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Sample records for patient skin dose

  1. [Patient skin dose in interventional radiology using radiochromic dosimetry film].

    PubMed

    Amano, Masafumi; Nishitani, Hiromu; Kohno, Shingo; Yasutomo, Motokatsu; Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Yagi, Hirofumi

    2003-01-01

    Various types of X-ray examinations are currently being carried out for the purpose of diagnosis. However, since dose limits for contamination by medical examinations have not been set, management of dose measurements and contamination records is called for. With increasing use of the IVR technique, reports of radiation injury and the symptoms associated with it have become more common. To advance our understanding of this situation and to reduce contamination, it is necessary to carry out contamination management. The reflection film on which colors are formed by irradiating X-rays has recently come into use. Dose measurement is possible with the use of this film, and, because effective results can be obtained as a result of performing fundamental examinations, the film actually provides dose measurements for the IVR technique. Another benefit is that maximum patient skin dose and dose distribution can be determined in addition to dose measurement. Moreover, since various methods were examined in this study, the method of dose evaluation is also reported for those wishing to employ it in the clinical setting. PMID:12577009

  2. Measurement and comparison of skin dose using OneDose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mattar, Essam H.; Hammad, Lina F.; Al-Mohammed, Huda I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Total body irradiation is a protocol used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia in patients prior to bone marrow transplant. It is involved in the treatment of the whole body using a large radiation field with extended source-skin distance. Therefore measuring and monitoring the skin dose during the treatment is important. Two kinds of metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (OneDose MOSFET and mobile MOSEFT) dosimeter are used during the treatment delivery to measure the skin dose to specific points and compare it with the target prescribed dose. The objective of this study was to compare the variation of skin dose in patients with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) treated with total body irradiation (TBI) using OneDose MOSFET detectors and Mobile MOSFET, and then compare both results with the target prescribed dose. Material/Methods The measurements involved 32 patient’s (16 males, 16 females), aged between 14–30 years, with an average age of 22.41 years. One-Dose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET dosimetry were performed at 10 different anatomical sites on every patient. Results The results showed there was no variation between skin dose measured with OneDose MOSFET and Mobile MOSFET in all patients. Furthermore, the results showed for every anatomical site selected there was no significant difference in the dose delivered using either OneDose MOSFET detector or Mobile MOSFET as compared to the prescribed dose. Conclusions The study concludes that One-Dose MOSFET detectors and Mobile MOSFET both give a direct read-out immediately after the treatment; therefore both detectors are suitable options when measuring skin dose for total body irradiation treatment. PMID:21709641

  3. Skin dose measurements using MOSFET and TLD for head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh A; Murthy, Vedang; Goel, Vineeta; Tambe, Chandrashekar M; Dhote, Dipak S; Deshpande, Deepak D

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to estimate skin dose for the patients treated with tomotherapy using metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). In vivo measurements were performed for two head and neck patients treated with tomotherapy and compared to TLD measurements. The measurements were subsequently carried out for five days to estimate the inter-fraction deviations in MOSFET measurements. The variation between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for first patient was 2.2%. Similarly, the variation of 2.3% was observed between skin dose measured with MOSFET and TLD for second patient. The tomotherapy treatment planning system overestimated the skin dose as much as by 10-12% when compared to both MOSFET and TLD. However, the MOSFET measured patient skin doses also had good reproducibility, with inter-fraction deviations ranging from 1% to 1.4%. MOSFETs may be used as a viable dosimeter for measuring skin dose in areas where the treatment planning system may not be accurate. PMID:19369084

  4. In vivo evaluating skin doses for lung cancer patients undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Pan, Lung-Kang; Chen, Hsin-Yu; Liu, Wen-Shan; Hsu, Chang-Chieh; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    This study is the first to use 10- to 90-kg tissue-equivalent phantoms as patient surrogates to measure peripheral skin doses (Dskin) in lung cancer treatment through Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of the Axesse linac. Five tissue-equivalent and Rando phantoms were used to simulate lung cancer patients using the thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD-100H) approach. TLD-100H was calibrated using 6 MV photons coming from the Axesse linac. Then it was inserted into phantom positions that closely corresponded with the position of the represented organs and tissues. TLDs were measured using the Harshaw 3500 TLD reader. The ICRP 60 evaluated the mean Dskin to the lung cancer for 1 fraction (7 Gy) undergoing VMAT. The Dskin of these phantoms ranged from 0.51±0.08 (10-kg) to 0.22±0.03 (90-kg) mSv/Gy. Each experiment examined the relationship between the Dskin and the distance from the treatment field. These revealed strong variations in positions close to the tumor center. The correlation between Dskin and body weight was Dskin (mSv) = -0.0034x + 0.5296, where x was phantom's weight in kg. R2 is equal to 0.9788. This equation can be used to derive an equation for lung cancer in males. Finally, the results are compared to other published research. These findings are pertinent to patients, physicians, radiologists, and the public. PMID:26405934

  5. Visual and numerical methods to measure patient skin doses in interventional procedures using radiochromic XR-RV2 films.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Machado, A; Roas, N

    2011-09-01

    Radiochromic XR-RV2 films are considered as one of the best dosemeters to measure patient skin doses in fluoroscopy-guided interventional procedures. To fulfil this purpose, they need to be calibrated with diagnostic energies and doses beyond several Gray. The vendor provides a visual calibration strip to estimate the absorbed dose. Differences between visual dose estimation versus film digitisation were investigated. The influence of backscatter radiation on film sensitivity was also investigated and the sources of uncertainty were analysed when skin doses were measured with these films. When based on the visual comparison with the strip, the estimation of the dose resulted in an error of 50 % (2 Gy in the region around 4 Gy). However, when using numerical methods after film digitisation, the uncertainty in dose measurement fell to 7-14 % in the dose range of interest. Calibration under backscatter conditions demonstrates that the  'in air' calibration underestimates the doses by 7 %. When the dose was measured with a calibration method based on 16 bits grey digitisation, uncertainty was twice higher than when the red channel from red, green, blue digitised images was used. PMID:21757442

  6. Skin dose mapping for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Perry B.; Borrego, David; Balter, Stephen; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To introduce a new skin dose mapping software system for interventional fluoroscopy dose assessment and to analyze the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching. Methods: In this study, a new software system was developed for visualizing patient skin dose during interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The system works by translating the reference point air kerma to the location of the patient's skin, which is represented by a computational model. In order to orient the model with the x-ray source, geometric parameters found within the radiation dose structured report (RDSR) are used along with a limited number of in-clinic measurements. The output of the system is a visual indication of skin dose mapped onto an anthropomorphic model at a resolution of 5 mm. In order to determine if patient-dependent and patient-sculpted models increase accuracy, peak skin dose was calculated for each of 26 patient-specific models and compared with doses calculated using an elliptical stylized model, a reference hybrid model, a matched patient-dependent model and one patient-sculpted model. Results were analyzed in terms of a percent difference using the doses calculated using the patient-specific model as the true standard. Results: Anthropometric matching, including the use of both patient-dependent and patient-sculpted phantoms, was shown most beneficial for left lateral and anterior-posterior projections. In these cases, the percent difference using a reference model was between 8 and 20%, using a patient-dependent model between 7 and 15%, and using a patient-sculpted model between 3 and 7%. Under the table tube configurations produced errors less than 5% in most situations due to the flattening affects of the table and pad, and the fact that table height is the main determination of source-to-skin distance for these configurations. In addition to these results, several skin dose maps were produced and a prototype display system was placed on the in

  7. Skin dose mapping for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Perry B.; Borrego, David; Balter, Stephen; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To introduce a new skin dose mapping software system for interventional fluoroscopy dose assessment and to analyze the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching. Methods: In this study, a new software system was developed for visualizing patient skin dose during interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The system works by translating the reference point air kerma to the location of the patient’s skin, which is represented by a computational model. In order to orient the model with the x-ray source, geometric parameters found within the radiation dose structured report (RDSR) are used along with a limited number of in-clinic measurements. The output of the system is a visual indication of skin dose mapped onto an anthropomorphic model at a resolution of 5 mm. In order to determine if patient-dependent and patient-sculpted models increase accuracy, peak skin dose was calculated for each of 26 patient-specific models and compared with doses calculated using an elliptical stylized model, a reference hybrid model, a matched patient-dependent model and one patient-sculpted model. Results were analyzed in terms of a percent difference using the doses calculated using the patient-specific model as the true standard. Results: Anthropometric matching, including the use of both patient-dependent and patient-sculpted phantoms, was shown most beneficial for left lateral and anterior–posterior projections. In these cases, the percent difference using a reference model was between 8 and 20%, using a patient-dependent model between 7 and 15%, and using a patient-sculpted model between 3 and 7%. Under the table tube configurations produced errors less than 5% in most situations due to the flattening affects of the table and pad, and the fact that table height is the main determination of source-to-skin distance for these configurations. In addition to these results, several skin dose maps were produced and a prototype display system was placed on the in

  8. Dose estimation for different skin models in interstitial breast brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kabacińska, Renata; Makarewicz, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Skin is a major organ at risk in breast-conserving therapy (BCT). The American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) recommendations require monitoring of maximum dose received, however, there is no unambiguous way of skin contouring provided. The purpose of this study was to compare the doses received by the skin in different models. Material and methods Standard treatment plans of 20 patients who underwent interstitial breast brachytherapy were analyzed. Every patient had a new treatment plan prepared according to Paris system and had skin contoured in three different ways. The first model, Skin 2 mm, corresponds to the dermatological breast skin thickness and is reaching 2 mm into an external patient contour. It was rejected in a further analysis, because of distinct discontinuities in contouring. The second model, Skin 4 mm, replaced Skin 2 mm, and is reaching 2 mm inside and 2 mm outside of the External contour. The third model, Skin EXT, is created on the External contour and it expands 4 mm outside. Doses received by the most exposed 0.1 cc, 1 cc, 2 cc, and the maximum doses for Skin 4 mm and Skin EXT were compared. Results Mean, median, maximum, and standard deviation of percentage dose difference between Skin EXT and Skin 4 mm for the most exposed 0.1 cc (D0.1cc) of skin were 18.01%, 17.20%, 27.84%, and 4.01%, respectively. All differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions Monitoring of doses received by skin is necessary to avoid complications and obtain a satisfactory cosmetic effect. It is difficult to assess the compatibility of treatment plans with recommendations, while there is no unambiguous way of skin contouring. Especially, if a mean difference of doses between two models of skin contouring is 18% for the most exposed 0.1 cc and can reach almost 28% in some cases. Differences of this magnitude can result in skin complications during BCT. PMID:25097562

  9. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Jamali, Farideh; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV) was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution. PMID:27358592

  10. Skin dose from radionuclide contamination on clothing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, D.C.; Hussein, E.M.A.; Yuen, P.S.

    1997-06-01

    Skin dose due to radio nuclide contamination on clothing is calculated by Monte Carlo simulation of electron and photon radiation transport. Contamination due to a hot particle on some selected clothing geometries of cotton garment is simulated. The effect of backscattering in the surrounding air is taken into account. For each combination of source-clothing geometry, the dose distribution function in the skin, including the dose at tissue depths of 7 mg cm{sup -2} and 1,000 Mg cm{sup -2}, is calculated by simulating monoenergetic photon and electron sources. Skin dose due to contamination by a radionuclide is then determined by proper weighting of & monoenergetic dose distribution functions. The results are compared with the VARSKIN point-kernel code for some radionuclides, indicating that the latter code tends to under-estimate the dose for gamma and high energy beta sources while it overestimates skin dose for low energy beta sources. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. SU-E-I-55: The Contribution to Skin Dose Due to Scatter From the Patient Table and the Head Holder During Fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, N; Xiong, Z; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine contributions to skin dose due to scatter from the table and head holder used during fluoroscopy, and also to explore alternative design material to reduce the scatter dose. Methods: Measurements were made of the primary and scatter components of the xray beam exiting the patient table and a cylindrical head holder used on a Toshiba Infinix c-arm unit as a function of kVp for the various beam filters on the machine and for various field sizes. The primary component of the beam was measured in air with the object placed close to the x-ray tube with an air gap between it and a 6 cc parallel-plate ionization chamber and with the beam collimated to a size just larger than the chamber. The primary plus scatter radiation components were measured with the object moved to a position in the beam next to the chamber for larger field sizes. Both sets of measurements were preformed while keeping the source-to-chamber distance fixed. The scatter fraction was estimated by taking the ratio of the difference between the two measurements and the reading that included both primary and scatter. Similar measurements were also made for a 2.3 cm thick Styrofoam block which could substitute for the patient support. Results: The measured scatter fractions indicate that the patient table as well as the head holder contributes an additional 10–16% to the patient entrance dose depending on field size. Forward scatter was reduced with the Styrofoam block so that the scatter fraction was about 4–5%. Conclusion: The results of this investigation demonstrated that scatter from the table and head holder used in clinical fluoroscopy contribute substantially to the skin dose. The lower contribution of scatter from Styrofoam suggests that there is an opportunity to redesign patient support accessories to reduce the skin dose. Partial support from NIH grant R01EB002873 and Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation Equipment Grant.

  12. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis to evaluate ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimens for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and complicated skin and skin-structure infections in patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    PubMed

    Canut, A; Isla, A; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the probability of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target attainment (PTA) of ceftaroline against clinical isolates causing community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and complicated skin and skin-structure infection (cSSSI) in Europe was evaluated. Three dosing regimens were assessed: 600 mg every 12 h (q12 h) as a 1-h infusion (standard dose) or 600 mg every 8 h (q8 h) as a 2-h infusion in virtual patients with normal renal function; and 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pharmacokinetic and microbiological data were obtained from the literature. The PTA and the cumulative fraction of response (CFR) were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. In patients with normal renal function, the ceftaroline standard dose (600 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion) can be sufficient to treat CABP due to ceftazidime-susceptible (CAZ-S) Escherichia coli, CAZ-S Klebsiella pneumoniae, meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (CFR>90%). However, against meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), the CFR was 72%. In cSSSI, the CFR was also <80% for MRSA. Administration of ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion or 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal insufficiency provided a high probability of treatment success (CFR ca. 100%) for most micro-organisms causing CABP and cSSSI, including MRSA and penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae. These results suggest that in patients with normal renal function, ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion may be a better option than the standard dose, especially if the MRSA rate is high. PMID:25700566

  13. Patient skin dose measurements using a cable free system MOSFETs based in fluoroscopically guided percutaneous vertebroplasty, percutaneous disc decompression, radiofrequency medial branch neurolysis, and endovascular critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Falco, Maria D; Masala, Salvatore; Stefanini, Matteo; Fiori, Roberto; Gandini, Roberto; Bagalà, Paolo; Morosetti, Daniele; Calabria, Eros; Tonnetti, Alessia; Verona-Rinati, Gianluca; Santoni, Riccardo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work has been to dosimetrically investigate four fluoroscopically guided interventions: the percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP), the percutaneous disc decompression (PDD), the radiofrequency medial branch neurolysis (RF) (hereafter named spine procedures), and the endovascular treatment for the critical limb ischemia (CLI). The X-ray equipment used was a Philips Integris Allura Xper FD20 imaging system provided with a dose-area product (DAP) meter. The parameters investigated were: maximum skin dose (MSD), air kerma (Ka,r), DAP, and fluoroscopy time (FT). In order to measure the maximum skin dose, we employed a system based on MOSFET detectors. Before using the system on patients, a calibration factor Fc and correction factors for energy (CkV) and field size (CFD) dependence were determined. Ka,r, DAP, and FT were extrapolated from the X-ray equipment. The analysis was carried out on 40 patients, 10 for each procedure. The average fluoroscopy time and DAP values were compared with the reference levels (RLs) proposed in literature. Finally, the correlations between MSD, FT, Ka,r, and DAP values, as well as between DAP and FT values, were studied in terms of Pearson's product-moment coefficients for spine procedures only. An Fc value of 0.20 and a very low dependence of CFD on field size were found. A third-order polynomial function was chosen for CkV. The mean values of MSD ranged from 2.3 to 10.8cGy for CLI and PVP, respectively. For these procedures, the DAP and FT values were within the proposed RL values. The statistical analysis showed little correlation between the investigated parameters. The interventional procedures investigated were found to be both safe with regard to deterministic effects and optimized for stochastic ones. In the spine procedures, the observed correlations indicated that the estimation of MSD from Ka,r or DAP was not accurate and a direct measure of MSD is therefore recommended. PMID:25679159

  14. Evaluation the consistency of location of moist desquamation and skin high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy after breast conservative surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether the location of moist desquamation matches high dose area for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast conservative surgery. Methods One hundred and nine breast cancer patients were enrolled to this study. Their highest skin dose area (the hot spot) was estimated from the treatment planning. We divided the irradiated field into breast; sternal/parasternal; axillary; and inframammary fold areas. The location for moist desquamation was recorded to see if it matches the hot spot. We also analyzed other possible risk factors which may be related to the moist desquamation. Results Forty-eight patients with 65 locations developed moist desquamation during the RT course. Patients with larger breast sizes and easy to sweat are two independent risk factors for moist desquamation. The distribution of moist desquamation occurred most in the axillary area. All nine patients with the hot spots located at the axillary area developed moist desquamation at the axillary area, and six out of seven patients with the hot spots located at the inframammary fold developed moist desquamation there. The majority of patients with moist desquamation over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas had the hot spots located at these areas. Conclusions For a patient with moist desquamation, if a hot spot is located at the axillary or inframammary fold areas, it is very likely to have moist desquamation occur there. On the other hand, if moist desquamation occurs over the breast or sternal/parasternal areas, we can highly expect these two areas are also the hot spot locations. PMID:23497574

  15. Skin dose differences between intensity-modulated radiation therapy and volumetric-modulated arc therapy and between boost and integrated treatment regimens for treating head and neck and other cancer sites in patients.

    PubMed

    Penoncello, Gregory P; Ding, George X

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to evaluate dose to skin between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment techniques for target sites in the head and neck, pelvis, and brain and (2) to determine if the treatment dose and fractionation regimen affect the skin dose between traditional sequential boost and integrated boost regimens for patients with head and neck cancer. A total of 19 patients and 48 plans were evaluated. The Eclipse (v11) treatment planning system was used to plan therapy in 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 5 patients with prostate cancer, and 5 patients with brain cancer with VMAT and static-field IMRT. The mean skin dose and the maximum dose to a contiguous volume of 2cm(3) for head and neck plans and brain plans and a contiguous volume of 5cm(3) for pelvis plans were compared for each treatment technique. Of the 9 patients with head and neck cancer, 3 underwent an integrated boost regimen. One integrated boost plan was replanned with IMRT and VMAT using a traditional boost regimen. For target sites located in the head and neck, VMAT reduced the mean dose and contiguous hot spot most noticeably in the shoulder region by 5.6% and 5.4%, respectively. When using an integrated boost regimen, the contiguous hot spot skin dose in the shoulder was larger on average than a traditional boost pattern by 26.5% and the mean skin dose was larger by 1.7%. VMAT techniques largely decrease the contiguous hot spot in the skin in the pelvis by an average of 36% compared with IMRT. For the same target coverage, VMAT can reduce the skin dose in all the regions of the body, but more noticeably in the shoulders in patients with head and neck and pelvis cancer. We also found that using integrated boost regimens in patients with head and neck cancer leads to higher shoulder skin doses compared with traditional boost regimens. PMID:26764180

  16. Image perception by expert readers as a function of patient skin entrance dose levels in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, T.; Korkusuz, H.; Khan, F.; Vogl, T. J.; Mack, M. G.

    2008-03-01

    In this study, image quality was based on required clinical criteria, in order to investigate to what degree entrance dose could be lowered and what kind of added filtration can be used without impinging on radiologist confidence levels in diagnosing. Images were taken of extremities from a cadaver using stepwise decreasing dose levels and variation of added filtration (no filtration, aluminum, aluminum/copper) under digital projection radiography (Kodak DirectView DR7500). The starting point dose level for all body parts imaged was the current x-ray technique. Two experienced and two resident radiologists were presented the images in a blinded fashion and rated each with an image quality score from 1 to 9 indicated very satisfied and 1 as very unsatisfied indicating loss of diagnostic value. The readers were not aware of which dose level and added filtration corresponded to which image. Dose levels considered were 100%, 75%, 50% and 25% of the normal and customary x-ray techniques used for the particular body part and projection. Images were reviewed on a clinical diagnostic workstation with no time limits imposed. Readers were also able to change the image presentation by adjusting the window width and level. Without added filtration image quality mean score was rated with 6.3 (dose level 100%), 6.2 (dose level 75%), 5.3 (dose level 50%) and with 4.4 (dose level 25%). An added aluminum filtration induced an image quality mean score of 6.3 (dose level 100%), 6.0 (dose level 75%), 5.1 (dose level 50%) and of 4.2 (dose level 25%). Using aluminum/copper filtration image quality mean score was rated with 6.0 (dose level 100%), 6.1 (dose level 75%), 5.0 (dose level 50%) and with 3.8 (dose level 25%). Regardless of the added filtration a differentiation between dose levels 100% and 75% was possible in 38.9%, between dose levels 75% and 50% in 66.7%, and between dose levels 50% and 25% in 70.0% of the cases. It is possible, in the case of extremities, to lower entrance

  17. UV doses and skin effects during psoriasis climate therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeberg, Lise L.; Hernandez-Palacios, Julio; Lilleeng, Mila; Nilsen, Lill Tove; Krogstad, Anne-Lene

    2011-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common autoimmune disease with inflammatory symptoms affecting skin and joints. One way of dealing with psoriasis is by controlled solar UV exposure treatment. However, this treatment should be optimized to get the best possible treatment effect and to limit negative side effects such as erythema and an increased risk of skin cancer. In this study 24 patients at Valle Marina Treatment Center in Gran Canaria were monitored throughout a treatment period of three weeks starting at the beginning of November. The total UV dose to the location was monitored by UV-meters placed on the roof of the treatment centere, and the patients wore individual film dosimeters throughout the treatment period. Skin parameters were accessed by reflection spectroscopy (400-850nm). This paper presents preliminary findings from the skin measurements in the visible part of the spectrum, such as blood oxygenation, erythema and melanin indexes. Reflection spectroscopy was found to be a good tool for such treatment monitoring.

  18. Estimation of absorbed dose in the covering skin of human melanoma treated by neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Hiratsuka, J.; Karashima, H.; Honda, C.; Yamamura, K.; Ichihashi, M.; Kanda, K.; Mishima, Y. )

    1989-07-01

    A patient with malignant melanoma was treated by thermal neutron capture therapy using 10B-paraboronophenylalanine. The compound was injected subcutaneously into ten locations in the tumor-surrounding skin, and the patient was then irradiated with thermal neutrons from the Musashi Reactor at reactor power of 100 KW and neutron flux of 1.2 X 10(9) n/cm{sup 2}/s. Total absorbed dose to the skin was 11.7-12.5 Gy in the radiation field. The dose equivalents of these doses were estimated as 21.5 and 24.4 Sv, respectively. Early skin reaction after irradiation was checked from day 1 to day 60. The maximum and mean skin scores were 2.0 and 1.5, respectively, and the therapy was safely completed as far as skin reaction was concerned. Some factors influencing the absorbed dose and dose equivalent to the skin are discussed.

  19. Non-melanoma skin cancer treated with high-dose-rate brachytherapy and Valencia applicator in elderly patients: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Laliscia, Concetta; Manfredi, Bruno; Ursino, Stefano; Pasqualetti, Francesco; Lombardo, Ezio; Perrone, Franco; Morganti, Riccardo; Paiar, Fabiola; Fabrini, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been increasing over the past 30 years. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the two most common subtypes of NMSC. The aim of this study was to estimate tumour control, toxicity, and aesthetic events in elderly patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) using Valencia applicator. Material and methods From January 2012 to May 2015, 57 lesions in 39 elderly eligible patients were enrolled. All the lesions had a diameter ≤ 25 mm (median: 12.5 mm) and a depth ≤ 4 mm. The appropriate Valencia applicator, 2 or 3 cm in diameter was used. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy in 8 fractions (5 Gy/fraction) in 48 lesions (group A), and 50 Gy in 10 fractions (5 Gy/fraction) in 9 lesions (group B), delivered 2/3 times a week. The biological effective dose (BED) was 60 Gy and 75 Gy, respectively. Results After median follow-up of 12 months, 96.25% lesions showed a complete response and only two cases presented partial remission. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group – European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) G 1-2 acute toxicities were observed in 63.2% of the lesions: 56.3% in group A and 77.7% in group B. Late G1-G2 toxicities was observed in 19.3% of the lesions: 18.8% in group A and 22.2% in group B, respectively. No G3 or higher acute or late toxicities occurred. In 86% of the lesions, an excellent cosmetic result was observed (87.5% in group A and 77.8% in group B). Six lesions had a good cosmetic outcome and only 2.3% presented a fair cosmetic impact. Conclusions The treatment of NMSC with HDR-BT using Valencia surface applicator is effective with excellent and good cosmetics results in elderly patients. The hypofractionated course appears effective and no statistical differences were observed between the two groups analysed. PMID:26816500

  20. Verification of Calculated Skin Doses in Postmastectomy Helical Tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Shima; Parker, Brent C.; Levine, Renee; Sanders, Mary Ella; Fontenot, Jonas; Gibbons, John; Hogstrom, Kenneth

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To verify the accuracy of calculated skin doses in helical tomotherapy for postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT). Methods and Materials: In vivo thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the skin dose at multiple points in each of 14 patients throughout the course of treatment on a TomoTherapy Hi.Art II system, for a total of 420 TLD measurements. Five patients were evaluated near the location of the mastectomy scar, whereas 9 patients were evaluated throughout the treatment volume. The measured dose at each location was compared with calculations from the treatment planning system. Results: The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for the scar measurements was -1.8% {+-} 0.2% (standard deviation [SD], 4.3%; range, -11.1% to 10.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for measurements throughout the treatment volume was -3.0% {+-} 0.4% (SD, 4.7%; range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference and standard error of the mean difference between measurement and calculation for all measurements was -2.1% {+-} 0.2% (standard deviation, 4.5%: range, -18.4% to 12.6%). The mean difference between measured and calculated TLD doses was statistically significant at two standard deviations of the mean, but was not clinically significant (i.e., was <5%). However, 23% of the measured TLD doses differed from the calculated TLD doses by more than 5%. Conclusions: The mean of the measured TLD doses agreed with TomoTherapy calculated TLD doses within our clinical criterion of 5%.

  1. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  2. How accurately can the peak skin dose in fluoroscopy be determined using indirect dose metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A. Kyle; Ensor, Joe E.; Pasciak, Alexander S.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. There is no consensus as to whether or not indirect skin dosimetry is sufficiently accurate for fluoroscopically-guided interventions. However, measuring PSD with film is difficult and the decision to do so must be madea priori. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different types of indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% using indirect dose metrics for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures at two sites. Indirect dose metrics from the procedures were collected, including reference air kerma. Four different estimates of PSD were calculated from the indirect dose metrics and compared along with reference air kerma to the measured PSD for each case. The four indirect estimates included a standard calculation method, the use of detailed information from the radiation dose structured report, and two simplified calculation methods based on the standard method. Indirect dosimetry results were compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the different indirect estimates were examined. Results: When using the standard calculation method, calculated PSD were within ±35% for all 41 procedures studied. Calculated PSD were within ±50% for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance for all calculations. Reference air kerma was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which reference air kerma or calculated PSD exhibited large (±35%) differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two main causative factors were identified: unusually small or large source-to-patient distances and large contributions to reference air kerma from cone

  3. Measurement of entrance skin dose and estimation of organ dose during pediatric chest radiography.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, M; Kumar, Rajesh; Biju, K; Choubey, Ajay; Kantharia, S

    2011-06-01

    Entrance skin dose (ESD) was measured to calculate the organ doses from the anteroposterior (AP) and posteroanterior (PA) chest x-ray projections for pediatric patients in an Indian hospital. High sensitivity tissue-equivalent thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD, LiF: Mg, Cu, P chips) were used for measuring entrance skin dose. The respective organ doses were calculated using the Monte Carlo method (MCNP 3.1) to simulate the examination set-up and a three-dimensional mathematical phantom for representing an average 5-y-old Indian child. Using this method, conversion coefficients were derived for translating the measured ESD to organ doses. The average measured ESDs for the chest AP and PA projections were 0.305 mGy and 0.171 mGy, respectively. The average calculated organ doses in the AP and the PA projections were 0.196 and 0.086 mSv for the thyroid, 0.167 and 0.045 mSv for the trachea, 0.078 and 0.043 mSv for the lungs, 0.110 and 0.013 mSv for the liver, 0.002 and 0.016 mSv for the bone marrow, 0.024 and 0.002 mSv for the kidneys, and 0.109 and 0.023 mSv for the heart, respectively. The ESD and organ doses can be reduced significantly with the proper radiological technique. According to these results, the chest PA projection should be preferred over the AP projection in pediatric patients. The estimated organ doses for the chest AP and PA projections can be used for the estimation of the associated risk. PMID:22004934

  4. Evaluating the consistency of location of the most severe acute skin reaction and highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter during radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Gia-Hsin; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2016-01-01

    We conducted this prospective study to evaluate whether the location of the most severe acute skin reaction matches the highest skin dose measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) during adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for patients with breast cancer after breast conservative surgery. To determine whether TLD measurement can reflect the location of the most severe acute skin reaction, 80 consecutive patients were enrolled in this prospective study. We divided the irradiated field into breast, axillary, inframammary fold, and areola/nipple areas. In 1 treatment session when obvious skin reaction occurred, we placed the TLD chips onto the 4 areas and measured the skin dose. We determined whether the highest measured skin dose area is consistent with the location of the most severe skin reaction. The McNemar test revealed that the clinical skin reaction and TLD measurement are more consistent when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the axillary area, and the p = 0.0108. On the contrary, TLD measurement of skin dose is less likely consistent with clinical observation when the most severe skin reaction occurred at the inframammary fold, breast, and areola/nipple areas (all the p > 0.05). Considering the common site of severe skin reaction over the axillary area, TLD measurement may be an appropriate way to predict skin reaction during RT. PMID:27158022

  5. Clinical implementation of total skin electron irradiation treatment with a 6 MeV electron beam in high-dose total skin electron mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucero, J. F.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) is a special treatment technique offered by modern radiation oncology facilities, given for the treatment of mycosis fungoides, a rare skin disease, which is type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma [1]. During treatment the patient's entire skin is irradiated with a uniform dose. The aim of this work is to present implementation of total skin electron irradiation treatment using IAEA TRS-398 code of practice for absolute dosimetry and taking advantage of the use of radiochromic films.

  6. A Comparison of Skin and Chest Wall Dose Delivered With Multicatheter, Contura Multilumen Balloon, and MammoSite Breast Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Todor, Dorin; Rosu, Mihaela; Arthur, Douglas W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Skin and chest wall doses have been correlated with toxicity in patients treated with breast brachytherapy . This investigation compared the ability to control skin and chest wall doses between patients treated with multicatheter (MC), Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB), and MammoSite (MS) brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: 43 patients treated with the MC technique, 45 patients treated with the CMLB, and 83 patients treated with the MS were reviewed. The maximum doses delivered to the skin and chest wall were calculated for all patients. Results: The mean maximum skin doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.2 Gy per fraction (94% of prescription dose), respectively. Although the skin distances were similar (p = 0.23) for the two balloon techniques, the mean skin dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.05). The mean maximum rib doses for the MC, CMLB, and MS were 2.3 Gy (67% of prescription dose), 2.8 Gy (82% of prescription dose), and 3.6 Gy per fraction (105% of prescription dose), respectively. Again, the mean rib dose with the CMLB was significantly lower than with the MS (p = 0.002). Conclusion: The MC and CMLB techniques are associated with significantly lower mean skin and rib doses than is the MS. Treatment with the MS was associated with significantly more patients receiving doses to the skin or rib in excess of 125% of the prescription. Treatment with the CMLB may prove to yield less normal tissue toxicity than treatment with the MS.

  7. Skin cancer in patients with chronic radiation dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, M.M.; Hanke, C.W.; Zollinger, T.W.; Montebello, J.F.; Hornback, N.B.; Norins, A.L.

    1989-04-01

    The cases of 76 patients with chronic radiation dermatitis resulting from low-dose ionizing radiation for benign disease were reviewed retrospectively for risk factors leading to the development of neoplasia. The patients were studied with respect to original hair color, eye color, sun reactive skin type, benign disease treated, area treated, age at treatment, and age at development of first skin cancer. Analysis of data showed 37% of patients had sun-reactive skin type I, 27% had type II, and 36% had type III. Types IV through VI were not represented. There appeared to be an overrepresentation of types I and II. Increased melanin pigmentation may therefore be either directly or indirectly protective against the development of skin cancers in patients who have received low-dose superficial ionizing radiation for benign disease. The sun-reactive skin type of patients with chronic radiation dermatitis may be used as a predictor of skin cancer risk when the total dose of ionizing radiation is not known.

  8. A system to track skin dose for neuro-interventional cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Xiong, Zhenyu; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin-dose tracking system (DTS) provides a color-coded illustration of the cumulative skin-dose distribution on a closely-matching 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic interventions in real-time for immediate feedback to the interventionist. The skin-dose tracking utility of DTS has been extended to include cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) of neurointerventions. While the DTS was developed to track the entrance skin dose including backscatter, a significant part of the dose in CBCT is contributed by exit primary radiation and scatter due to the many overlapping projections during the rotational scan. The variation of backscatter inside and outside the collimated beam was measured with radiochromic film and a curve was fit to obtain a scatter spread function that could be applied in the DTS. Likewise, the exit dose distribution was measured with radiochromic film for a single projection and a correction factor was determined as a function of path length through the head. Both of these sources of skin dose are added for every projection in the CBCT scan to obtain a total dose mapping over the patient graphic. Results show the backscatter to follow a sigmoidal falloff near the edge of the beam, extending outside the beam as far as 8 cm. The exit dose measured for a cylindrical CTDI phantom was nearly 10 % of the entrance peak skin dose for the central ray. The dose mapping performed by the DTS for a CBCT scan was compared to that measured with radiochromic film and a CTDI-head phantom with good agreement.

  9. A practical method for skin dose estimation in interventional cardiology based on fluorographic DICOM information.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Lucy; Dixon, Matthew; Rowles, Nick; Stevens, Greg

    2016-03-01

    A practical method for skin dose estimation for interventional cardiology patients has been developed to inform pre-procedure planning and post-procedure patient management. Absorbed dose to the patient skin for certain interventional radiology procedures can exceed thresholds for deterministic skin injury, requiring documentation within the patient notes and appropriate patient follow-up. The primary objective was to reduce uncertainty associated with current methods, particularly surrounding field overlap. This was achieved by considering rectangular field geometry incident on a spherical patient model in a polar coordinate system. The angular size of each field was quantified at surface of the sphere, i.e. the skin surface. Computer-assisted design software enabled the modelling of a sufficient dataset that was subsequently validated with radiochromic film. Modelled overlap was found to agree with overlap measured using film to within 2.2° ± 2.0°, showing that the overall error associated with the model was < 1 %. Mathematical comparison against exposure data extracted from procedural Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine files was used to generate a graphical skin dose map, demonstrating the dose distribution over a sphere centred at the interventional reference point. Dosimetric accuracy of the software was measured as between 3.5 and 17 % for different variables. PMID:25994848

  10. Accurate skin dose measurements using radiochromic film in clinical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, S.; Seuntjens, J.; Abdel-Rahman, W.; Evans, M.; Olivares, M.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Vuong, Te; Soares, Christopher G.

    2006-04-15

    Megavoltage x-ray beams exhibit the well-known phenomena of dose buildup within the first few millimeters of the incident phantom surface, or the skin. Results of the surface dose measurements, however, depend vastly on the measurement technique employed. Our goal in this study was to determine a correction procedure in order to obtain an accurate skin dose estimate at the clinically relevant depth based on radiochromic film measurements. To illustrate this correction, we have used as a reference point a depth of 70 {mu}. We used the new GAFCHROMIC[reg] dosimetry films (HS, XR-T, and EBT) that have effective points of measurement at depths slightly larger than 70 {mu}. In addition to films, we also used an Attix parallel-plate chamber and a home-built extrapolation chamber to cover tissue-equivalent depths in the range from 4 {mu} to 1 mm of water-equivalent depth. Our measurements suggest that within the first millimeter of the skin region, the PDD for a 6 MV photon beam and field size of 10x10 cm{sup 2} increases from 14% to 43%. For the three GAFCHROMIC[reg] dosimetry film models, the 6 MV beam entrance skin dose measurement corrections due to their effective point of measurement are as follows: 15% for the EBT, 15% for the HS, and 16% for the XR-T model GAFCHROMIC[reg] films. The correction factors for the exit skin dose due to the build-down region are negligible. There is a small field size dependence for the entrance skin dose correction factor when using the EBT GAFCHROMIC[reg] film model. Finally, a procedure that uses EBT model GAFCHROMIC[reg] film for an accurate measurement of the skin dose in a parallel-opposed pair 6 MV photon beam arrangement is described.

  11. Patient dose management in digital radiography

    PubMed Central

    Vano, E; Fernandez Soto, JM

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To present the experience in patient dose management and the development of an online audit tool for digital radiography. Materials and methods: Several tools have been developed to extract the information contained in the DICOM header of digital images, collect radiographic parameters, calculate patient entrance doses and other related parameters, and audit image quality. Results: The tool has been used for mammography, and includes images from over 25,000 patients, over 75,000 chest images, 100,000 computed radiography procedures and more than 1,000 interventional radiology procedures. Examples of calculation of skin dose distribution in interventional cardiology based upon information of DICOM header and the results of dosimetric parameters for cardiology procedures in 2006 are presented. Conclusion: Digital radiology has great advantages for imaging and patient dose management. Dose reports, QCONLINE systems and the MPPS DICOM service are good tools to optimise procedures and to manage patient dosimetry data. The implementation of the ongoing IEC-DICOM standard for patient dose structured reports will improve dose management in digital radiology. PMID:21614273

  12. Bone marrow aplasia and severe skin rash after a single low dose of methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Copur, S; Dahut, W; Chu, E; Allegra, C J

    1995-02-01

    A 64 year old man with recurrent metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck developed severe skin rash and bone marrow aplasia 4 and 7 days, respectively, following a single dose of 40 mg/m2 methotrexate (MTX). Skin rash involved regions of the face, lower abdomen, back, buttocks and both upper thighs. Biopsy of the skin rash demonstrated superficial perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate and was consistent with a drug reaction. Peripheral blood count revealed pancytopenia and a bone marrow biopsy was consistent with aplasia. Blood counts returned to normal 6 days after institution of granulocyte colony stimulating factor therapy. In the absence of mucositis or diarrhea, severe dermatologic toxicity following a single low dose of the drug suggests an 'allergic' or acute hypersensitivity reaction to MTX in this patient. Development of an extensive skin rash following a single dose of MTX may be an early warning sign for life-threatening bone marrow aplasia. PMID:7538828

  13. Skin Prick Test in Patients with Chronic Allergic Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Pooja; Dogra, Alka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic allergic skin disorders are the inflammatory and proliferative conditions in which both genetic and environmental factors play important roles. Chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) and atopic dermatitis (AD) are among the most common chronic allergic skin disorders. These can be provoked by various food and aeroallergens. Skin prick tests (SPTs) represent the cheapest and most effective method to diagnose type I hypersensitivity. Positive skin tests with a history suggestive of clinical sensitivity strongly incriminate the allergen as a contributor to the disease process. Aims and Objectives: To determine the incidence of positive SPT in patients with chronic allergic skin disorders and to identify the various allergens implicated in positive SPT. Methods: Fifty patients of chronic allergic disorders were recruited in this study. They were evaluated by SPT with both food and aeroallergens. Results: In our study, SPT positivity in patients of CIU was 63.41% and in AD was 77.78%. Out of the 41 patients of CIU, the most common allergen groups showing SPT positivity were dust and pollen, each comprising 26.83% patients. SPT reaction was positive with food items (21.6%), insects (17.07%), fungus (12.20%), and Dermatophagoides farinae, that is, house dust mite (HDM) (7.32%). The allergen which showed maximum positivity was grain dust wheat (19.51%). Among nine patients of AD, maximum SPT positivity was seen with Dermatophagoides farinae, pollen Amaranthus spinosus, grain dust wheat, and cotton mill dust; each comprising 22.22% of patients. Conclusion: Our study showed that a significant number of patients of CIU and AD showed sensitivity to dust, pollen, insects, Dermatophagoides farinae, and fungi on SPT. Thus, it is an important tool in the diagnosis of CIU and AD. PMID:25814704

  14. Dosimetric optimization of a conical breast brachytherapy applicator for improved skin dose sparing

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yun; Rivard, Mark J.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Both the AccuBoost D-shaped and round applicators have been dosimetrically characterized and clinically used to treat patients with breast cancer. While the round applicators provide conformal dose coverage, under certain clinical circumstances the breast skin dose may be higher than preferred. The purpose of this study was to modify the round applicators to minimize skin dose while not substantially affecting dose uniformity within the target volume and reducing the treatment time. Methods: In order to irradiate the intended volume while sparing critical structures such as the skin, the current round applicator design has been augmented through the addition of an internal truncated cone (i.e., frustum) shield. Monte Carlo methods and clinical constraints were used to design the optimal cone applicator. With the cone applicator now defined as the entire assembly including the surrounding tungsten-alloy shell holding the HDR {sup 192}Ir source catheter, the applicator height was reduced to diminish the treatment time while minimizing skin dose. Monte Carlo simulation results were validated using both radiochromic film and ionization chamber measurements based on established techniques. Results: The optimal cone applicators diminished the maximum skin dose by 15%-32% (based on the applicator diameter and breast separation) with the tumor dose reduced by less than 3% for a constant exposure time. Furthermore, reduction in applicator height diminished the treatment time by up to 30%. Radiochromic film and ionization chamber dosimetric results in phantom agreed with Monte Carlo simulation results typically within 3%. Larger differences were outside the treatment volume in low dose regions or associated with differences between the measurement and Monte Carlo simulation environments. Conclusions: A new radiotherapy treatment device was developed and dosimetrically characterized. This set of applicators significantly reduces the skin dose and treatment time while

  15. Radiation effect in mouse skin: Dose fractionation and wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Gorodetsky, R.; Mou, X.D.; Fisher, D.R.; Taylor, J.M.; Withers, H.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Radiation induced dermal injury was measured by the gain in the physical strength of healing wounds in mouse skin. A sigmoid dose response for the inhibition of wound healing 14 days after surgery was found for single doses of X rays. The sparing of dermal damage from fractionation of the X-ray dose was quantified in terms of the alpha/beta ratio in the linear-quadratic (LQ) model, at a wide range of doses per fraction reaching as low as about 1 Gy. The fit and the appropriateness of the LQ model for the skin wound healing assay was examined with the use of the Fe-plot in which inverse total dose is plotted versus dose per fraction for wound strength isoeffects. The alpha/beta ratio of the skin was about 2.5 Gy (95% confidence of less than +/- 1 Gy) and was appropriate over a dose range of 1 Gy to about 8 Gy. The low alpha/beta value is typical for a late responding tissue. This assay, therefore, has the advantage of measuring and forecasting late radiation responses of the dermis within a short time after irradiation.

  16. Patient selection for skin-tightening procedures.

    PubMed

    Northington, Marian

    2014-09-01

    Noninvasive skin-tightening devices have become increasingly popular over the last decade to improve skin laxity with minimal risk and recovery time. Proper patient selection improves patient outcomes and satisfaction. There are many devices available for tightening including monopolar radiofrequency, bipolar radiofrequency, fractional radiofrequency devices, infrared devices, combined light and bipolar radiofrequency devices, and intense focused ultrasound devices. There have been shortcomings with tightening devices including inconsistent clinical outcomes. The question arises, why are there inconsistent results and variability among patient outcomes? Variability could be related to different devices, treatment protocols, body area treated, and patient selection. Patient age, degree of laxity, history of smoking, ethnicity, body mass index, and individual patient pain threshold could all possibly contribute to patient response to tightening devices. The literature does not elucidate consistently, which variables are the most important in predicting best patient response. Included is a review of the literature discussing skin tightening and patient selection. PMID:25196688

  17. A real-time skin dose tracking system for biplane neuro-interventional procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vijay K.; Rudin, Stephen R.; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    A biplane dose-tracking system (Biplane-DTS) that provides a real-time display of the skin-dose distribution on a 3D-patient graphic during neuro-interventional fluoroscopic procedures was developed. Biplane-DTS calculates patient skin dose using geometry and exposure information for the two gantries of the imaging system acquired from the digital system bus. The dose is calculated for individual points on the patient graphic surface for each exposure pulse and cumulative dose for both x-ray tubes is displayed as color maps on a split screen showing frontal and lateral projections of a 3D-humanoid graphic. Overall peak skin dose (PSD), FOV-PSD and current dose rates for the two gantries are also displayed. Biplane- TS uses calibration files of mR/mAs for the frontal and lateral tubes measured with and without the table in the beam at the entrance surface of a 20 cm thick PMMA phantom placed 15 cm tube-side of the isocenter. For neuro-imaging, conversion factors are applied as a function of entrance field area to scale the calculated dose to that measured with a Phantom Laboratory head phantom which contains a human skull to account for differences in backscatter between PMMA and the human head. The software incorporates inverse-square correction to each point on the skin and corrects for angulation of the beam through the table. Dose calculated by Biplane DTS and values measured by a 6-cc ionization chamber placed on the head phantom at multiple points agree within a range of -3% to +7% with a standard deviation for all points of less than 3%.

  18. Verification of the VARSKIN beta skin dose calculation computer code.

    PubMed

    Sherbini, Sami; DeCicco, Joseph; Gray, Anita Turner; Struckmeyer, Richard

    2008-06-01

    The computer code VARSKIN is used extensively to calculate dose to the skin resulting from contaminants on the skin or on protective clothing covering the skin. The code uses six pre-programmed source geometries, four of which are volume sources, and a wide range of user-selectable radionuclides. Some verification of this code had been carried out before the current version of the code, version 3.0, was released, but this was limited in extent and did not include all the source geometries that the code is capable of modeling. This work extends this verification to include all the source geometries that are programmed in the code over a wide range of beta radiation energies and skin depths. Verification was carried out by comparing the doses calculated using VARSKIN with the doses for similar geometries calculated using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP5. Beta end-point energies used in the calculations ranged from 0.3 MeV up to 2.3 MeV. The results showed excellent agreement between the MCNP and VARSKIN calculations, with the agreement being within a few percent for point and disc sources and within 20% for other sources with the exception of a few cases, mainly at the low end of the beta end-point energies. The accuracy of the VARSKIN results, based on the work in this paper, indicates that it is sufficiently accurate for calculation of skin doses resulting from skin contaminations, and that the uncertainties arising from the use of VARSKIN are likely to be small compared with other uncertainties that typically arise in this type of dose assessment, such as those resulting from a lack of exact information on the size, shape, and density of the contaminant, the depth of the sensitive layer of the skin at the location of the contamination, the duration of the exposure, and the possibility of the source moving over various areas of the skin during the exposure period if the contaminant is on protective clothing. PMID:18469586

  19. MR-guided breast radiotherapy: feasibility and magnetic-field impact on skin dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Heijst, Tristan C. F.; den Hartogh, Mariska D.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Desirée van den Bongard, H. J. G.; van Asselen, Bram

    2013-09-01

    The UMC Utrecht MRI/linac (MRL) design provides image guidance with high soft-tissue contrast, directly during radiotherapy (RT). Breast cancer patients are a potential group to benefit from better guidance in the MRL. However, due to the electron return effect, the skin dose can be increased in presence of a magnetic field. Since large skin areas are generally involved in breast RT, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effects on the skin dose, for whole-breast irradiation (WBI) and accelerated partial-breast irradiation (APBI). In ten patients with early-stage breast cancer, targets and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on postoperative CT scans co-registered with MRI. The OARs included the skin, comprising the first 5 mm of ipsilateral-breast tissue, plus extensions. Three intensity-modulated RT techniques were considered (2× WBI, 1× APBI). Individual beam geometries were used for all patients. Specially developed MRL treatment-planning software was used. Acceptable plans were generated for 0 T, 0.35 T and 1.5 T, using a class solution. The skin dose was augmented in WBI in the presence of a magnetic field, which is a potential drawback, whereas in APBI the induced effects were negligible. This opens possibilities for developing MR-guided partial-breast treatments in the MRL.

  20. Interplanetary crew doses and dose equivalents: variations among different bone marrow and skin sites.

    PubMed

    Hoff, J L; Townsend, L W; Zapp, E N

    2004-01-01

    Previously, calculations of bone marrow dose from the large solar particle event (SPE) of July 2000 were carried out using the BRYNTRN space radiation transport code and the computerized anatomical man (CAM) model. Results indicated that the dose for a bone marrow site in the mid-thigh might be twice as large as the dose for a site in the pelvis. These large variations may be significant for space radiation protection purposes, which traditionally use an average of many (typically 33) sites throughout the body. Other organs that cover large portions of the body, such as the skin, may also exhibit similar variations with doses differing from site to site. The skin traditionally uses an average of 32 sites throughout the body. Variations also occur from site to site among the dose equivalents, which may be important in determining stochastic effects. In this work, the magnitudes of dose and dose equivalent variations from site to site are investigated. The BRYNTRN and HZETRN transport codes and the CAM model are used to estimate bone marrow and skin doses and dose equivalents as a function of position in the body for several large solar particle events and annual galactic cosmic ray spectra from throughout the space era. These position-specific results are compared with the average values usually used for radiation protection purposes. Various thicknesses of aluminum shielding, representative of nominal spacecraft, are used in the analyses. PMID:15880922

  1. Incidence of malignant skin tumors in 14,140 patients after grenz-ray treatment for benign skin disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeloef, B.E.; Eklund, G.

    1986-12-01

    During the years 1949 to 1975, 14,237 patients received therapeutic doses of grenz rays for the treatment of benign skin disorders such as chronic eczema, psoriasis, and warts. The records of 14,140 of these patients (99.3%) formed the basis for an epidemiologic study of the incidence of skin malignancies in this population. Information about the patients, diagnoses, doses, and sites of treatment was obtained from separate records. The follow-up time was 15 years on the average. We searched the Swedish Cancer Registry, Stockholm, for records reporting the incidence of malignant skin tumors in the study population (incidences of basal cell carcinoma are not registered). The expected number of malignancies was calculated on the basis of age- and sex-standardized incidence data from the Swedish Cancer Registry. In 58 patients, a malignant skin tumor was diagnosed more than five years after grenz-ray therapy had first been administered. Nineteen patients had malignant melanomas, and 39 patients had other malignant skin tumors. The expected number of melanomas was 17.8, and that of other malignant skin tumors was 26.9. None of the patients with melanomas, and only eight of the patients with other malignant skin tumors, had received grenz-ray therapy at the site of the tumor. Six of these eight patients had also been exposed to other known carcinogens. Four hundred eighty-one patients had received an accumulated high dose of grenz rays (greater than or equal to 10 000 rad (greater than or equal to 100 Gy)) on one and the same area. No malignancies were found on those areas. Although we cannot exclude grenz-ray therapy as a risk factor in the development of nonmelanoma skin malignancies, this risk, if any, is small, if recommendations for therapy are followed.

  2. Dose metrics in the acquisition of skin sensitization: thresholds and importance of dose per unit area.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Dearman, Rebecca J; Basketter, David A; Ryan, Cindy A; Gerberick, G Frank; McNamee, Pauline M; Lalko, Jon; Api, Anne Marie

    2008-10-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common occupational and environmental health problem and many hundreds of chemicals have been implicated as skin sensitizers. Sensitization is acquired following topical exposure to a contact allergen and induction of a cutaneous immune response of an appropriate magnitude. For effective assessment and management of human health risks there is a need to appreciate the dose metrics that drive the induction of skin sensitization. The available evidence suggests that under most normal conditions of exposure it is the dose per unit area of chemical that has over-riding impact on the effectiveness of sensitization. The exception to this rule is when the area of the application site drops below a certain critical level. Here we review in detail the evidence which supports dose per unit area as being the critical exposure metric in the induction of skin sensitization, and the mechanistic bases for this relationship. PMID:18423821

  3. A Prospective, Open-Label Study of Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Kamstrup, Maria R.; Specht, Lena; Skovgaard, Gunhild L.; Gniadecki, Robert

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of low-dose (4 Gy) total skin electron beam therapy as a second-line treatment of Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides in a prospective, open-label study. Methods and Materials: Ten patients (6 men, 4 women, average age 68.7 years [range, 55-82 years]) with histopathologically confirmed mycosis fungoides T2-T4 N0-N1 M0 who did not achieve complete remission or relapsed within 4 months after treatment with psoralen plus ultraviolet-A were included. Treatment consisted of low-dose total skin electron beam therapy administered at a total skin dose of 4 Gy given in 4 fractions over 4 successive days. Results: Two patients had a complete clinical response but relapsed after 3.5 months. Six patients had partial clinical responses, with a mean duration of 2.0 months. One patient had no clinical response. Median time to relapse was 2.7 months. One patient died of unrelated causes and did not complete treatment. Acute side effects included desquamation, xerosis, and erythema of the skin. No severe side effects were observed. Conclusion: Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy can induce complete and partial responses in Stage IB-II mycosis fungoides; however, the duration of remission is short. Low-dose total skin electron beam therapy may find application in palliative treatment of mycosis fungoides because of limited toxicity and the possibility of repeating treatments for long-term disease control.

