication affects the hyperalgesic state. In this study, we examined the effects of opioid tapering on pain sensitivity in chronic pain patients. Design Twelve chronic pain patients on long-term opioid analgesic treatment were observed in a 7- to 14-day inpatient pain rehabilitation program, with cold pain tolerance assessed at admission and discharge. The majority of participants were completely withdrawn from their opioids during their stay. Outcome Measures We hypothesized that those patients with the greatest reduction in daily opioid use would show the greatest increases in pain tolerance, as assessed by a cold pressor task. Results A linear regression revealed that the amount of opioid medication withdrawn was a significant predictor of pain tolerance changes, but not in the direction hypothesized. Greater opioid reduction was associated with decreased pain tolerance. This reduction of pain tolerance was not associated with opioid withdrawal symptoms or changes in general pain. Conclusions These findings suggest that the withdrawal of opioids in a chronic pain sample leads to an acute increase in pain sensitivity. PMID:18564998

Younger, Jarred; Barelka, Peter; Carroll, Ian; Kaplan, Kim; Chu, Larry; Prasad, Ravi; Gaeta, Ray; Mackey, Sean

2009-01-01

40

Multidisciplinary pain management based on a computerized clinical decision support system in cancer pain patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective controlled intervention cohort study in cancer pain patients (n=50 per group) admitted to radiation oncology wards (62 beds, 3 wards) was conducted in a 1621-bed university hospital. We investigated the effect of an intervention consisting of daily pain assessment using the numeric visual analog scale (NVAS) and pain therapy counseling to clinicians based on a computerized clinical decision

Thilo Bertsche; Vasileios Askoxylakis; Gregor Habl; Friederike Laidig; Jens Kaltschmidt; Simon P. W. Schmitt; Hamid Ghaderi; Angelika Zabel-du Bois; Stefanie Milker-Zabel; Jürgen Debus; Hubert J. Bardenheuer; Walter E. Haefeli

2009-01-01

41

Imaging pain: a potent means for investigating pain mechanisms in patients  

PubMed Central

Summary Chronic pain is a state of physical suffering strongly associated with feelings of anxiety, depression and despair. Disease pathophysiology, psychological state, and social milieu can influence chronic pain, but can be difficult to diagnose based solely on clinical presentation. Here, we review brain neuroimaging research that is shaping our understanding of pain mechanisms, and consider how such knowledge might lead to useful diagnostic tools for the management of persistent pain in individual patients. PMID:23794647

Lee, M. C.; Tracey, I.

2013-01-01

42

Pain management among medical in-patients in Blantyre, Malawi  

PubMed Central

Background Pain is a leading symptom which influences patients to seek medical attention. The management of pain among patients attending in-patient care in southern African countries has been little described. Information regarding the prevalence of pain and the quality of its management may be useful in guiding clinical decisions, training of health workers and health care quality improvements. Methods A hospital-based audit was conducted to estimate the prevalence of pain and examine the quality of its management among patients admitted to adult medical wards at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi in 2004. Data were abstracted from ward charts of consecutive patients' who had been either been discharged or had died within a specified period. Characteristics of interest included; socio-demographic data, presence or absence of pain at admission, characterization or description of pain when present, and drug treatment given. Data were analyzed to obtain frequencies and proportions of the characteristics and assess the prevalence of pain and quality of care. Results A total of 121 patients' case notes were reviewed and the prevalence of pain was recorded for 91 (75.2%) of the patients. Clinicians had recorded pertinent information regarding pain management with the following frequency: pain severity or intensity 5/91 (5.5%), alleviating factors 5 (5.5%), pain radiation 7 (7.7%), exacerbating factors in 9 (9.9%) and periodicity in 43 (47.3%) of the cases. Males with pain were more than 3 times more likely to receive analgesic as compared to females, p < 0.01. Paracetamol was the commonest analgesic prescribed. Conclusion Inadequate management of pain among patients attending medical wards at QECH was found. There is need for prospective studies to further characterize pain management and identify pain management gaps in Malawi. Interviews of clinicians and documentation of observations within clinical practice are likely to be of value. PMID:19323817

Muula, Adamson S; Misiri, Humphreys E

2009-01-01

43

Pathogenesis and clinical aspects of pain in patients with osteoporosis  

PubMed Central

Summary Bone pain is one of the most frequent kinds of chronic pain, mainly in elderly patients. It causes a significant worsening of functional capacity and deterioration in the quality of life in people affected. Mechanisms of pain in osteoporosis are poorly known and often extrapolated by other pathologies or other experimental model. One of principal causes would be a “hyper-remodeling” of bone, that involves osteoclasts activity and pathological modifications of bone innervation. Several studies show that osteoclasts play a significant role in bone pain etiology. Pain in osteoporosis is mainly nociceptive, if it become persistent a sensitization of peripheral and central nervous system can occur, so underlining the transition to a chronic pain syndrome. Central sensitization mechanisms are complex and involve several neuromediators and receptors (Substance P, NMDA, etc.). Most common manifestations of osteoporosis are vertebral compression fractures that cause persistent pain, though to differentiate from pain originating in structures as joint or muscle. First manifestation can be an acute pain due to pathological fracture, those of hip often causes disability. Pain in osteoporosis is an important clinical challenge. Often its complications and consequences on patient quality of life are underestimated with not negligible social implications. A balanced and early multimodal pain therapy including opioids as necessary, even in cases of acute pain, improve the functional capacity of patients and helps to prevent neurological alterations that seems to contribute in significant way in causing irreversible pain chronic syndromes. PMID:25568647

Mediati, Rocco Domenico; Vellucci, Renato; Dodaro, Lucia

2014-01-01

44

Prefrontal cortical hyperactivity in patients with sympathetically mediated chronic pain  

E-print Network

Prefrontal cortical hyperactivity in patients with sympathetically mediated chronic pain A. Vania form 12 July 2001; accepted 12 July 2001 Abstract Chronic pain continues to impose a large burden of suffering, yet its neural correlates remain poorly understood. In sympathetically mediated chronic pain (SMP

Apkarian, A. Vania

45

Computer Assessment and Diagnostic Classification of Chronic Pain Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

New Hampshire; § Psychological Applications, Waterbury, Vermont, USA ABSTRACT Objective. In order to establish a diagnosis of chronic pain, emphasis is placed on a patient's report of the pain's intensity, location, and character. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a computer assessment method to collect self-reports of pain that were then used in discriminant analyses

David A. Provenzano; Gilbert J. Fanciullo; Robert N. Jamison; Gregory J. McHugo; John C. Baird

2007-01-01

46

Oral and maxillofacial surgery in patients with chronic orofacial pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: In this investigation, we evaluated a population of patients with chronic orofacial pain who sought treatment at a pain center in an academic institution. These patients were evaluated with respect to 1) the frequency and types of previous oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures, 2) the frequency of previous significant misdiagnoses, and 3) the number of patients who subsequently required

Howard A. Israel; John Desmond Ward; Brenda Horrell; Steven J. Scrivani

2003-01-01

47

Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

1989-01-01

48

Painful crises in sickle cell disease--patients' perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

One hundred and two patients returned structured questionnaires sent to clinics for sickle cell disease in the United Kingdom in order to gain greater insight into the patients' perception of painful crises. Most patients who suffer pain crises experience a prodromal stage that should be investigated further to find out if prophylaxis is possible. Cold, exertion, and tiredness were the

N. Murray; A. May

1988-01-01

49

Pain sensitivity and tactile spatial acuity are altered in healthy musicians as in chronic pain patients  

PubMed Central

Extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements, as it occurs in professional classical musicians, may lead to changes in tactile sensitivity and corresponding cortical reorganization of somatosensory cortices. It is also known that professional musicians frequently experience musculoskeletal pain and pain-related symptoms during their careers. The present study aimed at understanding the complex interaction between chronic pain and music training with respect to somatosensory processing. For this purpose, tactile thresholds (mechanical detection, grating orientation, two-point discrimination) and subjective ratings to thermal and pressure pain stimuli were assessed in 17 professional musicians with chronic pain, 30 pain-free musicians, 20 non-musicians with chronic pain, and 18 pain-free non-musicians. We found that pain-free musicians displayed greater touch sensitivity (i.e., lower mechanical detection thresholds), lower tactile spatial acuity (i.e., higher grating orientation thresholds) and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. Moreover, we also found that musicians and non-musicians with chronic pain presented lower tactile spatial acuity and increased pain sensitivity to pressure and heat compared to pain-free non-musicians. The significant increment of pain sensitivity together with decreased spatial discrimination in pain-free musicians and the similarity of results found in chronic pain patients, suggests that the extensive training of repetitive and highly skilled movements in classical musicians could be considered as a risk factor for developing chronic pain, probably due to use-dependent plastic changes elicited in somatosensory pathways. PMID:25610384

Zamorano, Anna M.; Riquelme, Inmaculada; Kleber, Boris; Altenmüller, Eckart; Hatem, Samar M.; Montoya, Pedro

2015-01-01

50

Subgrouping Patients With Low Back Pain  

PubMed Central

Context: Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent condition imposing a large socioeconomic burden. Despite intensive research aimed at the efficacy of various therapies for patients with LBP, most evidence has failed to identify a superior treatment approach. One proposed solution to this dilemma is to identify subgroups of patients with LBP and match them with targeted therapies. Among the subgrouping approaches, the system of treatment-based classification (TBC) is promoted as a means of increasing the effectiveness of conservative interventions for patients with LBP. Evidence acquisition: MEDLINE and PubMed databases were searched from 1985 through 2010, along with the references of selected articles. Results: TBC uses a standardized approach to categorize patients into 1 of 4 subgroups: spinal manipulation, stabilization exercise, end-range loading exercise, and traction. Although the TBC subgroups are in various stages of development, recent research lends support to the effectiveness of this approach. Conclusions: While additional research is required to better elucidate this method, the TBC approach enhances clinical decision making, as evidenced by the improved clinical outcomes experienced by patients with LBP. PMID:23016055

Hebert, Jeffrey J.; Koppenhaver, Shane L.; Walker, Bruce F.

2011-01-01

51

Painful Skin Ulcers in a Hemodialysis Patient  

PubMed Central

Summary Calciphylaxis, also referred to as calcific uremic arteriolopathy, is a relatively rare but well described syndrome that occurs most commonly in patients with late stage CKD. It is characterized by very painful placques or subcutaneous nodules and violaceous, mottled skin lesions that may progress to nonhealing ulcers, tissue necrosis, and gangrene with a 1-year mortality rate >50%. The pathogenesis of calciphylaxis is poorly understood. Risk factors include female sex, obesity, hyperphosphatemia, hypercalcemia, hyperparathyroidism, longer dialysis vintage, hypercoagulable states, and use of calcium-containing phosphate binders and warfarin. Treatment strategies for calciphylaxis are limited by inadequate understanding of its pathophysiology. Therapy is generally focused on correcting disturbances of calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone metabolism. Additional therapy focuses on decreasing inflammation and on dissolution of tissue calcium deposits with sodium thiosulfate and/or bisphosphonates. Successful treatment generally results in improvement of pain and healing of the lesions within 2–4 weeks, but the disorder generally takes many months to completely resolve. PMID:24202137

2014-01-01

52

Renal autotransplantation in patients with loin pain–hematuria syndrome  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine if renal autotransplantation is an effective treatment for the loin pain–hematuria syndrome. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Tertiary care referral centre in Manitoba. Patients Four patients referred for diagnosis and management of loin pain–hematuria syndrome. Follow-up for each of the four was 2, 24, 29 and 48 months. Intervention Renal autotransplantation. Main Outcome Measures Relief of pain with preservation of renal function and blood pressure. Results All four patients experienced relief of the pain of loin pain–hematuria syndrome. Renal function was preserved and blood pressure maintained. Narcotic analgesia was discontinued in all cases. Conclusion Renal autotransplantation appears to be an effective treatment for patients with loin pain–hematuria syndrome. PMID:8769922

Karvelas, John P.; Ramsey, Ernest W.

1996-01-01

53

Pain Symptoms in Fibromyalgia Patients with and without Provoked Vulvodynia  

PubMed Central

Objective. The aim of the study was to compare the pain symptoms of fibromyalgia patients exhibiting (FMS+PVD) and not exhibiting (FMS) comorbidity with provoked vulvodynia. Study Design. The case control study was performed in 39 patients who had been diagnosed with FMS and accepted to undergo gynaecological examination and in 36 healthy women (C). All patients completed standardized questionnaires for pain intensity, pain area, and psychological functioning. The gynaecological examination included vulvar pain pressure reactivity (Q-tip), pelvic tone assessment (Kegel manoeuver), and a semistructured interview collecting detailed information about pelvic symptoms and sexual function. Results. FMS+PVD patients displayed a higher number of associated symptoms than FMS patients. The vulvar excitability was significantly higher in FMS+PVD than in FMS and in both groups than in Controls. Half of FMS+PVD patients were positive to Kegel manoeuver and displayed higher scores in widespread pain intensity, STAI-Y2, and CESD levels than Kegel negative patients. Conclusions. The study reveals that increased vulvar pain excitability may occur in FMS patients independently of the presence of coital pain. Results suggest that coital pain develops in patients with higher FMS symptoms severity due to the cooperative effects of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms. PMID:24624294

Ghizzani, Anna; Di Sabatino, Valentina; Suman, Anna Lisa; Biasi, Giovanni; Carli, Giancarlo

2014-01-01

54

Characterization of Breakthrough Pain by Hospice Patients and Their Caregivers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study sought to characterize the nature of breakthrough pain experienced by 22 hospice patients and to assess the perceptions of their respective caregivers. Questionnaires were administered by trained hospice nurses to determine key elements of episodic pains in this home-based terminally ill population. Eighty-six percent of the patients surveyed experienced breakthrough pain, with an average of 2.9 episodes per

Perry G Fine; Michael A Busch

1998-01-01

55

Cooperative hernia study. Pain in the postrepair patient.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The Cooperative Hernia Study assessed postoperative pain in a prospective trial as part of a larger study looking at the recurrence rate and other morbidity of the Bassini, McVay, and Shouldice repairs. METHODS: Patients were randomized to one of three surgical hernia repairs. Patients were seen in follow-up at 6, 12, and 24 months and were assessed for the presence of pain, numbness, paresthesia, and recurrence. RESULTS: Three hundred fifteen patients were seen in follow-up, with 276 seen at the 2-year mark. At 1 year, 62.9% of patients had groin or inguinal pain and 11.9% of patients had moderate to severe pain; 53.6% had pain and 10.6% of patients continued to report moderate to severe pain 2 years postoperatively. The predictors for long-term postoperative pain were as follows: absence of a visible bulge before the operation (p < 0.001); presence of numbness in the surgical area postoperatively (p < 0.05); and patient requirement of more than 4 weeks out of work postoperatively (p < 0.004). Three distinct chronic pains were identified. The most common and most severe pain was somatic, localized to the common ligamentous insertion to the public tubercle. The second was neuropathic and was referable to the ilioinguinal or genitofemoral nerve distribution. This was likely because of injury to the genitofemoral nerves, either at surgery or subsequently by encroachment of scar. The third pain was visceral, ejaculatory pain. Twenty-four percent of patients had postoperative numbness at 2 years, independent of the type of repair. Numbness was most common in the distribution of cutaneous branches of the ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves. CONCLUSION: Pain or numbness are common late sequelae of traditional external surgical hernia repairs. Strategies need to be developed to reduce the risk of these complications. PMID:8916874

Cunningham, J; Temple, W J; Mitchell, P; Nixon, J A; Preshaw, R M; Hagen, N A

1996-01-01

56

Spatial Summation of Mechanically Evoked Muscle Pain and Painful Aftersensations in Normal Subjects and Fibromyalgia Patients  

PubMed Central

Impulse frequency and number of recruited central neurons are relevant for pain encoding and temporal as well as spatial summation of pain (SSP). Whereas SSP of heat-induced pain is well characterized, mechanical SSP (MSSP) has been less studied. MSSP may be relevant for chronic pain conditions like fibromyalgia (FM) and play an important role in the pathogenesis of this chronic pain syndrome. Our study was designed to determine MSSP in twelve normal controls (NC) and eleven FM subjects. MSSP testing consisted of 5sec supratheshold pressure-pain stimulations of forearm muscles by up to three identical probes (separated by 4cm or 8cm). The stimulated areas ranged between 0.79cm2 and 2.37cm2. The subjects rated the pain intensity of mechanical stimuli as well as pain aftersensations. Although MSSP increased monotonically in NC and FM subjects, pressure pain and pressure pain aftersensations were greater in FM subjects and highly associated with clinical pain intensity (r2= .44 to .64), suggesting that spatial and temporal summation factors may contribute to overall clinical pain. However, despite higher experimental pain ratings, the magnitude of MSSP was not statistically different between NC and FM subjects. Furthermore, muscle stimuli elicited more MSSP when separated by 8cm than 4cm and this finding was not different between NC and FM subjects. Thus, mechanisms of MSSP were similar for both FM and NC subjects. The important role of MSSP for pain encoding suggests that decreasing pain in some muscle areas by local anesthetics or other means, may improve overall clinical pain of FM patients. PMID:17459587

Staud, Roland; Koo, Euna; Robinson, Michael E.; Price, Donald D.

2007-01-01

57

Comparative Responsiveness of Pain Measures in Cancer Patients  

PubMed Central

Brief measures to assess and monitor pain in cancer patients are available, but few head-to-head psychometric comparisons of different measures have been reported. Baseline and 3-month data were analyzed from 274 patients enrolled in the Indiana Cancer Pain and Depression (INCPAD) trial. Participants completed the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), the PEG (a 3-item abbreviated version of the BPI), the short form (SF)-36 pain scale, and a pain global rating of change measure. The global rating was used as the criterion for standardized response mean and receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. To assess responsiveness to the trial intervention, we evaluated standardized effect size statistics stratified by trial arm. All measures were responsive to global improvement, discriminated between participants with and without improvement, and detected a significant intervention treatment effect. Short and longer measures were similarly responsive. Also, composite measures that combined pain severity and interference into a single score (BPI total, PEG, SF-36 pain) performed comparably to separate measures of each domain (BPI severity and BPI interference). Perspective Pain measures as brief as 2 or 3 items that provide a single score are responsive in patients with cancer-related pain. Ultra-brief measures offer a valid and efficient means of assessing and monitoring pain for the clinical management as well as research of cancer-related pain. PMID:22800982

Kroenke, Kurt; Theobald, Dale; Wu, Jingwei; Tu, Wanzhu; Krebs, Erin E.

2012-01-01

58

‘Two Pains Together’: Patient Perspectives on Psychological Aspects of Chronic Pain while Living with HIV  

PubMed Central

Objective Chronic pain is common in HIV-infected individuals. Understanding HIV-infected patients’ chronic pain experience not just from a biological, but also from a psychological perspective, is a critical first step toward improving care for this population. Our objective was to explore HIV-infected patients’ perspectives on psychological aspects of chronic pain using in-depth qualitative interviews. Methods Investigators engaged in an iterative process of independent and group coding until theme saturation was reached. Results Of the 25 patients with chronic pain interviewed, 20 were male, 15 were younger than age 50, and 15 were African-American. Key themes that emerged included the close relationship between mood and pain; mood and pain in the context of living with HIV; use of alcohol/drugs to self-medicate for pain; and the challenge of receiving prescription pain medications while dealing with substance use disorders. Conclusions The results suggest that psychological approaches to chronic pain treatment may be well received by HIV-infected patients. PMID:25365306

Merlin, Jessica S.; Walcott, Melonie; Ritchie, Christine; Herbey, Ivan; Kertesz, Stefan G.; Chamot, Eric; Saag, Michael; Turan, Janet M.

2014-01-01

59

Transdermal Fentanyl in Opioid-Naive Cancer Pain Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

To treat cancer pain, physicians often decide to jump directly from step 1 of the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder to step 3. The use of transdermal fentanyl in patients with cancer pain who had either used no opioid before, or only codeine, is evaluated in the present trial. Both opioid-naive (N= 14) and codeine-using (N = 14) patients

Ans P. E Vielvoye-Kerkmeer; Carlien Mattern; Martin P Uitendaal

2000-01-01

60

GUIDELINE Open Access Pain care for patients with epidermolysis bullosa  

E-print Network

GUIDELINE Open Access Pain care for patients with epidermolysis bullosa: best care practice present with a number of both acute and chronic pain care needs. Effects on quality of life and itch care for these patients is minimal. Evidence-based best care practice guidelines are needed

61

Pain patients and who they live with: A correlational study of coresidence patterns and pain interference  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Mixed associations have been observed between various aspects of ‘social support’ and patient pain experiences OBJECTIVE: To explore the possibility that more basic social factors, namely coresidence patterns, may be associated with variability in patient pain experiences. METHODS: Relationships between coresidence partners and self-reported pain that interferes with activities were examined in a large representative sample of home health care patients (n=11,436; age range 18 to 107 years, mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.1 years; 55% females). RESULTS: After controlling for sex, age and behavioural risks, compared with living alone, coresidence with an intimate affiliate (eg, spouse, relative) predicted greater pain interference (Cohen’s d = 0.10 to 1.72), and coresidence with a less intimate type of affiliate (eg, friend, paid help) predicted lower pain interference (Cohen’s d = ?0.21 tö0.83). In general, however, coresidence patterns accounted for small proportions of variance in pain interference, and the magnitudes of these effects varied widely according to patients’ sex, age and diagnosis. DISCUSSION: The findings suggest that fundamental components of patient’s home-living environment may be associated with potential costs and benefits related to clinically relevant pain functioning for some subgroups of patients. CONCLUSION: Further research that incorporates quantitative and qualitative assessments of patient pain functioning is warranted to better understand how objective and subjective characteristics of patients’ home-living environment may inform the development of more individualized pain treatment options for patients with differing social circumstances. PMID:25106029

Vigil, Jacob M; Pendleton, Patricia; Coulombe, Patrick; Vowles, Kevin E; Alcock, Joe; Smith, Bruce W

2014-01-01

62

Caring for patients with chronic pain: pearls and pitfalls.  

PubMed

Chronic, nonmalignant pain is a substantial public health problem in the United States. Research over the past 2 decades has defined chronic pain by using a "biopsychosocial model" that considers a patient's biology and psychological makeup in the context of his or her social and cultural milieu. Whereas this model addresses the pathology of chronic pain, it also places many demands on the physician, who is expected to assess and manage chronic pain safely and successfully. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that opioids can be effective in the management of chronic pain, but there has also been a rise in opioid-related overdoses and deaths. Clinicians should be aware of assessment tools that may be used to evaluate the risk of opioid abuse. A basic understanding of chronic pain pathophysiology and a uniform approach to patient care can satisfy the needs of both patients and physicians. PMID:23918913

Debono, David J; Hoeksema, Laura J; Hobbs, Raymond D

2013-08-01

63

Acute stress contributes to individual differences in pain and pain-related brain activity in healthy and chronic pain patients.  

PubMed

Individual differences in pain sensitivity and reactivity are well recognized but the underlying mechanisms are likely to be diverse. The phenomenon of stress-induced analgesia is well documented in animal research and individual variability in the stress response in humans may produce corresponding changes in pain. We assessed the magnitude of the acute stress response of 16 chronic back pain (CBP) patients and 18 healthy individuals exposed to noxious thermal stimulations administered in a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment and tested its possible contribution to individual differences in pain perception. The temperature of the noxious stimulations was determined individually to control for differences in pain sensitivity. The two groups showed similar significant increases in reactive cortisol across the scanning session when compared with their basal levels collected over 7 consecutive days, suggesting normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity to painful stressors in CBP patients. Critically, after controlling for any effect of group and stimulus temperature, individuals with stronger cortisol responses reported less pain unpleasantness and showed reduced blood oxygenation level-dependent activation in nucleus accumbens at the stimulus onset and in the anterior mid-cingulate cortex (aMCC), the primary somatosensory cortex, and the posterior insula. Mediation analyses indicated that pain-related activity in the aMCC mediated the relationship between the reactive cortisol response and the pain unpleasantness. Psychophysiological interaction analysis further revealed that higher stress reactivity was associated with reduced functional connectivity between the aMCC and the brainstem. These findings suggest that acute stress modulates pain in humans and contributes to individual variability in pain affect and pain-related brain activity. PMID:23595741

Vachon-Presseau, Etienne; Martel, Marc-Oliver; Roy, Mathieu; Caron, Etienne; Albouy, Geneviève; Marin, Marie-France; Plante, Isabelle; Sullivan, Michael J; Lupien, Sonia J; Rainville, Pierre

2013-04-17

64

Sympathetic Blocks Provided Sustained Pain Relief in a Patient with Refractory Painful Diabetic Neuropathy  

PubMed Central

The sympathetic nervous system has been implicated in pain associated with painful diabetic neuropathy. However, therapeutic intervention targeted at the sympathetic nervous system has not been established. We thus tested the hypothesis that sympathetic nerve blocks significantly reduce pain in a patient with painful diabetic neuropathy who has failed multiple pharmacological treatments. The diagnosis of small fiber sensory neuropathy was based on clinical presentations and confirmed by skin biopsies. A series of 9 lumbar sympathetic blocks over a 26-month period provided sustained pain relief in his legs. Additional thoracic paravertebral blocks further provided control of the pain in the trunk which can occasionally be seen in severe diabetic neuropathy cases, consequent to extensive involvement of the intercostal nerves. These blocks provided sustained and significant pain relief and improvement of quality of life over a period of more than two years. We thus provided the first clinical evidence supporting the notion that sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in painful diabetic neuropathy and sympathetic blocks can be an effective management modality of painful diabetic neuropathy. We concluded that the sympathetic nervous system is a valuable therapeutic target of pharmacological and interventional modalities of treatments in painful diabetic neuropathy patients. PMID:22606406

Cheng, Jianguo; Daftari, Anuj; Zhou, Lan

2012-01-01

65

Anterior Knee Pain in Patients with Cerebral Palsy  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for anterior knee pain in patients with cerebral palsy. Methods This prospective study investigated the risk factors for anterior knee pain in 127 ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy in terms of walking pain, resting pain, and provocative pain. Demographic data analysis and physical examination for measuring the knee flexion contracture and unilateral and bilateral popliteal angles were performed. Patellar height was measured on radiographs, and patella alta was identified. The risk factors for anterior knee pain were analyzed using multivariate analysis with a generalized estimating equation. Results Seventy-seven patients were found to have patella alta based on the radiographic measurements (60.6%). Overall, sixteen patients (12.6%) had either unilateral or bilateral anterior knee pain. Of these, 6 patients showed a visual analogue scale (VAS) ? 3, 9 patients showed 3 < VAS ? 7, and one patient showed a VAS > 7. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for walking pain and resting pain with odds ratios (ORs) of 1.08 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.14) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.15), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, knee flexion contracture was a significant protective factor with an OR of 0.92 (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.98). Conclusions Approximately 12.6% of ambulatory patients with spastic cerebral palsy were found to have anterior knee pain in our hospital-based cohort study. Age was found to be a significant risk factor for anterior knee pain while walking and resting. PMID:25436067

Choi, Young; Lee, Sang Hyeong; Chung, Chin Youb; Park, Moon Seok; Lee, Kyoung Min; Sung, Ki Hyuk; Won, Sung Hun; Lee, In Hyeok; Choi, In Ho; Cho, Tae-Joon; Yoo, Won Joon

2014-01-01

66

Clinical characteristics, patient-reported outcomes, and previous therapeutic management of patients with uncontrolled neuropathic pain referred to pain clinics.  

PubMed

Background. The aim of this report was to evaluate the clinical profile and previous management of patients with uncontrolled neuropathic pain who were referred to pain clinics. Methods. We included adult patients with uncontrolled pain who had a score of ?4 in the DN4 questionnaire. In addition to sociodemographic and clinical data, we evaluated pain levels using a visual analog scale as well as anxiety, depression, sleep, disability, and treatment satisfaction employing validated tools. Results. A total of 755 patients were included in the study. The patients were predominantly referred to pain clinics by traumatologists (34.3%) and primary care physicians (16.7%). The most common diagnoses were radiculopathy (43%) and pain of oncological origin (14.3%). The major cause for uncontrolled pain was suboptimal treatment (88%). Fifty-three percent of the patients were depressed, 43% had clinical anxiety, 50% rated their overall health as bad or very bad, and 45% noted that their disease was severely or extremely interfering with their daily activities. Conclusions. Our results showed that uncontrolled neuropathic pain is a common phenomenon among the specialties that address these clinical entities and, regardless of its etiology, uncontrolled pain is associated with a dramatic impact on patient well-being. PMID:24891950

de Andrés, José; de la Calle, José-Luis; Pérez, María; López, Vanessa

2014-01-01

67

Exploring the information needs of patients with unexplained chest pain  

PubMed Central

Background Unexplained chest pain is a common condition. Despite negative findings, a large number of these patients will continue to suffer from chest pain after being investigated at cardiac outpatient clinics. Unexplained chest pain covers many possible complaints, and diagnosing a single cause for a patient’s pain is often described as difficult, as there are a number of possible factors that can contribute to the condition. For health professionals to meet patients’ expectations, they must know more about the information needs of patients with unexplained chest pain. The aim of this study was to describe information needs among patients with unexplained chest pain and how those needs were met by health professionals during medical consultations. Methods A qualitative design was used. Data were collected by means of seven individual interviews with four women and three men, aged 21–62 years. The interviews were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Results The results are described in two subthemes, ie, “experiencing lack of focus on individual problems” and “experiencing unanswered questions”. These were further abstracted under the main theme “experiencing unmet information needs”. Conclusion Existing models of consultations should be complemented to include a person-centered approach to meeting patients’ beliefs, perceptions, and expressions of feelings related to experiencing unexplained chest pain. This is in line with a biopsychosocial model with active patient participation, shared decision-making, and a multidisciplinary approach. Such an approach is directly within the domain of nursing, and aims to take into account patient experience. PMID:24043934

Røysland, Ingrid Ølfarnes; Dysvik, Elin; Furnes, Bodil; Friberg, Febe

2013-01-01

68

American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders  

PubMed Central

The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations. PMID:24335741

Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen

2014-01-01

69

American Society for Pain Management Nursing Position Statement: Pain Management in Patients with Substance Use Disorders  

PubMed Central

The American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) has updated its position statement on managing pain in patients with substance use disorders. This position statement is endorsed by the International Nurses Society on Addictions (IntNSA) and includes clinical practice recommendations based on current evidence. It is the position of ASPMN and IntNSA that every patient with pain, including those with substance use disorders, has the right to be treated with dignity, respect, and high quality pain assessment and management. Failure to identify and treat the concurrent conditions of pain and substance use disorders will compromise the ability to treat either condition effectively. Barriers to caring for these patients include stigmatization, misconceptions, and limited access to providers skilled in these two categories of disorders. Topics addressed in this position statement include the scope of substance use and related disorders, conceptual models of addiction, ethical considerations, addiction risk stratification, and clinical recommendations. PMID:22929604

Oliver, June; Coggins, Candace; Compton, Peggy; Hagan, Susan; Matteliano, Deborah; Stanton, Marsha; St. Marie, Barbara; Strobbe, Stephen; Turner, Helen N.

2013-01-01

70

[Peculiarities of cognitive functions in patients with chronic back pain].  

PubMed

The authors have studied cognitive functions and influencing factors in 64 patients with chronic low back pain. All patients have been examined using neurologic, neuroorthopedic, pathopsychological and neuropsychological methods. Patients have been divided into 2 groups according to their age: group 1 (aged 30-50 years) and group 2 (aged 51-60 years). Healthy controls were matched to patients for age, sex and education. Significant differences in neuropsychological testing, i.e. mental flexibility, delayed memory, psychomotor speed, which referred to the subtle cognitive impairment with executive function disturbances, were found in both groups of patients with chronic low back pain as compared to pain-free adults. Sensory-discriminative (pain intensity) and affective-emotional (negative emotions, in particular, anxiety) characteristics had the effect on cognitive functions in younger patients without depressive symptoms. Affective-emotional (anxiety, psychological distress) and cognitive characteristics (i.e. catastrophising) contributed to the cognitive disturbances in older patients. PMID:20032949

Melkumova, K A; Podchufarova, E V; Iakhno, N N

2009-01-01

71

The effects of music therapy on pain in patients with neuropathic pain.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of relaxing music on pain intensity in patients with neuropathic pain. A quasi-experimental study, repeated measures design was used. Thirty patients, aged 18-70 years, with neuropathic pain and hospitalized in an Algology clinic were identified as a convenience sample. Participants received 60 minutes of music therapy. Classical Turkish music was played to patients using a media player (MP3) and headphones. Participants had pain scores taken immediately before the intervention and at the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention. Data were collected over a 6-month period in 2012. The patients' mean pain intensity scores were reduced by music, and that decrease was progressive over the 30th and 60th minutes of the intervention, indicating a cumulative dose effect. The results of this study implied that the inclusion of music therapy in the routine care of patients with neuropathic pain could provide nurses with an effective practice for reducing patients' pain intensity. PMID:23375348

Korhan, Esra Ak?n; Uyar, Meltem; Eyigör, Can; Hakverdio?lu Yönt, Gülendam; Çelik, Serkan; Khorsh?d, Leyla

2014-03-01

72

Experimental Pain Responses Support Peripheral and Central Sensitization in Patients with Unilateral Shoulder Pain  

PubMed Central

Objective The aims of this study were to 1) examine the pattern of experimental pain responses in the affected and non-affected extremities in patients with shoulder pain and 2) explore the intra-individual association between sensitization states derived from experimental pain testing. Methods Experimental pain responses from 58 patients with shoulder pain (17 females, ages 18 to 52) were compared to those from 56 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (16 females, ages 21 to 58). Experimental pain responses included pressure pain threshold (PPT), thermal pain threshold and tolerance, and suprathreshold heat pain response (SHPR). Comparisons were made between the affected and non-affected extremity of clinical participants and the average response of extremities in healthy participants. Peripheral and central sensitization indexes were computed for clinical participants using standardized scores and percentile cut-offs based on the data from the healthy control sample. Experimental pain responses in clinical participants observed beyond the 25th and 75th percentile of healthy control sample responses were used for investigation of intra-individual association of sensitization states. Results PPT on the affected side acromion and masseter of clinical participants were diminished compared to their non-affected side (p < 0.015). Bilateral sensitivity in clinical participants was noted for PPT at the acromion and SHPR (p < 0.015). Peripheral and central sensitization indexes demonstrated that individuals with shoulder pain present with variable patterns of peripheral and central sensitization. Conclusions Collectively, experimental pain responses supported peripheral and central sensitization in response to pressure and thermal stimuli. No clear association was made between individuals exhibiting peripheral or central sensitization and suggests heterogeneity in pain processing in this clinical population. PMID:23619203

Coronado, Rogelio A.; Simon, Corey B.; Valencia, Carolina; George, Steven Z.

2013-01-01

73

Talking about the pain: A patient-centered study of low back pain in primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite considerable research, low back pain (LBP) often proves resistant to treatment. This study was designed to increase the understanding of low back pain through access to patients' perceptions, beliefs, illness behaviors and lived experiences. The findings are based on focus groups, individual interviews and participant observation conducted in primary care practices and community settings in three regions in Israel.

Jeffrey Borkan; Shmuel Reis; Doron Hermoni; Aya Biderman

1995-01-01

74

The challenge of pain management in patients with myasthenia gravis.  

PubMed

Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. The complexity of the disease and its treatments make MG patients particularly susceptible to adverse effects of drugs. MG is not a painful condition; however, as pain management armamentarium includes drugs from diverse pharmacological groups and with potential for drug-drug interactions, managing pain in patients with MG can be challenging. The underlying disease and the concomitant medications of each patient must be considered and the analgesic treatment individualized. This review presents an update on the various aspects of pain pharmacotherapy in patients with MG, focusing primarily on medications used to treat chronic pain. Drugs discussed are opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, muscle relaxants, benzodiazepines, intravenous magnesium, and local anesthetics. Drug interactions with agents used for MG treatment (acethylcholinesterase inhibitors, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants) and plasmapheresis are discussed. The clinical usefulness and limitations of each of the drug classes and agents are described. PMID:19670021

Haroutiunian, Simon; Lecht, Shimon; Zur, Arik A; Hoffman, Amnon; Davidson, Elyad

2009-01-01

75

Pain, Executive Functioning, and Affect in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease resulting in substantial pain. The physical and emotional effects of RA are well known, but little attention has been given to the potential cognitive effects of RA pain, although intact executive functioning in patients with chronic illness is crucial for the successful completion of many daily activities. We examined the relationship between pain and executive functioning in patients with RA, and also considered the influence of positive and negative affect in the relationship between pain and executive functioning. Methods A sample of 157 adults with RA completed measures of pain and positive and negative affect and were tested for working memory and selective attention using the Letter Number Sequencing subtest from the WAIS-III and the Stroop Color Word Test tests, respectively. Results: Consistent with prior research, pain was inversely related to executive functioning, with higher pain levels associated with poorer performance on executive functioning tasks. This relationship was not moderated or mediated by negative affect; however, positive affect moderated the relationship between pain and executive functioning. For patients high in positive affect there was a significant inverse relationship between pain and executive functioning, whereas there was no such relationship for patients low in positive affect. Discussion These findings are discussed in the context of cognitive research on the effects of positive affect on executive functioning as well as functional neuroanatomical research suggesting neurocognitive mechanisms for such moderation. PMID:20862788

Abeare, Christopher A.; Cohen, Jay L.; Axelrod, Bradley N.; Leisen, James C.C.; Mosley-Williams, Angelia; Lumley, Mark A.

2010-01-01

76

[Mesenteric angina: infrequent cause of chronic pain in hemodialysis patient].  

PubMed

We report a 73 years old male undergoing chronic hemodialysis with a history of seven years of abdominal pain and weight loss. A mesenteric angiography disclosed a critical stenosis of the celiac artery and a partial stenosis of the superior mesenteric artery. Other causes of abdominal pain were excluded. The patient was subjected to a successful angioplasty with stent placement that resulted in a complete relief of the pain. PMID:12491833

Duclos, Jaime; Urquieta, María Soledad; Opazo, Marcos

2002-10-01

77

The prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and fibromyalgia in patients hospitalized on internal medicine wards  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of nonarticular pain complaints (chronic widespread pain, chronic localized pain, transient pain) and fibromyalgia in hospitalized patients and to study utilization patterns of health services associated with pain related problems. Methods: Five hundred twenty-two patients hospitalized on internal medicine wards were enrolled. Data were collected with a questionnaire covering demographic background, information on pain and

Dan Buskila; Lily Neumann; Lisa R. Odes; Elena Schleifer; Roman Depsames; Mahmoud Abu-Shakra

2001-01-01

78

Monoamines in the brain cerebrospinal fluid of facial pain patients.  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the study was to assay monoamines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the trigeminal cistern of 64 patients with intractable facial pain. The CSF was analyzed for homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG), end-product markers of activity for the dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine systems, respectively. HVA averaged 121 ng/mL in these facial pain patients, compared to 150 to 550 ng/mL in 10 studies of ventricular brain CSF in assorted psychiatric and pain patients. 5-HIAA averaged 29 to ng/mL in our facial pain patients compared to 60 to 120 ng/mL in nine studies of ventricular brain CSF in assorted psychiatric and neurological patients. Trigeminal cistern CSF MHPG averaged 9 ng/mL, similar to the range of 13 studies of lumbar CSF of assorted psychiatric and pain diagnoses. These results indicate that (1) the electrochemical detection method provides a unique way of accurately measuring nanogram concentrations of multiple monoamines in a little as 0.25 mL of CSF; (2) trigeminal cistern and posterior fossa brain CSF monoamine metabolites reflect a different profile of dopaminergic and serotonergic functioning in these facial pain patients from that previously reported with lumbar CSF measurements of other patients; and (3) trigeminal sensory ganglion or brain dopamine and serotonin systems may be concomitantly dysfunctional in intractable facial pain. PMID:7504420

Bouckoms, A. J.; Sweet, W. H.; Poletti, C.; Lavori, P.; Carr, D.; Matson, W.; Gamache, P.; Aronin, N.

1992-01-01

79

Painful prosthesis: approaching the patient with persistent pain following total hip and knee arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

Summary Background Symptomatic severe osteoarthritis and hip osteoporotic fractures are the main conditions requiring total hip arthroplasty (THA), whereas total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is mainly performed for pain, disability or deformity due to osteoarthritis. After surgery, some patients suffer from “painful prosthesis”, which currently represents a clinical problem. Methods A systematic review of scientific literature has been performed. A panel of experts has examined the issue of persistent pain following total hip or knee arthroplasty, in order to characterize etiopathological mechanisms and define how to cope with this condition. Results Four major categories (non infective, septic, other and idiopathic causes) have been identified as possible origin of persistent pain after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Time to surgery, pain level and function impairment before surgical intervention, mechanical stress following prosthesis implant, osseointegration deficiency, and post-traumatic or allergic inflammatory response are all factors playing an important role in causing persistent pain after joint arthroplasty. Diagnosis of persistent pain should be made in case of post-operative pain (self-reported as VAS ?3) persisting for at least 4 months after surgery, or new onset of pain (VAS ?3) after the first 4 months, lasting ?2 months. Acute pain reported as VAS score ?7 in patients who underwent TJA should be always immediately investigated. Conclusions The cause of pain needs always to be indentified and removed whenever possible. Implant revision is indicated only when septic or aseptic loosening is diagnosed. Current evidence has shown that peri-and/or post-operative administration of bisphosphonates may have a role in pain management and periprosthetic bone loss prevention. PMID:24133526

Piscitelli, Prisco; Iolascon, Giovanni; Innocenti, Massimo; Civinini, Roberto; Rubinacci, Alessandro; Muratore, Maurizio; D’Arienzo, Michele; Leali, Paolo Tranquilli; Carossino, Anna Maria; Brandi, Maria Luisa

2013-01-01

80

Ketamine reduces muscle pain, temporal summation, and referred pain in fibromyalgia patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Central mechanisms related to referred muscle pain and temporal summation of muscular nociceptive activity are facilitated in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) patients. The present study assessed the effects of an NMDA-antagonist (ketamine) on these central mechanisms. FMS patients received either i.v. placebo or ketamine (0.3 mg\\/kg, Ketalar®) given over 30 min on two separate occasions. Habitual pain intensity was assessed on

Thomas Graven-Nielsen; Sally Aspegren Kendall; Karl G. Henriksson; Mats Bengtsson; Jan Sörensen; Anders Johnson; Björn Gerdle; Lars Arendt-Nielsen

2000-01-01

81

Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Upper-Extremity Nerve Injury  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this review was to present an analysis of the literature of the outcome studies reported in patients following traumatic upper-extremity (UE) nerve injuries (excluding amputation), to assess the presence of an association between neuropathic pain and outcome in patients following traumatic UE nerve injuries, and to provide recommendations for inclusion of more comprehensive outcome measures by clinicians who treat these patients. Summary of Key Points: A Medline and CINAHL literature search retrieved 48 articles. This review identified very few studies of patients with peripheral nerve injury that reported neuropathic pain. When pain was reported, visual analogue or numeric rating scales were most frequently used; standardized questionnaires measuring pain or psychosocial function were rarely administered. Recent evidence shows substantial long-term disability and pain in patients following peripheral nerve injury. Recommendation: To better understand neuropathic pain in patients following peripheral nerve injury, future outcome studies should include valid, reliable measures of physical impairment, pain, disability, health-related quality of life, and psychosocial functioning. PMID:21629596

Katz, Joel

2010-01-01

82

Knee Muscle Forces during Walking and Running in Patellofemoral Pain Patients and Pain-Free Controls  

PubMed Central

One proposed mechanism of patellofemoral pain, increased stress in the joint, is dependent on forces generated by the quadriceps muscles. Describing causal relationships between muscle forces, tissue stresses, and pain is difficult due to the inability to directly measure these variables in vivo. The purpose of this study was to estimate quadriceps forces during walking and running in a group of male and female patients with patellofemoral pain (n=27, 16 female; 11 male) and compare these to pain-free controls (n=16, 8 female; 8 male). Subjects walked and ran at self-selected speeds in a gait laboratory. Lower limb kinematics and electromyography (EMG) data were input to an EMG-driven musculoskeletal model of the knee, which was scaled and calibrated to each individual to estimate forces in 10 muscles surrounding the joint. Compared to controls, the patellofemoral pain group had greater co-contraction of quadriceps and hamstrings (p=0.025) and greater normalized muscle forces during walking, even though the net knee moment was similar between groups. Muscle forces during running were similar between groups, but the net knee extension moment was less in the patellofemoral pain group compared to controls. Females displayed 30-50% greater normalized hamstring and gastrocnemius muscle forces during both walking and running compared to males (p<0.05). These results suggest that some patellofemoral pain patients might experience greater joint contact forces and joint stresses than pain-free subjects. PMID:19268945

Besier, Thor F.; Fredericson, Michael; Gold, Garry E.; Beaupré, Gary S.; Delp, Scott L.

2009-01-01

83

Slow Temporal Summation of Pain for Assessment of Central Pain Sensitivity and Clinical Pain of Fibromyalgia Patients  

PubMed Central

Background In healthy individuals slow temporal summation of pain or wind-up (WU) can be evoked by repetitive heat-pulses at frequencies of ?.33 Hz. Previous WU studies have used various stimulus frequencies and intensities to characterize central sensitization of human subjects including fibromyalgia (FM) patients. However, many trials demonstrated considerable WU-variability including zero WU or even wind-down (WD) at stimulus intensities sufficient for activating C-nociceptors. Additionally, few WU-protocols have controlled for contributions of individual pain sensitivity to WU-magnitude, which is critical for WU-comparisons. We hypothesized that integration of 3 different WU-trains into a single WU-response function (WU-RF) would not only control for individuals’ pain sensitivity but also better characterize their central pain responding including WU and WD. Methods 33 normal controls (NC) and 38 FM patients participated in a study of heat-WU. We systematically varied stimulus intensities of.4 Hz heat-pulse trains applied to the hands. Pain summation was calculated as difference scores of 1st and 5th heat-pulse ratings. WU-difference (WU-?) scores related to 3 heat-pulse trains (44°C, 46°C, 48°C) were integrated into WU-response functions whose slopes were used to assess group differences in central pain sensitivity. WU-aftersensations (WU-AS) at 15 s and 30 s were used to predict clinical FM pain intensity. Results WU-? scores linearly accelerated with increasing stimulus intensity (p<.001) in both groups of subjects (FM>NC) from WD to WU. Slope of WU-RF, which is representative of central pain sensitivity, was significantly steeper in FM patients than NC (p<.003). WU-AS predicted clinical FM pain intensity (Pearson’s r?=?.4; p<.04). Conclusions Compared to single WU series, WU-RFs integrate individuals’ pain sensitivity as well as WU and WD. Slope of WU-RFs was significantly different between FM patients and NC. Therefore WU-RF may be useful for assessing central sensitization of chronic pain patients in research and clinical practice. PMID:24558475

Staud, Roland; Weyl, Elizabeth E.; Riley, Joseph L.; Fillingim, Roger B.