  4. Comparative evaluation of 2 g single dose versus conventional dose azithromycin in uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sudipta Kumar; Das, Amal Kanti; Sen, Sumit; Hazra, Avijit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Uncomplicated skin and skin structure infections (uSSSIs) are a common clinical problem. Majority are caused by staphylococci and streptococci. Different oral antibiotics are used for uSSSI, with comparable efficacy but varying treatment duration, cost, and adverse event profile. Azithromycin is used in uSSSI in adults conventionally in a dose of 500 mg once for 5 days. The extensive tissue distribution of the drug and its long elimination half-life prompted us to explore whether a single 2 g dose of the drug would produce a response in uSSSI comparable to conventional dosing. Materials and Methods: We conducted a parallel group, open-label, randomized, controlled trial (CTRI/2015/07/005969) with subjects of either sex, ≥12 years of age, presenting with uSSSI to the dermatology outpatient department. One group (n = 146) received 2 g single supervised dose while the other (n = 146) received conventional dose of 500 mg once daily for 5 days. Subjects were followed up on day 4 and day 8. Complete clinical cure implied complete healing of lesions, without residual signs or symptoms, within 7 days. Results: High cure rate was observed in both arms (97.97% and 98.63%, respectively) along with noticeable improvement in symptom profile from baseline but without statistically significant difference between groups. However, excellent adherence (defined as no tablets missed) was better in single dosing arm (98.65% vs. 86.30%). Tolerability was also comparable between groups with the majority of adverse events encountered being gastrointestinal in nature and mild. Conclusions: Single 2 g azithromycin dose achieved the same result as conventional azithromycin dosing in uSSSI with comparable tolerability but with the advantage of assured adherence. This dose can, therefore, be recommended as an alternative and administration supervised if feasible. PMID:26288467

  5. Dose evaluation for skin and organ in hepatocellular carcinoma during angiographic procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiation dose in patients undergoing liver angiographic procedure and verify the usefulness of different dose measurements to prevent deterministic effects. Gafchromic film, MicroMOSFET data and DIAMENTOR device of the X-ray system were used to characterize the examined interventional radiology (IR) procedure. Materials and methods A liver embolization procedure, the SIRT (Selective Internal Radiation Therapy), was investigated. The exposure parameters from the DIAMENTOR as well as patient and geometrical data were registered. Entrance skin dose map obtained using Gafchromic film (ESDGAF) in a standard phantom as well as in 12 patients were used to calculate the maximum skin dose (MSDGAF). MicroMOSFETs were used to assess ESD in relevant points/areas. Moreover, the maximum value of five MicroMOSFETs array, due to the extension of treated area and to the relative distance of 2–3 cm of two adjacent MicroMOSFETs, was useful to predict the MSD without interfering with the clinical practice. PCXMC vers.1.5 was used to calculate effective dose (E) and equivalent dose (H). Results The mean dose-area product (DAPDIAMENTOR) for SIRT procedures was 166 Gycm2, although a wide range was observed. The mean MSDGAF for SIRT procedures was 1090 mGy, although a wide range was experienced. A correlation was found between the MSDGAF measured on a patient and the DAPDIAMENTOR value for liver embolizations. MOSFET and Gafchromic data were in agreement within 5% in homogeneous area and within 20% in high dose gradient regions. The mean equivalent dose in critical organs was 89.8 mSv for kidneys, 22.9 mSv for pancreas, 20.2 mSv for small intestine and 21.0 mSv for spleen. Whereas the mean E was 3.7 mSv (range: 0.5-13.7). Conclusions Gafchromic films result useful to study patient exposure and determine localization and amplitude of high dose skin areas to better predict the skin injuries. Then, DAPDIAMENTOR or MOSFET data

  6. Using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to evaluate the location reliability of the highest–skin dose area detected by treatment planning in radiotherapy for breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Li-Min; Huang, Chih-Jen; Chen, Hsiao-Yun; Meng, Fan-Yun; Lu, Tsung-Hsien; Tsao, Min-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Acute skin reaction during adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer is an inevitable process, and its severity is related to the skin dose. A high–skin dose area can be speculated based on the isodose distribution shown on a treatment planning. To determine whether treatment planning can reflect high–skin dose location, 80 patients were collected and their skin doses in different areas were measured using a thermoluminescent dosimeter to locate the highest–skin dose area in each patient. We determined whether the skin dose is consistent with the highest-dose area estimated by the treatment planning of the same patient. The χ{sup 2} and Fisher exact tests revealed that these 2 methods yielded more consistent results when the highest-dose spots were located in the axillary and breast areas but not in the inframammary area. We suggest that skin doses shown on the treatment planning might be a reliable and simple alternative method for estimating the highest skin doses in some areas.

  7. Measurement of skin dose in primary irradiation of maxillary sinus carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Janjan, N.A.; Zellmer, D.; Gillin, M.; Kengchon, W.; Campbell, B. )

    1991-03-01

    Subcutaneous involvement frequently occurs in maxillary sinus carcinoma. Radical resection does not include removal of the skin at risk. In standard postoperative wedge-pair treatment plans, the surface dose is dependent upon beam weighting, beam energy, and patient contour. Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements were performed to evaluate the surface dose of patients undergoing postoperative irradiation of maxillary sinus carcinoma following primary resection. When 60 Gy was delivered to isocenter with a 45 degrees wedge pair and 6 MV photons with 1 cm bolus, the subcutaneous tissues at risk received {approximately} 30 Gy. Based upon presented TLD measurements, supplemental electron beam therapy to the subcutaneous tissues if primarily involved should be considered.

  8. Use of skin substitutes in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ozerdem, Omer R; Wolfe, S Anthony; Marshall, Deirdre

    2003-07-01

    There are various artificial skin substitutes available commercially. The authors have used Integra, cultured epithelium, and Apligraf in their clinic. In the present report, they present their experiences based on two case reports. The first patient was a 12-year-old boy with widespread skin defects and left axillary contracture due to epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Apligraf was used to cover the skin defects on the trunk and face and to manage ectropion and axillary contracture. The second patient was a 6-year-old boy who suffered neurocutaneous melanosis. Partial excision of a pigmented lesion on the back created a large defect. Integra application followed by repair with cultured autologous skin was accomplished, and the results were satisfactory. Skin substitute products 1) are commercially immediately available; 2) are effective for management of contractures, chronic wounds, and chronic skin illnesses; 3) decrease or avoid the risk of donor area morbidity, which is more difficult to treat in children; 4) provide long-term coverage of the wound; and 5) can be used in conjunction with autologous tissue (e.g., Integra followed by cultured epithelium applications). PMID:12867866

  9. Skin Dose Impact from Vacuum Immobilization Device and Carbon Fiber Couch in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.-W.; Wu, J.-K.; Jeng, S.-C.; Hsueh Liu Yen-Wan; Cheng, Jason Chia-Hsien

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the unexpected skin dose increase from intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on vacuum cushions and carbon-fiber couches and then to modify the dosimetric plan accordingly. Eleven prostate cancer patients undergoing IMRT were treated in prone position with a vacuum cushion. Two under-couch beams scattered the radiation from the vacuum cushion and carbon-fiber couch. The IMRT plans with both devices contoured were compared with the plans not contouring them. The skin doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) placed on the inguinal regions in a single IMRT fraction. Tissue equivalent thickness was transformed for both devices with the relative densities. The TLD-measured skin doses (59.5 {+-} 9.5 cGy and 55.6 {+-} 5.9 cGy at left and right inguinal regions, respectively) were significantly higher than the calculated doses (28.7 {+-} 4.7 cGy; p = 2.2 x 10{sup -5} and 26.2 {+-} 4.3 cGy; p = 1.5 x 10{sup -5}) not contouring the vacuum cushion and carbon-fiber couch. The calculated skin doses with both devices contoured (59.1 {+-} 8.8 cGy and 55.5 {+-} 5.7 cGy) were similar to the TLD-measured doses. In addition, the calculated skin doses using the vacuum cushion and a converted thickness of the simulator couch were no different from the TLD-measured doses. The recalculated doses of rectum and bladder did not change significantly. The dose that covered 95% of target volume was less than the prescribed dose in 4 of 11 patients, and this problem was solved after re-optimization applying the corrected contours. The vacuum cushion and carbon-fiber couch contributed to increased skin doses. The tissue-equivalent-thickness method served as an effective way to correct the dose variations.

  10. Dose Distribution Calculation in Skin Cancer Treatment Using Leipzig Applicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowlawi, Ali Asghar; Yazdani, Majed

    The combination of 192Ir seed with the Leipzig applicators is used in a considerable number of clinical trials for skin cancer treatment. As is known, the beneficial effects of ionizing radiation for tumor treatment depends on the dosimetry accuracy. Nowadays, dosimetry calculations are supported by the characteristics provided by the manufacturer, which have been obtained from measurements with an ionization chamber in a phantom. Despite their benefit, the experimental data involves errors related to the positioning, energy, and angular dependence of the detectors. Thus, in order to get a detailed and more accurate dosimetry, the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C2 — Monte Carlo Neutron Particle, 4C2 version — has been employed to analyze the dose distribution in depth and at the surface in the skin cancer treatment using Leipzig applicators. On the other hand, some different measurements have been taken to validate the method and compare results. The results for this material of phantom (the skin with 0.5 cm thick over infinite soft tissue) can be used in treatment planning systems and also for computation of model dependent parameters like anisotropy dose function.

  11. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Jong, W. L.; Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  12. VARSKIN MOD 2 and SADDE MOD2: Computer codes for assessing skin dose from skin contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, J.S. )

    1992-12-01

    The computer code VARSKIN has been modified to calculate dose to skin from three-dimensional sources, sources separated from the skin by layers of protective clothing, and gamma dose from certain radionuclides correction for backscatter has also been incorporated for certain geometries. This document describes the new code, VARSKIN Mod 2, including installation and operation instructions, provides detailed descriptions of the models used, and suggests methods for avoiding misuse of the code. The input data file for VARSKIN Mod 2 has been modified to reflect current physical data, to include the contribution to dose from internal conversion and Auger electrons, and to reflect a correction for low-energy electrons. In addition, the computer code SADDE: Scaled Absorbed Dose Distribution Evaluator has been modified to allow the generation of scaled absorbed dose distributions for mixtures of radionuclides and intereat conversion and Auger electrons. This new code, SADDE Mod 2, is also described in this document. Instructions for installation and operation of the code and detailed descriptions of the models used in the code are provided.

  13. TLD skin dose measurements and acute and late effects after lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for early breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Francisco . E-mail: francisco.perera@lrcc.on.ca; Chisela, Frank; Stitt, Larry; Engel, Jay; Venkatesan, Varagur

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: This report examines the relationships between measured skin doses and the acute and late skin and soft tissue changes in a pilot study of lumpectomy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy only for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-seven of 39 women enrolled in this pilot study of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (37.2 Gy in 10 fractions b.i.d.) each had thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) at 5 points on the skin of the breast overlying the implant volume. Skin changes at TLD dose points and fibrosis at the lumpectomy site were documented every 6 to 12 months posttreatment using a standardized physician-rated cosmesis questionnaire. The relationships between TLD dose and acute skin reaction, pigmentation, or telangiectasia at 5 years were analyzed using the GEE algorithm and the GENMOD procedure in the SAS statistical package. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether there were any significant associations between acute skin reaction and late pigmentation or telangiectasia or between the volumes encompassed by various isodoses and fibrosis or fat necrosis. Results: The median TLD dose per fraction (185 dose points) multiplied by 10 was 9.2 Gy. In all 37 patients, acute skin reaction Grade 1 or higher was observed at 5.9% (6 of 102) of dose points receiving 10 Gy or less vs. 44.6% (37 of 83) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.0001). In 25 patients at 60 months, 1.5% telangiectasia was seen at dose points receiving 10 Gy or less (1 of 69) vs. 18% (10 of 56) telangiectasia at dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p 0.004). Grade 1 or more pigmentation developed at 1.5% (1 of 69) of dose points receiving less than 10 Gy vs. 25% (14 of 56) of dose points receiving more than 10 Gy (p < 0.001). A Grade 1 or more acute skin reaction was also significantly associated with development of Grade 1 or more pigmentation or telangiectasia at 60 months. This association was most significant for acute reaction and telangiectasia directly over the

  14. Monte Carlo investigation of backscatter factors for skin dose determination in interventional neuroradiology procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omar, Artur; Benmakhlouf, Hamza; Marteinsdottir, Maria; Bujila, Robert; Nowik, Patrik; Andreo, Pedro

    2014-03-01

    Complex interventional and diagnostic x-ray angiographic (XA) procedures may yield patient skin doses exceeding the threshold for radiation induced skin injuries. Skin dose is conventionally determined by converting the incident air kerma free-in-air into entrance surface air kerma, a process that requires the use of backscatter factors. Subsequently, the entrance surface air kerma is converted into skin kerma using mass energy-absorption coefficient ratios tissue-to-air, which for the photon energies used in XA is identical to the skin dose. The purpose of this work was to investigate how the cranial bone affects backscatter factors for the dosimetry of interventional neuroradiology procedures. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo system was used to calculate backscatter factors at the entrance surface of a spherical and a cubic water phantom that includes a cranial bone layer. The simulations were performed for different clinical x-ray spectra, field sizes, and thicknesses of the bone layer. The results show a reduction of up to 15% when a cranial bone layer is included in the simulations, compared with conventional backscatter factors calculated for a homogeneous water phantom. The reduction increases for thicker bone layers, softer incident beam qualities, and larger field sizes, indicating that, due to the increased photoelectric crosssection of cranial bone compared to water, the bone layer acts primarily as an absorber of low-energy photons. For neurointerventional radiology procedures, backscatter factors calculated at the entrance surface of a water phantom containing a cranial bone layer increase the accuracy of the skin dose determination.

  15. Expected skin complaints of the geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Walther, R R; Harber, L C

    1984-12-01

    Increased exposure to systemic medications in older patients makes drug reactions a likely cause of skin eruptions. Efforts to increase return of venous blood to the heart is the primary therapeutic and preventive measure in stasis dermatitis. If there is a suggestion of infection, antibiotics are indicated. The dermatitis can be treated with standard therapies. PMID:6238868

  16. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  17. Radiation doses of patients and urologists during percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Safak, M; Olgar, T; Bor, D; Berkmen, G; Gogus, C

    2009-09-01

    Renal stones can be treated either by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) or percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Increasing use of fluoroscopic exposure for access and to detect stone location during PCNL make the measurement of patient and staff doses important. The main objective of this work was to assess patient and urologist doses for the PCNL examination. We used the tube output technique for determination of patient doses (n = 20) and lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips for urologist dose measurements. The TLD technique was also used for some patient dose measurements (n = 7) for comparison with the tube output technique. Mean entrance skin doses of 191 and 117 mGy were measured by the tube output technique for anterior-posterior (AP) and right anterior oblique (RAO) 30 degrees /left anterior oblique (LAO) 30 degrees projections, respectively. The mean urologist doses for eye, finger and collar were measured as 26, 33.5 and 48 microGy per procedure, respectively. The mean effective dose per procedure for the urologist was 12.7 microSv. None of the individual skin dose results approach deterministic levels. PMID:19690355

  18. Method for preparing dosimeter for measuring skin dose

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Donald E.; Parker, DeRay; Boren, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with neutron-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

  19. Dosimeter for measuring skin dose and more deeply penetrating radiation

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Donald E.; Parker, DeRay; Boren, Paul R.

    1981-01-01

    A personnel dosimeter includes a plurality of compartments containing thermoluminescent dosimeter phosphors for registering radiation dose absorbed in the wearer's sensitive skin layer and for registering more deeply penetrating radiation. Two of the phosphor compartments communicate with thin windows of different thicknesses to obtain a ratio of shallowly penetrating radiation, e.g. beta. A third phosphor is disposed within a compartment communicating with a window of substantially greater thickness than the windows of the first two compartments for estimating the more deeply penetrating radiation dose. By selecting certain phosphors that are insensitive to neutrons and by loading the holder material with netruon-absorbing elements, energetic neutron dose can be estimated separately from other radiation dose. This invention also involves a method of injection molding of dosimeter holders with thin windows of consistent thickness at the corresponding compartments of different holders. This is achieved through use of a die insert having the thin window of precision thickness in place prior to the injection molding step.

  20. Minimal skin dose increase in longitudinal rotating biplanar linac-MR systems: examination of radiation energy and flattening filter design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvanloo, A.; Burke, B.; St. Aubin, J.; Baillie, D.; Wachowicz, K.; Warkentin, B.; Steciw, S.; Fallone, B. G.

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient entrance skin dose. Also, the increased SSD of linac-MR systems reduces the maximum achievable dose rate. To accurately quantify the changes in entrance skin dose, the authors use EGSnrc Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate 3D magnetic field of the Alberta 0.5 T longitudinal linac-MR system. The Varian 600C linac head geometry assembled on the MRI components is used in the BEAMnrc simulations for 6 MV and 10 MV beam models and skin doses are calculated at an average depth of 70 μm using DOSXYZnrc. 3D modeling shows that magnetic fringe fields decay rapidly and are small at the linac head. SSDs between 100 and 120 cm result in skin-dose increases of between ~6%–19% and ~1%–9% for the 6 and 10 MV beams, respectively. For 6 MV, skin dose increases from ~10.5% to ~1.5% for field-size increases of 5  ×  5 cm2 to 20  ×  20 cm2. For 10 MV, skin dose increases by ~6% for a 5  ×  5 cm2 field, and decreases by ~1.5% for a 20  ×  20 cm2 field. Furthermore, the proposed reshaped flattening filter increases the dose rate from the current 355 MU min‑1 to 529 MU min‑1 (6 MV) or 604 MU min‑1 (10 MV), while the skin-dose increases by only an additional ~2.6% (all percent increases in skin dose are relative to D max). This study suggests that there is minimal increase in the entrance skin dose and minimal/no decrease in the dose rate of the Alberta longitudinal linac-MR system. The even lower skin dose increase at 10 MV offers further advantages in future designs of linac-MR prototypes.

  1. Minimal skin dose increase in longitudinal rotating biplanar linac-MR systems: examination of radiation energy and flattening filter design.

    PubMed

    Keyvanloo, A; Burke, B; St Aubin, J; Baillie, D; Wachowicz, K; Warkentin, B; Steciw, S; Fallone, B G

    2016-05-01

    The magnetic fields of linac-MR systems modify the path of contaminant electrons in photon beams, which alters patient entrance skin dose. Also, the increased SSD of linac-MR systems reduces the maximum achievable dose rate. To accurately quantify the changes in entrance skin dose, the authors use EGSnrc Monte Carlo calculations that incorporate 3D magnetic field of the Alberta 0.5 T longitudinal linac-MR system. The Varian 600C linac head geometry assembled on the MRI components is used in the BEAMnrc simulations for 6 MV and 10 MV beam models and skin doses are calculated at an average depth of 70 μm using DOSXYZnrc. 3D modeling shows that magnetic fringe fields decay rapidly and are small at the linac head. SSDs between 100 and 120 cm result in skin-dose increases of between ~6%-19% and ~1%-9% for the 6 and 10 MV beams, respectively. For 6 MV, skin dose increases from ~10.5% to ~1.5% for field-size increases of 5  ×  5 cm(2) to 20  ×  20 cm(2). For 10 MV, skin dose increases by ~6% for a 5  ×  5 cm(2) field, and decreases by ~1.5% for a 20  ×  20 cm(2) field. Furthermore, the proposed reshaped flattening filter increases the dose rate from the current 355 MU min(-1) to 529 MU min(-1) (6 MV) or 604 MU min(-1) (10 MV), while the skin-dose increases by only an additional ~2.6% (all percent increases in skin dose are relative to D max). This study suggests that there is minimal increase in the entrance skin dose and minimal/no decrease in the dose rate of the Alberta longitudinal linac-MR system. The even lower skin dose increase at 10 MV offers further advantages in future designs of linac-MR prototypes. PMID:27050044

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Skin Cancer: An Assessment of Patient Risk Factors, Knowledge, and Skin Practices

    PubMed Central

    Kimmel, Jessica N.; Taft, Tiffany H.; Keefer, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk from skin cancer. Aims include assessing IBD patients' risk factors and knowledge of skin cancer and current skin protection practices to identify gaps in patient education regarding skin cancer prevention in IBD. Methods. IBD patients ≥ 18 years were recruited to complete an online survey. Results. 164 patients (mean age 43.5 years, 63% female) with IBD (67% Crohn's disease, 31% ulcerative colitis, and 2% indeterminate colitis) were included. 12% (n = 19) of patients had a personal history and 34% (n = 55) had a family history of skin cancer. Females scored better on skin protection (16.94/32 versus 14.53/32, P ≤ 0.03) and awareness (35.16/40 versus 32.98/40, P ≤ 0.03). Patients over 40 years old scored better on prevention (17.45/28 versus 15.35/28, P = 0.03). Patients with skin cancer scored better on prevention (20.56/28 versus 15.75/28, P ≤ 0.001) and skin protection (21.47/32 versus 15.33/32, P ≤ 0.001). 61% of patients recognized the link between skin cancer and IBD. Conclusions. The majority of IBD patients are aware of the link between skin cancer and IBD; however, skin protection practices are suboptimal. This emphasizes the role of healthcare professionals in providing further education for skin cancer prevention in the IBD population. PMID:27034838

  3. Measurement of skin and target dose in post-mastectomy radiotherapy using 4 and 6 MV photon beams

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For patients with high risk breast cancer and mastectomy, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice to improve survival and local control. Target dose is mainly limited due to skin reactions. The feasibility of using 4 MV beams for chest wall treatment was studied and compared to standard 6 MV bolus radiotherapy. Methods Post-mastectomy IMRT was planned on an Alderson-phantom using 4 and 6 MV photon beams without/with a 0.5 cm thick bolus. Dose was measured using TLDs placed at 8 locations in 1 and 3 mm depth to represent skin and superficial target dose, respectively. Results 4 MV and 6 MV beams with bolus perform equally regarding target coverage. The minimum and mean superficial target dose for the 6 MV and 4 MV were 93.0% and 94.7%, and 93.1% and 94.4%, respectively. Regarding skin dose the 4 MV photon beam was advantageous. The minimum and mean skin dose for the 6 MV and 4 MV was 76.7% and 81.6%, and 69.4% and 72.9%, respectively. The TPS was able to predict dose in the build-up region with a precision of around 5%. Conclusions The use of 4 MV photon beams are a good alternative for treating the thoracic wall without the need to place a bolus on the patient. The main limitation of 4 MV beams is the limited dose rate. PMID:24238366

  4. Antimicrobial Dose in Obese Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kassab, Sawsan; Syed Sulaiman, Syed Azhar; Abdul Aziz, Noorizan

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a chronic disease that has become one of major public health issue in Malaysia because of its association with other disease states including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Despite continuous efforts to educate the public about the health risks associated with obesity, prevalence of the disease continues to increase. Dosing of many medications are based on weight, limited data are available on how antimicrobial agents should be dosed in obesity. The aim of this case presentation is to discuss dose of antibiotic in obese patient. Case report: Patient: GMN, Malay, Female, 45 year old, 150kg, transferred from medical ward to ICU with problems of fever, orthopnea, sepsis secondary to nosocomial pneumonia. She was admitted to hospital a week ago for SOB on exertion, cyanosis, mildly dyspneic, somasthenia, bilateral ankle swelling. There was no fever, cough, chest pain, clubbing, flapping tremor. Her grand father has pre-morbid history of obesity, HPT, DM and asthma. She was non alcoholic, smoker, and not on diet control. The diagnosis Pickwickian syndrome was made. Patient was treated with IV Dopamine 11mcg/kg/min, IV Morphine 4mg/h. IV GTN 15mcg/min, IV Ca gluconate 10g/24h for 3/7, IV Zantac 50mg tds, IV Augmentin 1.2g tds, IV Lasix 40mg od, IV Plasil 10mg tds, S.c heparin 5000IU bd. patient become stable and moved to medical ward to continue her treatment. Discussion: The altered physiologic function seen in obese patients is a concern in patients receiving antimicrobial agents because therapeutic outcomes depend on achieving a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The therapeutic effect of any drug can be altered when any of the 4 pharmacokinetic processes (absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination) are altered. Decreased blood flow rates and increased renal clearance in obese patients can affect drug distribution and elimination. Changes in serum protein levels can change the metabolism and distribution of drugs that are

  5. Approach to skin ulcers in older patients.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide family physicians with an approach to managing skin ulcers in older patients. SOURCES OF INFORMATION: Clinical practice guidelines and best practice guidelines were summarized to describe an evidence-based approach. MAIN MESSAGE; Preventing ulcers is important in frail older patients. Using guidelines can help prevent ulcers in institutions. Clarifying the cause and contributing factors is the first step in management. Pressure and venous ulcers are common in elderly people. Poor nutrition, edema, arterial insufficiency, and anemia often impair wound healing. Adequate debridement is important to decrease risk of infection and to promote healing. There are guidelines for cleaning ulcers. Choice of dressings depends on the circumstances of each wound, but dressings should provide a moist environment. Options for dressings are summarized. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can manage skin ulcers effectively by applying basic principles and using readily available guidelines. PMID:15648380

  6. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant melanoma with special reference to absorbed doses to the normal skin and tumor.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Hiratsuka, J; Kobayashi, T; Sakurai, Y; Yoshino, K; Karashima, H; Turu, K; Araki, K; Mishima, Y; Ichihashi, M

    2003-09-01

    Twenty-two patients with malignant melanoma were treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using 10B-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The estimation of absorbed dose and optimization of treatment dose based on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in melanoma patients is described. The doses of gamma-rays were measured using small TLDs of Mg2SiO4 (Tb) and thermal neutron fluence was measured using gold foil and wire. The total absorbed dose to the tissue from BNCT was obtained by summing the primary and capture gamma-ray doses and the high LET radiation doses from 10B(n, alpha)7Li and 14N(n,p)14C reactions. The key point of the dose optimization is that the skin surrounding the tumour is always irradiated to 18 Gy-Eq, which is the maximum tolerable dose to the skin, regardless of the 10B-concentration in the tumor. The neutron fluence was optimized as follows. (1) The 10B concentration in the blood was measured 15-40 min after the start of neutron irradiation. (2) The 10B-concentration in the skin was estimated by multiplying the blood 10B value by a factor of 1.3. (3) The neutron fluence was calculated. Absorbed doses to the skin ranged from 15.7 to 37.1 Gy-Eq. Among the patients, 16 out of 22 patients exhibited tolerable skin damage. Although six patients showed skin damage that exceeded the tolerance level, three of them could be cured within a few months after BNCT and the remaining three developed severe skin damage requiring skin grafts. The absorbed doses to the tumor ranged from 15.7 to 68.5 Gy-Eq and the percentage of complete response was 73% (16/22). When BNCT is used in the treatment of malignant melanoma, based on the pharmacokinetics of BPA and radiobiological considerations, promising clinical results have been obtained, although many problems and issues remain to be solved. PMID:14626847

  7. Improved-resolution real-time skin-dose mapping for interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Vijay K.; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a dose-tracking system (DTS) that provides a real-time display of the skin-dose distribution on a 3D patient graphic during fluoroscopic procedures. Radiation dose to individual points on the skin is calculated using exposure and geometry parameters from the digital bus on a Toshiba C-arm unit. To accurately define the distribution of dose, it is necessary to use a high-resolution patient graphic consisting of a large number of elements. In the original DTS version, the patient graphics were obtained from a library of population body scans which consisted of larger-sized triangular elements resulting in poor congruence between the graphic points and the x-ray beam boundary. To improve the resolution without impacting real-time performance, the number of calculations must be reduced and so we created software-designed human models and modified the DTS to read the graphic as a list of vertices of the triangular elements such that common vertices of adjacent triangles are listed once. Dose is calculated for each vertex point once instead of the number of times that a given vertex appears in multiple triangles. By reformatting the graphic file, we were able to subdivide the triangular elements by a factor of 64 times with an increase in the file size of only 1.3 times. This allows a much greater number of smaller triangular elements and improves resolution of the patient graphic without compromising the real-time performance of the DTS and also gives a smoother graphic display for better visualization of the dose distribution.

  8. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubis, L. E.; Badawy, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care.

  9. Verification of the performance accuracy of a real-time skin-dose tracking system for interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, Daniel R.; Barbarits, Jeffery; Rana, Vijay K.; Nagaraja, Srikanta P.; Josan, Madhur S.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-03-01

    A tracking system has been developed to provide real-time feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. The dose tracking system (DTS) calculates the radiation dose rate to the patient's skin using the exposure technique parameters and exposure geometry obtained from the x-ray imaging system digital network (Toshiba Infinix) and presents the cumulative results in a color mapping on a 3D graphic of the patient. We performed a number of tests to verify the accuracy of the dose representation of this system. These tests included comparison of system-calculated dose-rate values with ionization-chamber (6 cc PTW) measured values with change in kVp, beam filter, field size, source-to-skin distance and beam angulation. To simulate a cardiac catheterization procedure, the ionization chamber was also placed at various positions on an Alderson Rando torso phantom and the dose agreement compared for a range of projection angles with the heart at isocenter. To assess the accuracy of the dose distribution representation, Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was exposed with the beam at different locations. The DTS and film distributions were compared and excellent visual agreement was obtained within the cm-sized surface elements used for the patient graphic. The dose (rate) values agreed within about 10% for the range of variables tested. Correction factors could be applied to obtain even closer agreement since the variable values are known in real-time. The DTS provides skin-dose values and dose mapping with sufficient accuracy for use in monitoring diagnostic and interventional x-ray procedures.

  10. Verification of the performance accuracy of a real-time skin-dose tracking system for interventional fluoroscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Bednarek, Daniel R; Barbarits, Jeffery; Rana, Vijay K; Nagaraja, Srikanta P; Josan, Madhur S; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-02-13

    A tracking system has been developed to provide real-time feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. The dose tracking system (DTS) calculates the radiation dose rate to the patient's skin using the exposure technique parameters and exposure geometry obtained from the x-ray imaging system digital network (Toshiba Infinix) and presents the cumulative results in a color mapping on a 3D graphic of the patient. We performed a number of tests to verify the accuracy of the dose representation of this system. These tests included comparison of system-calculated dose-rate values with ionization-chamber (6 cc PTW) measured values with change in kVp, beam filter, field size, source-to-skin distance and beam angulation. To simulate a cardiac catheterization procedure, the ionization chamber was also placed at various positions on an Alderson Rando torso phantom and the dose agreement compared for a range of projection angles with the heart at isocenter. To assess the accuracy of the dose distribution representation, Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was exposed with the beam at different locations. The DTS and film distributions were compared and excellent visual agreement was obtained within the cm-sized surface elements used for the patient graphic. The dose (rate) values agreed within about 10% for the range of variables tested. Correction factors could be applied to obtain even closer agreement since the variable values are known in real-time. The DTS provides skin-dose values and dose mapping with sufficient accuracy for use in monitoring diagnostic and interventional x-ray procedures. PMID:21731400

  11. Skin dose rate conversion factors after contamination with radiopharmaceuticals: influence of contamination area, epidermal thickness and percutaneous absorption.

    PubMed

    Covens, P; Berus, D; Caveliers, V; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F; Verellen, D

    2013-06-01

    Skin contamination with radiopharmaceuticals can occur during biomedical research and daily nuclear medicine practice as a result of accidental spills, after contact with bodily fluids of patients or by inattentively touching contaminated materials. Skin dose assessment should be carried out by repeated quantification to map the course of the contamination together with the use of appropriate skin dose rate conversion factors. Contamination is generally characterised by local spots on the palmar surface of the hand and complete decontamination is difficult as a result of percutaneous absorption. This specific issue requires special consideration as to the skin dose rate conversion factors as a measure for the absorbed dose rate to the basal layer of the epidermis. In this work we used Monte Carlo simulations to study the influence of the contamination area, the epidermal thickness and the percutaneous absorption on the absorbed skin dose rate conversion factors for a set of 39 medical radionuclides. The results show that the absorbed dose to the basal layer of the epidermis can differ by up to two orders of magnitude from the operational quantity Hp(0.07) when using an appropriate epidermal thickness in combination with the effect of percutaneous absorption. PMID:23519114

  12. Assessing patient dose in interventional fluoroscopy using patient-dependent hybrid phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry Barnett

    Interventional fluoroscopy uses ionizing radiation to guide small instruments through blood vessels or other body pathways to sites of clinical interest. The technique represents a tremendous advantage over invasive surgical procedures, as it requires only a small incision, thus reducing the risk of infection and providing for shorter recovery times. The growing use and increasing complexity of interventional procedures, however, has resulted in public health concerns regarding radiation exposures, particularly with respect to localized skin dose. Tracking and documenting patient-specific skin and internal organ dose has been specifically identified for interventional fluoroscopy where extended irradiation times, multiple projections, and repeat procedures can lead to some of the largest doses encountered in radiology. Furthermore, inprocedure knowledge of localized skin doses can be of significant clinical importance to managing patient risk and in training radiology residents. In this dissertation, a framework is presented for monitoring the radiation dose delivered to patients undergoing interventional procedures. The framework is built around two key points, developing better anthropomorphic models, and designing clinically relevant software systems for dose estimation. To begin, a library of 50 hybrid patient-dependent computational phantoms was developed based on the UF hybrid male and female reference phantoms. These phantoms represent a different type of anthropomorphic model whereby anthropometric parameters from an individual patient are used during phantom selection. The patient-dependent library was first validated and then used in two patient-phantom matching studies focused on cumulative organ and local skin dose. In terms of organ dose, patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to large patients where error associated with soft tissue attenuation differences could be minimized. For small patients, inherent difference

  13. Verification of the performance accuracy of a real-time skin-dose tracking system for interventional fluoroscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, Daniel R.; Barbarits, Jeffery; Rana, Vijay K.; Nagaraja, Srikanta P.; Josan, Madhur S.; Rudin, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    A tracking system has been developed to provide real-time feedback of skin dose and dose rate during interventional fluoroscopic procedures. The dose tracking system (DTS) calculates the radiation dose rate to the patient’s skin using the exposure technique parameters and exposure geometry obtained from the x-ray imaging system digital network (Toshiba Infinix) and presents the cumulative results in a color mapping on a 3D graphic of the patient. We performed a number of tests to verify the accuracy of the dose representation of this system. These tests included comparison of system–calculated dose-rate values with ionization-chamber (6 cc PTW) measured values with change in kVp, beam filter, field size, source-to-skin distance and beam angulation. To simulate a cardiac catheterization procedure, the ionization chamber was also placed at various positions on an Alderson Rando torso phantom and the dose agreement compared for a range of projection angles with the heart at isocenter. To assess the accuracy of the dose distribution representation, Gafchromic film (XR-RV3, ISP) was exposed with the beam at different locations. The DTS and film distributions were compared and excellent visual agreement was obtained within the cm-sized surface elements used for the patient graphic. The dose (rate) values agreed within about 10% for the range of variables tested. Correction factors could be applied to obtain even closer agreement since the variable values are known in real-time. The DTS provides skin-dose values and dose mapping with sufficient accuracy for use in monitoring diagnostic and interventional x-ray procedures. PMID:21731400

  14. Skin necrosis after a low-dose vasopressin infusion through a central venous catheter for treating septic shock.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Sae Hwan; Byun, Seung Woon; Kang, Ho Suk; Koo, Dong Hoe; Park, Hyun-Gu; Hong, Sang Bum

    2006-12-01

    This is a report on a case of severe skin necrosis in a vasodilatory septic shock patient after the infusion of low-dose vasopressin through a central venous catheter. An 84-year-old male was hospitalized for edema on both legs at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. On hospital day 8, the patient began to complain of dyspnea and he subsequently developed severe septic shock caused by E. coli. After being transferred to the medical intensive care unit, his hypotension, which was refractory to norepinephrine, was controlled by an infusion of low-dose vasopressin (0.02 unit/min) through a central venous catheter into the right subclavian vein. After the infusion of low-dose vasopressin, severe skin necrosis with bullous changes developed, necessitating discontinuation of the low-dose vasopressin infusion. The patient expired from refractory septic shock. Although low-dose vasopressin can control hypotension in septic shock patients, low-dose vasopressin must be used with caution because ischemic complications such as skin necrosis can develop even with administration through a central venous catheter. PMID:17249516

  15. Estimating pediatric entrance skin dose from digital radiography examination using DICOM metadata: A quality assurance tool

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, S. L. Kaufman, R. A.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated methodology to estimate patient examination dose in digital radiography (DR) imaging using DICOM metadata as a quality assurance (QA) tool. Methods: Patient examination and demographical information were gathered from metadata analysis of DICOM header data. The x-ray system radiation output (i.e., air KERMA) was characterized for all filter combinations used for patient examinations. Average patient thicknesses were measured for head, chest, abdomen, knees, and hands using volumetric images from CT. Backscatter factors (BSFs) were calculated from examination kVp. Patient entrance skin air KERMA (ESAK) was calculated by (1) looking up examination technique factors taken from DICOM header metadata (i.e., kVp and mA s) to derive an air KERMA (k{sub air}) value based on an x-ray characteristic radiation output curve; (2) scaling k{sub air} with a BSF value; and (3) correcting k{sub air} for patient thickness. Finally, patient entrance skin dose (ESD) was calculated by multiplying a mass–energy attenuation coefficient ratio by ESAK. Patient ESD calculations were computed for common DR examinations at our institution: dual view chest, anteroposterior (AP) abdomen, lateral (LAT) skull, dual view knee, and bone age (left hand only) examinations. Results: ESD was calculated for a total of 3794 patients; mean age was 11 ± 8 yr (range: 2 months to 55 yr). The mean ESD range was 0.19–0.42 mGy for dual view chest, 0.28–1.2 mGy for AP abdomen, 0.18–0.65 mGy for LAT view skull, 0.15–0.63 mGy for dual view knee, and 0.10–0.12 mGy for bone age (left hand) examinations. Conclusions: A methodology combining DICOM header metadata and basic x-ray tube characterization curves was demonstrated. In a regulatory era where patient dose reporting has become increasingly in demand, this methodology will allow a knowledgeable user the means to establish an automatable dose reporting program for DR and perform patient dose related QA testing for

  16. Revisiting Low-Dose Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy in Mycosis Fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Cameron; Young, James; Navi, Daniel; Riaz, Nadeem; Lingala, Bharathi; Kim, Youn; Hoppe, Richard

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is a highly effective treatment for mycosis fungoides (MF). The standard course consists of 30 to 36 Gy delivered over an 8- to 10-week period. This regimen is time intensive and associated with significant treatment-related toxicities including erythema, desquamation, anhydrosis, alopecia, and xerosis. The aim of this study was to identify a lower dose alternative while retaining a favorable efficacy profile. Methods and Materials: One hundred two MF patients were identified who had been treated with an initial course of low-dose TSEBT (5-<30 Gy) between 1958 and 1995. Patients had a T stage classification of T2 (generalized patch/plaque, n = 51), T3 (tumor, n = 29), and T4 (erythrodermic, n = 22). Those with extracutaneous disease were excluded. Results: Overall response (OR) rates (>50% improvement) were 90% among patients with T2 to T4 disease receiving 5 to <10 Gy (n = 19). In comparison, OR rates between the 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy subgroups were 98% and 97%, respectively. There was no significant difference in median progression free survival (PFS) in T2 and T3 patients when stratified by dose group, and PFS in each was comparable to that of the standard dose. Conclusions: OR rates associated with low-dose TSEBT in the ranges of 10 to <20 Gy and 20 to <30 Gy are comparable to that of the standard dose ({>=} 30 Gy). Efficacy measures including OS, PFS, and RFS are also favorable. Given that the efficacy profile is similar between 10 and <20 Gy and 20 and <30 Gy, the utility of TSEBT within the lower dose range of 10 to <20 Gy merits further investigation, especially in the context of combined modality treatment.

  17. Buildup region and skin-dose measurements for the Therac 6 linear accelerator for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Tannous, N B; Gagnon, W F; Almond, P R

    1981-01-01

    Buildup and surface-dose measurements were taken for the 6 MV photon beam from a Therac 6 linear accelerator manufactured by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) with and without a lucite blocking tray in place. Further measurements were made with a copper filter designed to reduce secondary electrons emitted by photon interactions with the Lucite tray. The results are discussed in relation to skin-sparing for radiation therapy patients. The measurements were made with a fixed volume PTW parallel-plate ionization chamber and corrected to zero-chamber volume. The results were found to be consistent with similar measurements taken with a variable volume extrapolation chamber. PMID:6798394

  18. Patient Dose In Diagnostic Radiology: When & How?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, Margit; Gorson, Robert O.

    1980-08-01

    Different situations are discussed in which it is of value to know radiation dose to the patient in diagnostic radiology. Radiation dose to specific organs is determined using the Handbook on Organ Doses published by the Bureau of Radiological Health of the Food and Drug Administration; the method is applied to a specific case. In this example dose to an embryo is calculated in examinations involving both fluoroscopy and radiography. In another example dose is determined to a fetus in late pregnancy using tissue air ratios. Patient inquiries about radiation dose are discussed, and some answers are suggested. The reliability of dose calculations is examined.

  19. Decreased neutrophil skin infiltration after UVB exposure in patients with polymorphous light eruption.

    PubMed

    Schornagel, Ines J; Sigurdsson, Vigfús; Nijhuis, Evert H J; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Knol, Edward F

    2004-07-01

    UV radiation, in particular UVB, suppresses the skin immune response. In patients with polymorphous light eruption (PLE) the skin immune response seems activated after UV exposure. Typical PLE skin lesions can occur as early as several hours after UV exposure. In healthy volunteers, neutrophils infiltrate the skin shortly after UV exposure. The kinetics and mechanisms of neutrophil infiltration in the skin of PLE patients after UVB exposure was studied. Skin biopsies at 0, 3, 6, and 18 h were taken from five PLE patients and six healthy controls after irradiation with three minimal erythema dose UVB. Furthermore, neutrophils were isolated from blood of five PLE patients and six healthy controls to test their chemotactic activity. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a significant decreased neutrophil infiltration in PLE skin after UVB irradiation compared with healthy controls (p<0.05). In both healthy controls and PLE patients, after UVB irradiation, ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression on endothelial cells increased at 6 h after irradiation. Blood neutrophil chemotactic response towards IL-8 and C5a, as well as the expression of cell surface markers involved in adhesion and chemotaxis, was not different between PLE patients and healthy controls. In conclusion, PLE is marked by a decreased skin infiltration of neutrophils after UVB irradiation, possibly leading to a diminished neutrophil-induced suppression. PMID:15191561

  20. Support of large breasts during tangential irradiation using a micro-shell and minimizing the skin dose-a pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Latimer, James G. . E-mail: James.Latimer@swsahs.nsw.gov.au; Beckham, Wayne; West, Mark; Holloway, Lois; Delaney, Geoff

    2005-03-31

    Tangential radiotherapy delivered to women with large breasts can be problematic due to the excessive skin folds and the way that the breast falls into the axilla. This may necessitate excessive lung irradiation to cover the posterior part of the breast volume adequately. Conventional breast rings used to move the breast anteriorly can be very difficult to reproduce and may substantially increase the skin dose and hence skin toxicity due to the bolus effect. An in-house designed microshell device was constructed to improve setup reproducibility and minimize skin dose. Dose comparisons using a phantom were made between this device and 2 other commonly used devices. The microshell successfully reduced the surface dose compared to the other breast rings tested. This device was then investigated on 8 patients under clinical conditions. Skin doses measured on the trial patients were within acceptable limits. During this small pilot study, no patients suffered excessive skin toxicity or required treatment breaks. Due to the microshell's expandable nature, ease of application, which increases patient comfort compared to other breast rings, and the lower surface dose, the microshell is the preferred breast stabilization device for this department when treating patients with large pendulous breasts. We encourage other departments to consider their current method of breast stabilization and compare them to our results.

  1. Facial skin injuries caused by adhesive tapes in a patient receiving cosmetic skin exfoliants.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chau P; Chui, Po T; Karmakar, Manoj K

    2003-11-01

    A 39-yr-old woman underwent general anesthesia for laparoscopic sterilization. We used adhesive tapes to close her eyelids and to secure the tracheal tube. Removal of the tapes caused patchy areas of skin loss. We later discovered that the patient had fragile facial skin from cosmetics containing skin exfoliants. We recommend taking a detailed drug history before anesthesia and avoiding adhesive tapes to the patient's face under general anesthesia. PMID:14570644

  2. Standard or hypofractionated radiotherapy in the postoperative treatment of breast cancer: a retrospective analysis of acute skin toxicity and dose inhomogeneities

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To identify predictive factors of radiation-induced skin toxicity in breast cancer patients by the analysis of dosimetric and clinical factors. Methods 339 patients treated between January 2007 and December 2010 are included in the present analysis. Whole breast irradiation was delivered with Conventional Fractionation (CF) (50Gy, 2.0/day, 25 fractions) and moderate Hypofractionated Schedule (HS) (44Gy, 2.75Gy/day, 16 fractions) followed by tumour bed boost. The impact of patient clinical features, systemic treatments and, in particular, dose inhomogeneities on the occurrence of different levels of skin reaction has been retrospectively evaluated. Results G2 and G3 acute skin toxicity were 42% and 13% in CF patients and 30% and 7.5% in HS patients respectively. The retrieval and revaluation of 200 treatment plans showed a strong correlation between areas close to the skin surface, with inhomogeneities >107% of the prescribed dose, and the desquamation areas as described in the clinical records. Conclusions In our experience dose inhomogeneity underneath G2 – G3 skin reactions seems to be the most important predictor for acute skin damage and in these patients more complex treatment techniques should be considered to avoid skin damage. Genetic polymorphisms too have to be investigated as possible promising candidates for predicting acute skin reactions. PMID:23651532

  3. Patient Radiation Doses in Interventional Cardiology Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Pantos, Ioannis; Patatoukas, Georgios; Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Efstathopoulos, Efstathios

    2009-01-01

    Interventional cardiology procedures result in substantial patient radiation doses due to prolonged fluoroscopy time and radiographic exposure. The procedures that are most frequently performed are coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary interventions, diagnostic electrophysiology studies and radiofrequency catheter ablation. Patient radiation dose in these procedures can be assessed either by measurements on a series of patients in real clinical practice or measurements using patient-equivalent phantoms. In this article we review the derived doses at non-pediatric patients from 72 relevant studies published during the last 22 years in international scientific literature. Published results indicate that patient radiation doses vary widely among the different interventional cardiology procedures but also among equivalent studies. Discrepancies of the derived results are patient-, procedure-, physician-, and fluoroscopic equipmentrelated. Nevertheless, interventional cardiology procedures can subject patients to considerable radiation doses. Efforts to minimize patient exposure should always be undertaken. PMID:20066141

  4. Sunscreens, Skin Cancer, and Your Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Terence M.; Wolfe, Dana P.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of sunlight on skin are described. The principal types of sunscreens and their properties are discussed. The three types of skin tumors, their cure rates, and treatment methods are examined. (Author/MT)

  5. Estimation of the radiation dose from radiotherapy for skin haemangiomas in childhood: the ICTA software for epidemiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsaldin, A.; Lundell, M.; Diallo, I.; Ligot, L.; Chavaudra, J.; de Vathaire, F.

    2000-12-01

    Radium applicators and pure beta emitters have been widely used in the past to treat skin haemangioma in early childhood. A well defined relationship between the low doses received from these applicators and radiation-induced cancers requires accurate dosimetry. A human-based CT scan phantom has been used to simulate every patient and treatment condition and then to calculate the source-target distance when radium and pure beta applicators were used. The effective transmission factor ϕ(r) for the gamma spectrum emitted by the radium sources applied on the skin surface was modelled using Monte Carlo simulations. The well-known quantization approach was used to calculate gamma doses delivered from radium applicators to various anatomical points. For 32P, 90Sr/90Y applicators and 90Y needles we have used the apparent exponential attenuation equation. The dose calculation algorithm was integrated into the ICTA software (standing for a model that constructs an Individualized phantom based on CT slices and Auxological data), which has been developed for epidemiological studies of cohorts of patients who received radium and beta-treatments for skin haemangioma. The ϕ(r) values obtained for radium skin applicators are in good agreement with the available values in the first 10 cm but higher at greater distances. Gamma doses can be calculated with this algorithm at 165 anatomical points throughout the body of patients treated with radium applicators. Lung heterogeneity and air crossed by the gamma rays are considered. Comparison of absorbed doses in water from a 10 mg equivalent radium source simulated by ICTA with those measured at the Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital (RAH) showed good agreement, but ICTA estimation of organ doses did not always correspond those estimated at the RAH. Beta doses from 32P, 90Sr/90Y applicators and 90Y needles are calculated up to the maximum beta range (11 mm).

  6. C-arm rotation as a method for reducing peak skin dose in interventional cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Pasciak, Alexander S; Bourgeois, Austin C; Jones, A Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged interventional cardiology (IC) procedures may result in radiation-induced skin injury, a potentially preventable cause of patient morbidity. Rotating the C-arm during an IC procedure may reduce this risk, although the methods by which the technique can be practically applied remains unexplored. A previous study demonstrated that C-arm rotation often increases peak skin dose (PSD) in interventional radiology procedures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether C-arm rotation reduces the PSD in IC procedures and, if so, under what circumstances. Materials and methods Simulations were performed using a numerical ray-tracing algorithm to analyse the effect of C-arm rotation on PSD across a range of patient sizes, C-arm configurations and procedure types. Specific data from modern fluoroscopes and patient dimensions were used as inputs to the simulations. Results In many cases, modest C-arm rotation angles completely eliminated overlap between X-ray field sites on the skin. When overlap remained, PSD increases were generally small. One exception was craniocaudal rotation, which tended to increase PSD. C-arm rotation was most effective for large patients and small X-ray field sizes. Small patients may not benefit from C-arm rotation as a procedural modification. The use of a prophylactic method where the C-arm was rotated between small opposing oblique angles was effective in reducing PSD. Conclusions With the exception of rotation to steep craniocaudal angles, rotating the C-arm reduces PSD in IC procedures when used as either a procedural modification or a prophylactic strategy. Tight collimation increases the benefit of C-arm rotation. PMID:25568803

  7. Population UV-dose and skin area--do sunbeds rival the sun?

    PubMed

    Wester, U; Boldemann, C; Jansson, B; Ullén, H

    1999-10-01

    From the perspective of skin cancer risks, sunbed tanning may give the population group of Swedish adolescents a yearly total dose in terms of ultraviolet radiant energy to the skin which is comparable to sunlight. For populations, a dosage scheme is applied, where exposed skin area is estimated to be two to ten times larger in tanning units than in outdoor sunlight. The normal dose fluence rate is multiplied by the exposure time and by the exposed body surface area. A study of sunbed use among adolescents was reinvestigated. Skin dose from artificial tanning in that population group is calculated and compared to sun exposure for erythemally effective radiation and for UVA (315-400 nm). Skin doses from tanning units to the adolescent population agree with estimates based on information concerning sunbed lamp sales/year. For the population, the erythemal skin dose from tanning units exceeds an increase in solar ultraviolet radiation to the skin projected from 10% ozone depletion. The dosage scheme might help to interpret data suggesting an increased melanoma risk among young people using sunbeds > or = 10 times per year. Tanning and sunburns in sunbeds and in sunlight is discussed with regard to skin area. PMID:10492351

  8. Skin disorders in peritoneal dialysis patients: An underdiagnosed subject

    PubMed Central

    Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Topcuoğlu, Derya; Koc, Leyli Kadriye; Yucel, Lamiye; Sumnu, Abdullah; Cebeci, Egemen; Ozkan, Oktay; Behlul, Ahmet; Koc, Leyla; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine all skin changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients followed up in our unit. METHODS: Patients on PD program for at least three months without any known chronic skin disease were included in the study. Patients with already diagnosed skin disease, those who have systemic diseases that may cause skin lesions, patients with malignancies and those who did not give informed consent were excluded from the study. All patients were examined by the same predetermined dermatologist with all findings recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory data including measures of dialysis adequacy of patients were recorded also. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows 16.0 standard version was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Among the patients followed up in our PD unit, those without exclusion criteria who gave informed consent, 38 patients were included in the study with male/female ratio and mean age of 26/12 and 50.3 ± 13.7 years, respectively. The duration of CKD was 7.86 ± 4.16 years and the mean PD duration was 47.1 ± 29.6 mo. Primary kidney disease was diabetic nephropathy in 11, nephrosclerosis in six, uropathologies in four, chronic glomerulonephritis in three, chronic pyelonephritis in three, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in three patients while cause was unknown in eight patients. All patients except for one patient had at least one skin lesion. Loss of lunula, onychomycosis and tinea pedis are the most frequent skin disorders recorded in the study group. Diabetic patients had tinea pedis more frequently (P = 0.045). No relationship of skin findings was detected with primary renal diseases, comorbidities and medications that the patients were using. CONCLUSION: Skin abnormalities are common in in PD patients. The most frequent skin pathologies are onychomycosis and tinea pedis which must not be overlooked. PMID:27458566

  9. Patient Radiation Doses from Diagnostic Radiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, D.

    1996-01-01

    Explains how x-ray doses to patients are measured. Describes how different techniques expose patients to differing amounts of ionizing radiation. Compares these figures with other natural and man-made sources. (Author/MKR)

  10. Other Skin Conditions Often Present in Rosacea Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Survey: Other Skin Conditions Often Present in Rosacea Patients Although rosacea patients often have to cope ... ocular rosacea. arrow Follow us on Facebook arrow Rosacea Review Current Issue Past Issues Index by Topic ...

  11. Patient experiences living with split thickness skin grafts.

    PubMed

    Burnett, L N; Carr, E; Tapp, D; Raffin Bouchal, S; Horch, J D; Biernaskie, J; Gabriel, V

    2014-09-01

    The standard of care for deep burns is autologous split thickness skin grafting. Although adequate to resurface a deep wound, the resulting skin is chronically abnormal. The purpose of this study was to describe the experience of patients with split thickness skin grafts to help guide future investigations related to skin regeneration. In this study, an interpretive description qualitative methodology was employed. Subjects participated in a two-part single patient interview that was recorded and transcribed. A nurse with experience in clinical burn care coded and interpreted the data. Participants were recruited through presentation to a university based outpatient burn clinic for follow up from autologous split thickness skin grafting. Eight male patients and four female patients 20-62 years old ranging 2-29 months post-skin grafting were enrolled in the study. The most significant concerns voiced by patients were identified and organized into five themes: (1) a new normal, (2) split thickness skin graft symptoms, (3) appearance of new skin, (4) coping, and (5) participation in future clinical trials. Participants reported that the abnormalities related to their split thickness skin grafts were significant enough that they would be willing to participate in a future clinical trial investigating new cell-based therapies. PMID:24794227

  12. A computational dosimetry tool for the study of tumor doses and skin toxicities in BNCT.

    PubMed

    Gossio, Sebastián; Carando, Daniel G; González, Sara J

    2009-07-01

    A Matlab-based computational tool, named SPHERE, was developed that helps determining tumor and skin doses in BNCT treatments. It was especially designed for cutaneous melanoma treatments and, among its features, it provides a guide for the location and delineation of tumors and a visual representation of superficial dose distributions (for both tumor and normal tissues). It also generates cumulative dose-volume histograms for different volumes of interest and dose-area histograms for skin. A description of the tool is presented, as well as examples of its application. PMID:19386508

  13. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Single-Dose Versus Weekly Dalbavancin for Treatment of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Michael W.; Puttagunta, Sailaja; Giordano, Philip; Krievins, Dainis; Zelasky, Michael; Baldassarre, James

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) are a cause of significant morbidity and therapy can be a burden to the healthcare system. New antibiotics that simplify treatment and avoid hospitalization are needed. This study compared the safety and efficacy of a single intravenous infusion of 1500 mg of dalbavancin to the 2-dose regimen. Methods. This study was a randomized, double-blind trial in patients aged >18 years with ABSSSIs. Patients were randomized to dalbavancin 1500 mg either as a single intravenous (IV) infusion or 1000 mg IV on day 1 followed 1 week later by 500 mg IV. The primary endpoint was a ≥20% reduction in the area of erythema at 48–72 hours in the intent-to-treat population. Noninferiority was to be declared if the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval (CI) on the difference in the outcomes was greater than −10%. Clinical outcome was also assessed at days 14 and 28. Results. Six hundred ninety-eight patients were randomized. Demographic characteristics were similar on each regimen, although there were more patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) at baseline on the 2-dose regimen (36/210 [17.1%] vs 61/220 [27.7%]). Dalbavancin delivered as a single dose was noninferior to a 2-dose regimen (81.4% vs 84.2%; difference, −2.9% [95% CI, −8.5% to 2.8%]). Clinical outcomes were also similar at day 14 (84.0% vs 84.8%), day 28 (84.5% vs 85.1%), and day 14 in clinically evaluable patients with MRSA in a baseline culture (92.9% vs 95.3%) in the single- and 2-dose regimens, respectively. Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 20.1% of the single-dose patients and 19.9% on the 2-dose regimen. Conclusions. A single 1500-mg infusion of dalbavancin is noninferior to a 2-dose regimen, has a similar safety profile, and removes logistical constraints related to delivery of the second dose. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT02127970. PMID:26611777

  14. Suitability of laser stimulated TLD arrays as patient dose monitors in high dose x-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Geise, R A; Schueler, B A; Lien, W; Jones, S C

    1997-10-01

    Skin entrance doses of patients undergoing interventional x-ray procedures are capable of causing skin damage and should be monitored routinely. Single TLD chips are not suitable because the location of maximum skin exposure cannot be predicted. Most photographic films are too sensitive at diagnostic x-ray energies for dosimetry, exhibit temporal changes in response, and require special packaging by the user. We have investigated the suitability of laser heated MgB4O7 TLDs in a polyimide binder in the range of 0.2-20 Gy. These are available in radioluscent arrays up to 30 x 30 cm for direct measurement of patient skin dose. Dose response was compared with a calibrated ion chamber dosimeter. Exposures were made at 60, 90, and 120 kVp, at low (fluoroscopy) and high (DSA) dose rates, and at different beam incidence angles. Longitudinal reproducibility and response to temperature changes during exposure were also checked. The dose response is linear below approximately 6 Gy where the slope starts to increase 2% per Gy. Errors were less than +/- 2% over a 0-80 degrees range of beam incidence angles; less than +/- 3% for both dose rate variations and kVp differences between 70 and 120 kVp. The response was unaffected by temperature changes between 20 and 37 degrees C. Reproducibility is current +/- 7%. MgB4O7 TLD arrays are suitable for patient dosimetry in high dose fluoroscopy procedures if appropriate calibrations are used. Uncertainty in skin dose measurement is less than 10%, which is substantially better than film dosimetry. PMID:9350720

  15. Objective biophysical findings in patients with sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Roussaki-Schulze, A V; Zafiriou, E; Nikoulis, D; Klimi, E; Rallis, E; Zintzaras, E

    2005-01-01

    The term sensitive skin has been used to describe a clinical phenomenon of hyperreactivity of the human skin, which develops exaggerated reactions when exposed to external factors. The aim of this study was to determine objective biophysical findings in patients with sensitive skin compared to those individuals with nonsensitive skin. Thirty-two patients with sensitive skin and 30 healthy volunteers with nonsensitive skin were studied. The testing methods included in vivo and in vitro tests: epicutaneous testing (Patch tests); measurement of sebum and hydration of the skin; alkali resistance test; stinging test with lactic acid; reaction to aqueous solution of methyl nicotinate 0.5%, 1.4% and acetyl-b-methylcholine chloride 1:1000; pH measurement; dermographism; and measurement of total and specific IgE. Significant results were observed in the measurement of sebum (p < 0.01) and hydration (p < 0.05) of the skin, in the alkali resistance test (p < 0.05), in the vascular reaction to methyl nicotinate (p < 0.01) and to acetyl-b-methylcholine chloride (p < 0.01) and in the skin response to allergens of the European standard (p < 0.01) and cosmetic series (p < 0.05). In addition, the subjective findings of stinging test produced significant results (p < 0.001) as was anticipated. Patients with sensitive skin possess very dry skin with low fatness, which leads to a disturbance of the protective skin barrier function. They also present a hyperreaction of the skin blood vessels, increased transcutaneous penetration of water-soluble chemicals, enhanced immune responsiveness, significant decrease of alkali resistance and a heightened neurosensory stimulation. PMID:16444908

  16. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  17. Real-time measurement and audit of radiation dose to patients undergoing computed radiography.

    PubMed

    Vano, Eliseo; Fernandez, Jose Miguel; Ten, Jose Ignacio; Guibelalde, Eduardo; Gonzalez, Luciano; Pedrosa, Cesar S A

    2002-10-01

    A real-time patient dose monitoring system for auditing computed radiography is described. Technical data from each exposure and for every examination type are collected and sent by a network to a workstation, which calculates the moving average values of entrance skin dose and dose-area product from the 10 most recently examined patients. Comparison of averages with reference values generates warning messages if reference values are exceeded, prompting corrective action if necessary. PMID:12355017

  18. Skin Biophysical Characteristics in Patients with Keratoconus: A Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Robati, Reza M.; Einollahi, Bahram; Einollahi, Hoda; Younespour, Shima; Fadaifard, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Keratoconus is a relatively common corneal disease causing significant visual disability. Individuals with connective tissue disorders that affect the skin such as Marfan's syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or patients with atopic dermatitis show an increased prevalence of keratoconus. It seems that there are some concurrent alterations of skin and cornea in patients with keratoconus. Objective. We plan to compare skin biophysical characteristics in patients with keratoconus and healthy controls. Methods. Forty patients with keratoconus (18 females and 22 males) with mean (SD) age of 33.32 (9.55) years (range 19–56) and 40 healthy controls were recruited to this study. Skin biophysical characteristics including cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT), stratum corneum hydration, and melanin values were measured in patients and controls. Results. The median CRRT, stratum corneum hydration, and melanin measurements were significantly lower in patients with keratoconus in comparison with healthy controls. Conclusion. There are some alterations of skin biophysical properties in patients with keratoconus. Therefore, the assessment of these skin parameters could provide us some clues to the possible common biophysical variations of cornea and skin tissue in diseases such as keratoconus. PMID:27403376

  19. Skin Biophysical Characteristics in Patients with Keratoconus: A Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Robati, Reza M; Einollahi, Bahram; Einollahi, Hoda; Younespour, Shima; Fadaifard, Shahed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Keratoconus is a relatively common corneal disease causing significant visual disability. Individuals with connective tissue disorders that affect the skin such as Marfan's syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome or patients with atopic dermatitis show an increased prevalence of keratoconus. It seems that there are some concurrent alterations of skin and cornea in patients with keratoconus. Objective. We plan to compare skin biophysical characteristics in patients with keratoconus and healthy controls. Methods. Forty patients with keratoconus (18 females and 22 males) with mean (SD) age of 33.32 (9.55) years (range 19-56) and 40 healthy controls were recruited to this study. Skin biophysical characteristics including cutaneous resonance running time (CRRT), stratum corneum hydration, and melanin values were measured in patients and controls. Results. The median CRRT, stratum corneum hydration, and melanin measurements were significantly lower in patients with keratoconus in comparison with healthy controls. Conclusion. There are some alterations of skin biophysical properties in patients with keratoconus. Therefore, the assessment of these skin parameters could provide us some clues to the possible common biophysical variations of cornea and skin tissue in diseases such as keratoconus. PMID:27403376

  20. Measurement of maximum skin dose in interventional radiology and cardiology and challenges in the set-up of European alert thresholds.

    PubMed

    Farah, J; Trianni, A; Carinou, E; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Clairand, I; Dabin, J; De Angelis, C; Domienik, J; Jarvinen, H; Kopec, R; Majer, M; Malchair, F; Negri, A; Novák, L; Siiskonen, T; Vanhavere, F; Knežević, Ž

    2015-04-01

    To help operators acknowledge patient dose during interventional procedures, EURADOS WG-12 focused on measuring patient skin dose using XR-RV3 gafchromic films, thermoluminescent detector (TLD) pellets or 2D TL foils and on investigating possible correlation to the on-line dose indicators such as fluoroscopy time, Kerma-area product (KAP) and cumulative air Kerma at reference point (CK). The study aims at defining non-centre-specific European alert thresholds for skin dose in three interventional procedures: chemoembolization of the liver (CE), neuroembolization (NE) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Skin dose values of >3 Gy (ICRP threshold for skin injuries) were indeed measured in these procedures confirming the need for dose indicators that correlate with maximum skin dose (MSD). However, although MSD showed fairly good correlation with KAP and CK, several limitations were identified challenging the set-up of non-centre-specific European alert thresholds. This paper presents preliminary results of this wide European measurement campaign and focuses on the main challenges in the definition of European alert thresholds. PMID:25316909

  1. Skin care of the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Pallija, G; Mondozzi, M; Webb, A A

    1999-04-01

    Several factors influence the chronically ill child's susceptibility for skin breakdown. Nurses are an integral part of the care team that has the responsibility for identification of these factors, as well as pressure ulcer prevention and early intervention. An important aspect of this responsibility is identification of individuals at risk. This article provides a guide for assessment and early intervention for skin breakdown in chronically ill children. A care plan and consultation recommendations are included. PMID:10337118

  2. Yeasts in a hospital for patients with skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Dorothy A.

    1972-01-01

    The incidence and acquisition of Candida albicans and other yeasts in two wards of a skin hospital is described. Carriage rates on the skin in hospital patients is higher than is generally supposed, and cutaneous sites may act as sources of infection with these organisms. PMID:4567312

  3. Measuring the skin dose protection afforded by protective apparel with a beta spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, D.E.; Rich, B.L.; Johnson, L.O. )

    1986-10-01

    This paper reports that the protective apparel worn by radiation workers to avoid skin contamination also provides measurable protection against external beta sources. The beta contribution to the skin dose rate depends on the residual energy spectrum of the beta particles after they have penetrated the protective apparel. The shift in the beta energy spectra and consequent reduction in the shallow dose rates afforded by various items of protective apparel were investigated for a few laboratory beta sources using a beta spectrometer that is capable of dose calculations. The results presented here indicate that significant dose rates to the skin can occur despite the presence of protective apparel if high energy beta emitting isotopes are present.

  4. Dental orthopantomography: survey of patient dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolotta, A.; Calenda, E.; Calicchia, A.; Indovina, P.L.

    1983-03-01

    Absorbed dose to specific regions of the head and neck during dental orthopantomography with various commercial units was assessed using a Rando ''standard man'' phantom and TLD-100 LiF dosimeters. Relevance to patient protection is discussed.

  5. Incorporating corrections for the head-holder and compensation filter when calculating skin dose during fluoroscopically guided interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Rana, Vijay K.; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2015-03-01

    The skin dose tracking system (DTS) that we developed provides a color-coded illustration of the cumulative skin dose distribution on a 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic procedures for immediate feedback to the interventionist. To improve the accuracy of dose calculation, we now have incorporated two additional important corrections (1) for the holder used to immobilize the head in neuro-interventions and (2) for the built-in compensation filters used for beam equalization. Both devices have been modeled in the DTS software so that beam intensity corrections can be made. The head-holder is modeled as two concentric hemi-cylindrical surfaces such that the path length between those surfaces can be determined for rays to individual points on the skin surface. The head-holder on the imaging system we used was measured to attenuate the primary x-rays by 10 to 20% for normal incidence, and up to 40% at non-normal incidence. In addition, three compensation filters of different shape are built into the collimator apparatus and were measured to have attenuation factors ranging from 58% to 99%, depending on kVp and beam filtration. These filters can translate and rotate in the beam and their motion is tracked by the DTS using the digital signal from the imaging system. When it is determined that a ray to a given point on the skin passes through the compensation filter, the appropriate attenuation correction is applied. These corrections have been successfully incorporated in the DTS software to provide a more accurate determination of skin dose.

  6. Skin Biopsy and Patient-Specific Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Nguyen, Huy V.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells permits the development of next-generation patient-specific systems biology models reflecting personalized genomics profiles to better understand pathophysiology. In this chapter, we describe how to create a patient-specific iPS cell line. There are three major steps: (1) performing a skin biopsy procedure on the patient; (2) extracting human fibroblast cells from the skin biopsy tissue; and (3) reprogramming patient-specific fibroblast cells into the pluripotent stem cell stage. PMID:26141312

  7. Skin dose calculations for uranium fuel particles below 500 microns in diameter.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, R; Toivonen, H

    1995-03-01

    Two different methods for skin dose calculations, VARSKIN Mod 2 and PSS are compared for a spherical uranium fuel particle (diameter 1-500 microns) deposited on the skin. Nuclide-specific beta dose rate at different skin depths for a particle of unit activity is determined as a function of particle size. Both methods show that the effects of self-shielding must be included in the dose calculations for low and medium energy beta emitters. Skin dose rate is drastically overestimated when point source approximation is used. For high energy beta emitters (e.g., 90Y, 106Rh, and 144Pr) the volume source can be approximated as a point source. The difference in doses is then below 20% for particles up to 100 microns in diameter. The models give equal results deep in the skin (in terms of range of the beta particles). The reason is that the correction due to the diminished backscattering in air-tissue interface is insignificant at large distances. For three-dimensional sources the backscattering correction should be introduced in the VARSKIN Mod 2. PMID:7860313

  8. Oritavancin Population Pharmacokinetics in Healthy Subjects and Patients with Complicated Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Bacteremia▿

    PubMed Central

    Rubino, Christopher M.; Van Wart, Scott A.; Bhavnani, Sujata M.; Ambrose, Paul G.; McCollam, Jill S.; Forrest, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Oritavancin is a novel glycopeptide antimicrobial agent with potent in vitro activity against a wide variety of gram-positive bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains of staphylococci and enterococci. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to describe the disposition of oritavancin with data from a pooled population of phase 1 healthy subjects and phase 2 and 3 patients with complicated skin and skin structure infections or Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. In addition, the potential influence of factors such as the subject's age, gender, and clinical laboratory measures on oritavancin disposition was evaluated. Oritavancin was administered as both single- and multiple-dose intravenous (i.v.) infusions in fixed doses ranging from 100 to 800 mg or weight-based doses ranging from 0.02 to 10 mg/kg of body weight, with infusion durations ranging from 0.13 to 6.5 h across all studies. The most robust fit to the data (n = 6,290 oritavancin plasma concentrations from 560 subjects) was obtained using a three-compartment model with zero-order i.v. infusion and first-order elimination. The model was parameterized using total clearance (CL), volume of central compartment (Vc), distributional clearances from the central to both the first and second peripheral compartments, and volumes of distribution for both the first and second peripheral compartments. Weight and study phase (phase 1 versus phase 2/3) were identified as significant predictors of the interindividual variability in CL, while body surface area and age were significant for Vc. These results suggest that dose modification may be warranted in patients weighing >110 kg. However, the mild nature of the observed relationships for Vc suggest that dosing adjustments are not necessary for elderly patients. PMID:19635952

  9. Patient perspectives on radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Graff, Joyce

    2014-03-01

    People with genetic cancer syndromes have a special interest in imaging. They also have special risk factors with respect to radiation. They need to utilize the potential of imaging while keeping in mind concerns about cumulative radiation exposure. Before imaging, early detection of problems was limited. With imaging, issues can be identified when they are small and a good plan of action can be developed early. Operations can be planned and metastatic cancer avoided. The positive contribution of imaging to the care of these patients can be profound. However, this additional surveillance is not without cost. An average patient with 1 of these syndromes will undergo 100 or more scans in their lifetime. Imaging professionals should be able to describe the risks and benefits of each scan in terms that the patient and the ordering physician can understand to make smart decisions about the ordering of scans. Why CT versus MRI? When are x-ray or ultrasound appropriate, and when are they not? What are the costs and the medical risks for the patient? What value does this picture add for the physician? Is there a way to answer the medical question with a test other than a scan? Medicine is a team sport, and the patient is an integral member of the team. PMID:24589397

  10. Patient radiation doses during coronary interventions in four Croatian hospitals: 4-y comparison.

    PubMed

    Krpan, Tomislav; Faj, Dario; Brnić, Zoran; Baraban, Vedrana; Mišir, Mihael

    2015-07-01

    The number of coronary interventions increased substantially in the recent years. Although of great benefit to patients, these procedures can subject patients to considerable radiation doses. There is a legal framework for patient dose measurements in Croatia during radiological procedures, but in practice, it applies only occasionally. A quality control manual, established at the University Hospital Osijek, was accepted by other major cardiology centres in Croatia; besides checking the technical characteristics of the device, it provides constant measurement and analysis of patient doses in interventional cardiology. It also includes patient examination for radiation skin injuries in case of dose of >2 Gy. The aim of the study was to determine and compare patient radiation doses during cardiological interventions measured within 4 y in four major cardiology centres with the values proposed by the European Commission and other professional bodies. The local reference dose levels were also set. PMID:25848111

  11. Variation of patient dose in head CT.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Shah, G A; Kron, T

    1998-12-01

    CT dose varies with both equipment related and operator dependent factors. Thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) was employed in two phantoms to investigate the variation in absorbed dose for head CT scans, using a cylindrical head CT dose phantom. Dose profiles were plotted and the computed tomography dose index (CTDI) calculated for a single 10 mm thick slice on 14 CT scanners. An anthropomorphic head phantom was also scanned from the base-of-skull to the vertex using 10/10 mm slices. The absorbed dose measured at the centre of the scan series is reported (Dmid). The mean CTDIw for the 14 scanners was 60.0 mGy, while the mean Dmid was 45.8 mGy. Dmid better represents the absorbed dose in human tissues. The CTDIw and Dmid normalized to mAs varied by up to a factor of 2.2 for the different scanners. Equipment related factors contribute to such variations. However, variations due to operator dependent factors such as the choice of exposure factors, scanning protocol and positioning technique must also be considered. When such factors are taken into account the absorbed dose received by the patient can vary considerably, by as much as 16.2 for lens dose. Increased awareness of the factors influencing CT dose and the standardization of scanning protocols is recommended. PMID:10319004

  12. Malignant skin tumours in patients with inherited ichthyosis.

    PubMed

    Natsuga, K; Akiyama, M; Shimizu, H

    2011-08-01

    Inherited ichthyoses are rare genodermatoses caused by mutations in the genes involved in epidermal development. Although there have been case reports on patients with ichthyosis who developed skin malignancies, it is still unknown whether or not patients with ichthyosis have an increased risk of skin malignancies. Here, we review case series of skin malignancies in patients with ichthyosis and show biological findings which might lead to cancer susceptibility. A survey of the literature revealed 28 cases of inherited ichthyoses with skin malignancy, including 12 cases of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome, seven of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, three of Netherton syndrome and six of miscellaneous ichthyosis. Twenty-four of the 28 cases developed single or multiple squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). The age at diagnosis of the first skin malignancy ranged from 15 to 54 years. As patients with these particular subtypes of ichthyosis seem to be prone to skin malignancies, including SCC, at an unusually young age, routine cancer surveillance of these patients is strongly recommended. PMID:21517795

  13. Patient Dose Management: Focus on Practical Actions.

    PubMed

    Park, Michael Yong; Jung, Seung Eun

    2016-02-01

    Medical radiation is a very important part of modern medicine, and should be only used when needed and optimized. Justification and optimization of radiation examinations must be performed. The first step of reduction of medical exposure is to know the radiation dose in currently performed examinations. This review covers radiation units, how various imaging modalities report dose, and the current status of radiation dose reports and legislation. Also, practical tips that can be applied to clinical practice are introduced. Afterwards, the importance of radiology exposure related education is emphasized and the current status of education for medical personal and the public is explained, and appropriate education strategies are suggested. Commonly asked radiation dose related example questions and answers are provided in detail to allow medical personnel to answer patients. Lastly, we talk about computerized programs that can be used in medical facilities for managing patient dose. While patient dose monitoring and management should be used to decrease and optimize overall radiation dose, it should not be used to assess individual cancer risk. One must always remember that medically justified examinations should always be performed, and unneeded examinations should be avoided in the first place. PMID:26908988

  14. Patient Dose Management: Focus on Practical Actions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Medical radiation is a very important part of modern medicine, and should be only used when needed and optimized. Justification and optimization of radiation examinations must be performed. The first step of reduction of medical exposure is to know the radiation dose in currently performed examinations. This review covers radiation units, how various imaging modalities report dose, and the current status of radiation dose reports and legislation. Also, practical tips that can be applied to clinical practice are introduced. Afterwards, the importance of radiology exposure related education is emphasized and the current status of education for medical personal and the public is explained, and appropriate education strategies are suggested. Commonly asked radiation dose related example questions and answers are provided in detail to allow medical personnel to answer patients. Lastly, we talk about computerized programs that can be used in medical facilities for managing patient dose. While patient dose monitoring and management should be used to decrease and optimize overall radiation dose, it should not be used to assess individual cancer risk. One must always remember that medically justified examinations should always be performed, and unneeded examinations should be avoided in the first place. PMID:26908988

  15. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Analysis for Efficacy of Ceftaroline Fosamil in Patients with Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Jeffrey P.; Van Wart, Scott A.; Rubino, Christopher M.; Reynolds, Daniel K.; Forrest, Alan; Drusano, George L.; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H. David; Riccobene, Todd A.; Ambrose, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum in vitro activity against pathogens commonly associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of ceftaroline, is approved for the treatment of patients with ABSSSI. Using data from the microbiologically evaluable population from two phase 2 and two phase 3 randomized, multicenter, double-blind studies of patients with ABSSSI, an analysis examining the relationship between drug exposure, as measured by the percentage of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remain above the MIC (f%T>MIC), and clinical and microbiological responses was undertaken. The analysis population included 526 patients, of whom 423 had infections associated with S. aureus. Clinical and microbiological success percentages were 94.7 and 94.5%, respectively, among all of the patients and 95.3 and 95.7%, respectively, among those with S. aureus infections. Univariable analysis based on data from all of the patients and those with S. aureus infections demonstrated significant relationships between f%T>MIC and microbiological response (P < 0.001 and P = 0.026, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression analyses demonstrated other patient factors in addition to f%T>MIC to be significant predictors of microbiological response, including age and infection type for all of the patients evaluated and age, infection type, and the presence of diabetes mellitus for patients with S. aureus infections. Results of these analyses confirm that a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg every 12 h provides exposures associated with the upper plateau of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for efficacy. PMID:25367904

  16. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic analysis for efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections.

    PubMed

    Bhavnani, Sujata M; Hammel, Jeffrey P; Van Wart, Scott A; Rubino, Christopher M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Forrest, Alan; Drusano, George L; Khariton, Tatiana; Friedland, H David; Riccobene, Todd A; Ambrose, Paul G

    2015-01-01

    Ceftaroline is a cephalosporin with broad-spectrum in vitro activity against pathogens commonly associated with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of ceftaroline, is approved for the treatment of patients with ABSSSI. Using data from the microbiologically evaluable population from two phase 2 and two phase 3 randomized, multicenter, double-blind studies of patients with ABSSSI, an analysis examining the relationship between drug exposure, as measured by the percentage of time during the dosing interval that free-drug steady-state concentrations remain above the MIC (f%T>MIC), and clinical and microbiological responses was undertaken. The analysis population included 526 patients, of whom 423 had infections associated with S. aureus. Clinical and microbiological success percentages were 94.7 and 94.5%, respectively, among all of the patients and 95.3 and 95.7%, respectively, among those with S. aureus infections. Univariable analysis based on data from all of the patients and those with S. aureus infections demonstrated significant relationships between f%T>MIC and microbiological response (P < 0.001 and P = 0.026, respectively). Multivariable logistic regression analyses demonstrated other patient factors in addition to f%T>MIC to be significant predictors of microbiological response, including age and infection type for all of the patients evaluated and age, infection type, and the presence of diabetes mellitus for patients with S. aureus infections. Results of these analyses confirm that a ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimen of 600 mg every 12 h provides exposures associated with the upper plateau of the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship for efficacy. PMID:25367904

  17. WE-E-18A-03: How Accurately Can the Peak Skin Dose in Fluoroscopy Be Determined Using Indirect Dose Metrics?

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, A; Pasciak, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Skin dosimetry is important for fluoroscopically-guided interventions, as peak skin doses (PSD) that Result in skin reactions can be reached during these procedures. The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of different indirect dose estimates and to determine if PSD can be calculated within ±50% for embolization procedures. Methods: PSD were measured directly using radiochromic film for 41 consecutive embolization procedures. Indirect dose metrics from procedures were collected, including reference air kerma (RAK). Four different estimates of PSD were calculated and compared along with RAK to the measured PSD. The indirect estimates included a standard method, use of detailed information from the RDSR, and two simplified calculation methods. Indirect dosimetry was compared with direct measurements, including an analysis of uncertainty associated with film dosimetry. Factors affecting the accuracy of the indirect estimates were examined. Results: PSD calculated with the standard calculation method were within ±50% for all 41 procedures. This was also true for a simplified method using a single source-to-patient distance (SPD) for all calculations. RAK was within ±50% for all but one procedure. Cases for which RAK or calculated PSD exhibited large differences from the measured PSD were analyzed, and two causative factors were identified: ‘extreme’ SPD and large contributions to RAK from rotational angiography or runs acquired at large gantry angles. When calculated uncertainty limits [−12.8%, 10%] were applied to directly measured PSD, most indirect PSD estimates remained within ±50% of the measured PSD. Conclusions: Using indirect dose metrics, PSD can be determined within ±50% for embolization procedures, and usually to within ±35%. RAK can be used without modification to set notification limits and substantial radiation dose levels. These results can be extended to similar procedures, including vascular and interventional oncology

  18. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-04: Automatic Skin-Dose Mapping for An Angiographic System with a Region-Of-Interest, High-Resolution Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayan, S; Rana, V; Setlur Nagesh, S; Ionita, C; Rudin, S; Bednarek, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Our real-time skin dose tracking system (DTS) has been upgraded to monitor dose for the micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF), a high-resolution, small field-of-view x-ray detector. Methods: The MAF has been mounted on a changer on a clinical C-Arm gantry so it can be used interchangeably with the standard flat-panel detector (FPD) during neuro-interventional procedures when high resolution is needed in a region-of-interest. To monitor patient skin dose when using the MAF, our DTS has been modified to automatically account for the change in scatter for the very small MAF FOV and to provide separated dose distributions for each detector. The DTS is able to provide a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose on a 3D graphic model of the patient. To determine the correct entrance skin exposure to be applied by the DTS, a correction factor was determined by measuring the exposure at the entrance surface of a skull phantom with an ionization chamber as a function of entrance beam size for various beam filters and kVps. Entrance exposure measurements included primary radiation, patient backscatter and table forward scatter. To allow separation of the dose from each detector, a parameter log is kept that allows a replay of the procedure exposure events and recalculation of the dose components.The graphic display can then be constructed showing the dose distribution from the MAF and FPD separately or together. Results: The DTS is able to provide separate displays of dose for the MAF and FPD with field-size specific scatter corrections. These measured corrections change from about 49% down to 10% when changing from the FPD to the MAF. Conclusion: The upgraded DTS allows identification of the patient skin dose delivered when using each detector in order to achieve improved dose management as well as to facilitate peak skin-dose reduction through dose spreading. Research supported in part by Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation and NIH Grants R43FD0158401, R44FD

  19. Iron deposition in skin of patients with haemochromatosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Silva, J. N.; Alves, L. C.; Filipe, P.

    2003-09-01

    Haemochromatosis is the most common inherited liver disease in Caucasians and the most common autosomal recessive genetic disorder. It is characterized by inappropriately high iron absorption resulting in progressive iron overload in parenchymal organs such as liver, heart, pancreas, pituitary, joints, and skin. Upon early detection, haemochromatosis can be a manageable chronic disease but, if undetected, is potentially fatal. Skin biopsies were obtained from patients and from healthy donors. Images of the elemental distributions in skin were obtained using nuclear microscopy techniques (nuclear microprobe, NMP). Elemental profiles along skin, and intra-, and extra-cellular iron concentrations, were determined. Results for patients with haemochromatosis were cross-examined with morphologic features and with data obtained for healthy skin. Skin iron content is much increased in patients with haemochromatosis when compared with healthy subjects. Extensive iron deposits are observed at dermis, at the dermo-epidermal interface, at upper epidermis layers and at stratum corneum. Iron deposition was observed preferentially at cell boundaries or at the interstitial matrix.

  20. The radiation dose from a proposed measurement of arsenic and selenium in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherase, Mihai R.; Mader, Joanna E.; Fleming, David E. B.

    2010-09-01

    Dose measurements following 10 min irradiations with a portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer composed of a miniature x-ray tube and a silicon PiN diode detector were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters consisting of LiF:Mg,Ti chips of 3 mm diameter and 0.4 mm thickness. The table-top setup of the spectrometer was used for all measurements. The setup included a stainless steel lid which served as a radiation shield. Two rectangular polyethylene skin/soft tissue phantoms with two cylindrical plaster of Paris bone phantoms were used to study the effect of x-ray beam attenuation and backscatter on the measured dose. Eight different irradiation experiments were performed. The average dose rate values measured with TLD chips within a 1 × 1 cm2 area were between 4.8 and 12.8 mGy min-1. The equivalent dose for a 1 × 1 cm2 skin area was estimated to be 13.2 mSv. The maximum measured dose rate values with a single TLD chip were between 7.5 and 25.1 mGy min-1. The effective dose corresponding to a proposed arsenic/selenium skin measurement was estimated to be 0.13 µSv for a 2 min irradiation.

  1. Determination of half-dose depth in skin for soft x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Kolber, A.B.; Altman, S.M.; Gladstein, A.H.; Buchanan, S.; Marx, J.; Grisewood, E.; Kopf, A.

    1982-09-01

    Unlike superficial x-rays, the soft x-rays normally used in dermatologic practice spare unaffected underlying organs during treatment of cutaneous malignancies. However, since the dose with depth from soft x-rays varies markedly, it is important to know this relationship for optimal therapeutic results. The peak kilovoltage, and thus the energy of the beam, is generally selected so that the dose to the base of the lesion is one-half the surface dose. An absorbed dose of 3,400 rads to the surface and a dose of about one-half this amount to the base of most malignant lesions is one standard protocol for optimal therapeutic results. An accurate value of half-depth dose in skin is therefore necessary and is readily obtained from ordinary half-value layer measurements using the technic described.

  2. Increased Skin Dose With the Use of a Custom Mattress for Prone Breast Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Stewart J. Patel, Rakesh R.; Mackie, Thomas R.

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the loss of buildup to the skin of the breast in the prone position due to 2 different positioning systems during tangential external beam irradiation. Two experiments were performed; one with a standard nylon-covered foam support and another with a novel helium-filled Mylar bag support. The choice of helium-filled Mylar was to reduce the contamination to as low as possible. The experiments were designed to allow a surface dose measurement and a depth dose profile with the pads placed in the path of the beam in front of the detector. All measurements were taken using a Capintec PS-033 thin-window parallel plate ionization chamber. The standard nylon-covered foam pad caused the surface dose to rise as it got closer to the skin. When the pad was directly touching the surface, the surface dose increased by 300% compared to the result when no pad was present. This loss of buildup to the surface was similar to that of a custom bolus material. The opposite effect occurred with the use of the helium-filled Mylar bag, namely the surface dose gradually decreased as the pad got closer to the phantom. When the Mylar pad was directly touching the phantom, the surface dose was decreased by 7% compared to when no pad was present. The use of a foam pad could potentially result in a significant higher dose to the skin, resulting in an enhanced acute skin reaction. Therefore, special care should be taken in this clinical scenario and further investigation of an air- or helium-based mylar support pad should be investigated in the context of definitive breast radiation treatment.

  3. Reduction of Radiation Doses to Patients and Staff During Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Paroutoglou, Georgios; Kapsoritakis, Andreas; Kapatenakis, Anargeyros; Potamianos, Spiros; Vlychou, Marianna; Theodorou, Kiki

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is associated with a considerable radiation exposure for patients and staff. While optimization of the radiation dose is recommended, few studies have been published. The purpose of this study has been to measure patient and staff radiation dose, to estimate the effective dose and radiation risk using digital fluoroscopic images. Entrance skin dose (ESD), organ and effective doses were estimated for patients and staff. Materials and Methods: Fifty-seven patients were studied using digital X-ray machine and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to measure ESD at different body sites. Organ and surface dose to specific radiosensitive organs was carried out. The mean, median, minimum, third quartile and the maximum values are presented due to the asymmetry in data distribution. Results: The mean ESD, exit and thyroid surface dose were estimated to be 75.6 mGy, 3.22 mGy and 0.80 mGy, respectively. The mean effective dose for both gastroenterologist and assistant is 0.01 mSv. The mean patient effective dose was 4.16 mSv, and the cancer risk per procedure was estimated to be 2 × 10-5 Conclusion: ERCP with fluoroscopic technique demonstrate improved dose reduction, compared to the conventional radiographic based technique, reducing the surface dose by a factor of 2, without compromising the diagnostic findings. The radiation absorbed doses to the different organs and effective doses are relatively low. PMID:21196649

  4. Estimating peak skin and eye lens dose from neuroperfusion examinations: Use of Monte Carlo based simulations and comparisons to CTDIvol, AAPM Report No. 111, and ImPACT dosimetry tool values

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Di; Cagnon, Chris H.; Villablanca, J. Pablo; McCollough, Cynthia H.; Cody, Dianna D.; Zankl, Maria; Demarco, John J.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: CT neuroperfusion examinations are capable of delivering high radiation dose to the skin or lens of the eyes of a patient and can possibly cause deterministic radiation injury. The purpose of this study is to: (a) estimate peak skin dose and eye lens dose from CT neuroperfusion examinations based on several voxelized adult patient models of different head size and (b) investigate how well those doses can be approximated by some commonly used CT dose metrics or tools, such as CTDIvol, American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Report No. 111 style peak dose measurements, and the ImPACT organ dose calculator spreadsheet. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation methods were used to estimate peak skin and eye lens dose on voxelized patient models, including GSF's Irene, Frank, Donna, and Golem, on four scanners from the major manufacturers at the widest collimation under all available tube potentials. Doses were reported on a per 100 mAs basis. CTDIvol measurements for a 16 cm CTDI phantom, AAPM Report No. 111 style peak dose measurements, and ImPACT calculations were performed for available scanners at all tube potentials. These were then compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The dose variations across the different voxelized patient models were small. Dependent on the tube potential and scanner and patient model, CTDIvol values overestimated peak skin dose by 26%–65%, and overestimated eye lens dose by 33%–106%, when compared to Monte Carlo simulations. AAPM Report No. 111 style measurements were much closer to peak skin estimates ranging from a 14% underestimate to a 33% overestimate, and with eye lens dose estimates ranging from a 9% underestimate to a 66% overestimate. The ImPACT spreadsheet overestimated eye lens dose by 2%–82% relative to voxelized model simulations. Conclusions: CTDIvol consistently overestimates dose to eye lens and skin. The ImPACT tool also overestimated dose to eye lenses. As such they are still

  5. Patient Satisfaction after Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Maryam M.; Bertenthal, Daniel; Sen, Saunak; Sahay, Anju; Chren, Mary-Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of patient-centered care, but has not been systematically studied after treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most prevalent cancer. Objective To compare patient satisfaction after treatment for NMSC and to determine factors associated with better satisfaction. Methods We prospectively measured patient, tumor and care characteristics in 834 consecutive patients at two centers before and after destruction, excision and Mohs surgery. We evaluated factors associated with short-term and long-term satisfaction. Results In all treatment groups, patients were more satisfied with the interpersonal manners of the staff, communication, and financial aspects of their care, than with the technical quality, time with the clinician, and accessibility of their care (p<0.05). Short-term satisfaction did not differ across treatment groups. In multivariable regression models adjusting for patient, tumor, and care characteristics, higher long-term satisfaction was independently associated with younger age, better pre-treatment mental health and skin-related quality of life, and treatment with Mohs surgery (p<0.05). Conclusions Long-term patient satisfaction after treatment of NMSC is related to pre-treatment patient characteristics (mental health, skin-related quality of life) as well as treatment type (Mohs) but not related to tumor characteristics. These results can guide informed decision-making for treatment of NMSC. PMID:19438672

  6. High and Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation Induce Different Secretome Profiles in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qibin; Matzke, Melissa M.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hu, Zeping; Monroe, Matthew E.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-03-18

    It is postulated that secreted soluble factors are important contributors of bystander effect and adaptive responses observed in low dose ionizing radiation. Using multidimensional liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry based proteomics, we quantified the changes of skin tissue secretome – the proteins secreted from a full thickness, reconstituted 3-dimensional skin tissue model 48 hr after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. Overall, 135 proteins showed statistical significant difference between the sham (0 cGy) and any of the irradiated groups (3, 10 or 200 cGy) on the basis of Dunnett adjusted t-test; among these, 97 proteins showed a trend of downregulation and 9 proteins showed a trend of upregulation with increasing radiation dose. In addition, there were 21 and 8 proteins observed to have irregular trends with the 10 cGy irradiated group either having the highest or the lowest level among all three radiated doses. Moreover, two proteins, carboxypeptidase E and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 were sensitive to ionizing radiation, but relatively independent of radiation dose. Conversely, proteasome activator complex subunit 2 protein appeared to be sensitive to the dose of radiation, as rapid upregulation of this protein was observed when radiation doses were increased from 3, to 10 or 200 cGy. These results suggest that different mechanisms of action exist at the secretome level for low and high doses of ionizing radiation.

  7. Assessment of skin dose for breast chest wall radiotherapy as a function of bolus material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Shu-Hui; Roberson, Peter L.; Chen, Yu; Marsh, Robin B.; Pierce, Lori J.; Moran, Jean M.

    2008-05-01

    Skin dose assessment for chest wall radiotherapy is important to ensure sufficient dose to the surface target volume without excessive skin reaction. This study quantified changes to the surface doses as a function of bolus material for conventional and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) tangential fields. Three types of bolus materials (2 mm solid, 2 mm fine mesh and 3.2 mm large mesh Aquaplast) were compared with Superflab. Surface dose measurements were performed using an Attix parallel plate chamber in a flat solid water phantom at 0°, 45° and 70° incident angles. Over-response correction factors were applied to the Attix chamber results for different incident angles. Surface dose measurements on an anthropomorphic phantom were done using a thermoluminescent dosimeter extrapolation method. Dose characteristics of Superflab and solid Aquaplast were within 2% of solid water material. No significant differences (within 3%) in the surface dose were found between conventional and IMRT tangential techniques. The bolus effect was large for chest wall tangential radiotherapy, with up to an 82% increase using 2 mm fine mesh Aquaplast. The dosimetric effect of different Aquaplast materials has been quantified in this work. These materials can be used to create a custom bolus with potentially better reproducibility of placement.

  8. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    correction factors for the MOSFET organ dose measurements in the following studies. Minor angular dependence (< +/-20% at all angles tested, < +/-10% at clinically relevant angles in cardiac catheterization) was observed. Second, the cardiac dose for common fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was measured. Imaging technique settings with variations of individual key imaging parameters were tested to observe the quantitative effect of imaging optimization or lack thereof. Along with each measurement, the two standard system output indices, the Air Kerma (AK) and Dose-Area Product (DAP), were also recorded and compared to the measured cardiac and skin doses -- the lack of correlation between the indices and the organ doses shed light to the substantial limitation of the indices in representing patient radiation dose, at least within the scope of this dissertation. Third, the effective dose (ED) for Posterior-Anterior and Lateral fluoroscopic imaging techniques for pediatric patients in the two age groups was determined. In addition, the dosimetric effect of removing the anti-scatter grid was studied, for which a factor-of-two ED rate reduction was observed for the imaging techniques. The Clinical Component involved analytical research to develop a validated retrospective cardiac dose reconstruction formulation and to propose the new Optimization Index which evaluates the level of optimization of the clinician's imaging usage during a procedure; and small sample group of actual procedures were used to demonstrate applicability of these formulations. In its entirety, the research represents a first-of-its-kind comprehensive approach in radiation dosimetry for pediatric cardiac catheterization; and separately, it is also modular enough that each individual section can serve as study templates for small-scale dosimetric studies of similar purposes. The data collected and algorithmic formulations developed can be of use in areas of

  9. Dose delivered from Varian's CBCT to patients receiving IMRT for prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ning; Guan, Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Pradhan, Deepak; Nurushev, T.; Li, Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-04-01

    With the increased use of cone beam CT (CBCT) for daily patient setup, the accumulated dose from CBCT may be significantly higher than that from simulation CT or portal imaging. The objective of this work is to measure the dose from daily pelvic scans with fixed technical settings and collimations. CBCT scans were acquired in half-fan mode using a half bowtie and x-rays were delivered in pulsed-fluoro mode. The skin doses for seven prostate patients were measured on an IRB-approved protocol. TLD capsules were placed on the patient's skin at the central axis of three beams: AP, left lateral (Lt Lat) and right lateral (Rt Lat). To avoid the ring artefacts centred in the prostate, the treatment couch was dropped 3 cm from the patient's tattoo (central axis). The measured AP skin doses ranged 3-6 cGy for 20-33 cm separation. The larger the patient size the less the AP skin dose. Lateral doses did not change much with patient size. The Lt Lat dose was ~4.0 cGy, which was ~40% higher than the Rt Lat dose of ~2.6 cGy. To verify this dose asymmetry, surface doses on an IMRT QA phantom (oval shaped, 30 cm × 20 cm) were measured at the same three sites using TLD capsules with 3 cm table-drop. The dose asymmetry was due to: (1) kV source rotation which always starts from the patient's Lt Lat and ends at Lt Lat. Gantry rotation gets much slower near the end of rotation but dose rate stays constant and (2) 370° scan rotation (10° scan overlap on the Lt Lat side). In vivo doses were measured inside a Rando pelvic heterogeneous phantom using TLDs. The left hip (femoral head and neck) received the highest doses of ~10-11 cGy while the right hip received ~6-7 cGy. The surface and in vivo doses were also measured for phantoms at the central-axis setup. The difference was less than ~12% to the table-drop setup.

  10. Dose delivered from Varian's CBCT to patients receiving IMRT for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ning; Guan, Huaiqun; Hammoud, Rabih; Pradhan, Deepak; Nurushev, T; Li, Shidong; Movsas, Benjamin

    2007-04-21

    With the increased use of cone beam CT (CBCT) for daily patient setup, the accumulated dose from CBCT may be significantly higher than that from simulation CT or portal imaging. The objective of this work is to measure the dose from daily pelvic scans with fixed technical settings and collimations. CBCT scans were acquired in half-fan mode using a half bowtie and x-rays were delivered in pulsed-fluoro mode. The skin doses for seven prostate patients were measured on an IRB-approved protocol. TLD capsules were placed on the patient's skin at the central axis of three beams: AP, left lateral (Lt Lat) and right lateral (Rt Lat). To avoid the ring artefacts centred in the prostate, the treatment couch was dropped 3 cm from the patient's tattoo (central axis). The measured AP skin doses ranged 3-6 cGy for 20-33 cm separation. The larger the patient size the less the AP skin dose. Lateral doses did not change much with patient size. The Lt Lat dose was approximately 4.0 cGy, which was approximately 40% higher than the Rt Lat dose of approximately 2.6 cGy. To verify this dose asymmetry, surface doses on an IMRT QA phantom (oval shaped, 30 cm x 20 cm) were measured at the same three sites using TLD capsules with 3 cm table-drop. The dose asymmetry was due to: (1) kV source rotation which always starts from the patient's Lt Lat and ends at Lt Lat. Gantry rotation gets much slower near the end of rotation but dose rate stays constant and (2) 370 degrees scan rotation (10 degrees scan overlap on the Lt Lat side). In vivo doses were measured inside a Rando pelvic heterogeneous phantom using TLDs. The left hip (femoral head and neck) received the highest doses of approximately 10-11 cGy while the right hip received approximately 6-7 cGy. The surface and in vivo doses were also measured for phantoms at the central-axis setup. The difference was less than approximately 12% to the table-drop setup. PMID:17404468

  11. Patient radiation dose audits for fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, Stephen; Rosenstein, Marvin; Miller, Donald L.; Schueler, Beth; Spelic, David

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: Quality management for any use of medical x-ray imaging should include monitoring of radiation dose. Fluoroscopically guided interventional (FGI) procedures are inherently clinically variable and have the potential for inducing deterministic injuries in patients. The use of a conventional diagnostic reference level is not appropriate for FGI procedures. A similar but more detailed quality process for management of radiation dose in FGI procedures is described. Methods: A method that takes into account both the inherent variability of FGI procedures and the risk of deterministic injuries from these procedures is suggested. The substantial radiation dose level (SRDL) is an absolute action level (with regard to patient follow-up) below which skin injury is highly unlikely and above which skin injury is possible. The quality process for FGI procedures collects data from all instances of a given procedure from a number of facilities into an advisory data set (ADS). An individual facility collects a facility data set (FDS) comprised of all instances of the same procedure at that facility. The individual FDS is then compared to the multifacility ADS with regard to the overall shape of the dose distributions and the percent of instances in both the ADS and the FDS that exceed the SRDL. Results: Samples of an ADS and FDS for percutaneous coronary intervention, using the dose metric of reference air kerma (K{sub a,r}) (i.e., the cumulative air kerma at the reference point), are used to illustrate the proposed quality process for FGI procedures. Investigation is warranted whenever the FDS is noticeably different from the ADS for the specific FGI procedure and particularly in two circumstances: (1) When the facility's local median K{sub a,r} exceeds the 75th percentile of the ADS and (2) when the percent of instances where K{sub a,r} exceeds the facility-selected SRDL is greater for the FDS than for the ADS. Conclusions: Analysis of the two data sets (ADS and FDS) and

  12. 'Perfect skin', the media and patients with skin disease: a qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Magin, Parker; Adams, Jon; Heading, Gaynor; Pond, Dimity

    2011-01-01

    The relationship of skin disease with societal ideals of beauty, and the role of the media in this relationship, has not previously been researched. The overall objective of this study was to explore the psychological effects of skin disease. The theme of the ideal of perfect skin and the role of the media in generating this ideal arose via an inductive study methodology and was explored in the context of respondents' psychological morbidity. A qualitative study, 62 semi-structured interviews were conducted with respondents with acne, eczema or psoriasis recruited from both general practice and specialist dermatology practice in an Australian regional city. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis employing a process of constant comparison in which data collection and analysis were cumulative and concurrent. The themes of perfect skin, societal ideals and media influence emerged from this iterative process. Respondents identified a societal ideal of flawless skin, largely mediated by media portrayals of perfection. Failure to meet this ideal precipitated psychological morbidity in female, but not male, respondents. An appreciation of the pervasive pressures of society and media upon females with skin disease may inform management strategies, particularly psychological management strategies, in patients with skin disease. PMID:21645475

  13. Potent response of QS-21 as a vaccine adjuvant in the skin when delivered with the Nanopatch, resulted in adjuvant dose sparing

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Hwee-Ing; Fernando, Germain J. P.; Depelsenaire, Alexandra C. I.; Kendall, Mark A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants play a key role in boosting immunogenicity of vaccines, particularly for subunit protein vaccines. In this study we investigated the induction of antibody response against trivalent influenza subunit protein antigen and a saponin adjuvant, QS-21. Clinical trials of QS-21 have demonstrated the safety but, also a need of high dose for optimal immunity, which could possibly reduce patient acceptability. Here, we proposed the use of a skin delivery technology – the Nanopatch – to reduce both adjuvant and antigen dose but also retain its immune stimulating effects when compared to the conventional needle and syringe intramuscular (IM) delivery. We have demonstrated that Nanopatch delivery to skin requires only 1/100th of the IM antigen dose to induce equivalent humoral response. QS-21 enhanced humoral response in both skin and muscle route. Additionally, Nanopatch has demonstrated 30-fold adjuvant QS-21 dose sparing while retaining immune stimulating effects compared to IM. QS-21 induced localised, controlled cell death in the skin, suggesting that the danger signals released from dead cells contributed to the enhanced immunogenicity. Taken together, these findings demonstrated the suitability of reduced dose of QS-21 and the antigen using the Nanopatch to enhance humoral responses, and the potential to increase patient acceptability of QS-21 adjuvant. PMID:27404789

  14. Potent response of QS-21 as a vaccine adjuvant in the skin when delivered with the Nanopatch, resulted in adjuvant dose sparing.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hwee-Ing; Fernando, Germain J P; Depelsenaire, Alexandra C I; Kendall, Mark A F

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants play a key role in boosting immunogenicity of vaccines, particularly for subunit protein vaccines. In this study we investigated the induction of antibody response against trivalent influenza subunit protein antigen and a saponin adjuvant, QS-21. Clinical trials of QS-21 have demonstrated the safety but, also a need of high dose for optimal immunity, which could possibly reduce patient acceptability. Here, we proposed the use of a skin delivery technology - the Nanopatch - to reduce both adjuvant and antigen dose but also retain its immune stimulating effects when compared to the conventional needle and syringe intramuscular (IM) delivery. We have demonstrated that Nanopatch delivery to skin requires only 1/100(th) of the IM antigen dose to induce equivalent humoral response. QS-21 enhanced humoral response in both skin and muscle route. Additionally, Nanopatch has demonstrated 30-fold adjuvant QS-21 dose sparing while retaining immune stimulating effects compared to IM. QS-21 induced localised, controlled cell death in the skin, suggesting that the danger signals released from dead cells contributed to the enhanced immunogenicity. Taken together, these findings demonstrated the suitability of reduced dose of QS-21 and the antigen using the Nanopatch to enhance humoral responses, and the potential to increase patient acceptability of QS-21 adjuvant. PMID:27404789

  15. Patient doses from CT examinations in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ataç, Gökçe Kaan; Parmaksız, Aydın; İnal, Tolga; Bulur, Emine; Bulgurlu, Figen; Öncü, Tolga; Gündoğdu, Sadi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to establish the first diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for computed tomography (CT) examinations in adult and pediatric patients in Turkey and compare these with international DRLs. METHODS CT performance information and examination parameters (for head, chest, high-resolution CT of the chest [HRCT-chest], abdominal, and pelvic protocols) from 1607 hospitals were collected via a survey. Dose length products and effective doses for standard patient sizes were calculated from the reported volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). RESULTS The median number of protocols reported from the 167 responding hospitals (10% response rate) was 102 across five different age groups. Third quartile CTDIvol values for adult pelvic and all pediatric body protocols were higher than the European Commission standards but were comparable to studies conducted in other countries. CONCLUSION The radiation dose indicators for adult patients were similar to those reported in the literature, except for those associated with head protocols. CT protocol optimization is necessary for adult head and pediatric chest, HRCT-chest, abdominal, and pelvic protocols. The findings from this study are recommended for use as national DRLs in Turkey. PMID:26133189

  16. A spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection map for patient dose evaluation: A new first line patient quality assurance tool

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Weigang; Graff, Pierre; Boettger, Thomas; Pouliot, Jean; and others

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To develop a spatially encoded dose difference maximal intensity projection (DD-MIP) as an online patient dose evaluation tool for visualizing the dose differences between the planning dose and dose on the treatment day. Methods: Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) images acquired on the treatment day are used for generating the dose difference index. Each index is represented by different colors for underdose, acceptable, and overdose regions. A maximal intensity projection (MIP) algorithm is developed to compress all the information of an arbitrary 3D dose difference index into a 2D DD-MIP image. In such an algorithm, a distance transformation is generated based on the planning CT. Then, two new volumes representing the overdose and underdose regions of the dose difference index are encoded with the distance transformation map. The distance-encoded indices of each volume are normalized using the skin distance obtained on the planning CT. After that, two MIPs are generated based on the underdose and overdose volumes with green-to-blue and green-to-red lookup tables, respectively. Finally, the two MIPs are merged with an appropriate transparency level and rendered in planning CT images. Results: The spatially encoded DD-MIP was implemented in a dose-guided radiotherapy prototype and tested on 33 MVCBCT images from six patients. The user can easily establish the threshold for the overdose and underdose. A 3% difference between the treatment and planning dose was used as the threshold in the study; hence, the DD-MIP shows red or blue color for the dose difference >3% or {<=}3%, respectively. With such a method, the overdose and underdose regions can be visualized and distinguished without being overshadowed by superficial dose differences. Conclusions: A DD-MIP algorithm was developed that compresses information from 3D into a single or two orthogonal projections while hinting the user whether the dose difference is on the skin surface or deeper.