2014-01-01

84

Predictors of Pain among Head and Neck Cancer Patients  

PubMed Central

Objective Pain is a strong contributor to cancer patients’ quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine predictors of pain 1 year after the diagnosis of head and neck cancer. Design Prospective, multi-site cohort study. Setting Three academically-affiliated medical centers. Patients Previously untreated patients with carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract (n=374). Main Outcome Measures Participants were surveyed pre-treatment and 1 year thereafter. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine predictors of the SF-36 bodily pain score 1 year after diagnosis. Results The mean SF-36 bodily pain score at 1 year was 65, compared to 61 at diagnosis (p=.004), compared to 75 among population norms (lower scores indicate worse pain). Variables independently associated with pain included pre-treatment pain score (p<0.001), less education (p=0.02), neck dissection (p=0.001), feeding tube (p=0.05), xerostomia (p<0.001), depressive symptoms (p<0.001), taking more pain medication (p<0.001), less physical activity (p=.02), and poor sleep quality (p=0.006). Current smoking and problem drinking were marginally significant (p=0.07 and 0.08, respectively). Conclusions Aggressive pain management may be indicated for head and neck cancer patients who undergo neck dissections, complain of xerostomia, require feeding tubes, and have medical comorbidities. Treatment of modifiable risk factors such as depression, poor sleep quality, tobacco and alcohol abuse may also reduce pain and improve quality of life among head and neck cancer patients. PMID:23165353

Shuman, Andrew G.; Terrell, Jeffrey E.; Light, Emily; Wolf, Gregory T.; Bradford, Carol R.; Chepeha, Douglas; Jiang, Yunyun; McLean, Scott; Ghanem, Tamer A.; Duffy, Sonia A.

2014-01-01

85

Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain  

Cancer.gov

Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

86

Acupuncture, Exercise May Ease Pain for Breast Cancer Patients  

MedlinePLUS

... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acupuncture, Exercise May Ease Pain for Breast Cancer Patients ... 2015) Thursday, November 13, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Acupuncture Breast Cancer Exercise and Physical Fitness THURSDAY, Nov. ...

87

A Simple and Effective Daily Pain Management Method for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The incidence of painful bone metastases increases with longer survival times. Although external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) is an effective palliative treatment, it often requires several days from the start of treatment to produce a measurable reduction in pain scores and a qualitative amelioration of patient pain levels. Meanwhile, the use of analgesics remains the best approach early on in the treatment course. We investigated the role of radiation therapists as key personnel for collecting daily pain scores to supplement assessments by physician and oncology nursing staff and manage pain more effectively during radiation treatment. Methods and Materials: Daily pain scores were obtained by the radiation therapists for 89 patients undertaking a total of 124 courses of EBRT for bone metastases and compared with pretreatment pain scores. The majority of patients (71%) were treated to 30 Gy (range, 20-37.5) in 10 fractions (range, 8-15 fractions). Results: One hundred nineteen treatment courses (96%) were completed. Pain scores declined rapidly to 37.5%, 50%, and 75% of the pretreatment levels by Days 2, 4, and 10, respectively. Pain was improved in 91% of patients with only 4% of worse pain at the end of treatment. Improved pain scores were maintained in 83% of patients at 1-month follow-up, but in 35% of them, the pain was worse than at the end of treatment. Conclusions: Collection of daily pain scores by radiation therapists was associated with an effective reduction in pain scores early on during EBRT of painful osseous metastases.

Andrade, Regiane S. [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, UPMC Shadyside Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); UPMC Radiation Oncology Outreach Program (ROCOG), UPMC McKeesport Hospital, McKeesport, PA (United States); Proctor, Julian W., E-mail: proctorj@upmc.ed [UPMC Jameson Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology Department, New Castle, PA (United States); UPMC Radiation Oncology Outreach Program (ROCOG), UPMC McKeesport Hospital, McKeesport, PA (United States); Slack, Robert; Marlowe, Ursula [UPMC Jameson Cancer Center, Radiation Oncology Department, New Castle, PA (United States); Ashby, Karlotta R. [University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, UPMC Shadyside Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); UPMC Radiation Oncology Outreach Program (ROCOG), UPMC McKeesport Hospital, McKeesport, PA (United States); Schenken, Larry L. [UPMC Radiation Oncology Outreach Program (ROCOG), UPMC McKeesport Hospital, McKeesport, PA (United States)

2010-11-01

88

Current concepts of pain management for cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain management is one of the most important issues confronted when treating patients with malignant diseases. Since its release\\/publication\\u000a in 1986, the World Health Organization’s three-step analgesic ladder has helped to greatly improve pain management in cancer\\u000a patients. However, many questions about this three-step analgesic ladder have been raised and its application in the clinical\\u000a setting remains a controversial subject.

Yin-Hsun Feng; Ying-Wai Wang; Sai-Ching Jim Yeung

2008-01-01

89

Cancer-related pain in older adults receiving palliative care: Patient and family caregiver perspectives on the experience of pain  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Despite an emphasis on pain management in palliative care, pain continues to be a common problem for individuals with advanced cancer. Many of those affected are older due to the disproportionate incidence of cancer in this age group. There remains little understanding of how older patients and their family caregivers perceive patients’ cancer-related pain, despite its significance for pain management in the home setting. OBJECTIVES: To explore and describe the cancer pain perceptions and experiences of older adults with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive approach was used to describe and interpret data collected from semistructured interviews with 18 patients (?65 years of age) with advanced cancer receiving palliative care at home and their family caregivers. RESULTS: The main category ‘Experiencing cancer pain’ incorporated three themes. The theme ‘Feeling cancer pain’ included the sensory aspects of the pain, its origin and meanings attributed to the pain. A second theme, ‘Reacting to cancer pain’, included patients’ and family caregivers’ behavioural, cognitive (ie, attitudes, beliefs and control) and emotional responses to the pain. A third theme, ‘Living with cancer pain’ incorporated individual and social-relational changes that resulted from living with cancer pain. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide an awareness of cancer pain experienced by older patients and their family caregivers within the wider context of ongoing relationships, increased patient morbidity and other losses common in the aged. PMID:23957019

McPherson, Christine J; Hadjistavropoulos, Thomas; Lobchuk, Michelle M; Kilgour, Kelly N

2013-01-01

90

Psychological variables associated with foot function and foot pain in patients with plantar heel pain.  

PubMed

It is widely accepted that psychological variables are associated with self-reported pain and self-reported physical function in patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the relationship between psychological variables and foot pain and foot function has not been evaluated in people with plantar heel pain. Eighty-four participants with plantar heel pain completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale short version (DASS-21) and Foot Health Status Questionnaire. Using a hierarchical regression analysis, a baseline model with age, sex and BMI explained 10 % of the variability in foot function. The addition of depression and stress in separate models explained an additional 7.3 % and 8.1 % of foot function scores, respectively. In the respective models, depression was a significant predictor (??=?-0.28; p?=?0.009) as was stress (??=?-0.29; p?=?0.006). Females drove the effect between stress and foot function (??=?-0.50; p?=?0.001) and depression and foot function (??=?-0.53; p?pain, depression, anxiety and stress did not contribute significantly to pain scores. When the data was stratified by sex, stress (??=?-0.36; p?=?0.024) and depression (??=?-0.41; p?=?0.013) were significantly associated with foot pain in females but not in males. For participants with plantar heel pain, stress and depression scores were significantly associated with foot function but not foot pain. When the data was stratified by sex, stress and depression were significant predictors of foot pain and function in females. PMID:24647980

Cotchett, Matthew P; Whittaker, Glen; Erbas, Bircan

2014-03-20

91

Stability of patient adaptation classifications on the multidimensional pain inventory  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the adaptational classification stability of the multidimensional pain inventory (MPI) in two samples of female fibromyalgia syndrome patients. Retest resulted in one-third of patients being assigned to a different classification. Twenty patients had four repeated MPI assessments over a 10-month period; 85% of them changed classification at least once. Prediction of classification stability using demographic variables and

Joan E Broderick; Doerte U Junghaenel; Dennis C Turk

2004-01-01

92

Perception of pain among pediatric patients with sickle cell pain crisis.  

PubMed

Pain related to vasoocclusion is the most common reason for emergency department visits and hospital stays among pediatric patients with sickle cell disease. Using a prospective descriptive design, patients hospitalized with sickle cell pain were asked to complete the Adolescent Pediatric Pain Tool on each day of their hospital stay, providing data on the location, intensity, and quality of their pain. Data for 82 hospital stays were collected from 40 African American study participants. Mean age was 14.8 years, and mean length of stay (LOS) was 5.1 days. Mean LOS for 8 to 12 year olds (3.23 days; n = 22) was shorter than mean LOS for 13 to 19 year olds (5.85 days; n = 60). This LOS difference was significant (P = .004). Difference in LOS by gender was not significant. Higher initial number of body sites with pain was significantly associated with longer LOS (r = .39; P < .001). Higher initial pain intensity scores were significantly associated with longer LOS (r = .37; P = .001). Higher initial number of word descriptors was only weakly associated with longer LOS. Neither gender nor age differences were significant for Adolescent Pediatric Pain Tool data. PMID:25416521

Fosdal, Marian B

2015-01-01

93

Prevalence and Characteristics of Breakthrough Pain in Cancer Patients Admitted to a Hospice  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in cancer patients admitted to a hospice. Of 414 consecutive admissions, 33 patients were confused or too unwell to take part and 136 were pain-free. The remaining 245 reported 404 pains (range 1–5 per patient); of these patients, 218 (89%) had breakthrough pain and identified 361

Giovambattista Zeppetella; Catherine A O'Doherty; Silke Collins

2000-01-01

94

Observational study of prehospital delays in patients with chest pain  

PubMed Central

Method: A prospective observational study of prehospital times and events was undertaken on a target population of patients presenting with acute chest pain attributable to an acute coronary syndrome over a three month period. Results: Patients who decided to call the ambulance service were compared with patients who contacted any other service. Most patients who contact non-ambulance services are seen by general practitioners. The prehospital system time for 121 patients who chose to call the ambulance service first was significantly shorter than for 96 patients who chose to call another service (median 57 min v 107 min; p<0.001). Of the 42 patients thrombolysed in the emergency department, those who chose to call the ambulance service had significantly shorter prehospital system times (number 21 v 21; median 44 v 69 min; p<0.001). Overall time from pain onset to initiation of thrombolysis was significantly longer in the group of patients who called a non-ambulance service first (median 130 min v 248 min; p=0.005). Conclusions: Patient with acute ischaemic chest pain who call their general practice instead of the ambulance service are likely to have delayed thrombolysis. This is likely to result in increased mortality. The most beneficial current approach is for general practices to divert all patients with possible ischaemic chest pain onset within 12 hours direct to the ambulance service. PMID:12748152

Hitchcock, T; Rossouw, F; McCoubrie, D; Meek, S

2003-01-01

95

Multi-centre European study of breakthrough cancer pain: pain characteristics and patient perceptions of current and potential management strategies.  

PubMed

This study involved 320 cancer patients from four Northern European countries. Patients with breakthrough pain were questioned about the characteristics of their pain, the current management of their pain, and the acceptability/utility of alternative routes of administration. The median number of episodes was 3/day. Forty-four percent patients reported incident-type pain, 39% spontaneous-type pain, and 17% a combination of these pains. The median duration was 60 min, and the median time to peak intensity was 15 min. Three percent patients reported "mild" pain, 37% "moderate" pain, and 60% "severe" pain. Ninety percent patients stated that the pain interfered with their daily activities. All patients were using opioids as rescue medication (mainly oral morphine/oxycodone), whilst 28% patients were using non-opioids, and 50% patients were using non-pharmacological interventions. Only 55% patients took rescue medication every time they experienced breakthrough pain. Sixty-five percent patients would definitely consider using an oral transmucosal product; patients from Denmark were less likely to answer positively, and a positive response was associated with previous use of the route for breakthrough pain. Seventy-three percent patients reported regular oral problems. Forty-two percent patients would definitely consider using an intranasal product, with 26% patients stating they would definitely not use such a preparation; patients from Denmark and Sweden were less likely to answer positively, and a positive response was associated with male gender, and previous use of the route. Forty-four percent patients reported regular nasal problems. Sixty percent patients would definitely consider using a subcutaneous product, and 44% patients would definitely consider using an intrapulmonary product. PMID:21251860

Davies, Andrew; Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Andersen, Steen; Damkier, Anette; Vejlgaard, Tove; Nauck, Friedemann; Radbruch, Lukas; Sjolund, Karl-Frederik; Stenberg, Mariann; Buchanan, Alison

2011-08-01

96

Computed tomography findings in patients with sacroiliac pain.  

PubMed

This retrospective study evaluated the diagnostic value of computed tomography in patients with sacroiliac pain. Computed tomography scans of the sacroiliac joints of 62 patients with sacroiliac joint pain were reviewed. The criteria to include the patient in the current study were pain relief after a local injection in the sacroiliac joint under computed tomography guidance, a physical examination consistent with a sacroiliac origin of the pain, and negative magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine. A control group consisted of 50 patients of matched age who had computed tomography scans of the pelvis for a reason other than pelvic or back pain. Computed tomography scans showed one or more findings in 57.5% and 31% of the sacroiliac joints in the symptomatic and the control groups, respectively. The computed tomography scans were negative in 37 (42.5%) symptomatic sacroiliac joints with a positive sacroiliac joint injection test. The sensitivity of computed tomography was 57.5 % and its specificity was 69%. The finding of the current study suggests limited diagnostic value of computed tomography in sacroiliac joint disease because of its low sensitivity and specificity. With clinical suspicion of a sacroiliac origin of pain, intraarticular injection is currently the only means to confirm that diagnosis. PMID:11153977

Elgafy, H; Semaan, H B; Ebraheim, N A; Coombs, R J

2001-01-01

97

Frequency of temporomandibular arthralgia among myofascial pain patients with pain on palpation of ipsilateral masseter.  

PubMed

Aims: The masseter muscle is a common source of referred pain to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), with a possibility of false positive diagnoses for arthralgia when diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD) clinical examination. The current study investigated the distribution of arthralgia diagnoses among individuals with myofascial pain, with or without pain on masseter palpation. Methodology: The study was conducted with 255 outpatients. Clinical data and questionnaires were directly entered into software that deploys algorithms based on the diagnostic criteria of the RDC/TMD, and automatically classifies and stores the diagnosis of each patient evaluated. An association between diagnostic subgroups was verified by calculating the odds ratio (OR), and the statistical significance was tested using the Chi-square test. Results: A higher frequency of concordance (about three times greater) between myofascial pain and arthralgia occurred when there was pain on palpation in the region of the ipsilateral masseter muscle, and the association was statistically significant. Conclusions: The results of this study revealed a threefold increase in the risk for the presence of temporomandibular arthralgia in cases of myofascial pain combined with pain on palpation in the region of the ipsilateral masseter muscle. PMID:25200308

Macedo, Leonora Cristiana da Silva Parente; Filho, Gilberto Senechal de Goffredo; Tesch, Ricardo de Souza; Góes, Cristina Pessoa de Queiroz Farias

2014-09-01

98

Patient versus parental perceptions about pain and disability in children and adolescents with a variety of chronic pain conditions  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Cross-informant variance is often observed in patient self-reports versus parent proxy reports of pediatric chronic pain and disability. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship and merit of the child versus parent perspective. METHODS: A total of 99 patients (eight to 17 years of age [mean 13.2 years]; 71% female, 81% Caucasian) and parents completed the Pediatric Pain Questionnaire and Functional Disability Inventory at their initial clinic visit. Patients’ and parents’ pain intensity and disability scores were analyzed using an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), Wilcoxon signed-rank test, Bland-Altman plot and Spearman’s correlation coefficient. The association between clinical/demographic variables and differences in patient/parent pain intensity and disability scores was assessed using multivariable regression. RESULTS: There was significant agreement between patients’ self-reports and parents’ proxy reports of their child’s pain intensity (ICC=0.52; P<0.001) and disability (ICC=0.57; P=0.004) at the individual level. There were no significant group differences in patient versus parent-proxy pain intensity scores (P=0.40) and disability scores (P=0.54). The difference between patient and parent-proxy pain intensity was associated with patients’ self-reported pain intensity (P<0.001). The difference between patient and parent-proxy disability was associated with patient’s self-reported pain disability (P<0.001). Bland-Altman plots revealed major inter-rater variation in the Pediatric Pain Questionnaire and Functional Disability Inventory across their score ranges. A significant relationship (r=0.38; P<0.001) was observed between patients’ self-reported pain intensity and disability. CONCLUSIONS: While equal merit should ideally be given to pediatric chronic pain patients’ self-reports and their parents’ proxy reports of pain intensity and disability, it would appear that, as needed, pediatric patients or parents can offer a clinically valid, single clinical perspective. PMID:24147272

Vetter, Thomas R; Bridgewater, Cynthia L; Ascherman, Lee I; Madan-Swain, Avi; McGwin, Gerald L

2014-01-01

99

Tolerance of Pain by Cancer Patients in Hyperthermia Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperthermia-the artificial inducement of abnormally high blood temperature-is designed to cause tumor tissue to retain heat and has additive or synergistic effects with radiation and chemotherapy. Because of the clinically administered high temperature, cancer patients often experience pain and discomfort. In the study described in this article, 30 cancer patients undergoing hyperthermia treatment as part of their overall cancer care

Ronald H. Rozensky; Laurie Feldman Honor; Steve M. Tovian; Gordon Herz; Margaret Holland

1985-01-01

100

[Psychodynamic therapy in chronic pain patients: a systematic review].  

PubMed

Psychoanalysis has made fundamental contributions to our understanding of somatoform pain disorder; however, psychodynamic therapy procedures have not been accorded their due recognition in the treatment of chronic pain. This is due to the inadequate differential indication for the employment of psychodynamic treatment methods, on the one hand, and to the refusal of most of the psychoanalysts to modify the standard psychoanalytic procedures in accordance with the requirements of pain treatment. This article reviews evidence of the modification of psychodynamic therapy procedures and their outcome in chronic pain patients in the context of past research. We conducted a systematic computer-based literature research employing MEDLINE, EVIDENCE BASED MEDICINE, and PSYNDEX data-bases between 1980 and 2000. Psychodynamic therapy procedures are indicated in the first instance for patients with psychic co-morbidity and those with somatoform pain disorder. A modification of the psychotherapeutic technique, involving an approach that is more structured and is also rather supportive at least at the beginning, is necessary. While employing psychodynamic methods in the treatment of pain patients, greater importance should be attached to the physical level and to the 'holding function' of the therapist than is usually the case with the conventional psychoanalytic therapy procedures. PMID:11593457

Söllner, W; Schüssler, G

2001-01-01

101

Sex differences in the stability of conditioned pain modulation (CPM) among patients with chronic pain  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the temporal stability of conditioned pain modulation (CPM), formerly termed diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC), among a sample of patients with chronic pain. The study also examined the factors that might be responsible for the stability of CPM. Design & subjects, and methods In this test-retest study, patients underwent a series of standardized psychophysical pain testing procedures designed to assess CPM on two separate occasions (i.e., baseline, follow-up). Patients also completed self-report measures of catastrophizing (PCS) and negative affect (NA). Results Overall, results provided evidence for the stability of CPM among patients with chronic pain. Results, however, revealed considerable sex differences in the stability of CPM. For women, results revealed a significant test-retest correlation between baseline and follow-up CPM scores. For men, however, the test-retest correlation between baseline and follow-up CPM scores was not significant. Results of a Fisher’s Z-test revealed that the stability of CPM was significantly greater for women than for men. Follow-up analyses revealed that the difference between men and women in the stability of CPM could not be accounted for by any demographic (e.g., age) and/or psychologic factors (PCS, NA). Conclusions Our findings suggest that CPM paradigms possess sufficient reliability to be incorporated into bedside clinical evaluation of patients with chronic pain, but only among women. The lack of CPM reproducibility/stability observed among men places limits on the potential use of CPM paradigms in clinical settings for the assessment of men’s endogenous pain-inhibitory function. PMID:23924369

Martel, MO; Wasan, AD; Edwards, RR

2013-01-01

102

Neuropathic and nociceptive pain in head and neck cancer patients receiving radiation therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Pain is common in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients and may be attributed to the malignancy and\\/or cancer treatment. Pain mechanisms and patient report of pain in HNC are expected to include both nociceptive and neuropathic components. The purpose of this study was to assess the trajectory of orofacial and other pain during and following treatment, using patient

Joel B Epstein; Diana J Wilkie; Dena J Fischer; Young-Ok Kim; Dana Villines

2009-01-01

103

The Effect of Pressure Pain Sensitivity and Patient Factors on Self-Reported Pain-Disability in Patients with Chronic Neck Pain  

PubMed Central

The study was conducted to estimate the extent to which pressure pain sensitivity (PPS) and patient factors predict pain-related disability in patients with neck pain (NP), and to determine if PPS differs by gender. Forty-four participants with a moderate level of chronic NP were recruited for this cross sectional study. All participants were asked to complete self-reported assessments of pain, disability and comorbidity and then underwent PPS testing at 4-selected body locations. Pearson`s r w was computed to explore relationships between the PPS measures and the self-reported assessments. Regression models were built to identify predictors of pain and disability. An independent sample t-test was done to identify gender-related differences in PPS, pain-disability and comorbidity. In this study, greater PPS (threshold and tolerance) was significantly correlated to lower pain-disability (r = -.30 to -.53, p?0.05). Age was not correlated with pain or disability but comorbidity was (r= 0.42-.43, p?0.01). PPS at the 4-selected body locations was able to explain neck disability (R2=25-28%). Comorbidity was the strongest predictor of neck disability (R2 =30%) and pain (R2=25%). Significant mean differences for gender were found in PPS, disability and comorbidity, but not in pain intensity or rating. This study suggests that PPS may play a role in outcome measures of pain and disability but between-subject comparisons should consider gender and comorbidity issues. PMID:25320651

Uddin, Zakir; MacDermid, Joy C.; Woodhouse, Linda J.; Triano, John J.; Galea, Victoria; Gross, Anita R.

2014-01-01

104

Pain 5 years after instrumented and non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain drawings have been used in spine surgery for diagnostic use and psychological evaluation of fusion candidates; they have rarely been used to evaluate pain status after spinal fusion. This study is a 5-year follow-up on a randomised clinical trial assigning patients to posterolateral spinal fusion with or without pedicle screw instrumentation. Patients were mailed a pain drawing and questionnaires

Thomas Andersen; Finn B. Christensen; Ebbe S. Hansen; Cody Bünger

2003-01-01

105

Assessment tools for the evaluation of pain in the oncology patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

The control of cancer pain is an essential goal in the care of patients with cancer. Inadequate pain assessment by health\\u000a care providers is a major risk factor for undertreatment of pain. Repeated and accurate pain assessment is required for optimal\\u000a pain management. Pain assessment tools such as simple rating scales and short pain questionnaires can facilitate routine measurement\\u000a of

Karen O. Anderson; Holcombe Boulevard

2007-01-01

106

Factors That Influence Patient Advocacy by Pain Management Nurses: Results of the American Society for Pain Management Nursing Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

What is the meaning of advocacy, and how does it relate to the nurse who wants patients to experience optimum pain management? This question and the lack of empirical data provided the stimulus for the American Society for Pain Management Nursing (ASPMN) Research Committee to explore ASPMN members' beliefs, knowledge, and skills regarding pain management advocacy activities. The specific aim

Laurie Jowers Ware; Patricia Bruckenthal; Gail C. Davis; Susan K. O'Conner-Von

2011-01-01

107

Anesthesia and pain management in pediatric burn patients.  

PubMed

Patients with severe burn injury are a challenge for the pediatric anesthesiologist. Today with adequate care many children survive their trauma and have a good chance for complete functional and psychological rehabilitation. The anesthesiologist has to provide excellent care even for patients in suboptimal or unstable condition to enable wound debridement and grafting, because only rapid skin closure will stabilize the patient. Adequate pain treatment during all phases of burn treatment is mandatory. PMID:9244091

Beushausen, T; Mücke, K

1997-07-01

108

A Practical Approach to Improving Pain Control in Cancer Patients  

PubMed Central

Despite a wealth of recent articles, many patients with cancer pain continue to suffer needlessly. The satisfactory treatment of cancer pain requires a variety of practical management strategies. Practicing physicians need a wider understanding of both the basic principles of analgesic therapy and the pharmacologic features of analgesics. Certain analgesics are best not used in cancer care. The use of pharmacologic adjuncts may lessen overall narcotic requirements and side effects. The appropriate use of alternative therapies can dramatically improve the quality of patients' overall survival. PMID:2884781

Brigden, Malcolm L.; Barnett, Jeffrey B.

1987-01-01

109

Persistent pain in postmastectomy patients: Comparison of psychophysical, medical, surgical, and psychosocial characteristics between patients with and without pain  

PubMed Central

Persistent postmastectomy pain (PPMP) is a major individual and public health problem. Increasingly, psychosocial factors such as anxiety and catastrophizing are being revealed as crucial contributors to individual differences in pain processing and outcomes. Furthermore, differences in patients’ responses to standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST) may aid in the discernment of who is at risk for acute and chronic pain after surgery. However, characterization of the variables that differentiate those with PPMP from those whose acute postoperative pain resolves is currently incomplete. The purpose of this study was to investigate important surgical, treatment-related, demographic, psychophysical, and psychosocial factors associated with PPMP by comparing PPMP cases with PPMP-free controls. Pain was assessed using the breast cancer pain questionnaire to determine the presence and extent of PPMP. Psychosocial and demographic information were gathered via phone interview, and women underwent a QST session. Consistent with most prior research, surgical and disease-related variables did not differ significantly between cases and controls. Furthermore, treatment with radiation, chemotherapy, or hormone therapy was also not more common among those with PPMP. In contrast, women with PPMP did show elevated levels of distress-related psychosocial factors such as anxiety, depression, catastrophizing, and somatization. Finally, QST in nonsurgical body areas revealed increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation among PPMP cases, while thermal pain responses were not different between the groups. These findings suggest that an individual’s psychophysical and psychosocial profile may be more strongly related to PPMP than their surgical treatment. PMID:23290256

Schreiber, Kristin L.; Martel, Marc O.; Shnol, Helen; Shaffer, John R.; Greco, Carol; Viray, Nicole; Taylor, Lauren N.; McLaughlin, Meghan; Brufsky, Adam; Ahrendt, Gretchen; Bovbjerg, Dana; Edwards, Robert R.; Belfer, Inna

2013-01-01

110

When race matters: disagreement in pain perception between patients and their physicians in primary care.  

PubMed Central

Patients and physicians often disagree in their assessment of pain intensity. This study explores the impact of patient factors on underestimation of pain intensity in chronic noncancer pain. We surveyed patients and their physicians in 12 primary care centers. To measure pain intensity, patients completed an 11-point numeric rating scale for which pain scores range from 0 (no pain) to 10 (unbearable pain). Physicians rated patients' pain on the same scale. We defined disagreement of pain intensity as underestimation or overestimation by 22 points. Of 601 patients approached, 463 (77%) completed the survey. The majority of participants were black (39%) or white (47%), 67% were female, and the mean age was 53 years. Physicians underestimated pain intensity relative to their patients 39% of the time. Forty-six percent agreed with their patients' pain perception, and 15% of physicians overestimated their patients' pain levels by > or =2 points. In both the bivariate and multivariable models, black race was a significant variable associated with underestimation of pain by physicians (p < 0.05; OR = 1.92; 95% CI: 1.31-2.81). This study finds that physicians are twice as likely to underestimate pain in blacks patients compared to all other ethnicities combined. A qualitative study exploring why physicians rate blacks patients' pain low is warranted. PMID:17534011

Staton, Lisa J.; Panda, Mukta; Chen, Ian; Genao, Inginia; Kurz, James; Pasanen, Mark; Mechaber, Alex J.; Menon, Madhusudan; O'Rorke, Jane; Wood, JoAnn; Rosenberg, Eric; Faeslis, Charles; Carey, Tim; Calleson, Diane; Cykert, Sam

2007-01-01

111

A SIMPLE AND EFFECTIVE DAILY PAIN MANAGEMENT METHOD FOR PATIENTS RECEIVING RADIATION THERAPY FOR PAINFUL BONE METASTASES  

PubMed Central

Purpose The incidence of painful bone metastases increases with longer survival times. While External Beam Radiation Therapy (EBRT) is an effective palliative treatment, it often requires several days from the start of treatment to produce a measurable reduction in pain scores and a qualitative amelioration of patient pain levels. Meanwhile, the use of analgesics remains the best approach early on in the treatment course. We investigated the role of Radiation Therapists as key personnel for collecting daily pain scores to supplement assessments by physician and oncology nursing staff and manage pain more effectively, during radiation treatment. Methods and Materials Daily pain scores were obtained by the radiation therapists for 89 patients undertaking a total of 124 courses of EBRT for bone metastases and compared to pre-treatment pain score. The majority of patients (71%) were treated to 30 (20–37.5) Gy in 10 (8–15) fractions. Results A total of 119 treatment courses (96%) were completed. Pain Scores declined rapidly to 37.5%, 50% and 75% of the pretreatment levels by Days 2, 4, and 10 respectively. Pain was improved in 91 % of patients with only 4% of worse pain at the end of treatment. Improved pain scores were maintained in 83% of patients at 1 month follow up, but in 35% of them the pain was worse than at the end of treatment. Conclusions Collection of daily pain scores by radiation therapists was associated with an effective reduction in pain scores early on during EBRT of painful osseous metastases. PMID:20171810

Andrade, Regiane S.; Proctor, Julian W.; Slack, Robert; Marlowe, Ursula; Ashby, Karlotta R.; Schenken, Larry I

2009-01-01

112

Pain epidemiology and health related quality of life in chronic non-malignant pain patients referred to a Danish multidisciplinary pain center  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the results of a detailed study of the pain epidemiology and health related quality of life (HRQL) in 150 chronic non-malignant pain patients consecutively referred to a Danish multidisciplinary pain center. Mean pain severity was 71.6 (SD=18.5) on the VAS scale. Forty-two percent reported poor quality of sleep. HRQL was evaluated with the Medical Outcome Study-Short Form

Niels Becker; Annemarie Bondegaard Thomsen; Alf Kornelius Olsen; Per Sjøgren; Per Bech; Jørgen Eriksen

1997-01-01

113

Empirically derived Symptom Checklist 90 subgroups of chronic pain patients: A cluster analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four hundred fifty-three chronic pain patients completed a Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) and a comprehensive pain evaluation questionnaire. All patients were evaluated by a physician and rated on degree of pain pathology and pain behavior. The SCL-90 data were analyzed using two clustering procedures and replicated over two similar samples. Three distinct profiles emerged and represented high, medium, and low

Robert N. Jamison; Daniel L. Rock; Winston C. V. Parris

1988-01-01

114

Altered rectal sensory response induced by balloon distention in patients with functional abdominal pain syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Functional abdominal pain syndrome (FAPS) has chronic unexplained abdominal pain and is similar to the psychiatric diagnosis of somatoform pain disorder. A patient with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) also has chronic unexplained abdominal pain, and rectal hypersensitivity is observed in a majority of the patients. However, no reports have evaluated the visceral sensory function of FAPS precisely. We aimed

Tsukasa Nozu; Miwako Kudaira

2009-01-01

115

Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: simonec@mail.nih.gov; Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-09-01

116

[Health maintenance, relaxation and hypnosis for chronic pain patients].  

PubMed

The treatment of chronic pain patients integrates more and more complementary therapies such as relaxation and hypnosis, implemented by specially trained nurses. These techniques are offered on the basis of nurses' diagnoses carried out in the framework of a clinical approach. PMID:25518140

Boiron, Clare

2014-10-01

117

Treating pain in addicted patients: recommendations from an expert panel.  

PubMed

Clinicians may face pragmatic, ethical, and legal issues when treating addicted patients. Equal pressures exist for clinicians to always address the health care needs of these patients in addition to their addiction. Although controversial, mainly because of the lack of evidence regarding their long-term efficacy, the use of opioids for the treatment of chronic pain management is widespread. Their use for pain management in the addicted population can present even more challenges, especially when evaluating the likelihood of drug-seeking behavior. As the misuse and abuse of opioids continues to burgeon, clinicians must be particularly vigilant when prescribing chronic opioid therapy. The purpose of this article is to summarize recommendations from a recent meeting of experts convened to recommend how primary care physicians should approach treatment of chronic pain for addicted patients when an addiction specialist is not available for a referral. As there is a significant gap in guidelines and recommendations in this specific area of care, this article serves to create a foundation for expanding chronic pain guidelines in the area of treating the addicted population. This summary is designed to be a practical how-to guide for primary care physicians, discussing risk assessment, patient stratification, and recommended therapeutic approaches. PMID:24138341

Cheatle, Martin; Comer, Dominique; Wunsch, Martha; Skoufalos, Alexis; Reddy, Yeshwant

2014-04-01

118

Nurses' assessment of postoperative pain: can it be an alternative to patients' self-reports?  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to evaluate whether the nurses' assessment of postoperative pain can be an alternative to patients' self-reporting. We examined 187 patients receiving postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia. The nurses assessed the patients' pain with three pain indices (therapeutic efficacy, pain intensity, and facial pain expression) 8 hr after operation. The patients recorded their resting and movement pain using 100-mm visual analog scales immediately following the nurses' assessment. There was an acceptable correlation between overall pain measurement assessed by patients and that assessed by nurses (canonical correlation coefficient=0.72, p=0.0001). The resting pain was more reliably reflected than the movement pain in overall measurement assessed both by nurses and by patients. Among the three pain indices assessed by nurses, the pain intensity most reliably reflected the patients' self-reports. The pain intensity assessed with a simple verbal descriptor scale therefore is believed to be an effective alternative to the patients' self-reports of postoperative pain at rest. However, it mirrored the patients' self-reports during movement less reliably. Therapeutic efficacy and facial pain expression indices were not effective alternatives to patients' self-reporting. PMID:11748363

Chung, I. S.; Sim, W. S.; Kim, G. S.; Park, S. H.; Park, Y. S.; Cha, K. J.; Park, Y. S.; Lim, Y. J.; Lee, S. C.; Kim, Y. C.

2001-01-01

119

Tough guys or sensitive guys? Disentangling the role of examiner sex on patient pain reports  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Experimental and clinical pain studies are conflicting regarding whether individuals report heightened or dampened pain sensitivity in the presence of other men or women. OBJECTIVES: In the present preliminary study, two small medical record reviews of patients admitted for emergency care were conducted to examine the possibility that patients may report differential pain intensity to male and female health care examiners. The study also sought to determine whether these effects are moderated by and, thus, only detectable by examining patients at different pain (debilitation) levels. METHODS: Pain intensity scores were extracted from two medical record reviews of patients admitted for emergency care (n=64 and n=135, respectively). Pain intensity was measured using an 11-point numerical scale during standard triage assessments and the sex of the examiner was recorded. RESULTS: Mean pain scores reported to male and female emergency staff did not differ in either set of medical records. However, when patients were split between low and high pain levels, male patients reported higher pain scores to male practitioners when experiencing relatively low pain levels, and both male and female patients reported higher pain scores to female practitioners when experiencing relatively high pain levels. DISCUSSION: The statistical magnitudes of these effects were large, suggesting that this phenomenon may be a pervasive feature in clinical settings and experimental pain studies. CONCLUSION: These preliminary findings warrant larger-scale investigations of social contextual influences on patient pain reports, which are necessary for creating more standardized protocols for reliably assessing and treating patient pain experiences. PMID:24511573

Vigil, Jacob M; Alcock, Joe

2014-01-01

120

Sex differences in the adequacy of pain management among patients referred to a multidisciplinary cancer pain clinic.  

PubMed

Few studies have evaluated sex differences in the adequacy of pain management in cancer. Existing studies have been marked by methodological limitations and results have been mixed. The present study sought to determine whether sex was associated with pain severity and pain management in cancer patients newly referred by their primary oncology team to a multidisciplinary cancer pain clinic. One hundred thirty-one cancer patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form and medical chart review was conducted to obtain patients' clinical characteristics and pain treatment data. There were no differences between males and females in ratings of worst pain in the last week. Females were significantly less likely to have been prescribed high potency opioids by their primary oncology team and significantly more likely to report inadequate pain management as measured by Pain Management Index scores. These results suggest a sex bias in the treatment of cancer pain and support the routine examination of the effect of sex in cancer pain research. PMID:18395398

Donovan, Kristine A; Taliaferro, Lindsay A; Brock, Charles W; Bazargan, Sadaf

2008-08-01

121

Analysis of long-standing nociceptive and neuropathic pain in patients with post-polio syndrome.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to analyze pain, both nociceptive and neuropathic, in patients with post-polio syndrome (PPS) and relate the pain to age at the initial polio infection, age at examination, to gender and disability. The study was conducted in a university hospital department. Patients with PPS were interviewed at their regular visits about pain, its character, intensity and localization. A clinical examination, including a thorough neurological examination, was performed. Data included age at time of polio infection, age at time of examination and gender. Pain intensity was measured with the VAS-scale and walking capability by the WISCI-scale. One hundred sixty-three (88 women, 75 men) patients were included in the study. Pain was present in 109 (67%). Pain was more frequently reported by women (82%) than by men (49%). 96 patients experienced nociceptive pain, 10 patients both neuropathic and nociceptive pain and three experienced pure neuropathic pain. Half of the patients with pain experienced pain in more than one body region. When neuropathic pain was present, another additional neurological disorder was diagnosed. Pain was more often found in younger patients (around 70%) than in older patients (around 50%). In summary pain is common in patients with PPS and most patients experienced nociceptive pain. Women have pain more often than men. Older patients experience pain more seldom than younger patients. Age at time of primary polio infection is important for the development of pain. When neuropathic pain is present, it is important to proceed with neurological examination to find an adequate diagnosis. PMID:20352256

Werhagen, Lars; Borg, Kristian

2010-06-01

122

Etifoxine for Pain Patients with Anxiety  

PubMed Central

Etifoxine (etafenoxine, Stresam®) is a non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic with an anticonvulsant effect. It was developed in the 1960s for anxiety disorders and is currently being studied for its ability to promote peripheral nerve healing and to treat chemotherapy-induced pain. In addition to being mediated by GABAA?2 receptors like benzodiazepines, etifoxine appears to produce anxiolytic effects directly by binding to ?2 or ?3 subunits of the GABAA receptor complex. It also modulates GABAA receptors indirectly via stimulation of neurosteroid production after etifoxine binds to the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) of the outer mitochondrial membrane in the central and peripheral nervous systems, previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Therefore, the effects of etifoxine are not completely reversed by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil. Etifoxine is used for various emotional and bodily reactions followed by anxiety. It is contraindicated in situations such as shock, severely impaired liver or kidney function, and severe respiratory failure. The average dosage is 150 mg per day for no more than 12 weeks. The most common adverse effect is drowsiness at the initial stage. It does not usually cause any withdrawal syndromes. In conclusion, etifoxine shows less adverse effects of anterograde amnesia, sedation, impaired psychomotor performance, and withdrawal syndromes than those of benzodiazepines. It potentiates GABAA receptor-function by a direct allosteric effect and by an indirect mechanism involving the activation of TSPO. It seems promising that non-benzodiazepine anxiolytics including etifoxine will replenish shortcomings of benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors according to animated studies related to TSPO. PMID:25589941

Choi, Yun Mi

2015-01-01

123

Etifoxine for pain patients with anxiety.  

PubMed

Etifoxine (etafenoxine, Stresam®) is a non-benzodiazepine anxiolytic with an anticonvulsant effect. It was developed in the 1960s for anxiety disorders and is currently being studied for its ability to promote peripheral nerve healing and to treat chemotherapy-induced pain. In addition to being mediated by GABAA?2 receptors like benzodiazepines, etifoxine appears to produce anxiolytic effects directly by binding to ?2 or ?3 subunits of the GABAA receptor complex. It also modulates GABAA receptors indirectly via stimulation of neurosteroid production after etifoxine binds to the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) of the outer mitochondrial membrane in the central and peripheral nervous systems, previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Therefore, the effects of etifoxine are not completely reversed by the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil. Etifoxine is used for various emotional and bodily reactions followed by anxiety. It is contraindicated in situations such as shock, severely impaired liver or kidney function, and severe respiratory failure. The average dosage is 150 mg per day for no more than 12 weeks. The most common adverse effect is drowsiness at the initial stage. It does not usually cause any withdrawal syndromes. In conclusion, etifoxine shows less adverse effects of anterograde amnesia, sedation, impaired psychomotor performance, and withdrawal syndromes than those of benzodiazepines. It potentiates GABAA receptor-function by a direct allosteric effect and by an indirect mechanism involving the activation of TSPO. It seems promising that non-benzodiazepine anxiolytics including etifoxine will replenish shortcomings of benzodiazepines and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors according to animated studies related to TSPO. PMID:25589941

Choi, Yun Mi; Kim, Kyung Hoon

2015-01-01

124

Acute Pain Management for Patients Receiving Maintenance Methadone or Buprenorphine Therapy  

PubMed Central

More patients with opioid addiction are receiving opioid agonist therapy (OAT) with methadone and buprenorphine. As a result, physicians will more frequently encounter patients receiving OAT who develop acutely painful conditions, requiring effective treatment strategies. Undertreatment of acute pain is suboptimal medical treatment, and patients receiving long-term OAT are at particular risk. This paper acknowledges the complex interplay among addictive disease, OAT, and acute pain management and describes 4 common misconceptions resulting in suboptimal treatment of acute pain. Clinical recommendations for providing analgesia for patients with acute pain who are receiving OAT are presented. Although challenging, acute pain in patients receiving this type of therapy can effectively be managed. PMID:16418412

Alford, Daniel P.; Compton, Peggy; Samet, Jeffrey H.

2007-01-01

125

Cross-sectional assessment of pain and physical function in skeletal dysplasia patients.  

PubMed

Short stature skeletal dysplasia (SD) patients have orthopedic and neurologic complications causing significant pain and physical disability. We conducted a large cross-sectional online survey in 361 people with short stature SD (>10?years) to describe pain prevalence, characteristics, and the relationship between pain and function. Chronic pain prevalence per Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) was 70.3%. Women reported more pain than men (73% vs 63% p?=?0.04). Pain Severity Score (average of current, worst, least and average pain) averaged 3.3?±?2, while the Pain Interference Score (with daily activities) averaged 3.4?±?2.7 on a 10-point scale. Per Bleck scale, 20.5% had little or no functional capacity. Increasing age and decreased ambulation independently predicted chronic pain. Chronic pain is prevalent in short stature SD patients and associated with poor physical function. Further study is required to clarify the temporal relationship among pain, function and treatments. PMID:23106480

Alade, Y; Tunkel, D; Schulze, K; McGready, J; Jallo, G; Ain, M; Yost, T; Hoover-Fong, J

2013-09-01

126

Pain Expectancies, Pain, and Functional Self-Efficacy Expectancies as Determinants of Disability in Patients with Chronic Low Back Disorders.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Tested the predictive power of self-efficacy expectations of physical capabilities, expectations of pain, and expectations of reinjury on physical function in chronic back pain patients. Before assessment of function, patients rated their abilities to perform essential job tasks--functional self-efficacy (FSE)--and the likelihood working would…

Lackner, Jeffrey M.; And Others

1996-01-01

127

Assessment of pain in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: relation between pain intensity and degree of joint inflammation.  

PubMed Central

The relation between pain and joint inflammation in patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis has not previously been systematically evaluated. Eighteen patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis completed paediatric pain questionnaires and the joints affected were examined by thermography. Although significant correlations were shown between parent and doctor pain intensity ratings and joint temperature, correlations of patient pain intensity ratings and joint temperature were only significant in younger children. The degree of joint inflammation is only one factor of several contributing to the amount of subjective pain experienced by children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, indicating the need for a comprehensive assessment of the relatively independent variables of inflammation and pain in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:1575578

Ilowite, N T; Walco, G A; Pochaczevsky, R

1992-01-01

128

Avoidance and Confrontation of Painful, Back-Straining Movements in Chronic Back Pain Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Avoidance of painful activities has been proposed to be an important n'sk factor for the initiation and maintenance of chronic low back suffering, whereas exposure to these activities has been suggested to be beneficial for recovery. In a cross-sectional study, the differences between chronic patients with avoidant and confrontational styles were investigated using self-report measures and a behavioral test. Participants

Geert Crombez; Leen Vervaet; Roland Lysens; Frank Baeyens; Paul Eelen

1998-01-01

129

Pain and Anxiety Experienced by Patients Following Placement of a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy.  

PubMed

Background: Abdominal pain following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) placement is a recognized complication. However, the prevalence and degree of severity of pain are poorly characterized. We assessed abdominal pain and anxiety levels associated with PEG placement in communicative and noncommunicative patients. Methods: A prospective questionnaire assessed patients' anxiety and abdominal pain 1 hour before, 1 hour after, and 24 hours after PEG placement using 11-point Likert-type scales. Patients were followed up until pain had resolved. Procedural data, analgesia requirements, and complications were recorded. For analysis, patients were divided into 2 groups: communicative (able to self-assess) and noncommunicative (clinician assessed). Results: Seventy consecutive patients were assessed. Of the 49 self-assessed patients, 11 (22%) reported immediate pain, 32 (65%) reported pain at 1 hour (24 mild, 5 moderate, 3 severe), and 40 (82%) reported pain at 24 hours. Pain most commonly lasted between 24 and 48 hours (25 patients). Of the 21 clinician-assessed patients, only 1 was deemed to have pain, and this was at 24 hours. Four (6%) patients were admitted with pain. There was no relationship between preplacement anxiety scores and postplacement pain scores. Discussion: Abdominal pain after PEG placement pain is common but resolved by 48 hours in most patients. In patients able to communicate, clinicians scored pain lower compared with patients' scores. It is likely that pain is not identified in patients unable to communicate. Patients need to be better informed about the possibility of postprocedural pain and routinely offered access to appropriate analgesia. PMID:25249027

Oppong, Philip; Pitts, Narrie; Chudleigh, Vicky; Latchford, Andrew; Roy, Amy; Rocket, Mark; Lewis, Stephen

2014-09-23

130

Evidence of a disposition toward fearfulness and vulnerability to posttraumatic stress in dysfunctional pain patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few investigations have addressed whether patient subgroups derived using the Multiaxial Assessment of Pain (MAP) [Turk, D. C., & Rudy, T. E. (1987). Towards a comprehensive assessment of chronic pain patients. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 25, 237–249; Turk, D. C., & Rudy, T. E. (1988). Toward an empirically derived taxonomy of chronic pain patients: integration of psychological assessment data. Journal

Gordon J. G Asmundson; Michel F Bonin; Inger K Frombach; G. Ron Norton

2000-01-01

131

Pregabalin, the lidocaine plaster and duloxetine in patients with refractory neuropathic pain: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Patients frequently fail to receive adequate pain relief from, or are intolerant of, first-line therapies prescribed for neuropathic pain (NeP). This refractory chronic pain causes psychological distress and impacts patient quality of life. Published literature for treatment in refractory patients is sparse and often published as conference abstracts only. The aim of this study was to identify published data

Melanie Plested; Sangeeta Budhia; Zahava Gabriel

2010-01-01

132

Fear-avoidance beliefs about back pain in patients with acute LBP E Coudeyre MD1  

E-print Network

Title page Fear-avoidance beliefs about back pain in patients with acute LBP E Coudeyre MD1 , F in patients with acute low back pain (LBP) and to identify features of patients and general practitioners (GPs early stage of the disease. Key Indexing Terms : Low back pain, Acute, Survey, Fear-avoidance beliefs

Boyer, Edmond

133

Profile of sexuality in Moroccan chronic low back pain patients  

PubMed Central

Background Sexual life had an important role in preserving the good quality of life for patients and for their partner. Chronic Low Back Pain (CLBP) as other musculoskeletal diseases may affect all aspects of life including sexual functioning. The purpose of this study is to describe the impact of CLBP on the sexual life of patients and to identify the factors that affect their Sexual Quality of Life (SQOL). Methods One hundred CLBP sexually active patients were included. Patients and disease Characteristics were collected. Impact on sexual life (sexual intercourse and SQOL) was also assessed. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to analyze significant determinants associated with the SQOL disturbance. Results Eighty one percent of our patients complained about sexual difficulties related to CLBP. Libido decrease and painful intercourse position were reported respectively in 14.8 and 97.5% of cases. The most pain generating position was supine. Mean of sexual intercourse frequency decrease was at ?10.4?±?4.8 per month. SQOL score mean was at 44.6?±?17.4%. Men suffered more than women from sexual problems (respectively 90% vs. 72%; p?=?0.02). Men had worse SQOL than women (respectively 38.9?±?17.2 vs. 50.3?±?15.7%; p?=?0.001). Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that advanced age (p?=?0.009), poor functional status (p?=?0.03), male gender (p?=?0.03) and sexual intercourse frequency decrease (p?=?0.005) were the independent variables associated with the SQOL disturbance. Conclusion Our study suggests that sexuality is profoundly disturbed in CLBP patients; both their sexual intercourse and SQOL were affected. This disturbance seems to be associated with patient and disease characteristics. Sexuality should be taken into account in managing CLBP patients. PMID:23413914

2013-01-01

134

Abnormal Pain Modulation in Patients with Spatially Distributed Chronic Pain: Fibromyalgia  

PubMed Central

Many chronic pain syndromes including fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome, migraine headache, chronic back pain, and complex regional pain syndrome are associated with hypersensitivity to painful stimuli and with reduced endogenous pain inhibition. These findings suggest that modulation of pain-related information may be related to the onset and/or maintenance of chronic pain. Although pain sensitivity and pain inhibition are normally distributed in the general population, they are not useful as reliable predictors of future pain. The combination of heightened pain sensitivity and reduced pain-inhibition, however, appears to predispose individuals to greater risk for increased acute clinical pain (e.g., postoperative pain). It is unknown at this time whether such pain processing abnormalities may also place individuals at increased risk for chronic pain. Psychophysical methods, including heat sensory and pressure pain testing have become increasingly available and can be used for the evaluation of pain sensitivity and pain inhibition. However, long-term prospective studies in the general population are lacking which could yield insight into the role of heightened pain sensitivity and pain disinhibition for the development of chronic pain disorders like fibromyalgia. PMID:19647141

Staud, Roland

2009-01-01

135

Implementation of a portable electronic system for providing pain relief to patellofemoral pain syndrome patients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, a portable electromyogram (EMG) system and a stimulator are developed for patellofemoral pain syndrome patients, with the objective of reducing the pain experienced by these patients; the patellar pain is caused by an imbalance between the vastus medialis obliquus (VMO) and the vastus lateralis (VL). The EMG measurement circuit and the electrical stimulation device proposed in this study are specifically designed for the VMO and the VL; they are capable of real-time waveform recording, possess analyzing functions, and can upload their measurement data to a computer for storage and analysis. The system can calculate and record the time difference between the EMGs of the VMO and the VL, as well as the signal strengths of both the EMGs. As soon as the system detects the generation of the EMG of the VL, it quickly calculates and processes the event and stimulates the VMO as feedback through electrical stimulation units, in order to induce its contraction. The system can adjust the signal strength, time length, and the sequence of the electrical stimulation, both manually and automatically. The output waveform of the electrical stimulation circuit is a dual-phase asymmetrical pulse waveform. The primary function of the electrical simulation circuit is to ensure that the muscles contract effectively. The performance of the device can be seen that the width of each pulse is 20-1000 ?s, the frequency of each pulse is 10-100 Hz, and current strength is 10-60 mA.

Chang Chien, Jia-Ren; Lin, Guo-Hong; Hsu, Ar-Tyan

2011-10-01

136

Somatosensory Profiles but Not Numbers of Somatosensory Abnormalities of Neuropathic Pain Patients Correspond with Neuropathic Pain Grading  

PubMed Central

Due to the lack of a specific diagnostic tool for neuropathic pain, a grading system to categorize pain as ‘definite’, ‘probable’, ‘possible’ and ‘unlikely’ neuropathic was proposed. Somatosensory abnormalities are common in neuropathic pain and it has been suggested that a greater number of abnormalities would be present in patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the presence of somatosensory abnormalities by means of Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) in patients with a clinical diagnosis of neuropathic pain and correlated the number of sensory abnormalities and sensory profiles to the different grades. Of patients who were clinically diagnosed with neuropathic pain, only 60% were graded as ‘definite’ or ‘probable’, while 40% were graded as ‘possible’ or ‘unlikely’ neuropathic pain. Apparently, there is a mismatch between a clinical neuropathic pain diagnosis and neuropathic pain grading. Contrary to the expectation, patients with ‘probable’ and ‘definite’ grades did not have a greater number of abnormalities. Instead, similar numbers of somatosensory abnormalities were identified for each grade. The profiles of sensory signs in ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ neuropathic pain were not significantly different, but different from the ‘unlikely’ grade. This latter difference could be attributed to differences in the prevalence of patients with a mixture of sensory gain and loss and with sensory loss only. The grading system allows a separation of neuropathic and non-neuropathic pain based on profiles but not on the total number of sensory abnormalities. Our findings indicate that patient selection based on grading of neuropathic pain may provide advantages in selecting homogenous groups for clinical research. PMID:22927981

Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; van Wijhe, Marten

2012-01-01

137

Isometric exercise has opposite effects on central pain mechanisms in fibromyalgia patients compared to normal controls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aerobic exercise has been shown to activate endogenous opioid and adrenergic systems and attenuate experimental pain in normal control subjects (NC). In contrast, fibromyalgia (FM) subjects' experimental pain ratings increase after aerobic exercise, suggestive of abnormal pain modulation. In order to determine whether central or peripheral mechanisms are predominantly involved in the abnormal pain modulation of FM patients, the effects

Roland Staud; Michael E. Robinson; Donald D. Price

2005-01-01

138

Extensive reorganization of primary somatosensory cortex in chronic back pain patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hypothesis of reorganization of the primary somatosensory cortex in states of chronic pain was assessed in 10 low back pain patients and nine matched healthy controls. Intracutaneous electric stimuli were applied to the left back and index finger at a standard, a non-painful and a painful intensity. Magnetic fields were recorded by a 37-channel BTi biomagnetometer from the hemisphere

Herta Flor; Christoph Braun; Thomas Elbert; Niels Birbaumer

1997-01-01

139

Evaluation and Management of Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain  

PubMed Central

Up to a third of patients undergoing coronary angiography for angina-like chest pain are found to have normal coronary arteries and a substantial proportion of these individuals continue to consult and even attend emergency departments. Initially, these patients are usually seen by cardiologists but with accumulating evidence that the pain might have a gastrointestinal origin, it may be more appropriate for them to be cared for by the gastroenterologist once a cardiological cause has been excluded. This review covers the assessment and management of this challenging condition, which includes a combination of education, reassurance, and pharmacotherapy. For the more refractory cases, behavioral treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy or hypnotherapy, may have to be considered. PMID:19390646

Shekhar, C.; Whorwell, P. J.

2008-01-01

140

Fibromyalgia and neuropathic pain - differences and similarities. A comparison of 3057 patients with diabetic painful neuropathy and fibromyalgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Patients with diabetic neuropathy (DPN) and fibromyalgia differ substantially in pathogenetic factors and the spatial distribution\\u000a of the perceived pain. We questioned whether, despite these obvious differences, similar abnormal sensory complaints and pain\\u000a qualities exist in both entities. We hypothesized that similar sensory symptoms might be associated with similar mechanisms\\u000a of pain generation. The aims were (1) to compare epidemiological

Jana Koroschetz; Stefanie E Rehm; Ulrich Gockel; Mathias Brosz; Rainer Freynhagen; Thomas R Tölle; Ralf Baron

2011-01-01

141

Static Balance in Patients With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background: The relationship between one-leg static standing balance (OLSSB) and patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is unknown. Hypothesis: OLSSB decreases in patients with PFPS. Design: Prospective case series. Methods: Fifty-two women with unilateral PFPS were enrolled in this study. OLSSB was evaluated with a stabilometer. Q angle was measured with a lengthened-arm universal goniometer. Lower extremity alignment was analyzed with full-length standing anteroposterior teleroentgenograms. Quadriceps and hamstring strength was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. Results: There were significant differences in OLSSB, Q angle, and strength of quadriceps and hamstring between the symptomatic and asymptomatic sides. There was a correlation between the strength of the quadriceps and hamstring and OLSSB, while there was no correlation between OLSSB and the severity of pain, lower extremity alignment, and Q angle on the symptomatic side. Conclusions: OLSSB and quadriceps and hamstring strength decreased and Q angle increased on the symptomatic side in PFPS patients. A relationship between OLSSB and pain, Q angle, and lower extremity alignment was not detected, while there was a correlation between the strength of the quadriceps and hamstring and OLSSB. Clinical Relevance: A quadriceps and hamstring strengthening may be beneficial to improve OLSSB in patients with PFPS. PMID:23016053

Citaker, Seyit; Kaya, Defne; Yuksel, Inci; Yosmaoglu, Baran; Nyland, John; Atay, Ozgur Ahmet; Doral, Mahmut Nedim

2011-01-01

142

Chronic pain patients are impaired on an emotional decision-making task A. Vania Apkariana,*, Yamaya Sosaa  

E-print Network

pain. Chronic back pain (CBP) patients, chronic complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patientsChronic pain patients are impaired on an emotional decision-making task A. Vania Apkariana pain can result in anxiety, depression and reduced quality of life. However, its effects on cognitive

Chialvo, Dante R.

143

The relationship between symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and pain, affective disturbance and disability among patients with accident and non-accident related pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent studies have reported a high prevalence of symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among individuals with chronic pain. Studies suggest that persons with pain and PTSD also display higher levels of affective disturbance. In the present study we examined self-reports of pain, affective disturbance, and disability among pain patients with and without symptoms of PTSD. Patients without PTSD symptoms

Michael E. Geisser; Randy S. Roth; Jan E. Bachman; Thomas A. Eckert

1996-01-01

144

Can attitudes of stoicism and cautiousness explain observed age-related variation in levels of self-rated pain, mood disturbance and functional interference in chronic pain patients?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of the present study were (a) to examine the relationship between age, attitudes and self-reported pain and suffering in a sample of chronic pain patients and (b) to determine the extent to which attitudes of stoicism and cautiousness might mediate between age and chronic pain experience. Psychometric measures were administered to 338 chronic pain patients. The results indicate

Hua-Hie Yong

2006-01-01

145

Psychosocial Correlates of Recurrent Childhood Pain: A Comparison of Pediatric Patients With Recurrent Abdominal Pain, Organic Illness, and Psychiatric Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pediatric patients with recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) were compared with patients with peptic disease, patients with emotional disorders, and well children with regard to (a) emotional and somatic symptoms and (b) theoretically derived variables, including negative life events, competence, family functioning, and the modeling and encouragement of illness behavior. RAP patients had levels of emotional distress and somatic complaints higher

Lynn S. Walker; Judy Garber; John W. Greene

1993-01-01

146

Monitoring sedation in patients receiving opioids for pain management.  

PubMed

Excessive sedation precedes opioid-induced respiratory depression. An evidence-based practice project standardized systematic sedation monitoring by nurses using an opioid sedation scale and respiratory assessment when opioids are administered for pain management. Nurses were educated and documentation updated. Nurses demonstrated increased ability to identify at-risk patients (3.2 pre-implementation; 3.6 post-implementation; 1-4 Likert scale) and reported understanding the tool to assess for oversedation (2.6 pre-implementation; 3.2 post-implementation). Documentation compliance improved, and patient safety was maintained. PMID:24686040

Smith, Anne; Farrington, Michele; Matthews, Grace

2014-01-01

147

A personalized approach to assessing and managing pain in patients with cancer.  

PubMed

Pain is one of the most common and distressing symptoms in patients with cancer. In this review, we discuss an evidence-based approach to personalized pain assessment and management. Recent insights into the pain expression pathway have led to a paradigm shift in pain management, allowing clinicians to deliver personalized treatments tailored to the individual's needs. Personalized pain management begins with systematic screening, followed by comprehensive pain assessment. Impeccable characterization of pain informs its etiology and the mechanism to guide treatment choices. Identification of modulators of pain expression such as psychological distress, alcoholism, substance use, and delirium allow clinicians to further tailor treatment recommendations. Documentation of a personalized pain goal provides an individualized response criterion. A multidimensional treatment plan is then formulated targeting the pain mechanism, etiologic factors, and modulators. Finally, longitudinal monitoring customized to the individual's needs allows clinicians to improve adherence and, ultimately, to optimize pain control over time. PMID:24799495

Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

2014-06-01

148

Shoulder pain and concomitant hand oedema among stroke patients with pronounced arm paresis  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this prospective study was to identify clinical factors associated with the development of shoulder pain in stroke patients with pronounced arm paresis. Methods At stroke onset, 485 patients were initially assessed in 2007–2009. Sixty-three patients with pronounced arm paresis completed the study, and 21 of these developed shoulder pain. Clinical findings were recorded fortnightly by the attending physiotherapist during hospital stay. Results Hand oedema on the paretic side was more common in patients developing shoulder pain compared with those who did not develop shoulder pain. The onset of shoulder pain was associated with concomitant hand oedema. High NIHSS score was associated with developing shoulder pain. Patients with a history of shoulder pain developed pain earlier than those without previous shoulder pain. Patients with haemorrhagic stroke were significantly more prone to developing shoulder pain. Conclusions One-third of the stroke patients with pronounced arm paresis developed shoulder pain. Concomitant hand oedema seems to be an additional symptom of shoulder injury. Patients with low general status are more vulnerable to develop post-stroke shoulder pain. PMID:24765589

2013-01-01

149

The Effect of Therapeutic Touch on Pain and Fatigue of Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite major advances in pain management, cancer pain is managed poorly in 80% of the patients with cancer. Due to deleterious side effects of pharmacology therapy in these people, there is an urgent need for clinical trials of non-pharmacological interventions. To examine the effect of therapeutic touch (TT) on the pain and fatigue of the cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, a

Nahid Aghabati; Eesa Mohammadi; Zahra Pour Esmaiel

2010-01-01

150

Ketamine treatment for intractable pain in a patient with severe refractory complex regional pain syndrome: a case report.  

PubMed

In this case report, we describe the effect of ketamine infusion in a case of severe refractory complex regional pain syndrome I (CRPS I). The patient was initially diagnosed with CRPS I in her right upper extremity. Over the next 6 years, CRPS was consecutively diagnosed in her thoracic region, left upper extremity, and both lower extremities. The severity of her pain, combined with the extensive areas afflicted by CRPS, caused traumatic emotional problems for this patient. Conventional treatments, including anticonvulsants, bisphosphonates, oral steroids and opioids, topical creams, dorsal column spinal cord stimulation, spinal morphine infusion, sympathetic ganglion block, and sympathectomy, failed to provide long-term relief from pain. An N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist inhibitor, ketamine, was recently suggested to be effective at resolving intractable pain. The patient was then given several infusions of intravenous ketamine. After the third infusion, the edema, discoloration, and temperature of the affected areas normalized. The patient became completely pain-free. At one-year of follow-up, the patient reported that she has not experienced any pain since the last ketamine infusion. Treatment with intravenous ketamine appeared to be effective in completely resolving intractable pain caused by severe refractory CRPS I. Future research on this treatment is needed. PMID:18523505

Shirani, Peyman; Salamone, Alicia R; Schulz, Paul E; Edmondson, Everton A

2008-01-01

151

Percutaneous spinal cord stimulation for chronic pain: indications and patient selection.  

PubMed

Percutaneous spinal cord stimulation has a clinical benefit in selected patients with chronic neuropathic pain related to failed back surgery syndrome and complex regional pain syndrome. Patients with other peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes may also respond favorably. The cause of the chronic pain must be established to rule out remediable causes. Drug abuse or aberrant drug-related behaviors should be assessed before proceeding. A psychological evaluation identifies patients who may not benefit. Risk factors for infection should be corrected where possible. This safe, reversible treatment should be considered early for patients with intractable peripheral neuropathic pain. PMID:25240659

Nagel, Sean J; Lempka, Scott F; Machado, Andre G

2014-10-01

152

Pain Assessment and Management in Critically ill Intubated Patients in Jordan: A Prospective Study  

PubMed Central

Objectives The purpose of this study was to describe: (1) pain indicators used by nurses and physicians to assess pain, (2) pain management interventions (pharmacological and non-pharmacological) used by nurses, and (3) indicators used by nurses to verify pain intervention effectiveness. Methodology A total of 301 medical records of currently admitted patients from six different ICUs in Jordan were reviewed using a data collection instrument developed by Gélinas et al. (2004) Pain-related indicators were classified into non-observable (patient’s self-reports of pain) and observable (physiological and behavioral) categories. Results Only 105 (35%) of a total 301 reviewed medical records contained pain assessment data. From these medical records, 15 pain episodes were collected altogether. Observable indicators documented 98% of the 115 pain episodes. Patients’ self-reports of pain were documented only 1.7% of the time. In 78% and 46% of the 115 pain episodes, pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain management were documented, respectively. Only 37% of the pain episodes were reassessed with self- report (1%) and observable indicators (36%) to determine the effectiveness of the interventions. Conclusion Pain documentation for assessment, management, and reassessment was lacking and needs improvement. PMID:25505864

Ayasrah, Shahnaz Mohammad; O’Neill, Teresa Mary; Abdalrahim, Maysoon Saleem; Sutary, Manal Mohammed; Kharabsheh, Muna Suliman

2014-01-01

153

Outcome measures for studying patients with low back pain.  

PubMed

There is growing recognition in the treatment of back pain that patient perspectives are essential in judging the results of treatment. Improving the patient's "quality of life" is often the main goal of therapy. Thus, although clinical research in the past has focused on physiologic outcomes, such as range of motion, muscle strength, or neurologic deficits, increasing attention is being given to the rigorous measurement of symptoms, functional status, role function, satisfaction with treatment, and health care costs. In many cases, these so-called "soft" outcomes can be measured with a level of reproducibility similar to more conventional clinical data such as imaging test results. Because symptoms and functional outcomes are sometimes only loosely associated with physiologic phenomena, the former outcomes should be measured directly. Modern questionnaires for measuring patient quality of life combine the expertise of social scientists and clinicians and have demonstrated validity. Furthermore, they have some important advantages over simple ratings of "excellent, good, fair, and poor" outcomes, or work status alone. Several modern instruments for measuring health-related quality of life in patients with low back pain are reviewed briefly, describing their content and length. Wider use of these instruments would help to increase clinician familiarity with their meaning and avoid duplication of effort in questionnaire development. PMID:7801179

Deyo, R A; Andersson, G; Bombardier, C; Cherkin, D C; Keller, R B; Lee, C K; Liang, M H; Lipscomb, B; Shekelle, P; Spratt, K F

1994-09-15

154

Attentional Strategy Moderates Effects of Pain Catastrophizing on Symptom-Specific Physiological Responses in Chronic Low Back Pain Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study, we examined whether experimentally-manipulated attentional strategies moderated relations between pain\\u000a catastrophizing and symptom-specific physiological responses to a cold-pressor task among sixty-eight chronic low back patients.\\u000a Patients completed measures of pain catastrophizing and depression, and were randomly assigned to sensory focus, distraction\\u000a or suppression conditions during a cold pressor. Lumbar paraspinal and trapezius EMG, and cardiovascular responses

Phillip J. Quartana; John W. Burns; Kenneth R. Lofland

2007-01-01

155

Preferences for shared decision making in chronic pain patients compared with patients during a premedication visit  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There is some evidence that patients' outcomes improve if they are involved in shared decision making (SDM). A chronic pain clinic or premedication visit could be adequate settings for the implementation of SDM. So far, the patients' preference for involvement in decision making and their desire for information have not been tested in anesthesiological settings. METHODS: A group of

C. D. Spies; C. M. Schulz; E. Weiss-Gerlach; B. Neuner; T. Neumann; V. von Dossow; M. Schenk; K.-D. Wernecke; G. Elwyn

2006-01-01

156

Helping patients decide: From Hippocrates to videodiscs—an application for patients with low back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines a modular, microcomputer and videodisc expert system, for patients with mechanical low back pain. The system incorporate facts, rules, and methods to extract data, opinions, information, and user preferences. It supports individual patient needs with a broad knowledge base, and analytical modelling techniques that connect flexible inference structures and user choices. Videodisc based expert systems help break

Carl W. Nelson

1988-01-01

157

Patient-controlled intranasal analgesia (PCINA) for the management of postoperative pain: a pilot study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study Objective: To compare patient-controlled intranasal analgesia (PCINA) for postoperative pain management with ward-provided pain therapy.Design: Randomized, prospective pilot study.Setting: University medical center.Patients: 20 ASA status I and II orthopedic patients.Interventions: On the first postoperative day, 20 patients were randomized to receive either PCINA for 4 hours followed by 5 hours of ward-provided pain therapy (Group 1; n = 10)

H. Walter Striebel; Thomas Olmann; Claudia Spies; Glenda Brummer

1996-01-01

158

Validation and Clinical Application of a Biopsychosocial Model of Pain Intensity and Functional Disability in Patients with a Pediatric Chronic Pain Condition Referred to a Subspecialty Clinic  

PubMed Central

Background. Pediatric chronic pain is considered to be a multidimensional construct that includes biological, psychological, and social components. Methods. The 99 enrolled study patients (mean age 13.2 years, 71% female, 81% Caucasian) and an accompanying parent completed a series of health-related questionnaires at the time of their initial appointment in a pediatric chronic pain medicine clinic. Results. Significant correlations (r ? 0.30, P < 0.05) were observed between pediatric chronic pain intensity and patient anxiety, patient depression, patient pain coping, parent chronic pain intensity, and parent functional disability. Pediatric chronic pain intensity was significantly associated with patient anxiety (P = 0.002). Significant correlations (r ? 0.30, P < 0.05) were observed between pediatric functional disability and patient chronic pain intensity, patient anxiety, patient depression, patient pain coping, parent chronic pain intensity, parent functional disability, parent anxiety, parent depression, and parent stress. Pediatric functional disability was significantly associated with patient chronic pain intensity (P = 0.025), patient anxiety (P = 0.021), patient pain coping (P = 0.009), and parent functional disability (P = 0.027). Conclusions. These findings provide empirical support of a multidimensional Biobehavioral Model of Pediatric Pain. However, the practical clinical application of the present findings and much of the similar previously published data may be tenuous. PMID:24251035

Vetter, Thomas R.; McGwin, Gerald; Bridgewater, Cynthia L.; Madan-Swain, Avi; Ascherman, Lee I.

2013-01-01

159

Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in two preoperative patients with pain.  

PubMed

Reversible stress-induced cardiomyopathy, i.e., Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, rarely presents in preoperative patients. We provide the case reports of two patients who presented with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, which we surmise was due to excess endogenous catecholamine production in response to acute pain. Electrocardiogram revealed T-wave inversion, with peak Troponin-T elevation in each case, i.e., 0.66 microg/L and 0.14 microg/L (normal range <0.03 microg/L). Despite these findings consistent with acute myocardial infarction, neither patient had obstructive coronary disease at angiography. Left ventriculography showed apical ballooning, a typical feature of the Takotsubo syndrome. Ventricular dysfunction had resolved completely at repeat echocardiography 2 wk later, after adequate analgesia and surgery. PMID:19617583

Daly, Michael J; Dixon, Lana J

2010-03-01

160

Successful management of a difficult cancer pain patient by appropriate adjuvant and morphine titration.  

PubMed

Morphine has been used for many years to relieve cancer pain. Oral morphine (in either immediate release or modified release form) remains the analgesic of choice for moderate or severe cancer pain. The dose of oral morphine is titrated up to achieve adequate relief from pain with minimal side effects. Antidepressant and anticonvulsant drugs, when used in addition to conventional analgesics, give excellent relief from cancer pain. Most cancer pain responds to pharmacological measures with oral morphine but some pain like neuropathic and bony pain, pain in children and elderly age group, and advanced malignancy pain are very difficult to treat. Here, we report the management of a similar patient of severe cancer pain and the difficulty that we came across during dose titration of oral morphine and adjuvant analgesic. PMID:21976860

Rana, Shiv Ps; Ahmed, Arif; Kumar, Vindo; Chaudhary, Prakash K; Khurana, Deepa; Mishra, Seema

2011-05-01

161

Successful Management of a Difficult Cancer Pain Patient by Appropriate Adjuvant and Morphine Titration  

PubMed Central

Morphine has been used for many years to relieve cancer pain. Oral morphine (in either immediate release or modified release form) remains the analgesic of choice for moderate or severe cancer pain. The dose of oral morphine is titrated up to achieve adequate relief from pain with minimal side effects. Antidepressant and anticonvulsant drugs, when used in addition to conventional analgesics, give excellent relief from cancer pain. Most cancer pain responds to pharmacological measures with oral morphine but some pain like neuropathic and bony pain, pain in children and elderly age group, and advanced malignancy pain are very difficult to treat. Here, we report the management of a similar patient of severe cancer pain and the difficulty that we came across during dose titration of oral morphine and adjuvant analgesic. PMID:21976860

Rana, Shiv PS; Ahmed, Arif; Kumar, Vindo; Chaudhary, Prakash K; Khurana, Deepa; Mishra, Seema

2011-01-01

162

Heavy metals and pain in the dysfunctional patient  

PubMed Central

Summary Aims The aim of this research is to verify the quality and quantity of heavy metals (HM) of dental origin in TMD patients. Methods A population of 100 subject was studied and divided in two homogeneous groups: Study Group (SG) and Control Group (CG). Organism heavy metals were tested by a spot sampling method in which the first urine of the day, through Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), were analyzed. The results obtained were compared with reference values (RV) of Italian people. Descriptive statistical analysis and student’s t-test has been applied (statistical significance for p > 0.05). Results The SG presented the absolute highest levels of HM compared to the CG (p=0.787). As regards the relation between pain and HM, the subjects that refer “severe/very severe” values of pain present the highest levels of HM in urines. Conclusions The obtained results seem to highlight a possible direct proportionality between the level of pain the increase of the concentration of heavy metals in all the examined groups and subgroups. PMID:25002917

Di Paolo, Carlo; Serritella, Emanuela; Panti, Fabrizio; Falisi, Giovanni; Manna, Fedele

2014-01-01

163

Somatosensory findings in patients with spinal cord injury and central dysaesthesia pain.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether central pain in patients with spinal cord injury is only dependent on the lesioning of spinothalamic pathways. METHODS: In sixteen patients with spinal cord injury and central dysaesthesia pain, somatosensory abnormalities in painful denervated skin areas were compared with somatosensory findings in normal skin areas as well as in non-painful denervated skin areas. RESULTS: The threshold values for detection of thermal (heat, cold, heat pain, or cold pain) and tactile stimulation were significantly changed in denervated skin areas although there were no significant differences in the threshold values between painful and non-painful denervated skin areas. The reductions of sensations of touch, vibration, joint position, and two point discrimination in painful and non-painful denervated skin areas were not significantly different. Allodynia (pain caused by non-noxious stimulation) and wind up-like pain (pain caused by repeatedly pricking the skin) were significantly more common in painful than non-painful denervated skin areas. CONCLUSIONS: Because pain and thermal sensory perception are primarily mediated to the brain via spinothalamic pathways, whereas the sensations of touch, vibration and joint position are primarily mediated by dorsal column-medial lemniscal pathways, the results indicate that central pain is not only dependent on the lesioning of either dorsal column-medial lemniscal pathways or spinothalamic pathways. The findings of abnormal evoked pain (allodynia and wind up-like pain) may be consistent with the experimental findings of hyperexcitability in nociceptive spinothalamic tract neurons, that may be involved in the pathogenesis of central pain. Images PMID:8774406

Eide, P K; Jørum, E; Stenehjem, A E

1996-01-01

164

The prevalence of pain at pressure areas and pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with pressure ulcers (PUs) report that pain is their most distressing symptom, but there are few PU pain prevalence studies. We sought to estimate the prevalence of unattributed pressure area related pain (UPAR pain) which was defined as pain, soreness or discomfort reported by patients, on an “at risk” or PU skin site, reported at a patient level. Methods We undertook pain prevalence surveys in 2 large UK teaching hospital NHS Trusts (6 hospitals) and a district general hospital NHS Trust (3 hospitals) during their routine annual PU prevalence audits. The hospitals provide secondary and tertiary care beds in acute and elective surgery, trauma and orthopaedics, burns, medicine, elderly medicine, oncology and rehabilitation. Anonymised individual patient data were recorded by the ward nurse and PU prevalence team. The analysis of this prevalence survey included data summaries; no inferential statistical testing was planned or undertaken. Percentages were calculated using the total number of patients from the relevant population as the denominator (i.e. including all patients with missing data for that variable). Results A total of 3,397 patients in 9 acute hospitals were included in routine PU prevalence audits and, of these, 2010 (59.2%) patients participated in the pain prevalence study. UPAR pain prevalence was 16.3% (327/2010). 1769 patients had no PUs and of these 223 patients reported UPAR pain, a prevalence of 12.6%. Of the 241 people with pressure ulcers, 104 patients reported pain, a UPAR pain prevalence of 43.2% (104/241). Conclusion One in six people in acute hospitals experience UPAR pain on ‘at risk’ or PU skin sites; one in every 8 people without PUs and, more than 2 out of every five people with PUs. The results provide a clear indication that all patients should be asked if they have pain at pressure areas even when they do not have a PU. PMID:23902583

2013-01-01

165

The Efficacy of Thermotherapy and Cryotherapy on Pain Relief in Patients with Acute Low Back Pain, A Clinical Trial Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Acute low back pain is one of the most common health problems especially in industrialized countries where 75 per cent of the population develop it at least once during their life. This study examined the efficacy of thermotherapy and cryotherapy, alongside a routine pharmacologic treatment, on pain relief in patients with acute low back pain referring an orthopedic clinic in Shahrekord, Iran. Materials and Methods: This clinical trial study was conducted on 87 patients randomly assigned to three (thermotherapy and cryotherapy as intervention, and naproxen as control) groups of 29 each. The first (thermotherapy) group underwent treatment with hot water bag and naproxen, the second (cryotherapy) group was treated with ice and naproxen, and the naproxen group was only treated with naproxen, all for one week. All patients were examined on 0, 3rd, 8th, and 15th day after the first visit and the data gathered by McGill Pain Questionnaire. The data were analyzed by SPSS software using paired t-test, ANOVA, and chi-square. Results: In this study, mean age of the patients was 34.48 (20–50) years and 51.72 per cent were female. Thermotherapy patients reported significantly less pain compared to cryotherapy and control (p?0.05). In thermotherapy and cryotherapy groups, mean pain in the first visit was 12.70±3.7 and 12.06±2.6, and on the 15th day after intervention 0.75±0.37 and 2.20±2.12, respectively. Conclusion: The results indicated that the application of thermo–therapy and cryotherapy accompanied with a pharmacologic treatment could relieve pain in the patients with acute low back pain. PMID:25386469

Dehghan, Morteza

2014-01-01

166

Somatosensory Abnormalities for Painful and Innocuous Stimuli at the Back and at a Site Distinct from the Region of Pain in Chronic Back Pain Patients  

PubMed Central

Chronic low back pain (CLBP) was shown to be associated with pathophysiological changes at several levels of the sensorimotor system. Changes in sensory thresholds have been reported but complete profiles of Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) were only rarely obtained in CLBP patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate comprehensive QST profiles in CLBP at the painful site (back) and at a site distinct from their painful region (hand) and to compare these data with similar data in healthy controls. We found increased detection thresholds in CLBP patients compared to healthy controls for all innocuous stimuli at the back and extraterritorial to the painful region at the hand. Additionally, CLBP patients showed decreased pain thresholds at both sites. Importantly, there was no interaction between the investigated site and group, i.e. thresholds were changed both at the affected body site and for the site distinct from the painful region (hand). Our results demonstrate severe, widespread changes in somatosensory sensitivity in CLBP patients. These widespread changes point to alterations at higher levels of the neuraxis or/and to a vulnerability to nociceptive plasticity in CLBP patients. PMID:23554950

Puta, Christian; Schulz, Birgit; Schoeler, Saskia; Magerl, Walter; Gabriel, Brunhild; Gabriel, Holger H. W.; Miltner, Wolfgang H. R.; Weiss, Thomas

2013-01-01

167

The role of psychological interventions in the management of patients with chronic pain  

PubMed Central

Chronic pain can be best understood from a biopsychosocial perspective through which pain is viewed as a complex, multifaceted experience emerging from the dynamic interplay of a patient’s physiological state, thoughts, emotions, behaviors, and sociocultural influences. A biopsychosocial perspective focuses on viewing chronic pain as an illness rather than disease, thus recognizing that it is a subjective experience and that treatment approaches are aimed at the management, rather than the cure, of chronic pain. Current psychological approaches to the management of chronic pain include interventions that aim to achieve increased self-management, behavioral change, and cognitive change rather than directly eliminate the locus of pain. Benefits of including psychological treatments in multidisciplinary approaches to the management of chronic pain include, but are not limited to, increased self-management of pain, improved pain-coping resources, reduced pain-related disability, and reduced emotional distress – improvements that are effected via a variety of effective self-regulatory, behavioral, and cognitive techniques. Through implementation of these changes, psychologists can effectively help patients feel more in command of their pain control and enable them to live as normal a life as possible despite pain. Moreover, the skills learned through psychological interventions empower and enable patients to become active participants in the management of their illness and instill valuable skills that patients can employ throughout their lives. PMID:22114534

Roditi, Daniela; Robinson, Michael E

2011-01-01

168

Chest Pain as a presenting complaint in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)  

PubMed Central

Objective: To study various characteristics of chest pain in acute myocardial infarction patients. Methodology: A total of 331 patients of AMI admitted at Cardiology unit Nishtar Hospital Multan and Chaudhry Pervez Elahi Institute of Cardiology Multan, irrespective of the age and gender, were included in this study. The study duration was one year starting from June 2011 to June 2012. Non-probability purposive sampling technique was used in this descriptive study. Informed consent to participate in this study was taken. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS-11. Results: A total number of 331 patients with AMI were included in the study. Mean age was 54.99±11.25 years with minimum age 20 years and maximum age 90 years. It included 264(79.8%) male and 67(20.2%) female patients with male to female ratio of 3.9:1. Out of these 331 patients 308 (93.1%) patients reported chest pain as the presenting complaint. Remaining 23(6.9%) presented with clinical features other than chest pain. There were 127(38.4%) patients with pre-cordial chest pain, 115(34.7%) had retrosternal chest pain, 58(17.5%) were having epigastric pain. Severe chest pain was seen in 281(84.9%) patients while 26(7.9%) had only mild chest discomfort. Radiation of the pain to shoulder, neck and jaw was seen in 75 (22.7%) patients. In 42(12.7%) patients, pain radiated to both sides of chest. Another 55(16.6%) patients had pain radiation to chest, shoulder, upper arm and ulnar side of left forearm. Chest pain radiation to interscapular region along with both sides of chest was present in 10(3.0%) patients. In 11(3.3%) patientspain radiated only to left side of chest. Pain persisting for >20 minutes was reported by 298 (90%) patients while only 10(3.1%) had pain persisting for <20 minutes. Conclusion: There is considerable overlap in chest pain of cardiac as well as non cardiac causes. However, vigilant evaluation of characteristics of chest pain in history taking may help to overcome this dilemma. Severe and prolonged precordial chest pain in a male patient between the age of 41-70 years, with pain radiation to left shoulder, neck and jaw is highly suggestive of AMI. PMID:24353577

Malik, Muhammad Ajmal; Alam Khan, Shahzad; Safdar, Sohail; Taseer, Ijaz-Ul-Haque

2013-01-01

169

Sex Differences in Experimental and Clinical Pain Sensitivity for Patients with Shoulder Pain  

PubMed Central

Previous research demonstrates that men and women differ in the way that they perceive and process pain. Much of this work has been done in healthy adults with a lack of consensus in clinical pain populations. The purpose of this study was to investigate how men and women with shoulder pain differ in their experience of experimental and clinical pain and whether psychological processes differentially affect these responses. Fifty nine consecutive subjects (24 women, 35 men) seeking operative treatment for shoulder pain were enrolled in this study. Subjects completed self report questionnaires to assess clinical pain, catastrophizing, anxiety and depression and underwent a series of experimental pain tests consisting of pressure pain, thermal pain (threshold and tolerance), and thermal temporal summation. Results indicated that women experienced greater clinical pain and enhanced sensitivity to pressure pain. Age did not affect the observed sex differences. There were no sex differences in psychological association with experimental and clinical pain in this cohort. The relationship between clinical and experimental pressure pain was stronger in women as compared to men. These findings offer insight into the interactions between biological and psychosocial influences of pain and how these interactions vary by sex. PMID:20598598

Kindler, Lindsay L.; Valencia, Carolina; Fillingim, Roger B.; George, Steven Z.

2010-01-01

170

Functional abdominal pain patient subtypes in childhood predict functional gastrointestinal disorders with chronic pain and psychiatric comorbidities in adolescence and adulthood.  

PubMed

Although pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP) has been linked to abdominal pain later in life, childhood predictors of long-term outcomes have not been identified. This study evaluated whether distinct FAP profiles based on patterns of pain and adaptation in childhood could be identified and whether these profiles predicted differences in clinical outcomes and central sensitization (wind-up) on average 9years later. In 843 pediatric FAP patients, cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups at initial FAP evaluation based on profiles of pain severity, gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI symptoms, pain threat appraisal, pain coping efficacy, catastrophizing, negative affect, and activity impairment. Three profiles were identified: high pain dysfunctional, high pain adaptive, and low pain adaptive. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age and sex showed that, compared with pediatric patients with the low pain adaptive profile, those with the high pain dysfunctional profile were significantly more likely at long-term follow-up to meet criteria for pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) (odds ratio: 3.45, confidence interval: 1.95 to 6.11), FGID with comorbid nonabdominal chronic pain (odds ratio: 2.6, confidence interval: 1.45 to 4.66), and FGID with comorbid anxiety or depressive psychiatric disorder (odds ratio: 2.84, confidence interval: 1.35 to 6.00). Pediatric patients with the high pain adaptive profile had baseline pain severity comparable to that of the high pain dysfunctional profile, but had outcomes as favorable as the low pain adaptive profile. In laboratory pain testing at follow-up, high pain dysfunctional patients showed significantly greater thermal wind-up than low pain adaptive patients, suggesting that a subgroup of FAP patients has outcomes consistent with widespread effects of heightened central sensitization. PMID:22721910

Walker, Lynn S; Sherman, Amanda L; Bruehl, Stephen; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A

2012-09-01

171

Functional Abdominal Pain Patient Subtypes in Childhood Predict Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders with Chronic Pain and Psychiatric Comorbidities in Adolescence and Adulthood  

PubMed Central

Although pediatric functional abdominal pain (FAP) has been linked to abdominal pain later in life, childhood predictors of long-term outcomes have not been identified. This study evaluated whether distinct FAP profiles based on patterns of pain and adaptation in childhood could be identified and whether these profiles predicted differences in clinical outcomes and central sensitization (wind-up) on average 9 years later. In 843 pediatric FAP patients, cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups at initial FAP evaluation based on profiles of pain severity, gastrointestinal (GI) and non-GI symptoms, pain threat appraisal, pain coping efficacy, catastrophizing, negative affect, and activity impairment. Three profiles were identified: High Pain Dysfunctional, High Pain Adaptive, and Low Pain Adaptive. Logistic regression analyses controlling for age and sex showed that, compared to pediatric patients with the Low Pain Adaptive profile, those with the High Pain Dysfunctional profile were significantly more likely at long-term follow-up to meet criteria for pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) (OR: 3.45; CI: 1.95–6.11), FGID with comorbid non-abdominal chronic pain (OR: 2.6; CI:1.45–4.66), and FGID with comorbid anxiety or depressive psychiatric disorder (OR: 2.84; CI: 1.35–6.00). Pediatric patients with the High Pain Adaptive profile had baseline pain severity comparable to the High Pain Dysfunctional profile, but had outcomes as favorable as the Low Pain Adaptive profile. In laboratory pain testing at follow-up, High Pain Dysfunctional patients exhibited significantly greater thermal wind-up than Low Pain Adaptive patients, suggesting that a subgroup of FAP patients has outcomes consistent with widespread effects of heightened central sensitization. PMID:22721910

Walker, Lynn S.; Sherman, Amanda L.; Bruehl, Stephen; Garber, Judy; Smith, Craig A.

2012-01-01

172

Patients with fibromyalgia display less functional connectivity in the brain’s pain inhibitory network  

PubMed Central

Background There is evidence for augmented processing of pain and impaired endogenous pain inhibition in Fibromyalgia syndrome (FM). In order to fully understand the mechanisms involved in FM pathology, there is a need for closer investigation of endogenous pain modulation. In the present study, we compared the functional connectivity of the descending pain inhibitory network in age-matched FM patients and healthy controls (HC). We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 42 subjects; 14 healthy and 28 age-matched FM patients (2 patients per HC), during randomly presented, subjectively calibrated pressure pain stimuli. A seed-based functional connectivity analysis of brain activity was performed. The seed coordinates were based on the findings from our previous study, comparing the fMRI signal during calibrated pressure pain in FM and HC: the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) and thalamus. Results FM patients required significantly less pressure (kPa) to reach calibrated pain at 50?mm on a 0–100 visual analogue scale (p?patients. There were no regions where FM patients showed higher rACC connectivity. Thalamus showed significantly higher connectivity to the orbitofrontal cortex in healthy controls but no regions showed higher thalamic connectivity in FM patients. Conclusion Patients with FM displayed less connectivity within the brain’s pain inhibitory network during calibrated pressure pain, compared to healthy controls. The present study provides brain-imaging evidence on how brain regions involved in homeostatic control of pain are less connected in FM patients. It is possible that the dysfunction of the descending pain modulatory network plays an important role in maintenance of FM pain and our results may translate into clinical implications by using the functional connectivity of the pain modulatory network as an objective measure of pain dysregulation. PMID:22537768

2012-01-01

173

Alleviating the pain of unresectable hepatic tumors by percutaneous cryoablation: Experience in 73 patients.  

PubMed

Pain caused by liver tumors can be alleviated by cryoablation, but little is known about the analgesic effects and duration of pain alleviation. We retrospectively reviewed the changes in the severity of pain before and after percutaneous cryoablation of hepatic tumors. Each patient enrolled in this study had a single hepatic tumor; patients with large tumors (major diameter, ?5 cm) underwent transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) first and then cryoablation. Severe abdominal pain that was not controlled with long-lasting oral analgesics was treated with opioid injections. In all 73 study patients, severe abdominal pain was gradually eased 5 days after cryosurgery, completely disappeared after 15 days and did not recur for more than 8 weeks. There were no differences in analgesic effects between patients with hepatocellular carcinomas and those with liver metastasis (P > 0.05). The patients were divided into four groups depending on their pain outcomes: (i) immediate relief (n = 6), severe abdominalgia was no longer present after cryosurgery; (ii) delayed relief (n = 11), severe abdominalgia disappeared gradually within 15 days after the cryosurgery; (iii) always pain-free (n = 39), severe abdominalgia was not present before or after treatment; and (iv) new pain (n = 17), abdominalgia developed after treatment and disappeared within 15 days. In summary, percutaneous cryoablation of hepatic tumors caused short-term pain in some patients, but this pain disappeared within 15 days. Moreover, the pain-relieving effect of this treatment was sustained for at least 8 weeks, without severe side effects. PMID:24513462

Xin'an, Long; Jianying, Zeng; Lizhi, Niu; Fei, Yao; Xiaohua, Wang; Jibing, Chen; Jialiang, Li; Kecheng, Xu

2013-10-25

174

A web-based neurological pain classifier tool utilizing Bayesian decision theory for pain classification in spinal cord injury patients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pain is a common complication after spinal cord injury with prevalence estimates ranging 77% to 81%, which highly affects a patient's lifestyle and well-being. In the current clinical setting paper-based forms are used to classify pain correctly, however, the accuracy of diagnoses and optimal management of pain largely depend on the expert reviewer, which in many cases is not possible because of very few experts in this field. The need for a clinical decision support system that can be used by expert and non-expert clinicians has been cited in literature, but such a system has not been developed. We have designed and developed a stand-alone tool for correctly classifying pain type in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, using Bayesian decision theory. Various machine learning simulation methods are used to verify the algorithm using a pilot study data set, which consists of 48 patients data set. The data set consists of the paper-based forms, collected at Long Beach VA clinic with pain classification done by expert in the field. Using the WEKA as the machine learning tool we have tested on the 48 patient dataset that the hypothesis that attributes collected on the forms and the pain location marked by patients have very significant impact on the pain type classification. This tool will be integrated with an imaging informatics system to support a clinical study that will test the effectiveness of using Proton Beam radiotherapy for treating spinal cord injury (SCI) related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning.