  17. Sildenafil attenuates the fibrotic phenotype of skin fibroblasts in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Tomoaki; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Takagi, Kae; Tochimoto, Akiko; Ota, Yuko; Katsumata, Yasuhiro; Ichida, Hisae; Hanaoka, Masanori; Kawasumi, Hidenaga; Tochihara, Mari; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multi-organ fibrotic disease that affects the skin and various internal organs. Therapeutic strategies for tissue fibrosis have not been established; however, aberrantly activated fibroblasts in affected lesions are key targets for modulating fibrosis. Recently, increased intracellular cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels were demonstrated to improve fibrosis levels in various diseases. The purpose of this study was to assess the anti-fibrotic properties of cGMP in cultured fibroblasts from patients with SSc. The phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5 inhibitor sildenafil increased the intracellular cGMP levels in skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. Sildenafil treatment also significantly decreased the expression of several pro-fibrotic factors that were upregulated by TGF-β1 treatment in SSc skin fibroblasts. These inhibitory effects occurred via non-canonical TGF-β signaling. Our findings revealed that sildenafil might be a novel strategy to treat tissue fibrosis and vasculopathy in SSc. PMID:26387628

  18. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  19. A dose-response analysis of skin cancer from inorganic arsenic in drinking water

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.G.; Boyle, K.E.; Chen, C.W.; Gibb, H.J. )

    1989-12-01

    A study of the prevalence of skin cancer among 40,421 persons consuming arsenic-contaminated drinking water in Taiwan was used for a cancer dose-response assessment of ingested arsenic. The numbers of persons at risk over three dose intervals and four exposure durations were estimated from the data in order to apply the method of maximum likelihood to a multistage-Weibull time/dose-response model. A constant exposure level since birth for each of the exposure categories was assumed. It was found that the cumulative hazard increases as a power of three in age, and is linear or quadratic (with a linear coefficient) in dose. Observations from a smaller epidemiologic survey in Mexico were similar to what would be predicted from the model of the Taiwan data. Assuming that the skin cancer risk from ingested arsenic in the American population would also be similar to the Taiwan population, an American male would have a lifetime risk of developing skin cancer of 1.3 x 10(-3) (3.0 x 10(-3)) if exposed to 1 microgram/kg/day for a 76-year lifespan (median lifespan in the U.S.).

  20. Topical review: skin infections in the foot and ankle patient.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Hsu, Jessica W

    2012-07-01

    There are numerous cutaneous disorders that affect the foot, but of these conditions skin infections have the most significant impact on overall patient morbidity and clinical outcome. Skin infections in foot and ankle patients are common, with often devastating consequences if left unrecognized and untreated in both surgical and nonsurgical cases. There is a diverse array of infectious dermatoses that afflict the foot and ankle patient including tinea pedis, onychomycosis, paronychia, pitted keratolysis, verruca, folliculitis, and erysipelas. Prompt diagnosis, treatment, and surveillance of these common infectious conditions are critical in managing these dermatoses that can potentially progress to form deep abscesses and osteomyelitis. Infections can be managed with a combination of ventilated shoewear and synthetic substances to keep the feet dry, topical and oral antimicrobial agents, and patient education regarding preventative hygiene measures. The purpose of this review is to aid foot and ankle surgeons and other physicians in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious dermatoses affecting the foot. PMID:22835400

  1. Low-Dose (10-Gy) Total Skin Electron Beam Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma: An Open Clinical Study and Pooled Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kamstrup, Maria R.; Gniadecki, Robert; Iversen, Lars; Skov, Lone; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Loft, Annika; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs) are dominated by mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary syndrome (SS), and durable disease control is a therapeutic challenge. Standard total skin electron beam therapy (TSEBT) is an effective skin-directed therapy, but the possibility of retreatments is limited to 2 to 3 courses in a lifetime due to skin toxicity. This study aimed to determine the clinical effect of low-dose TSEBT in patients with MF and SS. Methods and Materials: In an open clinical study, 21 patients with MF/SS stages IB to IV were treated with low-dose TSEBT over <2.5 weeks, receiving a total dose of 10 Gy in 10 fractions. Data from 10 of these patients were published previously but were included in the current pooled data analysis. Outcome measures were response rate, duration of response, and toxicity. Results: The overall response rate was 95% with a complete cutaneous response or a very good partial response rate (<1% skin involvement with patches or plaques) documented in 57% of the patients. Median duration of overall cutaneous response was 174 days (5.8 months; range: 60-675 days). TSEBT-related acute adverse events (grade 1 or 2) were observed in 60% of patients. Conclusions: Low-dose (10-Gy) TSEBT offers a high overall response rate and is relatively safe. With this approach, reirradiation at times of relapse or progression is likely to be less toxic than standard dose TSEBT. It remains to be established whether adjuvant and combination treatments can prolong the beneficial effects of low-dose TSEBT.

  2. Estimation of the Dose of Radiation Received by Patient and Physician During a Videofluoroscopic Swallowing Study.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Yoshiaki; Chida, Koichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) is considered the standard diagnostic imaging technique to investigate swallowing disorders and dysphagia. Few studies have been reported concerning the dose of radiation a patient receives and the scattering radiation dose received by a physician during VFSS. In this study, we investigated the dose of radiation (entrance skin dose, ESD) estimated to be received by a patient during VFSS using a human phantom (via a skin-dose monitor sensor placed on the neck of the human phantom). We also investigated the effective dose (ED) and dose equivalent (DE) received by a physician (wearing two personal dosimeters) during an actual patient procedure. One dosimeter (whole body) was worn under a lead apron at the chest, and the other (specially placed to measure doses received by the lens of the eye) outside the lead apron on the neck collar to monitor radiation doses in parts of the body not protected by the lead apron. The ESD for the patient was 7.8 mGy in 5 min. We estimated the average patient dose at 12.79 mGy per VFSS procedure. The physician ED and DE during VFSS were 0.9 mSv/year and 2.3 mSv/year, respectively. The dose of radiation received by the physician in this study was lower than regulatory dose limits. However, in accordance with the principle that radiation exposure should be as low as reasonably achievable, every effort should be made (e.g., wearing lead glasses) to reduce exposure doses. PMID:27318941

  3. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in Croatia: first results.

    PubMed

    Brnić, Z; Krpan, T; Faj, D; Kubelka, D; Ramac, J Popić; Posedel, D; Steiner, R; Vidjak, V; Brnić, V; Visković, K; Baraban, V

    2010-02-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/Euroatom strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm(2), 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm(2), 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD <1 Gy were measured in 72 % and PSD >2 Gy in 8 % of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia. PMID:19880413

  4. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised. PMID:26156930

  5. Measurement of Entrance Skin Dose and Calculation of Effective Dose for Common Diagnostic X-Ray Examinations in Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aliasgharzadeh, Akbar; Mihandoost, Ehsan; Masoumbeigi, Mahboubeh; Salimian, Morteza; Mohseni, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of the radiation dose received by the patient during the radiological examination is essential to prevent risks of exposures. The aim of this work is to study patient doses for common diagnostic radiographic examinations in hospitals affiliated to Kashan University of Medical sciences, Iran. The results of this survey are compared with those published by some national and international values. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was measured based on the exposure parameters used for the actual examination and effective dose (ED) was calculated by use of conversion coefficients calculated by Monte Carlo methods. The mean entrance surface dose and effective dose for examinations of the chest (PA, Lat), abdomen (AP), pelvis (AP), lumbar spine (AP, Lat) and skull (AP, Lat) are 0.37, 0.99, 2.01, 1.76, 2.18, 5.36, 1.39 and 1.01 mGy, and 0.04, 0.1, 0.28, 0,28, 0.23, 0.13, 0.01 and 0.01 mSv, respectively. The ESDs and EDs reported in this study, except for examinations of the chest, are generally lower than comparable reference dose values published in the literature. On the basis of the results obtained in this study can conclude that use of newer equipment and use of the proper radiological parameter can significantly reduce the absorbed dose. It is recommended that radiological parameter in chest examinations be revised. PMID:26156930

  6. Efficacy of a single high dose versus multiple low doses of LLLT on wounded skin fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Denise H.; Abrahamse, Heidi

    2007-07-01

    Background/purpose: In vivo studies have demonstrated that phototherapy accelerates wound healing in the clinical environment; however the exact mechanism is still not completely understood. The main focus of this study was to use in vitro laboratory results to establish an effective treatment regimen that may be practical and applicable to the clinical environment. This in vitro study aimed to compare the cellular responses of wounded fibroblasts following a single exposure of 5 J/cm2 or multiple exposures of low doses (2.5 J/cm2 or 5 J/cm2) on one day of the week to a single application of a higher dose (16 J/cm2) on day 1 and day 4. Methodology: Cellular responses to Helium-Neon (632.8 nm) laser irradiation were evaluated by measuring changes in cell morphology, cell viability, cell proliferation, membrane integrity and DNA damage. Results: Wounded cells exposed to 5 J/cm2 on day 1 and day 4 showed an increase in cell viability, increase in the release of bFGF, increase in cell density, decrease in ALP enzyme activity and decrease in caspase 3/7 activity indicating a stimulatory effect. Wounded cells exposed to three doses of 5 J/cm2 on day 1 showed a decrease in cell viability and cell proliferation and an increase in LDH cytotoxicity and DNA damage indicating an inhibitory effect. Conclusion: Results indicate that cellular responses are influenced by the combination of dose administered, number of exposures and time between exposures. Single doses administered with sufficient time between exposures is more beneficial to restoring cell function than multiple doses within a short period. Although this work confirms previous reports on the cumulative effect of laser irradiation it provides essential information for the initiation of in vivo clinical studies.

  7. Radiologic exposure conditions and resultant skin doses in application of xeroradiography to the orthodontic diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nakasima, A.; Nakata, S.; Shimizu, K.; Takahama, Y.

    1980-12-01

    Xeroradiography is the recording of radiologic image by a photoelectric process rather than the photochemical one used in conventional radiography. In order to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of xeroradiography in the orthodontic field, minimum xeroradiologic exposure conditions for skull projections, joint projections, and hand projections were established by thirteen examiners and the relationship between the image production and x-ray radiation was compared with conventional film techniques. The advantages of xeroradiograph were finer and clear images caused by the edge effect and wide latitude of xeroradiography; the main hazard was the unavoidable larger skin dose required by the projection procedures. The skin doses with xeroradiography were 2.4 to 16.2 times larger than those with conventional film techniques.

  8. Patient doses in interventional cardiology in Bosnia and Herzegovina: first results.

    PubMed

    Beganović, Adnan; Kulić, Mehmed; Spuzić, Muhamed; Gazdić-Santić, Maja; Skopljak-Beganović, Amra; Drljević, Advan; Dzanić, Suad; Basić, Begzada; Lincender, Lidija

    2010-01-01

    Cardiologists at the Cardiac Centre of the Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University performed invasive cardiology procedures in one room equipped with a Siemens Coroskop (Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany) unit with the possibility of digital cine imaging. The number of procedures performed with this unit is 1126 per year. The number of adults performing only diagnostic procedures is 816, therapeutic procedures 62 and both diagnostic and therapeutic 228. Twenty diagnostic examinations but no therapeutic procedure are performed on children per year. The workload is increasing year by year, with an average increase of 26 % per year. The X-ray system does not have a kerma area product (KAP) meter installed; therefore an external KAP meter was mounted on the X-ray tube. Gafchromic dosimetry films (International Specialty Products, Wayne, USA) were placed under the patient to record the skin dose distribution. The peak skin dose (PSD) was calculated from the maximum optical density of the dosimetry films. Dose measurements were performed on 51 patients undergoing therapeutic procedures (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and stent placement). Two patients received doses (KAP) larger than 100 Gycm(2). The PSD was higher than 1 Gy in 3 out of 16 evaluations, and one of these patients received a skin dose >2 Gy. No deterministic skin effects were recorded. The dosimetry results are similar to results reported in other countries. Invasive cardiac procedures deliver high doses to the skin that could cause deterministic effects (erythema). Physicians performing these procedures should be aware of these risks. More efforts should be put into the training of cardiologists in radiation protection. PMID:20223846

  9. Measurement of radiotherapy x-ray skin dose on a chest wall phantom.

    PubMed

    Quach, K Y; Morales, J; Butson, M J; Rosenfeld, A B; Metcalfe, P E

    2000-07-01

    Sufficient skin dose needs to be delivered by a radiotherapy chest wall treatment regimen to ensure the probability of a near surface tumor recurrence is minimized. To simulate a chest wall treatment a hemicylindrical solid water phantom of 7.5 cm radius was irradiated with 6 MV x-rays using 20x20 cm2 and 10x20 cm2 fields at 100 cm source surface distance (SSD) to the base of the phantom. A surface dose profile was obtained from 0 to 180 degrees, in 10 degrees increments around the circumference of the phantom. Dosimetry results obtained from radiochromic film (effective depth of 0.17 mm) were used in the investigation, the superficial doses were found to be 28% (of Dmax) at the 0 degrees beam entry position and 58% at the 90 degrees oblique beam position. Superficial dose results were also obtained using extra thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) (effective depth 0.14 mm) of 30% at 0 degrees, 57% at 90 degrees, and a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) detector (effective depth 0.5 mm) of 43% at 0 degrees, 62% at 90 degrees. Because the differences in measured superficial doses were significant and beyond those related to experimental error, these differences are assumed to be mostly attributable to the effective depth of measurement of each detector. We numerically simulated a bolus on/bolus off technique and found we could increase the coverage to the skin. Using an alternate "bolus on," "bolus off" regimen, the skin would receive 36.8 Gy at 0 degrees incidence and 46.4 Gy at 90 degrees incidence for a prescribed midpoint dose of 50 Gy. From this work it is evident that, as the circumference of the phantom is traversed the SSD increases and hence there is an inverse square fluence fall-off, this is more than offset by the increase in skin dose due to surface curvature to a plateau at about 90 degrees. Beyond this angle it is assumed that beam attenuation through the phantom and inverse square fall-off is causing the surface dose to

  10. Management of skin disease in patients with lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2002-04-01

    Skin disease in patients with lupus erythematosus may be subdivided into two broad categories - those represented by a 'specific' histopathology, the interface dermatitis, and those with changes that are not specific to lupus erythematosus, for example, vasculitis, mucin infiltration, etc. The specific skin lesions that are most common are discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE). Evaluation will allow the treating physician to assign a prognosis. Cutaneous lesions can generally be managed with standard therapies. Patients with discoid LE and subacute cutaneous LE are generally photosensitive, and therefore sunscreens, protective clothing and behavioural alteration should be discussed with all patients. Topical corticosteroids are a standard form of therapy, but 'newer' agents such as retinoids, calcipotriene and tacrolimus might be effective. Antimalarial agents are generally effective. Attempts to reduce or stop smoking may aid in the control of cutaneous LE. The choice of alternative therapy is personal, and discussions of the risks and benefits should be carefully documented. PMID:12041952

  11. Comparison of cutaneous bioavailability of cosmetic preparations containing caffeine or alpha-tocopherol applied on human skin models or human skin ex vivo at finite doses.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Frank; Fouchard, Frédéric; Patouillet, Claire; Andrian, Michèle; Simonnet, Jean-Thierry; Benech-Kieffer, Florence

    2002-01-01

    The use of human skin models for performing cutaneous bioavailability studies has been little investigated. For instance, only few studies have been reported on human skin models dealing with vehicle effects on percutaneous penetration. The present study aimed at evaluating the influence on caffeine's and alpha-tocopherol's cutaneous bioavailability of cosmetic vehicles such as a water-in-oil emulsion, an oil-in-water emulsion, a liposome dispersion and a hydrogel applied at finite dose using the reconstructed human skin models EpiDerm and Episkin. The results were compared with those obtained in human skin ex vivo using similar experimental conditions. It was demonstrated that the rank order of solute permeability could be correctly predicted when the preparation was applied at a finite dose in human skin models, at least when solutes with far different physicochemical properties such as caffeine and alpha-tocopherol were used. If only slight effects of cosmetic vehicle on skin bioavailability were observed in human skin ex vivo, they were less predictable using skin models. Especially, alcohol-containing vehicles seemed to behave differently in EpiDerm as well as in Episkin than on human skin ex vivo. Stratum corneum intercellular lipid composition and organization of human skin models differ to some extent from that of human stratum corneum ex vivo, which contributes to less pronounced barrier properties, together with the increased hydration of the outermost stratum corneum layers of the models. These features, as well as still unknown factors, may explain the differences observed in vehicle effects in human skin ex vivo versus human skin models. PMID:12476008

  12. Estimated UV doses to psoriasis patients during climate therapy at Gran Canaria in March 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, L. T. N.; Søyland, E.; Krogstad, A. L.

    2008-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease involving about 2-3% of the Norwegian population. Sun exposure has a positive effect on most psoriasis lesions, but ultraviolet (UV) radiation also causes a direct DNA damage in the skin cells and comprises a carcinogenic potential. UV exposure on the skin causes a local as well as a systemic immune suppressive effect, but the relation between sun exposure and these biological effects is not well known. In March 2006 a study was carried out to investigate possible therapeutic outcome mechanisms in 20 psoriasis patients receiving climate therapy at Gran Canaria. This paper presents estimates of their individual skin UV-doses based on UV measurements and the patients' diaries with information on time spent in the sun. On the first day of exposure the patients received on average 5.1 Standard Erythema Doses (SED: median=4.0 SED, range 2.6-10.3 SED) estimated to the skin. During the 15 days study they received 165.8 SED (range 104.3-210.1 SED). The reduction in PASI score was 72.8% on average, but there was no obvious relation between the improvement and the UV dose. The UV doses were higher than those found from climate therapy studies at other locations. It seems beneficial to use more strict exposure schedules that consider the available UV irradiance, depending on time of the day, time of the year and weather conditions.

  13. Fluence to local skin absorbed dose and dose equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic positrons using Monte-Carlo code MCNP6.

    PubMed

    Bourgois, L; Antoni, R

    2016-01-01

    Conversion coefficients fluence to local skin equivalent dose, as introduced in ICRP Publication 116, 2010, are calculated for positrons of energies ranging from 10 keV to 10 MeV using the code MCNP6. Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients H'(0.07,0°)/Φ are calculated for positrons of energy ranging between 20 keV and 10 MeV. A comparison between operational dose quantity H'(0.07,0°) and the Local-Skin equivalent Dose shows an overall good agreement between these two quantities, except between 60 keV and 100 keV. PMID:26623930

  14. Persistent DNA Damage after High Dose In Vivo Gamma Exposure of Minipig Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad A.; Agay, Diane; Schrock, Gerrit; Drouet, Michel; Meineke, Viktor; Scherthan, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation (IR) can lead to localized radiation injury of the skin and exposed cells suffer dsDNA breaks that may elicit cell death or stochastic changes. Little is known about the DNA damage response after high-dose exposure of the skin. Here, we investigate the cellular and DNA damage response in acutely irradiated minipig skin. Methods and Findings IR-induced DNA damage, repair and cellular survival were studied in 15 cm2 of minipig skin exposed in vivo to ∼50 Co-60 γ rays. Skin biopsies of control and 4 h up to 96 days post exposure were investigated for radiation-induced foci (RIF) formation using γ-H2AX, 53BP1, and active ATM-p immunofluorescence. High-dose IR induced massive γ-H2AX phosphorylation and high 53BP1 RIF numbers 4 h, 20 h after IR. As time progressed RIF numbers dropped to a low of <1% of keratinocytes at 28–70 days. The latter contained large RIFs that included ATM-p, indicating the accumulation of complex DNA damage. At 96 days most of the cells with RIFs had disappeared. The frequency of active-caspase-3-positive apoptotic cells was 17-fold increased 3 days after IR and remained >3-fold elevated at all subsequent time points. Replicating basal cells (Ki67+) were reduced 3 days post IR followed by increased proliferation and recovery of epidermal cellularity after 28 days. Conclusions Acute high dose irradiation of minipig epidermis impaired stem cell replication and induced elevated apoptosis from 3 days onward. DNA repair cleared the high numbers of DBSs in skin cells, while RIFs that persisted in <1% cells marked complex and potentially lethal DNA damage up to several weeks after exposure. An elevated frequency of keratinocytes with persistent RIFs may thus serve as indicator of previous acute radiation exposure, which may be useful in the follow up of nuclear or radiological accident scenarios. PMID:22761813

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hengel, Shawna; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Waters, Katrina M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2014-07-29

    To assess molecular responses to low doses of radiation that may be encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents, or terrorist acts, a quantitative global proteomic approach was used to identify protein alterations in a reconstituted human skin tissue treated with 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and provide insight on radiation induced alterations in protein abundance and localization. In addition, peptides were post-fractionated using high resolution 2-dimensional liquid chromatography to increase the dynamic range of detection of protein abundance and translocation changes. Quantitative data was obtained by labeling peptides with 8-plex isobaric iTRAQ tags. A total of 207 proteins were detected with statistically significant alterations in abundance and/or subcellular localization compared to sham irradiated tissues. Bioinformatics analysis of the data indicated that the top canonical pathways affected by low dose radiation are related to cellular metabolism. Among the proteins showing alterations in abundance, localization and proteolytic processing was the skin barrier protein filaggrin which is consistent with our previous observation that ionizing radiation alters profilaggrin processing with potential effects on skin barrier functions. In addition, a large number of proteases and protease regulators were affected by low dose radiation exposure indicating that altered proteolytic activity may be a hallmark of low dose radiation exposure. While several studies have demonstrated altered transcriptional regulation occurs following low dose radiation exposures, the data presented here indicates post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization, and proteolytic processing play an important role in regulating radiation responses in complex human tissues.

  16. Functional and morphological changes in pig skin after single or fractionated doses in x rays

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.M.A.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1982-09-01

    The flank skin of pigs has been treated with either single or fractionated doses of x-irradiation. A single dose (2070 cGy) was compared with treatment given as 6 fractions in 18 days (6f/18 days; 3780 cGy) or 30 fractions in 39 days (30f/39 days; 8000 cGy). The doses were selected on the basis that similar levels of late tissue damage would result. Radiation induced changes in the skin were assessed by observing the skin reactions and by the measurement of isotope clearance (functional study), relative field contraction, dermal and epidermal thickness and dermal vascular density (morphological studies). In the three treatment groups the early radiation reaction varied considerably. In the first wave reaction (3 to 6 weeks after treatment) bright red erythema was recorded in many fields but moist desquamation developed only in the 30f/39 days treatment group. The second wave (10-16 weeks) was characterized by an ischemic mauve/dusky reaction. Dermal necrosis developed in 50% of the single dose fields. In the 30f/39 days regimen persistent moist desquamation progressed to dermal necrosis. Neither desquamation nor necrosis developed after 6f/18 days. Different levels of vascular damage in the dermis were assessed using an isotope clearance technique; for example in the early reaction significant changes were recorded in the papillary dermis (faster clearance) prior to the development of moist desquamation (30f/39 days) and in the reticular dermis (slower clearance) before necrosis (single dose). Changes in clearance rates have been correlated with changes in the vascular density and thickness of the dermis. Between 26 and 52 weeks (the late reaction) relative field contraction was slightly greater in the 30f/39 days group than in the other treatment groups.

  17. The effective dose equivalent and effective dose for hot particles on the skin.

    PubMed

    Xu, X George

    2005-07-01

    Whole body exposure from photon-emitting hot particles is a relatively new problem. Until recently, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required the use of deep dose equivalent (DDE) to estimate and report whole body exposures from hot particles. In this study, effective dose equivalent (EDE) and effective dose (ED) were calculated for point sources with photon energies between 0.1 MeV to 2.0 MeV for 74 locations covering the entire body surface, using the MCNP code and the MIRD-type stylized phantoms. Tabulated data show that the sources located near the upper chest and the lower waist have the highest EDE and ED, while sources near the top of head and feet yielded the smallest. The calculated DDE values are much higher than the EDE values. For an exposure of 75 microCi h(-1) to a 60Co source located at the center upper chest area, the EDE is 36.5 microSv (3.65 mrem), which is a factor of 240 smaller than the corresponding DDE. EDE and ED data are tabulated for quick reference by users in nuclear power plants. PMID:15951692

  18. SU-E-T-233: Modeling Linac Couch Effects On Attenuation and Skin Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, L; Halvorsen, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Treatment couch tops in medical LINAC rooms lead to attenuation to beams penetrating them, plus higher skin dose which can become a significant concern with the high fraction doses associated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy. This work measures the attenuation and shallow depth dose due to a BrainLab couch, and studies the modeling of the couch top in our treatment planning system (TPS) as a uniform solid material with homogeneous density. Methods: LINAC photon beams of size 10×10 cm and nominal energy 6 MV were irradiated from different gantry angles on a stack of solid water. Depth dose were measured with two types of parallel plate chambers, MPPK and Markus. In the Philips Pinnacle TPS, the couch was modeled as a slab with varying thickness and density. A digital phantom of size 30×30×10 cm with density 1 g/cc was created to simulate the measurement setup. Both the attenuation and skin dose effects due to the couch were studied. Results: An orthogonal attenuation rate of 3.2% was observed with both chamber measurements. The attenuation can be modeled by couch models of varying thicknesses. Once the orthogonal attenuation was modeled well, the oblique beam attenuation in TPS agreed with measurement within 1.5%. The depth dose at shallow depth (0.5 cm) was also shown to be modeled correctly within 1.5% of the measurement using a 12 mm thick couch model with density of 0.9 g/cc. Agreement between calculation and measurement diverges at very shallow depths (≤1 mm) but remains acceptable (<5%) with the aforementioned couch model parameters. Conclusion: Modeling the couch top as a uniform solid in a treatment planning system can predict both the attenuation and surface dose simultaneously well within clinical tolerance in the same model.

  19. Hair loss in patients with skin of color.

    PubMed

    Semble, Ashley L; McMichael, Amy J

    2015-06-01

    Hair loss in skin of color patients can vary from the very simplest of diagnoses to a unique diagnostic challenge requiring extensive knowledge of historical symptoms, haircare practices, and previous treatments. There are several disorders in the literature that are noted to be more common in patients of African descent as compared to Caucasian populations. These disorders include central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, dissecting cellulitis, discoid lesions of lupus erythematosus, traction alopecia, seborrheic dermatitis, and hair breakage. While there is no definitive prevalence data for the various forms of hair loss in the skin of color population, it is clear that these disorders are a concern for many patients in this population along with common hair loss concerns, such as telogen effluvium and pattern hair loss. A careful detailed clinical examination, history, and potential histopathology will guide the clinician to appropriate management. Hair disorders in skin of color patients may present unique challenges to the clinician, and knowledge of accurate clinical presentation and treatment approaches is essential to providing quality care. PMID:26176285

  20. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-2, MIP-1α, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-γ, MIP-1α, TNF α, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1α, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  1. Patient doses in {gamma}-intracoronary radiotherapy: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thierens, Hubert . E-mail: hubert.thierens@Ughent.be; Reynaert, Nick; Bacher, Klaus; Eijkeren, Marc van; Taeymans, Yves

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To determine accurately the radiation burden of both patients and staff from intracoronary radiotherapy (IRT) with {sup 192}Ir and to investigate the importance of IRT in the patient dose compared with interventional X-rays. Methods and materials: The Radiation Burden Assessment Study (RABAS) population consisted of 9 patients undergoing {gamma}-IRT after percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty and 14 patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty only as the control group. For each patient, the dose to the organs and tissues from the internal and external exposure was determined in detail by Monte Carlo N-particle simulations. Patient skin dose measurements with thermoluminescence dosimeters served as verification. Staff dosimetry was performed with electronic dosimeters, thermoluminescence dosimeters, and double film badge dosimetry. Results: With respect to the patient dose from IRT, the critical organs are the thymus (58 mGy), lungs (31 mGy), and esophagus (27 mGy). The mean effective dose from IRT was 8 mSv. The effective dose values from interventional X-rays showed a broad range (2-28 mSv), with mean values of 8 mSv for the IRT patients and 13 mSv for the control group. The mean dose received by the radiotherapist from IRT was 4 {mu}Sv/treatment. The doses to the other staff members were completely negligible. Conclusion: Our results have shown that the patient and personnel doses in {gamma}-IRT remain at an acceptable level. The patient dose from IRT was within the variations in dose from the accompanying interventional X-rays.

  2. Weight-based antibiotic dosing in a real-world European study of complicated skin and soft-tissue infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lawson, W; Nathwani, D; Eckmann, C; Corman, S; Stephens, J; Solem, C; Macahilig, C; Li, J; Baillon-Plot, N; Charbonneau, C; Haider, S

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to characterize real-world dosing of weight-based intravenous (IV) antibiotic therapy in patients hospitalized for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTIs). This was a subgroup analysis of a retrospective chart review that captured data from 12 European countries. The study included patients ≥18 years old, hospitalized with an MRSA cSSTI between 1 July 2010 and 30 June 2011 and discharged alive by 31 July 2011. Patients treated with IV vancomycin, teicoplanin or daptomycin at any stage during hospitalization were included in this analysis. Analyses were conducted at the regimen level (dosing in mg/kg or in mg, frequency, and total daily dose (TDD)), with potentially multiple regimens per patient, and the patient level, categorizing patients into low, standard (labelled) and high dosing groups according to their initial MRSA-targeted regimen. Among the 1502 patients in the parent study, 998 patients contributed a total of 1050 daptomycin, teicoplanin or vancomycin regimens. Across all regimens, the mean initial TDDs were 6.3 ± 1.9 mg/kg for daptomycin, 10.5 ± 4.9 mg/kg for teicoplanin and 28.5 ± 11.5 mg/kg for vancomycin. A total of 789 patients received first-line therapy with one of the above antibiotics. The majority of patients receiving first-line teicoplanin and daptomycin (96% and 80%, respectively) received higher than labelled cSSTI doses, whereas vancomycin doses were lower than labelled doses in >40% of patients. These real-world data reveal significant deviation from labelled antibiotic dosing in 12 European countries and the potential for suboptimal outcomes in patients with MRSA cSSTIs. PMID:26206621

  3. Evaluation of selenium in biological sample of arsenic exposed female skin lesions and skin cancer patients with related to non-exposed skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kolachi, Nida F; Kazi, Tasneem G; Wadhwa, Sham K; Afridi, Hassan I; Baig, Jameel A; Khan, Sumaira; Shah, Faheem

    2011-08-01

    The antagonistic effects between selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) suggest that low Se status plays an important role in arsenism development. The objective of present study was to assess Se contents in biological samples of As exposed females have skin lesions and cancer with related to non-exposed skin cancer patients. The biological samples (blood and scalp hair) of As exposed group comprises, female skin cancer (ESC) patients admitted in cancer hospitals have skin lesions (ESL) and exposed referents have not both diseases (ER), belongs to As exposed area of Pakistan. For comparative purposes, age matched female skin cancerous patient (RP) and non-cancerous females (NER) belong to non-exposed areas were also selected. The As and Se in acid digests of biological samples were pre-concentrated by complexing with chelating agent (ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate), and resulted complexes were extracted into non-ionic extractant (Triton X-114), prior to analysis by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The enhancement factor of about 25 was obtained by pre-concentrating 10 mL of sample solutions. The accuracy of the optimized procedure was evaluated by using certified reference material (BCR 397) with certified values for Se and As and standard addition method at three concentration levels in real samples. No significant differences was observed (p>0.05) when comparing the values obtained by the proposed method, added and certified values of both elements. The biological samples of ESC patients had 2-3 folds higher As and lower Se levels as compared to RP (p<0.001). Understudied exposed referents have high level of As and lower Se contents as compared to referents subjects of non-exposed area (p<0.01). The higher concentration of As and lower levels of Se in biological samples of cancerous patients are consisted with reported studies. PMID:21624640

  4. High dose intravenous ciprofloxacin in febrile neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P R; Yin, J A; Tooth, J A

    1990-12-01

    We have evaluated the use of high-dose intravenous ciprofloxacin as monotherapy in the empirical therapy of febrile episodes in neutropenic patients during the course of a randomized trial comparing ciprofloxacin with a standard combination regimen. Sixty-four episodes of fever were studied in a high risk population of 42 patients mostly undergoing intensive chemotherapy for leukaemia. Ciprofloxacin achieved clinical responses as follows: completely successful in 39%, partially successful in 20%, and unsuccessful in 41%. Infections were microbiologically documented in 37 (58%), with Gram-positive bacteria (of which 37% were coagulase negative staphylococci and 34% were streptococci) accounting for 81% of all organisms cultured. Responses in documented infections were as follows; completely successful in 32%, partially successful in 27%, and unsuccessful in 41%. One infection-related death occurred 30 h after starting ciprofloxacin, and a further three patients died before the resolution of neutropenia. The early death was caused by fulminant infection with a ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No other ciprofloxacin resistance was seen amongst eight Gram-negative isolates. There was no evidence of emerging ciprofloxacin resistance during the course of the study. Ciprofloxacin was associated with a low incidence of adverse events with skin rash (five cases) and nausea (one case) being reported as possibly or probably related to ciprofloxacin. We conclude that high-dose intravenous ciprofloxacin may be safely employed as monotherapy in the empirical treatment of febrile episodes in neutropenic patients. It has the additional advantages of twice daily administration, the availability of intravenous and oral presentations, and absence of cross-allergy in beta-lactam antibiotic hypersensitive patients. PMID:2292537

  5. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation reverses skin fibrosis but does not change skin vessel density in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Daikeler, T; Kump, E; Stern, M; Hügle, T; Hij, A; Haeuserman, P; Farge, D

    2015-09-01

    Hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) improves survival in patients with severe systemic sclerosis (SSc) by resetting the immune system. We studied how HSCT acts on the key SSc skin pathology findings (fibrosis and vascularization). In mean, 3 skin punch biopsies per patient (range 2-6) were analyzed from 13 patients (5 females) with severe diffuse SSc before and up to 96 months after HSCT. Fibrosis of the four skin layers was graded semi-quantitatively and an overall fibrosis score was then calculated. Vessel numbers and calibers were assessed in the superficial and deeper dermis after immune-staining for endothelial antigens (CD31, VE-cadherin and vWF). The median age of patients at HSCT was 47 (24-64) years. The overall median modified Rodnan skin score decreased from 24 to 10 (P=0.003) at first follow-up within a median of 9 (6-36) months after HSCT as did the histological skin score (P=0.03). The modified Rodnan skin score and the fibrosis score correlated positively (r=0.589, P<0.001). The vessels density did not significantly change after HSCT nor did the expression of the tested endothelial markers. Although improving skin fibrosis in patients with SSc, HSCT does not alter vessel density within skin biopsies. PMID:26300240

  6. Dose-survival relationship for epithelial cells of human skin after multifraction irradiation: evaluation by a quantitative method in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, G.; Mauro, F.; Nervi, C.; Withers, H.R.

    1980-07-01

    The dose-survival relationship for normal epithelial cells after single and fractionated radiation exposures has been established by Withers for the mouse, but it is not available for humans according to a strict criterion for survival of single cell reproductive integrity. In an attempt to obtain such a quantitative estimation, 2 patients requiring radical radiation therapy to the chest wall were treated according to particular Multiple Daily Fractionation (MDF) protocols: i) 250 + 150 + 150 rad/day, 4 hr interval, 5 days/week; and ii) 150 + 150 + 150 + 150 rad/day, 3.5 hr interval, 5 days/week. In both cases, different strips of skin received different total doses: 6300, 6850, and 7150 rad, and 6300, 6750, and 7200 rad, respectively. In case (i), moist desquamation appeared and thereafter repopulating colonies of epithelium could be recognized and counted. Using these counts a survival curve having a D/sub o/ value of 490 +- 150 rad was estimated according to the formula proposed by Withers. In case (ii), no moist desquamation was reached at the doses delivered. The difference observed may imply that the initial region of the survival curve deviates appreciably from exponential between doses of 150 and 250 rad. If such is the case, a /sub 1/D/sub o/ value of 490 rad may represent an underestimate. These results are discussed from the point of view of both the shape of the survival curve and the effectiveness of nonconventional fractionation courses.

  7. [Expression of bioinformatically identified genes in skin of psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    Sobolev, V V; Nikol'skaia, T A; Zolotarenko, A D; Piruzian, E S; Bruskin, S A

    2013-10-01

    Gene expression analysis for EPHA2 (EPH receptor A2), EPHB2 (EPH receptor B2), S100A9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9), PBEF(nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase), LILRB2 (leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B (with TM and ITIM domains), member 2), PLAUR (plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor), LTB (lymphotoxin beta (TNF superfamily, member 3)), WNT5A (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A) has been conducted using real-time polymerase chain reaction in specimens affected by psoriasis versus visually intact skin in 18 patients. It was revealed that the expression of the nine examined genes was upregulated in the affected by psoriasis compared to visually intact skin specimens. The highest expression was observed for S100A9, S100AS, PBEF, WNT5A2, and EPHB2 genes. S100A9 and S100A8 gene expression in the affected by psoriasis skin was 100-fold higher versus visually intact skin while PBEF, WNT5A, and EPHB2 gene expression was upregulated more than five-fold. We suggested that the high expression of these genes might be associated with the state of the pathological process in psoriasis. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of these genes might serve a molecular indicator of the efficacy of treatment in psoriasis. PMID:25474898

  8. [Expression of bioinformatically identified genes in skin of psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Gene expression analysis for EPHA2 (EPH receptor A2), EPHB2 (EPH receptor B2), S100A9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9), PBEF(nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase), LILRB2 (leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B (with TM and ITIM domains), member 2), PLAUR (plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor), LTB (lymphotoxin beta (TNF superfamily, member 3)), WNT5A (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A) has been conducted using real-time polymerase chain reaction in specimens affected by psoriasis versus visually intact skin in 18 patients. It was revealed that the expression of the nine examined genes was upregulated in the affected by psoriasis compared to visually intact skin specimens. The highest expression was observed for S100A9, S100AS, PBEF, WNT5A2, and EPHB2 genes. S100A9 and S100A8 gene expression in the affected by psoriasis skin was 100-fold higher versus visually intact skin while PBEF, WNT5A, and EPHB2 gene expression was upregulated more than five-fold. We suggested that the high expression of these genes might be associated with the state of the pathological process in psoriasis. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of these genes might serve a molecular indicator of the efficacy of treatment in psoriasis. PMID:25508677

  9. Patient and staff doses for some complex x-ray examinations.

    PubMed

    Olgar, T; Bor, D; Berkmen, G; Yazar, T

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to measure patient and staff doses simultaneously for some complex x-ray examinations. Measurements of dose-area product (DAP) and entrance skin dose (ESD) were carried out in a sample of 107 adult patients who underwent different x-ray examinations such as double contrast barium enema (DCBE), single contrast barium enema (SCBE), barium swallow, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography (PTC), and various orthopaedic surgical procedures. Dose measurements were made separately for each projection, and DAP, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD), film dosimetry and tube output measurement techniques were used. Staff doses were measured simultaneously with patient doses for these examinations, with the exception of barium procedures. The measured mean DAP values were found to be 8.33, 90.24, 79.96 Gy cm(2) for barium swallow, SCBE and DCBE procedures with the fluoroscopy times of 3.1, 4.43 and 5.86 min, respectively. The calculated mean DAP was 26.33 Gy cm(2) for diagnostic and 89.76 Gy cm(2) therapeutic ERCP examinations with the average fluoroscopy times of 1.9 and 5.06 min respectively. Similarly, the calculated mean DAP was 97.53 Gy cm(2) with a corresponding fluoroscopy time of 6.1 min for PTC studies. The calculated mean entrance skin dose (ESD) was 172 mGy for the orthopaedic surgical studies. Maximum skin doses were measured as 324, 891, 1218, 750, 819 and 1397 mGy for barium swallow, SCBE, DCBE, ERCP, PTC and orthopaedic surgical procedures, respectively. The high number of radiographs taken during barium enema examinations, and the high x-ray outputs of the fluoroscopic units used in ERCP, were the main reasons for high doses, and some corrective actions were immediately taken. PMID:19690354

  10. Patient-specific organ dose estimation during transcatheter arterial embolization using Monte Carlo method and adaptive organ segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hui-Yu; Lin, Yung-Chieh; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate organ doses for individual patients undergoing interventional transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using measurement-based Monte Carlo simulation and adaptive organ segmentation. Five patients were enrolled in this study after institutional ethical approval and informed consent. Gafchromic XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface dose to reconstruct the nonuniform fluence distribution field as the input data in the Monte Carlo simulation. XR-RV3 films were used to measure entrance surface doses due to their lower energy dependence compared with that of XR-RV2 films. To calculate organ doses, each patient's three-dimensional dose distribution was incorporated into CT DICOM images with image segmentation using thresholding and k-means clustering. Organ doses for all patients were estimated. Our dose evaluation system not only evaluated entrance surface doses based on measurements, but also evaluated the 3D dose distribution within patients using simulations. When film measurements were unavailable, the peak skin dose (between 0.68 and 0.82 of a fraction of the cumulative dose) can be calculated from the cumulative dose obtained from TAE dose reports. Successful implementation of this dose evaluation system will aid radiologists and technologists in determining the actual dose distributions within patients undergoing TAE.

  11. Patient dose, gray level and exposure index with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, T. R.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing conventional screen-film system in Brazil. To assess image quality, manufactures provide the calculation of an exposure index through the acquisition software of the CR system. The objective of this study is to verify if the CR image can be used as an evaluator of patient absorbed dose too, through a relationship between the entrance skin dose and the exposure index or the gray level values obtained in the image. The CR system used for this study (Agfa model 30-X with NX acquisition software) calculates an exposure index called Log of the Median (lgM), related to the absorbed dose to the IP. The lgM value depends on the average gray level (called Scan Average Level (SAL)) of the segmented pixel value histogram of the whole image. A Rando male phantom was used to simulate a human body (chest and head), and was irradiated with an X-ray equipment, using usual radiologic techniques for chest exams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF, TLD100) were used to evaluate entrance skin dose and exit dose. The results showed a logarithm relation between entrance dose and SAL in the image center, regardless of the beam filtration. The exposure index varies linearly with the entrance dose, but the angular coefficient is beam quality dependent. We conclude that, with an adequate calibration, the CR system can be used to evaluate the patient absorbed dose.

  12. The maximal cumulative solar UVB dose allowed to maintain healthy and young skin and prevent premature photoaging.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Masamitsu; Ando, Hideya

    2014-10-01

    The young facial skin of children with a smooth healthy appearance changes over time to photoaged skin having mottled pigmentation, solar lentigines, wrinkles, dry and rough skin, leathery texture, and benign and malignant tumors after exposure to chronic, repeated solar radiation. The first sign of photoaging in Japanese subjects is usually solar lentigines appearing around 20 years of age on the face. Fine wrinkles can then appear after 30 years of age, and benign skin tumors, seborrhoeic keratoses, can occur after 35 years of age in sun-exposed skin. We theoretically calculated the maximal daily exposure time to solar radiation, which could prevent the development of photoaged skin until 60 and 80 years of age, based on published data of personal solar UVB doses in sun-exposed skin. One MED (minimal erythema dose) was determined to be 20 mJ/cm(2) , and 200 MED was used as the average yearly dose of Japanese children. Further, we hypothesized that the annual dose of Japanese adults is the same as that of the children. The cumulative UVB dose at 20 years of age was thus calculated to be 4000 MED, and 22 MED was used as the maximal daily UVB dose based on data measured in Kobe, located in the central area of Japan. We used the solar UVB dose from 10:00 a.m. to 14:00 p.m. which occupies 60% of the total daily UV dose, to obtain the maximal UVB per hour in a day, and calculated the maximal daily UV exposure time that would delay the onset of solar lentigines until 60 or 80 years of age. The mean daily sun exposure time to maintain healthy skin until 80 years of age in the summer was calculated to be 2.54 min (0.14 MED) for unprotected skin and 127 min with the use of a sunscreen of SPF (sun protection factor) of 50. In this study, we did not evaluate the photoaging effect of UVA radiation, but findings of the adverse effects of UVA radiation on the skin have accumulated in the last decade. Therefore, it will be important to estimate the maximal dose of solar

  13. Patient-specific Monte Carlo dose calculations for 103Pd breast brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miksys, N.; Cygler, J. E.; Caudrelier, J. M.; Thomson, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    This work retrospectively investigates patient-specific Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations for 103Pd permanent implant breast brachytherapy, exploring various necessary assumptions for deriving virtual patient models: post-implant CT image metallic artifact reduction (MAR), tissue assignment schemes (TAS), and elemental tissue compositions. Three MAR methods (thresholding, 3D median filter, virtual sinogram) are applied to CT images; resulting images are compared to each other and to uncorrected images. Virtual patient models are then derived by application of different TAS ranging from TG-186 basic recommendations (mixed adipose and gland tissue at uniform literature-derived density) to detailed schemes (segmented adipose and gland with CT-derived densities). For detailed schemes, alternate mass density segmentation thresholds between adipose and gland are considered. Several literature-derived elemental compositions for adipose, gland and skin are compared. MC models derived from uncorrected CT images can yield large errors in dose calculations especially when used with detailed TAS. Differences in MAR method result in large differences in local doses when variations in CT number cause differences in tissue assignment. Between different MAR models (same TAS), PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} each vary by up to 6%. Basic TAS (mixed adipose/gland tissue) generally yield higher dose metrics than detailed segmented schemes: PTV {{D}90} and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} are higher by up to 13% and 9% respectively. Employing alternate adipose, gland and skin elemental compositions can cause variations in PTV {{D}90} of up to 11% and skin {{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} of up to 30%. Overall, AAPM TG-43 overestimates dose to the PTV ({{D}90} on average 10% and up to 27%) and underestimates dose to the skin ({{D}1~\\text{c{{\\text{m}}3}}} on average 29% and up to 48%) compared to the various MC models derived using the post-MAR CT images studied

  14. SU-E-I-22: Dependence On Calibration Phantom and Field Area of the Conversion Factor Used to Calculate Skin Dose During Neuro-Interventional Fluoroscopic Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, V K; Vijayan, S; Rudin, S R; Bednarek, D R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the appropriate calibration factor to use when calculating skin dose with our real-time dose-tracking system (DTS) during neuro-interventional fluoroscopic procedures by evaluating the difference in backscatter from different phantoms and as a function of entrance-skin field area. Methods: We developed a dose-tracking system to calculate and graphically display the cumulative skin-dose distribution in real time. To calibrate the DTS for neuro-interventional procedures, a phantom is needed that closely approximates the scattering properties of the head. We compared the x-ray backscatter from eight phantoms: 20-cm-thick solid water, 16-cm diameter water-filled container, 16-cm CTDI phantom, modified-ANSI head phantom, 20-cm-thick PMMA, Kyoto-Kagaku PBU- 50 head, Phantom-Labs SK-150 head, and RSD RS-240T head. The phantoms were placed on the patient table with the entrance surface at 15 cm tube-side from the isocenter of a Toshiba Infinix C-arm, and the entrance-skin exposure was measured with a calibrated 6-cc PTW ionization chamber. The measurement included primary radiation, backscatter from the phantom and forward scatter from the table and pad. The variation in entrance-skin exposure was also measured as a function of the skin-entrance area for a 30x30 cm by 20-cm-thick PMMA phantom and the SK-150 head phantom using four different added beam filters. Results: The entranceskin exposure values measured for eight different phantoms differed by up to 12%, while the ratio of entrance exposure of all phantoms relative to solid water showed less than 3% variation with kVp. The change in entrance-skin exposure with entrance-skin area was found to differ for the SK-150 head compared to the 20-cm PMMA phantom and the variation with field area was dependent on the added beam filtration. Conclusion: To accurately calculate skin dose for neuro-interventional procedures with the DTS, the phantom for calibration should be carefully chosen since different

  15. Evaluation of two-dimensional bolus effect of immobilization/support devices on skin doses: A radiochromic EBT film dosimetry study in phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu-Tsao, Sou-Tung; Chan, Maria F.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors have quantified the two-dimensional (2D) perspective of skin dose increase using EBT film dosimetry in phantom in the presence of patient immobilization devices during conventional and IMRT treatments. Methods: For 6 MV conventional photon field, the authors evaluated and quantified the 2D bolus effect on skin doses for six different common patient immobilization/support devices, including carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, Orfit carbon fiber base plate, balsa wood board, Styrofoam, perforated AquaPlast sheet, and alpha-cradle. For 6 and 15 MV IMRT fields, a stack of two film layers positioned above a solid phantom was exposed at the air interface or in the presence of a patient alpha-cradle. All the films were scanned and the pixel values were converted to doses based on an established calibration curve. The authors determined the 2D skin dose distributions, isodose curves, and cross-sectional profiles at the surface layers with or without the immobilization/support device. The authors also generated and compared the dose area histograms (DAHs) and dose area products from the 2D skin dose distributions. Results: In contrast with 20% relative dose [(RD) dose relative to d{sub max} on central axis] at 0.0153 cm in the film layer for 6 MV 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, the average RDs at the same depth in the film layer were 71%, 69%, 55%, and 57% for Orfit, balsa wood, Styrofoam, and alpha-cradle, respectively. At the same depth, the RDs were 54% under a strut and 26% between neighboring struts of a carbon fiber grid with Mylar sheet, and between 34% and 56% for stretched perforated AquaPlast sheet. In the presence of the alpha-cradle for the 6 MV (15 MV) IMRT fields, the hot spot doses at the effective measurement depths of 0.0153 and 0.0459 cm were 140% and 150% (83% and 89%), respectively, of the isocenter dose. The enhancement factor was defined as the ratio of a given DAH parameter (minimum dose received in a given area) with

  16. Skin zinc concentrations in patients with varicose ulcers

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Z.; Loewenthal, E.; Seidenbaum, M.; Rubinow, A.; Gorodetsky, R. )

    1990-06-01

    The concentration of zinc in the skin has been determined noninvasively in patients with varicose vein ulcers. The examinations were performed with the use of diagnostic x-ray spectrometry, a method based on x-ray fluorescence for in vivo noninvasive evaluation of trace elements. Four skin foci were examined: at the periphery of the ulcer and control areas in a nonulcerated area in the diseased leg, in the noninvolved leg, and in the proximal inner surface of the arm. Zinc levels around the ulcer (mean +/- SD, 9.8 +/- 4.0 micrograms of zinc in 1 g of wet tissue) were higher than those in the nonulcerated skin in the diseased leg (6.9 +/- 3.0 micrograms/g, p greater than 0.05) and those in the noninvolved leg (5.4 +/- 2.0 micrograms/g, p less than 0.01). The concentration of zinc in the inner proximal surface of the arm (9.8 +/- 2.8 micrograms/g) was significantly higher than those of a control group (5.3 +/- 1.9 micrograms/g, p less than 0.01). These results suggest a defect of zinc distribution in patients with varicose vein ulcers.

  17. Dose-Dependent Onset of Regenerative Program in Neutron Irradiated Mouse Skin

    PubMed Central

    Artibani, Mara; Kobos, Katarzyna; Colautti, Paolo; Negri, Rodolfo; Amendola, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Tissue response to irradiation is not easily recapitulated by cell culture studies. The objective of this investigation was to characterize, the transcriptional response and the onset of regenerative processes in mouse skin irradiated with different doses of fast neutrons. Methodology/Principal Findings To monitor general response to irradiation and individual animal to animal variation, we performed gene and protein expression analysis with both pooled and individual mouse samples. A high-throughput gene expression analysis, by DNA oligonucleotide microarray was done with three months old C57Bl/6 mice irradiated with 0.2 and 1 Gy of mono-energetic 14 MeV neutron compared to sham irradiated controls. The results on 440 irradiation modulated genes, partially validated by quantitative real time RT-PCR, showed a dose-dependent up-regulation of a sub-class of keratin and keratin associated proteins, and members of the S100 family of Ca2+-binding proteins. Immunohistochemistry confirmed mRNA expression data enabled mapping of protein expression. Interestingly, proteins up-regulated in thickening epidermis: keratin 6 and S100A8 showed the most significant up-regulation and the least mouse-to-mouse variation following 0.2 Gy irradiation, in a concerted effort toward skin tissue regeneration. Conversely, mice irradiated at 1 Gy showed most evidence of apoptosis (Caspase-3 and TUNEL staining) and most 8-oxo-G accumulation at 24 h post-irradiation. Moreover, no cell proliferation accompanied 1 Gy exposure as shown by Ki67 immunohistochemistry. Conclusions/Significance The dose-dependent differential gene expression at the tissue level following in vivo exposure to neutron radiation is reminiscent of the onset of re-epithelialization and wound healing and depends on the proportion of cells carrying multiple chromosomal lesions in the entire tissue. Thus, this study presents in vivo evidence of a skin regenerative program exerted independently from DNA repair

  18. Risk of skin cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Hui-Wen; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Lam, Hing-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increasing evidence suggests that certain types of cancers are more common in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to investigate the risk of skin cancer in patients with DM in Taiwan. In this retrospective cohort study using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Research Database, the risk of developing overall skin cancer, including nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma, was compared by Poisson regression analysis and Cox regression analysis between the DM and non-DM cohorts. The DM cohort with newly diagnosed DM (n = 41,898) and a non-DM cohort were one-to-one matched by age, sex, index date, and comorbidities (coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and obesity). Compared with non-DM cohort statistically, for the people with DM aged ≥60 years, the incidence rates of overall skin cancer and NMSC were significantly higher (overall: DM/non-DM: number [n] = 99/76, incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.44, P = 0.02; NMSC: DM/non-DM: n = 94/66, IRR = 1.57, P = 0.005). By Cox regression analysis, the risk of developing overall skin cancer or NMSC was significantly higher after adjusting for sex, comorbidities, and overall diseases with immunosuppression status (overall: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.46, P = 0.01; NMSC: AHR = 1.6, P = 0.003). Other significant risk factors were older males for skin cancer (overall: AHR = 1.68, P = 0.001; NMSC: AHR = 1.59, P = 0.004; melanoma: AHR = 3.25, P = 0.04), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for NMSC (AHR = 1.44, P = 0.04), and coronary artery disease for melanoma (AHR = 4.22, P = 0.01). The risk of developing melanoma was lower in the DM cohort than in the non-DM cohort, but without significance (AHR = 0.56, P = 0.28; DM/non-DM: n = 5/10). The incidence rate and risk of developing overall skin cancer, including NMSC, was significantly higher in older adults with DM. Other significant risk factors for older

  19. Metabolomic Response of Human Skin Tissue to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Zeping; Kim, Young-Mo; Sowa, Marianne B.; Robinson, Robert J.; Gao, Xiaoli; Metz, Thomas O.; Morgan, William F.; Zhang, Qibin

    2012-05-18

    Understanding how human organs respond to ionizing radiation (IR) at a systems biology level and identifying biomarkers for IR exposure at low doses can help provide a scientific basis for establishing radiation protection standards. Little is known regarding the physiological responses to low dose IR at the metabolite level, which represents the end-point of biochemical processes inside cells. Using a full thickness human skin tissue model and GC-MS-based metabolomics analysis, we examined the metabolic perturbations at three time points (3, 24 and 48 hr) after exposure to 3, 10 and 200 cGy of X-rays. PLS-DA score plots revealed dose- and time-dependent clustering between sham and irradiated groups. Importantly, a comparable number of metabolites were detected to have significant change 48 hr after exposure to 3 and 10 cGy of irradiation, when compared with the high dose of 200 cGy. Biochemical pathway analysis showed perturbations to DNA/RNA damage and repair, lipid and energy metabolisms, even at low doses of IR.