Verma, Sneha K.; Chun, Sophia; Liu, Brent J.

2014-03-01

175

Deficient modulation of pain by a positive emotional context in fibromyalgia patients.  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate the modulating effects of emotional context on pain perception in 16 patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and 16 healthy control (HC) subjects. An infrared laser was used to apply individually adapted painful stimuli to the dorsum of the left hand. The emotional background of the painful stimuli was modulated by concurrent presentations of negative, neutral, and positive picture stimuli selected from the International Affective Picture System. As control conditions, painful stimuli and the pictures were also presented by themselves. During each of the 5 laser-picture trials, subjects received 10 painful stimuli and were asked to rate the average intensity and unpleasantness of the experienced pain. Functional magnetic resonance images were obtained, using a T2(?) sensitive echo planar sequence. HC subjects showed a linear increase in pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings when painful stimuli were presented during positive, neutral, and negative pictures. In contrast, FMS patients showed a quadratic trend for pain intensity ratings indicating a lack of pain reduction by the positive pictures. In addition, the FMS patients showed less activation in secondary somatosensory cortex, insula, orbitofrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex during the positive picture pain trials. Our results suggest that fibromyalgia patients are less efficient in modulating pain by positive affect and may benefit less from appetitive events than healthy control subjects. PMID:23752177

Kamping, Sandra; Bomba, Isabelle C; Kanske, Philipp; Diesch, Eugen; Flor, Herta

2013-09-01

176

White Cancer Patients’ Perception of Gender and Ethnic Differences in Pain Experience  

PubMed Central

Not considering cancer patients’ own views and experience with pain, especially gender and ethnic differences in their cancer pain experience, was reported to be a major contributor to the miscommunication that frequently results in inadequate cancer pain management. The purpose of this study was to explore white cancer patients’ perception of gender and ethnic differences in pain experience through an online forum. This was a descriptive qualitative study among 29 white cancer patients based on a feminist approach. Nine topics related to cancer pain experience were used. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis: 5 themes were identified. First, the participants perceived that pain accompanies cancer throughout the diagnosis and treatment process. Second, the specific characteristics of the participants’ individual culture and its view of pain and cancer could result in different cancer pain experience even among white cancer patients. Third, the participants complained that women’s pain was not taken seriously by health care providers. Fourth, the participants reported highly individualized pain experience with emotional pain. Finally, the participants wanted to have a control of their own pain management process. Based on the findings, implications for nursing research and practice are proposed. PMID:17135816

Im, Eun-Ok

2008-01-01

177

Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Exhibit Elevated Bone Metabolic Activity at the Patellofemoral Joint  

E-print Network

- lofemoral pain accounts for a large fraction of knee dis- orders seen in sports medicine clinics,1Patients with Patellofemoral Pain Exhibit Elevated Bone Metabolic Activity at the Patellofemoral in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). DOI 10.1002/jor.21523 ABSTRACT: Patellofemoral pain

Delp, Scott

178

The Safety and Efficacy of Intrathecal Adenosine in Patients with Chronic Neuropathic Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adenosine and adenosine analogs decrease pain-like behavior in animal models of both acute nociceptive and neuropathic pain via adenosine receptor activation at spinal and\\/or supraspinal levels. This open study is the first in a series of intrathecal (IT) adenosine admin- istration studied for the evaluation of efficacy and side effects in 14 patients. All had chronic neuropathic pain with tactile

Måns Belfrage; M arta Segerdahl; Staffan Arner; Alf Sollevi

179

A collaborative research utilization approach to evaluate the effects of pain management standards on patient outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The generation of research-based knowledge is incomplete unless it reaches clinicians at the point of care. Despite major advances in clinical research related to pain management, inadequate pain relief has become a significant quality issue in hospitalized patients, which has created an imperative for research-based pain management. Using a collaborative research utilization model, multidisciplinary academic scientists were paired with clinicians

Marlene A. Dufault; Mary Sullivan

2000-01-01

180

Increased taste intensity perception exhibited by patients with chronic back pain  

E-print Network

Increased taste intensity perception exhibited by patients with chronic back pain Dana M. Small a as well as decreases in sensitivity to taste. Recently it was shown that chronic back pain (CBP (Formaker and Frank, 2000). Gustation and chronic back pain (CBP) also appear to have overlapping neural

Apkarian, A. Vania

181

Process evaluation of podiatric treatment of patients with forefoot pain  

PubMed Central

Background Foot pain is a common problem for people aged 50 and over and occurs more often in women than in men. About 60% of the foot problems are forefoot problems and slightly more than half of these patients seek medical help, mainly in the form of podiatric care. Podiatric treatment of forefoot problems is known to be heterogeneous. The aims of the present study are to describe the podiatric treatment of patients with forefoot pain and to evaluate the podiatric examination and treatment using an expert panel. Method We invited twenty-five randomly selected subjects with forefoot problems who had received podiatric treatment in a pragmatic randomised clinical trial to participate in an analysis of their treatment by an expert panel. The panel retrospectively established the cause of the foot problem as well as the therapeutic goals and evaluated the treatment. These findings were compared to those reported by the treating podiatrist. Results Two fundamentally different approaches were found in approach of podiatric examination; a functional approach (n?=13) and a non-functional approach (n?=12). In nine cases the expert panel agreed with the cause recorded by the podiatrist. In five other cases the expert panel concluded that the treatment of the podiatrist was not consistent with the cause of the problem recorded by the podiatrist. Of the 10 patients for whom the podiatrist had recorded to have given shoe advice, only two were able to recollect the proper advice. Three patients did not remember receiving advice at all. Conclusion In this study almost half of the podiatrists worked according to a non-functional approach where the other half (like the expert panel) chose a functional strategy that analyses the underlying problem. Fundamental differences in treatment plans and thus heterogeneous treatments could be a consequence. PMID:23919765

2013-01-01

182

Cocontraction of Ankle Dorsiflexors and Transversus Abdominis Function in Patients With Low Back Pain  

PubMed Central

Context The abdominal draw-in maneuver (ADIM) with cocontraction has been shown to be a more effective method of activating the transversus abdominis (TrA) in healthy adults than the ADIM alone. Whether such an augmented core stabilization exercise is effective in managing low back pain (LBP) remains uncertain. Objective To determine the effect of 2 weeks of ADIM and cocontraction training on abdominal muscle thickness and activation timing and to monitor pain and function in patients with LBP. Design Case-control study. Setting Local orthopaedic clinic and research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Twenty patients with mechanical LBP (age = 27.20 ± 6.46 years, height = 166.25 ± 8.70 cm, mass = 58.10 ± 11.81 kg) and 20 healthy, age-matched people (age = 24.25 ± 1.59 years, height = 168.00 ± 8.89 cm, mass = 60.65 ± 11.99 kg) volunteered for the study. Intervention(s) Both the LBP and control groups received ten 30-minute sessions of ADIM and cocontraction training of the tibialis anterior (TA) and rectus femoris (RF) muscles over a 2-week period. Main Outcome Measure(s) A separate, mixed-model analysis of variance was computed for the thicknesses of the TrA, internal oblique (IO), and external oblique muscles. The differences in mean and peak electromyographic (EMG) amplitudes, onset time, and latency were compared between the groups. The visual analog pain scale, Pain Disability Index, and LBP rating scale were used to assess pain in the LBP group before and after the intervention. Results We found an interaction between the LBP and control groups and a main effect from pretest to posttest for only TrA muscle thickness change (F1,38 = 6.57, P = .01). Reductions in all pain measures were observed after training (P < .05). Group differences in peak and mean EMG amplitudes and onset time values for TrA/IO and TA were achieved (P < .05). The RF peak (t38 = ?3.12, P = .003) and mean (t38 = ?4.12, P = .001) EMG amplitudes were different, but no group difference was observed in RF onset time (t38 = 1.63, P = .11) or the cocontracted TrA/IO peak (t38 = ?1.90, P = .07) and mean (t38 = ?1.81, P = .08). The test-retest reliability for the muscle thickness measure revealed excellent correlations (intraclass correlation coefficient range, 0.95–0.99). Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that a cocontraction of the ankle dorsiflexors with ADIM training might result in a thickness change in the TrA muscle and associated pain management in patients with chronic LBP. PMID:22889653

Chon, Seung-Chul; You, Joshua H.; Saliba, Susan A.

2012-01-01

183

Brief presurgery hypnosis reduces distress and pain in excisional breast biopsy patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Each year, hundreds of thousands of women undergo excisional breast biopsies for definitive diagnosis. Not only do these patients experience pain associated with the procedure, but they also endure distress associated with the threat of cancer. Hypnosis has been demonstrated as effective for controlling patients' pain in other surgical settings, but breast surgery patients have received little attention. To determine

Guy H. Montgomery; Christina R. Weltz; Megan Seltz; Dana H. Bovbjerg

2002-01-01

184

Analgesie effects of oral nalbuphine and codeine in patients with postoperative pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efficacy and safety of oral nalbuphine in doses of 15 and 45 mg were compared with those of the standard oral analgesic codeine in single doses of 30 and 90 mg in 153 patients with acute postoperative pain; data on 20 more patients were excluded because they received potentially interfering medications. All patients had pain ranging from moderate to severe

Ronald Okun

1982-01-01

185

Coping strategies, stress, physical activity and sleep in patients with unexplained chest pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The number of patients suffering from unexplained chest pain (UCP) is increasing. Intervention programmes are needed to reduce the chest pain and suffering experienced by these patients and effective preventive strategies are also required to reduce the incidence of these symptoms. The aim of this study was to describe general coping strategies in patients with UCP and examine the

Margaretha Jerlock; Fannie Gaston-Johansson; Karin I Kjellgren; Catharina Welin

2006-01-01

186

Identification of neuropathic pain in patients with neck/upper limb pain: application of a grading system and screening tools.  

PubMed

The Neuropathic Pain Special Interest Group (NeuPSIG) of the International Association for the Study of Pain has proposed a grading system for the presence of neuropathic pain (NeP) using the following categories: no NeP, possible, probable, or definite NeP. To further evaluate this system, we investigated patients with neck/upper limb pain with a suspected nerve lesion, to explore: (i) the clinical application of this grading system; (ii) the suitability of 2 NeP questionnaires (Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs pain scale [LANSS] and the painDETECT questionnaire [PD-Q]) in identifying NeP in this patient cohort; and (iii) the level of agreement in identifying NeP between the NeuPSIG classification system and 2 NeP questionnaires. Patients (n = 152; age 52 ± 12 years; 53% male) completed the PD-Q and LANSS questionnaire and underwent a comprehensive clinical examination. The NeuPSIG grading system proved feasible for application in this patient cohort, although it required considerable time and expertise. Both questionnaires failed to identify a large number of patients with clinically classified definite NeP (LANSS sensitivity 22%, specificity 88%; PD-Q sensitivity 64%, specificity 62%). These lowered sensitivity scores contrast with those from the original PD-Q and LANSS validation studies and may reflect differences in the clinical characteristics of the study populations. The diagnostic accuracy of LANSS and PD-Q for the identification of NeP in patients with neck/upper limb pain appears limited. PMID:23973362

Tampin, Brigitte; Briffa, Noelle Kathryn; Goucke, Roger; Slater, Helen

2013-12-01

187

Recognizing Myofascial Pelvic Pain in the Female Patient with Chronic Pelvic Pain  

PubMed Central

Myofascial pelvic pain (MFPP) is a major component of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and often is not properly identified by healthcare providers. The hallmark diagnostic indicator of MFPP is myofascial trigger points in the pelvic floor musculature that refer pain to adjacent sites. Effective treatments are available to reduce MFPP, including myofascial trigger point release, PMID:22862153

Pastore, Elizabeth Anne; Katzman, Wendy B.

2012-01-01

188

Effects of Coaching Patients with Lung Cancer to Report Cancer Pain  

PubMed Central

We examined effects of sensory self-monitoring and reporting Coaching on pain-related variables in patients with lung cancer. Randomly assigned to Coached or Not-Coached groups, 215 patients had their interactions with their providers audiotaped and completed study measures pre and post intervention. Of the 151 patients who completed the 4-week study, those Coached were more likely than those Not-Coached to give their providers unsolicited sensory pain information and to mention it before their providers asked for it. The mean number of pain parameters discussed during the audiotaped clinic visit was statistically larger at study-end for the Coached group. Scores for analgesic adequacy, all pain indices except one, anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing coping were not significantly different. Although Coaching increased the amount of pain data communicated to providers by patients with lung cancer, the magnitude was small and did not lead to improved adequacy of analgesics prescribed for each patient's pain level. PMID:20164474

Wilkie, Diana J.; Werley, Harriet H.; Berry, Donna L.; Cain, Kevin C.; Huang, Hsiu-Ying; Mekwa, Julia; Lewis, Frances Marcus; Gallucci, Betty; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Angela Chia-Chen; Ko, Nai-Ying

2013-01-01

189

The Utility of the Faces Pain Scale in the Assessment of Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Its Relation with Quality of Life and Psychologic Status  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was planned to investigate the utility of the vertical Faces Pain Scale (FPS) in the assessment of pain in stroke patients using the shoulder pain model and to assess its utility in the Turkish patient population. The secondary aim was to analyze the association of FPS with the quality of life and depression in the study population.…

Dogan, Sebnem Koldas; Ay, Saime; Oztuna, Derya; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Evcik, Deniz

2010-01-01

190

Pain in Underserved Community-Dwelling Chinese American Cancer Patients: Demographic and Medical Correlates  

PubMed Central

Background. Little is known about cancer pain in Chinese Americans. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of pain in this population. This information is needed to identify and address unmet clinical needs for culturally relevant interventions targeting pain and its consequences. Methods. A consecutive sample of underserved ethnic Chinese patients in a large community-based oncology practice was screened for persistent or frequent pain. Those patients with pain completed translated instruments assessing demographics, linguistic acculturation, disease-related characteristics, and pain-related characteristics. Results. Of 312 patients screened, 178 (57.1%) reported frequent or persistent pain, 175 were eligible, and 170 participated. Most participants (85.9%) were born in China and 84.7% overall spoke Cantonese only. The most common cancers were gastrointestinal (28.2%), lung (21.8%), breast (20.6%), head and neck (12.9%), and genitourinary (4.7%); 43.5% had metastatic disease. The mean worst pain severity on a 0–10 numeric scale was 4.7 (standard deviation, 2.4), with 28.2% of patients rating their worst pain at ?7 of 10. Although 37.6% used opioids and 47.1% used nonopioids, 45.8% reported “little” or “no” pain relief from medications. Complementary or alternative medicine therapies for cancer pain were used by 35.8%. In multiple regression analyses, worst pain was positively associated with acculturation to the English language and opioid therapy, and pain-related distress was positively associated with opioid therapy. Conclusion. Pain is prevalent among community-dwelling, ethnic Chinese American cancer patients. Additional studies are needed to confirm these results and investigate the finding that higher linguistic acculturation is associated with reports of more intense pain. PMID:21402591

Lam, Kin; Homel, Peter; Chen, Jack; Chang, Victor T.; Zhou, Juanyi; Chan, Selina; Lam, Wan Ling; Portenoy, Russell

2011-01-01

191

Postoperative Pain Management among Surgically Treated Patients in an Ethiopian Hospital  

PubMed Central

Background Incidence of postoperative pain has been reported to be between 47–100%. Ineffective postoperative pain management results in tangible and intangible costs. The purpose of this study was to assess the processes and outcomes of pain management in the surgical wards of Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia. Methods and Findings A prospective cross sectional study was conducted among 252 postoperative patients during February 13 to April 30, 2012. A contextually modified and validated (Cronbach’s ? coefficient of 0.78) American Pain Society Patient Outcome Questionnaire was used to assess pain experience of patients. Patients’ charts were reviewed to assess the pattern of analgesic use. Incidence of postoperative pain was 91.4%, and remained high over 3 measurements (McNemar’s; p<0.05), and 80.1% of the patients were undertreated. The mean pain intensity, and pain interference on functional status were 6.72±1.44 and 5.61±1.13 on a 10 point Numerical rating scale respectively; both being strongly correlated(r?=?0.86: p<0.001). Pain intensity was varied by ethnicity, education and preoperative information (ANOVA; P<0.05). Only 50% of the patients were adequately satisfied with their pain management. As needed (prn), solo analgesic, null analgesic, and intramuscular orders were noted for 31.3%, 89.29%, 9.7% and 20.1% of the prescription orders respectively. Though under dose, diclofenac and tramadol were the top prescribed medications, and only 57% of their dose was administered. Linear regression model showed that the predictors of satisfaction were sex of an individual and pain interference with functional status. Conclusion Despite patients’ paradoxical high satisfaction with pain management, the majority of patients were inadequately and inappropriately treated. Thus, further research is needed to determine how best to break down current barriers to effective pain management. PMID:25033399

Woldehaimanot, Tewodros Eyob; Eshetie, Tesfahun Chanie; Kerie, Mirkuzie Woldie

2014-01-01

192

Percutaneous Thoracic Intervertebral Disc Nucleoplasty: Technical Notes from 3 Patients with Painful Thoracic Disc Herniations  

PubMed Central

Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is an uncommon condition and early surgical approaches were associated with significant morbidity and even mortality. We are the first to describe the technique of percutaneous thoracic nucleoplasty in three patients with severe radicular pain due to thoracic disc herniation. Two of the patients experienced more than 75% pain relief and one patient experienced more than 50% pain relief. Post-procedural pain relief was maintained up to an average of 10 months after nucleoplasty. One patient with preoperative neurological signs improved postoperatively. There were no reported complications in all three patients. In view of the reduced morbidity and shorter operating time, thoracic intervertebral disc nucleoplasty can be considered in patients with pain due to thoracic disc herniation, with no calcification of the herniated disc, and in patients who may be otherwise be unfit for conventional surgery. PMID:21386942

Gültuna, Ismail; Riezebos, Patricia; Beems, Tjemme; Vissers, Kris C.

2011-01-01

193

Early adjunct treatment with topical lidocaine results in improved pain and function in a patient with complex regional pain syndrome.  

PubMed

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a pain disorder characterized by sensory, motor, trophic and autonomic dysfunction. The hallmark of the disorder is pain out of proportion of the inciting event. CRPS is difficult for clinicians to manage as there is no gold standard for diagnosis or treatment. Patients with CRPS are at risk of developing contractures, tissue atrophy, joint dislocation and severe chronic pain. While CRPS is thought to be due to peripheral and central nervous system dysfunction, there is limited understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS. The proposed mechanisms are multifactorial and consequently, so are the proposed treatments. These treatments can be invasive, such as intrathecal drug delivery or sympathectomy, which have poor evidence for efficacy. Thus, highlighting the need for a safe, effective, and early intervention. We present a case of topical 5% lidocaine ointment as a non-invasive, inexpensive and effective adjunct treatment in the management of pain in a spinal cord injured patient presenting with early CRPS. The clinically important effect of topical lidocaine for reducing severe allodynia allowed the patient to participate in rehabilitation strategies to further manage the debilitating consequences of her CRPS, including decreased range of motion (ROM) and function. The immediate pain relief from topical lidocaine allowed the patient to tolerate physical therapy sessions directed at her CRPS. A successful outcome was measured subjectively and objectively by our patient's reduction in symptoms and improvement in ROM and function, respectively. This case study provides preliminary support for improved pain and functional outcome with early adjunct treatment of CRPS with topical lidocaine. PMID:25247913

Hanlan, Amy K L; Mah-Jones, Dianna; Mills, Patricia B

2014-01-01

194

Managing a Female Patient with Left Low Back Pain and Sacroiliac Joint Pain with Therapeutic Exercise: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to describe the management of a female patient with chronic left low back pain and sacroiliac joint pain (LBP/SIJP) using unique unilateral exercises developed by the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) to address pelvic asymmetry and left hip capsule restriction, which is consistent with a Right Handed and Left Anterior Interior Chain pattern of postural asymmetry. Client Description: The client was 65-year-old woman with a 10-month history of constant left LBP/SIJP and leg pain. Intervention: The patient was seen six times to correct pelvic position/posture and left hip posterior capsule restriction via (1) muscle activation (left hamstrings, adductor magnus, and anterior gluteus medius) and (2) left hip adduction to lengthen the left posterior capsule/ischiofemoral ligament. Stabilization exercises included bilateral hamstrings, gluteus maximus, adductors, and abdominals to maintain pelvic position/posture. Measures and Outcome: Left Ober's test (initially positive) was negative at discharge. Pain as measured on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (initially 1/10 at best and 8/10 at worst) was 0/10–0/10 at discharge. Oswestry Disability Index score (initially 20%) was 0% at discharge. The patient no longer had numbness in her left leg, and sexual intercourse had become pain free. Implications: Interventions to restore and maintain the optimal position of pelvis and hip (femoral head in the acetabulum) may be beneficial for treating patients with chronic LBP/SIJP. The patient's pain was eliminated 13 days after she first performed three exercises to reposition the pelvis and restore left posterior hip capsule extensibility and internal rotation. PMID:22379254

2011-01-01

195

What constitutes a clinically important pain reduction in patients after third molar surgery?  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: For patients with surgical third molar removal, it is unknown what constitutes a clinically important change in patients’ visual analogue scale (VAS) reports of pain intensity. OBJECTIVES: To determine what constitutes a clinically important change in pain intensity on a VAS following surgical removal of the third molar. METHODS: The study population consisted of patients participating in three randomized trials. Patients were asked to rate their pain three times per day over a period of seven days on a 100 mm VAS after surgical removal of the third molar. Global Perceived Effect was measured on day 1 and day 7 and was used as the external criterion for assessing clinically important pain reduction. Global Perceived Effect scores of 6 (‘much improved’) or higher were classified as clinically ‘successful’, and scores of 5 (‘slightly improved’) or below were classified as clinically ‘unsuccessful’. For each trial, the mean absolute and relative changes in VAS scores were calculated for both ‘successful’ and ‘unsuccessful’ treatments. Sensitivity and specificity analyses were performed. RESULTS: The patients who reported ‘successful’ pain reduction showed a relative pain reduction of ?69% and an absolute pain reduction >2.5 cm on the VAS, whereas patients who classified their pain reduction as ‘unsuccessful’ had a relative pain reduction of ?18.5% and an absolute pain reduction <0.5 cm on the VAS. Furthermore, sensitivity and specificity analyses showed that a cut-off point of ?50% relative pain reduction exhibited the best balance of sensitivity and specificity. CONCLUSION: Relative pain reduction of ?50% and an absolute pain reduction of ?2.5 cm on the VAS were most accurate in predicting a successful pain reduction after a given treatment. PMID:23957018

Martin, Wilhelmus JJM; Ashton-James, CE; Skorpil, NE; Heymans, MW; Forouzanfar, T

2013-01-01

196

The Kinetic Family Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Utilizes the Kinetic Family Drawings-Revised (KFD-R) to measure siblings' (N=44) feelings and attitudes toward bone marrow transplants. Data from drawings and discussions with siblings underscore that not all children are affected by stress in the same way. How a particular child responds depends on factors such as life history, personality,…

Packman, Wendy L.; Crittenden, Mary R.; Fischer, Jodie B. Rieger; Cowan, Morton J.; Long, Janet K.; Gruenert, Carol; Schaeffer, Evonne; Bongar, Bruce

1998-01-01

197

Pain in ambulatory HIV-infected patients with and without intravenous drug use.  

PubMed

The prevalence of pain in 211 HIV-infected patients with and without intravenous drug use was assessed and the prognostic information inherent in pain reporting was evaluated, using a questionnaire on pain and HIV-related symptoms combined with data on disease classification, route of HIV transmission, CD4+ lymphocyte counts in blood (CD4) and mortality rates at 15 months after completing the questionnaire. The pain prevalence was significantly higher among intravenous drug users (IDUs) compared with non-IDUs [76/89 (85%) vs 87/122 (71%);p<0.05], especially among the patients classified as asymptomatic [43/53 (81%) vs 35/59 (59%);p = 0.01]. No significant difference was found among AIDS patients. In non-IDUs, a strong correlation was found between HIV disease stages according to the Centers for Disease Control classification (CDC) and pain prevalence (CDC A: 59%vs B: 74%vs C: 96%, p<0.001), and between the number of concurrent pain sites and both the CD4 levels (no pains: CD4 0.26 x 10(9)/l vs 1-2 pain sites: CD4 0.22 vs>2 pain sites: CD4 0.09;r = 0.35, p<0.001), and the mortality rate [no pains: 2/35 (6%) vs 1-2 pain sites: 8/45 (18%) vs> 2 pain sites: 12/42 (29%), p<0.01]. In IDUs, no such correlations were found. Our data demonstrates differences in the development, prevalence and prognostic value of pain among HIV-infected patients, with and without intravenous drug use, clearly indicating the need to differentiate risk groups in pain related studies. Copyright 1999 European Federation of Chapters of the International Association for the Study of Pain. PMID:10700345

Martin; Pehrsson; Österberg; Sönnerborg; Hansson

1999-06-01

198

Specificity of Social Support for Back Pain Patients: Do Patients Care Who Provides What?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined low back pain patients’ (N=50) perceptions of what they considered to be helpful and unhelpful social support from various sources over the previous\\u000a six months. Among types of social support, tangible support was most likely to be rated as helpful, whereas emotional support\\u000a was the type of support most likely to be rated as unhelpful. Patients reported

Kevin S. Masters; Alexandra M. Stillman; Glen I. Spielmans

2007-01-01

199

Early maladaptive schemas in Finnish adult chronic pain patients and a control sample.  

PubMed

Engel (1959) suggested that negative physical or emotional experiences in childhood predispose to the development of chronic pain. Studies have shown that physical and sexual abuse in early life is connected with chronic pain. Emotional adversities are much less studied causes contributing to the development of chronic pain and disability. Early emotional abuse, neglect, maltreatment and other adversities are deleterious childhood experiences which, according to Young's schema theory (1990), produce early maladaptive schemas (EMSs). The primary goal of this study was to examine whether early adversities were more common in chronic pain patients than in a control group. A total of 271 (53% women) first-visit chronic pain patients and 331 (86% women) control participants took part in the study. Their socio-demographic data, pain variables and pain disability were measured. To estimate EMSs the Young Schema Questionnaire was used. Chronic pain patients scored higher EMSs reflecting incapacity to perform independently, catastrophic beliefs and pessimism. The most severely disabled chronic pain patients showed an increase in all the EMSs in the Disconnection and Rejection schema domain, namely Abandonment/Instability, Mistrust/Abuse, Emotional Deprivation, Defectiveness/Shame and Social Isolation/Alienation EMSs. The results of the study suggested that chronic pain patients had suffered early emotional maltreatment. PMID:21054422

Saariaho, Tom Harri; Saariaho, Anita Sylvia; Karila, Irma Anneli; Joukamaa, Matti I

2011-04-01

200

Allopathic, complementary, and alternative medical treatment utilization for pain among methadone-maintained patients: An exploratory study1  

PubMed Central

We surveyed 150 methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) patients about pain, pain treatment utilization, perceived efficacy of prior pain treatment, and interest in pursuing pain treatment at the MMTP. Respondents with chronic severe pain (CSP) (i.e., pain lasting at least 6 months with moderate to severe pain intensity or significant pain interference) and “some pain” (i.e., pain reported in the previous week but not CSP) endorsed similar rates of past-week and lifetime allopathic or standard medical (with the exception of lifetime medical use of non-opiate medication) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization for pain reduction. Prior pain treatments were perceived to be less effective by CSP than SP patients but both groups had equivalent high rates of interest in pain treatment associated with the MMTP. These findings may have implications for resource and program planning in MMT programs. PMID:19874157

Barry, Declan T.; Beitel, Mark; Cutter, Christopher J.; Garnet, Brian; Joshi, Dipa; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

2009-01-01

201

Cancer pain and depression: management of the dual-diagnosed patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depressive disorders and pain syndromes are very common in the experience of cancer patients and may be experienced simultaneously.\\u000a There is an intuitive association between cancer pain and cancer depression, both of which are multidimensional entities.\\u000a Research has suggested, but not conclusively proven a cause-effect relationship. Suicidal ideation is a common concern in\\u000a cancer patients with severe depression or pain.

Alan D. Valentine

2003-01-01

202

BRIEF REPORT: Patient-Physician Agreement as a Predictor of Outcomes in Patients with Back Pain  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether a patient-physician agreement instrument predicts important health outcomes. Design Three hundred eighty patients with back pain were enrolled in a comparison of rapid magnetic resonance imaging with standard x-rays. One month later, patients rated agreement with their physician in the following areas: diagnosis, diagnostic plan, and treatment plan. Outcomes included patient satisfaction with care at 1 and 12 months and functional and health status at 12 months. Setting Urban academic and community primary care and specialty clinics. Measurements and Main Results Higher agreement at 1 month (using a composite sum of scores on the 3 agreement questions) was correlated in univariate analysis with higher patient satisfaction at 1 month (R=.637, P<.001). In multivariate analysis, controlling for 1-month satisfaction and other potential confounders, higher agreement independently predicted better 12-month patient satisfaction (?=0.188, P=.003), mental health (?=1.080, P<.001), social function (?=1.124, P=.001), and vitality (?=1.190, P<.001). Conclusion Agreement between physicians and patients regarding diagnosis, diagnostic plan, and treatment plan is associated with higher patient satisfaction and better health status outcomes in patients with back pain. Additional research is required to clarify the relationship between physician communication skills, agreement, and patient outcomes. PMID:16191141

Staiger, Thomas O; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Deyo, Richard A; Martin, Brook; Braddock, Clarence H

2005-01-01

203

Prevalence of heroin markers in urine for pain management patients.  

PubMed

Surveys of current trends indicate heroin abuse is associated with nonmedical use of pain relievers. Consequently, there is an interest in evaluating the presence of heroin-specific markers in chronic pain patients who are prescribed controlled substances. A total of 926,084 urine specimens from chronic pain patients were tested for heroin/diacetylmorphine (DAM), 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), 6-acetylcodeine (6AC), codeine (COD), and morphine (MOR). Heroin and markers were analyzed using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). Opiates were analyzed following hydrolysis using LC-MS-MS. The prevalence of heroin use was 0.31%, as 2871 were positive for one or more heroin-specific markers including DAM, 6AM, or 6AC (a known contaminant of illicit heroin). Of these, 1884 were additionally tested for the following markers of illicit drug use: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), methamphetamine (MAMP), 11-nor-9-carboxy-?(9)-tetracannabinol (THCCOOH), and benzoylecgonine (BZE); 654 (34.7%) had positive findings for one or more of these analytes. The overall prevalence of heroin markers were as follows: DAM 1203 (41.9%), 6AM 2570 (89.5%), 6AC 1082 (37.7%). MOR was present in 2194 (76.4%) and absent (

Knight, Julie; Puet, Brandi L; DePriest, Anne; Heltsley, Rebecca; Hild, Cheryl; Black, David L; Robert, Timothy; Caplan, Yale H; Cone, Edward J

2014-10-01

204

Pain and disability correlated with disc degeneration via magnetic resonance imaging in scoliosis patients  

PubMed Central

Prior imaging studies of scoliosis patients attempted to demonstrate a relationship between plain radiographic curve patterns and curve progression and pain, or used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to focus on spinal cord abnormalities. Pain in scoliosis patients may differ from nondeformity patients, yet may still be discogenic. The purpose of this study was to assess the possible relationship of degenerative disc findings on MRI to scoliosis patientspain. This prospective study enrolled scoliosis and control patients, all of whom had assessment for back pain (visual analog scale) and disability (Oswestry Index) and spinal MRI to identify prevalence and distribution of degenerative disc findings. Specifically, we assessed 60 consecutive pediatric and adult idiopathic scoliosis patients who had progressed to surgical treatment, 60 age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls, and 172 nondeformity symptomatic degenerative disc disease patients who had progressed to surgical treatment. All subjects had independent analysis of their preoperative MRI for disc degeneration, disc herniation, Schmorl’s nodes, and inflammatory end plate changes. Imaging findings of the scoliosis patients were compared to those from asymptomatic and symptomatic control groups. Our results found that both pediatric and adult scoliosis patients had significantly more pain and disability than did asymptomatic controls (P < 0.001). The adult idiopathic scoliosis patients had pain and disability similar to those of surgical degenerative disc disease control groups. Disc degeneration and herniation (contained) were not related to pain. However, in the pediatric scoliosis patients, those with Schmorl’s nodes often had greater pain than those without (P = 0.01). Adults with painful scoliosis, typically occurring at the apex of the scoliosis or at the lumbosacral junction, had a significantly higher frequency of inflammatory end plate changes on MRI than did controls (P < 0.001). Prior studies have demonstrated a correlation of inflammatory end plate changes to lumbar discogenic pain. In conclusions, scoliosis patients who have progressed to surgical intervention, pediatric patients have varying degrees of pain, and those with Schmorl’s nodes may be at greater risk for pain. Adult scoliosis patients have multifactorial pain of which one component may be related to degeneration of the lower lumbar discs similar to that in nondeformity patients. Additionally, adult scoliosis patients may have MRI findings consistent with discogenic pain at the apex of their curvature, most commonly at the proximal lumbar levels. PMID:17973128

Mullin, William J.

2007-01-01

205

Minimally Painful Local Anesthetic Injection for Cleft Lip/Nasal Repair in Grown Patients  

PubMed Central

Introduction: There has been a recent interest in injecting large body and face areas with local anesthetic in a minimally painful manner. The method includes adherence to minimal pain injection details as well feedback from the patient who counts the number of times he feels pain during the injection process. This article describes the successes and limitations of this technique as applied to primary cleft lip/nasal repair in grown patients. Methods: Thirty-two primary cleft lip patients were injected with local anesthesia by 3 surgeons and then underwent surgical correction of their deformity. At the beginning of the injection of the local anesthetic, patients were instructed to clearly inform the injector each and every time they felt pain during the entire injection process. Results: The average patient felt pain only 1.6 times during the injection process. This included the first sting of the first 27-gauge needle poke. The only pain that 51% of the patients felt was that first poke of the first needle; 24% of the patients only felt pain twice during the whole injection process. The worst pain score occurred in a patient who felt pain 6 times during the injection process. Ninety-one percent of the patients felt no pain at all after the injection of the local anesthetic and did not require a top-up. Conclusion: It is possible to successfully and reliably inject local anesthesia in a minimally painful manner for cleft lip and nasal repair in the fully grown cleft patient. PMID:25289364

Price, Christopher; Wong, Alison L.; Chokotho, Tilinde

2014-01-01

206

Reasons for opioid use among patients with dependence on prescription opioids: the role of chronic pain.  

PubMed

The number of individuals seeking treatment for prescription opioid dependence has increased dramatically, fostering a need for research on this population. The aim of this study was to examine reasons for prescription opioid use among 653 participants with and without chronic pain, enrolled in the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study, a randomized controlled trial of treatment for prescription opioid dependence. Participants identified initial and current reasons for opioid use. Participants with chronic pain were more likely to report pain as their primary initial reason for use; avoiding withdrawal was rated as the most important reason for current use in both groups. Participants with chronic pain rated using opioids to cope with physical pain as more important, and using opioids in response to social interactions and craving as less important, than those without chronic pain. Results highlight the importance of physical pain as a reason for opioid use among patients with chronic pain. PMID:24814051

Weiss, Roger D; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Griffin, Margaret L; McHugh, R Kathryn; Haller, Deborah; Jacobs, Petra; Gardin, John; Fischer, Dan; Rosen, Kristen D

2014-08-01

207

Home Delivery of Pain Therapy to Elderly Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chronic pain occurs most frequently in the elderly. Unfortunately, most pain clinics are located in large urban areas and are not readily accessible to the rural elderly. Recent advances in behavioral medicine have provided pain relief techniques that can be used by a wide variety of professional and paraprofessional workers who do not have…

Dietrich, Coralie

208

Urinary hydrocodone and metabolite distributions in pain patients.  

PubMed

Hydrocodone combined with acetaminophen is commonly used for moderate pain. Hydrocodone is metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 into hydromorphone and by CYP3A4 into norhydrocodone. This was a retrospective study evaluating hydrocodone, hydromorphone and norhydrocodone distributions in urine. Urine specimens (n = 76,924) were obtained from patients on chronic opioid therapy during their first or single visit and were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS). The patients were at least 16 years of age and had documented hydrocodone use via a medication list. There were 48,710 specimens that were positive for all three analytes. Mean hydrocodone, hydromorphone and norhydrocodone mole fractions (95% confidence interval) were 0.39 (0.38-0.39), 0.12 (0.11-0.12) and 0.49 (0.48-0.49), respectively. Hydromorphone fractions were lower in women compared with men (0.11 versus 0.13; P < 0.0001). Hydrocodone mole fractions were higher in the 65-year and older age group compared with the 16- to 39-year age group (0.4 versus 0.36; P ? 0.005). Concurrent use of a CYP2D6 and/or CYP3A4 inhibitor altered hydromorphone and norhydrocodone mole fractions, compared with the control group. Patient factors affect hydrocodone and metabolite mole fractions and suggest increased awareness of their contribution when attempting to interpret urine drug testing results. PMID:24836897

Barakat, Neveen H; Atayee, Rabia S; Best, Brookie M; Ma, Joseph D

2014-09-01

209

Sleep continuity and architecture: Associations with pain-inhibitory processes in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder  

PubMed Central

Recent research suggests bi-directional interactions between the experience of pain and the process of sleep; pain interferes with the ability to obtain sleep, and disrupted sleep contributes to enhanced pain perception. Our group recently reported, in a controlled experimental study, that sleep fragmentation among healthy adults resulted in subsequent decrements in endogenous pain inhibition. The present report follows up that observation by extending this line of research to a sample of patients experiencing persistent pain. Patients with chronic temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) pain were studied using polysomnography and psychophysical evaluation of pain responses. We assessed whether individual differences in sleep continuity and/or architecture were related to diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC), a measure of central nervous system pain inhibition. Among 53 TMD patients, higher sleep efficiency and longer total sleep time were positively associated with better functioning of DNIC (r=.42 ? .44, p< .01; p’s< .05 for the multivariate analyses). These results suggest the possibility that disrupted sleep may serve as a risk factor for inadequate pain-inhibitory processing and hint that aggressive efforts to treat sleep disturbance early in the course of a pain condition might be beneficial in reducing the severity or impact of clinical pain. PMID:19168380

Edwards, R.R.; Grace, E; Peterson, S.; Klick, B.; Haythornthwaite, J.A.; Smith, M.T.

2009-01-01

210

Cognitive-Behavioral Classifications of Chronic Pain in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to replicate, in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), the three-cluster cognitive-behavioral classification proposed by Turk and Rudy. Sixty-two patients attending a tertiary MS rehabilitation center completed the Pain Impact Rating questionnaire measuring activity interference, pain intensity, social support, and…

Khan, Fary; Pallant, Julie F.; Amatya, Bhasker; Young, Kevin; Gibson, Steven

2011-01-01

211

Measurement of sacroiliac joint stiffness in peripartum pelvic pain patients with Doppler imaging of vibrations (DIV)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The research question of the present study was: are sacroiliac joint stiffness levels of peripartum pelvic pain patients different from those of healthy subjects?Study design. A cross-sectional comparative sacroiliac joint stiffness analysis of peripartum pelvic pain patients with healthy subjects. In previous studies we introduced a new technique, Doppler imaging of vibrations (DIV), to assess sacroiliac joint stiffness using

H. Muzaffer Buyruk; Hendrik J. Stam; Christian J. Snijders; Johan S. Laméris; Wim P. J. Holland; Theo H. Stijnen

1999-01-01

212

Initial pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy evaluation of nasal morphine gluconate for breakthrough pain in cancer patients  

E-print Network

for breakthrough pain in cancer patients Dermot Fitzgibbona,*, Donna Morgana , Deanna Docktera , Chris Barrya Pacific St., Seattle, WA 98195, USA b Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle Abstract Patients with controlled background pain associated with cancer frequently also experience

Steinbach, Joe Henry

213

Prior History of Back Pain in Patients with Compensable and Non-Compensable Injuries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data were collected retrospectively from insurance information forms and histories of 111 patients (ages 14-84) referred to physical therapy for evaluation of back and/or neck pain. Analysis indicated that patients with compensable (work-related or motor vehicle accident) injuries infrequently acknowledged prior episodes of back or neck pain. (JDD)

Pellecchia, Geraldine L.

1993-01-01

214

Pain.  

PubMed

Invasive stimulation of the motor (precentral) cortex using surgically implanted epidural electrodes is indicated for the treatment of neuropathic pain that is refractory to medical treatment. Controlled trials have demonstrated the efficacy of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS), but MCS outcome remains variable and validated criteria for selecting good candidates for implantation are lacking. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive approach that could be used as a preoperative tool to predict MCS outcome and also could serve as a therapeutic procedure in itself to treat pain disorders. This requires repeated rTMS sessions and a maintenance protocol. Other studies have also demonstrated the efficacy of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in relieving chronic pain syndromes. The most studied target is the precentral cortex, but other targets, such as the prefrontal and parietal cortices, could be of interest. The analgesic effects of cortical stimulation relate to the activation of various circuits modulating neural activities in remote structures, such as the thalamus, limbic cortex, insula, or descending inhibitory controls. In addition to the treatment of refractory neuropathic pain by epidural MCS, new developments of this type of strategy are ongoing, for other types of pain syndrome and stimulation techniques. PMID:24112914

Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

2013-01-01

215

[Imaging modalities and therapy options in patients with acute flank pain].  

PubMed

The objective of this article is the description of imaging techniques for the evaluation of patients with acute flank pain and suspicion of urolithiasis and the impact of these techniques in the therapy management of patients with calculi. PMID:24981448

Grosse, A; Grosse, C

2014-07-01

216

Quality of Life After Bypass Surgery in Patients with Chest Pain and Heart Failure  

MedlinePLUS

... Bypass Surgery in Patients With Chest Pain and Heart Failure The full report is titled “Quality-of-Life ... in patients who have coronary artery disease plus heart failure, which can cause additional symptoms, such as shortness ...

217

Pelvic pain in urogynecology. Part II: treatment options in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms.  

PubMed

Therapeutic options for chronic pelvic pain in women offer only a limited symptom relief. Especially in the patient with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), where overlap of pain, storage and voiding symptoms is common, data on the efficacy of treatment of pain are limited. We conducted a literature review to detect articles which pertained to female patients with LUTS and pelvic pain and we included articles which evaluated the efficacy of the treatment of pelvic pain. Forty-one articles were detected, which included nerve stimulation (sacral and pudendal), intravesical instillations and injections, oral pharmacological treatments, periurethral injections as well as physical and manual therapy as treatment options. Only five controlled trials were found, which did not show superiority of the active treatment versus placebo. Although some treatment options show promising results in the treatment of pelvic pain in patients with LUTS, more randomised controlled trials are needed to confirm these results. PMID:22270729

Kavvadias, Tilemachos; Baessler, Kaven; Schuessler, Bernhard

2012-05-01

218

Prevalence and determinants of pain in the ipsilateral upper limb of stroke patients (.).  

PubMed

Summary.-This study investigated the prevalence of pain in the ipsilateral upper-limb in stroke patients. 229 stroke patients (133 men, 96 women; M age = 59.0 yr., SD = 12.4) were assessed with the Pain Behaviors Scales and their motor weakness was measured with the Motricity Index. Results indicated that over 27% of patients experienced pain in at least one joint of the ipsilateral upper limb. Shoulder pain was the most common. Further analysis indicated that the occurrence of pain in the ipsilateral upper limb was higher among women, among patients who used a cane, and among patients with a greater weakness of the affected lower limb. PMID:25387036

Kwon, Yong Hyun; Kwon, Jung Won; Lee, Na Kyung; Kang, Kyung Woo; Son, Sung Min

2014-12-01

219

Outcomes of follow-up visits to chronic nonmalignant pain patients.  

PubMed

Follow-up visits by clinical nurse specialists are beneficial for patients with various chronic conditions. It is unknown whether patients with chronic nonmalignant pain can achieve similar benefit. The aim of this study was to assess outcomes of follow-up visits by clinical nurse specialists to chronic nonmalignant pain patients regarding health-related quality of life (HRQoL), pain, opioid treatment, quality of sleep, and depression. A total of 102 patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized controlled trial during a 2-year period after discharge from multidisciplinary pain treatment and randomized to intervention or control group. Intervention group patients (n = 52) received home visits every fourth month for 2 years. The findings showed that HRQoL improved generally more in the intervention group. Statistically significant improvements were observed for physical function and bodily pain. Whereas the intervention group maintained the pain level on a visual analog scale, the control group reported more pain. During the observation period, the control group increased dosage of opioids whereas the intervention group maintained stable dosage. No significant effect on quality of life was found. Nurses identified signs of depression in 80% of their patients scoring depression on the simultaneous depression questionnaire, and thereby could refer patients to early treatment. Follow-up visits by clinical nurse specialists appeared to offer positive benefits to patients with chronic nonmalignant pain after discharge from multidisciplinary pain treatment. The intervention improved physical functioning, reduced bodily pain and pain intensity and prevented opioid dosage increase. Most episodes of depression were identified and referred to relevant treatment. PMID:23158704

Frich, Liv M H; Sorensen, Jan; Jacobsen, Susanne; Fohlmann, Bente; Højsted, Jette

2012-12-01

220

The impact of pain and depression on assessment of rehabilitation need: a cross-sectional study in long-term sick-listed patients.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between pain extent, severity of depressive symptoms and recommended rehabilitation measures in long-term sick-listed patients. In this cross-sectional study, the medical records of 228 long-term sick-listed patients consecutively referred to a multidisciplinary setting were examined retrospectively. Three specialists in psychiatry, orthopaedic surgery and rehabilitation medicine had made joint rehabilitation recommendations into the four different groups: (i) back to work without rehabilitation; (ii) vocational rehabilitation or adjusted work; (iii) medical rehabilitation and (iv) sick pension. Each patient filled in a pain drawing as a measure of pain extent and the self-administered Montgomery-Asberg-Depression-Rating Scale for evaluating the severity of depressive symptoms. Ninety-five percent of the patients had ongoing pain and 53% had depression. No statistically significant difference was seen between the outcome groups regarding the pain extent. A statistically significant difference was seen between the back to work without any rehabilitation and vocational rehabilitation or adjusted work groups in Montgomery-Asberg-Depression-Rating Scale score versus the medical-rehabilitation and sick-pension groups [P<0.001 between groups (chi(2) test); P<0.05 within groups (Tukey-Kramer Honestly Significant Difference test)]. In conclusion, two-thirds of the patients were assessed to need medical rehabilitation. These patient groups could be separated from the ones who were assessed to be able to go back to work without medical rehabilitation by the severity of the ongoing depression, but not by the pain extent alone. It was found that the combination of severity of depression and pain extent provided more information than the severity of depression alone. PMID:17762774

Linder, Jürgen; Svensson, Ola

2007-09-01

221

Measuring the functional status of patients with low back pain.  

PubMed

For trials of back pain therapy and for many clinical purposes, the outcome of greatest interest may be patient functioning. Physical measurements of muscle strength and range of motion are only weakly correlated with actual patient behavior or symptoms, so the behavior and symptoms must be measured directly. Commonly used physician ratings on ordinal scales are often highly subjective and fail to distinguish particular activities which may improve from those which do not. This paper briefly considers the pressures for improving functional status measurement, describes five criteria for assessing and comparing functional questionnaires, and selectively reviews some newer instruments using these criteria. These newer instruments offer standardization of measurement, comprehensiveness, and generally good reproducibility and validity. Unfortunately, little is known about the responsiveness of these measures to small but clinically important changes. There is a need in this field to define the optimal balance between brevity on the one hand and comprehensiveness on the other, to assess and improve instrument responsiveness, and to compare instruments "head-to-head" to allow rational selection for particular applications. PMID:2975164

Deyo, R A

1988-12-01

222

Evaluation of low-level laser therapy effectiveness on the pain and masticatory performance of patients with myofascial pain.  

PubMed

This study investigated the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the masticatory performance (MP), pressure pain threshold (PPT), and pain intensity in patients with myofascial pain. Twenty-one subjects, with myofascial pain according to Research Diagnostic Criteria/temporomandibular dysfunction, were divided into laser group (n = 12) and placebo group (n = 9) to receive laser therapy (active or placebo) two times per week for 4 weeks. The measured variables were: (1) MP by analysis of the geometric mean diameter (GMD) of the chewed particles using Optocal test material, (2) PPT by a pressure algometer, and (3) pain intensity by the visual analog scale (VAS). Measurements of MP and PPT were obtained at three time points: baseline, at the end of treatment with low-level laser and 30 days after (follow-up). VAS was measured at the same times as above and weekly throughout the laser therapy. The Friedman test was used at a significance level of 5% for data analysis. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of the Federal University of Sergipe (CAAE: 0025.0.107.000-10). A reduction in the GMD of crushed particles (p < 0.01) and an increase in PPT (p < 0.05) were seen only in the laser group when comparing the baseline and end-of-treatment values. Both groups showed a decrease in pain intensity at the end of treatment. LLLT promoted an improvement in MP and PPT of the masticatory muscles. PMID:23143142

de Moraes Maia, Mila Leite; Ribeiro, Maria Amália Gonzaga; Maia, Luiz Guilherme Martins; Stuginski-Barbosa, Juliana; Costa, Yuri Martins; Porporatti, André Luís; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues; Bonjardim, Leonardo Rigoldi

2014-01-01

223

Morbidity of "DSM-IV" Axis I Disorders in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain: Psychiatric Morbidity Linked with Increased Pain and Health Care Utilization  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study examined current and lifetime psychiatric morbidity, chest pain, and health care utilization in 229 patients with noncardiac chest pain (NCCP), angina-like pain in the absence of cardiac etiology. Diagnostic interview findings based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed.; "DSM-IV"; American…

White, Kamila S.; Raffa, Susan D.; Jakle, Katherine R.; Stoddard, Jill A.; Barlow, David H.; Brown, Timothy A.; Covino, Nicholas A.; Ullman, Edward; Gervino, Ernest V.

2008-01-01

224

The impact of chronic pain: The perspective of patients, relatives, and caregivers.  

PubMed

To assess the impact of chronic pain on the family environment from the patient's, relative's and caregiver's perspective, we undertook cross-sectional study on a representative sample of Spanish adults who suffered pain at least 4 days a week for ?3 months and on relatives and caregivers of patients that fulfilled these criteria. The characteristics of pain and the perception of its impact on the family environment were assessed, using logistic regression models to reveal the variables associated with the impact of pain on the family. From a total of 1,957 subjects, 325 experienced chronic pain and 34.6% of them perceived that their pain affected their family environment. These patients recognized a stronger impact when their relatives were sad (OR = 3.61; CI:1.57, 8.27) and had modified the leisure activities because of the pain (OR = 3.62; CI:1.56, 8.38). Among the 131 relatives, 51.2% perceived that pain was affecting the family, causing changes in their leisure activities (OR = 1.17; CI:1.04, 9.94) and sleep disturbance (OR = 1.40; CI:1.32, 12.58). Of the 36 caregivers, mainly women over 50 years of age, 66.7% indicated that pain affected the family, although 72.8% were satisfied with the help they provided. Chronic pain has a very strong impact on the family, although this is perceived distinctly by patients, relatives, and caregivers. Recognizing that factors related to pain affect the family's well-being, and adopting a global approach to pain that takes into consideration the family's experiences, should improve the therapeutic response, and enhance the patient's and relative's quality of life. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25000222

Ojeda, Begoña; Salazar, Alejandro; Dueñas, María; Torres, Luís Miguel; Micó, Juan Antonio; Failde, Inmaculada

2014-12-01

225

Altered resting state EEG in chronic pancreatitis patients: toward a marker for chronic pain  

PubMed Central

Objectives Electroencephalography (EEG) may be a promising source of physiological biomarkers accompanying chronic pain. Several studies in patients with chronic neuropathic pain have reported alterations in central pain processing, manifested as slowed EEG rhythmicity and increased EEG power in the brain’s resting state. We aimed to investigate novel potential markers of chronic pain in the resting state EEG of patients with chronic pancreatitis. Participants Resting state EEG data from 16 patients with persistent abdominal pain due to chronic pancreatitis (CP) were compared to data from healthy controls matched for age, sex and education. Methods The peak alpha frequency (PAF) and power amplitude in the alpha band (7.5–13 Hz) were compared between groups in four regions of interest (frontal, central, parietal, and occipital) and were correlated with pain duration. Results The average PAF was lowered in CP patients compared with that in healthy controls, observed as a statistically significant between-group effect (mean 9.9 versus 9.5 Hz; P=0.049). Exploratory post hoc analysis of average PAF per region of interest revealed a significant difference, particularly in the parietal and occipital regions. In addition, we observed a significant correlation between pain duration and PAF and showed increased shifts in PAF with longer pain durations. No significant group differences were found in peak power amplitudes. Conclusion CP pain is associated with alterations in spontaneous brain activity, observed as a shift toward lower PAF. This shift correlates with the duration of pain, which demonstrates that PAF has the potential to be a clinically feasible biomarker for chronic pain. These findings could be helpful for assisting diagnosis, establishing optimal treatment, and studying efficacy of new therapeutic agents in chronic pain patients. PMID:24379694

de Vries, Marjan; Wilder-Smith, Oliver HG; Jongsma, Marijtje LA; van den Broeke, Emanuel N; Arns, Martijn; van Goor, Harry; van Rijn, Clementina M

2013-01-01

226

Influences of the Aging Process on Acute Perioperative Pain Management in Elderly and Cognitively Impaired Patients  

PubMed Central

Background The aging process results in physiological deterioration and compromise along with a reduction in the reserve capacity of the human body. Because of the reduced reserves of mammalian organ systems, perioperative stressors may result in compromise of physiologic function or clinical evidence of organ insult secondary to surgery and anesthesia. The purpose of this review is to present evidence-based indications and best practice techniques for perioperative pain management in elderly surgical patients. Results In addition to pain, cognitive dysfunction in elderly surgical patients is a common occurrence that can often be attenuated with appropriate drug therapy. Modalities for pain management must be synthesized with intraoperative anesthesia and the type of surgical intervention and not simply considered a separate entity. Conclusions Pain in elderly surgical patients continues to challenge physicians and healthcare providers. Current studies show improved surgical outcomes for geriatric patients who receive multimodal therapy for pain control. PMID:23789010

Halaszynski, Thomas

2013-01-01

227

Post-Operative Pain Management Practices in Patients with Dementia - The Current Situation in Finland  

PubMed Central

The aim of this study is to describe current post-operative pain management practices for patients with dementia and hip fracture in Finland. Older adults with hip fracture are at high risk of under treatment for pain, especially if they also have a cognitive disorder at the stage of dementia. Previous studies have provided limited information about the quality of acute pain treatment for persons with dementia. In this study data concerning current pain management practices was collected by questionnaire from 333 nursing staff. They worked in surgical wards of seven universities and ten city-centre hospitals. The response rate to the questionnaire was 53%. The data was analysed using factor analysis and parametric methods. Half the respondents (53%) considered that post-operative pain management was sufficient for patients with dementia. Less than one third of respondent nurses reported that pain scales were in use on their unit: the most commonly used scale was VAS. The use of pain scales was significantly related to the respondents’ opinion of the sufficiency of post-operative pain management in this patient group (p<0.001). The findings can be utilised in nursing practice and research when planning suitable complementary educational interventions for nursing staff of surgical wards. Further research is needed to explain the current situation of pain management practices from the viewpoint of patients with dementia. PMID:22723810

Rantala, Maija; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kvist, Tarja; Hartikainen, Sirpa

2012-01-01

228

Neurodegenerative Properties of Chronic Pain: Cognitive Decline in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Chronic pain has been associated with impaired cognitive function. We examined cognitive performance in patients with severe chronic pancreatitis pain. We explored the following factors for their contribution to observed cognitive deficits: pain duration, comorbidity (depression, sleep disturbance), use of opioids, and premorbid alcohol abuse. The cognitive profiles of 16 patients with severe pain due to chronic pancreatitis were determined using an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Data from three cognitive domains (psychomotor performance, memory, executive functions) were compared to data from healthy controls matched for age, gender and education. Multivariate multilevel analysis of the data showed decreased test scores in patients with chronic pancreatitis pain in different cognitive domains. Psychomotor performance and executive functions showed the most prominent decline. Interestingly, pain duration appeared to be the strongest predictor for observed cognitive decline. Depressive symptoms, sleep disturbance, opioid use and history of alcohol abuse provided additional explanations for the observed cognitive decline in some of the tests, but to a lesser extent than pain duration. The negative effect of pain duration on cognitive performance is compatible with the theory of neurodegenerative properties of chronic pain. Therefore, early and effective therapeutic interventions might reduce or prevent decline in cognitive performance, thereby improving outcomes and quality of life in these patients. PMID:21876748

Souren, Pierre; Arns, Martijn; Gordon, Evian; Vissers, Kris; Wilder-Smith, Oliver; van Rijn, Clementina M.; van Goor, Harry

2011-01-01

229

How to Assess a New Patient for a Multidisciplinary Chronic Pain Rehabilitation Program: A Review Article  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic pain is a debilitating condition that affects people all over the world. To effectively treat chronic pain patients, assignment to patient-centered functional restoration and psychological pain rehabilitation programs at an early stage is essential. Methods This article describes the initial patient screening and evaluation process for an interdisciplinary chronic pain rehabilitation program and highlights the relevant points that should be covered in each section of the initial assessment. Results A thorough, detailed history that includes an evaluation of the patient's pain, functional limitations, prior medications, prior procedures/interventions, substance abuse, and psychiatric disorders, as well as the patient's social, legal, and developmental histories, are key to the proper screening and appropriate treatment of patients with chronic pain. Conclusion Thorough initial evaluation of patients is essential for proper enrollment in a chronic pain rehabilitation program. Such programs allow early treatment and reduce unnecessary health costs. Future prospective studies are needed to identify additional screening methods and triage tools to allow early admission of appropriate patients to these rehabilitation programs. PMID:24688340

Malaty, Adham; Sabharwal, Josephine; Lirette, Lesley Smallwood; Chaiban, Gassan; Eissa, Hazem; Tolba, Reda

2014-01-01

230

Influence of tinnitus on pain severity and quality of life in patients with temporomandibular disorders  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the relationship among pain intensity and duration, presence of tinnitus and quality of life in patients with chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Material and Methods Fifty-nine female patients presenting with chronic TMD were selected from those seeking for treatment at the Bauru School of Dentistry Orofacial Pain Center. Patients were submitted to the Research Diagnostic Criteria anamnesis and physical examination. Visual analog scale was used to evaluate the pain intensity while pain duration was assessed by interview. Oral Health Impact Profile inventory modified for patients with orofacial pain was used to evaluate the patients' quality of life. The presence of tinnitus was assessed by self report. The patients were divided into: with or without self report of tinnitus. The data were analyzed statistically using the Student's t-test and Pearson's Chi-square test, with a level of significance of 5%. Results The mean age for the sample was 35.25 years, without statistically significant difference between groups. Thirty-two patients (54.24%) reported the presence of tinnitus. The mean pain intensity by visual analog scale was 77.10 and 73.74 for the groups with and without tinnitus, respectively. The mean pain duration was 76.12 months and 65.11 months for the groups with and without tinnitus, respectively. The mean OHIP score was 11.72 and 11.74 for the groups with and without tinnitus, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between groups for pain intensity, pain duration and OHIP scoreS (p>0.05). Conclusion Chronic TMD pain seems to play a more significant role in patient's quality of life than the presence of tinnitus. PMID:22666832

CALDERON, Patrícia dos Santos; HILGENBERG, Priscila Brenner; ROSSETTI, Leylha Maria Nunes; LAURENTI, João Vítor El Hetti; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues

2012-01-01

231

An Examination of Adherence to Pain Medication Plans in Older Cancer Patients in Hospice Care  

PubMed Central

Context Timely and appropriate management of pain is essential to promote comfort at the end of life. Objectives To determine if pain-related factors and non-pharmacological interventions affect medication adherence in older cancer patients in community-based hospices. Methods The study involved cancer patients 55 years and older, newly admitted to one of 13 community-based hospices in the Midwest U.S. A descriptive design with patients or their proxies providing information during two telephone interviews and review of their hospice medical records was used. Results A total sample of 65 patients was obtained, with data directly from 32 patients during interview one (T1); 25 at interview two (T2), and proxy reports for 33 (T1) and 30 (T2) patients. The overall mean pain medication adherence scores (maximum 9) for all patients were 8.43 (T1) and 8.38 (T2). For component analysis (three components; maximum of three points each), patients were the least adherent with opioid orders at both time points (2.65). Patients were the most adherent to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory/acetaminophen orders at T1 (2.91) and to medications for neuropathic pain at T2 (2.89). Data provided statistical evidence that patients with more hours of controlled pain in the past 24 hours were more likely to have had better adherence, whereas patients with higher levels of comfort over the last few days were more likely to have had worse adherence. Conclusion This study identified that pain medication adherence among older adults with cancer receiving hospice care is high. However, hospices must be alert to the fact that even as patients become more comfortable, adherence must continue to be emphasized to ensure pain does not re-develop or exacerbate, if pain relief is a patient priority. PMID:22841408

Sanders, Sara; Herr, Keela; Fine, Perry G.; Fiala, Cate; Tang, Xiongwen; Forcucci, Chris

2012-01-01

232

Pain Management in Cancer Patients Using a Mobile App: Study Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the availability of effective medications and clinical guidelines for pain management, pain control is suboptimal in a sizeable proportion of patients with cancer pain. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend a comprehensive and multimodal approach for management of cancer pain. We developed a mobile phone application, ePAL, based on clinical guidelines to empower patients for cancer pain management by prompting regular pain assessments and coaching for self-management. Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of a multidimensional mobile phone-based pain management application, ePAL, on controlling cancer pain and improving quality of life in patients with cancer pain being treated at an academic palliative care clinic. Methods The study will be implemented as a 2-arm randomized controlled trial with 110 adult patients with CP who own a mobile phone over a follow-up period of two months. Participants will be randomized to either the intervention group receiving ePAL and usual care or to a control group receiving only usual care. The brief pain inventory will be used to assess our primary outcome which is pain intensity. We will also evaluate the effect of the intervention on secondary outcomes which include the effect of the intervention on hospital utilization for pain crisis, quality of life, adherence to analgesic medications, barriers to pain control, anxiety and patient engagement. Instruments that will be used in evaluating secondary outcomes include the Brief Pain Inventory, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale, Barriers Questionnaire-II, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–General, Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale, and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue. The intention-to-treat approach will be used to evaluate outcomes. Our primary outcome, pain intensity, measured longitudinally over eight weeks, will be assessed by mixed model repeated analysis. Effect sizes will be calculated as mean group differences with standard deviations. Results The study is still in progress. We hope to have results by the end of 2015. Conclusions The multidimensional approach to pain management implemented on a mobile phone application could lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02069743; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02069743 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6Qb65XGGA). PMID:25500281

Kamdar, Mihir; Flanagan, Clare; Searl, Meghan; Traeger, Lara; Kvedar, Joseph; Jethwani, Kamal

2014-01-01

233

Cognitive impairment in patients with chronic pain: The significance of stress  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review article examines the role of emotional distress and other aspects of suffering in the cognitive impairment that\\u000a often is apparent in patients with chronic pain. Research suggests that pain-related negative emotions and stress potentially\\u000a impact cognitive functioning independent of the effects of pain intensity. The anterior cingulate cortex is likely an integral\\u000a component of the neural system that

Robert P. Hart; James B. Wade; Michael F. Martelli

2003-01-01

234

The Efficacy of a Perceptive Rehabilitation on Postural Control in Patients with Chronic Nonspecific Low Back Pain  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Patients with chronic low back pain have a worse posture, probably related to poor control of the back muscles and altered perception of the trunk midline. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a perceptive rehabilitation in terms of stability and pain relief in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain. Thirty patients were…

Paolucci, Teresa; Fusco, Augusto; Iosa, Marco; Grasso, Maria R.; Spadini, Ennio; Paolucci, Stefano; Saraceni, Vincenzo M.; Morone, Giovanni

2012-01-01

235

Improving cancer pain control with NCCN guideline-based analgesic administration: a patient-centered outcome.  

PubMed

Improving the control of cancer-related pain (CRP) is a clinical and ethical imperative. Clinical research has documented improved treatment tolerance and survival rates among patients with cancer who have effective pain control. Barriers to CRP control include inadequate patient and physician education. Meta-analyses of patient education studies correlate improvements in CRP control with improved communications with health care providers and the implementation of strategies that assist with adherence to medication schedules. These strategies build patient confidence, allowing better self-management of pain and reduced psychological consequences. For physicians, ample educational resources exist in CRP management. However, in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, compliance with NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Adult Cancer Pain continues to be less than 70%, and more than one-third of patients continue to receive inadequate doses of analgesics. Patient-centered outcomes have become an integral end point in health policy, and the nation's medical training, research, and delivery systems are transforming to a value-based accreditation and reimbursement system. Pain control is a significant patient-centered outcome in cancer care, because pain adversely impacts function and affects all domains of quality of life. Agreement is clear on the value of health care interventions that relieve suffering from cancer pain and restore personal dignity. PMID:25190693

Janjan, Nora

2014-09-01

236

A Comparison of the Abuse Liability of Tramadol, NSAIDs, and Hydrocodone in Patients with Chronic Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concern about abuse\\/dependence in chronic pain patients taking opioid analgesics may lead to undertreatment of pain, yet little is known about the prevalence of abuse\\/dependence in these patients and how it differs among analgesic agents. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of tramadol abuse compared to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and hydrocodone-containing analgesics in patients with

Edgar H. Adams; Scott Breiner; Theodore J. Cicero; Anne Geller; James A. Inciardi; Sidney H. Schnoll; Edward C. Senay; George E. Woody

2006-01-01

237

Use of limited MR protocol (coronal STIR) in the evaluation of patients with hip pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo assess the role of a limited MR protocol (coronal STIR) as the initial part of the MR examination in patients with hip pain.Design and patientsEighty-five patients presenting with hip pain, and normal radiographs of the pelvis, and who underwent our full MR protocol for hips were included retrospectively in the study. The full protocol consists of coronal T1-weighted and

N. J. Khoury; G. A. Birjawi; M. Chaaya; M. H. Hourani

2003-01-01

238

Urine specimen detection of zolpidem use in patients with pain.  

PubMed

This study examined zolpidem and concurrent opioid, benzodiazepine, other central nervous system (CNS) depressants, and alcohol use. Urine specimens were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Specimens were tested for zolpidem (n = 71,919) and separated into a provider-reported medication list documenting (n = 5,257) or not documenting zolpidem use (n = 66,662). Zolpidem-positive specimens were further separated into reported and unreported use cohorts. The total number of zolpidem-positive specimens in the reported and unreported use cohorts was 3,391 and 3,190, respectively. Non-informed prescribers were 4.4% (3,190/71,919) among the general population and 48.5% (3,190/6,581) when only zolpidem users were considered. In the zolpidem user population, the most common concurrent opioids in both cohorts were hydrocodone and oxycodone. Alprazolam and clonazepam were higher in the unreported use cohort (P ? 0.05). The unreported use cohort also had a higher detection of zolpidem plus a benzodiazepine (49.7 vs. 46%; P ? 0.05), zolpidem plus an opioid and a benzodiazepine (40.8% vs. 37.4%; P ? 0.05) and zolpidem plus an opioid, a benzodiazepine, and an other CNS depressant (12.9 vs. 10.9%; P ? 0.05). Concurrent use of zolpidem, an opioid, a benzodiazepine and an other CNS depressant is prevalent in a pain patient population. PMID:24802157

Mann, Lindsey M; Atayee, Rabia S; Best, Brookie M; Morello, Candis M; Ma, Joseph D

2014-01-01

239

Capsaicin 8 % as a cutaneous patch (Qutenza™): analgesic effect on patients with peripheral neuropathic pain.  

PubMed

Evaluation of the analgesic effect after a single application of the capsaicin 8 % cutaneous patch (Qutenza™) in 37 patients suffering from painful, distal symmetric polyneuropathy (PNP) for an average of 5 years. Patients ranged from 40 to 78 years of age and 22 subjects were HIV-positive. Patients were observed 4 weeks prior to 12 weeks post administration. An evaluation of the therapeutic effect of capsaicin 8 % as a dermal patch in terms of pain reduction, change of sleeping behavior and social activities was performed and statistical analysis of data was conducted using non-parametric methods. Patients were selected according to clinical criteria. Numerical rating scale (NRS 0-10) was used to inquire pain intensity and a pain score was calculated using the painDETECT(©) questionnaire Freynhagen R (Curr Med Res Opin 22:1911-1920, [2006]). A significant reduction of pain was achieved for up to 12 weeks, with a maximum after 2-4 weeks post administration. After patient education and before application of capsaicin patch, a significant reduction of three levels on the NRS was observed. Symptoms of painful PNP decreased over the period of investigation and 8 patients reported a reduction of systemic pain medication. In patients with an HIV infection, a significant extension of sleep was achieved for 2, 4 and 8 weeks after application. Thus, the application of the capsaicin 8 % patch resulted in a significant relief of neuropathic pain, a prolongation of sleep, a reduction of oral pain medication and a resumption of social activities. PMID:25421590

Raber, Julia Marie; Reichelt, Doris; Grüneberg-Oelker, Ute; Philipp, Konstanze; Stubbe-Dräger, Bianca; Husstedt, Ingo-W

2014-11-25

240

Biofeedback relaxation for pain associated with continuous passive motion in taiwanese patients after total knee arthroplasty.  

PubMed

Effective pain management is crucial for patient recovery after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Biofeedback therapy, which encourages relaxation and helps alleviate various conditions associated with stress, may help to decrease postoperative pain in patients undergoing TKA. A quasi- experimental design was used to investigate the efficacy of a biofeedback relaxation intervention in reducing pain associated with postoperative continuous passive motion (CPM) therapy. Sixty-six patients admitted to a general hospital in Taiwan for TKA were recruited and randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention group received biofeedback training twice daily for 5 days, concurrent with CPM therapy, whereas the control group did not receive the biofeedback intervention. Pain was measured using a numeric rating scale before and after each CPM therapy session on postoperative days 1 through 5. The CPM-elicited pain score was calculated by subtracting the pre-CPM pain score from the post-CPM pain score. Results of repeated-measures analysis of variance showed intervention group reported significantly less pain caused by CPM than did the control group (f?=?29.70, p?pain management in this population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25557776

Wang, Tsae-Jyy; Chang, Ching-Fen; Lou, Meei-Fang; Ao, Man-Kuan; Liu, Chiung-Chen; Liang, Shu-Yuan; Wu, Shu-Fang Vivienne; Tung, Heng-Hsing

2015-02-01

241

Bilateral Sensory Abnormalities in Patients with Unilateral Neuropathic Pain; A Quantitative Sensory Testing (QST) Study  

PubMed Central

In patients who experience unilateral chronic pain, abnormal sensory perception at the non-painful side has been reported. Contralateral sensory changes in these patients have been given little attention, possibly because they are regarded as clinically irrelevant. Still, bilateral sensory changes in these patients could become clinically relevant if they challenge the correct identification of their sensory dysfunction in terms of hyperalgesia and allodynia. Therefore, we have used the standardized quantitative sensory testing (QST) protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS) to investigate somatosensory function at the painful side and the corresponding non-painful side in unilateral neuropathic pain patients using gender- and age-matched healthy volunteers as a reference cohort. Sensory abnormalities were observed across all QST parameters at the painful side, but also, to a lesser extent, at the contralateral, non-painful side. Similar relative distributions regarding sensory loss/gain for non-nociceptive and nociceptive stimuli were found for both sides. Once a sensory abnormality for a QST parameter at the affected side was observed, the prevalence of an abnormality for the same parameter at the non-affected side was as high as 57% (for Pressure Pain Threshold). Our results show that bilateral sensory dysfunction in patients with unilateral neuropathic pain is more rule than exception. Therefore, this phenomenon should be taken into account for appropriate diagnostic evaluation in clinical practice. This is particularly true for mechanical stimuli where the 95% Confidence Interval for the prevalence of sensory abnormalities at the non-painful side ranges between 33% and 50%. PMID:22629414

Konopka, Karl-Heinz; Harbers, Marten; Houghton, Andrea; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Vliet, Andre; Timmerman, Wia; den Boer, Johan A.; Struys, Michel M.R.F.; van Wijhe, Marten

2012-01-01

242

Comparisons of spontaneous pain and tenderness in patients with primary fibromyalgia.  

PubMed

Pain was assessed in 47 patients with fibromyalgia in the University Rheumatology Clinic in Basle with the aid of three different techniques. First, a simple visual analog scale was used, later a body diagram on which patients could indicate pain separately in different regions of the body (pain score) and, finally, dolorimetric measurements at 56 typical PFS tender points. After four weeks of therapy, pain was again scored by patients using these techniques. The changes in assessment were compared with the aid of Spearman correlation. Data recorded with the aid of the body diagram correlated better with dolorimetric findings than did the results obtained from a simple visual analog scale. The severity of the disease can be more objectively assessed using these three techniques than it can using only the visual analog scale. In particular, the pain score and dolorimetry make possible a clear assessment of the value of therapeutic regimens. PMID:1914417

Lautenschlager, J; Seglias, J; Bruckle, W; Muller, W

1991-06-01

243

The Human Figure Drawing with Donor and Nondonor Siblings of Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is little research on the psychological impact of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) on family members. This study uses the Human Figure Drawing (HFD) to measure siblings' emotional distress toward BMT. Among the siblings, feelings of isolation, anger, depression, anxiety, and low self-esteem emerged as major themes. Findings indicate the…

Packman, Wendy L.; Beck, Vanessa L.; VanZutphen, Kelly H.; Long, Janet K.; Spengler, Gisele

2003-01-01

244

Knee Joint Pain Potentially Due to Bone Alterations in a Knee Osteoarthritis Patient  

PubMed Central

Patient: Male, 83 Final Diagnosis: Osteoarthritis Symptoms: Knee joint pain Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Resting Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the leading cause of musculoskeletal pain and functional disability worldwide. However, the etiology of this condition is still largely unknown. Case Report: We report the clinical course of an elderly man with knee OA. Conclusions: Plain radiographs and MRI examinations performed during follow-up suggested that the pathophysiology of the patient’s knee OA and joint pain may have been primarily due to bone alterations. PMID:25436838

Komatsu, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Yukio; Kamimura, Mikio; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Mukaiyama, Keijiro; Ikegami, Shota; Kato, Hiroyuki

2014-01-01

245

Self-Report of Depressive Symptoms in Low Back Pain Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents two studies designed to examine the self-report of depressive symptoms in low back pain patients (N=134). Both studies found that patients were more likely to report somatic than cognitive symptoms of depression. Patients with multiple physical findings were not more likely to report somatic symptoms than patients with few physical…

Crisson, James; And Others

1986-01-01

246

Chronic Back Pain Patients Show Differences in Behavior and Brain Activity During a Loss-Aversion Gambling Task  

E-print Network

Chronic Back Pain Patients Show Differences in Behavior and Brain Activity During a Loss with chronic back pain. Additionally, many labs have observed that people with a variety of chronic pain with chronic back pain. We then correlate these scores to participants' resting state data obtained on the same

Apkarian, A. Vania

247

Qualitative assessment of pain management in patients undergoing computed tomography-guided transthoracic lung biopsy  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Unpublished questionnaire data collected by the authors’ institution (Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario) indicates that patients often experience significant pain while undergoing lung biopsy, yet receive only a fraction of the maximum allowable dosage of analgesic. OBJECTIVES: To qualitatively assess current pain management practices from the patient perspective. Patient education and patient satisfaction were also evaluated. METHODS: From March through June 2012, participants were contacted via telephone within one week of their procedure until data saturation was reached. The semistructured interviews were based on a study-specific interview template. Thematic analysis of qualitative study data was used to identify recurring interview topics. RESULTS: A consecutive sample of 16 outpatients who had undergone image-guided transthoracic lung biopsy at the authors’ institution were interviewed. None of the study participants reported noteworthy pain associated with the insertion of lung biopsy needles. The most significant pain was caused by positioning within the computed tomography scanner, particularly among participants who were in the prone position. All participants reported high satisfaction with the amount of analgesic received. Potential complications and recovery period details were identified as areas for improved patient education. CONCLUSIONS: At the authors’ institution, pain associated with lung biopsy needle insertion was well controlled. Positional pain is common for patients required to be in the prone position. Potential solutions include increasing awareness of positional pain and instituting additional supportive equipment. PMID:24761429

Wong, Erin T; Dunham, Carol; Patsios, Demetris

2014-01-01

248

Elderly Patients With Painful Bone Metastases Should be Offered Palliative Radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of palliative radiotherapy (RT) in relieving metastatic bone pain in elderly patients. Methods and Materials: The response to RT for palliation of metastatic bone pain was evaluated from a prospective database of 558 patients between 1999 and 2008. The pain scores and analgesic intake were used to calculate the response according to the International Bone Metastases Consensus Working Party palliative RT endpoints. Subgroup analyses for age and other demographic information were performed. Results: No significant difference was found in the response rate in patients aged >=65, >=70, and >=75 years compared with younger patients at 1, 2, or 3 months after RT. The response was found to be significantly related to the performance status. Conclusion: Age alone did not affect the response to palliative RT for bone metastases. Elderly patients should be referred for palliative RT for their painful bone metastases, regardless of age, because they receive equal benefit from the treatment.

Campos, Sarah; Presutti, Roseanna; Zhang Liying; Salvo, Nadia; Hird, Amanda; Tsao, May; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Danjoux, Cyril; Sahgal, Arjun; Mitera, Gunita; Sinclair, Emily; DeAngelis, Carlo; Nguyen, Janet; Napolskikh, Julie [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chow, Edward, E-mail: Edward.Chow@sunnybrook.c [Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2010-04-15

249

Dance\\/movement therapy in fibromyalgia patients: Changes in self-figure drawings and their relation to verbal self-rating scales  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluates if verbally oriented scales are as effective as the visual instruments of self-figure drawing and video interpretation in detecting treatment responses after 6 months of dance\\/movement therapy in fibromyalgia patients.The self-figure drawing and video interpretation technique captured treatment effects that were not seen on verbal scales. In the self-figure drawings, significant differences were seen in the variables

E. Bojner Horwitz; J. Kowalski; T. Theorell; U. M. Anderberg

2006-01-01

250

Patterns of pain and consulting behaviour in patients with musculoskeletal disorders in rural Crete, Greece  

Microsoft Academic Search

Antonopoulou M, Antonakis N, Hadjipavlou A and Lionis C. Patterns of pain and consulting be- haviour in patients with musculoskeletal disorders in rural Crete, Greece. Family Practice 2007; 24: 209-216. Background. Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) account as a reason for frequent consultations in primary care. However, the magnitude of the problem at the GP's clinic, the patterns of pain and the

Maria Antonopouloua

251

Investigation and macroscopic anatomical study of referred pain in patients with hip disease.  

PubMed

[Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and patterns of referred pain in patients with hip disease, as well as the nerve distribution in the hip and knee joints of 2 cadavers. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 113 patients with hip joint disease were included in the investigation. The incidence of regional pain and referred pain patterns were evaluated before and after arthroplasty. Two cadavers were macroscopically observed to verify the nerve innervation of the hip and knee joints. [Results] Anterior knee pain was observed preoperatively in 13.3% (in resting) and 33.6% (in motion) of the patients, which was comparable with the incidence of greater trochanter pain. In addition, the preoperative incidence rates of knee pain in resting and motion markedly decreased postoperatively. Of note is the remarkable incidence of pain radiating to the ventral lower limb. An anteromedial innervation was determined in the cadavers by the articular branches of the obturator and femoral nerve, which supply small branches to the knee joints. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that the distribution of the incidence of pain among the patients with hip disease is diverse owing to the sensory distribution of the femoral and obturator nerves. PMID:24648632

Sakamoto, Junya; Morimoto, Yosuke; Ishii, Shun; Nakano, Jiro; Manabe, Yoshitaka; Okita, Minoru; Tsurumoto, Toshiyuki

2014-02-01

252

Effectiveness of Hypnotherapy with Cancer Patients' Trajectory: Emesis, Acute Pain, and Analgesia and Anxiolysis in Procedures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical hypnosis in cancer settings provides symptom reduction (pain and anxiety) and empowers patients to take an active role in their treatments and procedures. The goal of this paper is to systematically and critically review evidence on the effectiveness of hypnotherapy for emesis, analgesia, and anxiolysis in acute pain, specifically in procedures with an emphasis on the period from 1999

Sylvain Néron; Randolph Stephenson

2007-01-01

253

Methods of assessing progress in a chronic low back pain patient: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important for the chiropractor to be able to assess and monitor the progress of patients with chronic pain syndromes This case demonstrates the use of verbal pain-scaling, the Revised Oswestry Disability Questionnaire (RODQ), orthopædic straight leg raise test and active range of lumbar motion as outcome measure and illustrates their relative advantages and shortcomings. The case describes the

Michelle Carrington

1999-01-01

254

A phase II trial of reiki for the management of pain in advanced cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

This trial compared pain, quality of life, and analgesic use in a sample of patients with cancer pain (n=24) who received either standard opioid management plus rest (Arm A) or standard opioid management plus Reiki (Arm B). Participants either rested for 1.5 hr on Days 1 and 4 or received two Reiki treatments (Days 1 and 4) one hour after

Karin Olson; John Hanson; Mary Michaud

2003-01-01

255

The assessment and management of pain in the demented and non-demented elderly patient.  

PubMed

Persistent pain is a frequent health problem in the elderly. Its prevalence ranges from 45% to 80%. Chronic diseases, such as depression, cardiovascular disease, cancer and osteoporosis have a higher prevalence in aged individuals and increase the risk of developing chronic pain. The presence of pain is known to be associated with sleep disorders in these patients, as well as functional impairment, decreased sociability and greater use of the health system, with consequent increase in costs. Alzheimer's disease patients seem to have a normal pain discriminative capacity and they may probably have weaker emotional and affective experience of pain when compared to other types of dementia. Many patients have language deficits and thus cannot properly describe its characteristics. In more advanced cases, it becomes even difficult to determine whether pain is present or not. Therefore, the evaluation of these patients should be performed in a systematic way. There are three ways to measure the presence of pain: by direct questioning (self-report), by direct behavioral observation and by interviews with caregivers or informants. In recent years, many pain scales and questionnaires have been published and validated specifically for the elderly population. Some are specific to patients with cognitive decline, allowing pain evaluation to be conducted in a structured and reproducible way. The next step is to determine the type of painful syndrome and discuss the bases of the pharmacological management, the use of multiple medications and the presence of comorbidities demand the use of smaller doses and impose contra-indications against some drug classes. A multiprofessional approach is the rule in the management of these patients. PMID:21625771

Andrade, Daniel Ciampi de; Faria, José Weber Vieira de; Caramelli, Paulo; Alvarenga, Luciana; Galhardoni, Ricardo; Siqueira, Silvia R D; Yeng, Lin T; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

2011-01-01

256

Do Diabetic Patients with Acute Coronary Syndromes Have a Higher Threshold for Ischemic Pain?  

PubMed Central

Background: Data from over 4 decades have reported a higher incidence of silent infarction among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), but recent publications have shown conflicting results regarding the correlation between DM and presence of pain in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). Objective: Our primary objective was to analyze the association between DM and precordial pain at hospital arrival. Secondary analyses evaluated the association between hyperglycemia and precordial pain at presentation, and the subgroup of patients presenting within 6 hours of symptom onset. Methods: We analyzed a prospectively designed registry of 3,544 patients with ACS admitted to a Coronary Care Unit of a tertiary hospital. We developed multivariable models to adjust for potential confounders. Results: Patients with precordial pain were less likely to have DM (30.3%) than those without pain (34.0%; unadjusted p = 0.029), but this difference was not significant after multivariable adjustment, for the global population (p = 0.84), and for subset of patients that presented within 6 hours from symptom onset (p = 0.51). In contrast, precordial pain was more likely among patients with hyperglycemia (41.2% vs 37.0% without hyperglycemia, p = 0.035) in the overall population and also among those who presented within 6 hours (41.6% vs. 32.3%, p = 0.001). Adjusted models showed an independent association between hyperglycemia and pain at presentation, especially among patients who presented within 6 hours (OR = 1.41, p = 0.008). Conclusion: In this non-selected ACS population, there was no correlation between DM and hospital presentation without precordial pain. Moreover, hyperglycemia correlated significantly with pain at presentation, especially in the population that arrived within 6 hours from symptom onset. PMID:25076180

Nicolau, José Carlos; Barbosa, Carlos José Dornas Gonçalves; Franci, André; Baracioli, Luciano Moreira; Franken, Marcelo; Lima, Felipe Gallego; Giraldez, Roberto Rocha; Kalil Filho, Roberto; Ramires, José Antônio Franchini; Giugliano, Robert P.

2014-01-01

257

Major depressive disorder and sleep disturbance in patients with chronic pain  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Disturbed sleep is a common problem in both chronic pain and major depressive disorder (MDD). Moreover, many patients with chronic pain are depressed. OBJECTIVES: To examine the effects of depression on the sleep behaviour of chronic pain patients by comparing patients who did or did not meet diagnostic criteria for MDD. METHODS: A total of 60 patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain underwent structured diagnostic interviews for MDD and insomnia, and completed questionnaires assessing pain severity, disability, sleep quality, beliefs and attitudes about sleep, and sleep hygiene. For four consecutive days, they also completed a sleep diary, and reported on sleep hygiene practices and presleep arousal. RESULTS: Thirty-three patients (55%) met diagnostic criteria for MDD, most of whom (n=32 [97%]) also fulfilled criteria for insomnia disorder. Insomnia was also common among patients without MDD (21 of 27 [78%]). Participants with MDD had higher self-reports of pain, disability, dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, and, on a prospective basis, greater presleep arousal and poorer sleep hygiene. However, diary assessments of specific sleep parameters (eg, sleep onset latency, total sleep time, sleep efficiency) did not differ between the groups. DISCUSSION: Chronic pain patients with comorbid MDD exhibited more dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, poorer sleep hygiene practices and greater presleep arousal; however, diary-recorded sleep characteristics may not differ from those of patients without MDD. Chronic pain itself may disturb sleep so extensively that MDD introduces little additive effect. CONCLUSION: MDD in chronic pain may be related to the cognitive and behavioural aspects of insomnia, rather than to an incremental disturbance in the initiation or maintenance of sleep. PMID:24367795

Emery, Patricia C; Wilson, Keith G; Kowal, John

2014-01-01

258

A preliminary report on adjuvant analgesic efficacy of HANS in opioid tolerant patients with cancer pain  

PubMed Central

Objective To observe the adjuvant analgesic efficacy of Han’s Acupoint Nerve Stimulator (HANS) in opioid tolerant patients with cancer pain. Methods A prospective non-controlled study was conducted. Opioid tolerant patients with cancer pain were enrolled and treated with both routinely analgesics and adjuvant HANS (2/100 Hz for 30 min/d, 5 d on and 2 d off for two weeks). Cancer pain, quality of life (QOL), anxiety and depression were assessed before enrollment and on d 8 and d 15 with the BPI-C, EORTC QLQ-C30, and self-rating anxiety scale (SAS)/self-rating depression scale (SDS), respectively; the therapeutic frequency of breakthrough pain (BP) and daily opioid dose were also recorded. Results Totally 47 patients meeting the inclusion criteria participated in this study; 43 patients completed the two-week treatment and assessment. The mean scores of patient’s “worst” and “least” pain intensity assessed with BPI-C decreased significantly on d 8 and d 15; the therapeutic frequency of BP also significantly decreased; but the average daily dose of opioids did not change significantly. For the nine symptoms in EORTC QLQ-C30 assessment, the mean scores of pain, fatigue, constipation and insomnia were significantly lower on d 8 and d 15 compared with baseline; the mean scores of the overall health status, nausea/vomiting and the incidence rates of both anxiety and depression also decreased significantly on d 15. Conclusions To opioid tolerant patients with cancer pain, adjuvant treatment with HANS could improve pain release and patients’ QOL by decreasing the severity of pain, fatigue, constipation, insomnia and other concomitant symptoms; it could also decrease the incidence rates of anxiety and depression. PMID:24826058

Li, Xiaomei; Zhu, Jianhua; Li, Pingping; Zhu, Guangqing; Wu, Xiaoming; Chen, Huoming; Zhao, Huixia; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Duanqi

2014-01-01

259

Predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain  

PubMed Central

Background The objective of this exploratory study was to identify patient-related predictors of communication preferences in patients with chronic low back pain for various dimensions of patient-physician communication (patient participation and orientation, effective and open communication, emotionally supportive communication, communication about personal circumstances). Methods Eleven rehabilitation centers from various parts of Germany participated in collection of data between 2009 and 2011. A total of 701 patients with chronic low back pain were surveyed at the start of rehabilitation. The patient questionnaire captured communication preferences, pain impact, pain intensity, and psychologic variables (fear avoidance beliefs, illness coherence, control beliefs, communication self-efficacy, and personality characteristics). The rehabilitation physicians filled out a documentation sheet containing information on diagnosis, inability to work, duration of the illness, and comorbidity at the beginning and end of rehabilitation. Hierarchical regression analyses were performed. Results On average, effective, open, and patient-centered communication was very important for patients with back pain, emotionally supportive communication was important, and communication about personal circumstances was somewhat important. The variance in communication preferences explained by the predictors studied here was 8%–19%. Older patients showed a lower preference for patient-centered and open communication, but a higher preference for communication about personal circumstances. Patients with psychologic risk factors (eg, fear avoidance beliefs), extroverted patients, and patients with high self-efficacy in patient-physician interaction generally had higher expectations of the physician’s communicative behavior. Conclusion Providers should take into consideration the fact that patients with back pain have a strong need for effective, open, and patient-centered communication. A flexible approach to communication needs appears to be especially important for communication about emotional and personal circumstances, because the patients differ most clearly in this respect. Personal characteristics provided only initial clues to possible preferences; for more precision, an individual assessment (by means of questionnaires or discussion) is needed. PMID:24187489

Farin, Erik; Gramm, Lukas; Schmidt, Erika

2013-01-01

260

Pain and quality of life for patients with venous leg ulcers: proof of concept of the efficacy of BiatainR-Ibu, a new pain reducing wound dressing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wound pain is a serious problem for elderly patients suffering from chronic leg ulcers, and it may lead to reduced wound healing rates and reduced quality of life. Biatains-Ibu Non-adhesive (Coloplast A\\/S), a new pain-reducing moist wound healing dressing containing ibuprofen was tested for pain reduction, safety, and efficacy on 1012 patients in a single-blinded crossover study against Biatain Non-adhesive

Bo Jorgensen; Gitte Juel Friis; Finn Gottrup

2006-01-01

261

Pain, disability, and satisfation outcomes and predictors of outcomes: A practice-based study of chronic low back pain patients attending primary care and chiropractic physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Few studies exist on the prognostic value of demographic, clinical, or psychosocial factors on long-term outcomes for patients with chronic low back pain.Objective: This study reports on long-term pain and disability outcomes for patients with chronic low back pain, evaluates predictors of long-term outcomes, and assesses the influence of doctor type on clinical outcome.Methods: Sixty chiropractic (DC) and 111

Joanne Nyiendo; Mitchell Haas; Bruce Goldberg; Gary Sexton

2001-01-01

262

Graded exposure in vivo in the treatment of pain-related fear: a replicated single-case experimental design in four patients with chronic low back pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this investigation was to examine the effectiveness of a graded exposure in vivo treatment with behavioural experiments as compared to usual graded activity in reducing pain-related fears, catastrophising and pain disability in chronic low back pain patients reporting substantial fear of movement\\/(re)injury. Included in the study were four consecutive CLBP patients who were referred for outpatient behavioural

Johan W. S Vlaeyen; Jeroen de Jong; Mario Geilen; Peter H. T. G Heuts; Gerard van Breukelen

2001-01-01

263

PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A)  

E-print Network

PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A) 0-10 NUMERIC PAIN INTENSITY SCALE 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 NO PAIN MODERATE WORST PAIN PAIN #12;PAIN SCALES (ATTACHMENT A) FLACC PAIN SCALE The FLACC is a behavioral pain assessment scale for use in non-verbal patients unable to provide numeric reports of pain. SCORING Categories

Oliver, Douglas L.