  20. Skin prick testing in patients using beta-blockers: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The use of beta-blockers is a relative contraindication in allergen skin testing yet there is a paucity of literature on adverse events in this circumstance. We examined a population of skin tested patients on beta-blockers to look for any adverse effects. Methods Charts from 2004-2008 in a single allergy clinic were reviewed for any patients taking a beta-blocker when skin tested. Data was examined for skin test reactivity, type of skin test, concomitant asthma diagnosis, allergens tested, and adverse events. Results One hundred and ninety-one patients were taking beta-blockers when skin testing occurred. Seventy-two patients had positive skin tests. No tests resulted in an adverse event. Conclusions This data demonstrates the relative safety of administrating of skin prick tests to patients on beta-blocker treatment. Larger prospective studies are needed to substantiate the findings of this study. PMID:20298514

  1. Impaired skin vasomotor reflexes in patients with erythromelalgia.

    PubMed

    Littleford, R C; Khan, F; Belch, J J

    1999-05-01

    Erythromelalgia (EM) is a chronic disorder characterized by intermittent burning pain, warmth and erythema of the extremities. Increasing the local temperature and dependency of the affected limb(s) precipitates the symptoms, whereas direct cooling and elevation of the limb(s) can provide partial relief. Our previous findings showed that patients with EM have enhanced cutaneous vascular tone at rest and during stimulation, which may be due to an increase in sympathetic neural activity. To test this, we measured skin vasoconstrictor responses to contralateral arm cold challenge (CC) and inspiratory gasp (IG) using laser Doppler flowmetry at the toe pulp and fingertip. These areas were chosen because of their dense sympathetic innervation. An index of the vasoconstrictor response (between 0 and 1) was calculated from the change in skin perfusion from baseline following CC and IG. In control subjects, vasoconstrictor responses to CC at the toe and fingertip were both 0. 70+/-0.02 (mean+/-S.E.M.), which were significantly greater (P<0. 001) than corresponding values in patients with EM (0.37+/-0.04 and 0.45+/-0.04 respectively). Similarly, vasoconstrictor responses to IG were significantly greater (P<0.001) at the toe and fingertip in control subjects (0.70+/-0.03 and 0.70+/-0.02 respectively) compared with values in EM patients (0.27+/-0.03 and 0.45+/-0.15 respectively). These data show that, in contrast with control subjects, patients with EM have diminished sympathetic vasoconstrictor responses to both CC and IG. Denervation supersensitivity may play a part by increasing vasoconstrictor responses to circulating catecholamines, leading to a reduction in skin blood flow. Therefore an interplay between neural and vasoactive agents may be involved in the pathophysiology of EM. PMID:10209083

  2. Estimation of beta-ray skin dose from exposure to fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoru; Tanaka, Kenichi; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Imanaka, Tetsuji

    2012-03-01

    Beta-ray skin dose due to the fission fallout from the Hiroshima atomic bomb is potentially related to the epilation in the black rain area. The absorbed dose to the skin from beta-rays emitted by fission fallout has been estimated for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² on the ground at 0.5 h after the explosion. The estimated skin dose takes into account both external exposure from fission fallout radionuclides uniformly distributed in 1 mm of soil on the surface of the ground and from a 26 μm thickness of contaminated soil on the skin, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. The cumulative skin dose for 1 month after the explosion is taken as the representative value. The estimated skin dose for an initial ¹³⁷Cs deposition of 1 kBq m⁻² was determined to be about 500 mSv. PMID:22042969

  3. Effects and dose-response relationships of skin cancer and blackfoot disease with arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Wen-Ping

    1977-01-01

    In a limited area on the southwest coast of Taiwan, where artesian well water with a high concentration of arsenic has been used for more than 60 years, a high prevalence of chronic arsenicism has been observed in recent years. The total population of this “endemic” area is approximately 100,000. A general survey of 40,421 inhabitants and follow-up of 1,108 patients with blackfoot disease were made. Blackfoot disease, so-termed locally, is a peripheral vascular disorder resulting in gangrene of the extremities, especially the feet. The overall prevalence rates for skin cancer was 10.6 per 1000, and for blackfoot disease 8.9 per 1000. Generally speaking, the prevalence increased steadily with age in both diseases. The prevalence rates for skin cancer and blackfoot disease increased with the arsenic content of well water, i.e., the higher the arsenic content, the more patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease. A dose–response relationship between blackfoot disease and the duration of water intake was also noted. Furthermore, the degree of permanent impairment of function in the patient was directly related to duration of intake of arsenical water and to duration of such intake at the time of onset. The most common cause of death in the patients with skin cancer and blackfoot disease was carcinoma of various sites. The 5-year survival rate after the onset of blackfoot disease was 76.3%; the 10-year survival rate was 63.3% and 15-year survival rate, 52.2%. The 50% survival point was 16 years after onset of the disease. ImagesFIGURE 1.FIGURE 2. PMID:908285

  4. Characterization of differences in calculated and actual measured skin doses to canine limbs during stereotactic radiosurgery using Gafchromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, Jerri; Ryan, Stewart; Harmon, Joseph F.

    2012-07-01

    Accurate calculation of absorbed dose to the skin, especially the superficial and radiosensitive basal cell layer, is difficult for many reasons including, but not limited to, the build-up effect of megavoltage photons, tangential beam effects, mixed energy scatter from support devices, and dose interpolation caused by a finite resolution calculation matrix. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has been developed as an alternative limb salvage treatment option at Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for dogs with extremity bone tumors. Optimal dose delivery to the tumor during SBRT treatment can be limited by uncertainty in skin dose calculation. The aim of this study was to characterize the difference between measured and calculated radiation dose by the Varian Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) AAA treatment planning algorithm (for 1-mm, 2-mm, and 5-mm calculation voxel dimensions) as a function of distance from the skin surface. The study used Gafchromic EBT film (International Specialty Products, Wayne, NJ), FilmQA analysis software, a limb phantom constructed from plastic water Trade-Mark-Sign (fluke Biomedical, Everett, WA) and a canine cadaver forelimb. The limb phantom was exposed to 6-MV treatments consisting of a single-beam, a pair of parallel opposed beams, and a 7-beam coplanar treatment plan. The canine forelimb was exposed to the 7-beam coplanar plan. Radiation dose to the forelimb skin at the surface and at depths of 1.65 mm and 1.35 mm below the skin surface were also measured with the Gafchromic film. The calculation algorithm estimated the dose well at depths beyond buildup for all calculation voxel sizes. The calculation algorithm underestimated the dose in portions of the buildup region of tissue for all comparisons, with the most significant differences observed in the 5-mm calculation voxel and the least difference in the 1-mm voxel. Results indicate a significant difference between measured and calculated data

  5. Patient dose measurements in diagnostic radiology procedures in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-hyun; Choi, Jong-hak; Kim, Chang-kyun; Kim, Jung-min; Kim, Sung-soo; Oh, Yu-whan; Lee, Chang-yeap; Kang, Dae-hyun; Lee, Young-bae; Cho, Pyong-kon; Kim, Hyung-chul; Kim, Chel-min

    2007-01-01

    This study is the first nationwide investigation aimed at estimating the patient dose for radiographic examinations in Korea including gastrointestinal studies, computed tomography and mammography. The survey data from 161 hospitals and the dose data from 32 hospitals were analysed. The third quartile entrance surface dose, dose area product (DAP), weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) and mean glandular dose (MGD) were reported. All the estimated doses were less than the stated International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) reference levels for radiographic examinations. However, DAPs for the fluoroscopic examinations had higher dose values than the IAEA reference levels. In addition, the CTDIw and MGD were lower than the IAEA reference levels. PMID:17223642

  6. Skin nodules in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Le Clech, Lenaïg; Hutin, Pascal; Le Gal, Solène; Guillerm, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Opportunistic infections cause a significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. We describe the case of a patient with skin fusariosis and a probable cerebral toxoplasmosis after UCB stem cell transplantation for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Fusarium species (spp) infections are difficult to treat. To date, there has been no consensus on the treatment of fusariosis and the management of its side effects. Given the negative pretransplant Toxoplasma serology in this case, identifying the origin of the Toxoplasma infection was challenging. All usual transmission routes were screened for and ruled out. The patient's positive outcome was not consistent with that of the literature reporting 60% mortality due to each infection. PMID:24408938

  7. Skin wound trauma, following high-dose radiation exposure, amplifies and prolongs skeletal tissue loss.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua M; Swift, Sibyl N; Smith, Joan T; Kiang, Juliann G; Allen, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    The present study investigated the detrimental effects of non-lethal, high-dose (whole body) γ-irradiation on bone, and the impact that radiation combined with skin trauma (i.e. combined injury) has on long-term skeletal tissue health. Recovery of bone after an acute dose of radiation (RI; 8 Gy), skin wounding (15-20% of total body skin surface), or combined injury (RI+Wound; CI) was determined 3, 7, 30, and 120 days post-irradiation in female B6D2F1 mice and compared to non-irradiated mice (SHAM) at each time-point. CI mice demonstrated long-term (day 120) elevations in serum TRAP 5b (osteoclast number) and sclerostin (bone formation inhibitor), and suppression of osteocalcin levels through 30 days as compared to SHAM (p<0.05). Radiation-induced reductions in distal femur trabecular bone volume fraction and trabecular number through 120 days post-exposure were significantly greater than non-irradiated mice (p<0.05) and were exacerbated in CI mice by day 30 (p<0.05). Negative alterations in trabecular bone microarchitecture were coupled with extended reductions in cancellous bone formation rate in both RI and CI mice as compared to Sham (p<0.05). Increased osteoclast surface in CI animals was observed for 3 days after irradiation and remained elevated through 120 days (p<0.01). These results demonstrate a long-term, exacerbated response of bone to radiation when coupled with non-lethal wound trauma. Changes in cancellous bone after combined trauma were derived from extended reductions in osteoblast-driven bone formation and increases in osteoclast activity. PMID:26335157

  8. Photosensitivity of murine skin greatly depends on the genetic background: clinically relevant dose as a new measure to replace minimal erythema dose in mouse studies.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Lőrincz, Kende; Keszeg, András; Haluszka, Dóra; Bánvölgyi, András; Tátrai, Erika; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Wikonkál, Norbert M

    2016-07-01

    Artificial UV irradiation of murine skin is a frequently used method for testing photosensitivity, study carcinogenesis and photoprotective effects of different compounds. However, doses of UV radiation and mouse strains used in experiments vary greatly. The genetic background of mice may influence the photosensitivity as melanin content, pigmentation and hair cycle parameters are dissimilar. Doses of UV are often expressed in relation to the minimal erythema dose (MED) that was not necessarily determined for the given strain. We set out to standardize the method of measuring photosensitivity in three commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6N, Balb/c and SKH-1. We found that MED may not be determined for some strains as erythema development in mice with diverse genotypes differs greatly. We measured the oedema response in vivo and ex vivo by using OCT. Given the strain-specific variability of erythema, we introduced Clinically Relevant Dose (CRD) as a new term to replace MED in experiments, to describe the lowest dose that triggers a perceptible skin reaction in mice. Not only the CRD but the proportion of erythema and oedema were different in strains examined. C57BL/6N mice display skin reactions at the lowest UVB dose, while SKH-1 hairless mice show changes, mostly oedema, after higher doses of UVB. The cellular composition and skin thickness were examined by histopathology. IL-1beta and IL-6 levels in skin correlated with the increasing doses of UVB. Despite the variations in the degree of erythema and oedema, no major differences in cytokine expressions were seen among various strains of mice. PMID:26910301

  9. Wrinkled skin and fat pads in patients with ALG8-CDG: revisiting skin manifestations in congenital disorders of glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Kouwenberg, Dorus; Gardeitchik, Thatjana; Mohamed, Miski; Lefeber, Dirk J; Morava, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation is the posttranslational coupling of sugar chains to proteins or lipids. Proper glycosylation is essential for normal protein structure, function, and trafficking. Mutations in the glycosylation pathway lead to a phenotypically heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders, the congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG). Some of these conditions, including PMM2-CDG, frequently present with recognizable skin abnormalities such as abnormal fat distribution, skin wrinkling, or peau d'orange, whereas others, such as COG7-CDG and ATP6V0A2-CDG, have been described in association with cutis laxa: wrinkled, inelastic, and sagging skin. Ichthyosis is also common in several types of CDG. ALG8-CDG is a severe disorder characterized by dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, protein-losing enteropathy, neurologic and ophthalmologic problems, and developmental delay. We reviewed the clinical features in all nine previously reported patients diagnosed with ALG8-CDG with a special focus on their skin signs. Three of the nine patients had abnormal fat distribution and skin wrinkling. As the spectrum of CDG presenting with skin signs expands further, we suggest screening for CDG in all patients presenting with any type of central nervous involvement and wrinkled skin, cutis laxa, severe ichthyosis, or abnormal fat distribution. PMID:24555185

  10. Estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, E; Vardalaki, E; Hourdakis, C J; Dimitriou, P

    2001-01-01

    This study deals with the estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in order to establish diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) within the process of optimisation of patients' exposure in Greece. Six large hospitals in Athens were selected and 385 patients made up the sample. The entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients undertaking five common X ray examinations (chest, cervical spine, lumbar spine AP and LAT, pelvis) were estimated using both thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) attached to the patient's skin and an ionisation chamber for air kerma measurements. Exposure settings and patient's data were recorded. Results concerning the kilovoltage and focus-to-film-distance (FFD) settings and the ESD values were analysed and compared to those recommended by the EU. Discrepancies in the patient doses and techniques used for the examinations studied were found among the different hospitals denoting the importance of establishing a national quality assurance programme and examination protocols to ensure patient doses are kept as low as possible. All the examinations studied fulfilled the EU recommendations except that for the chest where the doses were considerably higher due to the use of low kVP settings. PMID:11548324

  11. Simulated solar light-induced p53 mutagenesis in SKH-1 mouse skin: a dose-response assessment.

    PubMed

    Verkler, Tracie L; Delongchamp, Robert R; Miller, Barbara J; Webb, Peggy J; Howard, Paul C; Parsons, Barbara L

    2008-08-01

    Sunlight and ultraviolet-induced mutation of the p53 gene is a frequent, possibly obligate step in skin cancer development, making quantitative measurement of p53 mutation an ideal biomarker for sunlight-induced skin carcinogenesis. To understand how the appearance of p53 mutation relates to skin tumor development, SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed 5 d per week to one of four different doses of simulated solar light (SSL; 0, 6.85, 13.70, 20.55 mJ x CIE/cm(2)) previously characterized for their tumorigenic potential. Allele-specific competitive blocker-PCR (ACB-PCR) was used to measure levels of p53 codon 270 CGT to TGT mutation within DNA isolated from dorsal skin of exposed mice. For each dose, p53 mutant fraction (MF) was measured after 4, 16, and 28 wk of exposure. Significant dose- and time-dependent increases in p53 MF were identified. All p53 MF measurements were integrated by relating the observed p53 MF to the cumulative dose of SSL. The increase in the logarithm of p53 MF was described by the linear function: log(10) MF = alpha + 0.0016 x d, where alpha is the spontaneous log(10) MF after a particular time point and d is the dose of SSL in mJ x CIE/cm(2). The p53 MF induced in nontumor bearing skin by 28 wk of exposure at the high dose of SSL was significantly lower than that found in skin tumors induced by approximately 32 wk of exposure to the same dose of SSL. p53 MF showed a strong negative correlation with tumor latency, suggesting this quantitative biomarker has the potential to predict tumorigenicity. PMID:18314877

  12. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model.

    PubMed

    von Neubeck, Claere; Geniza, Matthew J; Kauer, Paula M; Robinson, R Joe; Chrisler, William B; Sowa, Marianne B

    2015-05-01

    Outside the protection of Earth's atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin's barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts. PMID:25839759

  13. Patient radiation doses for electron beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Castellano, Isabel A.; Dance, David R.; Skinner, Claire L.; Evans, Phil M.

    2005-08-15

    A Monte Carlo based computer model has been developed for electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) to calculate organ and effective doses in a humanoid hermaphrodite phantom. The program has been validated by comparison with experimental measurements of the CT dose index in standard head and body CT dose phantoms; agreement to better than 8% has been found. The robustness of the model has been established by varying the input parameters. The amount of energy deposited at the 12:00 position of the standard body CT dose phantom is most susceptible to rotation angle, whereas that in the central region is strongly influenced by the beam quality. The program has been used to investigate the changes in organ absorbed doses arising from partial and full rotation about supine and prone subjects. Superficial organs experience the largest changes in absorbed dose with a change in subject orientation and for partial rotation. Effective doses for typical clinical scan protocols have been calculated and compared with values obtained using existing dosimetry techniques based on full rotation. Calculations which make use of Monte Carlo conversion factors for the scanner that best matches the EBCT dosimetric characteristics consistently overestimate the effective dose in supine subjects by typically 20%, and underestimate the effective dose in prone subjects by typically 13%. These factors can therefore be used to correct values obtained in this way. Empirical dosimetric techniques based on the dose-length product yield errors as great as 77%. This is due to the sensitivity of the dose length product to individual scan lengths. The magnitude of these errors is reduced if empirical dosimetric techniques based on the average absorbed dose in the irradiated volume (CTDI{sub vol}) are used. Therefore conversion factors specific to EBCT have been calculated to convert the CTDI{sub vol} to an effective dose.

  14. Warfarin skin necrosis mimicking calciphylaxis in a patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jee Eun; Byeon, Seonggyu; Kim, Hee Kyung; Moon, Seong Mi; Moon, Ji Hoon; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Byung-Jae; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Huh, Wooseong; Kim, Dae Joong; Kim, Yoon-Goo; Oh, Ha Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2016-03-01

    Warfarin skin necrosis (WSN) is an infrequent complication of warfarin treatment and is characterized by painful ulcerative skin lesions that appear a few days after the start of warfarin treatment. Calciphylaxis also appears as painful skin lesions caused by tissue injury resulting from localized ischemia caused by calcification of small- to medium-sized vessels in patients with end-stage renal disease. We report on a patient who presented with painful skin ulcers on the lower extremities after the administration of warfarin after a valve operation. Calciphylaxis was considered first because of the host factors; eventually, the skin lesions were diagnosed as WSN by biopsy. The skin lesions improved after warfarin discontinuation and short-term steroid therapy. Most patients with end-stage renal disease have some form of cardiovascular disease and some require temporary or continual warfarin treatment. It is important to differentiate between WSN and calciphylaxis in patients with painful skin lesions. PMID:27069859

  15. Arsenic-induced enhancement of ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis in mouse skin: a dose-response study.

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Fredric J; Uddin, Ahmed N; Wu, Feng; Nádas, Arthur; Rossman, Toby G

    2004-01-01

    The present study was designed to establish the form of the dose-response relationship for dietary sodium arsenite as a co-carcinogen with ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in a mouse skin model. Hairless mice (strain Skh1) were fed sodium arsenite continuously in drinking water starting at 21 days of age at concentrations of 0.0, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, and 10 mg/L. At 42 days of age, solar spectrum UVR exposures were applied three times weekly to the dorsal skin at 1.0 kJ/m2 per exposure until the experiment ended at 182 days. Untreated mice and mice fed only arsenite developed no tumors. In the remaining groups a total of 322 locally invasive squamous carcinomas occurred. The carcinoma yield in mice exposed only to UVR was 2.4 +/- 0.5 cancers/mouse at 182 days. Dietary arsenite markedly enhanced the UVR-induced cancer yield in a pattern consistent with linearity up to a peak of 11.1 +/- 1.0 cancers/mouse at 5.0 mg/L arsenite, representing a peak enhancement ratio of 4.63 +/- 1.05. A decline occurred to 6.8 +/- 0.8 cancers/mouse at 10.0 mg/L arsenite. New cancer rates exhibited a consistent-with-linear dependence on time beginning after initial cancer-free intervals ranging between 88 and 95 days. Epidermal hyperplasia was elevated by arsenite alone and UVR alone and was greater than additive for the combined exposures as were growth rates of the cancers. These results demonstrate the usefulness of a new animal model for studying the carcinogenic action of dietary arsenite on skin exposed to UVR and should contribute to understanding how to make use of animal data for assessment of human cancer risks in tissues exposed to mixtures of carcinogens and cancer-enhancing agents. PMID:15064167

  16. Development and Comparison of Warfarin Dosing Algorithms in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sun-Mi; Lee, Kyung-Yul; Choi, Jong Rak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The genes for cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) have been identified as important genetic determinants of warfarin dosing and have been studied. We developed warfarin algorithm for Korean patients with stroke and compared the accuracy of warfarin dose prediction algorithms based on the pharmacogenetics. Materials and Methods A total of 101 patients on stable maintenance dose of warfarin were enrolled. Warfarin dosing algorithm was developed using multiple linear regression analysis. The performance of all the algorithms was characterized with coefficient of determination, determined by linear regression, and the mean of percent deviation was used to predict doses from the actual dose. In addition, we compared the performance of the algorithms using percentage of predicted dose falling within ±20% of clinically observed doses and dividing the patients into a low-dose group (≤3 mg/day), an intermediate-dose group (3–7 mg/day), and high-dose group (≥7 mg/day). Results A new developed algorithms including the variables of age, body weight, and CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype. Our algorithm accounted for 51% of variation in the warfarin stable dose, and performed best in predicting dose within 20% of actual dose and intermediate-dose group. Conclusion Our warfarin dosing algorithm may be useful for Korean patients with stroke. Further studies to elucidate clinical utility of genotype-guided dosing and find the additional genetic association are necessary. PMID:26996562

  17. Electron contamination modeling and skin dose in 6 MV longitudinal field MRIgRT: Impact of the MRI and MRI fringe field

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Keall, P. J.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: In recent times, longitudinal field MRI-linac systems have been proposed for 6 MV MRI-guided radiotherapy (MRIgRT). The magnetic field is parallel with the beam axis and so will alter the transport properties of any electron contamination particles. The purpose of this work is to provide a first investigation into the potential effects of the MR and fringe magnetic fields on the electron contamination as it is transported toward a phantom, in turn, providing an estimate of the expected patient skin dose changes in such a modality. Methods: Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam were performed. Longitudinal magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T were applied to a 30 x 30 x 20 cm{sup 3} phantom. Surrounding the phantom there is a region where the magnetic field is at full MRI strength, consistent with clinical MRI systems. Beyond this the fringe magnetic field entering the collimation system is also modeled. The MRI-coil thickness, fringe field properties, and isocentric distance are varied and investigated. Beam field sizes of 5 x 5, 10 x 10, 15 x 15 and 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} were simulated. Central axis dose, 2D virtual entry skin dose films, and 70 {mu}m skin depth doses were calculated using high resolution scoring voxels. Results: In the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field, electron contamination from the linear accelerator is encouraged to travel almost directly toward the patient surface with minimal lateral spread. This results in a concentration of electron contamination within the x-ray beam outline. This concentration is particularly encouraged if the fringe field encompasses the collimation system. Skin dose increases of up to 1000% were observed for certain configurations and increases above Dmax were common. In nonmagnetically shielded cases, electron contamination generated from the jaw faces and air column is trapped and propagated almost directly to the phantom entry region, giving rise to

  18. [Reasons of non-radical surgery for patients with primary skin melanoma].

    PubMed

    Gerasimova, A A; Gafmon, G I; Anisimov, V V; Semiletova, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    It was found that up to now a significant number of patients with primary skin melanoma continued to have non-radical surgery. Based on the analysis of clinical and morphological data on 288 of these patients it was revealed that most non-radical treatment was performed for patients who had had primary skin melanoma of linear dimensions of 1 cm and a pink color. It was proved that patients with tumors of the skin should first be examined by the oncologist. A lack of knowledge of semiotics of primary skin melanoma was revealed among doctors. Widely used diagnostic biopsy of the primary tumor with subsequent cytology is recommended. PMID:24919268

  19. Sensitivity and specificity of dosing alerts for dosing errors among hospitalized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Porter, Kyle; Nahata, Milap C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the sensitivity and specificity of a dosing alert system for dosing errors and to compare the sensitivity of a proprietary system with and without institutional customization at a pediatric hospital. Methods A retrospective analysis of medication orders, orders causing dosing alerts, reported adverse drug events, and dosing errors during July, 2011 was conducted. Dosing errors with and without alerts were identified and the sensitivity of the system with and without customization was compared. Results There were 47 181 inpatient pediatric orders during the studied period; 257 dosing errors were identified (0.54%). The sensitivity of the system for identifying dosing errors was 54.1% (95% CI 47.8% to 60.3%) if customization had not occurred and increased to 60.3% (CI 54.0% to 66.3%) with customization (p=0.02). The sensitivity of the system for underdoses was 49.6% without customization and 60.3% with customization (p=0.01). Specificity of the customized system for dosing errors was 96.2% (CI 96.0% to 96.3%) with a positive predictive value of 8.0% (CI 6.8% to 9.3). All dosing errors had an alert over-ridden by the prescriber and 40.6% of dosing errors with alerts were administered to the patient. The lack of indication-specific dose ranges was the most common reason why an alert did not occur for a dosing error. Discussion Advances in dosing alert systems should aim to improve the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the system for dosing errors. Conclusions The dosing alert system had a low sensitivity and positive predictive value for dosing errors, but might have prevented dosing errors from reaching patients. Customization increased the sensitivity of the system for dosing errors. PMID:24496386

  20. Skin Autofluorescence and Mortality in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mácsai, Emília; Benke, Attila; Kiss, István

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Skin autofluorescence (SAF) is a proven prognostic factor of mortality in hemodialysis patients. Traditional and nontraditional risk factors are almost equivalent in peritoneal dialysis (PD), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death. Moreover, peritoneal glucose absorption accelerates the degenerative processes of connective tissues as in diabetes. In our study, we examined the predictive value of SAF for total mortality in the PD population. Data were collected from 198 prevalently adult Caucasian PD patients. One hundred twenty-six patients (mean age 66.2 y, men [n = 73], diabetes ratio 75/126) had anamnestic CVD (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease). Initially, we evaluated factors affecting SAF and CVD by multivariate linear regression. Survival rates were estimated by recording clinical and demographic data associated with mortality during a 36-month follow-up using the Kaplan–Meier method. Analyses were further stratified based on the presence or absence of CVD and SAF levels above or below the upper tercile 3.61 arbitrary units. Skin autofluorescence was influenced by CVD (P < 0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1–0.5) and white blood cell counts (P < 0.001, 95% CI 0.031–0.117). According to the Spearman correlation, SAF correlated with peritoneal cumulative glucose exposure (P = 0.02) and elapsed time in PD (P = 0.008). CVD correlated with age (P < 0.001, 95% CI 1.24–1.65) and diabetes (P < 0.001, 95% CI 2.58–10.66). More deaths were observed in the high SAF group than in the low SAF group (34/68 vs 44/130; P = 0.04). Comparing the CVD(−) low SAF group survival (mean 33.9 mos, standard error [SE] 1.39) to CVD(+) low SAF (mean 30.5 mos, SE 1.37, P = 0.03) and to CVD(+) high SAF group (mean 27.1 mos, SE 1.83, P = 0.001), the difference was significant. In conclusion, among PD patients, SAF values over 3.61 arbitrary units seem to be a

  1. Poster — Thur Eve — 10: Partial kV CBCT, complete kV CBCT and EPID in breast treatment: a dose comparison study for skin, breasts, heart and lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Roussin, E; Archambault, L K; Wierzbicki, W

    2014-08-15

    The advantages of kilovoltage cone beam CT (kV CBCT) imaging over electronic portal imaging device (EPID) such as accurate 3D anatomy, soft tissue visualization, fast rigid registration and enhanced precision on patient positioning has lead to its increasing use in clinics. The benefits of this imaging technique are at the cost of increasing the dose to healthy surrounding organs. Our center has moved toward the use of daily partial rotation kV CBCT to restrict the dose to healthy tissues. This study aims to better quantify radiation doses from different image-guidance techniques such as tangential EPID, complete and partial kV CBCT for breast treatments. Cross-calibrated ionization chambers and kV calibrated Gafchromic films were used to measure the dose to the heart, lungs, breasts and skin. It was found that performing partial kV CBCT decreases the heart dose by about 36%, the lungs dose by 31%, the contralateral breast dose by 41% and the ipsilateral breast dose by 43% when compared to a full rotation CBCT. The skin dose measured for a full rotation CBCT was about 0.8 cGy for the contralateral breast and about 0.3 cGy for the ipsilateral breast. The study is still ongoing and results on skin doses for partial rotation kV CBCT as well as for tangential EPID images are upcoming.

  2. Skin uptake, distribution, and elimination of antimony following administration of sodium stibogluconate to patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed Central

    al Jaser, M; el-Yazigi, A; Kojan, M; Croft, S L

    1995-01-01

    We examined in this study the pharmacokinetics of Sb in the affected skin and normal skin of patients treated with sodium stibogluconate for cutaneous leishmaniasis and compared the results with those for the blood. The procedure was fully explained, and a written consent was obtained from each of nine patients. After a dose of sodium stibogluconate equivalent to 600 mg of Sb was administered intramuscularly, small skin biopsies were collected under local anesthesia at different time intervals from the circumferences of the lesions and simultaneously from normal skin. Antimony was measured in these biopsies after suitable ashing and processing by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The means (with standard errors of the means in parentheses) of the peak concentration, time to peak concentration, area under the curve, half-life, and mean residence time in lesions were 5.02 (1.43) micrograms/g, 2.1 (0.4) h, 32.8 (6.1) micrograms.h/g, 6.88 (0.54) h, and 10.4 (1.2) h, respectively, and those in normal skin were 6.56 (2.01) micrograms/g, 2.6 (0.8) h, 44.0 (15.8) micrograms.h/g, 5.44 (0.83) h, and 8.08 (1.34) h, respectively. There was no significant difference in any of these parameters between lesions and normal skin, whereas the differences in peak concentration, half-life, and mean residence time between lesions and whole blood were significant (P < or = 0.05). The penetration of Sb into skin, either affected or normal, as measured by the skin/blood area under the curve ratio appears to be complete, but the disposition is slow compared with that from the blood. PMID:7726524

  3. Patient and operator dose during fluoroscopic examination of swallow mechanism.

    PubMed

    Crawley, M T; Savage, P; Oakley, F

    2004-08-01

    Dose-area product (DAP) measurements were made for 21 patients undergoing a modified barium swallow. The procedures were performed by a radiologist and speech and language therapist, to characterize swallowing disorders in patients with head or spinal injury, stroke, other neurological conditions or simple globus symptoms, in order to inform feeding strategies. The DAP values were used to estimate effective dose to the patient, in order to provide a measure of the radiation risk associated with the procedure. Whole body doses to operators, together with equivalent doses to extremities and eyes were also measured to inform the employer's risk assessment. Median DAP for the series was 3.5 (3.1-5.2) Gycm(2) with a corresponding effective dose to the patient of 0.85 (0.76-1.3) mSv, and a low associated risk, mainly of cancer induction, of about 1 in 16 000. The organ receiving the greatest dose was the thyroid, with a calculated median equivalent dose of 13.9 (12.3-20.7) mSv. Median screening time was 3.7 (2.5-4.3) min. Mean operator doses were 0.5 mSv equivalent dose (eyes), 0.9 mSv (extremities), and less than 0.3 mSv whole body dose. Extrapolating for an annual workload of 50 patients per year, this work will lead to annual operator doses of less than 0.6 mSv whole body dose, and approximately 1 mSv equivalent dose (eyes) and 1.8 mSv (extremities), against corresponding legal dose limits of 20 mSv, 150 mSv and 500 mSv, respectively. PMID:15326042

  4. Patient-specific dose estimation for pediatric chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Frush, Donald P.

    2008-12-15

    Current methods for organ and effective dose estimations in pediatric CT are largely patient generic. Physical phantoms and computer models have only been developed for standard/limited patient sizes at discrete ages (e.g., 0, 1, 5, 10, 15 years old) and do not reflect the variability of patient anatomy and body habitus within the same size/age group. In this investigation, full-body computer models of seven pediatric patients in the same size/protocol group (weight: 11.9-18.2 kg) were created based on the patients' actual multi-detector array CT (MDCT) data. Organs and structures in the scan coverage were individually segmented. Other organs and structures were created by morphing existing adult models (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. Organ and effective dose of these patients from a chest MDCT scan protocol (64 slice LightSpeed VCT scanner, 120 kVp, 70 or 75 mA, 0.4 s gantry rotation period, pitch of 1.375, 20 mm beam collimation, and small body scan field-of-view) was calculated using a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated to simulate radiation transport in the same CT system. The seven patients had normalized effective dose of 3.7-5.3 mSv/100 mAs (coefficient of variation: 10.8%). Normalized lung dose and heart dose were 10.4-12.6 mGy/100 mAs and 11.2-13.3 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. Organ dose variations across the patients were generally small for large organs in the scan coverage (<7%), but large for small organs in the scan coverage (9%-18%) and for partially or indirectly exposed organs (11%-77%). Normalized effective dose correlated weakly with body weight (correlation coefficient: r=-0.80). Normalized lung dose and heart dose correlated strongly with mid-chest equivalent diameter (lung: r=-0.99, heart: r=-0.93); these strong correlation relationships can be used to estimate patient-specific organ dose for

  5. Comparison of Medical Adhesive Tapes in Patients at Risk of Facial Skin Trauma under Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Sui An; Chong, Shin Yuet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Adhesive tapes are used for taping eyelids closed and securing endotracheal tubes during general anesthesia. These tapes can cause facial skin injury. We compared the incidence of facial skin injury and patient satisfaction with different tapes used. Methods. A total of 60 adult patients at risk of skin trauma were randomized to use 3M™ Kind Removal Silicone Tape or standard acrylate tapes: 3M Durapore (endotracheal tube) and Medipore (eyelids). Patients were blinded to tape used. Postoperatively, a blinded recovery nurse assessed erythema, edema, and denudation of skin. Anesthesiologist in charge also assessed skin injury. On postoperative day 1, patients rated satisfaction with the condition of their skin over the eyelids and face on a 5-point Likert scale. Results. More patients had denudation of skin with standard tapes, 4 (13.3%) versus 0 with silicone tape (p = 0.026) and in anesthesiologist-evaluated skin injury 11 (37%) with standard versus 1 (3%) with silicone (p = 0.002). No significant differences were found in erythema and edema. Patient satisfaction score was higher with silicone tape: over eyelids: mean 3.83 (standard) versus 4.53 (silicone), Mann-Whitney U test, p < 0.001; over face: mean 3.87 (standard) versus 4.57 (silicone) (p < 0.001). Conclusion. Silicone tape use had less skin injury and greater patient satisfaction than standard acrylate tapes. PMID:27382368

  6. The effect of low dose ionizing radiation on homeostasis and functional integrity in an organotypic human skin model

    SciTech Connect

    von Neubeck, Claere; Geniza, Matthew; Kauer, Paula M.; Robinson, Joseph E.; Chrisler, William B.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2015-05-01

    Outside the protection of earth’s atmosphere, astronauts are exposed to low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Future NASA plans for deep space missions or a permanent settlement on the moon are limited by the health risks associated with space radiation exposures. There is a paucity of direct epidemiological data for low dose exposures to space radiation-relevant high LET ions. Health risk models are used to estimate the risk for such exposures, though these models are based on high dose experiments. There is increasing evidence, however, that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events at the molecular level, and may involve different response mechanisms. Further, despite their low abundance, high LET particles have been identified as the major contributor to health risk during manned space flight. The human skin is exposed in every external radiation scenario, making it an ideal epithelial tissue model in which to study radiation induced effects. Here, we exposed an in vitro three dimensional (3-D) human organotypic skin tissue model to low doses of high LET oxygen (O), silicon (Si) and iron (Fe) ions. We measured proliferation and differentiation profiles in the skin tissue and examined the integrity of the skin’s barrier function. We discuss the role of secondary particles in changing the proportion of cells receiving a radiation dose, emphasizing the possible impact on radiation-induced health issues in astronauts.

  7. Effect of Photofrin on skin reflection of basal cell nevus syndrome patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossweiner, Leonard I.; Jones, Linda R.; Koehler, Irmgard K.; Bilgin, Mehmet D.

    1996-04-01

    Skin reflection spectra were measured before and 24 hours after administration of Photofrin (Reg. TM) to basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) patients. The drug reduced the reflectivity of uninvolved BCNS skin and increased the reflectivity of basal cell cancers. Photofrin (Reg. TM) absorption in normal rat skin and uninvolved BCNS skin was resolved by the diffusion approximation. Optical constants calculated with a two-layer skin model indicate that the drug increased light scattering in tumor tissues. The possible use of reflection spectra for PDT light dosimetry is discussed.

  8. Patient release criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy implants.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Dale E; Sheetz, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    A lack of consensus regarding a model governing the release of patients following sealed source brachytherapy has led to a set of patient release policies that vary from institution to institution. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued regulatory guidance on patient release in NUREG 1556, Volume 9, Rev. 2, Appendix U, which allows calculation of release limits following implant brachytherapy. While the formalism presented in NUREG is meaningful for the calculation of release limits in the context of relatively high energy gamma emitters, it does not estimate accurately the effective dose equivalent for the common low dose rate brachytherapy sources Cs, I, and Pd. NUREG 1556 states that patient release may be based on patient-specific calculations as long as the calculation is documented. This work is intended to provide a format for patient-specific calculations to be used for the consideration of patients' release following the implantation of certain low dose rate brachytherapy isotopes. PMID:23439145

  9. Patient doses from hybrid SPECT-CT procedures.

    PubMed

    Avramova-Cholakova, S; Dimcheva, M; Petrova, E; Garcheva, M; Dimitrova, M; Palashev, Y; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate patient doses from hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) procedures. The study involved all four SPECT-CT systems in Bulgaria. Effective dose was estimated for about 100 patients per system. Ten types of examinations were considered, representing all diagnostic procedures performed in the SPECT-CT systems. Effective doses from the SPECT component were calculated applying the ICRP 53 and ICRP 80 conversion coefficients. Computed tomography dose index and dose length product were retrospectively obtained from the archives of the systems, and effective doses from the CT component were calculated with CT-Expo software. Parallel estimation of CT component contribution with the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) conversion coefficients was performed where applicable. Large variations were found in the current practice of SPECT-CT imaging. Optimisation actions and diagnostic reference levels were proposed. PMID:25862537

  10. Absence of induction of enhanced reactivation of herpes simplex virus in cells from xeroderma pigmentosum patients without skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahams, P.J.; van der Kleij, A.A.; Schouten, R.; van der Eb, A.J.

    1988-11-01

    The time course of appearance of enhanced reactivation (ER) and enhanced mutagenesis (EM) of herpes simplex virus type 1 were studied in UV-irradiated stationary cultures of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts. In some of the XP cells EM followed similar kinetics of appearance as ER. Maximal activities occurred when infection was delayed 1 or 2 days after cell treatment. However, in certain XP cells only induction of the EM response was observed, whereas ER was absent. Interestingly, the latter XP cells had been obtained from patients who had not yet developed skin cancer at the time they were described in the literature, whereas the former XP patients had already developed skin tumors. This suggests that the ER response may somehow be involved in the process of oncogenic transformation. Dose-response studies of ER in XP cells from tumor-bearing patients showed that ER is maximally induced with a UV dose of 40 Jm-2 given to the virus. Normal levels of ER were observed in 14 different normal human skin fibroblasts, indicating that the ER- phenotype does not occur in normal cells or at least more rarely than in XP cells.

  11. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob; Xu, X George

    2015-07-21

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose--a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the 'software as a service (SaaS)' delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose's functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT-two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations. PMID:26134511

  12. Blue-Violet Light Irradiation Dose Dependently Decreases Carotenoids in Human Skin, Which Indicates the Generation of Free Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Vandersee, Staffan; Beyer, Marc; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to ultraviolet and infrared irradiation, which are known to facilitate cutaneous photoaging, immunosuppression, or tumour emergence due to formation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species, potentially similar effects of visible light on the human skin are still poorly characterized. Using a blue-violet light irradiation source and aiming to characterize its potential influence on the antioxidant status of the human skin, the cutaneous carotenoid concentration was measured noninvasively in nine healthy volunteers using resonance Raman spectroscopy following irradiation. The dose-dependent significant degradation of carotenoids was measured to be 13.5% and 21.2% directly after irradiation at 50 J/cm² and 100 J/cm² (P < 0.05). The irradiation intensity was 100 mW/cm². This is above natural conditions; the achieved doses, though, are acquirable under natural conditions. The corresponding restoration lasted 2 and 24 hours, respectively. The degradation of cutaneous carotenoids indirectly shows the amount of generated free radicals and especially reactive oxygen species in human skin. In all volunteers the cutaneous carotenoid concentration dropped down in a manner similar to that caused by the infrared or ultraviolet irradiations, leading to the conclusion that also blue-violet light at high doses could represent a comparably adverse factor for human skin. PMID:25741404

  13. Overall measurements of dose to patients in common interventional cardiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weipeng; Zhang, Menglong; Zhang, Yi

    2013-12-01

    This study was designed to measure peak skin dose (PSD), dose-area product (DAP), cumulative dose (CD) and fluoroscopy time (FT) for interventional cardiology procedures and to evaluate whether patient doses were higher than that in other published data. Three cardiac procedure types, including coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and radio frequency (RF) ablation, were entered into the study. Data of four special metrics (PSD, DAP, CD and FT) for these procedures were collected and measured. A total of 238 patients who underwent interventional radiology procedures participated in this study. For every procedure, data about PSD were resulted from six TLD arrays and DAP, CD and FT were collected from the displayed monitor. The mean, standard deviation (SD), range and third quartile of the distribution of PSD, DAP, CD and FT recorded and measured on spot were calculated for all procedures. High-dose cases were specifically recorded. There was wide variation in the doses observed for different instances of the same procedure. PSD for PTCA and RF ablation ranged from 0.1 Gy to more than 3 Gy. Of 238 instances, there were 22 (9.2 %) with PSDs greater than 2 Gy and 4 (1.7 %) than 3 Gy. The third quartile of the distribution for PTCA had exceeded the DIMOND preliminary reference levels by 41.1 % in DAP and 25.0 % in FT. Mean DAP was in the range of reported values for CAG procedure, but higher than all data obtained in literatures for PTCA. Data from this study are in the range of most reported values for CAG and RF ablation procedure, while higher than that obtained in some literatures for PTCA. In case of a constant delivering of high doses to patient and physician himself, thorough training of interventionalists and staff is necessary, and the legislation has to be revised and set dose constrains especially for the interventional high-dose procedures. PMID:23770572

  14. Providing quality skin and wound care for the bariatric patient: an overview of clinical challenges.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, (defined as body mass index [BMI] ≥30), and especially morbid obesity (defined as BMI ≥40), has a profound impact on the health and integrity of the patient's integumentary system and on the caregivers who strive to provide care for larger, heavy patients. The purpose of this overview is to address some common skin and wound care issues faced by bariatric patients in order to inform clinicians, patients, and caregivers and enable them to optimize care. For bariatric patients, extra attention must be paid to skin care, cleanliness, skin fold management, perigenital care, odor management, and effective pressure redistribution. Despite these interventions, the multifactorial challenges presented by morbid obesity increase patient risk for serious skin diseases and wound conditions. Implications for practice include how best to educate patients and caregivers for optimal problem prevention. Future research should target improving bariatric care equipment and decreasing risk indices. PMID:24434162

  15. Dosimetry for quantitative analysis of low dose ionizing radiation effects on humans in radiation therapy patients

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann, J; Stern, R L; Daly, T P; Schwieter, C W; Jones, G E; Arnold, M L; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Goldberg, Z

    2004-04-20

    We have successfully developed a practical approach to predicting the location of skin surface dose at potential biopsy sites that receive 1 cGy and 10 cGy, respectively, in support of in vivo biologic dosimetry in humans. This represents a significant technical challenge as the sites lie on the patient surface out side the radiation fields. The PEREGRINE Monte Carlo simulation system was used to model radiation dose delivery and TLDs were used for validation on a phantom and confirmation during patient treatment. In the developmental studies the Monte Carlo simulations consistently underestimated the dose at the biopsy site by approximately 15% for a realistic treatment configuration, most likely due to lack of detail in the simulation of the linear accelerator outside the main beam line. Using a single, thickness-independent correction factor for the clinical calculations, the average of 36 measurements for the predicted 1 cGy point was 0.985 cGy (standard deviation: 0.110 cGy) despite patient breathing motion and other real world challenges. Since the 10 cGy point is situated in the region of high dose gradient at the edge of the field, patient motion had a greater effect and the six measured points averaged 5.90 cGy (standard deviation: 1.01 cGy), a difference that is equivalent to approximately a 6 mm shift on the patient's surface.

  16. Influence trend of temperature distribution in skin tissue generated by different exposure dose pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Ning; Wang, Zhijing; Liu, Xia

    2014-11-01

    Laser is widely applied in military and medicine fields because of its excellent capability. In order to effectively defend excess damage by laser, the thermal processing theory of skin tissue generated by laser should be carried out. The heating rate and thermal damage area should be studied. The mathematics model of bio-tissue heat transfer that is irradiated by laser is analyzed. And boundary conditions of bio-tissue are discussed. Three layer FEM grid model of bio-tissue is established. The temperature rising inducing by pulse laser in the tissue is modeled numerically by adopting ANSYS software. The changing trend of temperature in the tissue is imitated and studied under the conditions of different exposure dose pulse laser. The results show that temperature rising in the tissue depends on the parameters of pulse laser largely. In the same conditions, the pulse width of laser is smaller and its instant power is higher. And temperature rising effect in the tissue is very clear. On the contrary, temperature rising effect in the tissue is lower. The cooling time inducing by temperature rising effect in the tissue is longer along with pulse separation of laser is bigger. And the temperature difference is bigger in the pulse period.

  17. Chemical Peels for Melasma in Dark-Skinned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rashmi; Bansal, Shuchi; Garg, Vijay K

    2012-01-01

    Melasma is a common disorder of hyperpigmentation, which has a severe impact on the quality of life. Inspite of tremendous research, the treatment remains frustrating both to the patient and the treating physician. Dark skin types (Fitzpatrick types IV to VI) are especially difficult to treat owing to the increased risk of post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). The treatment ranges from a variety of easily applied topical therapies to agents like lasers and chemical peels. Peels are a well-known modality of treatment for melasma, having shown promising results in many clinical trials. However, in darker races, the choice of the peeling agent becomes relatively limited; so, there is the need for priming agents and additional maintenance peels. Although a number of new agents have come up, there is little published evidence supporting their use in day-to -day practice. The traditional glycolic peels prove to be the best both in terms of safety as well as efficacy. Lactic acid peels being relatively inexpensive and having shown equally good results in a few studies, definitely need further experimentation. We also recommend the use of a new peeling agent, the easy phytic solution, which does not require neutralisation unlike the traditional alpha-hydroxy peels. The choice of peeling agent, the peel concentration as well as the frequency and duration of peels are all important to achieve optimum results. PMID:23378706

  18. Outcomes for split-thickness skin transplantation in high-risk patients using octenidine.

    PubMed

    Matiasek, J; Djedovic, G; Unger, L; Beck, H; Mattesich, M; Pierer, G; Koller, R; Rieger, U M

    2015-06-01

    Skin transplantation is a commonly used surgical technique; however, the complication rate, including postoperative infection and delayed wound healing due to inefficient perfusion, is significantly higher in patients suffering from comorbidities. Hence, a subsequent repeat procedure is often necessary. In this report, two case studies are presented in which an octenidine-based antiseptic is used with a tie-over dressing (TOD) instead of povidone iodine (PVP-iodine), following a split-thickness skin graft. The two patients selected were deemed to be at high risk of impaired wound healing due to comorbidities. The first patient, a confirmed smoker with diabetes, presented with a nodular melanoma that was resected and covered with a split-thickness skin graft. After 5 days of negative pressure wound therapy as a TOD, in combination with PVP-iodine, the graft became necrotic. A second split-thickness skin graft was performed and an antiseptic regimen with octenidine in combination with the same TOD resulted in a completely healed transplant. The second patient, also a confirmed smoker with diabetes and receiving oral corticosteroid treatment, was diagnosed with a skin necrosis on her leg. Following the split-thickness skin graft, octenidine and TOD were applied. The patient's skin graft completely healed without any adverse events. These two case studies indicate that the combination of octenidine and TOD following split-thickness skin transplantation is safe, well-tolerated and appears to have positive benefits in the reconstruction of defects in patients with impaired wound healing. PMID:26075514

  19. Diagnostic Value of PCR for Detection of Borrelia burgdorferi in Skin Biopsy and Urine Samples from Patients with Skin Borreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Brettschneider, S.; Bruckbauer, H.; Klugbauer, N.; Hofmann, H.

    1998-01-01

    Skin biopsies of 36 patients with erythema migrans and acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans (ACA) before therapy and those of 8 patients after therapy were examined for Borrelia burgdorferi DNA by PCR. Skin biopsies of 27 patients with dermatological diseases other than Lyme borreliosis and those of 10 healthy persons were examined as controls. Two different primer sets targeting 23S rRNA (PCR I) and 66-kDa protein (PCR II) genes were used. PCR was performed with freshly frozen tissue (FFT) and paraffin-embedded tissue (PET). For FFT specimens of erythema migrans, 73% were positive by PCR I, 79% were positive by PCR II, and 88% were positive by combining PCR I and II. For PET specimens, PCR was less sensitive (PCR I, 44%; PCR II, 52%). For FFT specimens of ACA, PCR I was positive for two of five patients and PCR II was positive for four of five patients. B. burgdorferi was cultured from 79% of the erythema migrans specimens but not from any of the ACA lesions. Elevated B. burgdorferi antibodies were detected in sera of 74% of erythema migrans patients and 100% of ACA patients. All urine samples were negative by PCR II, whereas PCR I was positive for 27%. However, hybridization of these amplicons was negative. Sequencing of three amplicons identified nonborrelial DNA. In conclusion, urine PCR is not suitable for the diagnosis of skin borreliosis. A combination of two different primer sets achieves high sensitivity with skin biopsies. In early erythema migrans infection, culture and PCR are more sensitive than serology. PMID:9705410

  20. ATP in human skin elicits a dose-related pain response which is potentiated under conditions of hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, S G; Warburton, J; Bhattacharjee, A; Ward, J; McMahon, S B

    2000-06-01

    Despite the considerable interest in the possibility that ATP may function as a peripheral pain mediator, there has been little quantitative study of the pain-producing effects of ATP in humans. Here we have used iontophoresis to deliver ATP to the forearm skin of volunteers who rated the magnitude of the evoked pain on a visual analogue scale. ATP consistently produced a modest burning pain, which began within 20 s of starting iontophoresis and was maintained for several minutes. Persistent iontophoresis of ATP led to desensitization within 12 min but recovery from this was almost complete 1 h later. Different doses of ATP were delivered using different iontophoretic driving currents. Iontophoresis of ATP produced a higher pain rating than saline, indicating that the pain was specifically caused by ATP. The average pain rating for ATP, but not saline, increased with increasing current. Using an 0.8 mA current, subjects reported pain averaging 27.7 +/- 2.8 (maximum possible = 100). Iontophoresis of ATP caused an increase in blood flow, as assessed using a laser Doppler flow meter. The increase in blood flow was significantly greater using ATP than saline in both the iontophoresed skin (P < 0.01) and in the surrounding skin, 3 mm outside the iontophoresed area (P < 0.05). The pain produced by ATP was dependent on capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons, since in skin treated repeatedly with topical capsaicin pain was reduced to less than 25% of that elicited on normal skin (2.1 +/- 0.4 compared with 9.3 +/- 1.5 on normal skin). Conversely, the pain-producing effects of ATP were greatly potentiated in several models of hyperalgesia. Thus, with acute capsaicin treatment when subjects exhibited touch-evoked hyperalgesia but no ongoing pain, there was a threefold increase in the average pain rating during ATP iontophoresis (22.7 +/- 3.1) compared with pre-capsaicin treatment (7.8 +/- 2.6). Moreover, ATP iontophoresed into skin 24 h after solar simulated radiation (2 x

  1. Organ doses to adult patients for chest CT

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Sterzik, Alexander; Tipnis, Sameer; Schoepf, U. Joseph

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to estimate organ doses for chest CT examinations using volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) data as well as accounting for patient weight. Methods: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT CT patient dosimetry calculator) was used to compute organ doses for a 70 kg patient undergoing chest CT examinations, as well as volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) in a body CT dosimetry phantom at the same CT technique factors. Ratios of organ dose to CTDI{sub vol} (f{sub organ}) were generated as a function of anatomical location in the chest for the breasts, lungs, stomach, red bone marrow, liver, thyroid, liver, and thymus. Values of f{sub organ} were obtained for x-ray tube voltages ranging from 80 to 140 kV for 1, 4, 16, and 64 slice CT scanners from two vendors. For constant CT techniques, we computed ratios of dose in water phantoms of differing diameter. By modeling patients of different weights as equivalent water cylinders of different diameters, we generated factors that permit the estimation of the organ doses in patients weighing between 50 and 100 kg who undergo chest CT examinations relative to the corresponding organ doses received by a 70 kg adult. Results: For a 32 cm long CT scan encompassing the complete lungs, values of f{sub organ} ranged from 1.7 (thymus) to 0.3 (stomach). Organs that are directly in the x-ray beam, and are completely irradiated, generally had f{sub organ} values well above 1 (i.e., breast, lung, heart, and thymus). Organs that are not completely irradiated in a total chest CT scan generally had f{sub organ} values that are less than 1 (e.g., red bone marrow, liver, and stomach). Increasing the x-ray tube voltage from 80 to 140 kV resulted in modest increases in f{sub organ} for the heart (9%) and thymus (8%), but resulted in larger increases for the breast (19%) and red bone marrow (21%). Adult patient chests have been modeled by water cylinders with diameters between

  2. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  3. EFFECTIVE DOSE TO PATIENTS FROM THORACIC SPINE EXAMINATIONS WITH TOMOSYNTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Svalkvist, Angelica; Söderman, Christina; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of the present work were to calculate the average effective dose to patients from lateral tomosynthesis examinations of the thoracic spine, compare the results with the corresponding conventional examination and to determine a conversion factor between dose-area product (DAP) and effective dose for the tomosynthesis examination. Thoracic spine examinations from 17 patients were included in the study. The registered DAP and information about the field size for each projection radiograph were, together with patient height and mass, used to calculate the effective dose for each projection radiograph. The total effective doses for the tomosynthesis examinations were obtained by adding the effective doses from the 60 projection radiographs included in the examination. The mean effective dose was 0.47 mSv (range 0.24-0.81 mSv) for the tomosynthesis examinations and 0.20 mSv (range 0.07-0.29 mSv) for the corresponding conventional examinations (anteroposterior + left lateral projection). For the tomosynthesis examinations, a conversion factor between total DAP and effective dose of 0.092 mSv Gycm(-2) was obtained. PMID:26675145

  4. Evaluation of the stepwise collimation method for the reduction of the patient dose in full spine radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Boram; Lee, Sunyoung; Yang, Injeong; Yoon, Myeonggeun

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose reduction when using the stepwise collimation method for scoliosis patients undergoing full spine radiography. A Monte Carlo simulation was carried out to acquire dose vs. volume data for organs at risk (OAR) in the human body. While the effective doses in full spine radiography were reduced by 8, 15, 27 and 44% by using four different sizes of the collimation, the doses to the skin were reduced by 31, 44, 55 and 66%, indicating that the reduction of the dose to the skin is higher than that to organs inside the body. Although the reduction rates were low for the gonad, being 9, 14, 18 and 23%, there was more than a 30% reduction in the dose to the heart, suggesting that the dose reduction depends significantly on the location of the OARs in the human body. The reduction rate of the secondary cancer risk based on the excess absolute risk (EAR) varied from 0.6 to 3.4 per 10,000 persons, depending on the size of the collimation. Our results suggest that the stepwise collimation method in full spine radiography can effectively reduce the patient dose and the radiation-induced secondary cancer risk.

  5. Skin dose measurements using radiochromic films, TLDS and ionisation chamber and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Alashrah, Saleh; Kandaiya, Sivamany; Maalej, Nabil; El-Taher, A

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the surface dose is very important for patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose at the surface of a water phantom at a depth of 0.007 cm as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement with radiochromic films (RFs), thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber in a 6-MV photon beam. The results were compared with the theoretical calculation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (MCNP5, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). The RF was calibrated by placing the films at a depth of maximum dose (d(max)) in a solid water phantom and exposing it to doses from 0 to 500 cGy. The films were scanned using a transmission high-resolution HP scanner. The optical density of the film was obtained from the red component of the RGB images using ImageJ software. The per cent surface dose (PSD) and percentage depth dose (PDD) curve were obtained by placing film pieces at the surface and at different depths in the solid water phantom. TLDs were placed at a depth of 10 cm in a solid water phantom for calibration. Then the TLDs were placed at different depths in the water phantom and were exposed to obtain the PDD. The obtained PSD and PDD values were compared with those obtained using a cylindrical ionisation chamber. The PSD was also determined using Monte Carlo simulation of a LINAC 6-MV photon beam. The extrapolation method was used to determine the PSD for all measurements. The PSD was 15.0±3.6% for RF. The TLD measurement of the PSD was 16.0±5.0%. The (0.6 cm(3)) cylindrical ionisation chamber measurement of the PSD was 50.0±3.0%. The theoretical calculation using MCNP5 and DOSXYZnrc yielded a PSD of 15.0±2.0% and 15.7±2.2%. In this study, good agreement between PSD measurements was observed using RF and TLDs with the Monte Carlo calculation. However, the cylindrical chamber measurement yielded an overestimate of the PSD

  6. Measurement of patient radiation doses in certain urography procedures.

    PubMed

    Sulieman, A; Barakat, H; Zailae, A; Abuderman, A; Theodorou, K

    2015-07-01

    Patients are exposed to significant radiation doses during diagnostic and interventional urologic procedures. This study aimed to measure patient entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and to estimate the effective dose during intravenous urography (IVU), extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL), and ascending urethogram (ASU) procedures. ESAK was measured in patients using calibrated thermo luminance dosimeters, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 179 procedures were investigated. 27.9 % of the patients underwent IVU procedures, 27.9 % underwent ESWL procedures and 44.2 % underwent ASU procedures. The mean ESAK was 2.1, 4.18 and 4.9 mGy for IVU, ESWL, and ASU procedures, respectively. Differences in patient ESAK for the same procedure were observed. The mean ESAK values were comparable with those in previous studies. PMID:25899610

  7. Development of the Facial Skin Care Index: A Health-Related Outcomes Index for Skin Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, B. Alex; Rhee, John S.; Neuburg, Marcy; Burzynski, Mary L.; Nattinger, Ann B.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Existing health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) tools do not appear to capture patients' specific skin cancer concerns. OBJECTIVE To describe the conceptual foundation, item generation, reduction process, and reliability testing for the Facial Skin Cancer Index (FSCI), a HRQOL outcomes tool for skin cancer researchers and clinicians. METHODS Participants in Phases I to III consisted of adult patients (N = 134) diagnosed with biopsy-proven nonmelanoma cervicofacial skin cancer. Data were collected via self-report surveys and clinical records. RESULTS Seventy-one distinct items were generated in Phase I and rated for their importance by an independent sample during Phase II; 36 items representing six theoretical HRQOL domains were retained. Test–retest I results indicated that four subscales showed adequate reliability coefficients (α = 0.60 to 0.91). Twenty-six items remained for test–retest II. Results indicated excellent internal consistency for emotional, social, appearance, and modified financial/work subscales (range 0.79 to 0.95); test–retest correlation coefficients were consistent across time (range 0.81 to 0.97; lifestyle omitted). CONCLUSION Pretesting afforded the opportunity to select items that optimally met our a priori conceptual and psychometric criteria for high data quality. Phase IV testing (validity and sensitivity before surgery and 4 months after Mohs micrographic surgery) for the 20-item FSCI is under way. PMID:16875475

  8. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F.; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  9. Development of a fibre-optic dosemeter to measure the skin dose and percentage depth dose in the build-up region of therapeutic photon beams.

    PubMed

    Kim, K-A; Yoo, W J; Jang, K W; Moon, J; Han, K-T; Jeon, D; Park, J-Y; Cha, E-J; Lee, B

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a fibre-optic dosemeter (FOD) using an organic scintillator with a diameter of 0.5 mm for photon-beam therapy dosimetry was fabricated. The fabricated dosemeter has many advantages, including water equivalence, high spatial resolution, remote sensing and real-time measurement. The scintillating light generated from an organic-dosemeter probe embedded in a solid-water stack phantom is guided to a photomultiplier tube and an electrometer via 20 m of plastic optical fibre. Using this FOD, the skin dose and the percentage depth dose in the build-up region according to the depths of a solid-water stack phantom are measured with 6- and 15-MV photon-beam energies with field sizes of 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm(2), respectively. The results are compared with those measured using conventional dosimetry films. It is expected that the proposed FOD can be effectively used in radiotherapy dosimetry for accurate measurement of the skin dose and the depth dose distribution in the build-up region due to its high spatial resolution. PMID:22764176

  10. How to Check Your Skin for Skin Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Cancer Types Skin Cancer Skin Cancer Patient Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer Prevention Skin Cancer Screening Health Professional Skin Cancer Treatment Melanoma Treatment Merkel Cell Carcinoma Treatment Skin Cancer ...

  11. Infliximab-induced skin manifestations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Eligius Hellström, Alec; Färkkilä, Martti; Kolho, Kaija-Leena

    2016-05-01

    Objective The use of infliximab in rheumatoid and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) has been associated with a variety of adverse skin reactions, including paradoxical psoriatic lesions. The prevalence and possible predictors for these lesions were under observation in our cross-sectional prospective study. Material and methods Nurses screened the skin of 118 adult patients with IBD during infliximab infusions between 4 September 2013 and 30 September 2014 based on the structured questionnaire. Data on skin manifestations, concomitant medications, extraintestinal manifestations and inflammatory markers were collected for analysis. Results Non-infectious skin manifestations were observed in 27 (22.9%) patients during the study period, of which eight (29.6%) were new-onset, eight (29.6%) were exacerbations of existing lesions and 11 (40.7%) were baseline lesions that did not worsen during the study. Scaling eczema was the most commonly described skin manifestation (n = 8; 29.6%), followed by exacerbated atopic eczema (n = 5; 18.5%) and plausible infliximab-induced psoriasiform lesions (n = 5; 18.5%). The strongest associating factor for skin manifestations was Crohn's disease, in nearly 80% of afflicted patients. Conclusions Anti-TNF-α therapy is frequently associated with newly onset skin reactions, most commonly in patients with Crohn's disease. Non-infectious skin manifestations can be treated topically and do not require cessation of anti-TNF-α therapy. PMID:26728295

  12. 77 FR 69863 - Antiseptic Patient Preoperative Skin Preparation Products; Public Hearing; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-21

    ... be sterile. Bacteria can contaminate these products at the time of manufacture or during product use... reduce the number of bacteria on the skin prior to medical procedures or injections. Although they are... activity, patient preoperative skin preparations may become contaminated with bacteria. A number of...

  13. An analysis of skin prick test reactions in 656 asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, D J; Davies, R J; D'Souza, M F; Pepys, J

    1975-02-01

    Of 656 asthmatic patients referred specifically for allergy assessments, 544 (84 percent) gave positive immediate skin prick tests to at least one of 22 common allergens used routinely. Comparison of these skin test positive patients with the 102 (16 percent) who were skin test negative showed a number of significant differences. The majority of the skin test positive patients (52 percent) were less than 10 years old at the time of onset of the asthma, whereas, of the skin test negative patients, 56 percent were aged over 30 years at the time of onset. Seventy per cent report rhinitis compared with 48 per cent of the skin test negative patients, and 29 per cent reported infantile eczema compared with 9 per cent. Symptoms attributed to house dust, pollens, and animals were noted two to three times more frequently by the skin test positive patients, while corticosteroid drugs had been used more commonly by the skin test negative patients (45 percent compared with 35 percent). No significant differences were observed with the other factors studied, namely, history of urticaria or angio-oedema, family history of "allergic" disease, and awareness of sensitivity to foods, aspirin or penicillin. Prick test reactions in the skin test positive patients were most commonly seen to house dust or the acarine mite, Dermatophagoides farinae (82 percent), followed by pollens (66 percent), animal danders (38 percent), foods (16 percent), Aspergillus fumigatus (16 percent), and other moulds (21 percent). There was a highly significant association of positive history with positive prick test for all allergens studied. PMID:1168378

  14. An analysis of skin prick test reactions in 656 asthmatic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, D J; Davies, R J; D'Souza, M F; Pepys, J

    1975-01-01

    Of 656 asthmatic patients referred specifically for allergy assessments, 544 (84 percent) gave positive immediate skin prick tests to at least one of 22 common allergens used routinely. Comparison of these skin test positive patients with the 102 (16 percent) who were skin test negative showed a number of significant differences. The majority of the skin test positive patients (52 percent) were less than 10 years old at the time of onset of the asthma, whereas, of the skin test negative patients, 56 percent were aged over 30 years at the time of onset. Seventy per cent report rhinitis compared with 48 per cent of the skin test negative patients, and 29 per cent reported infantile eczema compared with 9 per cent. Symptoms attributed to house dust, pollens, and animals were noted two to three times more frequently by the skin test positive patients, while corticosteroid drugs had been used more commonly by the skin test negative patients (45 percent compared with 35 percent). No significant differences were observed with the other factors studied, namely, history of urticaria or angio-oedema, family history of "allergic" disease, and awareness of sensitivity to foods, aspirin or penicillin. Prick test reactions in the skin test positive patients were most commonly seen to house dust or the acarine mite, Dermatophagoides farinae (82 percent), followed by pollens (66 percent), animal danders (38 percent), foods (16 percent), Aspergillus fumigatus (16 percent), and other moulds (21 percent). There was a highly significant association of positive history with positive prick test for all allergens studied. Images PMID:1168378

  15. Individualization of piperacillin dosing for critically ill patients: dosing software to optimize antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Felton, T W; Roberts, J A; Lodise, T P; Van Guilder, M; Boselli, E; Neely, M N; Hope, W W

    2014-07-01

    Piperacillin-tazobactam is frequently used for empirical and targeted therapy of infections in critically ill patients. Considerable pharmacokinetic (PK) variability is observed in critically ill patients. By estimating an individual's PK, dosage optimization Bayesian estimation techniques can be used to calculate the appropriate piperacillin regimen to achieve desired drug exposure targets. The aim of this study was to establish a population PK model for piperacillin in critically ill patients and then analyze the performance of the model in the dose optimization software program BestDose. Linear, with estimated creatinine clearance and weight as covariates, Michaelis-Menten (MM) and parallel linear/MM structural models were fitted to the data from 146 critically ill patients with nosocomial infection. Piperacillin concentrations measured in the first dosing interval, from each of 8 additional individuals, combined with the population model were embedded into the dose optimization software. The impact of the number of observations was assessed. Precision was assessed by (i) the predicted piperacillin dosage and by (ii) linear regression of the observed-versus-predicted piperacillin concentrations from the second 24 h of treatment. We found that a linear clearance model with creatinine clearance and weight as covariates for drug clearance and volume of distribution, respectively, best described the observed data. When there were at least two observed piperacillin concentrations, the dose optimization software predicted a mean piperacillin dosage of 4.02 g in the 8 patients administered piperacillin doses of 4.00 g. Linear regression of the observed-versus-predicted piperacillin concentrations for 8 individuals after 24 h of piperacillin dosing demonstrated an r(2) of >0.89. In conclusion, for most critically ill patients, individualized piperacillin regimens delivering a target serum piperacillin concentration is achievable. Further validation of the dosage

  16. SU-E-I-15: Comparison of Radiation Dose for Radiography and EOS in Adolescent Scoliosis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, B; Walz-Flannigan, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate patient radiation dose for whole spine imaging using EOS, a new biplanar slot-scanning radiographic system and compare with standard scoliosis radiography. Methods: The EOS imaging system (EOS Imaging, Paris, France) consists of two orthogonal x-ray fan beams which simultaneously acquire frontal and lateral projection images of a standing patient. The patient entrance skin air kerma was measured for each projection image using manufacturer-recommended exposure parameters for spine imaging. Organ and effective doses were estimated using a commercially-available Monte Carlo simulation program (PCXMC, STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki, Finland) for a 15 year old mathematical phantom model. These results were compared to organ and effective dose estimated for scoliosis radiography using computed radiography (CR) with standard exposure parameters obtained from a survey of pediatric radiographic projections. Results: The entrance skin air kerma for EOS was found to be 0.18 mGy and 0.33 mGy for posterior-anterior (PA) and lateral projections, respectively. This compares to 0.76 mGy and 1.4 mGy for CR, PA and lateral projections. Effective dose for EOS (PA and lateral projections combined) is 0.19 mSv compared to 0.51 mSv for CR. Conclusion: The EOS slot-scanning radiographic system allows for reduced patient radiation dose in scoliosis patients as compared to standard CR radiography.

  17. Electrical measurement of moisturizing effect on skin hydration and barrier function in psoriasis patients.

    PubMed

    Rim, J H; Jo, S J; Park, J Y; Park, B D; Youn, J I

    2005-07-01

    Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) in psoriatic skin lesions seems to be related to the severity of the psoriasis, and the electrical capacitance and conductance of the skin are indicators of the hydration level of the stratum corneum. We compared the characteristics of these electrical measurements, in assessing the persistent effect of a moisturizing cream on skin hydration and barrier function in psoriasis patients. Seventeen Korean psoriasis patients were recruited. Their right leg was treated with the moisturizer twice daily for 6 weeks, while their left leg was used as the control site. For each patient, one psoriatic plaque on each leg was selected as the involved psoriatic lesion. Uninvolved psoriatic skin was regarded as the apparently healthy looking skin 4-5 cm away from the periphery of the psoriatic lesion. The TEWL, electrical capacitance and conductance were measured, in order to evaluate the barrier function and hydration level of the stratum corneum. The clinical and biophysical data for each patient were recorded at the start of the study and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks. The degree of skin dryness at the applied area improved progressively. The electrical capacitance at the treated psoriatic lesion increased significantly after 2 weeks, and this improvement was maintained during the entire study period. However, no noticeable change was observed in the electrical conductance. The TEWL showed an inverse pattern to that of the skin capacitance, decreasing during the study period. The skin capacitance and TEWL exhibited good correlation with the visual assessment of skin dryness, but the skin conductance did not. Our data suggest that electrical capacitance and TEWL may be useful in the evaluation of the effect of a moisturizer on the hydration status and barrier function of psoriatic skin. PMID:15953083

  18. Radiation dose estimation of patients undergoing lumbar spine radiography

    PubMed Central

    Gyekye, Prince Kwabena; Simon, Adu; Geoffrey, Emi-Reynolds; Johnson, Yeboah; Stephen, Inkoom; Engmann, Cynthia Kaikor; Samuel, Wotorchi-Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Radiation dose to organs of 100 adult patients undergoing lumbar spine (LS) radiography at a University Hospital have been assessed. Free in air kerma measurement using an ionization chamber was used for the patient dosimetry. Organ and effective dose to the patients were estimated using PCXMC (version 1.5) software. The organs that recorded significant dose due to LS radiography were lungs, stomach, liver, adrenals, kidney, pancreas, spleen, galbladder, and the heart. It was observed that the stomach recorded the highest dose (48.2 ± 1.2 μGy) for LS anteroposterior (AP). The spleen also recorded the highest dose (41.2 ± 0.5 μGy) for LS lateral (LAT). The mean entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) of LS LAT (122.2 μGy) was approximately twice that of LS AP (76.3 μGy), but the effective dose for both examinations were approximately the same (LS LAT = 8.6 μSv and LS AP = 10.4 μSv). The overall stochastic health effect of radiation to patients due to LS radiography in the University Hospital is independent of the projection of the examination (AP or LAT). PMID:24672153

  19. IMPLICATIONS OF PATIENT CENTRING ON ORGAN DOSE IN COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Bharti; Sandborg, Michael; Althén, Jonas Nilsson

    2016-06-01

    Automatic exposure control (AEC) in computed tomography (CT) facilitates optimisation of dose absorbed by the patient. The use of AEC requires appropriate 'patient centring' within the gantry, since positioning the patient off-centre may affect both image quality and absorbed dose. The aim of this experimental study was to measure the variation in organ and abdominal surface dose during CT examinations of the head, neck/thorax and abdomen. The dose was compared at the isocenter with two off-centre positions-ventral and dorsal to the isocenter. Measurements were made with an anthropomorphic adult phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters. Organs and surfaces for ventral regions received lesser dose (5.6-39.0 %) than the isocenter when the phantom was positioned +3 cm off-centre. Similarly, organ and surface doses for dorsal regions were reduced by 5.0-21.0 % at -5 cm off-centre. Therefore, correct vertical positioning of the patient at the gantry isocenter is important to maintain optimal imaging conditions. PMID:26743256

  20. DOSE-RESPONSE STUDIES OF SODIUM ARSENITE IN THE SKIN OF K6/ODC TRANSGENIC MOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    It has previously been observed that chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic and/or its metabolites increase(s) tumor frequency in the skin of K6/ODC transgenic mice. To identify potential biomarkers and modes of action for this skin tumorigenicity, gene expression profiles w...

  1. Skin dose from neutron-activated soil for early entrants following the A-bomb detonation in Hiroshima: contribution from beta and gamma rays.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Imanaka, Tetsuji; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2008-07-01

    Epilation was reported among atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, including "early entrance survivors" who entered the cities after the bombings. The absorbed dose to the skin by neutron-activated soil via beta and gamma rays has been estimated in a preliminary fashion, for these survivors in Hiroshima. Estimation was done for external exposures from activated soil on the ground as well as skin and hair contamination from activated soil particles, using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4C. Assuming 26 mum thickness of activated soil on the skin as an example, the skin dose was estimated to be about 0.8 Gy, for an exposure scenario that includes the first 7 days after the bombing at 1 m above the ground at the hypocenter. In this case, 99% of the total skin dose came from activated radionuclides in the soil, i.e., 0.19 and 0.63 Gy due to beta and gamma rays, respectively. In contrast, contribution to skin dose due to skin contamination with soil particles was found to be about 1%. To make it comparable to the exposure by neutron-activated soil on the ground, a soil thickness on the skin of about 1 mm would be required, which seems to be difficult to keep for a long time. Fifty-five percent of the 7-day skin dose was delivered during the first hour after the bombing. Our estimates of the skin dose are lower than the conventionally reported threshold of 2 Gy for epilation. It should be noted, however, that the possibility of more extreme exposure scenarios for example for entrants who received much heavier soil contamination on their skin cannot be excluded. PMID:18496704

  2. High reactive oxygen species in fibrotic and nonfibrotic skin of patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bourji, Khalil; Meyer, Alain; Chatelus, Emmanuel; Pincemail, Joël; Pigatto, Erika; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Singh, François; Charlier, Corinne; Geny, Bernard; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Punzi, Leonardo; Cozzi, Franco; Sibilia, Jean

    2015-10-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic multisystemic connective tissue disease characterized by progressive fibrosis affecting skin and internal organs. Despite serious efforts to unveil the pathogenic mechanisms of SSc, they are still unclear. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in affected patients have been shown, and ROS are suggested to play a role in fibrosis pathogenesis. In this study we evaluate ROS levels in nonfibrotic and fibrotic skin of patients with SSc and we compare them with those obtained from healthy controls. We enrolled nine SSc patients fulfilling the EULAR/ACR classification criteria and seven healthy controls. Patients included four men and five women with mean age of 46 ± 10 years. Controls were matched by sex and age. All patients were affected by the diffuse cutaneous form of SSc and the ANA pattern anti-Scl70. Mean disease duration was 7.5 ± 5 years. Skin involvement was evaluated by modified Rodnan skin score. Skin samples (4-mm punch biopsy) were taken from fibrotic skin and nonfibrotic skin of patients and from healthy controls as well. To detect ROS, specimens were analyzed immediately after sampling by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Blood samples were drawn from all patients and controls to assess oxidative stress biomarkers. ROS levels (expressed as median and range, in nmol/L/min/mg of dry weight) were 24.7 (10.9-47.0) in fibrotic skin, 18.7 (7.3-34.0) in nonfibrotic skin, and 7.7 (3.5-13.6) in healthy control skin. ROS levels in fibrotic and nonfibrotic skin of SSc patients were significantly higher than in healthy controls (p = 0.002 and p = 0.009, respectively). ROS levels in fibrotic skin were raised in comparison to nonfibrotic skin, when samples related to each patient were compared (p = 0.01). ROS levels in fibrotic skin were correlated with forced vital capacity (r = -0.75, p = 0.02) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.70, p = 0.04). All other clinical and lab parameters showed no

  3. Ciprofloxacin utility as antifibrotic in the skin of patients with scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Rubén, Enríquez-Casillas; Manuel, Vázquez-Rodríguez; Agustín, Ochoa-Ramírez; Huerta, Miguel; Antonio, Fraga-Mouret; Iván, Delgado-Enciso

    2010-04-01

    Scleroderma is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder that is characterized by microvascular injury, excessive fibrosis of the skin, and distinctive visceral changes that can involve the lungs, heart, kidneys and gastrointestinal tract. To date, although several drugs have been used to reduce fibrosis in scleroderma, there exists no effective pharmacological treatment. To determine if oral ciprofloxacin reduces the severity of scleroderma, a controlled, double-blind randomized clinical trial, with placebo, was conducted on 32 patients with diffuse and limited scleroderma, who received oral ciprofloxacin (250 mg) or placebo every 12 h. Skin induration and thickness of the patients were clinically evaluated using the modified Rodnan skin score at the beginning and once per month during 6 months of treatment with ciprofloxacin. To monitor progression of the disease, a monthly hematological exam and clinical evaluation was done to explore renal and hepatic function for each patient. Thirty patients completed the study; one from the treatment group was excluded when presenting a skin reaction and another from the placebo group abandoned the study due to an exacerbation of disease. At the sixth month of the study, the ciprofloxacin group of patients showed a diminution in the modified Rodnan skin score (58% vs 18%, P = 0.003), showing no significant alterations in the laboratory assays in either groups of patients. Our results suggest that oral administration of ciprofloxacin for 6 months reduces the severity of symptoms affecting the skin of patients with systemic scleroderma, and does so without important secondary effects. PMID:20507401

  4. Increasing the dose of varenicline in patients who do not respond to the standard dose.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ruiz, Carlos A; Barrios, Malena; Peña, Sandra; Cicero, Ana; Mayayo, Marisa; Cristóbal, Maribel; Perera, Lidia

    2013-12-01

    Varenicline is a partial agonist of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. It is effective at dosages of 2 mg/d for 12 weeks, but not for all smokers. It is possible that increasing the dose can increase the drug efficacy. We reviewed the clinical records of consecutive smokers who had been treated in 2 smoking cessation services with varenicline at doses of 3 mg/d. In all cases, the treatment program consisted of a combination of behavioral therapy and drug treatment. Varenicline was prescribed at a standard dosage for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks of treatment, the dose was increased to 3 mg/d if patients tolerated varenicline well and continued smoking or, in spite of not smoking, if they experienced severe withdrawal symptoms. The sample included 73 patients, of whom 52 continued to smoke at 8 weeks and 21 stopped smoking but reported severe withdrawal discomfort. Carbon monoxide-validated continuous abstinence rates from week 9 to week 24 were 40% and 48% in these 2 subgroups, respectively. The increase in dosage was associated with adverse events in 22 patients (30%). These were mostly mild and included nausea, vomiting, abnormal dreams, and insomnia. Only 2 patients discontinued treatment (both because of nausea and vomiting). Thus, we conclude that increasing the varenicline dose in smokers who do not respond to the standard dose after 8 weeks of treatment is associated with limited adverse events and high success rates. PMID:24290118

  5. Comparison of radiation dose exposure in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention vs. peripheral intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bartus, Stanislaw; Rakowski, Tomasz; Bobrowska, Beata; Rutka, Joanna; Zabowka, Anna; Tokarek, Tomasz; Dudek, Dariusz; Dubiel, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most endovascular techniques are associated with patient and personal exposure to radiation during the procedure. Ionising radiation can cause deterministic effects, such as skin injury, as well as stochastic effects, which increase the long-term risk of malignancy. Endovascular operators need to be aware of radiation danger and take all necessary steps to minimise the risk to patients and staff. Some procedures, especially percutaneous peripheral artery revascularisation, are associated with increased radiation dose due to time-consuming operations. There is limited data comparing radiation dose during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of peripheral arteries. Aim To compare the radiation dose in percutaneous coronary vs. peripheral interventions in one centre with a uniform system of protection methods. Material and methods A total of 352 patients were included in the study. This included 217 patients undergoing PCI (single and multiple stenting) and 135 patients undergoing PTA (in lower extremities, carotid artery, renal artery, and subclavian artery). Radiation dose, fluoroscopy time, and total procedural time were reviewed. Cumulative radiation dose was measured in gray (Gy) units. Results The total procedural time was significantly higher in PTA (PCI vs. PTA: 60 (45–85) min vs. 75 (50–100) min), p < 0.001. The radiation dose for PCI procedures was significantly higher in comparison to PTA (PCI vs. PTA: 1.36 (0.83–2.23) Gy vs. 0.27 (0.13–0.46) Gy), p < 0.001. There was no significant difference in the fluoroscopy time (PCI vs. PTA: 12.9 (8.2–21.5) min vs. 14.4 (8.0–22.6) min), p = 0.6. The analysis of correlation between radiation dose and fluoroscopy time in PCI and PTA interventions separately shows a strong correlation in PCI group (r = 0.785). However, a weak correlation was found in PTA group (r = 0.317). Conclusions The radiation dose was significantly higher during PCI in

  6. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Maria F.; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Li Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar Trade-Mark-Sign DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium ({approx}2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by {+-} 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., {approx}d{sub max} of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  7. Patient specific tube current modulation for CT dose reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yannan; Yin, Zhye; Yao, Yangyang; Wang, Hui; Wu, Mingye; Kalra, Mannudeep; De Man, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Radiation exposure during CT imaging has drawn growing concern from academia, industry as well as the general public. Sinusoidal tube current modulation has been available in most commercial products and used routinely in clinical practice. To further exploit the potential of tube current modulation, Sperl et al. proposed a Computer-Assisted Scan Protocol and Reconstruction (CASPAR) scheme [6] that modulates the tube current based on the clinical applications and patient specific information. The purpose of this study is to accelerate the CASPAR scheme to make it more practical for clinical use and investigate its dose benefit for different clinical applications. The Monte Carlo simulation in the original CASPAR scheme was substituted by the dose reconstruction to accelerate the optimization process. To demonstrate the dose benefit, we used the CATSIM package generate the projection data and perform standard FDK reconstruction. The NCAT phantom at thorax position was used in the simulation. We chose three clinical cases (routine chest scan, coronary CT angiography with and without breast avoidance) and compared the dose level with different mA modulation schemes (patient specific, sinusoidal and constant mA) with matched image quality. The simulation study of three clinical cases demonstrated that the patient specific mA modulation could significantly reduce the radiation dose compared to sinusoidal modulation. The dose benefits depend on the clinical application and object shape. With matched image quality, for chest scan the patient specific mA profile reduced the dose by about 15% compared to the sinusoid mA modulation; for the organ avoidance scan the dose reduction to the breast was over 50% compared to the constant mA baseline.

  8. Preceding Annular Skin Lesions in a Patient with Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Hee Jin; Kim, Hyung Ok; Lee, Jun Young

    2015-01-01

    The cutaneous manifestations of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) are variable and nonspecific. A 42-year-old man presented with multiple annular, erythematous patches on the trunk for 3 months. Two months later, he presented with bullae along with high fever. The laboratory examination showed pancytopenia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. The bone marrow biopsy specimen showed an active hemophagocytosis. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of HLH was concluded. After five cycles of chemotherapy, his skin lesion completely resolved. Taking the results together, we suggest that annular skin lesion can be added to the list of cutaneous manifestations of HLH. PMID:26512177

  9. Doses to patients from diagnostic radiology in France

    SciTech Connect

    Maccia, C.; Benedittini, M.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F.

    1988-04-01

    Reported here are results of a 1982 national survey in France to establish the collective effective dose equivalent associated with the main types of radiological examinations practiced annually in this country (except nuclear medicine, C.T. scans, dental radiology and mass chest screening). This report describes the methodology followed in achieving dose measurements either on an anthropomorphic phantom or directly on the patient, and it highlights the importance of the radiological procedures (number of x-ray films, fluoroscopy screening time, etc.) on the patient organ doses. The estimated collective effective dose equivalent associated with these radiological practices is 86,000 person-Sv, i.e., an individual effective dose equivalent of 1.58 mSv y-1; the genetically significant dose figure is 0.29 mSv and the collective red bone marrow dose due to 45 million x-ray exams practiced in France (1982) is 40,300 person-Sv, i.e. 0.74 mSv per inhabitant.

  10. Dialytic dose in pediatric continuous renal replacement therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Guzzi, Francesco; Tuccinardi, Germana; Romagnoli, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    Although universally recognized as a crucial component of renal replacement therapy (RRT), dialytic dose has not been investigated in children with renal failure, differently from the adult population. Consequently, clear indications on the adequacy of continuous RRT in pediatric population is currently missing and wide variations in clinical practice exist worldwide. Fluid balance has been identified as a key factor in affecting outcomes these patients. Nonetheless, the concept and the precise evaluation of the dialytic dose for continuous pediatric RRT seems crucial, especially in light of the small body surface area of neonates and infants that might result into a difficult dose calculation. The present review clearly demonstrates that dialytic dose in pediatric RRT has been underestimated by scientific literature. Nowadays, the absence of any specific dedicated prospective study and the tendency to overlook theoretical basis of pediatric dialytic dose have led to the absence of a standard prescription: worldwide clinical practice ranges from very high doses to lower ones, also depending on different ways of estimating patients' sizes and solutes' volume of distribution. Large structured studies are warranted in order to define a reference dialytic dose for critically ill children, capable to cope an adequate solute control to gentle and safe treatments. PMID:27467103

  11. Characterization of a cable-free system based on p-type MOSFET detectors for 'in vivo' entrance skin dose measurements in interventional radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Falco, Maria Daniela; D'Andrea, Marco; Strigari, Lidia; D'Alessio, Daniela; Quagliani, Francesco; Santoni, Riccardo; Bosco, Alessia Lo

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: During radiological interventional procedures (RIP) the skin of a patient under examination may undergo a prolonged x-ray exposure, receiving a dose as high as 5 Gy in a single session. This paper describes the use of the OneDose{sup TM} cable-free system based on p-type MOSFET detectors to determine the entrance skin dose (ESD) at selected points during RIP. Methods: At first, some dosimetric characteristics of the detector, such as reproducibility, linearity, and fading, have been investigated using a C-arc as a source of radiation. The reference setting (RS) was: 80 kV energy, 40 cm Multiplication-Sign 40 cm field of view (FOV), current-time product of 50 mAs and source to skin distance (SSD) of 50 cm. A calibrated PMX III solid state detector was used as the reference detector and Gafchromic{sup Registered-Sign} films have been used as an independent dosimetric system to test the entire procedure. A calibration factor for the RS and correction factors as functions of tube voltage and FOV size have been determined. Results: Reproducibility ranged from 4% at low doses (around 10 cGy as measured by the reference detector) to about 1% for high doses (around 2 Gy). The system response was found to be linear with respect to both dose measured with the PMX III and tube voltage. The fading test has shown that the maximum deviation from the optimal reading conditions (3 min after a single irradiation) was 9.1% corresponding to four irradiations in one hour read 3 min after the last exposure. The calibration factor in the RS has shown that the system response at the kV energy range is about four times larger than in the MV energy range. A fifth order and fourth order polynomial functions were found to provide correction factors for tube voltage and FOV size, respectively, in measurement settings different than the RS. ESDs measured with the system after applying the proper correction factors agreed within one standard deviation (SD) with the corresponding ESDs

  12. Analysis of patient CT dose data using virtualdose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Richard

    X-ray computer tomography has many benefits to medical and research applications. Recently, over the last decade CT has had a large increase in usage in hospitals and medical diagnosis. In pediatric care, from 2000 to 2006, abdominal CT scans increased by 49 % and chest CT by 425 % in the emergency room (Broder 2007). Enormous amounts of effort have been performed across multiple academic and government groups to determine an accurate measure of organ dose to patients who undergo a CT scan due to the inherent risks with ionizing radiation. Considering these intrinsic risks, CT dose estimating software becomes a necessary tool that health care providers and radiologist must use to determine many metrics to base the risks versus rewards of having an x-ray CT scan. This thesis models the resultant organ dose as body mass increases for patients with all other related scan parameters fixed. In addition to this,this thesis compares a modern dose estimating software, VirtualDose CT to two other programs, CT-Expo and ImPACT CT. The comparison shows how the software's theoretical basis and the phantom they use to represent the human body affect the range of results in organ dose. CT-Expo and ImPACT CT dose estimating software uses a different model for anatomical representation of the organs in the human body and the results show how that approach dramatically changes the outcome. The results categorizes four datasets as compared to the three software types where the appropriate phantom was available. Modeling was done to simulate chest abdominal pelvis scans and whole body scans. Organ dose difference versus body mass index shows as body mass index (BMI) ranges from 23.5 kg/m 2 to 45 kg/m2 the amount of organ dose also trends a percent change from -4.58 to -176.19 %. Comparing organ dose difference with increasing x-ray tube potential from 120 kVp to 140 kVp the percent change in organ dose increases from 55 % to 65 % across all phantoms. In comparing VirtualDose to CT

  13. Phosphoproteomics profiling of human skin fibroblast cells reveals pathways and proteins affected by low doses of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Miller, John H.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Du, Xiuxia; Livesay, Eric A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Wang, Yingchun; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2010-11-30

    Background: High doses of ionizing radiation result in biological damage, however the precise relationships between long term health effects, including cancer, and low dose exposures remain poorly understood and are currently extrapolated using high dose exposure data. Identifying the signaling pathways and individual proteins affected at the post-translational level by radiation should shed valuable insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate dose dependent responses to radiation. Principle Findings: We have identified 6845 unique phosphopeptides (2566 phosphoproteins) from control and irradiated (2 and 50 cGy) primary human skin fibroblasts one hour post-exposure. Dual statistical analyses based on spectral counts and peak intensities identified 287 phosphopeptides (from 231 proteins) and 244 phosphopeptides (from 182 proteins) that varied significantly following exposure to 2 and 50 cGy respectively. This screen identified phosphorylation sites on proteins with known roles in radiation responses including TP53BP1 as well as previously unidentified radiation responsive proteins such as the candidate tumor suppressor SASH1. Bioinformatics analyses suggest that low and high doses of radiation affect both overlapping and unique biological processes and suggest a role of MAP kinase and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the radiation response as well as differential regulation of p53 networks at low and high doses of radiation. Conlcusions: Our results represent the most comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteomes of human primary fibroblasts exposed to multiple doses of ionizing radiation published to date and provides a basis for the systems level identification of biological processes, molecular pathways and individual proteins regulated in a dose dependent manner by ionizing radiation. Further study of these modified proteins and affected networks should help to define the molecular mechanisms that regulate biological responses to radiation at

  14. Insights into bacterial colonization of intensive care patients' skin: the effect of chlorhexidine daily bathing.

    PubMed

    Cassir, N; Papazian, L; Fournier, P-E; Raoult, D; La Scola, B

    2015-05-01

    Skin is a major reservoir of bacterial pathogens in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this study was to assess the skin bacterial richness and diversity in ICU patients and the effect of CHG daily bathing on skin microbiota. Twenty ICU patients were included during an interventional period with CHG daily bathing (n = 10) and a control period (n = 10). At day seven of hospitalization, eight skin swab samples (nares, axillary vaults, inguinal creases, manubrium and back) were taken from each patient. The bacterial identification was performed by microbial culturomics. We used the Shannon index to compare the diversity. We obtained 5,000 colonies that yielded 61 bacterial species (9.15 ± 3.7 per patient), including 15 (24.5 %) that had never been cultured from non-pathological human skin before, and three (4.9 %) that had never been cultured from human samples before. Notably, Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from all sites. In the water-and-soap group, there was a higher risk of colonization with Gram-negative bacteria (OR = 6.05, 95 % CI [1.67-21.90]; P = 0.006). In the CHG group, we observed more patients colonized by sporulating bacteria (9/10 vs. 3/10; P = 0.019) with a reduced skin bacterial richness (P = 0.004) and lower diversity (0.37, 95 % CI [0.33; 0.42] vs. 0.50, 95 % CI [0.48; 0.52]). Gram-negative bacteria are frequent and disseminated components of the transient skin flora in ICU patients. CHG daily bathing is associated with a reduction in Gram-negative bacteria colonization together with substantial skin microbiota shifts. PMID:25604707

  15. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  16. Skin toxicity in BRAF(V600) mutated metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients treated with vemurafenib

    PubMed Central

    Huszno, Joanna; Slomian, Grzegorz; Nieckula, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of orally available BRAF kinase inhibitor – vemurafenib is associated with numerous adverse skin reactions. Aim To assess the safety and early side effects of vemurafenib treatment in the unselected group of patients treated at the outpatient clinic, in particular the assessment of the incidence of skin cancer. Material and methods We carried out a systematic study of patients (pts) treated with vemurafenib. Skin toxicity during vemurafenib therapy was analyzed. Toxicity was determined on the basis of the toxicity scale CTCAE, version 4.0. Results The most common cutaneous side effects were hyperkeratotic perifollicular rash (69%) and photosensitivity (15%). Skin rash developed more frequently in the first month of treatment. Squamous cell carcinoma occurred in 38% of patients. Patients with skin cancer development during vemurafenib therapy had non-significantly longer overall survival (OS) than patients without skin cancer, p = 0.4. Skin cancer developed more often in women than in men (60% vs. 25%), p = 0.249. It was detected only in patients with normal weight compared to overweight patients (55% vs. 0), p = 0.09. The median OS was 26 months and median OS from the time of distant metastases diagnosis was 9.8 months. In patients with a low body mass index, shorter OS was observed, p = 0.09. Conclusions The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma was high (38%). This study has many limitations mostly due to a small group of patients. That is why the results should be taken into consideration with caution. The proper symptomatic treatment in cooperation with dermatologists allows to continue the vemurafenib therapy. PMID:26985180

  17. Differences Between Psoriasis Patients and Skin-healthy Controls Concerning Appraisal of Touching, Shame and Disgust.

    PubMed

    Lahousen, Theresa; Kupfer, Jörg; Gieler, Uwe; Hofer, Angelika; Linder, M Dennis; Schut, Christina

    2016-08-23

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease associated with high levels of psychological distress and considerable life impact. Feelings of shame and stigmatization can lead to avoidance of social activity and intimacy. In this study, the questionnaire TSD-Q was used to evaluate pleasure in touching oneself and in a partnership, parental touching during childhood and (skin-related) shame and disgust. Skin-related disgust and shame were significantly higher in psoriatic patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, psoriasis-patients scored significantly lower than skin-healthy controls concerning appraisal of self-touching and parental touching. In contrast, psoriasis-patients scored higher concerning appraisal of touching in a partnership. Due to the fact that low self-esteem might enhance the negative evaluation of touch and the feelings of shame and disgust, psychological interventions should be integrated in the treatment of psoriasis. PMID:27282125

  18. The altered landscape of the human skin microbiome in patients with primary immunodeficiencies

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Julia; Freeman, Alexandra F.; Park, Morgan; Sokolic, Robert; Candotti, Fabio; Holland, Steven M.; Segre, Julia A.; Kong, Heidi H.

    2013-01-01

    While landmark studies have shown that microbiota activate and educate host immunity, how immune systems shape microbiomes and contribute to disease is incompletely characterized. Primary immunodeficiency (PID) patients suffer recurrent microbial infections, providing a unique opportunity to address this issue. To investigate the potential influence of host immunity on the skin microbiome, we examined skin microbiomes in patients with rare monogenic PIDs: hyper-IgE (STAT3-deficient), Wiskott-Aldrich, and dedicator of cytokinesis 8 syndromes. While specific immunologic defects differ, a shared hallmark is atopic dermatitis (AD)–like eczema. We compared bacterial and fungal skin microbiomes (41 PID, 13 AD, 49 healthy controls) at four clinically relevant sites representing the major skin microenvironments. PID skin displayed increased ecological permissiveness with altered population structures, decreased site specificity and temporal stability, and colonization with microbial species not observed in controls, including Clostridium species and Serratia marcescens. Elevated fungal diversity and increased representation of opportunistic fungi (Candida, Aspergillus) supported increased PID skin permissiveness, suggesting that skin may serve as a reservoir for the recurrent fungal infections observed in these patients. The overarching theme of increased ecological permissiveness in PID skin was counterbalanced by the maintenance of a phylum barrier in which colonization remained restricted to typical human-associated phyla. Clinical parameters, including markers of disease severity, were positively correlated with prevalence of Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium, and other less abundant taxa. This study examines differences in microbial colonization and community stability in PID skin and informs our understanding of host–microbiome interactions, suggesting a bidirectional dialogue between skin commensals and the host organism. PMID:24170601

  19. DOSE-RESPONSE FOR UV-INDUCED IMMUNE SUPPRESSION IN PEOPLE OF COLOR: DIFFERENCES BASED ON ERYTHEMAL REACTIVITY RATHER THAN SKIN PIGMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is known to suppress immune responses in human subjects. The purpose of this study was to develop dose responses across a broad range of skin pigmentation in order to facilitate risk assessment. UVR was administered using FS 20 bulbs. Skin pigmentation...

  20. Patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk estimation in CT: Part II. Application to patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xiang; Samei, Ehsan; Segars, W. Paul; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Colsher, James G.; Toncheva, Greta; Yoshizumi, Terry T.; Frush, Donald P.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Current methods for estimating and reporting radiation dose from CT examinations are largely patient-generic; the body size and hence dose variation from patient to patient is not reflected. Furthermore, the current protocol designs rely on dose as a surrogate for the risk of cancer incidence, neglecting the strong dependence of risk on age and gender. The purpose of this study was to develop a method for estimating patient-specific radiation dose and cancer risk from CT examinations. Methods: The study included two patients (a 5-week-old female patient and a 12-year-old male patient), who underwent 64-slice CT examinations (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare) of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis at our institution in 2006. For each patient, a nonuniform rational B-spine (NURBS) based full-body computer model was created based on the patient's clinical CT data. Large organs and structures inside the image volume were individually segmented and modeled. Other organs were created by transforming an existing adult male or female full-body computer model (developed from visible human data) to match the framework defined by the segmented organs, referencing the organ volume and anthropometry data in ICRP Publication 89. A Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated for dose simulation on the LightSpeed VCT scanner was used to estimate patient-specific organ dose, from which effective dose and risks of cancer incidence were derived. Patient-specific organ dose and effective dose were compared with patient-generic CT dose quantities in current clinical use: the volume-weighted CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and the effective dose derived from the dose-length product (DLP). Results: The effective dose for the CT examination of the newborn patient (5.7 mSv) was higher but comparable to that for the CT examination of the teenager patient (4.9 mSv) due to the size-based clinical CT protocols at our institution, which employ lower scan techniques for smaller

  1. Skin vasomotor hemiparesis followed by overactivity: characteristic thermography findings in a patient with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We present a 21-year-old female with Horner syndrome due to spinal cord infarction. In this patient, infrared thermography revealed a hemibody skin temperature increase followed by excessive focal decreases, indicating skin vasomotor hemiparesis and overactivity. PMID:26811085

  2. Doses to patients from dental radiology in France

    SciTech Connect

    Benedittini, M.; Maccia, C.; Lefaure, C.; Fagnani, F. )

    1989-06-01

    In France, a national study was undertaken to estimate both dental radiology practices (equipment and activity) and the associated population collective dose. This study was done in two steps: A nationwide survey was conducted on the practitioner categories involved in dental radiology, and dosimetric measurements were performed on patients and on an anthropomorphic phantom by using conventional dental x-ray machines and pantomographic units. A total of 27.5 x 10(6) films were estimated to have been performed in 1984; 6% of them were pantomographic and 94% were conventional. Most of the organ doses measured for one intra-oral film were lower than 1 mGy (100 mrad); pantomogram dose values were generally higher than intra-oral ones. The collective effective dose equivalent figure was 2,000 person-Sv (2 x 10(5) person rem) leading to a per head dose equivalent of 0.037 mSv (3.7 mrem). The study allowed authors to identify ways to reduce the patient dose in France (e.g., implementing the use of long cone devices and controlling darkroom practices).