264

Bortezomib-induced painful neuropathy in patients with multiple myeloma  

PubMed Central

Neurotoxicity towards the peripheral nervous system which appears clinically in the form of painful neuropathy is an essential dose-limiting factor during the treatment of multiple myeloma. In this review article different forms of this painful neuropathy are presented together with currently available diagnostic tools which are usually applied to confirm the diagnosis. Also, the most often used neurological scales estimating neurological deficit are presented. Special attention is paid to the management of the reversibility of bortezomib-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:24596530

Usnarska-Zubkiewicz, Lidia; Pokryszko-Dragan, Anna

2013-01-01

265

Impact of a multidisciplinary pain program for the management of chronic low back pain in patients undergoing spine surgery and primary total hip replacement: a retrospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Background Low back pain is a very common disorder. In this field chronic low back pain represents a special challenge. The management of chronic low back pain consists of a range of different intervention strategies. Usually operative intervention should be avoided if possible. However, there are constellations were surgical therapy in patients with chronic low back pain seems to be meaningful. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcomes after spine surgery and hip replacement in patients with chronic low back pain after undergoing a structured rehabilitation program including cognitive – behavioral therapy. Methods From January 1, 2007 to January 1, 2010 patients were indicated for total hip replacement (THA) or spine surgery after receiving inpatient multidisciplinary pain programs including cognitive – behavioral therapy at our orthopedic institute with a specialized unit for the rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Indications for surgery were based on the synopsis of clinical and imaging findings and on positive effects after local injections during the multidisciplinary pain program. The tools for assessment included follow-up at 6 and 12 months and analyses of pain, chronicity, physical functioning and depression. Results Of the 256 patients admitted for multidisciplinary pain program, fifteen were indicated to benefit from a surgical intervention during multidisciplinary pain program. Ten patients received spine surgery. THA was indicated in five patients. In all cases, the peri- and postoperative clinical courses were uneventful. Only two of the patients subjected to spine surgery and three patients who had THA were improved after 12 months. One patient reported a worsened condition. All patients presented with good functional outcomes and normal radiological findings. Conclusions The indication for surgical intervention in patients with chronic low back pain and degenerative diseases must be critically assessed. THA in this cohort should focus on functional aspects, such as the improvement of range of motion, rather than the reduction of pain. Spine surgery in chronic low back pain patients after multidisciplinary pain program including cognitive – behavioral therapy cannot be recommended due to its questionable success. PMID:25473419

2014-01-01

266

The impact of stress and anxiety on the pressure pain threshold of myofascial pain patients.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of stress and anxiety on the pressure pain threshold (PPT) of masticatory muscles and on the subjective pain report. Forty-five women, students, with mean age of 19.75 years, were divided into two groups: group 1:29 presenting with masticatory myofascial pain (MFP), according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and group 2: 16 asymptomatic controls. An electronic algometer registered the pain thresholds on four different occasions throughout the academic year. To measure levels of stress, anxiety and pain, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, Lipp Stress Symptoms Inventory and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used. Three-way anova and Tukey's tests were used to verify differences in PPT between groups, times and sites. Levels of anxiety and VAS were compared using Mann-Whitney test, while Friedman's test was used for the within-groups comparison at different times (T1 to T4). The chi-squared and Cochran tests were performed to compare groups for the proportion of subjects with stress (alpha = 0.05). Differences in PPT recordings between time (P = 0.001) and sites (P < 0.001) were detected. Higher levels of anxiety and lower PPT figures were detected at T2 (academic examination) (P = 0.001). There was no difference between groups for anxiety and stress at any time (P > 0.05). The MFP group also has shown significant increase of VAS at the time of academic examination (P < 0.001). External stressors such as academic examinations have a potential impact on masticatory muscle tenderness, regardless of the presence of a previous condition such as masticatory myofascial pain. PMID:19210679

Vedolin, G M; Lobato, V V; Conti, P C R; Lauris, J R P

2009-05-01

267

The Bowel Function Index for evaluating constipation in pain patients: definition of a reference range for a non-constipated population of pain patients.  

PubMed

Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a severe, persisting side-effect of opioid therapy. The Bowel Function Index (BFI(a), numerical analogue scale 0 - 100), calculated as the mean of three variables (ease of defaecation, feeling of incomplete bowel evacuation, and personal judgement of constipation) was developed to evaluate bowel function in opioid-treated patients with pain. This clinician-administered tool allows easy measurement of OIC from the patient's perspective. The purpose of this investigation was to define a reference range reflecting BFI values in non-constipated chronic pain patients who were recruited into a cross-sectional survey and asked for their perceptions of constipation. The BFI scores were assessed and compared with those of patients with confirmed OIC obtained from two previously published trials. Results were analysed and a reference range of BFI values of 0 - 28.8, into which 95% of non-constipated chronic pain patients fell, was defined. This permits discrimination between chronic pain patients with, or without, constipation. PMID:21672306

Ueberall, M A; Müller-Lissner, S; Buschmann-Kramm, C; Bosse, B

2011-01-01

268

Pain and Anxiety versus Sense of Family Support in Lung Cancer Patients  

PubMed Central

Lung cancer is a stressful condition for both patient and family. The anxiety and pain accompanying cancer and its treatment have a significant negative influence on the patient's quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between anxiety, pain, and perceived family support in a sample of lung cancer patients. The sample consisted of a total of 101 lung cancer outpatients receiving treatment at the oncology department of a general hospital. Anxiety, pain (severity and impact on everyday life), and perceived family support were assessed using Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Brief Pain Inventory, and the Family Support Scale, respectively. Statistical analyses revealed correlations between anxiety, pain, and family support as perceived by the patients. The intensity of pain had a positive correlation with both state and trait anxiety and a negative correlation with family support. Anxiety (state and trait) had a significant negative correlation with family support. In conclusion, high prevalence rates of anxiety disorders were observed in lung cancer patients. Females appeared more susceptible to anxiety symptoms with a less sense of family support. A negative correlation was evidenced between family support and anxiety and a positive one between anxiety and pain. PMID:25126424

Lekka, Dimitra; Pachi, Argiro; Zafeiropoulos, Georgios; Evmolpidi, Argiri; Ilias, Ioannis; Karkanias, Athanasios; Moussas, Georgios; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

2014-01-01

269

Pain in patients with multiple sclerosis: a complex assessment including quantitative and qualitative measurements provides for a disease-related biopsychosocial pain model  

PubMed Central

Background: Pain of various causes is a common phenomenon in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). A biopsychosocial perspective has proven a useful theoretical construct in other chronic pain conditions and was also started in MS. To support such an approach, we aimed to investigate pain in MS with special emphasis on separating quantitative and qualitative aspects, and its interrelation to behavioral and physical aspects. Materials and methods: Pain intensity (NRS) and quality (SES) were measured in 38 consecutive outpatients with MS (mean age, 42.0 ± 11.5 years, 82% women). Pain-related behavior (FSR), health care utilization, bodily complaints (GBB-24) and fatigue (WEIMuS) were assessed by questionnaires, and MS-related neurological impairment by a standardized neurological examination (EDSS). Results: Mean pain intensity was 4.0 (range, 0–10) and mean EDSS 3.7 (range, 0–8) in the overall sample. Currently present pain was reported by 81.6% of all patients. Disease duration and EDSS did not differ between patients with and without pain and were not correlated to quality or intensity of pain. Patients with pain had significantly higher scores of musculoskeletal complaints, but equal scores of exhaustion, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular complaints. Pain intensity correlated only with physical aspects, whereas quality of pain was additionally associated with increased avoidance, resignation and cognitive fatigue. Conclusion: As in other conditions, pain in MS must be assessed in a multidimensional way. Further research should be devoted to adapt existing models to a MS-specific model of pain. PMID:21887119

Michalski, Dominik; Liebig, Stefanie; Thomae, Eva; Hinz, Andreas; Bergh, Florian Then

2011-01-01

270

Reducing Cancer Patients' Painful Treatment - Duration: 3:07.  

NASA Video Gallery

A NASA light technology originally developed to aid plant growth experiments in space has proved to reduce the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marro...

271

Active and passive coping strategies in chronic pain patients  

E-print Network

and the Vanderbilt Pain Management Inventory were both found to be psychometfically sound measures of these dimensions of active and passive coping. Passive coping was found to be strongly related to psychological distress. In contrast, active coping was inversely...

Snow-Turek, Andrea Lynn

2012-06-07

272

Effect of NCPB and VSPL on pain and quality of life in chronic pancreatitis patients  

PubMed Central

AIM: To compare the effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) and videothoracoscopic splanchnicectomy (VSPL) on pain and quality of life of chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients. METHODS: Forty-eight small duct CP patients were treated invasively with NCPB (n = 30) or VSPL (n = 18) in two non-randomized, prospective, case-controlled protocols due to chronic pain syndrome, and compared to a control group who were treated conservatively (n = 32). Visual analog scales were used to assess pain and opioid consumption rate was evaluated. In addition, the quality of life was measured using QLQ C-30 for NCPB and FACIT for VSPL. Although both questionnaires covered similar problems, they could not be compared directly one with another. Therefore, the studies were compared by meta-analysis methodology. RESULTS: Both procedures resulted in a significant positive effect on pain of CP patients. Opioids were withdrawn totally in 47.0% of NCPB and 36.4% of VSPL patients, and reduced in 53.0% and 45.4% of the respective patient groups. No reduction in opioid usage was observed in the control group. In addition, fatigue and emotional well-being showed improvements. Finally, NCPB demonstrated stronger positive effects on social support, which might possibly be attributed to earlier presentation of patients treated with NCPB. CONCLUSION: Both invasive pain treatment methods are effective in CP patients with chronic pain. PMID:16124055

Basinski, Andrzej; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Vingerhoets, Ad; Makarewicz, Wojciech; Kaska, Lukasz; Stanek, Aleksander; Lachinski, Andrzej J.; Sledzinski, Zbigniew

2005-01-01

273

Is Response to Radiotherapy in Patients Related to the Severity of Pretreatment Pain?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The primary objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the severity of pretreatment pain and response to palliative radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases. Methods and Materials: The database for patients with bone metastases seen at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program at the Odette Cancer Center from 1999 to 2006 was analyzed. The proportion of patients with mild (scores 1-4), moderate (scores 5-6), or severe (scores 7-10) pain at baseline who experienced a complete response, partial response, stable response, or progressive response after palliative RT was determined according to International Bone Metastases Consensus definitions. Results: During the 7-year study period 1,053 patients received palliative radiation for bone metastases. The median age was 68 years and the median Karnofsky performance status was 70. Of the patients, 53% had a complete or partial response at 1 month, 52% at 2 months, and 54% at 3 months post-RT. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in terms of the proportion of responders (patients with complete or partial response) and nonresponders in terms of painful bone metastases among patients presenting with mild, moderate, or severe pain. Patients with moderate pain should be referred for palliative RT.

Kirou-Mauro, Andrea; Hird, Amanda; Wong, Jennifer; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Tsao, May; Danjoux, Cyril [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chow, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)], E-mail: edward.chow@sunnybrook.ca

2008-07-15

274

Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis in an Iranian Patient  

PubMed Central

Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis is a rare disease of the nervous system which causes one to lose his/her feeling of pain. The disease is subtype four of hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN IV) that results from NTRK1 gene defect. Direct sequencing was performed to screen NTRK1 for mutations. The result revealed a homozygous deletion of adenine on intron 14 that may cause the disease. PMID:25337332

Saleh-gohari, Nasrollah; Mohammadi-Anaie, Marzye

2013-01-01

275

Effective Treatments for Pain in the Older Patient  

Microsoft Academic Search

By 2050, the number of older persons across the globe will exceed the number of younger people for the first time in history.\\u000a Chronic conditions, especially pain, will rise in prevalence as the population ages. Controlling pain in this unique subset\\u000a of the population demands careful attention to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic factors and their specific impact on pharmacotherapies,\\u000a relevant complementary

Paul J. Christo; Sean Li; Stephen J. Gibson; Perry Fine; Haroon Hameed

2011-01-01

276

Evidence Report on the Treatment of Pain in Cancer Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pain associated with cancer is of widespread concern. We conducted a systematic review to evaluate the best available evidence on the efficacy of treatments of cancer-related pain. The sources used were MEDLINE, CancerLit, and the Co- chrane Library from 1966 through April 2001, as well as bibliographies of meta-analyses and review articles. We se- lected randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting

Daniel B. Carr; Leonidas C. Goudas; Ethan M. Balk; Rina Bloch; John P. A. Ioannidis; Joseph Lau

2004-01-01

277

Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

1986-01-01

278

Triazolam improves sleep but fails to alter pain in TMD patients.  

PubMed

Patients with chronic orofacial pain often report disturbances in sleep, leading to the hypothesis that nocturnal motor hyperactivity of the muscles of mastication may contribute to the nociceptive process. This hypothesis was tested in a controlled study to evaluate the relationship between sleep stages, patient self-report of pain in the orofacial region, and nocturnal masticatory muscle activity. Twenty subjects participating in a two-period, within-subject, crossover study received triazolam or placebo for 4 nights. Sleep, pain, and mandibular range of motion were assessed at baseline, following the first period, and again following the second period; a 3-day washout period separated the two treatments. Subjective report of sleep quality was significantly improved following triazolam in comparison to placebo as measured by category scales for sleep quality, restfulness, and sleep compared to usual. The amount of time spent in stage-2 sleep was also significantly increased by triazolam. No improvement was seen in pain as measured by palpation with an algometer, in scales for sensory intensity and the affective component of pain, or in daily pain diaries. Mean facial muscle electromyographic activity for 30-second epochs averaged over the entire period of sleep did not reveal any differences in muscle activity across the three conditions. These data indicate that improvements in sleep quality and alterations in sleep architecture do not affect nocturnal facial muscle activity or subsequent pain report in temporomandibular patients, thereby failing to support the hypothesized relationship between sleep disturbances and chronic orofacial pain. PMID:9656889

DeNucci, D J; Sobiski, C; Dionne, R A

1998-01-01

279

Psychological Disturbance and Life Event Differences Among Patients With Low Back Pain.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of this study emphasized the importance of considering psychological disturbance in assessing functional components of low back pain. Psychologically disturbed patients had higher life-event scores regardless of organic pathology. (Author/BEF)

Leavitt, Frank; And Others

1980-01-01

280

Effect of Music on Postoperative Pain in Patients Under Open Heart Surgery  

PubMed Central

Background: Music, as a non-pharmacological and inexpensive nursing intervention, can be used easily as a complementary technique in reducing pain along with other methods. While some studies have demonstrated pain to decrease after music, others found music to be ineffective on pain. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of music on postoperative pain in patients under open heart surgery. Patients and Methods: A quasi-experimental study was performed on 60 patients under open heart surgery referred to ICU of Shahid Beheshti hospital in Kashan city. Patients were randomly divided into two groups including experimental and control groups. Patients in music group listened to nonverbal music for 30 minutes after surgery by headphones. The control group did not receive any intervention other than routine care. Before and after intervention, pain intensity was measured and recorded by visual analog scale in two groups. Data was analyzed using Chi-Square and t-tests. Results: Before intervention, the mean of pain intensity was 6.32 ± 0.21 and 6.10 ± 0.21 for experimental and control groups, respectively; and the difference was not significant (P = 0.21). After intervention, the mean of pain intensity was 3.11 ± 0.12 and 5.81 ± 0.38 for experimental and control groups, respectively; and the difference was significant (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Listening to the relaxant music can reduce postoperative pain. It is suggested that relaxant music be used as a complementary method in patients in order to reduce prospective pain.

Mirbagher Ajorpaz, Neda; Mohammadi, Abouzar; Najaran, Hamed; Khazaei, Shala

2014-01-01

281

Extracorporal shock wave therapy in patients with tennis elbow and painful heel  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of extracorporal shock wave therapy (ESWT) in tennis elbow and painful heel.\\u000a Nineteen patients with tennis elbow and 44 patients with painful heel in which conservative treatment had failed underwent\\u000a ESWT. Both groups received 3000 shock waves of 0.12 mJ\\/mm2 three times at weekly intervals. After a follow-up of 5

Dietrich S. Hammer; Stefan Rupp; Stefan Ensslin; Dieter Kohn; Romain Seil

2000-01-01

282

Catastrophic thinking and increased risk for prescription opioid misuse in patients with chronic pain  

PubMed Central

Background As a consequence of the substantial rise in the prescription of opioids for the treatment of chronic noncancer pain, greater attention has been paid to the factors that may be associated with an increased risk for prescription opioid misuse. Recently, a growing number of studies have shown that patients with high levels of catastrophizing are at increased risk for prescription opioid misuse. Objective The primary objective of this study was to examine the variables that might underlie the association between catastrophizing and risk for prescription opioid misuse in patients with chronic pain. Methods Patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (n = 115) were asked to complete the SOAPP-R, a validated self-report questionnaire designed to identify patients at risk for prescription opioid misuse. Patients were also asked to complete self-report measures of pain intensity, catastrophizing, anxiety, and depression. Results Consistent with previous research, we found that catastrophizing was associated with an increased risk for prescription opioid misuse. Results also revealed that the association between catastrophizing and risk for opioid misuse was partially mediated by patients’ levels of anxiety. Follow-up analyses, however, indicated that catastrophizing remained a significant ‘unique’ predictor of risk for opioid misuse even when controlling for patients’ levels of pain severity, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Discussion Discussion addresses the factors that might place patients with high levels of catastrophizing at increased risk for prescription opioid misuse. The implications of our findings for the management of patients considered for opioid therapy are also discussed. PMID:23618767

Martel, MO; Wasan, AD; Jamison, RN; Edwards, RR

2013-01-01

283

Neuropathic Pain and Psychological Morbidity in Patients with Treated Leprosy: A Cross-Sectional Prevalence Study in Mumbai  

PubMed Central

Background Neuropathic pain has been little studied in leprosy. We assessed the prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain and the validity of the Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire as a screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with treated leprosy. The association of neuropathic pain with psychological morbidity was also evaluated. Methodology/Principal Findings Adult patients who had completed multi-drug therapy for leprosy were recruited from several Bombay Leprosy Project clinics. Clinical neurological examination, assessment of leprosy affected skin and nerves and pain evaluation were performed for all patients. Patients completed the Douleur Neuropathique 4 and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire to identify neuropathic pain and psychological morbidity. Conclusions/Significance One hundred and one patients were recruited, and 22 (21.8%) had neuropathic pain. The main sensory symptoms were numbness (86.4%), tingling (68.2%), hypoesthesia to touch (81.2%) and pinprick (72.7%). Neuropathic pain was associated with nerve enlargement and tenderness, painful skin lesions and with psychological morbidity. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 92% in diagnosing neuropathic pain. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 is a simple tool for the screening of neuropathic pain in leprosy patients. Psychological morbidity was detected in 15% of the patients and 41% of the patients with neuropathic pain had psychological morbidity. PMID:21408111

Lasry-Levy, Estrella; Hietaharju, Aki; Pai, Vivek; Ganapati, Ramaswamy; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Haanpää, Maija; Lockwood, Diana N. J.

2011-01-01

284

The efficacy of a multidisciplinary group program for patients with refractory chronic pain  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Chronic pain is a major problem because it can result in not only a reduction in activities of daily living and quality of life but also requires initiation of social assistance. Seeking only to eliminate pain itself would appear to be too narrow an objective, in addition to often being unachievable; therefore, a multifaceted, comprehensive approach with multiple objectives is needed. OBJECTIVE: To describe the effects of a program (the ‘Chronic Pain Class’) offering cognitive behavioural therapy to small groups of individuals with refractory chronic pain in Japan. Exercise was an important feature of the program. METHODS: A total of 46 patients who were experiencing treatment difficulties and decreased activity participated in the program. The programs were conducted in groups of five to seven patients who met weekly for nine weeks. Weekly sessions, which were approximately 2 h in duration, combined lectures with exercise. Several measures related to pain and physical function were administered at the beginning and the conclusion of the program. RESULTS: Nine patients dropped out during the program. A number of measures (eg, pain intensity, disability, catastrophizing thoughts) showed significant improvements after intervention (P<0.002 after Bonferroni correction). Furthermore, most measures of physical function showed substantial improvement, especially seated forward bends, zig-zag walking, self-care and 6 min walk test (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: The results of the present study provide evidence that a combination of cognitive behavioural therapy and exercise should be recommended to patients with refractory chronic pain. PMID:24992454

Inoue, Masayuki; Inoue, Shinsuke; Ikemoto, Tatsunori; Arai, Young-Chang P; Nakata, Masatoshi; Miyazaki, Atsuko; Nishihara, Makoto; Kawai, Takashi; Hatakeyama, Noboru; Yamaguchi, Setsuko; Shimo, Kazuhiro; Miyagawa, Hirofumi; Hasegawa, Tomomi; Sakurai, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Yoshinobu; Ohmichi, Yusuke; Ushida, Takahiro

2014-01-01

285

Epidemiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Retrospective Chart Review of 150 Korean Patients  

PubMed Central

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronically painful and disabling disorder. However, no data are available even on the epidemiology of CRPS in Korea. This study was undertaken to retrospectively assess the epidemiologic characteristics of CRPS in 150 consecutive patients at a tertiary chronic pain center from March 2002 to February 2006. Information was obtained regarding patients' demographics, nature of injury, and treatment modalities. Seventy-one percent of patients had CRPS type I. The mean 11-point verbal numerical rating scale score at initial examinations and at the time of study were 8.0 and 5.7, respectively. Thirty-two percent of patients showed no change or increase in pain intensity during follow-up at our pain center. The mean duration of CRPS symptoms prior to our pain center evaluation and prior to the time of study were 27 months and 50 months, respectively. These patients had seen on average 5 different physicians before being referred to our center. This study shows that the majority of CRPS patients were referred to our center after more than 2 yr of symptoms. The clinical implication of such delayed transfer and strategies to avoid this problem are discussed. PMID:18955780

Choi, Yun Suk; Lee, Mi Geum; Lee, Hyo Min; Lee, Chul Joong; Jo, Ji Yeon; Jeon, Soo Young; Lee, Sang Chul

2008-01-01

286

Alleviating visceral cancer pain in patients with pancreatic cancer using cryoablation and celiac plexus block.  

PubMed

Little is known about the effects of pancreas cryoablation (PCA) on abdominalgia in pancreatic cancer patients or its synergism with celiac plexus block (CPB). In patients without abdominalgia, to investigate the effects of PCA; in patients with abdominalgia, to investigate the pain-alleviating effects of PCA+CPB. Sixty-two patients were enrolled in this retrospective review; 12 without abdominalgia refused PCA, 15 without abdominalgia received PCA to reduce their tumor load and 35 with abdominalgia received PCA+CPB to reduce tumor load and alleviate pain. All PCA and PCA+CPB procedures were performed successfully. Some slight adverse effects (e.g. increased serum amylase, abdominal distension and nausea, abdominal bleeding) had disappeared by 3weeks, spontaneously or after symptomatic treatment. In patients without abdominalgia, pain occurred in one-third of cases (all with pancreatic head cancer) after PCA but had stopped 1-12days after treatment; in patients with abdominalgia before treatment, pain stopped immediately after PCA+CPB in 18 cases and 2-24days after treatment in 17 (all with pancreatic head cancer); a significant difference was found between pretreatment and post-treatment pain frequency (P=0.0019), regardless of the presence of advanced (P=0.0096) or metastatic (P=0.0072) cancer. The average time to pain relief was approximately 7days after both PCA and PCA+CPB, and abdominalgia did not recur for more than 8weeks. PCA may cause short-term pain in some pancreatic cancer patients. Combined PCA+CPB can alleviate cancer pain for more than 8weeks, without severe side effects. PMID:23267876

Niu, Lizhi; Wang, Yu'e; Yao, Fei; Wei, Changqun; Chen, Yuxian; Zhang, Li; Chen, Jibing; Li, Jialiang; Zuo, Jiansheng; Xu, Kecheng

2013-04-01

287

Pressure Pain Sensitivity and Insular Combined Glutamate and Glutamine (Glx) Are Associated with Subsequent Clinical Response to Sham But Not Traditional Acupuncture in Patients Who Have Chronic Pain  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Clinical trials of acupuncture in chronic pain have largely failed to demonstrate efficacy of traditional over sham acupuncture. However, it should be noted that sham acupuncture is not inert. Objective To determine if experimental-pressure pain assessment and chemical neuroimaging can identify differential responsiveness to sham as opposed to traditional acupuncture. Patients and Intervention Fifty patients with fibromyalgia were randomized to either 9 traditional (TA) or sham (SA) acupuncture treatments over a period of 4 weeks. Both participants and assessors were blinded. Main Outcome Measures The main outcome measures were pressure-pain sensitivity at the thumbnail, insular glutamate+glutamine (Glx), and clinical pain. Results Patients with low pain sensitivity (LPS), but not with high pain sensitivity (HPS), had a significantly reduced clinical pain response to SA (change in mean [standard deviation (SD)]: HPS ?8.65 [7.91]; LPS ?2.14 [6.68]; p=0.03). This relationship was not the case for TA (HPS ?6.90 [4.51]; LPS ?6.41 [9.25]; p=0.88). SA-treated patients who were more sensitive also had greater baseline levels of insular Glx than patients who were less sensitive (Glx mean [SD]: HPS 11.3 [1.18]; LPS 10.2 [0.54]; p=0.04). Conclusions Pressure-pain testing may identify patients who are less likely to respond to SA. This effect may relate to the levels of brain excitatory neurotransmitters. PMID:24761170

Harte, Steven E.; Clauw, Daniel J.; Napadow, Vitaly

2013-01-01

288

Representation of verbal pain descriptors on a visual analogue scale by dental patients and dental students.  

PubMed

Verbal rating scales (VRS), composed of ranked pain descriptors, are often employed in pain research. Factors that may influence the subjective pain intensity values, however, are not well established. In this study, 5 common pain descriptor adjectives were represented on a visual analogue scale (VAS) by a group of 80 dental students, by a group of 48 patients undergoing periodontal therapy, and by a group of 31 dental phobic patients. It was thought that each group of individuals on conducting the test represented a different degree of apprehension, ranging from a relaxed to a very tense status. There were differences in the interpretation of the pain descriptors between groups. Furthermore, age seemed to influence the interpretation of the pain descriptors. No correlation was found with gender. The descriptors did not divide the analogue scale into equal segments. 71% of all subjects gave the adjective "mild" a lower pain intensity representation than the adjective "weak", while the order was reversed among remaining subjects. Findings cast doubt on the reliability of VRS and the data handling methods commonly adopted in clinical pain research. PMID:9249186

Tammaro, S; Berggren, U; Bergenholtz, G

1997-06-01

289

Clinical and ethical implications of placebo effects: enhancing patients' benefits from pain treatment.  

PubMed

Expectancy and learning are the core psychological mechanisms of placebo analgesia. They interact with further psychological processes such as emotions and motivations (e.g., anxiety, desire for relief), somatic focus, or cognitions (e.g., attitudes toward the treatment). The development of placebo responsiveness and the actual placebo response in a person is the result of the complex interaction between factors traced back to the individual learning history related to analgesic drugs or treatments and factors of the current context referring to the analgesic or placebo treatment. The aim of this chapter is to depict these complex interactions in a new model of analgesic placebo effects. It joins aspects of the learning history (preexisting experiences and preexisting expectations) of a patient with aspects of the current context (current expectation as a result of external and internal situation in which a pain medication/treatment/placebo is taken, e.g., current information about pain medication, current specific context/cues, desire for pain relief, certainty about upcoming pain relief, current expectation about pain reducing course, current selective attention, increased pain experience, or decreased pain experience). In order to exploit placebo efficacy for an analgesic treatment it is worthwhile to assess in which direction each of these factors exerts its influence in order to maximize placebo effects for a specific patient. By applying placebo mechanisms in this differentiated way, the efficacy of pain treatment can be deliberately boosted. PMID:25304535

Klinger, Regine; Flor, Herta

2014-01-01

290

Recurrent and progressive abdominal pain and enteritis in a Japanese patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria.  

PubMed

This case report describes a young male patient with recurrent abdominal pain persisting for more than 16 months. Clinical investigations showed signs of inflammation and pancytopenia. A diagnosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) was made 9 months after the onset of the abdominal pain, following endoscopic examinations that revealed evidence of a previously unknown hemorrhage. Regular monitoring indicated that the abdominal pain was associated with elevations in lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive proteins, and D-dimer levels. The patient started treatment with the complement inhibitor eculizumab shortly after it was approved for use in Japanese PNH patients with hemolysis. Resolution of the abdominal pain and normalization of clinical parameters were noted within 3 weeks from treatment initiation. PMID:24587926

Hino, Akihisa; Yamashita, Yukiko; Yamaguchi, Mitsuhiro; Azenishi, Yasuhiko

2014-01-01

291

Recurrent and Progressive Abdominal Pain and Enteritis in a Japanese Patient with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria  

PubMed Central

This case report describes a young male patient with recurrent abdominal pain persisting for more than 16 months. Clinical investigations showed signs of inflammation and pancytopenia. A diagnosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) was made 9 months after the onset of the abdominal pain, following endoscopic examinations that revealed evidence of a previously unknown hemorrhage. Regular monitoring indicated that the abdominal pain was associated with elevations in lactate dehydrogenase, C-reactive proteins, and D-dimer levels. The patient started treatment with the complement inhibitor eculizumab shortly after it was approved for use in Japanese PNH patients with hemolysis. Resolution of the abdominal pain and normalization of clinical parameters were noted within 3 weeks from treatment initiation. PMID:24587926

Hino, Akihisa; Yamashita, Yukiko; Yamaguchi, Mitsuhiro; Azenishi, Yasuhiko

2014-01-01

292

Correlating Femoral Shape with Patellar Kinematics in Patients with Patellofemoral Pain  

PubMed Central

Summary The etiology of patellofemoral pain is likely related to pathological femoral shape and soft-tissue restraints imbalance. These factors may result in various maltracking patterns in patients with patellofemoral pain. Thus, we hypothesized that femoral shape influences patellofemoral kinematics, but that this influence differs between kinematically-unique subgroups of patients with patellofemoral pain. 3D MRIs of 30 knees with patellofemoral pain and maltracking (“maltrackers”) and 33 knees of asymptomatic subjects were evaluated retrospectively. Dynamic MRI was acquired during a flexion-extension task. Maltrackers were divided into two subgroups (non-lateral and lateral maltrackers) based on previously defined kinematic criteria. Nine measures of femoral trochlear shape and two measures of patellar shape were quantified. These measures were correlated with patellofemoral kinematics. Differences were found in femoral shape between the maltracking and asymptomatic cohorts. Femoral shape was correlated with patellofemoral kinematics, but the kinematic parameters that demonstrated significant correlation varied across maltracking subgroups. Femoral shape parameters were associated with patellar kinematics in patients with patellofemoral pain and maltracking, but the correlations were unique across subgroups within this population. The ability to better categorize patients with patellofemoral pain will likely improve treatment by providing a more specific etiology of maltracking in individual patients. PMID:20108348

Harbaugh, Calista M.; Wilson, Nicole A.; Sheehan, Frances T.

2012-01-01

293

Biospectral analysis of the bladder channel point in chronic low back pain patients  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Chronic pain is the main cause of disability in the productive age people and is a public health problem that affects both the patient and society. On the other hand, there isn't any instrument to measure it; this is only estimated using subjective variables. The healthy cells generate a known membrane potential which is part of a network of biologically closed electric circuits still unstudied. It is proposed a biospectral analysis of a bladder channel point as a diagnosis method for chronic low back pain patients. Materials and methods: We employed a study group with chronic low back pain patients and a control group without low back pain patients. The visual analog scale (VAS) to determine the level of pain was applied. Bioelectric variables were measured for 10 seconds and the respective biostatistical analyses were made. Results: Biospectral analysis on frequency domain shows a depression in the 60-300 Hz frequency range proportional to the chronicity of low back pain compared against healthy patients.

Vidal, Alberto Espinosa; Nava, Juan José Godina; Segura, Miguel Ángel Rodriguez; Bastida, Albino Villegas

2012-10-01

294

Matching patients to an intervention for back pain: classifying patients using a latent class approach  

PubMed Central

Rationale, aims and objectives Classification of patients with back pain in order to inform treatments is a long-standing aim in medicine. We used latent class analysis (LCA) to classify patients with low back pain and investigate whether different classes responded differently to a cognitive behavioural intervention. The objective was to provide additional guidance on the use of cognitive behavioural therapy to both patients and clinicians. Method We used data from 407 participants from the full study population of 701 with complete data at baseline for the variables the intervention was designed to affect and complete data at 12 months for important outcomes. Patients were classified using LCA, and a link between class membership and outcome was investigated. For comparison, the latent class partition was compared with a commonly used classification system called Subgroups for Targeted Treatment (STarT). Results Of the relatively parsimonious models tested for association between class membership and outcome, an association was only found with one model which had three classes. For the trial participants who received the intervention, there was an association between class membership and outcome, but not for those who did not receive the intervention. However, we were unable to detect an effect on outcome from interaction between class membership and the intervention. The results from the comparative classification system were similar. Conclusion We were able to classify the trial participants based on psychosocial baseline scores relevant to the intervention. An association between class membership and outcome was identified for those people receiving the intervention, but not those in the control group. However, we were not able to identify outcome associations for individual classes and so predict outcome in order to aid clinical decision making. For this cohort of patients, the STarT system was as successful, but not superior. PMID:24661395

Barons, Martine J; Griffiths, Frances E; Parsons, Nick; Alba, Anca; Thorogood, Margaret; Medley, Graham F; Lamb, Sarah E

2014-01-01

295

Assessment of patients with neck pain: a review of definitions, selection criteria, and measurement tools  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this literature review was to synthesize the existing literature on various definitions, classifications, selection criteria, and outcome measures used in different studies in patients with neck pain. Methods A literature search of MEDLINE and CINAHL through September 2008 was performed to gather articles on the reliability, validity, and utility of a wide variety of outcome measurements for neck pain. Results Different types of definitions appear in the literature based on anatomical location, etiology, severity, and duration of symptoms. Classifications according to severity and duration of pain and the establishment of selection criteria seem to play a crucial role in study designs and in clinical settings to ensure homogeneous groups and effective interventions. A series of objective tests and subjective self-report measures are useful in assessing physical abilities, pain, functional ability, psychosocial well-being, general health status, and quality of life in patients with neck pain. Self-administered questionnaires are commonly used in clinical practice and research projects. Conclusions Because of multidimensionality of chronic neck pain, more than just one index may be needed to gain a complete health profile of the patient with neck pain. The instruments chosen should be reliable, valid, and able to evaluate the effects of treatment. PMID:21629550

Misailidou, Victoria; Malliou, Paraskevi; Beneka, Anastasia; Karagiannidis, Alexandros; Godolias, Georgios

2010-01-01

296

Parental substance abuse, reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease.  

PubMed Central

There is increasing interest from a social learning perspective in understanding the role of parental factors on adult health behaviors and health outcomes. Our review revealed no studies, to date, that have evaluated the effects of parental substance abuse on reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We explored the effects of parental substance (alcohol or drug) abuse on reports of the sensory, affective and summary indices of pain in 67 adult patients, mean age 38.9 (13.5), with SCD. We also explored the effects of parental substance abuse on psychopathology associated with pain and active coping. Twenty-four percent of patients reported that their parent(s) abused substances. Patients whose parent(s) were characterized as substance abusers reported greater sensory (p=0.02), affective (p=0.01) and summary (VAS; p=0.02) indices of pain as compared to their counterparts, whose parent(s) were not characterized as substance abusers. Patients did not differ in average age, education or the propensity to respond in a socially acceptable manner. There was a significant trend towards patients who characterized their parents as abusers scoring higher than their counterparts on active coping. We propose a Social Learning Theory to explain the current findings and suggest a need for additional prospective research to simultaneously explore biological (genetic) and social factors that influence the interpretation, experience and reporting of chronic pain in adult patients with chronic disease. PMID:16573309

Edwards, Christopher; Whitfield, Keith; Sudhakar, Shiv; Pearce, Michele; Byrd, Goldie; Wood, Mary; Feliu, Miriam; Leach-Beale, Brittani; DeCastro, Laura; Whitworth, Elaine; Abrams, Mary; Jonassaint, Jude; Harrison, M. Ojinga; Mathis, Markece; Scott, Lydia; Johnson, Stephanie; Durant, Lauren; Holmes, Anita; Presnell, Katherine; Bennett, Gary; Shelby, Rebecca; Robinson, Elwood

2006-01-01

297

A study of lifetime prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders in patients presenting with chest pain to emergency medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the prevalence of anxiety and depressive disorders in patients with chest pain presenting to an emergency department. Majority of the patients had coronary artery disease (CAD). Twenty-three percent of patients with chest pain had a diagnosable psychiatric disorder according to ICD-10 research criteria. Anxiety and depressive disorders were equally distributed among patients with concomitant psychiatric syndrome. The level

Krishnamachari Srinivasan; Willie Joseph

2004-01-01

298

A Learning and Teaching Resource on Patient Self-Management of Chronic Pain  

PubMed Central

Objective. To develop, pilot test, and evaluate an instructional module on patient self-management for undergraduate pharmacy students in an Australian university. Design. Learning outcomes and associated content and assessment tasks were developed, featuring lecture and readings, in-class discussions, and online delivery of in-depth interviews with patients who were living with chronic pain. Assessment. Students completed a premodule and postmodule questionnaire and were further assessed by multiple-choice questions following completion of the module and again at the end of the semester. Positive changes were identified in the students’ discourse surrounding patient self-management of chronic pain. Responses to multiple-choice questions showed that knowledge was sustained over the course of the semester. Conclusions. Completion of a comprehensive module on patient self-management increased undergraduate pharmacy students’ understanding and knowledge of patients experiencing chronic pain. The module could be implemented across other healthcare disciplines. PMID:23518902

Brown, Lin; Bundy, Anita; Ronaldson, Sue; McKenzie, Heather; Lewis, Peter; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

2013-01-01

299

Immediate Effects of tDCS on the ?-Opioid System of a Chronic Pain Patient  

PubMed Central

We developed a unique protocol where transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the motor cortex is performed during positron emission tomography (PET) scan using a ?-opioid receptor (?OR) selective radiotracer, [11C]carfentanil. This is one of the most important central neuromechanisms associated with pain perception and regulation. We measured ?OR non-displaceable binding potential (?OR BPND) in a trigeminal neuropathic pain patient (TNP) without creating artifacts, or posing risks to the patient (e.g., monitoring of resistance). The active session directly improved in 36.2% the threshold for experimental cold pain in the trigeminal allodynic area, mandibular branch, but not the TNP patient’s clinical pain. Interestingly, the single active tDCS application considerably decreased ?ORBPND levels in (sub)cortical pain-matrix structures compared to sham tDCS, especially in the posterior thalamus. Suggesting that the ?-opioidergic effects of a single tDCS session are subclinical at immediate level, and repetitive sessions are necessary to revert ingrained neuroplastic changes related to the chronic pain. To our knowledge, we provide data for the first time in vivo that there is possibly an instant increase of endogenous ?-opioid release during acute motor cortex neuromodulation with tDCS. PMID:23130002

DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; Love, Tiffany M.; Martikainen, Ilkka Kristian; Nascimento, Thiago Dias; Fregni, Felipe; Cummiford, Chelsea; Deboer, Misty Dawn; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; DaSilva, Alexandre F. M.

2012-01-01

300

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy: An adjuvant pain controlling modality in TMD patients — A clinical study  

PubMed Central

Background: The use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry was first described in 1967, by Shane and Kessler, but it has yet to gain widespread acceptance in dentistry. A study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of TENS therapy as an adjuvant modality and to compare it with the conventional medication in controlling pain in temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Yenepoya Dental College and Hospital, Mangalore. A total of 40 patients with the clinical symptom of pain associated with TMDs were randomly divided into two groups. Group A (control) patients were treated with medication (analgesics and muscle relaxants) alone, while group B patients were treated with TENS therapy in combination with medication. The intensity of the pain was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). The results were analyzed with the student's ‘t’ test. A P-value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: A significant improvement was observed in both the TENS and the control group in terms of pain control. On comparative analysis, adjuvant TENS therapy was found to be more effective than medication alone, in controlling pain. (P value = 0.019). Conclusion: The observed data suggest that TENS therapy can be used as an adjuvant modality in the management of pain associated with TMDs. This study justifies the use of TENS therapy in the management of TMD.

Shanavas, Muhammad; Chatra, Laxmikanth; Shenai, Prashanth; Rao, Prasanna Kumar; Jagathish, Veena; Kumar, Sreeja Prasanna; Naduvakkattu, Bilahari

2014-01-01

301

[Effect of change to flutamide for prostate cancer patient who developed breast pain during bicalutamide treatment (BIP-F study)].  

PubMed

In Japan, prostate cancer is treated with non-steroidal anti-androgen (flutamide and bicalutamide). Development of breast pain during bicalutamide treatment, in prostate cancer patients reduces their quality of life (QOL) and treatment compliance. We studied the safety and effectiveness of switching from bicalutamide to flutamide in 13 prostate cancer patients who developed breast pain during bicalutamide treatment. We estimated the change in breast pain using a face scale and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) and EPIC-hormone domain (HD) score. The switch to flutamide relieved breast pain in nine patients, had no effect in one patient, and increased breast pain in two patients. One patient dropped out. Furthermore, summary score and hormone function were improved with a significant difference in the EPIC-HD score. Switching to flutamide in prostate cancer patients who develop breast pain during bicalutamide is safe and effective. PMID:24594768

Kitamura, Yuki; Okuno, Hiroshi; Sakura, Yuma; Manabe, Yumi; Masuda, Norihiko; Ito, Haruk; Mishina, Mutsuki; Taoka, Rikiya; Terai, Akito; Sugimoto, Mikio; Kakehi, Yoshiyuki

2014-01-01

302

Pain Analysis in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Irreversible Electroporation versus Radiofrequency Ablation-Initial Observations  

SciTech Connect

To retrospectively compare the postprocedure pain of hepatocellular carcinoma treated with irreversible electroporation (IRE) with radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, institutional review board-approved study compared postprocedure pain in 21 patients (15 men, six women; mean age 61.5 years) who underwent IRE of 29 intrahepatic lesions (mean size 2.20 cm) in 28 IRE sessions with 22 patients (16 men, six women; mean age 60.2 years) who underwent RFA of 27 lesions (mean size 3.38 cm) in 25 RFA sessions. Pain was determined by patient-disclosed scores with an 11-point numerical rating scale and 24 h cumulative hydromorphone use from patient-controlled analgesia pump. Complications were noted. Statistical significance was evaluated by Fisher's exact test, the Chi-square test, and Student's t test. There was no significant difference in the cumulative hydromorphone dose (1.54 mg (IRE) vs. 1.24 mg (RFA); P = 0.52) and in the mean pain score (1.96 (IRE) vs. 2.25 (RFA); P = 0.70). In nine (32.14 %) of 28 IRE sessions and 11 (44.0 %) of 25 RFA sessions, patients reported no pain. Complications occurred in three (10.7 %) of 28 IRE treatments and included pneumothorax (n = 1), pleural effusion (n = 1), and bleeding in the form of hemothorax (n = 1); one (4 %) of 25 RFA treatments included burn. IRE is comparable to RFA in the amount of pain that patients experience and the amount of pain medication self-administered. Both modalities were well tolerated by patients. Prospective, randomized trials are necessary to further evaluate these findings.

Narayanan, Govindarajan, E-mail: gnarayanan@med.miami.edu; Froud, Tatiana, E-mail: tfroud@med.miami.edu [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)] [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States); Lo, Kaming, E-mail: KLo@biostat.med.miami.edu [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (United States)] [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health (United States); Barbery, Katuska J., E-mail: kbarbery@med.miami.edu; Perez-Rojas, Evelyn, E-mail: eprojas@med.miami.edu; Yrizarry, Jose, E-mail: jyrizarr@med.miami.edu [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)] [Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Department of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (United States)

2013-02-15

303

Emotional reactions to pain predict psychological distress in adult patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD).  

PubMed

Differentiating somatic from emotional influences on the experience of chronic pain has been of interest to clinicians and researchers for many years. Although prior research has not well specified these pathways at the anatomical level, some evidence, both theoretical and empirical, suggest that emotional reactions influence the experience of disease and non-disease-related pains. Other studies suggest that treatments directed at negative emotional responses reduce suffering associated with pain. The current study was conducted to explore the influence of emotional reactions to pain as a predictor of psychological distress in a sample of adult Blacks with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Using cross-sectional survey data, we evaluated whether negative emotional reactions to the experience of pain were predictive of psychological distress after controlling for the somatic dimension of pain and age in n = 67 Black patients with Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). Results showed that greater negative emotion associated with pain predicted Somatization (p < .01), Anxiety (p < .05), Phobic Anxiety (p < .05), and Psychoticism (p < .05). Increased negative emotion associated with pain was also predictive of the General Symptoms Index (p < .05) and the Positive Symptoms Total from the SCL-90-R (p < .01). We believe the current study demonstrates that negative emotional reactions to the experience of pain in adults with SCD are predictive of psychological distress above and beyond the influences of age and the direct nociceptive experience. We also believe these data to be valuable in conceptualizing the allocation of treatment resources toward a proactive approach with early identification of patients who are responding poorly for the purpose of potentially reducing later psychopathology. A deeper understanding of the ways that subpopulations cope with chronic disease-related pain may produce models that can be ultimately generalized to the consumers of the majority of healthcare resources. PMID:24956913

Edwards, Christopher L; Killough, Alvin; Wood, Mary; Doyle, Todd; Feliu, Miriam; Barker, Camela S; Uppal, Priyanka; DeCastro, Laura; Wellington, Chante; Whitfield, Keith E; O'Garo, Keisha-Gaye N; Morgan, Kai; Edwards Alesii, Lekisha Y; Byrd, Goldie S; McCabe, Melanie; Goli, Veeraindar; Keys, Abigail; Hill, Labarron; Collins-McNeil, Janice; Trambadia, Jay; Guinyard, Dariene; Muhammad, Malik; McDonald, Patricia; Schmechel, Donald E; Robinson, Elwood

2014-01-01

304

Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on pain in patients with spinal cord injury: a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] To investigate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on pain in patients with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] Fifty-two spinal cord injury patients with central pain were randomly allocated into two groups TENS and control with 26 subjects per group. The patients in TENS and control groups were treated with TENS and sham TENS for 20?min (three times a week) for 12 consecutive weeks, respectively. The two group’s pain was assessed using visual analog scale (VAS) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (including pain rating index-total, pain rating index-affective, pain rating index-sensory, present pain intensity, and number of words chosen) before and after the treatment. [Results] After the intervention, we found significant differences in VAS, pain rating index-total, pain rating index-affective, pain rating index-sensory, present pain intensity, and number of words chosen between the TENS group and the control group. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that TENS effectively decreases pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

Bi, Xia; Lv, Hong; Chen, Bin-Lin; Li, Xin; Wang, Xue-Qiang

2015-01-01

305

An exploratory study of patient preferences for pain management during intravenous insertion: maybe we should sweat the small stuff.  

PubMed

The purpose of this exploratory study was to add to the body of knowledge about patient preferences for pain management during intravenous (IV) insertion. A convenience sample of 30 patients who were scheduled to undergo surgical or nonsurgical procedures requiring an IV catheter were given a choice among intradermal lidocaine, guided imagery, or no pain control strategy. Only four participants chose no pain management strategy, the traditional standard of care. Most (86.6%) desired a pain control strategy. Mean pain ratings on IV insertion were very low for all the three groups, although pain was significantly lower in the intradermal lidocaine group. This study illustrates that patients have preferences for pain control during IV insertion and believe that they should be involved in decisions about pain management. PMID:23886287

Levitt, Francesca C; Ziemba-Davis, Mary

2013-08-01

306

Impact of Clinical Experience and Diagnostic Performance in Patients with Acute Abdominal Pain  

PubMed Central

Background. The aims were to evaluate the importance of the formal competence of the emergency department physician, the patient's time of arrival at the emergency department, and the use of a structured schedule for investigation of patients with acute abdominal pain. Methods. Patients attending the Mora Hospital with acute abdominal pain from 1997 to 2000 were registered prospectively according to a structured schedule. Registration included history, symptoms, signs, preliminary diagnosis, surgery and final diagnosis after at least one year. ?Results. 3073 acute abdominal pain patients were included. The preliminary diagnosis, as compared with the final diagnosis, was correct in 54% (n = 1659). Previously, during 1996, a base-line registration of 790 patients had a 58% correct diagnoses??(n = 458). A majority of the patients (n = 2699; 88%) were managed by nonspecialists. The proportion of correct diagnoses was 54% (n = 759) for pre-registrar house officers and 55% (n = 443) for senior house officers. Diagnostic performance at the emergency department was independent of patient's time of arrival. Conclusions. A structured schedule for investigation did not improve the diagnostic precision at the emergency department in patients with acute abdominal pain. The diagnostic performance was independent of the formal competence of the physician and the patient's time of arrival.

Laurell, Helena; Hansson, Lars-Erik; Gunnarsson, Ulf

2015-01-01

307

Increased Diagnostic Yield of Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain  

PubMed Central

Background and Study Aims Chronic abdominal pain is one of the most common chief complaints, but the underlying pathophysiology often remains unknown after routine clinical evaluation. Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a new technique for the visualization of the entire small bowel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of CE in patients with chronic abdominal pain of obscure origin. Patients and Methods Two hundred forty three patients with chronic abdominal pain with no significant lesions were enrolled in this study. CE was performed in all patients. Results A diagnosis was made in 23.0% of patients screened with CE. Of the 243 patients, 19 (7.8%) were diagnosed with Crohn's disease, 15 (6.2%) with enteritis, 11 (4.5%) with idiopathic intestinal lymphangiectasia, 5 (2.1%) with uncinariasis, and a number of other diagnoses including small bowel tumor, ascariasis, and anaphylactoid purpura. Five patients had abnormal transit time, and capsule retention occurred in two patients. Conclusions In contrast to other previous studies, we found that CE is an effective diagnostic tool for patients with abdominal pain. PMID:24498097

Yang, Liping; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Bingling; Chen, Chunxiao; Yue, Min; Du, Juan; Yu, Chaohui; Li, Youming

2014-01-01

308

Alterations in Pain Responses in Treated and Untreated Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome: Associations with Sleep Disruption  

PubMed Central

Objective There has been recent interest in characterizing potential abnormalities of pain processing in patients with sleep disorders such as Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). The aim of this study was to evaluate psychophysical responses to noxious heat and pressure stimuli in both treated and untreated RLS patients, compared to matched controls. Methods This study is a cross-sectional group comparison of RLS patients with matched controls. A total of 31 patients (15 treated, 16 untreated) with a confirmed diagnosis of RLS were compared to 18 controls with no history of RLS or related sleep disorders. Results RLS patients (both treated and untreated) demonstrated reduced pain thresholds and reported greater clinical pain relative to controls. Moreover, RLS patients demonstrated enhanced temporal summation of heat pain (p< .05), which may reflect aberrant central nervous system facilitation of pain transmission. Both treated and untreated RLS patients reported disrupted sleep relative to controls, and mediation analyses suggested that the reduced pain thresholds in RLS were attributable to sleep disturbance. However, the effect of RLS on the magnitude of temporal summation of heat pain was independent of sleep disturbance. Conclusions These findings suggest that central nervous system pain processing may be amplified in RLS, perhaps partially as a consequence of sleep disruption. RLS patients, even those whose symptoms are managed pharmacologically, may be at elevated long-term risk for the development or maintenance of persistent pain conditions. Further studies in larger samples could help to improve the prospects for pain management in RLS patients. PMID:21570347

Edwards, Robert R; Quartana, Phillip J.; Allen, Richard P; Greenbaum, Seth; Earley, Christopher J; Smith, Michael T

2011-01-01

309

Pain and the Thermally Injured Patient-A Review of Current Therapies.  

PubMed

Thermally injured patients experience tremendous pain from the moment of injury to months or years after their discharge from the hospital. Pain is therefore a critical component of proper management of burns. Although the importance of pain is well recognized, it is often undertreated. Acute uncontrolled pain has been shown to increase the incidence of mental health disorders and increase the incidence of suicide after discharge. Long-term poor pain control leads to an increase in the incidence of persistent pain. Most burn centers have used opioids as the mainstay analgesic, but recently, the significant side effects of opioids have led to the implementation of new and combined therapeutics. Pharmacological agents such as gabapentin, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, and ketamine have all been suggested as adjuncts to opioids in the treatment of burn pain. Nonpharmacological therapies such as hypnosis, virtual reality devices, and behavioral therapy are also essential adjuncts to current medications. This review aims at identifying the currently available pharmacological and nonpharmacological options for optimal pain management in the adult burn population. PMID:24823343

Retrouvey, Helene; Shahrokhi, Shahriar

2014-05-12

310

Evaluation of patients presenting with knee pain: Part II. Differential diagnosis.  

PubMed

Knee pain is a common presenting complaint with many possible causes. An awareness of certain patterns can help the family physician identify the underlying cause more efficiently. Teenage girls and young women are more likely to have patellar tracking problems such as patellar subluxation and patellofemoral pain syndrome, whereas teenage boys and young men are more likely to have knee extensor mechanism problems such as tibial apophysitis (Osgood-Schlatter lesion) and patellar tendonitis. Referred pain resulting from hip joint pathology, such as slipped capital femoral epiphysis, also may cause knee pain. Active patients are more likely to have acute ligamentous sprains and overuse injuries such as pes anserine bursitis and medial plica syndrome. Trauma may result in acute ligamentous rupture or fracture, leading to acute knee joint swelling and hemarthrosis. Septic arthritis may develop in patients of any age, but crystal-induced inflammatory arthropathy is more likely in adults. Osteoarthritis of the knee joint is common in older adults. PMID:13678140

Calmbach, Walter L; Hutchens, Mark

2003-09-01

311

Oral doxepin rinse: the analgesic effect and duration of pain reduction in patients with oral mucositis due to cancer therapy.  

PubMed

This research expands on our prior study, in which we assessed pain reduction after topical doxepin rinse in patients with oral mucositis resulting from cancer and cancer therapy. We continued to enroll patients with painful oral mucositis attributable solely to cancer therapy and performed further analysis on the duration of pain reduction. Fifty-one patients with oral mucositis were enrolled. Mucositis was scored and oral pain was assessed with a visual analog scale before doxepin oral rinse (5 mg/mL) and at regular intervals up to 4 h after rinsing. Of those who reported pain reduction, 95% did so within 15 min of rinsing with doxepin. In the total sample, the average patient reported a 70% maximum decrease in pain (P < 0.0001). Recurrence of pain was slow and at the conclusion of the study 19 patients (37%) still reported a reduction from baseline pain. With this censored data we used Cox-proportional hazards to determine what variables best explained longer duration of pain reduction. Our final model determined that more severe baseline pain, worse mucosal erythema score, or a larger relative maximum reduction in pain were all associated with a slower rate of pain recurrence after oral rinsing (all P < 0.01). PMID:16861436

Epstein, Joel B; Epstein, Joshua D; Epstein, Matthew S; Oien, Hal; Truelove, Edmond L

2006-08-01

312

Determinants of Pain Severity Changes in Ambulatory Patients With Cancer: An Analysis From Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Trial E2Z02  

PubMed Central

Purpose To understand changes in pain severity over time and to explore the factors associated with pain changes in ambulatory patients with solid tumors. Patients and Methods We enrolled 3,106 patients with invasive cancer of the breast, prostate, colon/rectum, or lung from multiple sites. At baseline and 4 to 5 weeks later, patients rated their pain level on a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale. A 2-point change in pain score was defined as a clinically significant change in pain. Multivariable logistic models were fitted to examine the effects of pain management and demographic and clinical factors on change in pain severity. Results We analyzed 2,761 patients for changes in pain severity. At initial assessment, 53.0% had no pain, 23.5% had mild pain, 10.3% had moderate pain, and 13.2% had severe pain. Overall, one third of patients with initial pain had pain reduction within 1 month of follow-up, and one fifth had an increase, and the improvement and worsening of pain varied by baseline pain score. Of the patients without pain at initial assessment, 28.4% had pain (8.9% moderate to severe) at the follow-up assessment. Logistic regression analysis showed that inadequate pain management was significantly associated with pain deterioration, as were lower baseline pain level, younger age, and poor health status. Conclusion One third of patients have pain improvement and one fifth experience pain deterioration within 1 month after initial assessment. Inadequate pain management, baseline pain severity, and certain patient demographic and disease characteristics are associated with pain deterioration. PMID:24366929

Zhao, Fengmin; Chang, Victor T.; Cleeland, Charles; Cleary, James F.; Mitchell, Edith P.; Wagner, Lynne I.; Fisch, Michael J.

2014-01-01

313

Assessment of Functional Status, Low Back Disability, and Use of Diagnostic Imaging in Patients with Low Back Pain and Radiating Leg Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

We analyzed data from outpatients with chronic low back pain (LBP) in the Veterans Health Study (n = 563) to examine the relationship between localized LBP intensity and radiating leg pain in assessing patient functional status, low back disability, and use of diagnostic imaging. Based on the localized LBP intensity, the study subjects were divided into tertiles (low, moderate, and

Xinhua S Ren; Alfredo J Selim; Graeme Fincke; Richard A Deyo; Mark Linzer; Austin Lee; Lewis Kazis

1999-01-01

314

Treatment of Extraspinal Painful Bone Metastases with Percutaneous Cementoplasty: A Prospective Study of 50 Patients  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of percutaneous cementoplasty (PC) with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) in painful extravertebral lytic bone metastases not responding to conventional therapy. Fifty patients (25 females), mean age 64.7 {+-} 11.2 years, underwent PC after giving informed consent. Procedures were performed under fluoroscopy (1/50) or combined fluoroscopy-CT (49/50) guidance in local anesthesia or under deep sedation in 7 patients with large metastases who underwent radiofrequency thermoablation (RFA) in the same session. Seventy lesions were treated (1-6 per patient; average, 1.4 {+-} 0.9), arranging in size from 1 to 10 cm (average, 3.6 {+-} 2.1 cm). Mean volume of PMMA per lesion was 5.9 {+-} 3.2 ml (range, 1.5-15.0 ml). Pain was prospectively evaluated on an 11-point visual analog scale (VAS) before and after the procedure (follow-up, 15 to 36 months). Mean VAS score dropped from 9.1 {+-} 1.2 (range: 6-10) to 2.1 {+-} 2.5 (range: 0-9). Mean VAS difference was 7.0 {+-} 2.3 (range, 1-10; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Forty-seven of the 50 patients (94%) suspended narcotic drugs, in 22 (44%) pain was controlled with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, in 25 (50%) analgesic therapy was suspended, and 13 of 50 (26%) had complete pain regression. In 3 of the 50 patients (6%) pain was not improved. No statistical difference between osteoplasty and osteoplasty plus RFA was found (p = 0.8338, Mann-Whitney test). No complications arose during the procedure. Two patients with metastases in the femoral diaphysis reported a fracture 1 month after treatment. PC is effective to obtain pain regression in painful bone metastases not responding to conventional analgesic therapy; bone consolidation cannot be obtained in the diaphysis of long weight-bearing bones.

Anselmetti, Giovanni Carlo, E-mail: giovanni.anselmetti@ircc.it; Manca, Antonio [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Interventional Radiology Unit (Italy); Ortega, Cinzia; Grignani, Giovanni [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Oncology Unit (Italy); DeBernardi, Felicino [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Anesthesiology Unit (Italy); Regge, Daniele [Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Radiology Unit (Italy)

2008-11-15

315

Effectiveness of Tai-Chi for decreasing acute pain in fibromyalgia patients.  

PubMed

Tai-Chi has shown benefits in physical and psychological outcomes in diverse populations. We aimed to determine the changes elicited by a Tai-Chi program (12 and 24 weeks) in acute pain (before vs. after session) in fibromyalgia patients. We also assessed the cumulative changes in pain brought about by a Tai-Chi program. Thirty-six patients (29 women) with fibromyalgia participated in a low-moderate intensity Tai-Chi program for 12 weeks (3 sessions/week). Twenty-eight patients (27 women) continued the program for an additional 12 weeks (i. e., 24 weeks). We assessed pain by means of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before and after each single session (i. e., 72 sessions). We observed significant immediate changes (P-values from 0.037 to 0.0001) with an approximately 12% mean decrease of acute pain in the comparison of VAS-values before and after each session (72 sessions in total), with the exception of 4 sessions. We observed significant changes in cumulative pain pre-session (95% CI=-0.019; -0.014; P<0.001) and cumulative pain post-session (95% CI=-0.021; -0.015; P<0.001) along the 24-week intervention only. In conclusion, a low-moderate intensity Tai-Chi program for 12 weeks (3 times/week) decreased levels of acute pain in fibromyalgia patients. A longer period is necessary (e. g. 24 weeks) for observing cumulative changes in pain. PMID:24203799

Segura-Jiménez, V; Romero-Zurita, A; Carbonell-Baeza, A; Aparicio, V A; Ruiz, J R; Delgado-Fernández, M

2014-05-01

316

Spinal cord stimulation in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy: A multicentre randomized clinical trial.  

PubMed

Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a peripheral neuropathic pain condition that is often difficult to relieve. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a proven effective therapy for various types of mixed neuropathic conditions, yet effectiveness of SCS treatment for PDN is not well established. To our knowledge, ours is the first multicentre randomized controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of SCS in patients with PDN. Sixty patients with PDN in the lower extremities refractory to conventional medical therapy were enrolled and followed for 6months. They were randomized 2:1 to best conventional medical practice with (SCS group) or without (control group) additional SCS therapy, and both groups were assessed at regular intervals. At each follow-up visit, the EuroQoL 5D, the short form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) and a visual analogue scale (VAS, ranging 0-100) to measure pain intensity were recorded. The average VAS score for pain intensity was 73 in the SCS group and 67 in the control group at baseline. After 6months of treatment, the average VAS score was significantly reduced to 31 in the SCS group (P<.001) and remained 67 (P=.97) in the control group. The SF-MPQ and EuroQoL 5D questionnaires also showed that patients in the SCS group, unlike those in the control group, experienced reduced pain and improved health and quality of life after 6months of treatment. In patients with refractory painful diabetic neuropathy, spinal cord stimulation therapy significantly reduced pain and improved quality of life. PMID:25180016

de Vos, Cecile C; Meier, Kaare; Zaalberg, Paul Brocades; Nijhuis, Harold J A; Duyvendak, Wim; Vesper, Jan; Enggaard, Thomas P; Lenders, Mathieu W P M

2014-11-01

317

The prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in chronic pain patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several of the more common causes of chronic pain include traumatic events such as motor vehicle accidents and workrelated\\u000a incidents. Therefore, it is not unusual for patients presenting with chronic pain to also describe significant levels of distress\\u000a including post-traumatic symptomatology and, in the more severe cases, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Throughout the\\u000a past few decades, the literature relating to

Timothy J. Sharp

2004-01-01

318

Magnetic Resonance–Guided Focused Ultrasound for Patients With Painful Bone Metastases: Phase III Trial Results  

PubMed Central

Background Pain due to bone metastases is a common cause of cancer-related morbidity, with few options available for patients refractory to medical therapies and who do not respond to radiation therapy. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS), a noninvasive method of thermal tissue ablation for palliation of pain due to bone metastases. Methods Patients with painful bone metastases were randomly assigned 3:1 to receive MRgFUS sonication or placebo. The primary endpoint was improvement in self-reported pain score without increase of pain medication 3 months after treatment and was analyzed by Fisher’s exact test. Components of the response composite, Numerical Rating Scale for pain (NRS) and morphine equivalent daily dose intake, were analyzed by t test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test, respectively. Brief Pain Inventory (BPI-QoL), a measure of functional interference of pain on quality of life, was compared between MRgFUS and placebo by t test. Statistical tests were two-sided. Results One hundred forty-seven subjects were enrolled, with 112 and 35 randomly assigned to MRgFUS and placebo treatments, respectively. Response rate for the primary endpoint was 64.3% in the MRgFUS arm and 20.0% in the placebo arm (P < .001). MRgFUS was also superior to placebo at 3 months on the secondary endpoints assessing worst score NRS (P < .001) and the BPI-QoL (P < .001). The most common treatment-related adverse event (AE) was sonication pain, which occurred in 32.1% of MRgFUS patients. Two patients had pathological fractures, one patient had third-degree skin burn, and one patient suffered from neuropathy. Overall 60.3% of all AEs resolved on the treatment day. Conclusions This multicenter phase III trial demonstrated that MRgFUS is a safe and effective, noninvasive treatment for alleviating pain resulting from bone metastases in patients that have failed standard treatments. PMID:24760791

Ghanouni, Pejman; Kanaev, Sergey V.; Iozeffi, Dmitri; Gianfelice, David; Fennessy, Fiona Mary; Kuten, Abraham; Meyer, Joshua E.; LeBlang, Suzanne D.; Roberts, Ann; Choi, Junsung; Larner, James M.; Napoli, Alessandro; Turkevich, Vladimir G.; Inbar, Yael; Tempany, Clare Mary C.; Pfeffer, Raphael M.

2014-01-01

319

Translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validity of the korean version of the pain sensitivity questionnaire in chronic pain patients.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to translate pain sensitivity questionnaires (PSQ) into the Korean language, perform a cross-cultural adaption of the PSQ, and validate the Korean version of PSQ in patients with degenerative spinal disease. The PSQ was translated forward and backward, cross-culturally adapted by 2 independent translators, and approved by an expert committee. The final Korean version of the PSQ was tested on 72 patients with degenerative spinal disease. Test-retest reliability was evaluated for 60 patients (83%) who completed the second assessment in an interval of 4 weeks. The mean PSQ-minor, PSQ-moderate, and PSQ-total (standard deviation [SD]) were 5.40 (2.02), 6.46 (1.98), and 5.93 (1.93), respectively. The PSQ-total, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate of the Korean version showed very good internal consistencies determined by the Cronbach's ? of 0.926, 0.869, and 0.877, respectively. For convergent validity, the PSQ scores of the Korean version showed significant correlations with pain catastrophizing scale (PCS) (r = 0.377, P = 0.002; r = 0.365, P = 0.003; r = 0.362, P = 0.003 for PSQ-total, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate of the Korean version, respectively). For test-retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.782 for PSQ-total, 0.752 for PSQ-minor, and 0.793 for PSQ-moderate. In conclusion, the validated Korean version of PSQ is a transculturally equivalent, reliable, and valid tool to assess individual pain sensitivity. PMID:24131768

Kim, Ho-Joong; Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Yeo, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Hyeon-Guk; Yi, Je-Min; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S

2014-11-01

320

Virtual reality as an adjunctive pain control during burn wound care in adolescent patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

For daily burn wound care procedures, opioid analgesics alone are often inadequate. Since most burn patients experience severe to excruciating pain during wound care, analgesics that can be used in addition to opioids are needed. This case report provides the first evidence that entering an immersive virtual environment can serve as a powerful adjunctive, nonpharmacologic analgesic. Two patients received virtual

Hunter G. Hoffman; Jason N; David R. Patterson; Gretchen J. Carrougher; Thomas A. Furness III

2000-01-01

321

Poststroke Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Relationship with Clinical Factors and Functional Outcomes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to assess the possible causes of hemiplegic shoulder pain (HSP) in Turkish patients with stroke, to identify the correlation between HSP and clinical factors, and to review the effects of HSP on functional outcomes. A total of 187 consecutive patients with stroke were evaluated for the presence of HSP and for the…

Barlak, Aysegul; Unsal, Sibel; Kaya, Kurtulus; Sahin-Onat, Sule; Ozel, Sumru

2009-01-01

322

Qigong and Exercise Therapy for Elderly Patients With Chronic Neck Pain (QIBANE): A Randomized Controlled Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of qigong compared with exercise therapy and no treatment. Elderly patients with chronic neck pain (>6 months) were randomly assigned to qigong or exercise therapy (each 24 sessions over a period of 3 months) or to a waiting list control. Patients completed standardized questionnaires at baseline and after 3 and

Philipp von Trott; Anna Maria Wiedemann; Rainer Lüdtke; Anett Reißhauer; Stefan N. Willich; Claudia M. Witt

2009-01-01

323

Post-traumatic stress disorder among patients with chronic pain and chronic fatigue  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic pain condition of unknown aetiology often develops following a traumatic event. FM has been associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depression disorder (MDD). Method. Patients seen in a referral clinic (N = 571) were evaluated for FM and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) criteria. Patients completed questionnaires, and underwent a physical examination and a

P. ROY-BYRNE; W. R. SMITH; J. GOLDBERG; N. AFARI; D. BUCHWALD

2004-01-01

324

Role of Self-Efficacy in Rehabilitation Outcome among Chronic Low Back Pain Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined role of self-efficacy beliefs in rehabilitation of 45 low back pain patients participating in 3-week rehabilitation program. Increments in self-efficacy beliefs during program were not associated with improved patient functioning at discharge. However, in support of theorized role of self-efficacy in behavior change, increments in…

Altmaier, Elizabeth M.; And Others

1993-01-01

325

Risk Assessment of Opioid Misuse in Italian Patients with Chronic Noncancer Pain  

PubMed Central

Objective. Opioid therapy in patients with chronic noncancer pain must be preceded by evaluation of the risk of opioid misuse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive validity of the Italian translation of the Pain Medication Questionnaire (PMQ) and of the Diagnosis Intractability Risk and Efficacy Score (DIRE) in chronic pain patients. Design. 75 chronic noncancer pain patients treated with opioids were enrolled and followed longitudinally. Risk of opioid misuse was evaluated through PMQ, DIRE, and the physician's clinical evaluation. Pain experience and psychological characteristics were assessed through specific self-report instruments. At follow-ups, pain intensity, aberrant drug behaviors, and presence of the prescribed opioid and of illegal substances in urine were also checked. Results. PMQ demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's ? = 0.77) and test-retest reliability (r = 0.86). Significant correlations were found between higher PMQ scores and the number of aberrant drug behaviors detected at 2-, 4-, and 6-month follow-ups (P < 0.01). Also the DIRE demonstrated good predictive validity. Conclusions. The results obtained with specific tools are more reliable than the clinician's evaluation alone in predicting the risk of opioid misuse; regular monitoring and psychological intervention will contribute to improving compliance and outcome of long-term opioid use. PMID:25177499

Ferrari, Renata; Duse, Genni; Capraro, Michela; Visentin, Marco

2014-01-01

326

Quantitative sensory testing somatosensory profiles in patients with cervical radiculopathy are distinct from those in patients with nonspecific neck-arm pain.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to establish the somatosensory profiles of patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with nonspecific neck-arm pain associated with heightened nerve mechanosensitivity (NSNAP). Sensory profiles were compared to healthy control (HC) subjects and a positive control group comprising patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) of thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds, pain sensitivity and responsiveness to repetitive noxious mechanical stimulation was performed in the maximal pain area, the corresponding dermatome and foot of 23 patients with painful C6 or C7 cervical radiculopathy, 8 patients with NSNAP in a C6/7 dermatomal pain distribution, 31 HC and 22 patients with FM. For both neck-arm pain groups, all QST parameters were within the 95% confidence interval of HC data. Patients with cervical radiculopathy were characterised by localised loss of function (thermal, mechanical, vibration detection P<.009) in the maximal pain area and dermatome (thermal detection, vibration detection, pressure pain sensitivity P<.04), consistent with peripheral neuronal damage. Both neck-arm pain groups demonstrated increased cold sensitivity in their maximal pain area (P<.03) and the foot (P<.009), and this was also the dominant sensory characteristic in patients with NSNAP. Both neck-arm pain groups differed from patients with FM, the latter characterised by a widespread gain of function in most nociceptive parameters (thermal, pressure, mechanical pain sensitivity P<.027). Despite commonalities in pain characteristics between the 2 neck-arm pain groups, distinct sensory profiles were demonstrated for each group. PMID:22980746

Tampin, Brigitte; Slater, Helen; Hall, Toby; Lee, Gabriel; Briffa, Noelle Kathryn

2012-12-01

327

Attitudes of Patients Toward Adoption of 3D Technology in Pain Assessment: Qualitative Perspective  

PubMed Central

Background Past research has revealed that insufficient pain assessment could, and often, has negative implications on the provision of quality health care. While current available clinical approaches have proven to be valid interventions, they are expensive and can often fail in providing efficient pain measurements. The increase in the prevalence of pain calls for more intuitive pain assessment solutions. Computerized alternatives have already been proposed both in the literature and in commerce, but may lack essential qualities such as accuracy of the collected clinical information and effective patient-clinician interaction. In response to this concern, 3-dimensional (3D) technology could become the innovative intervention needed to support and improve the pain assessment process. Objective The purpose of this analysis was to describe qualitative findings from a study which was designed to explore patients’ perceptions of adopting 3D technology in the assessment of their pain experience related to important themes that might positively or negatively influence the quality of the pain assessment process. Methods The perceptions of 60 individuals with some form of pain in the area of Greater London were collected through semi-structured interviews. Of the 60 respondents, 24 (43%) produced usable responses and were analyzed for content using principles of the grounded theory approach and thematic analysis, in order to gain insight into the participants’ beliefs and attitudes towards adopting 3D technology in pain assessment. Results The analysis identified 4 high-level core themes that were representative of the participants’ responses. These themes indicated that most respondents valued “the potential of 3D technology to facilitate better assessment of pain” as the most useful outcome of adopting a 3D approach. Respondents also expressed their opinions on the usability of the 3D approach, with no important concerns reported about its perceived ease of use. Our findings finally, showed that respondents appreciated the perceived clinical utility of the proposed approach, which could further have an influence on their intention to use it. Conclusions These findings highlighted factors that are seen as essential for improving the assessment of pain, and demonstrated the need for a strong focus on patient-clinician communication. The participants of this analysis believed that the introduction of 3D technology in the process might be a useful mechanism for such a positive health care outcome. The study’s findings could also be used to make recommendations concerning the potential for inclusion of 3D technology in current clinical pain tools for the purpose of improving the quality of health care. PMID:23575479

2013-01-01

328

Age, gender, obesity, and depression are associated with patient-related pain and function outcome after revision total hip arthroplasty  

Microsoft Academic Search

To examine whether patient characteristics predict patient-reported pain and function 2- or 5-years after revision total hip\\u000a arthroplasty (THA). In a prospective cohort of revision THA patients, we examined whether gender, age, body mass index (BMI),\\u000a comorbidity (Deyo–Charlson index) and depression predicted moderate–severe hip pain, moderate–severe activity limitation (?3\\u000a activities), dependence on walking aids and use of pain medications, using

Jasvinder A. Singh; David Lewallen

2009-01-01

329

Effects of music therapy on pain among female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results from a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Music therapy has been used in multiple health care settings to reduce patient pain, anxiety, and stress. However, few available\\u000a studies have investigated its effect on pain among breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The aim of this study\\u000a was to explore the effects of music therapy on pain reduction in patients with breast cancer after radical mastectomy. This\\u000a randomized

Xiao-Mei Li; Hong Yan; Kai-Na Zhou; Shao-Nong Dang; Duo-Lao Wang; Yin-Ping Zhang

2011-01-01

330

Short Term Results After Local Application of Steroids and Anesthetics in Patients with Painful Spine Conditions  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Introduction: Spinal pain is the most common of all chronic pain disorders. Imaging studies can be used to determine whether a pathological process is associated with the patient’s symptoms. Objective: To determine the short-term efficiency of local instillation of steroids in patients with painful spine conditions. Materials and methods: A prospective study included 35 patients with diagnosis of lumbar or cervical radiculopathy, or cervical and lumbar syndrome at the Department for the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Department for the Orthopedics and Traumatology, and Department for the Neurosurgery, Clinical Canter University of Sarajevo (KCUS). A clinical examination, visual pain scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were performed prior to the needle procedure and seven days after it. Descriptive and comparative statistics were used for comparison of pre and post-interventional results. This procedure was done for the first time in our region. Results: The males and females were equally represented in this study (17:18). The patients were 29 to 80 years old. The highest number of patients have been between 40-60 years, older then that have been 44,2% of patients, and younger only 8,5%. Patients have complained about the radicular pain along the legs or arms or back or neck pain. Most of them had disc herniation–57,14%, 8,57% had bulging disc, 8,57% had spinal canal stenosis, 5,71% had fasetarthrosis, rest of them had combination of those conditions. There was a statistically significant difference between the value of ODI score before procedure and 7 days later (26±10:16±12; p<0,001). The difference was also statistically significant in VAS values (7±1:1±1; p <0,001). Discussion: Our study suggests that needle instillation of steroid and lidocaine is effective in short-term pain occurs in different painful spine conditions (Sy cervicale, lumbare and radiculopathy). It is valuable alternative to the classic methods of physical and drug therapy. It can also postpone surgical treatment, and it is very useful in situations of diffuse degenerative changes when is very important to define exact source of pain, like for instance in hip-spine syndrome. PMID:24937937

Hadziahmetovic, Narcisa Vavra; Aganovic, Damir; Kadic, Aldijana; Biscevic, Mirza

2014-01-01

331

Transdermal fentanyl in HSCT patients: an open trial using transdermal fentanyl for the treatment of oral mucositis pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that can be delivered through a transdermal therapeutic system (TTS). The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of fentanyl TTS in treating oral mucositis pain in 75 adult hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients. The analysis was based on 62 patients who developed mucositis. Pain control was assessed by the patients using

F Demarosi; G Lodi; D Soligo; A Sardella; A Della Volpe; A Carrassi; G Lambertenghi Deliliers

2004-01-01

332

Cancer-related neuropathic pain in out-patient oncology clinics: a European survey  

PubMed Central

Background Although pain is frequently experienced by patients with cancer, it remains under-treated. The primary aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of cancer-related neuropathic pain (CRNP) in patients with chronic pain who attended an outpatient clinic for standard care in Europe (irrespective of the reason or stage of the cancer). The secondary aims of this study were to characterise pain and cancer in patients with CRNP (including treatment) and to evaluate the usefulness of the painDETECT (PD-Q) screening tool to help physicians identify a potential neuropathic component of cancer-related pain. Methods An observational, non-interventional, cross-sectional, multi-centre study of adult patients with cancer using patient and physician case report forms (CRFs). Patients with CRNP were identified by physicians’ clinical assessments after examining the completed PD-Q. Results A total of 951 patients visiting outpatient clinics across Europe were enrolled in this study between August 2010 and July 2011. Of these, 310 patients (32.60%; 95% confidence interval 29.62, 35.58) were identified as having CRNP. Twenty-nine of 39 (74.4%) physicians who completed the CRF relating to the PD-Q considered it a useful tool to help detect CRNP in daily practice and 28 of 39 (71.8%) indicated that they would use this tool in the future for most or some of their patients. Data from physicians before and after review of the completed PD-Qs showed a shift in clinical opinion (either to positive CRNP diagnosis [yes] or negative CRNP diagnosis [no]) in respect of 142 patients; about half of which (74) were categorised with an initial diagnosis of unknown. Opinions also shifted from a no to a yes diagnosis in 10 patients and from a yes to a no diagnosis in 51 patients. Conclusions Approximately one-third of adults with cancer experiencing chronic pain attending outpatient clinics as part of routine care were considered to have CRNP in the opinion of the physicians after considering scores on the PD-Q. While physicians did not consider the PD-Q to be a useful tool for all patients, shifts in diagnosis before and after the use of this tool indicate that it may help physicians identify CRNP, especially where there is initial uncertainty. PMID:24200014

2013-01-01

333

Lack of effect of chronic dextromethorphan on experimental pain tolerance in methadone-maintained patients  

PubMed Central

Good evidence exists to suggest that individuals on opioid maintenance for the treatment of addiction (i.e. methadone) are less tolerant of experimental pain than are matched controls or ex-opioid addicts, a phenomenon theorized to reflect opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Agonist activity at the excitatory ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on dorsal horn neurons has been implicated in the development of both OIH and its putative expression at the clinical level—opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of the NMDA-receptor antagonist, dextromethorphan (DEX), to reverse or treat OIH in methadone-maintenance (MM) patients. Utilizing a clinical trial design and double-blind conditions, changes in pain threshold and tolerance [cold pressor (CP) and electrical stimulation (ES)] following a 5-week trial of DEX (titrated to 480 mg/day) in comparison with placebo was evaluated in a well-characterized sample of MM patients. The sample (n = 40) was 53% male and ethnically diverse (53% Latino, 28% African American, 10% White, 9% other), with a mean age of 48.0 years (SD = 6.97). Based on t-test analyses, no difference was found between groups on CP pain threshold, CP pain tolerance, ES pain threshold or ES pain tolerance, both pre- and postmedication. Notably, DEX-related changes significantly differed by gender, with women tending to show diminished tolerance for pain with DEX therapy. These results support that chronic high-dose NMDA antagonism does not improve tolerance for pain in MM patients, although a gender effect on DEX response is suggested. PMID:18507735

Compton, Peggy A.; Ling, Walter; Torrington, Matt A.

2014-01-01

334

Evaluation of a cognitive behavioural programme for rehabilitating patients with chronic pain.  

PubMed Central

The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to evaluate an inpatient cognitive behavioural pain management programme for patients with chronic pain. A physical and psychological assessment of patients was carried out before and after treatment, and at one and six months follow up. A total of 212 patients with disabling chronic pain of mean duration 10.5 years, for whom no further medical or psychiatric treatment was appropriate or available, were admitted; their mean age was 50 years and 65% were women. The four week programme was delivered by a multidisciplinary team of two psychologists, a physiotherapist, nurse, occupational therapist and anaesthetist. The main components of therapy included: education, teaching behavioural and cognitive skills, a stretch and exercise programme, medication reduction, goal setting and pacing, and relaxation training. Outcome measures assessed quality of life, physical performance (for example walking speed), pain intensity and distress, depression severity and confidence. Assessment immediately after treatment revealed significant improvements on all measures. Improvements were well maintained at six month follow up. Cognitive behavioural treatment can be of value in improving the day-to-day functioning and quality of life of patients with chronic pain for whom conventional medical treatments have apparently failed. PMID:8312023

Williams, A C; Nicholas, M K; Richardson, P H; Pither, C E; Justins, D M; Chamberlain, J H; Harding, V R; Ralphs, J A; Jones, S C; Dieudonné, I

1993-01-01

335

Effect of music on postoperative pain and physiologic parameters of patients after open heart surgery.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of listening to personal choice of music on self-report of pain intensity and the physiologic parameters in patients who have undergone open heart surgery. The study design was quasiexperimental. Patients were selected through convenience sampling in the Cardiovascular Surgery Intensive Care Unit at a university hospital. The study was conducted with a total of 87 patients who underwent open heart surgery: 44 in the music group, 43 in the control group, ages between 18 and 78 years. Through pretest-posttest design, postoperative first-day data were collected. First, physiologic parameters (blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate) were recorded and a unidimensional verbal pain intensity scale applied to all participants. Later, the control group had a rest in their beds while the music group listened to their choice of music for 30 minutes. Physiologic data were then collected and the pain intensity scale applied once more. In the music group, there was a statistically significant increase in oxygen saturation (p = .001) and a lower pain score (p = .001) than in the control group. There was no difference between the groups in the other physiologic parameters. Results of this research provide evidence to support the use of music. Music might be a simple, safe, and effective method of reducing potentially harmful physiologic responses arising from pain in patients after open heart surgery. PMID:23452523

Özer, Nadiye; Karaman Özlü, Zeynep; Arslan, Sevban; Günes, Nezihat

2013-03-01

336

Assessment of functional status, low back disability, and use of diagnostic imaging in patients with low back pain and radiating leg pain.  

PubMed

We analyzed data from outpatients with chronic low back pain (LBP) in the Veterans Health Study (n = 563) to examine the relationship between localized LBP intensity and radiating leg pain in assessing patient functional status, low back disability, and use of diagnostic imaging. Based on the localized LBP intensity, the study subjects were divided into tertiles (low, moderate, and high intensity). The study subjects were also stratified by the extent of radiating leg pain. Using analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis, we compared the relative importance of localized LBP intensity and radiating leg pain in explaining the variability in the means of the SF-36 scales and low back disability days, and in the proportion of patients who had used diagnostic imaging. The results of the study indicate that measures of localized LBP intensity and radiating leg pain contribute separately to the assessment of patient functional status, low back disability, and use of diagnostic imaging. These results suggest that localized LBP intensity and radiating leg pain may represent two different approaches in assessing back pain severity. Future epidemiological and health services research should consider both measures in assessing the impact of LBP on patient functional status, low back disability, and use of diagnostic imaging. PMID:10527000

Ren, X S; Selim, A J; Fincke, G; Deyo, R A; Linzer, M; Lee, A; Kazis, L

1999-11-01

337

A Study of the Influence of Low Intensity Laser Therapy on Painful Temporomandibular Disorder Patients  

PubMed Central

A double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 30 female Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) patients who had pain as a chief complaint. The patients were randomly allocated into three groups based on Low Intensity Laser (LILT) regimes namely 820 nm Gallium Aluminium Arsenide (GaAlAs) laser at energy densities of 21.4J/cm2, 107 J/cm2 and placebo laser. Each patient had three LILT treatments in a week. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) of trigger points in masticatory muscles, unassisted maximum mouth opening without pain (MOSP) and symptom severity index (SSI) were recorded as baseline data and monitored after every treatment. Jaw kinesiology, electromyography (EMG) and pain rating index from McGill pain questionnaire were also recorded as baseline and final results. The analysis of covariance and further analysis showed that the higher energy density laser group had significant increases in PPT and EMG amplitude recorded from voluntary clenching (cEMG) compared with the placebo group at P values 0.0001 and 0.022 respectively. A significantly greater number of patients recovered from myofascial pain and TMJ arthralgia as assessed clinically in the higher energy group compared with the placebo (P value = 0.02 and 0.006 respectively). There was no statistically significant difference in the other parameters of assessment among the groups at a P value 0.05. At a period of 2 to 4 weeks review after LILT, there was an average 52% reduction of pain as assessed by SSI. PMID:24511188

Sattayut, S.; Bradley, P.

2012-01-01

338

Effects of jazz on postoperative pain and stress in patients undergoing elective hysterectomy.  

PubMed

Context • Anesthesiologists use various medications to provide surgical patients with pain relief in the postoperative period. Other modalities, such as music, could be used in conjunction with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to decrease pain and lower heart rate and blood pressure. Our hypothesis was that patients listening to jazz in a postanesthesia care unit (PACU) would have lower heart rates and blood pressures and reduced pain and anxiety. Objective • The study objective was to determine if listening to jazz music in the PACU, when compared to wearing noise-canceling headphones with no music playing, would decrease heart rate, blood pressure, pain, or anxiety in patients undergoing a hysterectomy. Design • The research design was a prospective, randomized study. Setting • The study was conducted in the PACU at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, PA, USA. Participants • A total of 56 patients, aged 18-75 y, who were categorized as status 1 or 2 according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status Classification System, and who were undergoing elective laparoscopic or abdominal hysterectomies, were enrolled in the study. Intervention • Patients were randomly assigned either to listen to jazz music where the beats per min (BPM) was <100 (experimental group, n = 28) or to wear noise-canceling headphones (control group, n = 28) for 30 min while in the PACU after their surgery. Outcome Measures • Heart rate was the primary outcome, and secondary outcomes included systolic and diastolic blood pressure, an anxiety score, and a pain score. All outcome measures were initially recorded at baseline upon the patient's arrival in the PACU. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded postoperatively every 5 min for the initial 30 min that a patient was in the PACU. Pain was checked every 10 min during the 30-min period; anxiety was checked at 30 min. Results • Heart rates of patients in the noise-cancellation group were significantly lower when compared with baseline (P < .05), at all time points. For patients in the jazz group, heart rates were significantly lower at 15, 20, 25, and 30 min when compared with baseline. The pain scores were significantly lower (P < .05) in the noise-cancellation group compared with the jazz group at 10 min into the recovery period. Conclusion • Overall, the results showed that patients responded not only to music but also to silence in the PACU. Using music and/or noise reduction could decrease opioid administration, promote relaxation, and improve patient satisfaction. PMID:25607117

Rafer, Lorenzo; Austin, Flower; Frey, Jessica; Mulvey, Christie; Vaida, Sonia; Prozesky, Jansie

2015-01-01

339

Improvement of pain related self management for oncologic patients through a trans institutional modular nursing intervention: protocol of a cluster randomized multicenter trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Pain is one of the most frequent and distressing symptoms in cancer patients. For the majority of the patients, sufficient pain relief can be obtained if adequate treatment is provided. However, pain remains often undertreated due to institutional, health care professional and patient related barriers. Patients self management skills are affected by the patients' knowledge, activities and attitude to

Patrick Jahn; Maria Kitzmantel; Petra Renz; Ene Kukk; Oliver Kuss; Anette Thoke-Colberg; Ingrid Horn; Margarete Landenberger

2010-01-01

340

Evaluation of Alexithymia, Somatosensory Sensitivity, and Health Anxiety Levels in Patients with Noncardiac Chest Pain  

PubMed Central

Objective. Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) is seen more frequently in young population and in these patients loss of function is evolving in social and professional areas. The aim of the study is to evaluate the levels of anxiety and somatic perception in patients with chest pain presenting to cardiology clinic. Methods. Fifty-one patients with noncardiac chest pain and 51 healthy controls were included in the study. All participants performed self-report based health anxiety inventory (HAI), somatosensory amplification scale (SAS), and Toronto alexithymia scale (TAS). Results. The patient group had significantly higher scores on the SAS, HAI-1, and HAI-T scales compared to controls (P < 0.001, P = 0.006, and P = 0.038, resp.). SAS, HAI-1, and HAI-T scores were significantly higher in female patients than male (P = 0.002, 0.036, and 0.039, resp.). There were significant differences in all TAS subscale scores between two groups. Patients, who had total TAS score more than 50, also presented higher levels of health anxiety (P = 0.045). Conclusions. Anxiety, somatic symptoms, and the exaggerated sense of bodily sensations are common in patients with NCCP. These patients unnecessarily occupy the cardiology outpatient clinics. These negative results can be eliminated when consultation-liaison psychiatry evaluates these patients in collaboration with cardiology departments. PMID:24967410

Bozkurt Zincir, Selma; Sunbul, Murat; Aydin Sunbul, Esra; Dalkilic, Bahar; Cengiz, Fatma; Kivrak, Tarik; Durmus, Erdal

2014-01-01

341

Cancer Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer pain remains undertreated. Pain occurs in over three-quarters of cancer patients and remains one of the most feared\\u000a aspects of this illness despite the excellent therapies that are available. Cancer pain commonly results from tumor compressing\\u000a or invading soft tissue, bone, or nerves or from diagnostic or therapeutic endeavors. Optimal pain management involves determining\\u000a pain intensity, evaluating the etiology

Suzanne A. Nesbit

342

Are tactile acuity and clinical symptoms related to differences in perceived body image in patients with chronic nonspecific lower back pain?  

PubMed

Clinically, perceived image of the lower back and the two-point discrimination (TPD) test are used as markers for evaluating alterations of cortical reorganization. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether TPD and selected clinical findings are different in subgroups of individuals with chronic nonspecific lower back pain (CNLBP) based on body image drawings. Forty-two patients with CNLBP and seventeen healthy individuals were recruited. Perceived body image, TPD and clinical profiles was measured. Of the patients with CNLBP, 42.8% had a normal perceived body image, 28.5% an expanded image, and 28.5% a shrunken image. The TPD distance threshold was significantly larger for the expanded subgroup (13.3 ± 6.8 mm) compared with the control (5.5 ± 3.8 mm; Difference, 7.8; 95%CI, 1.83 to 13.66; p < 0.05) and normal subgroups (4.5 ± 5.5 mm; Difference, 8.8; 95%CI, 2.90 to 14.59; p < 0.05). No significant differences in pain intensity, duration of pain, Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ), and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) scores were found between three body image subgroups. Our results suggest that TPD is increased in patients who report an expanded perceived image of the lower back compared with healthy individuals and patients who report a normal image. The effectiveness of new rehabilitation techniques may be evaluated by assessing perceived image of the lower back and TPD values for patients with CNLBP before and after treatment. PMID:25081221

Nishigami, Tomohiko; Mibu, Akira; Osumi, Michihiro; Son, Kouki; Yamamoto, Shyogo; Kajiwara, Saori; Tanaka, Katsuyoshi; Matsuya, Ayako; Tanabe, Akihito

2015-02-01

343

Efficacy and Safety of PPC-5650 on Experimental Rectal Pain in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.  