  3. Patient doses in abdominal aortogram and aorta femoral runoff examinations.

    PubMed

    Chu, R Y; Parry, C; Thompson, W; Loeffler, C

    1998-11-01

    Radiation doses to adult male patients from abdominal aortogram and aorta femoral runoff examinations in a medical center were determined with the help of a dose-area product meter. The abdominal aortogram and aorta femoral runoff examination consisted of scout radiographs, fluoroscopy (to position a catheter near the area of interest), and serial films (to record the flow of contrast media). Measurements were converted to effective doses with the help of published results from Monte Carlo simulation calculations. Data from 19 male adult patients weighing 53 to 86 kg were analyzed. The resulting total effective dose had a value of 14.0 +/- 4A mSv (mean and standard deviation). The percent contribution by fluoroscopy was 18.5 +/- 9.9%. The fluoroscopy effective dose had a stronger correlation with the dose-area product (correlation coefficient of 0.97) than with duration of exposure (correlation coefficient of 0.84). Most of the radiation exposure in the observed abdominal aortogram and aorta femoral runoff examination was attributed to radiography. PMID:9790557

  4. Evaluation of radiation exposure dose at double-balloon endoscopy for the patients with small bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagura, Asuka; Nakamura, Masanao; Watanabe, Osamu; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Ohno, Eizaburo; Miyahara, Ryoji; Kawashima, Hiroki; Koyama, Shuji; Hinami, Tomoki; Goto, Hidemi; Hirooka, Yoshiki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Double-balloon endoscopy (DBE) is useful for the diagnosis and treatment of small bowel diseases. Although fluoroscopy is used to confirm the position of endoscope at DBE, the endoscopist does not have the knowledge with regard to the radiation exposure dose. In this study, we evaluated the absorbed dose during DBE in patients with suspected or established small bowel diseases. This was a retrospective study in which the estimated fluoroscopic radiation absorbed doses loaded on the small bowel and skin were determined according to the data of the referential X-ray experiment with a human body phantom. The subjects were 415 DBEs preformed in total. The mean small bowel absorbed doses on antegrade and retrograde DBEs were 42.2 and 53.8 mGy, respectively, showing that the organ dose applied in retrograde DBE was significantly higher (P<0.0001). The mean skin absorbed doses of them were 79.2 and 101.0 mGy, respectively, showing that the dose was also significantly higher on retrograde DBE (P<0.0001). Of 27 cases who were applied endoscopic balloon dilation, the mean fluoroscopy time was 16.0 minutes, and mean small bowel and skin absorbed doses were 121.9 and 228.9 mGy, respectively. In conclusion, endoscopist should be careful for reducing the organ exposure dose at DBE, particularly for the lower abdominal region. Abbreviations: Double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE), endoscopic balloon dilation (EBD), endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (DBERCP), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) PMID:27578908

  5. Automatic computed tomography patient dose calculation using DICOM header metadata.

    PubMed

    Jahnen, A; Kohler, S; Hermen, J; Tack, D; Back, C

    2011-09-01

    The present work describes a method that calculates the patient dose values in computed tomography (CT) based on metadata contained in DICOM images in support of patient dose studies. The DICOM metadata is preprocessed to extract necessary calculation parameters. Vendor-specific DICOM header information is harmonized using vendor translation tables and unavailable DICOM tags can be completed with a graphical user interface. CT-Expo, an MS Excel application for calculating the radiation dose, is used to calculate the patient doses. All relevant data and calculation results are stored for further analysis in a relational database. Final results are compiled by utilizing data mining tools. This solution was successfully used for the 2009 CT dose study in Luxembourg. National diagnostic reference levels for standard examinations were calculated based on each of the countries' hospitals. The benefits using this new automatic system saved time as well as resources during the data acquisition and the evaluation when compared with earlier questionnaire-based surveys. PMID:21831868

  6. Edema, Hyperpigmentation, Induration: 3 Skin Signs Heralding Danger in Patients on Maintenance Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Stefan; Walter, Stefan; Witzke, Oliver; Körber, Andreas; Bienholz, Anja; Kottmann, Tanja; Kribben, Andreas; Kaiser, Gernot; Mitchell, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skin changes are common in patients on dialysis. This study focused on putative associations of specific skin findings with comorbidities and mortality. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 508 patients on maintenance hemodialysis therapy in 7 centers in the German State of North Rhine Westphalia. Data had been collected by interview, from patient files, and from targeted physical examination in an earlier prospective study screening hemodialysis patients for the presence of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis. While on dialysis, patients’ extremities had been examined for any of the following: edematous skin at the lower extremities, hyperpigmentation, induration, and xerosis cutis. Our present data analyses focused on associated mortality and comorbidities. Five hundred eight patients (median age 71 years, range 20.0–95.9; n = 292 men) had agreed to participate in the initial study: 48% (n = 243) were diabetics and 46% (n = 232) had been diagnosed with coronary heart disease. On examination, 86% of patients (n = 439) presented with at least 1 of the prespecified skin changes. Skin edema (n = 89; 18%), hyperpigmentation (n = 74; 15%), and induration (n = 9; 2%) were independently associated with increased mortality over 24 months (P < 0.002, P < 0.030, and P < 0.020, respectively). In our study, prespecified skin changes indicated an increased mortality risk in patients on chronic hemodialysis. Routinely assessing the skin of dialysis patients represents a simple, reliable, and cost effective means of identifying those at greatest risk. PMID:27015187

  7. Off-Pump CABG in a Patient with Laryngectomy and Permanent Tracheostomy Utilizing Low Midline Skin Incision with Transverse Skin Flaps and Manubrium Sparing Sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Kristofer T; Davies, James E

    2016-07-01

    Patients that have undergone previous laryngectomy with permanent stoma placement are at increased risk of wound infection, mediastinitis, and tracheal injury when undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) via standard skin incision and sternotomy. We present a case of off-pump CABG via a low midline skin incision with transverse skin flaps and a manubrium sparing sternotomy. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12771 (J Card Surg 2016;31:439-440). PMID:27246671

  8. Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

  9. Patient-reported outcome measures in nonmelanoma skin cancer of the face: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bates, A S; Davis, C R; Takwale, A; Knepil, G J

    2013-06-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in the western world, with an incidence of 98,000 in the U.K. Since 2009 the Department of Health (DoH) has collected patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) data following four common surgical procedures. However, a DoH PROM for NMSC does not exist. A systematic review of questionnaires published on patient concerns due to NMSC of the face was conducted. Keywords relevant to PROMs, NMSC and the facial region were comprehensively searched in medical databases. Inclusion criteria stipulated that questionnaires from relevant papers recruited patients with NMSC for both the item formulation and subsequent validation. Questionnaires were then discussed by a multispecialty skin cancer research team. Initially 2548 papers were found; after exclusion criteria were applied, 73 articles were retrieved. Four patient questionnaires for NMSC featured adequate development and validation according to the inclusion criteria. The Facial Skin Cancer Index (FSCI) was the only PROM specific to facial NMSC. Additional questionnaires identified included the Skin Cancer Quality of Life Impact Tool, Skindex, and Dermatology Life Quality Index. There is a scarcity of data relating to NMSC PROMs and appearance concerns. Only one questionnaire--the FSCI--was specific to patients with facial NMSC. We recommend nationally standardized data collection from patients with NMSC in order to create an evidence-based validated PROM for patients with facial skin cancer. PMID:23387431

  10. Flexible pressure sensors for burnt skin patient monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Gwang-Wook; Kim, Se-Hoon; Kim, Joo-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    To monitor hypertrophic scars in burnt skin we proposed and demonstrated a hybrid polymer/carbon tube-based flexible pressure sensor. To monitor the pressure on skin by measurement, we were focusing on the fabrication of a well-defined hybrid polydimethylsiloxsane/functionalized multi-walled carbon tube array formed on the patterned interdigital transducer in a controllable way for the application of flexible pressure sensing devices. As a result, the detection at the pressure of 20 mmHg is achieved, which is a suggested optimal value of resistance for sensing pressure. It should be noted that the achieved value of resistance at the pressure of 20 mmHg is highly desirable for the further development of sensitive flexible pressure sensors. In addition we demonstrate a feasibility of a wearable pressure sensor which can be in real-time detection of local pressure by wireless communication module. Keywords:

  11. Low Dose MDCT with Tube Current Modulation: Role in Detection of Urolithiasis and Patient Effective Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kakkar, Chandan; Sripathi, Smiti; Parakh, Anushri; Shrivastav, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urolithiasis is one of the major, recurring problem in young individuals and CT being the commonest diagnostic modality used. In order to reduce the radiation dose to the patient who are young and as stone formation is a recurring process; one of the simplest way would be, low dose CT along with tube current modulation. Aim Aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of low dose (70mAs) with standard dose (250mAs) protocol in detecting urolithiasis and to define the tube current and mean effective patient dose by these protocols. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted in 200 patients over a period of 2 years with acute flank pain presentation. CT was performed in 100 cases with standard dose and another 100 with low dose protocol using tube current modulation. Sensitivity and specificity for calculus detection, percentage reduction of dose and tube current with low dose protocol was calculated. Results Urolithiasis was detected in 138 patients, 67 were examined by high dose and 71 were by low dose protocol. Sensitivity and Specificity of low dose protocol was 97.1% and 96.4% with similar results found in high BMI patients. Tube current modulation resulted in reduction of effective tube current by 12.17%. The mean effective patient dose for standard dose was 10.33 mSv whereas 2.92 mSv for low dose with 51.13–53.8% reduction in low dose protocol. Conclusion The study has reinforced that low-dose CT with tube current modulation is appropriate for diagnosis of urolithiasis with significant reduction in tube current and patient effective dose. PMID:27437322

  12. 4.5 Doses to Patients in Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.5 Doses to Patients in Diagnostics' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  13. 4.6 Doses to Patients in Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noßke, D.; Mattsson, S.; Johansson, L.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '4.6 Doses to Patients in Therapy' of the Chapter '4 Dosimetry in Nuclear Medicine Diagnosis and Therapy' with the contents:

  14. Dose response to chlorthalidone in patients with mild hypertension. Efficacy of a lower dose.

    PubMed

    Materson, B J; Oster, J R; Michael, U F; Bolton, S M; Burton, Z C; Stambaugh, J E; Morledge, J

    1978-08-01

    A multicenter study of chlorthalidone was performed to determine the relative antihypertensive efficacy and side effects of doses lower than those usually recommended for therapy. After a 4-wk placebo control period 100 patients with mild hypertension were randomly assigned doubleblind to 12.5-, 25-, 50-, or 75-mg regimens of chlorthalidone or to placebo for 12 wk. The groups of patients taking 25, 50, and 75 mg had declines in blood pressure which were not significantly different from each other. Serum potassium decreased in the 50- and 75-mg groups but not significantly in the 25-mg group. We conclude that chlorthalidone, 25 mg daily, was at least as effective for hypertension as 50 and 75 mg with less perturbation of potassium. Use of smaller initial diuretic doses may provide equal efficacy with fewer side effects for many patients. PMID:354839

  15. The feasibility of a sensitive low-dose method for the in vivo evaluation of Fe in skin using K-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Michael J.; Bradley, David A.

    1999-04-01

    An x-ray fluorescence (XRF) system designed for monitoring of skin Fe concentrations has been performance tested for use on patients treated for -thalassaemia. The essentials of the system are: a collimated x-ray tube operated at 20 kV and 20 mA; energy selection of the x-ray beam by means of a Cu K-edge filter; use of skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range 10 to 100 parts per million (ppm); and a high-purity germanium detector placed at to the incident beam. For a Cu K-edge filter of 0.15 mm thickness a quasi-monoenergetic beam of approximately 8.4 keV is obtained which is close to the absorption edge of Fe (7.11 keV). For a real-time counting period of 400 s the system is capable of detecting Fe concentrations of ppm at a skin dose of the order of 5 mSv. This level of Fe is at the higher end of the normal range found in the skin. In using the same system and operating parameters, measurements on a sample of ferritin obtained from a rat's liver yield an Fe concentration of ppm for a measurement time of 500 s; this can be compared with suppliers' data indicating an Fe level of 36 ppm.

  16. The impact of surface loading and dosing scheme on the skin uptake of fragrances.

    PubMed

    Berthaud, Fabienne; Smith, Benjamin; Boncheva, Mila

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the skin uptake of γ-undecalactone, decanol, and dodecyl acetate in an in vitro, un-occluded penetration assay in which they were applied to porcine skin at different finite loadings and application schemes. The pattern of fractional uptake differed between the chemicals and did not show the often assumed inverse correlation with surface loading. Furthermore, the mass uptake of identical cumulative amounts of the chemicals was not always additive. These results show that the uptake of fragrances in absence of occlusion and at finite loadings is chemical-specific and depends on the surface loading, the application scheme, and most probably, on the effects of the chemicals on the skin barrier efficiency. The observed lack of additivity might explain some of the differences in the responses observed in patch and repeated open application tests, and the boosting of the allergic state in sensitized individuals by sub-clinical exposures. PMID:24041533

  17. Patient dose measurement in common medical X-ray examinations in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rasuli, Behrouz; Mahmoud-Pashazadeh, Ali; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Tabari Juybari, Raheleh; Naserpour, Mozafar

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate patient dose in the chest (PA/AP/LAT) and skull (PA/AP/LAT) X-ray examinations, as frequent procedures. The study was performed in eight public hospitals of Khuzestan province, Iran. Patient dosimetry was conducted on 567 standard patient X-ray examinations (males: 61.2%, female: 38.2%). Dosimetry protocol in this study was indirect method, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Reports series No.457. Patients weighing 70 ± 10 kg were considered as standard. In the indirect dosimetry approach, exposure parameters such as kVp, mAs, focal film distance (FFD), and tube outputs recorded during data acquisition were used for calculating incident air kerma on the patient's skin, entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) that is recommended by the IAEA as the most appropriate patient dosimetry quantity in simple radiographic examinations. This survey reveals significant variations in the radiological practice. Results showed that the parameters set by radiologic technologists change in a wide range: mAs varied from 2 to 80 for skull PA, 2 to 202 for chest LAT, and FFD varied from 50 to 180 for skull LAT projection. The study showed that patient doses in three chest projections exceed the IAEA and European Commission dose reference levels (EC DRLs) - 1.0, 1.12, and 2.20 mGy for chest PA, chest AP, and chest LAT, respectively. Results also showed that mean ESAKs of patients in skull projections were generally lower than the IAEA and EC DRLs, 1.5, 1.72, and 2.25 for skull LAT, skull AP, and skull PA, respectively. This study provides evidence that dose reduction in the simple X-ray examinations is feasible by updating clinical audits and implementation of systematic quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) programs. The authors recommend that DRLs obtained in this study can be used as local DRLs in Khuzestan area and dose surveys must be performed in all provinces to establish national dose

  18. Evaluation of Vancomycin Dosing in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Jennifer L.; Moonnumakal, Siby P.; Baker, Carol J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients' sputa is associated with a decline in pulmonary function and increased mortality. Vancomycin is the preferred treatment for MRSA pneumonia in children. No published studies have evaluated the vancomycin dose needed to achieve goal vancomycin trough concentrations (VTCs; 15–20 mg/L) in pediatric patients with CF. The primary objective is to determine whether a vancomycin dosage of 60 mg/kg/day achieves a goal VTC in pediatric CF patients. Secondary objectives include determining the average dosage required to reach a goal VTC and the impact of achieving a goal VTC on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and pulmonary function. METHODS: A retrospective review of pediatric patients with CF who received vancomycin was conducted. RESULTS: A total of 90 vancomycin treatment courses were analyzed. Standard vancomycin dosing (60 mg/kg/day) achieved goal VTC in 11 courses (12.2%). The mean dosage required to achieve a goal VTC for all courses was 70.6 ± 16.7 mg/kg/day. Patients who achieved goal VTCs were more often older, weighed more, and had higher serum creatinine concentrations at therapy initiation. On average, a dosage of 70.6 mg/kg/day was required to achieve a goal VTC. Despite dosages up to 120 mg/kg/day, no significant changes in renal function occurred. Achieving a goal VTC had no significant impact on eGFR or pulmonary function during therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Vancomycin dosing of 60 mg/kg/day does not reliably achieve a VTC of 15 to 20 mg/L in pediatric CF patients. Younger CF patients may require higher vancomycin doses. PMID:27199623

  19. Homeostatic Tissue Responses in Skin Biopsies from NOMID Patients with Constitutive Overproduction of IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Pamela; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Johnson-Huang, Leanne M.; Harden, Jamie Lynn; Pierson, Katherine C.; Dolan, Joseph G.; Novitskaya, Inna; Coats, Israel; Estes, Jacob; Cowen, Edward W.; Plass, Nicole; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Sun, Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The autoinflammatory disorder, Neonatal-onset Multisystem Inflammatory Disease (NOMID) is the most severe phenotype of disorders caused by mutations in CIAS1 that result in increased production and secretion of active IL-1β. NOMID patients present with systemic and organ-specific inflammation of the skin, central nervous system and bone, and respond dramatically to treatment with IL-1 blocking agents. We compared the cellular infiltrates and transcriptome of skin biopsies from patients with NOMID (n = 14) before treatment (lesional (LS) and non-lesional (pre-NL) skin) and after treatment (post-NL) with the IL-1 blocker anakinra (recombinant IL-1 receptor antagonist, Kineret®, Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB, SOBI), to normal skin (n = 5) to assess tissue responses in the context of untreated and treated disease. Abundant neutrophils distinguish LS skin from pre-NL and post-NL skin. CD11c+ dermal dendritic cells and CD163+ macrophages expressed activated caspase-1 and are a likely source of cutaneous IL-1 production. Treatment with anakinra led to the disappearance of neutrophils, but CD3+ T cells and HLA-DR+ cells remained elevated. Among the upregulated genes IL-6, IL-8, TNF, IL-17A, CCL20, and the neutrophil defensins DEFA1 and DEFA3 were differentially regulated in LS tissues (compared to normal skin). Important significantly downregulated pathways in LS skin included IL-1R/TLR signaling, type I and II cytokine receptor signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, and antigen presentation. The differential expression and regulation of microRNAs and pathways involved in post-transcriptional modification were suggestive of epigenetic modification in the chronically inflamed tissue. Overall, the dysregulated genes and pathways suggest extensive “adaptive” mechanisms to control inflammation and maintain tissue homeostasis, likely triggered by chronic IL-1 release in the skin of patients with NOMID. PMID:23226210

  20. Cosmetic selection of skin incision for resection of choledochal cyst in young female patients

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jong-Woo; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Open surgery for choledochal cyst has a disadvantage of skin incision scar from operative wound, which can be a definite disadvantage especially in young female patients. This study focused on the cosmetic aspect of skin incision for resection of choledochal cyst in young female patients. Methods During a 2-year study period, 11 adult female patients aged less than 40 years underwent primary resection of choledochal cyst by a single surgeon. The cosmetic effect of two types of skin incision was evaluated. Results The patients underwent mini-laparotomy through either a right subcostal incision (n=8) or an upper midline incision (n=3). The mean length of skin incision was 10 cm for right subcostal incisions and 9 cm for upper midline incisions. It took approximately 1 hour to repair the operative wound meticulously in both groups. At the 6 month to 1 year follow-up, a slight bulge on the skin scar was observed in 3 (37.5%) patients of the right subcostal incision group and 1 (33.3%) patient of the upper midline incision group. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study support the claim that cosmetic effect of the upper midline incision for CCD surgery appears to be non-inferior to that of the right subcostal incision if the incision is placed accurately and repaired very meticulously. PMID:27621750

  1. Collagen cross-linking of skin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1992-01-01

    Collagen cross-links of skin tissue (left upper arm) from 11 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 9 age-matched control subjects were quantified. It was found that patients with ALS had a significant reduction in the content of an age-related, stable cross-link, histidinohydroxylysinonorleucine, that was negatively correlated with the duration of illness. The contents of sodium borohydride-reducible labile cross-links, dehydro-hydroxylysinonorleucine and dehydro-histidinohydroxymerodesmosine, were significantly increased and were positively associated with the duration of illness (r = 0.703, p less than 0.05 and r = 0.684, p less than 0.05, respectively). The results clearly indicate that during the course of ALS, the cross-linking pathway of skin collagen runs counter to its normal aging, resulting in a "rejuvenation" phenomenon of skin collagen. Thus, cross-linking of skin collagen is affected in ALS.

  2. Long-chain polynucleotide filler for skin rejuvenation: efficacy and complications in five patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Kui Young; Seok, Joon; Rho, Nark Kyoung; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2016-01-01

    Aging well has become the new target of preventative medicine, and aesthetic dermatology can contribute to this request. The polynucleotide (PN) containing products not only fill the space, but improve tissue regeneration, resulting in more natural tissue regeneration. Five Korean women received four times injections of long-chain PN filler in two-week intervals for skin rejuvenation. About 0.05 mL of material was injected in 40 points of one-side cheek. The pore and skin thickness were markedly improved in the patients in their 30s, whereas skin tone, melanin, wrinkles, and sagging were noticeably improved for patients in their 40s. There are no serious side effects. In conclusion, intradermal long-chain PN filler injection seems to be an effective and safe treatment for skin rejuvenation. PMID:26814448

  3. A Phase I Dose-Escalation Study (ISIDE-BT-1) of Accelerated IMRT With Temozolomide in Patients With Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Morganti, Alessio G.; Balducci, Mario; Salvati, Maurizio; Esposito, Vincenzo; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Ferro, Marica; Calista, Franco; Digesu, Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Ianiri, Massimo; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Piermattei, Angelo M.P.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa; Cantore, Gian Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of fractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with temozolomide (TMZ) in patients with glioblastoma. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was performed. Eligible patients had surgically resected or biopsy-proven glioblastoma. Patients started TMZ (75 mg/day) during IMRT and continued for 1 year (150-200 mg/day, Days 1-5 every 28 days) or until disease progression. Clinical target volume 1 (CTV1) was the tumor bed +- enhancing lesion with a 10-mm margin; CTV2 was the area of perifocal edema with a 20-mm margin. Planning target volume 1 (PTV1) and PTV2 were defined as the corresponding CTV plus a 5-mm margin. IMRT was delivered in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Only the dose for PTV1 was escalated (planned dose escalation: 60 Gy, 62.5 Gy, 65 Gy) while maintaining the dose for PTV2 (45 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction). Dose limiting toxicities (DLT) were defined as any treatment-related nonhematological adverse effects rated as Grade >=3 or any hematological toxicity rated as >=4 by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. Results: Nineteen consecutive glioblastoma were treated with step-and-shoot IMRT, planned with the inverse approach (dose to the PTV1: 7 patients, 60 Gy; 6 patients, 62.5 Gy; 6 patients, 65 Gy). Five coplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the 95% isodose line. Median follow-up time was 23 months (range, 8-40 months). No patient experienced DLT. Grade 1-2 treatment-related neurologic and skin toxicity were common (11 and 19 patients, respectively). No Grade >2 late neurologic toxicities were noted. Conclusion: Accelerated IMRT to a dose of 65 Gy in 25 fractions is well tolerated with TMZ at a daily dose of 75 mg.

  4. Quantitative proteomics of the human skin secretome reveal a reduction in immune defense mediators in ectodermal dysplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Burian, Marc; Velic, Ana; Matic, Katarina; Günther, Stephanie; Kraft, Beatrice; Gonser, Lena; Forchhammer, Stephan; Tiffert, Yvonne; Naumer, Christian; Krohn, Michael; Berneburg, Mark; Yazdi, Amir S; Maček, Boris; Schittek, Birgit

    2015-03-01

    In healthy human skin host defense molecules such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) contribute to skin immune homeostasis. In patients with the congenital disease ectodermal dysplasia (ED) skin integrity is disturbed and as a result patients have recurrent skin infections. The disease is characterized by developmental abnormalities of ectodermal derivatives and absent or reduced sweating. We hypothesized that ED patients have a reduced skin immune defense because of the reduced ability to sweat. Therefore, we performed a label-free quantitative proteome analysis of wash solution of human skin from ED patients or healthy individuals. A clear-cut difference between both cohorts could be observed in cellular processes related to immunity and host defense. In line with the extensive underrepresentation of proteins of the immune system, dermcidin, a sweat-derived AMP, was reduced in its abundance in the skin secretome of ED patients. In contrast, proteins involved in metabolic/catabolic and biosynthetic processes were enriched in the skin secretome of ED patients. In summary, our proteome profiling provides insights into the actual situation of healthy versus diseased skin. The systematic reduction in immune system and defense-related proteins may contribute to the high susceptibility of ED patients to skin infections and altered skin colonization. PMID:25347115

  5. A study evaluating the dependence of the patient dose on the CT dose change in a SPECT/CT scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Ho-Sung; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Woo

    2012-07-01

    This study assessed ways of reducing the patient dose by examining the dependence of the patient dose on the CT (computed tomography) dose in a SPECT (single-photon emission computed tomography)/CT scan. To measure the patient dose, we used Precedence 16 SPECT/CT along with a phantom for the CT dose measurement (CT dose phantom kit for adult's head and body, Model 76-414-4150), a 100-mm ionization chamber (CT Ion Chamber) and an X-ray detector (Victoreen Model 4000M+). In addition, the patient dose was evaluated under conditions similar to those for an actual examination using an ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) dosimetry calculator in the Monte Carlo simulation method. The experimental method involved the use of a CT dose phantom to measure the patient dose under different CT conditions (kVp and mAs) to determine the CTDI (CT dose index) under each condition. An ImPACT dosimetry calculator was also used to measure CTDIw (CT dose index water ), CTDIv (CT dose index volume ), DLP (dose-length product), and effective dose. According to the patient dose measurements using the CT dose phantom, the CTDI showed an approximately 54 fold difference between when the maximum (140 kVp and 250 mAs) and the minimum dose (90 kVp and 25 mAs) was used. The CTDI showed a 4.2 fold difference between the conditions (120 kVp and 200 mAs) used mainly in a common CT scan and the conditions (120 kVp and 50 mAs) used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. According to the measurement results using the dosimetry calculator, the effective dose showed an approximately 35 fold difference between the conditions for the maximum and the minimum doses, as in the case with the CT dose phantom. The effective dose showed a 4.1 fold difference between the conditions used mainly in a common CT scan and those used mainly in a SPECT/CT scan. This study examined the patient dose by reducing the CT dose in a SPECT/CT scan. As various examinations can be conducted due to the development of

  6. Skin Cancer in Skin of Color

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, Porcia T.

    2009-01-01

    Skin cancers in skin of color often present atypically or with advanced stage in comparison to Caucasian patients. Health care providers must maintain a high index of suspicion when examining skin lesions in skin of color. PMID:19691228

  7. Characterizing a proton beam scanning system for Monte Carlo dose calculation in patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassberger, C.; Lomax, Anthony; Paganetti, H.

    2015-01-01

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low-energy electrons (<0.6 MeV for 230 MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of-field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5 mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Characterizing a proton beam scanning system for Monte Carlo dose calculation in patients.

    PubMed

    Grassberger, C; Lomax, Anthony; Paganetti, H

    2015-01-21

    The presented work has two goals. First, to demonstrate the feasibility of accurately characterizing a proton radiation field at treatment head exit for Monte Carlo dose calculation of active scanning patient treatments. Second, to show that this characterization can be done based on measured depth dose curves and spot size alone, without consideration of the exact treatment head delivery system. This is demonstrated through calibration of a Monte Carlo code to the specific beam lines of two institutions, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Comparison of simulations modeling the full treatment head at MGH to ones employing a parameterized phase space of protons at treatment head exit reveals the adequacy of the method for patient simulations. The secondary particle production in the treatment head is typically below 0.2% of primary fluence, except for low-energy electrons (<0.6 MeV for 230 MeV protons), whose contribution to skin dose is negligible. However, there is significant difference between the two methods in the low-dose penumbra, making full treatment head simulations necessary to study out-of-field effects such as secondary cancer induction. To calibrate the Monte Carlo code to measurements in a water phantom, we use an analytical Bragg peak model to extract the range-dependent energy spread at the two institutions, as this quantity is usually not available through measurements. Comparison of the measured with the simulated depth dose curves demonstrates agreement within 0.5 mm over the entire energy range. Subsequently, we simulate three patient treatments with varying anatomical complexity (liver, head and neck and lung) to give an example how this approach can be employed to investigate site-specific discrepancies between treatment planning system and Monte Carlo simulations. PMID:25549079

  9. Glove material, reservoir formation, and dose affect glove permeation and subsequent skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Sørensen, Jens Ahm

    2012-02-15

    Protective gloves are used to reduce dermal exposure when managing chemical exposures at the work place. Different glove materials may offer different degrees of protection. The present study combined the traditional ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) model with the Franz diffusion cell to evaluate overall penetration through glove and skin as well as the deposition in the different reservoirs. Benzoic acid was applied on latex or nitrile gloves placed on top of human skin. The amounts of chemical were quantified in the glove material, between glove and skin, within the skin, and in the receptor chamber. Both glove materials reduce total penetration of benzoic acid, but nitrile gloves offer a significantly better protection than latex gloves. This difference was less pronounced at the higher of the two concentrations of benzoic acid applied. Thus, glove types that offer relevant protection at low concentrations does not necessarily give appropriate protection at high concentrations. Significant amounts of benzoic acid could be extracted from the glove materials after exposure. If a chemical is accumulated in the glove material, reuse of single-use gloves should be cautioned. The reuse of gloves is generally not to be recommended without effective decontamination. PMID:22264917

  10. Use of microdose phenotyping to individualise dosing of patients.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Nicolas; Haefeli, Walter E; Mikus, Gerd

    2015-09-01

    Administering the right amount of the right drug at the right time is a key mission of clinical medicine. This comprises dose adaptation according to a patient's intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing drug disposition. Several biomarkers are available for dose adaptation; still, prediction of individual drug disposition may be improved. Phenotyping is the quantification of drug metabolism with probe substrates specific to drug-metabolising enzymes. This allows measurement of baseline metabolism and changes after modulation of drug metabolism. This article explores the concept of phenotyping using pharmacologically ineffective microdoses of probe substrates to obtain information on drug metabolism. Several probe drugs such as midazolam for cytochrome P450 3A have already been used, but validation of other microdosed probe drugs, analytical procedures and drug formulations still face some challenges that have to be overcome. Since microdosed probe drugs have no risk of adverse drug reactions or interference with therapy, more widespread use is possible. This allows drug-drug interaction data to be safely obtained during first-in-man studies, enhancing the clinical safety of human healthy volunteers and patients in clinical trials, and, most importantly, allows determination of the drug-metabolising phenotype in severely ill patients. With harmless probe drugs at hand quantifying drug metabolism and adapting the dose accordingly, a phenotyping-based dosing strategy could become reality, offering the possibility of individualised drug therapy with reduced adverse effects and fewer therapeutic failures. PMID:25925712

  11. Total Body Photography as an Aid to Skin Self-examination: A Patient's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Secker, Lisanne J; Bergman, Wilma; Kukutsch, Nicole A

    2016-03-01

    Skin self-examination can help patients who are at high risk for developing melanoma to become more involved in their own surveillance and treatment. This study examined the use of total body photography as an aid to skin self-examination from the patients' perspective. A total of 179 individuals at high risk for developing melanoma who had undergone total body photography (60.5% response rate) completed a self-reported questionnaire assessing the frequency of skin self-examination, perceived usefulness of total body photography, and a variety of potential demographic, clinical and psychological factors. Only approximately half of the participants indicated skin self-examination as useful and 78.9% preferred clinical skin examination by a specialist. Finding total body photography useful was associated with having received instructions on how to perform skin self-examination, the use of a (hand)mirror, and confidence to detect changing moles. These findings allow us to develop strategies to further improve patients' self-screening behaviours. PMID:26315708

  12. Honey: A Skin Graft Fixator Convenient for Both Patient and Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudi, Hemmat; Moradi, Sohrab

    2015-12-01

    Skin grafts can be used effectively to cover burn injuries. A critical element of this treatment is the adherence of the graft to the wound bed. Honey has been shown to increase the adherence of skin grafts to wound beds and have antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects and increase healing rate of wounds. We therefore devised a clinical trial to determine the effect of honey on skin graft fixation in burn injuries. Sixty patients were included in this study (in 30 patients, graft was fixed with medical honey, and in 30 patients, it was fixed with dressing or suturing). All patients in two groups were evaluated for infection, graft loss, graft contraction, severity of pain, and need for re-operation. The most common cause of burn was kerosene. Honey significantly decreased infection rate on fifth day and reduced the patient pain. The mean hospital stay was shorter in honey group. Contraction of graft was significantly less in honey group. Honey has strong adhesive properties for skin graft fixation. Medical honey is a natural material, not synthetic. For this reason, we can advise the application of medical honey for the fixation of split thickness skin graft. PMID:27011471

  13. Efficacy, Safety, and Subject Satisfaction of a Specified Skin Care Regimen to Cleanse, Medicate, Moisturize, and Protect the Skin of Patients Under Treatment for Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.; Gold, Michael; Rueda, Maria José; Brandt, Staci; Winkelman, Warren J.

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of acne vulgaris requires incorporation of several components including patient education, selection of a rational therapeutic regimen, dedicated adherence with the program by the patient, and integration of proper skin care. Unfortunately, the latter component is often overlooked or not emphasized strongly enough to the patient. Proper skin care may reduce potential irritation that can be associated with topical acne medications and prevents the patient from unknowingly using skin care products that can actually sabotage their treatment. This article reviews the effectiveness, skin tolerability, safety, and patient satisfaction of an open label study in which a specified skin care regimen is used in combination with topical therapy. The study was designed to mirror “real world” management of facial acne vulgaris clinical practice. The skin care regimen used in this study included a brand foam wash and a brand moisturizer with SPF 30 photoprotection, both of which contain ingredients that are included to provide benefits for acne-prone and acne-affected skin. PMID:25610521

  14. Efficacy, safety, and subject satisfaction of a specified skin care regimen to cleanse, medicate, moisturize, and protect the skin of patients under treatment for acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Gold, Michael; Rueda, Maria José; Brandt, Staci; Winkelman, Warren J

    2015-01-01

    Optimal management of acne vulgaris requires incorporation of several components including patient education, selection of a rational therapeutic regimen, dedicated adherence with the program by the patient, and integration of proper skin care. Unfortunately, the latter component is often overlooked or not emphasized strongly enough to the patient. Proper skin care may reduce potential irritation that can be associated with topical acne medications and prevents the patient from unknowingly using skin care products that can actually sabotage their treatment. This article reviews the effectiveness, skin tolerability, safety, and patient satisfaction of an open label study in which a specified skin care regimen is used in combination with topical therapy. The study was designed to mirror "real world" management of facial acne vulgaris clinical practice. The skin care regimen used in this study included a brand foam wash and a brand moisturizer with SPF 30 photoprotection, both of which contain ingredients that are included to provide benefits for acne-prone and acne-affected skin. PMID:25610521

  15. A real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool for patient specific VMAT QA and delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Tyagi, Neelam; Yang Kai; Gersten, David; Yan Di

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a real time dose monitoring and dose reconstruction tool to identify and quantify sources of errors during patient specific volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery and quality assurance. Methods: The authors develop a VMAT delivery monitor tool called linac data monitor that connects to the linac in clinical mode and records, displays, and compares real time machine parameters with the planned parameters. A new measure, called integral error, keeps a running total of leaf overshoot and undershoot errors in each leaf pair, multiplied by leaf width, and the amount of time during which the error exists in monitor unit delivery. Another tool reconstructs Pinnacle{sup 3} Trade-Mark-Sign format delivered plan based on the saved machine logfile and recalculates actual delivered dose in patient anatomy. Delivery characteristics of various standard fractionation and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) VMAT plans delivered on Elekta Axesse and Synergy linacs were quantified. Results: The MLC and gantry errors for all the treatment sites were 0.00 {+-} 0.59 mm and 0.05 {+-} 0.31 Degree-Sign , indicating a good MLC gain calibration. Standard fractionation plans had a larger gantry error than SBRT plans due to frequent dose rate changes. On average, the MLC errors were negligible but larger errors of up to 6 mm and 2.5 Degree-Sign were seen when dose rate varied frequently. Large gantry errors occurred during the acceleration and deceleration process, and correlated well with MLC errors (r= 0.858, p= 0.0004). PTV mean, minimum, and maximum dose discrepancies were 0.87 {+-} 0.21%, 0.99 {+-} 0.59%, and 1.18 {+-} 0.52%, respectively. The organs at risk (OAR) doses were within 2.5%, except some OARs that showed up to 5.6% discrepancy in maximum dose. Real time displayed normalized total positive integral error (normalized to the total monitor units) correlated linearly with MLC (r= 0.9279, p < 0.001) and gantry errors (r= 0.742, p= 0.005). There

  16. The effect of skin surface warming on pre-operative anxiety in neurosurgery patients.

    PubMed

    Kimberger, O; Illievich, U; Lenhardt, R

    2007-02-01

    Skin surface warming of patients not only improves thermal comfort, but has been shown to reduce anxiety in a pre-hospital setting. We tested the hypothesis that pre-operative warming can reduce pre-operative anxiety as effectively as a conventional dose of intravenous midazolam in patients undergoing neurosurgery. We randomly allocated 80 patients to four groups in the pre-operative holding area. Treatment was applied for 30-45 min with (1) passive insulation and placebo; (2) passive insulation and intravenous midazolam (30 microg.kg-1); (3) warming with forced-air and placebo; and (4) warming with forced-air and intravenous midazolam (30 microg.kg-1). Thermal comfort levels (VAS 0-100 mm) and anxiety levels (VAS 0-100 mm, Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) were assessed twice: before the designated treatment was started and before induction of anaesthesia. In the midazolam and the midazolam/warming groups, anxiety VAS and Spielberger state anxiety scores decreased by -19 (95% CI: -29 to -9, p<0.01) and -10 (95% CI: -14 to -6, p<0.01), respectively. In the warming and the combined groups, thermal VAS increased by +26 (95% CI: 17-34, p<0.01). Pre-operative warming did not reduce anxiety VAS (p=0.11) or Spielberger state anxiety (p=0.19). The results of our study indicate that pre-operative warming can be recommended solely to improve thermal comfort, not to replace anxiolytic premedication regimens. PMID:17223806

  17. Respiratory motion variations from skin surface on lung cancer patients from 4D CT data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego-Ortiz, Nicolas; Orban de Xivry, Jonathan; Descampe, Antonin; Goossens, Samuel; Geets, Xavier; Janssens, Guillaume; Macq, Benoit

    2014-03-01

    In radiation therapy of thorax and abdomen regions, knowing how respiratory motion modifies tumor position and trajectory is crucial for accurate dose delivery to tumors while avoiding healthy tissue and organs at risk. Three types of variations are studied: motion amplitudes measured from the patient's skin surface and internal tumor trajectory, internal/external correlations and tumor trajectory baseline shift. Four male patients with lung cancer with three repeated 4D computed tomography (4DCT) scans, taken on different treatment days, were studied. Surfaces were extracted from 4DCT scans by segmentation. Motion over specific regions of interest was analyzed with respect to the motion of the tumor center of mass and correlation coefficient was computed. Tumor baseline shifts were analyzed after rigid registration based on vertebrae and surface registration. External amplitude variations were observed between fractions. Correlation coefficients of internal trajectories and external distances are greater than 0.6 in the abdomen. This correlation was observable and significant for all patients showing that the external motion is a good surrogate for internal movement on an intra-fraction basis. However for the inter-fraction case, external amplitude variations were observed between fractions and no correlation was found with the internal amplitude variations. Moreover, baseline shifts after surface registration were greater than those after vertebrae registration and the mean distance between surfaces after registration was not correlated to the magnitude of the baseline shift. These two observations show that, with the current representation of the external surface, inter-fraction variations are not detectable on the surface.

  18. Effects of the tissue-air interface in calculations of beta-particle skin dose at a depth of 70 microns.

    PubMed

    Crawford, O H; Turner, J E; Hamm, R N; Ashley, J C

    1991-11-01

    The effects that the tissue-air interface has on the basal-layer dose at a depth of 70 microns from beta emitters on the skin surface are studied using Monte Carlo calculations. The dose is decreased at small lateral distances from a point source but is increased at large distances. PMID:1752748

  19. Vancomycin Dosing and Pharmacokinetics in Postoperative Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Benefield, Emily C.; Hagemann, Tracy M.; Allen, H. Christine; Farmer, Kevin; Burton, Michael E.; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study compared vancomycin trough concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery (CTS) patients versus those in controls receiving 20 mg/kg/dose, intravenously, every 8 hours. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in children <18 years of age, following CTS, versus an age-and sex-matched control group. The primary objective was to determine differences in trough concentrations between groups. Secondary objectives included comparisons of pharmacokinetics between groups and development of vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as a doubling in serum creatinine from baseline. Also dosing projections were developed to target an area-under-the-curve-to-minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC:MIC) ratio of ≥400. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients in each group were evaluated. Mean trough concentrations were significantly different between groups (CTS: 18.4 mg/L; control: 8.8 mg/L; p < 0.01). Vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury AKI was significantly higher in the CTS group than in controls (25.9% versus 0%, respectively, p<0.01). There were significant differences in vancomycin elimination rates, with a high degree of variability, but no statistical differences in other parameters. Based on dosing projections, CTS patients would require 21 to 88 mg/kg/day, with a dosage interval determined by the child's glomerular filtration rate to achieve the target AUC:MIC ≥400. CONCLUSIONS: Vancomycin dosage of 20 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 8 hours achieved significantly higher trough concentrations in CTS patients than in controls. Pharmacokinetic parameters were highly variable in CTS patients, indicating more individualization of dosage is needed. A future prospective study is needed to determine whether the revised dosage projections achieve the AUC:MIC target and to determine whether these regimens are associated with less vancomycin-associated AKI. PMID:26997930

  20. Samarium-153 therapy for prostate cancer: the evaluation of urine activity, staff exposure and dose rate from patients.

    PubMed

    Parlak, Yasemin; Gumuser, Gul; Sayit, Elvan

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the excretion of Samarium-153-ethylenediaminetetramethylphosphonic acid ((153)Sm-EDTMP) in urine and to calculate the dose rate of its retention in the body as a function of time and the dose received by the skin of laboratory staff's finger. Urine samples were collected from 11 patients after intravenous injection of (153)Sm-EDTMP. The measurements of dose rate were performed. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were used for absorbed dose measurements. Effective half-lives that were calculated from urine sample measurements were found as 7.1±3 h within the first 24 h. Whole body dose rates before collecting urine of patients were 60.0 ± 15.7 µSv h(-1) for within 1 h following (153)Sm-EDTMP administration. The highest finger radiation dose is to the right-hand thumb (3.8 ± 2 mGy). The results of the study imply that patients who recieved (153)Sm-EDTMP therapy should be kept a minumum of 8 h in an isolated room at hospital and that one staff should give therapy at most two patients per week. PMID:25063786

  1. [The patient with polymorphous light dermatosis. Skin type, hardening and other light-associated markers].

    PubMed

    Lindmaier, A; Neumann, R

    1991-07-01

    From 1985 to 1989 we interviewed 312 patients suffering from polymorphous light eruption (PLE). The interviews were based on a questionnaire dealing with the various light-dependent factors that exacerbate the disease. Of 90 patients who were tested with artificial UV-A and UV-B irradiation sources, 60 reacted with typical PLE lesions: (a) 27 patients to UV-A alone, (b) 12 to UV-B alone, and (c) 21 to both UV-A and UV-B. Using UV-A provocation tests we were able to determine the anamnestic criteria indicating a possible UV-A induction of PLE, e.g. occurrence in the shade, no protection from window glass, no benefit from conventional sunscreens, and occurrence in solaria. The period from experimental irradiation to induction of skin lesions was shorter in skin types I and II than in skin type III and IV. Hardening phenomenon was reported by 37% of our patients. Of the UV-A-positive patients, 38% showed the first presentation of PLE lesions at the height of summer, as against 64% of the total number of patients questioned. Additional lesions at non-irradiated skin sites occurred in 25% of our patients, the frequency rising with increasing duration of the tendency to PLE. PMID:1938396

  2. Patient experiences with oily skin: The qualitative development of content for two new patient reported outcome questionnaires

    PubMed Central

    Arbuckle, Robert; Atkinson, Mark J; Clark, Marci; Abetz, Linda; Lohs, Jan; Kuhagen, Ilka; Harness, Jane; Draelos, Zoe; Thiboutot, Diane; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Copley-Merriman, Kati

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop the content for two new patient reported outcome (PRO) measures to: a) assess the severity of symptoms; and b) the impact of facial skin oiliness on emotional wellbeing using qualitative data from face to face, and internet focus groups in Germany and the US. Methods Using input from initial treatment satisfaction focus groups (n = 42), a review of relevant literature and expert clinicians (n = 3), a discussion guide was developed to guide qualitative inquiry using Internet focus groups (IFGs). IFGs were conducted with German (n = 26) and US (n = 28) sufferers of oily skin. Questionnaire items were generated using coded transcript data from the focus groups. Cognitive debriefing was conducted online with 42 participants and face to face with an additional five participants to assess the comprehension of the items. Results There were equal numbers of male and female participants; mean age was 35.4 (SD 9.3) years. On average, participants had had oily skin for 15.2 years, and 74% (n = 40) reported having mild-moderate acne. Participants reported using visual, tactile and sensory (feel without touching their face) methods to evaluate the severity of facial oiliness. Oily facial skin had both an emotional and social impact, and was associated with feelings of unattractiveness, self-consciousness, embarrassment, irritation and frustration. Items were generated for a measure of oily skin severity (Oily Skin Self-Assessment Scale) and a measure of the impact of oily skin on emotional well-being (Oily Skin Impact Scale). Cognitive debriefing resulted in minor changes to the draft items and confirmed their face and content validity. Conclusion The research provides insight into the experience of having oily skin and illustrates significant difficulties associated with the condition. Item content was developed for early versions of two PRO measures of the symptoms and emotional impact of oily facial skin. The psychometric validation of these measures

  3. Development and validation of the Patient Benefit Index for the dermatocosmetic treatment of aged skin.

    PubMed

    Lohrberg, David; Blaak, Jürgen; Liebsch, Juliane; Staib, Peter; Wohlfart, Rainer; Lüttje, Dieter; Schürer, Nanna Y; Augustin, Matthias; Blome, Christine

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate an instrument for the assessment of patient-relevant benefit in dermatocosmetic treatment, i.e., skin care, of aged skin. Based on an open item collection with 33 elderly persons, items on patient-relevant treatment goals were collected. An expert panel selected 20 items to be most relevant and feasible for the questionnaire named Patient Benefit Index for Aged Skin (PBI-AS). The instrument, which assesses goal importance and achievement, was tested in a cognitive debriefing and validated in a longitudinal study (n = 80) along with the Dry Skin Area and Severity Index (DASI) and the Dermatology Quality of Life Index (DLQI) as convergent validation criteria. The cognitive debriefing showed the good practicability and feasibility of the instrument. Significant correlation with change in DASI (r = -0.527; p < 0.001) supports convergent validity of the PBI-AS. By contrast, correlation with DLQI was poor, indicating the different constructs. The PBI-AS is a valid and feasible tool for the patient-centered assessment of dermatocosmetic treatment benefit in aged skin. PMID:27117448

  4. Elastin cross-linking in the skin from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cross-links unique to elastin, desmosine and isodesmosine were measured and compared in skin tissue (left upper arm) from 10 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and from seven age-matched controls. The contents of desmosine and isodesmosine were significantly decreased (p < 0.01 and p < 0.01, respectively) in patients with ALS compared with those of controls, and were negatively and significantly associated with duration of illness in ALS patients (r = -0.77, p < 0.01 and r = -0.65, p < 0.05, respectively). The decline in skin desmosine and isodesmosine is more rapid in ALS than in normal ageing. Thus cross-linking of skin elastin is affected in ALS.

  5. Systemic Low-Dose UVB Inhibits CD8 T Cells and Skin Inflammation by Alternative and Novel Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sabita; Rogers, Linda Joanne; Halliday, Gary Mark

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to UVB radiation before antigen delivery at an unirradiated site inhibits functional immunological responses. Mice treated dorsally with suberythemal low-dose UVB and immunized with ova in abdominal skin generated ova-specific CD8 T cells with a significantly decreased activation, expansion, and cytotoxic activity compared with unirradiated mice. UVB also impaired the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction to ova. Transfer of CD4+CD25+ cells from UVB-exposed mice did not suppress the ova-specific CD8 T-cell response or DTH reaction in unexposed mice, confirming that systemic low-dose UVB does not induce long-lived functional regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells. Repairing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer–type DNA damage and blocking aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling also did not reverse the immunosuppressive effect of UVB on ova-specific CD8 T cells and DTH, suggesting that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor are not required in systemic low-dose UVB-induced immunosuppression. The known UVB chromophore, cis-urocanic acid, and reactive oxygen species triggered the inhibition of DTH caused by UVB, but they were not involved in the modulation of CD8 T cells. These findings indicate that systemic low-dose UVB impedes the primary response of antigen-specific CD8 T cells by a novel mechanism that is independent of pathways known to be involved in systemic suppression of DTH. PMID:21641400

  6. Does administering iodine in radiological procedures increase patient doses?

    SciTech Connect

    He, Wenjun; Yao, Hai; Huda, Walter; Mah, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the changes in the pattern of energy deposition in tissue equivalent phantoms following the introduction of iodinated contrast media. Methods: The phantom consisted of a small “contrast sphere,” filled with water or iodinated contrast, located at the center of a 28 cm diameter water sphere. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using MCNP5 codes, validated by simulating irradiations with analytical solutions. Monoenergetic x-rays ranging from 35 to 150 keV were used to simulate exposures to spheres containing contrast agent with iodine concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mg/ml. Relative values of energy imparted to the contrast sphere, as well as to the whole phantom, were calculated. Changes in patterns of energy deposition around the contrast sphere were also investigated. Results: Small contrast spheres can increase local absorbed dose by a factor of 13, but the corresponding increase in total energy absorbed was negligible (<1%). The highest localized dose increases were found to occur at incident photon energies of about 60 keV. For a concentration of about 10 mg/ml, typical of clinical practice, localized absorbed doses were generally increased by about a factor of two. At this concentration of 10 mg/ml, the maximum increase in total energy deposition in the phantom was only 6%. These simulations demonstrated that increases in contrast sphere doses were offset by corresponding dose reductions at distal and posterior locations. Conclusions: Adding iodine can result in values of localized absorbed dose increasing by more than an order of magnitude, but the total energy deposition is generally very modest (i.e., <10%). Their data show that adding iodine primarily changes the pattern of energy deposition in the irradiated region, rather than increasing patient doses per se.

  7. Delivered dialysis dose is suboptimal in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Obialo, C I; Hernandez, B; Carter, D

    1998-01-01

    Underdialyzed patients have high hospitalization and mortality rates. It is unclear if such patients receive adequate dialysis during hospitalization. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated single treatment delivered dialysis dose during hospitalization and compared this to the dosage received at the free-standing outpatient clinics in the same patients. Eighty-four patients (54% male) aged 23-63 years (means +/- SD 55.5 +/- 14.6) who have been on dialysis for at least 3 months were evaluated. Hypertension and diabetes were the most common diagnoses, while thrombosed graft or fistula accounted for 40% of admissions. The mean dialysis treatment time (Td) was 30 min longer in the outpatient (OP) setting than the hospital (H): 3.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 0.2 h (p < 0.0001). Attained blood flow (QB) was 15% greater in the OP than H: 394 +/- 40 vs. 331 +/- 54 ml/min (p < 0.0001). The Kt/V was analyzed in 49 of 84 patients; the OP Kt/V was 20% greater than the H Kt/V: 1.38 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.11 +/- 0.1 (p < 0.0001). A further breakdown of H Kt/V according to access and membrane types showed that patients with functional grafts/fistula had a higher Kt/V than those with temporary accesses 1.14 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.07 +/- 0.1 (p = 0.01). We conclude that hospitalized patients receive suboptimal dialysis dose, this could have a negative impact on survival if hospitalization is recurrent and prolonged. Kinetic modeling should be routinely performed in such patients and Td should be increased in patients with temporary accesses. PMID:9845829

  8. Dose reconstruction for real-time patient-specific dose estimation in CT

    SciTech Connect

    De Man, Bruno Yin, Zhye; Wu, Mingye; FitzGerald, Paul; Kalra, Mannudeep

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Many recent computed tomography (CT) dose reduction approaches belong to one of three categories: statistical reconstruction algorithms, efficient x-ray detectors, and optimized CT acquisition schemes with precise control over the x-ray distribution. The latter category could greatly benefit from fast and accurate methods for dose estimation, which would enable real-time patient-specific protocol optimization. Methods: The authors present a new method for volumetrically reconstructing absorbed dose on a per-voxel basis, directly from the actual CT images. The authors’ specific implementation combines a distance-driven pencil-beam approach to model the first-order x-ray interactions with a set of Gaussian convolution kernels to model the higher-order x-ray interactions. The authors performed a number of 3D simulation experiments comparing the proposed method to a Monte Carlo based ground truth. Results: The authors’ results indicate that the proposed approach offers a good trade-off between accuracy and computational efficiency. The images show a good qualitative correspondence to Monte Carlo estimates. Preliminary quantitative results show errors below 10%, except in bone regions, where the authors see a bigger model mismatch. The computational complexity is similar to that of a low-resolution filtered-backprojection algorithm. Conclusions: The authors present a method for analytic dose reconstruction in CT, similar to the techniques used in radiation therapy planning with megavoltage energies. Future work will include refinements of the proposed method to improve the accuracy as well as a more extensive validation study. The proposed method is not intended to replace methods that track individual x-ray photons, but the authors expect that it may prove useful in applications where real-time patient-specific dose estimation is required.

  9. Dosimetry for quantitative analysis of the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in radiation therapy patients.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Joerg; Stern, Robin L; Daly, Thomas P; Rocke, David M; Schwietert, Chad W; Jones, Gregory E; Arnold, Michelle L; Siantar, Christine L Hartmann; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2006-02-01

    We have developed and validated a practical approach to identifying the location on the skin surface that will receive a prespecified biopsy dose (ranging down to 1 cGy) in support of in vivo biological dosimetry in humans. This represents a significant technical challenge since the sites lie on the patient's surface outside the radiation fields. The PEREGRINE Monte Carlo simulation system was used to model radiation dose delivery, and TLDs were used for validation on phantoms and for confirmation during patient treatment. In the developmental studies, the Monte Carlo simulations consistently underestimated the dose at the biopsy site by approximately 15% (of the local dose) for a realistic treatment configuration, most likely due to lack of detail in the simulation of the linear accelerator outside the main beam line. Using a single, thickness-independent correction factor for the clinical calculations, the average of 36 measurements for the predicted 1-cGy point was 0.985 cGy (standard deviation: 0.110 cGy) despite patient breathing motion and other real-world challenges. Since the 10-cGy point is situated in the region of high-dose gradient at the edge of the field, patient motion had a greater effect, and the six measured points averaged 5.90 cGy (standard deviation: 1.01 cGy), a difference that is equivalent to approximately a 6-mm shift on the patient's surface. PMID:16435922

  10. Radiation dose to patients from the Philips CT scanner

    SciTech Connect

    Badcock, P.C.

    1985-07-01

    While the anthropomorphic phantom is useful in radiotherapy dosimetry, corrections for diagnostic qualities of radiation are necessary for departures from tissue-equivalence. TLD measurements were performed for this reason in the rectum of patients undergoing CT scanning of the pelvis. At high slice densities the energy imparted becomes comparable with that associated with fluoroscopic examinations of the abdomen. At low slice densities the average dose is ca 12 mGy.

  11. Analysis of skin patch test results and metalloproteinase-2 levels in a patient with contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Czajkowski, Rafał; Kowaliszyn, Bogna; Żbikowska-Gotz, Magdalena; Bartuzi, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The complex course of skin reactions that contact eczema involves is due in part to abnormalities of the extracellular matrix function. Proteins that degrade extracellular matrix components include metalloproteinases (MMP), which are divided into subcategories depending on the chemical structure and substrate specificity. Aim To analyse patch test results in contact dermatitis patients and to assess MMP-2 levels during skin lesion exacerbation and remission. Material and methods Fifty patients suffering from contact eczema were qualified to the study and 20 healthy volunteers as a control group. The study group patients had epidermal skin tests performed with the “European Standard” set. To assess the MMP-2 level in serum, venous blood was drawn, twice from study group patients – during contact dermatitis exacerbation and remission periods – and once from control group patients. Assessment of MMP-2 in serum was done with ELISA immunoassay. To verify the proposed hypotheses, parametric and nonparametric significance tests were used. Results Hands were the most frequent location of contact dermatitis. Nickel (II) sulphate was the most frequent sensitizing substance. Mean MMP-2 levels were statistically higher in the study group both in contact dermatitis exacerbation and remission periods than in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between MMP-2 levels and skin patch test results. Conclusions Nickel is one of the most allergenic contact allergens in patients with contact dermatitis. Metalloproteinase-2 is a good marker of contact dermatitis in various stages of the disease. PMID:26161054

  12. Reduction of radiation dose to patients undergoing barium enema by dose audit.

    PubMed

    Yu, S K; Cheung, Y K; Chan, T L; Kung, C M; Yuen, M K

    2001-02-01

    Nowadays, new fluoroscopic machines are usually equipped with a dose-area product (DAP) meter for dose measurement. In our hospital, DAP meters have been used in the Diagnostic Radiology Department for dose audit since June 1997. Demographic patient data, name of radiologist, fluoroscopic duration and DAP readings of every case were recorded by radiographers. In early 1999, questionnaires were distributed to radiologists who had performed fluoroscopic examinations during the auditing period. 23 radiologists with varying years of experience completed the questionnaire and their practice was analysed. Since familiarization with the examination technique would affect radiologists' practice, these radiologists were divided into two groups for analysis. Radiologists with less than 3 years of experience were grouped together as junior radiologists, whilst others were grouped as senior radiologists. Results of the questionnaire indicated that radiologists generally found DAP meters useful for dose evaluation in the process of technique refinement. Radiologists aware of being under continuous surveillance of their practice showed significant reduction of doses (junior radiologists 25%, p<0.005; senior radiologists 36%, p<0.05) and fluoroscopic times (junior radiologists 36%, p<0.001; senior radiologists 18%, p<0.05) compared with radiologists who were unaware that they were under surveillance but with similar radiological experience. This effect is believed to be because of increased awareness of radiation dose through audit. In addition, this "audit effect" may also affect junior radiologists in decision-making regarding the number of radiographs (p<0.05), but no effect was found for senior radiologists (p>0.5). PMID:11718389

  13. High dose calcitriol may reduce thrombosis in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Beer, Tomasz M; Venner, Peter M; Ryan, Christopher W; Petrylak, Daniel P; Chatta, Gurkamal; Dean Ruether, J; Chi, Kim N; Curd, John G; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2006-11-01

    The incidence of venous and arterial thrombosis in a placebo-controlled randomised trial of DN-101 (high dose calcitriol) with docetaxel versus docetaxel was compared. Of the 13 thrombotic events observed in the 250 patients enroled in this study, two occurred in DN-101 and 11 in placebo-treated patients (P = 0.01). This difference remained significant after adjustment for baseline history of thrombosis, atrial fibrillation and use of anti-thrombotic agents. In vitro and vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout mouse studies predict that nanomolar concentrations of calcitriol may act as an antithrombotic agent. We report the first clinical observation that supports this hypothesis in humans. PMID:16984385

  14. Therapeutic rationale for low dose doxepin in insomnia patients

    PubMed Central

    Katwala, Jigar; Kumar, Ananda K; Sejpal, Jaykumar J; Terrence, Marcelle; Mishra, Manish

    2013-01-01

    Histamine is an excitatory neurotransmitter in central nervous system. It plays an important role in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Antidepressant with sleep-promoting effects, for example, doxepin, promotes sleep not through a sedative action but through resynchronisation of circadian cycle. The stimulation of the H1 receptor is thought to play an important role in mediating arousal. Doxepin has a high affinity for the H1 receptor, making it a selective H1 antagonist at low dose and it has been shown to display sedating properties. Compared to other sedative antidepressant, low dose doxepin is the only tricyclic drug which has been evaluated by well-designed, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled studies in both adult and elderly patients. Doxepin is not designated as controlled substance/unscheduled drugs and thus may be of special advantage to use in patients with a history of substance abuse. Hence, well-documented therapeutic efficacy, tolerability and lack of important adverse effects make the low dose doxepin as a unique, rational drug for the treatment of insomnia in adult and elderly patients.