PubMed

PPC-5650 is a new pharmacological agent that can modulate acid-sensing ion channel activity, leading to a reduction in the pain signal under up-regulated conditions. The non-clinical programme for PPC-5650 supported a role for this novel agent in the treatment of pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In patients with IBS, the aims of the study were: (1) to assess the efficacy of a single bolus of PPC-5650 locally applied in the rectum using multi-modal stimulations of the recto sigmoid and (2) to assess the safety profile of PPC-5650. The study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial in patients with IBS, excluding females of child-bearing potential. The study consisted of a training visit, study visit 1 and 2 and a follow-up visit. Rectosigmoid electrical, thermal and mechanical stimulations were performed, pain perception was rated on a pain intensity scale and referred pain areas were assessed. All adverse events were registered. Twenty-five patients with IBS were enrolled and completed the study (9 women and 16 men; mean age 50.4 ± 12.7 years). No effects of the study drug were found on any of the rectal stimulations or for referred pain areas (all p > 0.05). No significant or clinically relevant treatment-related differences were seen for the laboratory safety variables or any other reported adverse event. In conclusion, in patients with IBS on rectal sensitivity to multi-modal stimulations, PPC-5650 did not produce efficacy relative to placebo. The overall safety and tolerability of PPC-5650 was acceptable. PMID:25052366

Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Simrén, Magnus; Törnblom, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

2015-02-01

344

Measurement properties of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMS) in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A systematic review.  

PubMed

This systematic review investigated the measurement properties of disease-specific patient-reported outcome measures used in Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Two independent reviewers conducted a systematic search of key databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINHAL+ and the Cochrane Library from inception to August 2013) to identify relevant studies. A third reviewer mediated in the event of disagreement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the validated COSMIN (Consensus-based Standards for the Selection of Health Measurement Instruments) tool. Data synthesis across studies determined the level of evidence for each patient-reported outcome measure. The search strategy returned 2177 citations. Following the eligibility review phase, seven studies, evaluating twelve different patient-reported outcome measures, met inclusion criteria. A 'moderate' level of evidence supported the structural validity of several measures: the Flandry Questionnaire, Anterior Knee Pain Scale, Functional Index Questionnaire, Eng and Pierrynowski Questionnaire and Visual Analogue Scales for 'usual' and 'worst' pain. In addition, there was a 'Limited' level of evidence supporting the test-retest reliability and validity (cross-cultural, hypothesis testing) of the Persian version of the Anterior Knee Pain Scale. Other measurement properties were evaluated with poor methodological quality, and many properties were not evaluated in any of the included papers. Current disease-specific outcome measures for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome require further investigation. Future studies should evaluate all important measurement properties, utilising an appropriate framework such as COSMIN to guide study design, to facilitate optimal methodological quality. PMID:24997774

Green, Andrew; Liles, Clive; Rushton, Alison; Kyte, Derek G

2014-12-01

345

Functional assessment of pediatric pain patients: psychometric properties of the functional disability inventory.  

PubMed

The Functional Disability Inventory (FDI; Walker LS, Greene JW. The functional disability inventory: measuring a neglected dimension of child health status. J Pediatr Psychol 1991;16:39-58) assesses activity limitations in children and adolescents with a variety of pediatric conditions. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the FDI in pediatric pain patients. Participants included 596 patients with chronic abdominal pain, ages 8-17, and a subset of their parents (n = 151) who completed the FDI and measures of pain, limitations in school activities, and somatic and depressive symptoms at a clinic visit. Test-retest reliability was high at 2 weeks (child report, .74; parent-report, .64) and moderate at 3 months (child report, .48; parent report, .39). Internal consistency reliability was excellent, ranging from .86 to .91. Validity was supported by significant correlations of child- and parent-report FDI scores with measures of school-related disability, pain, and somatic symptoms. Study results add to a growing body of empirical literature supporting the reliability and validity of the FDI for functional assessment of pediatric patients with chronic pain. PMID:16480823

Claar, Robyn Lewis; Walker, Lynn S

2006-03-01

346

Characterization of patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty in a real-world setting and pain-related medication prescriptions for management of postoperative pain.  

PubMed

Presently, no "gold-standard" exists for the management of pain after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) surgery. Understanding pain management methods used in clinical practice and the associated patient outcomes are necessary to fill gaps in pain management strategies. This study characterizes medication use in the immediate postoperative period among patients undergoing TKA at an academic medical center. Additionally, pre- and postoperative measures of pain (numeric pain rating scale), physical function (Knee Society Scale and Lower Extremity Function [LEFS]), and quality of life (Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form [SF]-36) were evaluated. The patient data were extracted from a clinical database at the University of Utah Orthopedic Clinic between September 1, 2008, and November 30, 2010. A total of 168 patients (mean age 64.0 ± 10.1 years, 63.1% were female, mean body mass index [BMI] 31.7 ± 7.1 kg/m(2)) were included. The most common comorbidities in these patients were osteoarthritis, hypertension, and major depressive disorders. Bupivacaine and fentanyl were commonly given on the day of surgery with oxycodone, hydrocodone/acetaminophen, and celecoxib prescribed at hospital discharge. Preoperative pain levels were reduced by half at 6 weeks. Physical function and quality of life were similar to established benchmarks and previously reported levels, respectively. Confirmation of results over a longer follow-up period is warranted. PMID:23216171

Kirkness, Carmen S; McAdam-Marx, Carrie; Unni, Sudhir; Young, Jason; Ye, Xiangyang; Chandran, Arthi; Peters, Christopher L; Asche, Carl V

2012-12-01

347

Patient characteristics and physicians' practice activities for patients with chronic low back pain: A practice-based study of primary care and chiropractic physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Chronic low back pain sufferers are among those who account for the greatest usage of health care resources. Primary care medical (MD) physicians and chiropractic (DC) physicians treat most of these patients. Objectives: To study patient characteristics and physician practice activities for patients with chronic low back pain treated by DC physicians and MD physicians. Methods: A longitudinal, practice-based

Joanne Nyiendo; Mitchell Haas; Bruce Goldberg; Gary Sexton

2001-01-01

348

Transient Receptor Potential Channel Polymorphisms Are Associated with the Somatosensory Function in Neuropathic Pain Patients  

PubMed Central

Transient receptor potential channels are important mediators of thermal and mechanical stimuli and play an important role in neuropathic pain. The contribution of hereditary variants in the genes of transient receptor potential channels to neuropathic pain is unknown. We investigated the frequency of transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, transient receptor potential melastin 8 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms and their impact on somatosensory abnormalities in neuropathic pain patients. Within the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (Deutscher Forscbungsverbund Neuropathischer Schmerz) 371 neuropathic pain patients were phenotypically characterized using standardized quantitative sensory testing. Pyrosequencing was employed to determine a total of eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms in transient receptor potential channel genes of the neuropathic pain patients and a cohort of 253 German healthy volunteers. Associations of quantitative sensory testing parameters and single nucleotide polymorphisms between and within groups and subgroups, based on sensory phenotypes, were analyzed. Single nucleotide polymorphisms frequencies did not differ between both the cohorts. However, in neuropathic pain patients transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 710G>A (rs920829, E179K) was associated with the presence of paradoxical heat sensation (p?=?0.03), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G (rs8065080, I585V) with cold hypoalgesia (p?=?0.0035). Two main subgroups characterized by preserved (1) and impaired (2) sensory function were identified. In subgroup 1 transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1911A>G led to significantly less heat hyperalgesia, pinprick hyperalgesia and mechanical hypaesthesia (p?=?0.006, p?=?0.005 and p<0.001) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 1103C>G (rs222747, M315I) to cold hypaesthesia (p?=?0.002), but there was absence of associations in subgroup 2. In this study we found no evidence that genetic variants of transient receptor potential channels are involved in the expression of neuropathic pain, but transient receptor potential channel polymorphisms contributed significantly to the somatosensory abnormalities of neuropathic pain patients. PMID:21468319

Baron, Ralf; Maier, Christoph; Tölle, Thomas R.; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Berthele, Achim; Faltraco, Frank; Flor, Herta; Gierthmühlen, Janne; Haenisch, Sierk; Huge, Volker; Magerl, Walter; Maihöfner, Christian; Richter, Helmut; Rolke, Roman; Scherens, Andrea; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Ufer, Mike; Wasner, Gunnar; Zhu, Jihong; Cascorbi, Ingolf

2011-01-01

349

Infrared thermography and acupuncture of the lobe of the outer ear in patients with facial pain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have assessed the thermal camera to complement the clinical odontology with the clinical assistance of acupuncture. Relevant cases of study were those of patients with facial pain. This work has registered the temperatures of the microsystem of the lobe of the outer ear. The recordings were made before, during and after removing the needles. Measurements of patients' temperatures were made very two minutes for 20 minutes, and a gradual increase of temperature was observed. The thermal camera allowed to register maps (thermography) that show an area affected with pain. After thermograms were performed to odontology patients treated with acupuncture, we were able to compare the temperature distribution maps and we found that they were quasi repetitive in the same zones in several patients for a specific illness. We made this technique available to different patients with lack of good irrigation on face and neck with the aim to establish patterns.

Rossi, Ricardo; Lluesma, Eliseo G.

2001-03-01

350

Optimization of diagnostic imaging use in patients with acute abdominal pain (OPTIMA): Design and rationale  

PubMed Central

Background The acute abdomen is a frequent entity at the Emergency Department (ED), which usually needs rapid and accurate diagnostic work-up. Diagnostic work-up with imaging can consist of plain X-ray, ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT) and even diagnostic laparoscopy. However, no evidence-based guidelines exist in current literature. The actual diagnostic work-up of a patient with acute abdominal pain presenting to the ED varies greatly between hospitals and physicians. The OPTIMA study was designed to provide the evidence base for constructing an optimal diagnostic imaging guideline for patients with acute abdominal pain at the ED. Methods/design Thousand consecutive patients with abdominal pain > 2 hours and < 5 days will be enrolled in this multicentre trial. After clinical history, physical and laboratory examination all patients will undergo a diagnostic imaging protocol, consisting of plain X-ray (upright chest and supine abdomen), US and CT. The reference standard will be a post hoc assignment of the final diagnosis by an expert panel. The focus of the analysis will be on the added value of the imaging modalities over history and clinical examination, relative to the incremental costs. Discussion This study aims to provide the evidence base for the development of a diagnostic algorithm that can act as a guideline for ED physicians to evaluate patients with acute abdominal pain. PMID:17683592

Laméris, Wytze; van Randen, Adrienne; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Bossuyt, Patrick MM; Stoker, Jaap; Boermeester, Marja A

2007-01-01

351

GPS Drawing  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website on GPS Drawing was created by Jeremy Wood and features his artwork and a few other GPS artists. The drawings posted in the Gallery "are of journeys captured using GPS receivers" and "were created by treating travel like a geodetic pencil or a cartographic crayon." He has created images of animals and objects through travels by foot, boat, bicycle and plane. The project is also meant to provide "a platform for creativity and innovation with GPS software and technology." One section describes the software used to make the drawings, but also notes that it is currently not available to the public. The Projects section includes various GPS animations, documentation of exhibitions, and workshops conducted in galleries, museums, and schools, as well as computer and cardboard models that make the drawings three dimensional.

352

Changes in pain and pressure pain sensitivity after manual treatment of active trigger points in patients with unilateral shoulder impingement: a case series.  

PubMed

The aim of this case series was to investigate changes in pain and pressure pain sensitivity after manual treatment of active trigger points (TrPs) in the shoulder muscles in individuals with unilateral shoulder impingement. Twelve patients (7 men, 5 women, age: 25 ± 9 years) diagnosed with unilateral shoulder impingement attended 4 sessions for 2 weeks (2 sessions/week). They received TrP pressure release and neuromuscular interventions over each active TrP that was found. The outcome measures were pain during arm elevation (visual analogue scale, VAS) and pressure pain thresholds (PPT) over levator scapulae, supraspinatus infraspinatus, pectoralis major, and tibialis anterior muscles. Pain was captured pre-intervention and at a 1-month follow-up, whereas PPT were assessed pre- and post-treatment, and at a 1-month follow-up. Patients experienced a significant (P < 0.001) reduction in pain after treatment (mean ± SD: 1.3 ± 0.5) with a large effect size (d > 1). In addition, patients also experienced a significant increase in PPT immediate after the treatment (P < 0.05) and one month after discharge (P < 0.01), with effect sizes ranging from moderate (d = 0.4) to large (d > 1).A significant negative association (r(s) = -0.525; P = 0.049) between the increase in PPT over the supraspinatus muscle and the decrease in pain was found: the greater the decrease in pain, the greater the increase in PPT. This case series has shown that manual treatment of active muscle TrPs can help to reduce shoulder pain and pressure sensitivity in shoulder impingement. Current findings suggest that active TrPs in the shoulder musculature may contribute directly to shoulder complaint and sensitization in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome, although future randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:21943613

Hidalgo-Lozano, Amparo; Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Díaz-Rodríguez, Lourdes; González-Iglesias, Javier; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

2011-10-01

353

Effect of Hospice Nonprofessional Caregiver Barriers to Pain Management on Adherence to Analgesic Administration Recommendations and Patient Outcomes.  

PubMed

Nonprofessional caregivers frequently experience barriers to using analgesics for pain in patients in home hospice settings, and patients in pain may suffer needlessly. For example, caregiver adherence to the administration of analgesics is lower for as-needed (PRN) regimens than for standard around-the-clock regimens. But little is known about the barriers caregivers experience and the effects of those barriers. Accordingly, we determined caregiver barriers to using analgesics to manage the pain of patients in the home hospice care setting, and how such barriers affected caregiver adherence and patient quality of life. To this end, we measured barriers, caregiver adherence to PRN analgesic regimens, and patient health outcomes (pain, depression, quality of life [QoL]). A 3-day longitudinal design was used. We recruited 46 hospice nonprofessional caregiver-patient dyads from a local community hospice agency. Barriers were measured with the Barrier Questionnaire II. Adherence to the PRN analgesic regimen was obtained with a 3-day pain and medication diary. Patient outcome measures included pain intensity, the Hospital Depression Scale, and the Brief Hospice Inventory for QoL. Barrier scores were moderate to low. Caregivers adhered to PRN analgesic regimens approximately 51% of the time. Higher caregiver adherence to PRN analgesic regimens was associated with lower patient pain intensity and higher patient QoL, but not, surprisingly, with barriers to pain management. Longitudinal studies are now needed to identify factors besides caregiver barriers that may unduly lower caregiver adherence to PRN analgesic regimens. PMID:25434499

Mayahara, Masako; Foreman, Marquis D; Wilbur, JoEllen; Paice, Judith A; Fogg, Louis F

2014-11-27

354

Drawing Board  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Drawing Board consists of a marking pen that remains stationary and a platform that swings beneath the pen, acting as a pendulum. As the platform swings, the pen marks a sheet of paper that is fastened to the platform, generating beautiful repetitive patterns. These colorful designs contain hidden lessons in physics. This resource includes instructions for making a large-scale Drawing Board as well.

2013-01-30

355

Solar Drawings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drawings were the first method used for keeping a record of astronomical observations; for example, drawings of the constellations\\u000a were being made from very early on. This technique was also applied to other scientific disciplines such as Anatomy, Botany\\u000a and Zoology. Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519) was one of the pioneers in this field (Kemp, 2006). In this way, it was

J. M. Vaquero

356

Evaluation of concomitant methylphenidate and opioid use in patients with pain.  

PubMed

Methylphenidate is a central nervous system simulant that is used for management of opioid-induced sedation. Sparse data exist regarding use patterns of methylphenidate and opioids in patients with pain. This retrospective data analysis evaluated concomitant methylphenidate and opioid use from physician-reported medication lists and in urine specimens of patients with pain. All specimens were analyzed and quantified with LC-MS-MS. Concomitant methylphenidate and opioid use (e.g., sample population) were compared with a baseline population of patients taking opioids. There were 3,326 patients with physician-reported use of methylphenidate. Of these, 1,089 patients were tested for the presence of methylphenidate in urine. Methylphenidate was positive in urine for 551 patients (detection rate of 50.6%). Ritalinic acid was positive in 776 patients (detection rate of 71.3%). The current study observed differences in the use pattern of methylphenidate based on opioid type. Physician-reported use revealed methadone had the highest percent difference between the sample and baseline populations (77%, P ? 0.05). Fentanyl, morphine and hydromorphone also had higher percent differences of 19.6, 25.3 and 32.3%, respectively. Further studies need to examine the apparent discrepancies between the physician-reported medication lists and urine drug testing of concomitant methylphenidate and opioid use in patients with pain. PMID:24907143

Jiang, Joy Y; Best, Brookie M; Morello, Candis M; Atayee, Rabia S; Ma, Joseph D

2014-09-01

357

Effect of Intravenous Patient Controlled Ketamine Analgesiaon Postoperative Pain in Opium Abusers  

PubMed Central

Background: Acutepostoperative pain is among the worst experience that patient scan undergo, and many analgesics have been used to suppress it; especially in chronic opium abusers. Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist analgesic, having both anesthetic and analgesic properties, which are not affected to the same extent in chronic opium abusers. Objectives: In this study, we assessed the analgesic effects of ketamine added to morphine as a patient-controlled analgesia method for acute pain management, compared with a placebo, inchronic maleopium abusers. Patients and Methods: After institutional review board approval for ethical considerations, a randomized double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial was conducted. A total of 140 male patients aged 18-65 years, undergoing orthopedic surgery, were entered into the study after matching inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients received the same anesthesia method; while the first group received ketamine (1mg/mL) and morphine (0.5 mg/mL) as a patient-controlled analgesia (70 patients), the second group received morphine (0.5 mg/mL) plus normal saline (70 patients). P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The ketamine and morphine group of patients experienced less postoperative pain and required less postoperative rescue analgesia. However, the unwanted postoperative side effects were nearly the same; although increased levels of postoperative nausea and vomiting were observed in the ketamine and morphine group Conclusions: This study demonstrated improved analgesic effects after using intravenous patient controlled analgesia with ketamine on postoperative pain in opium abusers. PMID:24701419

Dahi-Taleghani, Mastane; Fazli, Benjamin; Ghasemi, Mahshid; Vosoughian, Maryam; Dabbagh, Ali

2014-01-01

358

Validation of a Spanish language version of the pain self-perception scale in patients with fibromyalgia  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Pain Self-Perception Scale (PSPS) is a 24-item questionnaire used to assess mental defeat in chronic pain patients. The aim of this study was to develop a Spanish language version of the PSPS (PSPS-Spanish), to assess the instrument's psychometric properties in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia and to confirm a possible overlapping between mental defeat and pain catastrophizing.

J García-Campayo; B Rodero; Y López del Hoyo; JV Luciano; M Alda; M Gili

2010-01-01

359

The prognostic value of copeptin in patients with acute chest pain.  

PubMed

The prognostic value of copeptin in acute chest pain is an area of rapid growth and research interest. Copeptin has already established a role in early diagnosis and rule out of acute myocardial infarction, but as its use increases much of the attention has been directed at the prognostic value of copeptin. This article reviews the growing body of evidence supporting the use of copeptin to further risk-stratify chest pain patients. The studies included address a variety of populations ranging from all patients presenting with chest pain to those who are at high risk, diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome or found to have left ventricular dysfunction. Many of the studies compare and combine the prognostic value of copeptin with other prognostic markers such as troponin, brain natriuretic peptide and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events scores. Caveats of copeptin are also discussed such as gender differences, cutoff points and the importance of timing in the copeptin assay. PMID:25244624

Marston, Nicholas A; Maisel, Alan S

2014-10-01

360

Peripheral nerve function in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.  

PubMed Central

In order to study the effects of improved metabolic control on painful diabetic polyneuropathy, 15 patients were treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion over a 12 month period. Polyneuropathy was assessed by pain score, neurological examinations, nerve conduction studies and determination of sensory thresholds and cardiovascular reflexes. Improved metabolic control was confirmed by significantly improved levels of glycosylated haemoglobin (11.7 +/- 0.3% at entry to the study, to 8.7 +/- 0.3% after 12 months; mean +/- SEM). Symptomatic relief was confirmed by significantly improved pain scores. Thresholds for thermal cutaneous sensation improved significantly from 6.0 +/- 0.8 degrees C at entry to the study to 2.7 +/- 0.7 degrees C after 12 months (mean +/- SEM). These findings suggest a selective improvement of peripheral small nerve fibre function after continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The importance of quantitating thermal cutaneous sensation in longitudinal studies of patients with diabetic neuropathy was confirmed. PMID:3681313

Bertelsmann, F W; Heimans, J J; Van Rooy, J C; Dankmeijer, H F; Visser, S L; Van der Veen, E A

1987-01-01

361

Comparison of Modic Changes in the Lumbar and Cervical Spine, in 3167 Patients with and without Spinal Pain  

PubMed Central

Background Context There are few comparisons of Modic changes (MCs) in the lumbar and cervical spine. Purpose Compare the prevalence of MCs in the lumbar and cervical spine, and determine how MC prevalence depends on spinal pain, age, disc degeneration, spinal level, and the presence or absence of kyphosis. Study Design Retrospective clinical survey. Materials and Methods Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were compared from five patient groups: 1. 1223 patients with low-back pain/radiculopathy only; 2. 1023 patients with neck pain/radiculopathy only; 3. 497 patients with concurrent low-back and neck symptoms; 4. 304 asymptomatic subjects with lumbar MRIs; and 5. 120 asymptomatic subjects with cervical MRIs. Results The prevalence of MCs was higher in those with spinal pain than in those without, both in the lumbar spine (21.0% vs 10.5%) and cervical spine (8.8% vs 3.3%). Type II MCs were most common and Type III were least common in all groups. The prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was little affected by the presence of concurrent neck pain, and the same was true for the prevalence of cervical MCs in people with neck pain with or without concurrent back pain. When symptomatic patients were reclassified into two groups (back pain, neck pain), the prevalence of lumbar MCs in people with back pain was greater than that of cervical MCs in people with neck pain. The prevalence of lumbar and cervical MCs increased with age, disc degeneration, (descending) spinal level, and increased kyphosis. Conclusions There is a significantly higher prevalence of MCs in patients with back and neck pain. The reported association with increased kyphosis (flat back) is novel. PMID:25506944

Jian, Chen; Mamuti, Maiwulanjiang; Jun-hui, Liu; Zhi, Shan; Chong-yan, Wang; Shunwu, Fan; Zhao, Fengdong

2014-01-01

362

Preliminary outcomes of a pilot physical therapy program for HIV-infected patients with chronic pain.  

PubMed

Chronic pain in HIV-infected individuals is common and often undertreated. Physical therapy (PT) is an evidence-based nonpharmacologic treatment for chronic pain. Our objective is to present the results of a pilot PT program in an HIV pain/palliative care clinic, which is embedded within a Ryan White-funded multidisciplinary HIV primary care clinic. Medical records of HIV-infected patients participating in a PT program between November 2012 and July 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Pain scores on a 0-10 scale and cost data were collected and analyzed. Among 43 patients referred, 27 collectively attended 86 sessions. Median age of enrolled patients was 54 (IQR 49-58). Sixteen (59%) were African-American and 20 (77%) had an undetectable HIV viral load. Mean pain score at initial visit was 6.5 (SD = 1.1). The average session-level decrease was 2.6 (SD = 1.7) and patient-level decrease was 2.5 (SD = 1.2). The largest payors were Medicare managed care (28%), Medicaid (21%), and Ryan White grant-related funds (18%). When the first four months of the program are excluded to account for slow start-up, the program's monthly net revenue during the remaining five months was $163. We present preliminary data from a low-cost pilot PT program integrated into an HIV clinic in a primary care setting associated with clinically significant improvements in pain. Further investigation into the implementation of such programs is essential. PMID:25062028

Mgbemena, Okechukwu; Westfall, Andrew O; Ritchie, Christine S; Hicks, Jennifer; Raper, James L; Overton, Edgar Turner; Norton, Wynne E; Merlin, Jessica S

2015-02-01

363

Clinical Outcomes and Cost Effectiveness of Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol in a Chest Pain Center Compared with Routine Care of Patients with Chest Pain  

PubMed Central

Aims The aim of this study was to compare in patients presenting with acute chest pain the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of an accelerated diagnostic protocol utilizing contemporary technology in a chest pain unit versus routine care in an internal medicine department. Methods and Results Hospital and 90-day course were prospectively studied in 585 consecutive low-moderate risk acute chest pain patients, of whom 304 were investigated in a designated chest pain center using a pre-specified accelerated diagnostic protocol, while 281 underwent routine care in an internal medicine ward. Hospitalization was longer in the routine care compared with the accelerated diagnostic protocol group (p<0.001). During hospitalization, 298 accelerated diagnostic protocol patients (98%) vs. 57 (20%) routine care patients underwent non-invasive testing, (p<0.001). Throughout the 90-day follow-up, diagnostic imaging testing was performed in 125 (44%) and 26 (9%) patients in the routine care and accelerated diagnostic protocol patients, respectively (p<0.001). Ultimately, most patients in both groups had non-invasive imaging testing. Accelerated diagnostic protocol patients compared with those receiving routine care was associated with a lower incidence of readmissions for chest pain [8 (3%) vs. 24 (9%), p<0.01], and acute coronary syndromes [1 (0.3%) vs. 9 (3.2%), p<0.01], during the follow-up period. The accelerated diagnostic protocol remained a predictor of lower acute coronary syndromes and readmissions after propensity score analysis [OR = 0.28 (CI 95% 0.14–0.59)]. Cost per patient was similar in both groups [($2510 vs. $2703 for the accelerated diagnostic protocol and routine care group, respectively, (p = 0.9)]. Conclusion An accelerated diagnostic protocol is clinically superior and as cost effective as routine in acute chest pain patients, and may save time and resources. PMID:25622029

Asher, Elad; Reuveni, Haim; Shlomo, Nir; Gerber, Yariv; Beigel, Roy; Narodetski, Michael; Eldar, Michael; Or, Jacob; Hod, Hanoch; Shamiss, Arie; Matetzky, Shlomi

2015-01-01

364

Pharmacological treatment of chronic non-cancer pain in pediatric patients.  

PubMed

Chronic pain in children and young adults occurs frequently and contributes to early disability as well as personal and familial distress. A biopsychosocial approach to evaluation and treatment is recommended. Within this approach, there is a role for pharmacologic intervention. A variety of medications are used for chronic pain conditions in pediatric patients. Medication classes include anticonvulsants, muscle relaxants, antidepressants, opioids, local anesthetics, and anti-inflammatory drugs. Data is sparse, and most medications are used without condition-specific approval by national regulatory agencies such as the Food and Drug Administration in the US and the European Medicines Agency. In the absence of evidence on which to base practice, optimal drug therapy decisions rest on understanding proposed mechanisms of pain conditions, extrapolation from adult data-when such exists, and empirical and experiential knowledge. Drug delivery systems have evolved, and practitioners have to decide amongst not only medication classes, but also routes of delivery. Opioids are not recommended for use by non-pain specialists for the treatment of pediatric chronic pain, and even then the issues are more complex than can be addressed here. This article reviews the major medications used for pediatric chronic pain conditions. PMID:25304005

Mathew, Eapen; Kim, Eugene; Goldschneider, Kenneth R

2014-12-01

365

Long term safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of hyaluronic acid injection in patients with painful osteoarthritis of the knee  

PubMed Central

The increasing prevalence of painful knee osteoarthritis has created an additional demand for pharmacologic management to prevent or delay surgical management. Viscosupplementation, via intraarticular injection of hyaluronic acid (HA), aims to restore the favorable milieu present in the nonarthritic joint. The safety profile of intraarticular HA injections for painful knee osteoarthritis is well established, with the most common adverse effect being a self-limited reaction at the injection site. Although acceptance of the early literature has been limited by publication bias and poor study quality, more recent and rigorous meta-analysis suggests that intraarticular HA injection is superior to placebo injection for pain relief and matches, if not surpasses, the effect size of other nonoperative treatments, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication. Intraarticular HA injection is effective in providing temporary pain relief in patients with painful knee osteoarthritis. Future investigations should focus on optimizing the composition and administration of HA agents to provide prolonged relief of painful osteoarthritis in the knee and other joints. PMID:23271899

McArthur, Benjamin A; Dy, Christopher J; Fabricant, Peter D; Valle, Alejandro Gonzalez Della

2012-01-01

366

Imaging strategies for detection of urgent conditions in patients with acute abdominal pain: diagnostic accuracy study  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify an optimal imaging strategy for the accurate detection of urgent conditions in patients with acute abdominal pain. Design Fully paired multicentre diagnostic accuracy study with prospective data collection. Setting Emergency departments of two university hospitals and four large teaching hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants 1021 patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain of >2 hours’ and <5 days’ duration. Exclusion criteria were discharge from the emergency department with no imaging considered warranted by the treating physician, pregnancy, and haemorrhagic shock. Intervention All patients had plain radiographs (upright chest and supine abdominal), ultrasonography, and computed tomography (CT) after clinical and laboratory examination. A panel of experienced physicians assigned a final diagnosis after six months and classified the condition as urgent or non-urgent. Main outcome measures Sensitivity and specificity for urgent conditions, percentage of missed cases and false positives, and exposure to radiation for single imaging strategies, conditional imaging strategies (CT after initial ultrasonography), and strategies driven by body mass index and age or by location of pain. Results 661 (65%) patients had a final diagnosis classified as urgent. The initial clinical diagnosis resulted in many false positive urgent diagnoses, which were significantly reduced after ultrasonography or CT. CT detected more urgent diagnoses than did ultrasonography: sensitivity was 89% (95% confidence interval 87% to 92%) for CT and 70% (67% to 74%) for ultrasonography (P<0.001). A conditional strategy with CT only after negative or inconclusive ultrasonography yielded the highest sensitivity, missing only 6% of urgent cases. With this strategy, only 49% (46% to 52%) of patients would have CT. Alternative strategies guided by body mass index, age, or location of the pain would all result in a loss of sensitivity. Conclusion Although CT is the most sensitive imaging investigation for detecting urgent conditions in patients with abdominal pain, using ultrasonography first and CT only in those with negative or inconclusive ultrasonography results in the best sensitivity and lowers exposure to radiation. PMID:19561056

2009-01-01

367

Spinal cord stimulation normalizes abnormal cortical pain processing in patients with cardiac syndrome X.  

PubMed

Cardiac syndrome X (CSX) is characterized by effort angina, ST-segment depression during stress tests and normal coronary arteries. Abnormal nociception was suggested in these patients by studies showing a reduced cardiac pain threshold; furthermore, we recently found a lack of habituation to pain stimuli using recording of laser evoked potentials (LEPs). In CSX patients with severe angina, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) was shown to improve symptoms. In this study we investigated whether, in these patients, SCS has any effects on the excitability of the nociceptive system, assessed by LEPs recording. We studied 16 CSX patients (61.6+/-7 years; 4 men) who underwent SCS for refractory angina. Cortical LEPs were recorded during stimulation of the chest and right-hand during active SCS (SCS-ON) and in the absence of SCS (SCS-OFF), using a randomized cross-over design. Three sequences of painful stimuli were applied at each site during each test. During the first sequence of chest stimuli, the N2/P2 LEP amplitude was higher during the SCS-ON, compared to the SCS-OFF phase (18.2+/-7.8 vs. 11.5+/-4.4 microV, P=0.006). The N2/P2 amplitude did not change significantly across the three stimulation sequences during the SCS-OFF phase (P=0.22), whereas it decreased progressively during the second and third sequence (to 87.1+/-29.5% and 76.4+/-24.1%, respectively) compared with the first sequence, during the SCS-ON phase (P=0.014). Similar results were observed during right-hand stimulation. Our study shows that in CSX patients SCS is able to restore habituation to peripheral pain stimuli. This effect might contribute to restore the ability of CSX patients to better tolerate cardiac pain. PMID:18440702

Sestito, Alfonso; Lanza, Gaetano Antonio; Le Pera, Domenica; De Armas, Liala; Sgueglia, Gregory Angelo; Infusino, Fabio; Miliucci, Roberto; Tonali, Pietro Attilio; Crea, Filippo; Valeriani, Massimiliano

2008-09-30

368

Testing of Low-Risk Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain  

PubMed Central

The management of low-risk patients presenting to emergency departments is a common and challenging clinical problem entailing 8 million emergency department visits annually. Although a majority of these patients do not have a life-threatening condition, the clinician must distinguish between those who require urgent treatment of a serious problem and those with more benign entities who do not require admission. Inadvertent discharge of patients with acute coronary syndrome from the emergency department is associated with increased mortality and liability, whereas inappropriate admission of patients without serious disease is neither indicated nor cost-effective. Clinical judgment and basic clinical tools (history, physical examination, and electrocardiogram) remain primary in meeting this challenge and affording early identification of low-risk patients with chest pain. Additionally, established and newer diagnostic methods have extended clinicians' diagnostic capacity in this setting. Low-risk patients presenting with chest pain are increasingly managed in chest pain units in which accelerated diagnostic protocols are performed, comprising serial electrocardiograms and cardiac injury markers to exclude acute coronary syndrome. Patients with negative findings usually complete the accelerated diagnostic protocol with a confirmatory test to exclude ischemia. This is typically an exercise treadmill test or a cardiac imaging study if the exercise treadmill test is not applicable. Rest myocardial perfusion imaging has assumed an important role in this setting. Computed tomography coronary angiography has also shown promise in this setting. A negative accelerated diagnostic protocol evaluation allows discharge, whereas patients with positive findings are admitted. This approach has been found to be safe, accurate, and cost-effective in low-risk patients presenting with chest pain. PMID:20660809

Amsterdam, Ezra A.; Kirk, J. Douglas; Bluemke, David A.; Diercks, Deborah; Farkouh, Michael E.; Garvey, J. Lee; Kontos, Michael C.; McCord, James; Miller, Todd D.; Morise, Anthony; Newby, L. Kristin; Ruberg, Frederick L.; Scordo, Kristine Anne; Thompson, Paul D.

2011-01-01

369

Somatoform pain disorder  

MedlinePLUS

Pain disorder ... thought to be related to emotional stress. The pain was often said to be "all in their head." However, patients with somatoform pain disorder seem to experience painful sensations in a ...

370

Behavioral and physiologic indicators of pain in nonverbal patients with a traumatic brain injury: an integrative review.  

PubMed

The use of behavioral and physiologic indicators is recommended for pain assessment in nonverbal patients. Traumatic brain injuries (TBI) can lead to neurologic changes and affect the way patients respond to pain. As such, commonly used indicators of pain may not apply to TBI patients. This study aimed to review the literature about behavioral/physiologic indicators of pain in nonverbal TBI patients. An integrative review method was used. Medline (from 1948 to June 2011), Cinahl, and Cochrane databases were searched using any combination of the terms brain injury, behavioral indicators, behavioral scale, physiologic indicators, pain, pain assessment, and pain measurement. All articles reporting expert opinion or original data about the validity of behavioral and/or physiologic indicators of pain in TBI patients were considered. For each article included, the quality of findings/clinical recommendations was graded independently by two raters using SORT taxonomy. Eight papers were reviewed. Overall, TBI patients seemed to present a wider range of behavioral reactions to pain than other adult populations. In addition to the commonly observed grimace, agitation, and increased muscle tension, 14%-72% of TBI patients showed raising eyebrows, opening eyes, weeping eyes, and absence of muscle tension when exposed to pain. Those atypical reactions appeared to be present only in the acute phase of TBIs recovery. Similarly to other populations, vital signs were identified as potential indicators of pain in TBI patients. Further research studying TBI patients and considering changes in level of consciousness, location/severity of brain injury, and administration of analgesic/sedative is needed. Until then, nurses should follow the current clinical recommendations. PMID:24882028

Arbour, Caroline; Gélinas, Céline

2014-06-01

371

ER Patients with Chest Pain May Not Always Need Heart Tests  

MedlinePLUS

... rooms for chest pain in 2011. From this group, they identified almost 422,000 patients, of which more than 293,000 did not receive noninvasive tests and close to 128,000 did. The most common test used was a myocardial perfusion scintigraphy -- a scan that shows blood flow in the heart. According ...

372

Diagnostic Classification of Patients with Low Back Pain: Report on a Survey of Physical Therapy Experts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Backgmund and Pulpme. A survey of expert orthopedic physical therapists was conducted to assist in the development of a classijication system for patients with low back pain (W). The goal of the suruey was to measure levels of agree- ment on labels and accompanying constellations of signs and symptoms for sub

Carolyn Gowland

373

Predictors of Physical Therapy Clinic Performance in the Treatment of Patients With Low Back Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Purpose. Little is known about organizational and service delivery factors related to quality of care in physical therapy. This study sought to identify characteristics related to differences in practice outcomes and service utilization. Subjects. The sample comprised 114 outpatient clinics and 1,058 therapists who treated 16,281 patients with low back pain syndromes during the period 2000 -2001. Clinics

Dawei Liu; Vince Mor; Dennis L Hart

2008-01-01

374

Decrease in quadriceps inhibition after sacroiliac joint manipulation in patients with anterior knee pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Evidence exists that conservative rehabilitation protocols fail to achieve full recovery of muscle strength and function after joint injuries. The lack of success has been attributed to the high amount of muscle inhibition found in patients with pathologic conditions of the knee joint. Clinical evaluation shows that anterior knee pain is typically associated with sacroiliac joint dysfunction, which may

Esther Suter; Gordon McMorland; Walter Herzog; Robert Bray

1999-01-01

375

Locus of Control, Repression-Sensitization, and Psychological Disorder in Chronic Pain Patients.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the relationship between locus of control and psychological disorder in chronic pain patients (N=59) through administration of Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Results suggested that both anxiety and a response set affect this population's rating of ability to control…

McCreary, Charles; Turner, Judith

1984-01-01

376

Ischiogluteal bursitis in cancer patients: an infrequently recognized cause of pain.  

PubMed

We report eight patients with metastatic malignancy who developed severe back and leg pain caused by ischiogluteal bursitis. Careful evaluation excluded the possibility of bony metastases. Ischiogluteal bursitis is an easily diagnosed condition that can be effectively treated with local injection of corticosteroids. Recognition of this disorder will allow prompt therapy and unnecessary evaluation expenses. PMID:8338057

Mills, G M; Baethge, B A

1993-06-01

377

Treatment of joint pain in Crohn's patients with budesonide controlled ileal release.  

PubMed

1. Joint pain is a frequent manifestation of Crohn's disease. Budesonide controlled ileal release (CIR) is a predominantly topically acting glucocorticosteroid, which is effective in treating active ileal or ileocaecal Crohn's disease. 2. Therefore, it was of interest to study the effect of this predominantly topically acting therapy on the treatment of an extraintestinal symptom of Crohn's disease by analysing data collected from budesonide CIR (Entocort; Astra Draco AB, Lund, Sweden) trials. 3. Three large studies of budesonide CIR treatment in active Crohn's disease provided a reliable source of clinical data. Of the 611 patients treated in the prospective double-blind controlled trials, 291 had joint pain (arthritis/arthralgia) at entry, which was recorded as part of the Crohn's Disease Activity Index. Statistical analysis was based on all patients treated, provided that the patient had joint pain at the start of treatment. 4. Daily oral budesonide CIR (9mg) resulted in clinical remission of joint pain in 74% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 67-82%) of patients. This outcome was nearly twice as good as placebo (41%; 95% CI 34-57%) and as good as the outcome effected by daily oral prednisolone (40mg; 72%; 95% CI 60-84%). The favourable response to budesonide CIR (9 mg) did not correlate with glucocorticosteroid-associated side effects or with adrenal suppression, which were half those in the prednisolone (40 mg/day) group. 5. The favourable outcome may relate to restitution of normal intestinal immune function. PMID:10779128

Florin, T H; Graffner, H; Nilsson, L G; Persson, T

2000-04-01

378

Teaching Critical Decision-Making Skills to Students Concerning Patients with Acute Abdominal Pain.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The clinical performance of junior hospital staff concerning the management of patients with acute abdominal pain may be enhanced by placing greater emphasis on teaching clinical decision-making skills during the preintern year. Final year medical students took part in a teaching session in which groups of six to eight rotated through six stations…

Hill, David; And Others

1994-01-01

379

Appraisal and Coping with Daily Stressors by Pediatric Patients with Chronic Abdominal Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

and coping with daily stressors and to test a model of the relation of stress appraisal and coping to symptoms and disability. Methods Pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain (n = 143) and well children (n = 104) completed a 5-day diary study regarding their appraisal and coping with daily stressors. Somatic symptoms, depressive symptoms, and functional disability were assessed

Lynn S. Walker; Craig A. Smith; Judy Garber; Robyn Lewis Claar

2007-01-01

380

Painful snapping elbow in patients with congenital radioulnar synostosis: report of two cases.  

PubMed

Two patients with congenital radioulnar synostosis presented with painful snapping on elbow motion in one case and locking of the elbow joint in the other. Elbow arthroscopy revealed the presence of tight fibrous tissue trapping the radial head. Arthroscopic removal of this tight fibrous tissue resulted in painless joint motion without recurrence of snapping or locking. PMID:20684930

Shinohara, Takaaki; Horii, Emiko; Tatebe, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Michiro; Okui, Nobuyuki; Hirata, Hitoshi

2010-08-01

381

Magnetocardiography Predicts Coronary Artery Disease in Patients with Acute Chest Pain  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The value of magnetocardiography (MCG) for the detection of cardiac electrical distur- bances associated with myocardial ischemia was studied. Methods: Sensitivity and predictivity of admission MCG for the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) were prospectively evaluated in 264 consecutive patients presenting with acute chest pain and without ST-segment elevation. MCG findings were compared with 12-lead ECG, echocardiography (ECHO),

Jai-Wun Park; Peter M. Hill; Namsik Chung; Paul G. Hugenholtz; Friedrich Jung

2005-01-01

382

Nonspecific Chronic Low Back Pain Patients Are Deconditioned and Have An Increased Body Fat Percentage  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare data on the level of aerobic capacity and body composition of nonspecific chronic low back pain (CLBP) patients with normative data matched for sex, age and level of sporting activity. The study population consisted of 101 outpatients with nonspecific CLBP who had entered a rehabilitation…

Hodselmans, Audy P.

2010-01-01

383

Hysteria Scale Elevations in Low Back Pain Patients: A Risk Factor for Misdiagnosis?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the nature of elevations on the Hysteria scale of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory in low back pain patients. Subscales reflecting somatic complaints were more powerful predictors of diagnostic status than were subscales with nonsomatic content. Overlapping and nonoverlapping items on the Hysteria and Hypochondriasis scales…

Prokop, Charles K.

1986-01-01

384

Median Nerve Stimulation in a Patient with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type II  

PubMed Central

A 54-year-old man experienced injury to the second finger of his left hand due to damage from a paintball gun shot 8 years prior, and the metacarpo-phalangeal joint was amputated. He gradually developed mechanical allodynia and burning pain, and there were trophic changes of the thenar muscle and he reported coldness on his left hand and forearm. A neuroma was found on the left second common digital nerve and was removed, but his symptoms continued despite various conservative treatments including a morphine infusion pump on his left arm. We therefore attempted median nerve stimulation to treat the chronic pain. The procedure was performed in two stages. The first procedure involved exposure of the median nerve on the mid-humerus level and placing of the electrode. The trial stimulation lasted for 7 days and the patient's symptoms improved. The second procedure involved implantation of a pulse generator on the left subclavian area. The mechanical allodynia and pain relief score, based on the visual analogue scale, decreased from 9 before surgery to 4 after surgery. The patient's activity improved markedly, but trophic changes and vasomotor symptom recovered only moderately. In conclusion, median nerve stimulation can improve chronic pain from complex regional pain syndrome type II. PMID:19844632

Jeon, Ik-Chan; Kim, Min-Su

2009-01-01

385

Children in Chronic Pain: Promoting Pediatric Patients’ Symptom Accounts in Tertiary Care  

PubMed Central

This paper examines how clinicians promote pediatric patients’ symptom accounts at the beginning of visits in three pediatric tertiary care clinics at a university hospital in the US: pain, gastroenterology and neurology. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected for 69 patient-parent pairs, including videotaped intake visits. Two forms of child account promotion, together with their corresponding distribution across clinics, were identified: (1) Epistemic prefaces were used to upgrade the patient’s epistemic status and to establish the child as primary informant; and, (2) non-focused questioning was used to permit children latitude in the formulation of symptoms and experiences. In general, epistemic prefaces were characteristic of the gastroenterology and neurology visits, while non-focused questioning was found overwhelmingly in the pain encounters. PMID:18272275

Clemente, Ignasi; Lee, Seung-Hee; Heritage, John

2010-01-01

386

Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for interdisciplinary rehabilitation of chronic nonmalignant pain syndrome patients.  

PubMed

This is an update to evidence-based practice guidelines for chronic nonmalignant pain syndrome patients first published in 1995 and revised in 1999. The current guidelines recommend interdisciplinary-focused rehabilitation, which is goal-directed and time-limited. Emphasis is placed on educating patients in active self-management techniques that stress maximizing function. Integrated treatment involving medical, psychological/behavioral, physical/occupational therapy, and disability/vocational interventions are recommended on an outpatient basis whenever clinically possible. Patient selection criteria are delineated. Updated references providing evidence-based support for the recommendations are provided, including the use of opioids and sedative-hypnotic medications, injection and block procedures, acupuncture, implantable spinal infusion and stimulation devices, and other invasive spinal surgery procedures such as intradiscal electrothermal therapy. Guideline integration and early detection and intervention with chronic pain syndrome patients are encouraged. PMID:17177763

Sanders, Steven H; Harden, R Norman; Vicente, Peter J

2005-12-01