  15. Comprehensive pyrosequencing analysis of the bacterial microbiota of the skin of patients with seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiomi; Cho, Otomi; Saito, Chie; Saito, Mami; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Sugita, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a chronic inflammatory dermatologic condition in which erythema and itching develop on areas of the body with sebaceous glands, such as the scalp, face and chest. The inflammation is evoked directly by oleic acid, which is hydrolyzed from sebum by lipases secreted by skin microorganisms. Although the skin fungal genus, Malassezia, is thought to be the causative agent of SD, analysis of the bacterial microbiota of skin samples of patients with SD is necessary to clarify any association with Malassezia because the skin microbiota comprises diverse bacterial and fungal genera. In the present study, bacterial microbiotas were analyzed at non-lesional and lesional sites of 24 patients with SD by pyrosequencing and qPCR. Principal coordinate analysis revealed clear separation between the microbiota of non-lesional and lesional sites. Acinetobacter, Corynebacterium, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus and Propionibacterium were abundant at both sites. Propionibacterium was abundant at non-lesional sites, whereas Acinetobacter, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus predominated at lesional sites; however, the extent of Propionibacterium colonization did not differ significantly between lesional and non-lesional sites according to qPCR. Given that these abundant bacteria hydrolyze sebum, they may also contribute to SD development. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of the bacterial microbiotas of the skin of SD patients. PMID:27301664

  16. Patient experiences and outcomes following facial skin cancer surgery: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Erica H; Klassen, Anne F; Lawson, Jessica L; Cano, Stefan J; Scott, Amie M; Pusic, Andrea L

    2016-08-01

    Early melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer of the facial area are primarily treated with surgery. Little is known about the outcomes of treatment for facial skin cancer patients. The objective of the study was to identify concerns about aesthetics, procedures and health from the patients' perspective after facial skin surgery. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 participants. Line-by-line coding was used to establish categories and develop themes. We identified five major themes on the impact of skin cancer surgery: appearance-related concerns; psychological (e.g., fear of new cancers or recurrence); social (e.g. impact on social activities and interaction); physical (e.g. pain and swelling) concerns and satisfaction with the experience of care (e.g., satisfaction with surgeon). The priority of participants was the removal of the facial skin cancer, as this reduced their overall worry. The aesthetic outcome was secondary but important, as it had important implications on the participants' social and psychological functioning. The participants' experience with the care provided by the surgeon and staff also contributed to their satisfaction with their treatment. This conceptual framework provides the basis for the development of a new patient-reported outcome instrument. PMID:25833383

  17. Reduced WIF-1 expression stimulates skin hyperpigmentation in patients with melasma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Tae-Ryong; Lee, Ai-Young

    2013-01-01

    The expression of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF-1) gene, which was detected by a microarray analysis of hyperpigmented and normally pigmented skin sets of melasma patients, was significantly reduced in the hyperpigmented skin from melasma patients, but not in healthy controls, regardless of UV irradiation. Wnt signals regulate skin pigmentation; however, WIF-1 is expressed in cultured skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts, but not in melanocytes. Therefore, we examined whether WIF-1 knockdown in neighboring keratinocytes and fibroblasts plays a role in melasma. Additionally, the effect of WIF-1 overexpression on the amelioration of hyperpigmentation was examined. WIF-1 knockdown, either in fibroblasts or in keratinocytes, significantly stimulated tyrosinase expression and melanosome transfer, whereas melanocytes with WIF-1 overexpression significantly reduced those parameters. The WIF-1 knockdown decreased glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), β-catenin, and NFATc2 (nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 2) phosphorylation and increased microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression as in melanocytes with Wnt-1 overexpression, whereas the WIF-1 overexpression reversed the results. Expression of Wnts, both canonical and noncanonical, was increased in the hyperpigmented skin of melasma patients. Collectively, WIF-1 downregulation, which may occur in epidermal keratinocytes and in dermal fibroblasts, is involved in melasma development because of the stimulation of melanogenesis and melanosome transfer through upregulation of the canonical and the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway. PMID:22951732

  18. Patient Dose Reference Levels for Interventional Radiology: A National Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vano, Eliseo Sanchez, R.; Fernandez, J. M.; Gallego, J. J.; Verdu, J. F.; Garay, M. Gonzalez de; Azpiazu, A.; Segarra, A.; Hernandez, M. T.; Canis, M.; Diaz, F.; Moreno, F.; Palmero, J.

    2009-01-15

    A set of patient dose reference levels (RLs) for fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures was obtained in a survey launched by the National Society of Interventional Radiology (IR), involving 10 public hospitals, as recommended by the European Medical Exposures Directive. A sample of 1391 dose values (kerma area product [KAP]) was collected randomly during clinical procedures for seven of the most frequent procedures. Third quartiles of the KAP distributions were used to set the RLs. A regular quality control of the X-ray systems and a calibration of the dose meters were performed during the survey. The fluoroscopy time and total number of digital subtraction angiography images per procedure were also analyzed. The RL values proposed were 12 Gy cm{sup 2} for fistulography (hemodialysis access; sample of 180 cases), 73 Gy cm{sup 2} for lower limb arteriography (685 cases), 89 Gy cm{sup 2} for renal arteriography (55 cases), 80 Gy cm{sup 2} for biliary drainage (205 cases), 289 Gy cm{sup 2} for hepatic chemoembolization (151 cases), 94 Gy cm{sup 2} for iliac stent (70 cases), and 236 Gy cm{sup 2} for uterine embolization (45 cases). The provisional national RL values are lower than those obtained in a similar survey carried out in the United States from 2002 to 2004. These new values could be used to improve the practice of centers consistently working with doses higher than the RLs. This national survey also had a positive impact, as it helped increase the awareness of the members of the National Society of IR on a topic as crucial as patient dose values and programs on radiation protection.

  19. Low-dose cyclophosphamide effectively mobilizes peripheral blood stem cells in patients with autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Blank, Norbert; Lisenko, Katharina; Pavel, Petra; Bruckner, Thomas; Ho, Anthony D; Wuchter, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    For patients with severe and refractory autoimmune diseases, high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been established as a considerable therapeutic option in recent years. In this retrospective single-center analysis, we assessed the feasibility and efficacy of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) mobilization and collection in 35 patients with refractory autoimmune disease (AID). The mobilization data of 15 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc), 11 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), and 9 patients with other AID were analyzed. Stem cell mobilization with cyclophosphamide chemotherapy 2 × 2 g/m(2) (n = 16) or 1 × 2 g/m(2) (n = 17) and G-CSF followed by PBSC collection was performed between 1999 and 2015. Leukapheresis was performed in 16 inpatients and 19 outpatients. All patients reached their collection goal and no collection failures were observed. The median PBSC collection result was 12.2 (SSc), 8.0 (MS), and 8.2 (other AID) × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg, respectively. Twenty-five of 35 (71%) patients achieved a sufficient collection with one leukapheresis session, while 6 patients (17%) required two and 4 patients (11%) required three or more leukapheresis sessions. No correlation of the collected PBSC number was observed regarding age, body weight, diagnosis, disease duration, skin sclerosis, or previous cyclophosphamide. Mobilization chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide 2 × 2 g/m(2) and 1 × 2 g/m(2) delivered comparable mobilization results with leukapheresis on day 13 or 14. In summary, we demonstrate that PBSC collection is safe and feasible in patients with AID. Mobilization chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide 1 × 2 g/m(2) and 2 × 2 g/m(2) is equally effective in those patients. PMID:26381040

  20. Phase I/II Trial of Dose-Escalated Busulfan Delivered by Prolonged Continuous Infusion in Allogeneic Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas C; Walko, Christine; Chung, Yunro; Ivanova, Anastasia; Sheets, Julia; Rao, Kamakshi; Gabriel, Don; Comeau, Terry; Wood, William; Coghill, James; Armistead, Paul; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Serody, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Intensive chemotherapy or chemotherapy plus irradiation and allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be curative for patients with hematologic diseases. Reduced-intensity transplants can also achieve cure and result in less treatment-related mortality but higher relapse rates. Thus, optimizing the conditioning regimens used in allogeneic transplantation remains an important goal. We conducted a phase I/II trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of a continuous infusion of busulfan over 90 hours in conjunction with fludarabine followed by allogeneic related or unrelated donor transplant. Fifty-four patients with advanced hematologic malignancies were enrolled on this study. The MTD was identified as a 24-hour area under the curve (AUC) of approximately 7095 μM/min, which represents a 43% increase over the standard total daily AUC dose of 4800 μM/min given by intermittent schedules. DLTs at doses over 8000 μM/min were identified by a desquamative skin rash and mucositis. No dose-related increase in hepatic, pulmonary, or other organ toxicities were seen, whereas efficacy appeared to be improved at higher dose levels. Continuous-infusion busulfan with intermittent fludarabine provides an alternative treatment strategy that is generally well tolerated and permits an increase in total busulfan dose with encouraging efficacy. (NCI study no. NCT00448357.). PMID:26210442

  1. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm(2) fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C-C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. PMID:26047701

  2. A comparison of entrance skin dose delivered by clinical angiographic c-arms using the real-time dosimeter: the MOSkin.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Nathan Kenneth; Cutajar, Dean; Lian, Cheryl; Pitney, Mark; Friedman, Daniel; Perevertaylo, Vladimir; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2016-06-01

    Coronary angiography is a procedure used in the diagnosis and intervention of coronary heart disease. The procedure is often considered one of the highest dose diagnostic procedures in clinical use. Despite this, there is minimal use of dosimeters within angiographic catheterisation laboratories due to challenges resulting from their implementation. The aim of this study was to compare entrance dose delivery across locally commissioned c-arms to assess the need for real-time dosimetry solutions during angiographic procedures. The secondary aim of this study was to establish a calibration method for the MOSkin dosimeter that accurately produces entrance dose values from the clinically sampled beam qualities and energies. The MOSkin is a real-time dosimeter used to measure the skin dose delivered by external radiation beams. The suitability of the MOSkin for measurements in the angiographic catheterisation laboratory was assessed. Measurements were performed using a 30 × 30 × 30 cm(3) PMMA phantom positioned at the rotational isocenter of the c-arm gantry. The MOSkin calibration factor was established through comparison of the MOSkin response to EBT2 film response. Irradiation of the dosimeters was performed using several clinical beam qualities ranging in energy from 70 to 105 kVp. A total of four different interventional c-arm machines were surveyed and compared using the MOSkin dosimeter. The phantom was irradiated from a normal angle of incidence using clinically relevant protocols, field sizes and source to image detector distance values. The MOSkin was observed to be radiotranslucent to the c-arm beam in all clinical environments. The MOSkin response was reproducible to within 2 % of the average value across repeated measurements for each beam setting. There were large variations in entrance dose delivery to the phantom between the different c-arm machines with the highest observed cine-acquisition entrance dose rate measuring 326 % higher than the

  3. Assessing depression and anxiety in the caregivers of pediatric patients with chronic skin disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Ana Paula Dornelles da Silva; Weber, Magda Blessmann; Nagatomi, Aline Rodrigues da Silva; Pereira, Rita Langie; Townsend, Roberta Zaffari; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The literature has shown that the presence of emotional disturbances in caregivers of children with skin diseases affects the course and treatment of the disease. Anxiety and depression are among the most frequently reported psychiatric diagnoses related to this fact. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the presence of anxiety and depression in caregivers of pediatric patients with chronic skin disorders, exemplified by atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and vitiligo, and correlate them to the quality of life of the patients. METHODS The sample consisted of 118 patients with atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and psoriasis, monitored by their main caregiver. The levels of anxiety and depression in the caregivers were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Scale and the Beck Depression Inventory, respectively. The Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index was applied. RESULTS Anxiety was observed in 36% of the caregivers of the patients with atopic dermatitis, in 36% of those of children affected by psoriasis, and in 42% of those responsible for pediatric patients with vitiligo. Depression occurred in 36% of the caregivers of patients with atopic dermatitis, in 36% of those of children affected by psoriasis and in 26% of those responsible for pediatric patients with vitiligo. There was a significant correlation between poor quality of life scores in patients with vitiligo and the presence of depression and anxiety in their caregivers. CONCLUSION Emotional disorders tend to be present among close family members of children with the chronic skin diseases studied and their prevention can help in controlling and treating these diseases. PMID:24474096

  4. A case of warfarin skin necrosis despite enoxaparin anticoagulation in a patient with protein S deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tai, Chau Y; Ierardi, Ralph; Alexander, James B

    2004-03-01

    Warfarin-induced skin necrosis is a rare complication associated with the use of oral anticoagulants. Most patients develop this at the initiation of therapy, often while still receiving intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH). Recently, low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWHs) have gained wider use, providing an option for outpatient treatment of deep-vein thrombosis. The treatment protocols are similar to UFH, including the early initiation of oral anticoagulation with warfarin. A Medline search failed to reveal any cases of warfarin-induced skin necrosis while using a LMWH. We present a patient with protein S deficiency who developed warfarin skin necrosis despite appropriate anticoagulation with enoxaparin, and review the chemical and clinical difference between UFH and LMWH. PMID:15253263

  5. Low doses of nanodiamonds and silica nanoparticles have beneficial hormetic effects in normal human skin fibroblasts in culture.

    PubMed

    Mytych, Jennifer; Wnuk, Maciej; Rattan, Suresh I S

    2016-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (ND) and silica nanoparticles (SiO2-NP) have been much investigated for their toxicity at high doses, little is known about their biological activity at low concentrations. Here we report the biphasic dose response of ND and SiO2-NP in modulating normal human facial skin fibroblasts (FSF1) in culture. ND and SiO2-NP at low concentration (up to 0.5 μg/ml) had beneficial effects on FSF1 in terms of increasing their proliferation and metabolic activity. Exposure of FSF1 cells to low levels of NP enhanced their wound healing ability in vitro and slowed down aging during serial passaging as measured by maintenance of youthful morphology, reduction in the rate of loss of telomeres, and the over all proliferative characteristics. Furthermore, NP treatment induced the activation of Nrf2- and FOXO3A-mediated cellular stress responses, including an increased expression of heme oxygenease (HO-1), sirtuin (SIRT1), and DNA methyltransferase II (DNMT2). These results imply that ND and SiO2-NP at low doses are potential hormetins, which exert mild stress-induced beneficial hormetic effects through improved survival, longevity, maintenance, repair and function of human cells. PMID:26814705

  6. Skin phototype and local trauma in the onset of balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) in circumcised patients.

    PubMed

    Villa, Massimo; Dragonetti, Emanuele; Grande, Michele; Bove, Pierluigi; Sansalone, Salvatore; Rulli, Francesco; Tambucci, Roberto; Tucci, Gianfranco; Baldi, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    The association between balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) and skin disorders is long established, however, the role of skin phototype and local trauma in its onset has never been investigated in detail. Medical records of all Caucasian children circumcised over a 6-year period were reviewed. The excised skin underwent histological examination for BXO. Children with histological diagnosis of BXO were classified as group A, whereas children without histological diagnosis of BXO were classified as group B. The Fitzpatrick phototype (FT) was obtained in all children performing a personal or family interview with regards to their sunburn and suntan experience. According to their FT, both group A and B patients were divided into two subgroups: FT 1-2, with a higher tendency to sunburn due to their low skin melanin content; and FT 3-4 with a higher tendency to tan due to their higher skin melanin content. Maneuvers of mechanical reduction of the foreskin (MRF) performed at least 5-10 times per month during the year preceding circumcision was also considered. Statistical analysis was performed using univariate and multivariate analysis. A total of 297 patients met the inclusion criteria of our study: 78 patients were classified as group A and 219 as group B. The risk of developing BXO was significantly greater in FT 1-2 patients (n=76) (odd ratio=0.232, 95% confidence interval=0.124-0.435, p<0.0001). Furthermore, those undergoing MRF (n=131) had a significantly higher risk of developing BXO (odds ratio= 5.344, 95% confidence interval=2.860-9.987, p<0.0001). Although the foreskin is not directly exposed to sunlight, this study emphasizes the role of skin phototype on the onset of BXO in circumcised individuals. Moreover, the data produced suggest should the advantages of repeated MRF be weighed against the increased risk of developing BXO, which in turn may increase complication rate of circumcision surgery. PMID:22210729

  7. Intravenous heparin dosing strategy in hospitalized patients with atrial dysrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Roswell, Robert O; Greet, Brian; Shah, Sunny; Bernard, Samuel; Milin, Alexandra; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2016-08-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) have an elevated stroke risk that is 2-7 times greater than in those without AF. Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) is commonly used for hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AFL) to prevent stroke. Dosing strategies exist for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with acute coronary syndromes and venous thromboembolic diseases, but there are no data to guide providers on a dosing strategy for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with AF/AFL. 996 hospitalized patients with AF/AFL on UFH were evaluated. Bolus dosing and initial infusion rates of UFH were recorded along with rates of stroke, thromboemobolic events, and bleeding events as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis criteria. Among 226 patients included in the analysis, 76 bleeding events occurred. Using linear regression analysis, initial rates of heparin infusion ranging from 9.7 to 11.8 units/kilogram/hour (U/kg/h) resulted in activated partial thromboplastin times that were within therapeutic range. The median initial infusion rate in patients with bleeding was 13.3 U/kg/h, while in those without bleeding it was 11.4 U/kg/h; p = 0.012. An initial infusion rate >11.0 U/kg/h yielded an OR 1.95 (1.06-3.59); p = 0.03 for any bleeding event. Using IV heparin boluses neither increased the probability of attaining a therapeutic aPTT (56.1 vs 56.3 %; p = 0.99) nor did it significantly increase bleeding events in the study (35.7 vs 31.3 %; p = 0.48). The results suggest that higher initial rates of heparin are associated with increased bleeding risk. From this dataset, initial heparin infusion rates of 9.7-11.0 U/kg/h without a bolus can result in therapeutic levels of anticoagulation in hospitalized patients with AF/AFL without increasing the risk of bleeding. PMID:26951166

  8. Integration of kerma-area product and cumulative air kerma determination into a skin dose tracking system for fluoroscopic imaging procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, Sarath; Shankar, Alok; Rudin, Stephen; Bednarek, Daniel R.

    2016-03-01

    The skin dose tracking system (DTS) that we developed provides a color-coded mapping of the cumulative skin dose distribution on a 3D graphic of the patient during fluoroscopic procedures in real time. The DTS has now been modified to also calculate the kerma area product (KAP) and cumulative air kerma (CAK) for fluoroscopic interventions using data obtained in real-time from the digital bus on a Toshiba Infinix system. KAP is the integral of air kerma over the beam area and is typically measured with a large-area transmission ionization chamber incorporated into the collimator assembly. In this software, KAP is automatically determined for each x-ray pulse as the product of the air kerma/ mAs from a calibration file for the given kVp and beam filtration times the mAs per pulse times the length and width of the beam times a field nonuniformity correction factor. Field nonuniformity is primarily the result of the heel effect and the correction factor was determined from the beam profile measured using radio-chromic film. Dividing the KAP by the beam area at the interventional reference point provides the area averaged CAK. The KAP and CAK per x-ray pulse are summed after each pulse to obtain the total procedure values in real-time. The calculated KAP and CAK were compared to the values displayed by the fluoroscopy machine with excellent agreement. The DTS now is able to automatically calculate both KAP and CAK without the need for measurement by an add-on transmission ionization chamber.

  9. A Qualitative Analysis of Acute Skin Toxicity among Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schnur, Julie B.; Ouellette, Suzanne C.; DiLorenzo, Terry A.; Green, Sheryl; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives One of the most common acute side effects of breast cancer radiotherapy is treatment induced skin changes, referred to as skin toxicity. Yet no research to date has focused expressly on skin toxicity-related quality of life in breast cancer radiotherapy patients. Therefore, our aim was to use qualitative approaches to better understand the impact of skin toxicity on quality of life. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 women (Stage 0-III breast cancer), during their last week of external beam radiotherapy. Each interview was transcribed verbatim, and thematic analysis was performed. Results Three themes were identified based on the interview responses: First, skin changes affect multiple dimensions of quality of life. They cause physical discomfort, body image disturbance, emotional distress, and impair both day-to-day functioning and satisfaction with radiation treatment. Second, individual differences affect women’s experiences. Generally African-American women, younger women, women who are not currently in a relationship, women who are being treated during the summer, and women who are more invested in their appearance are more distressed by skin toxicity. Third, women use a variety of symptom management strategies including self-medication, complementary/alternative medicine approaches, and psychological strategies. Conclusions Implications of results are: 1) Skin toxicity affects numerous dimensions of quality of life, and assessment approaches and psychosocial interventions should address this; 2) individual differences may affect the experience of skin toxicity, and should be considered in treatment and education approaches; and 3) participants’ own creativity and problem-solving should be used to improve the treatment experience. PMID:20238306

  10. Preputial skin free graft as dorsal onlay urethroplasty: Our experience of 73 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bapat, Shivadeo S.; Padhye, Abhijit S.; Yadav, Pushkaraj B.; Bhave, Ashish A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To present the outcome of dorsal onlay urethroplasty in 73 patients for stricture urethra over a period of eight years. Materials and Methods: Seventy-three patients of stricture urethra have undergone dorsal onlay urethroplasty from July 1998 to February 2006. Age distribution: 14-58 years. Etiology: Trauma 20/73 (27.39%), Balanitis Xerotica Obliterans 2/73 (2.73%), Iatrogenic 26/73(35.61%), Infection 3/73 (4.10%), Idiopathic 22/73 (30.13%). Site: Penobulbar-25/73, bulbar-38/73, membranous-8/73 and long length-2/73. Suprapubic catheter was inserted preoperatively: 21/73 patients. Preputial / distal penile skin was used in all patients. Buccal mucosa was not used in any patient. Hospitalization was for four to five days. Catheter was removed after 21 days. All patients had their first endoscopic checkup after three months. Subsequently they were followed up by uroflometry. Routine imaging of urethra for follow-up was not carried out. Results: 63/73 (86.30%) patients had satisfactory outcome not requiring any further treatment, 8/73 (10.95%) developed anastomotic stricture (3/8-optical internal urethrotomy, 5/8 dilatation alone). 2/73 (2.75%) developed external meatal stenosis. None had urinary fistula and required repeat urethroplasty. Follow-up ranged from three months to eight years. Conclusion: Dorsal onlay urethroplasty using preputial/distal penile skin is a satisfactory procedure. Preputial/distal penile skin is devoid of hair and fat and hence an ideal graft material. Even in circumscribed patients distal penile skin can be harvested. Long-term follow-up is required in judging results of patients with stricture urethra. PMID:19718289

  11. 77 FR 71804 - Antiseptic Patient Preoperative Skin Preparation Products; Public Hearing; Request for Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is correcting a document that appeared in the Federal Register of November 21, 2012 (77 FR 69863). The document announced a public hearing entitled ``Antiseptic Patient Preoperative Skin Preparation Products.'' The document was published with an incorrect email address. This document corrects that error. Due to this error, FDA is extending the Requests......

  12. [Life quality in patients with sarcoidosis and isolated skin syndrome in chronic dermatoses].

    PubMed

    Guryleva, M E

    2003-01-01

    Seventeen patients, including 3 (17.6%) males and 14 (82.4%) females, who had respiratory sarcoidosis with the skin syndrome as erythema nodosum, were examined; their mean age was 41.65 +/- 2.63 years. The histological verification of the diagnosis was 94%. Among 77 patients with chronic dermatoses with the isolated skin syndrome (psoriasis, acne vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, neurodermitis, lichen ruber planus, seborrheal pemphigns, eczema), there were 33 (42.9%) males and 44 (57.1%) females, whose mean age was 36.64 +/- 1.3 years. Comparative analysis of life quality (LQ) in these two groups by using the WHOQOL-100 questionnaire revealed differences in two indices that reflect the level of independence and social relations (p < or = 0.05). In terms of independence, the impact of the disease on LQ was more pronounced in patients with sarcoidosis, its negative effect being in 75% of the criteria rated. Thus, poorer LQ may be stated in patients with skin lesion than in those with the isolated skin syndrome in chronic dermatoses. PMID:14524097

  13. Intercellular skin barrier lipid composition and organization in Netherton syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    van Smeden, Jeroen; Janssens, Michelle; Boiten, Walter A; van Drongelen, Vincent; Furio, Laetitia; Vreeken, Rob J; Hovnanian, Alain; Bouwstra, Joke A

    2014-05-01

    Netherton syndrome (NTS) is a rare genetic skin disease caused by mutations in the serine protease inhibitor Kazal-type 5 gene, which encodes the lympho-epithelial Kazal-type-related inhibitor. NTS patients have profoundly impaired skin barrier function. As stratum corneum (SC) lipids have a crucial role in the skin barrier function, we investigated the SC lipid composition and organization in NTS patients. We studied the SC lipid composition by means of mass spectrometry, and the lipid organization was examined by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Decreased free fatty acid (FFA) chain length and increased levels of monounsaturated FFAs were observed in the SC of NTS patients compared with controls. Furthermore, the level of short-chain ceramides (CERs) was enhanced in NTS patients and a strong reduction in long-chain CER levels was seen in several patients. The changes in lipid composition modified the lipid organization leading to an increased disordering of the lipids compared with the controls. In addition, in a subgroup of patients the organization of the lipid layers changed dramatically. The altered FFA and CER profiles in NTS patients corresponded to changes in the expression of enzymes involved in SC lipid processing. The observed changes in lipid composition, lipid organization, and enzyme expression are likely to contribute to the barrier dysfunction in NTS. PMID:24292773

  14. Skindex, a quality-of-life measure for patients with skin disease: reliability, validity, and responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Chren, M M; Lasek, R J; Quinn, L M; Mostow, E N; Zyzanski, S J

    1996-11-01

    To measure the effects of skin disease on patients' quality of life, we developed a 61-item self-administered survey instrument called Skindex. Skindex has eight scales, each of which addresses a construct, or an abstract component, in a comprehensive conceptual framework: cognitive effects, social effects, depression, fear, embarrassment, anger, physical discomfort, and physical limitations. Item responses are standardized from 0 (no effect) to 100 (maximal effect); a scale score is the average of responses to items addressing a construct. In 201 patients seen by dermatologists, mean scale scores (+/-SD) ranged from 14 (+/-17) for physical limitations to 31 (+/-22) for physical discomfort. Scale scores were reproducible after 72 h (r = 0.68-0.90) and were internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.76-0.86). Construct validity was assessed in two ways: (i) in a comparison of patients with inflammatory dermatoses and patients with isolated lesions, patients with inflammatory dermatoses had higher scale scores, and (ii) in an exploratory factor analysis, 78% of the common variance was explained by seven factors that correlated with the scale scores of Skindex. Most of the a priori scale scores changed in the expected direction in patients who reported that their skin conditions had improved or worsened after 6 mo. Finally, physicians' judgments of disease severity did not consistently correlate with Skindex scores. These preliminary data suggest that Skindex reliably and responsively measures the effects of skin disease on patients' quality of life and may supplement clinical judgments of disease severity. PMID:8875954

  15. Quality of life in patients with leg ulcers or skin lesions – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Mościcka, Paulina; Jawień, Arkadiusz; Cwajda-Białasik, Justyna; Cierzniakowska, Katarzyna; Ślusarz, Robert; Hancke, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Attempts to determine the quality of life are advisable in patients with ulcers as the group affected with this problem is relatively large. According to one Polish randomized trial, approximately 0.3–2% of the adult population suffers from active or healed venous ulcers. Aim To compare the quality of life of patients with leg ulcers of venous and arterial etiology and those with lower limb skin lesions due to chronic venous insufficiency. Material and methods This study included 90 consecutive patients with ulcers of venous (n = 30) or arterial etiology (n = 30), or patients with trophic disorders of the skin associated with chronic venous insufficiency (n = 30) treated at the Venous Ulceration Outpatient Clinic and at the Department and Clinic of General Surgery, Dr. J. Biziel Memorial University Hospital No. 2, in Bydgoszcz. This study was designed as a questionnaire survey and included the Skindex-29 instrument for the assessment of quality of life in patients with dermatological conditions. Results Overall, the global Skinndex-29 scores of all studied participants ranged between 37 and 136 points, 23.93 points on average. The analyzed groups of patients differed significantly with respect to the average level of the global quality of life determined using the Skindex-29 questionnaire. Conclusions Significant differences were observed in the global quality of life of patients who suffered from venous or arterial leg ulcers or skin lesions resulting from chronic venous insufficiency. PMID:26755912

  16. Effect of high-dose intravenous vitamin C on inflammation in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An inflammatory component is present in the microenvironment of most neoplastic tissues. Inflammation and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with poor prognosis and decreased survival in many types of cancer. Vitamin C has been suggested as having both a preventative and therapeutic role in a number of pathologies when administered at much higher-than-recommended dietary allowance levels. Since in vitro studies demonstrated inhibition of pro-inflammatory pathways by millimolar concentrations of vitamin C, we decided to analyze the effects of high dose IVC therapy in suppression of inflammation in cancer patients. Methods 45 patients with prostate cancer, breast cancer, bladder cancer, pancreatic cancer, lung cancer, thyroid cancer, skin cancer and B-cell lymphoma were treated at the Riordan Clinic by high doses of vitamin C (7.5 g -50 g) after standard treatments by conventional methods. CRP and tumor markers were measured in serum or heparin-plasma as a routine analysis. In addition, serum samples were collected before and after the IVCs for the cytokine kit tests. Results According to our data positive response to treatment, which was demonstrated by measurements of C- reactive protein, was found in 75% of patients and progression of the inflammation in 25% of patients. IVC treatments on all aggressive stage cancer patients showed the poor response of treatment. There was correlation between tumor markers (PSA, CEA, CA27.29 and CA15-3) and changes in the levels of C-reactive protein. Our test of the effect of IVC on pro-inflammatory cytokines demonstrated that inflammation cytokines IL-1α, IL-2, IL-8, TNF-α, chemokine eotaxin and CRP were reduced significantly after treatments. Conclusions The high dose intravenous ascorbic acid therapy affects C-reactive protein levels and pro-inflammation cytokines in cancer patients. In our study, we found that modulation of inflammation by IVC correlated with decreases in tumor marker levels. In

  17. Hyaluronic acid is increased in the skin and urine in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ono, S.; Imai, T.; Yamauchi, M.; Nagao, K.

    1996-01-01

    We performed morphological studies of skin and measured glycosaminoglycans in the urine from patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and control subjects. The wide spaces separating collagen bundles reacted strongly with alcian blue stain in ALS patients and stained more markedly as ALS progressed. Staining with alcian blue was virtually eliminated by Streptomyces hyaluronidase. The urinary excretion of hyaluronic acid (HA) (mg/day) was significantly increased (P < 0.01) in ALS patients compared with that of control subjects, and there was a significant positive correlation between the excreted amount of HA and the duration of illness in advanced ALS patients with a duration of more than 2 years from clinical onset (r = 0.72, P < 0.02). We suggest that sporadic ALS includes a metabolic disorder of HA in which an accumulation of HA in the skin is linked to an increased urinary excretion of HA.

  18. Radiation dose to patients during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography

    PubMed Central

    Boix, Jaume; Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment of the hepatobiliary system. The use of fluoroscopy to aid ERCP places both the patient and the endoscopy staff at risk of radiation-induced injury. Radiation dose to patients during ERCP depends on many factors, and the endoscopist cannot control some variables, such as patient size, procedure type, or fluoroscopic equipment used. Previous reports have demonstrated a linear relationship between radiation dose and fluoroscopy duration. When fluoroscopy is used to assist ERCP, the shortest fluoroscopy time possible is recommended. Pulsed fluoroscopy and monitoring the length of fluoroscopy have been suggested for an overall reduction in both radiation exposure and fluoroscopy times. Fluoroscopy time is shorter when ERCP is performed by an endoscopist who has many years experience of performing ERCP and carried out a large number of ERCPs in the preceding year. In general, radiation exposure is greater during therapeutic ERCP than during diagnostic ERCP. Factors associated with prolonged fluoroscopy have been delineated recently, but these have not been validated. PMID:21860683

  19. Can radiation therapy treatment planning system accurately predict surface doses in postmastectomy radiation therapy patients?

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Sharon; Back, Michael; Tan, Poh Wee; Lee, Khai Mun; Baggarley, Shaun; Lu, Jaide Jay

    2012-07-01

    Skin doses have been an important factor in the dose prescription for breast radiotherapy. Recent advances in radiotherapy treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and new treatment schemes such as hypofractionated breast therapy have made the precise determination of the surface dose necessary. Detailed information of the dose at various depths of the skin is also critical in designing new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of surface dose calculation by a clinically used treatment planning system and those measured by thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) in a customized chest wall phantom. This study involved the construction of a chest wall phantom for skin dose assessment. Seven TLDs were distributed throughout each right chest wall phantom to give adequate representation of measured radiation doses. Point doses from the CMS Xio Registered-Sign treatment planning system (TPS) were calculated for each relevant TLD positions and results correlated. There were no significant difference between measured absorbed dose by TLD and calculated doses by the TPS (p > 0.05 (1-tailed). Dose accuracy of up to 2.21% was found. The deviations from the calculated absorbed doses were overall larger (3.4%) when wedges and bolus were used. 3D radiotherapy TPS is a useful and accurate tool to assess the accuracy of surface dose. Our studies have shown that radiation treatment accuracy expressed as a comparison between calculated doses (by TPS) and measured doses (by TLD dosimetry) can be accurately predicted for tangential treatment of the chest wall after mastectomy.

  20. Fundamental study on the characteristics of a radiophotoluminescence glass dosemeter with no energy compensation filter for measuring patient entrance doses in cardiac interventional procedures.

    PubMed

    Kato, Mamoru; Chida, Koichi; Moritake, Takashi; Koguchi, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tadaya; Oosaka, Hajime; Tosa, Tetsuo; Kadowaki, Ken

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac interventional procedures have been increasing year by year. However, radiation skin injuries have been still reported. There is a necessity to measure the patient entrance skin dose (ESD), but an accurate dose measurement method has not been established. To measure the ESD, a lot of radiophotoluminescence dosemeters (RPLDs) provide an accurate measurement of the direct actual ESD at the points they are arrayed. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of RPLD to measure the ESD. As a result, X-ray permeable RPLD (with no tin filter) did not interfere with the percutaneous coronary intervention procedure. The RPLD also had good fundamental performance characteristics. Although the RPLD had a little energy dependence, it showed excellent dose and dose-rate linearity, and good angular dependence. In conclusion, by calibrating the energy dependence, RPLDs are useful dosemeter to measure the ESD in cardiac intervention. PMID:24277872

  1. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  2. Daily baseline skin care in the prevention, treatment, and supportive care of skin toxicity in oncology patients: recommendations from a multinational expert panel.

    PubMed

    Bensadoun, René-Jean; Humbert, Phillipe; Krutman, Jean; Luger, Thomas; Triller, Raoul; Rougier, André; Seite, Sophie; Dreno, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Skin reactions due to radiotherapy and chemotherapy are a significant problem for an important number of cancer patients. While effective for treating cancer, they disturb cutaneous barrier function, causing a reaction soon after initiation of treatment that impacts patient quality of life. Managing these symptoms with cosmetics and nonpharmaceutical skin care products for camouflage or personal hygiene may be important for increasing patient self-esteem. However, inappropriate product choice or use could worsen side effects. Although recommendations exist for the pharmaceutical treatment of skin reactions, there are no recommendations for the choice or use of dermatologic skin care products for oncology patients. The present guidelines were developed by a board of European experts in dermatology and oncology to provide cancer care professionals with guidance for the appropriate use of non-pharmaceutical, dermocosmetic skin care management of cutaneous toxicities associated with radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy, including epidermal growth factor inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. The experts hope that these recommendations will improve the management of cutaneous side effects and hence quality of life for oncology patients. PMID:24353440

  3. The profound effects of patient arm positioning on organ doses from CT procedures calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and deformable phantoms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haikuan; Gao, Yiming; Ding, Aiping; Caracappa, Peter F; Xu, X George

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the organ dose differences caused by the arms-raised and arms-lowered postures for multidetector computed tomography procedures. Organ doses were calculated using computational phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations. The arm position in two previously developed adult male and female human phantoms was adjusted to represent 'raised' and 'lowered' postures using advanced BREP-based mesh surface geometries. Organ doses from routine computed tomography (CT) scan protocols, including the chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis scans, were simulated at various tube voltages and reported in the unit of mGy per 100 mAs. The CT scanner model was based on previously tested work. The differences in organ dose per unit tube current between raised and lowered arm postures were studied. Furthermore, the differences due to the tube current modulation (TCM) for these two different postures and their impact on organ doses were also investigated. For a given scan parameter, a patient having lowered arms received smaller doses to organs located within the chest, abdomen or pelvis when compared with the patient having raised arms. As expected, this is caused by the attenuation of the primary X rays by the arms. However, the skin doses and bone surface doses in the patient having lowered arms were found to be 3.97-32.12% larger than those in a patient having raised arms due to the fact that more skin and spongiosa were covered in the scan range when the arms are lowered. This study also found that dose differences become smaller with the increase in tube voltage for most of organs or tissues except the skin. For example, the liver dose differences decreased from -15.01 to -11.33% whereas the skin dose differences increased from 21.53 to 25.24% with tube voltage increased from 80 to 140 kVp. With TCM applied, the organ doses of all the listed organs in patient having lowered arms are larger due to the additional tube current necessary to

  4. The profound effects of patient arm positioning on organ doses from CT procedures calculated using Monte Carlo simulations and deformable phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haikuan; Gao, Yiming; Ding, Aiping; Caracappa, Peter F.; Xu, X. George

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the organ dose differences caused by the arms-raised and arms-lowered postures for multidetector computed tomography procedures. Organ doses were calculated using computational phantoms and Monte Carlo simulations. The arm position in two previously developed adult male and female human phantoms was adjusted to represent ‘raised’ and ‘lowered’ postures using advanced BREP-based mesh surface geometries. Organ doses from routine computed tomography (CT) scan protocols, including the chest, abdomen–pelvis, and chest–abdomen–pelvis scans, were simulated at various tube voltages and reported in the unit of mGy per 100 mAs. The CT scanner model was based on previously tested work. The differences in organ dose per unit tube current between raised and lowered arm postures were studied. Furthermore, the differences due to the tube current modulation (TCM) for these two different postures and their impact on organ doses were also investigated. For a given scan parameter, a patient having lowered arms received smaller doses to organs located within the chest, abdomen or pelvis when compared with the patient having raised arms. As expected, this is caused by the attenuation of the primary X rays by the arms. However, the skin doses and bone surface doses in the patient having lowered arms were found to be 3.97–32.12 % larger than those in a patient having raised arms due to the fact that more skin and spongiosa were covered in the scan range when the arms are lowered. This study also found that dose differences become smaller with the increase in tube voltage for most of organs or tissues except the skin. For example, the liver dose differences decreased from −15.01 to −11.33 % whereas the skin dose differences increased from 21.53 to 25.24 % with tube voltage increased from 80 to 140 kVp. With TCM applied, the organ doses of all the listed organs in patient having lowered arms are larger due to the additional tube

  5. Determination of optimal vitamin D3 dosing regimens in HIV-infected paediatric patients using a population pharmacokinetic approach

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Frantz; Meyzer, Candice; Frange, Pierre; Chappuy, Hélène; Benaboud, Sihem; Bouazza, Naïm; Friedlander, Gérard; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude; Urien, Saïk; Blanche, Stéphane; Tréluyer, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    Aims To investigate 25-hydroxycholecalciferol [25(OH)D] population pharmacokinetics in children and adolescents, to establish factors that influence 25(OH)D pharmacokinetics and to assess different vitamin D3 dosing schemes to reach sufficient 25(OH)D concentrations (>30 ng ml−1). Methods This monocentric prospective study included 91 young HIV-infected patients aged 3 to 24 years. Patients received a 100 000 IU vitamin D3 supplementation. A total of 171 25(OH)D concentrations were used to perform a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Results At baseline 28% of patients had 25(OH)D concentrations below 10 ng ml−1, 69% between 10 and 30 ng ml−1 and 3% above 30 ng ml−1. 25(OH)D pharmacokinetics were best described by a one compartment model with an additional production parameter reflecting the input from diet and sun exposure. The effects of skin phototype and bodyweight were significant on 25(OH)D production before any supplementation. The basal level was 27% lower in non-white skin phototype patients and was slightly decreased with bodyweight. No significant differences in 25(OH)D concentrations were related to antiretroviral drugs. To obtain concentrations between 30 and 80 ng ml−1, patients with baseline concentrations between 10 and 30 ng ml−1 should receive 100 000 IU per 3 months. However, vitamin D deficient patients (<10 ng ml−1) would need an intensive phase of 100 000 IU per 2 weeks (two times) followed 2 weeks later by a maintenance phase of 100 000 IU per 3 months. Conclusions Skin phototype and bodyweight had an influence on the basal production of 25(OH)D. According to 25(OH)D baseline concentrations, dosing schemes to reach sufficient concentrations are proposed. PMID:24902982

  6. Senescent phenotypes of skin fibroblasts from patients with Tangier disease

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Fumihiko . E-mail: fumihiko@imed2.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Chiaki; Sandoval, Jose C.; Oku, Hiroyuki; Yuasa-Kawase, Miyako; Tsubakio-Yamamoto, Kazumi; Koseki, Masahiro; Masuda, Daisaku; Tsujii, Ken-ichi; Shimomura, Iichiro; Hori, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Shizuya; Ishigami, Masato; Nishida, Makoto

    2007-06-01

    Tangier disease (TD) is characterized by a deficiency of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma and patients with TD have an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Recently, we reported that fibroblasts from TD exhibited large and flattened morphology, which is often observed in senescent cells. On the other hand, data have accumulated to show the relationship between cellular senescence and development of atherosclerotic CAD. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TD fibroblasts exhibited cellular senescence. The proliferation of TD fibroblasts was gradually decreased at population doubling level (PDL) {approx}10 compared with control cells. TD cells practically ceased proliferation at PDL {approx}30. DNA synthesis was markedly decreased in TD fibroblasts. TD cells exhibited a higher positive rate for senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), which is one of the biomarkers of cellular senescence in vitro. These data showed that TD cells reached cellular senescence at an earlier PDL compared with controls. Although, there was no difference in the telomere length of fibroblasts between TD and controls at the earlier passage (PDL 6), the telomere length of TD cells was shorter than that of controls at the late passage (PDL 25). Taken together, the current study demonstrates that the late-passaged TD fibroblasts showed senescent phenotype in vitro, which might be related to the increased cardiovascular manifestations in TD patients.

  7. Medium dose ultraviolet A1 phototherapy and mRNA expression of interleukin 8, interferon γ, and chemokine receptor 4 in acute skin lesions in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska, Karolina; Sysa-Jedrzejowska, Anna; Wozniacka, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mechanisms responsible for UVA1 efficacy in atopic dermatitis (AD) are not fully elucidated. Aim To investigate IL-8, CCR-4, and IFN-γ mRNA expression in AD before and after UVA1, to identify correlations among them, and to determine whether and to what degree mRNA expression is influenced by UVA1. Material and methods Twenty-five patients with AD underwent medium dose UVA1-phototherapy at daily dosages of 10, 20, 30, 45, and then continuing 45 J/cm2 up to 20 days, from Monday to Friday for 4 weeks. Before and after UVA1, biopsies from acute skin lesions were studied using reverse-transcription and RT-PCR. Results The levels of CCR-4 mRNA correlated with those of IFN-γ, both before and after UVA1 phototherapy (p < 0.05). A significant correlation was found after UVA1 between mRNA levels of IL-8 and IFN-γ (p < 0.05). After UVA1 an increase in IL-8 mRNA expression in comparison to the baseline assessment (p = 0.02) was found, while no significant difference was revealed in the expression of CCR-4 and IFN-γ mRNA. UVA1 improved both SCORAD and severity of AD (p < 0.001). SCORAD and the severity of AD did not correlate with the degree of expression of measured cytokine mRNA, neither before nor after UVA1. Conclusions CCR-4 is expressed in parallel with IFN-γ in acute skin lesions of patients with AD both before and after UVA1 phototherapy. UVA1 significantly improves SCORAD index, lessens the severity of AD and increases the expression of IL-8, with no direct effects on other studied molecules. PMID:27512350

  8. Reduced secretion of IgA to skin surface of patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Imayama, S; Shimozono, Y; Hoashi, M; Yasumoto, S; Ohta, S; Yoneyama, K; Hori, Y

    1994-08-01

    To investigate whether the secretory form of immunoglobulin A (sIgA) was reduced on the skin surface in atopic dermatitis, the amount of sIgA present in sweat was measured in 40 patients with atopic dermatitis and in 50 healthy volunteers by attaching a cellulose membrane disk (10 x 10 mm) to the inner aspect of the upper arm skin for 24 hours. The secretory form of IgA, which was absorbed to the membrane and accumulated during the period of application, was revealed as dots by an enzyme immunoassay in which antibodies for IgA and for the secretory component were used. The density and number of dots (per mm2/day), which corresponded to the openings of eccrine excretory ducts, were determined with a densitometer. The mean amount of sIgA secreted by those patients was 3.86 +/- 0.71 pg/mm2/day (range, 0 to 21.17 pg/mm2/day), whereas that of the control subjects was significantly higher (p < 0.001), 16.79 +/- 2.80 pg/mm2/day (range, 0.79 to 133.77 pg/mm2/day). This may be related to the high incidence of bacterial and viral skin infections seen in patients with atopic dermatitis, and in addition, to the development of eczematous lesions through a defect in ridding the skin of allergens and/or microorganisms. PMID:8064071

  9. Transcriptional Analysis of Vitiligo Skin Reveals the Alteration of WNT Pathway: A Promising Target for Repigmenting Vitiligo Patients.

    PubMed

    Regazzetti, Claire; Joly, Florence; Marty, Carine; Rivier, Michel; Mehul, Bruno; Reiniche, Pascale; Mounier, Carine; Rival, Yves; Piwnica, David; Cavalié, Marine; Chignon-Sicard, Bérengère; Ballotti, Robert; Voegel, Johannes; Passeron, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Vitiligo affects 1% of the worldwide population. Halting disease progression and repigmenting the lesional skin represent the two faces of therapeutic challenge in vitiligo. We performed transcriptome analysis on lesional, perilesional, and non-depigmented skin from vitiligo patients and on matched skin from healthy subjects. We found a significant increase in CXCL10 in non-depigmented and perilesional vitiligo skin compared with levels in healthy control skin; however, neither CXCL10 nor other immune factors were deregulated in depigmented vitiligo skin. Interestingly, the WNT pathway, which is involved in melanocyte differentiation, was altered specifically in vitiligo skin. We demonstrated that oxidative stress decreases WNT expression/activation in keratinocytes and melanocytes. We developed an ex vivo skin model and confirmed the decrease activation of the WNT pathway in human skin subjected to oxidative stress. Finally, using pharmacological agents that activate the WNT pathway, we treated ex vivo depigmented skin from vitiligo patients and successfully induced differentiation of resident stem cells into pre-melanocytes. Our results shed light on the previously unrecognized role of decreased WNT activation in the prevention of melanocyte differentiation in depigmented vitiligo skin. Furthermore, these results support further clinical exploration of WNT agonists to repigment vitiligo lesions. PMID:26322948

  10. Monte Carlo simulation estimates of neutron doses to critical organs of a patient undergoing 18 MV x-ray LINAC-based radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Barquero, R.; Edwards, T.M.; Iniguez, M. P.; Vega-Carrillo, H.R.

    2005-12-15

    Absorbed photoneutron dose to patients undergoing 18 MV x-ray therapy was studied using Monte Carlo simulations based on the MCNPX code. Two separate transport simulations were conducted, one for the photoneutron contribution and another for neutron capture gamma rays. The phantom model used was of a female patient receiving a four-field pelvic box treatment. Photoneutron doses were determinate to be higher for organs and tissues located inside the treatment field, especially those closest to the patient's skin. The maximum organ equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose achieved within each treatment port was 719 {mu}Sv/Gy to the rectum (180 deg. field), 190 {mu}Sv/Gy to the intestine wall (0 deg. field), 51 {mu}Sv/Gy to the colon wall (90 deg. field), and 45 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin (270 deg. field). The maximum neutron equivalent dose per x-ray treatment dose received by organs outside the treatment field was 65 {mu}Sv/Gy to the skin in the antero-posterior field. A mean value of 5{+-}2 {mu}Sv/Gy was obtained for organs distant from the treatment field. Distant organ neutron equivalent doses are all of the same order of magnitude and constitute a good estimate of deep organ neutron equivalent doses. Using the risk assessment method of the ICRP-60 report, the greatest likelihood of fatal secondary cancer for a 70 Gy dose is estimated to be 0.02% for the pelvic postero-anterior field, the rectum being the organ representing the maximum contribution of 0.011%.

  11. A successful approach to overcome imatinib-induced skin toxicity in a GIST patient.

    PubMed

    Desar, Ingrid M E; van Herpen, Carla M L; van Erp, Nielka P; Kaal, Suzanne E J; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M; van der Graaf, Winette T A

    2016-07-01

    Since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients, the median survival of patients has increased from less than 1 to more than 5 years. The chronic use of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor has an impact on quality of life because of its toxicity. Adequate supportive therapy is therefore important. We describe a female patient with a metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor. During treatment with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib, she developed severe therapy-limiting skin toxicity. After several different supportive attempts, the combination of doxycycline and clemastine proved to be the solution, enabling successful chronic treatment with imatinib. Chronic use of doxycycline and clemastine is useful in the management of skin toxicity caused by c-KIT inhibitors, enabling the needed long-term use of these kind of anticancer drugs without hampering the quality of life. PMID:26982239

  12. Elemental concentrations in skin of patients with fibroeptelial polip using synchrotron radiation total reflection x-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Júlio C. A. C. R.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-01

    In this work, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in acrochordon, a skin lesion also known as skin tag or fibroepithelial polyp, as well as in normal skin from the same patient. The samples were analyzed by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (SRTXRF) in the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas/São Paulo-Brazil. The collection of lesion and healthy skin samples, including papillary dermis and epidermis, has involved 17 patients. It was evaluated the presence of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in the paired samples, which were compared, and significant differences were found in some of them.

  13. Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33 secreted from impaired vessels in the skin compared to fractionated irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jun Won; Yoo, Hyun; Kwak, Woori; Choi, Won Hoon; Cho, Seoae; Choi, Yu Jeong; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Jaeho

    2015-08-14

    We have revealed in a porcine skin injury model that eosinophil recruitment was dose-dependently enhanced by a single high-dose irradiation. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of eosinophil-associated skin fibrosis and the effect of high-dose-per-fraction radiation. The dorsal skin of a mini-pig was divided into two sections containing 4-cm{sup 2} fields that were irradiated with 30 Gy in a single fraction or 5 fractions and biopsied regularly over 14 weeks. Eosinophil-related Th2 cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and C–C motif chemokine-11 (CCL11/eotaxin) were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. RNA-sequencing using 30 Gy-irradiated mouse skin and functional assays in a co-culture system of THP-1 and irradiated-human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed to investigate the mechanism of eosinophil-mediated radiation fibrosis. Single high-dose-per-fraction irradiation caused pronounced eosinophil accumulation, increased profibrotic factors collagen and transforming growth factor-β, enhanced production of eosinophil-related cytokines including IL-4, IL-5, CCL11, IL-13, and IL-33, and reduced vessels compared with 5-fraction irradiation. IL-33 notably increased in pig and mouse skin vessels after single high-dose irradiation of 30 Gy, as well as in irradiated HUVECs following 12 Gy. Blocking IL-33 suppressed the migration ability of THP-1 cells and cytokine secretion in a co-culture system of THP-1 cells and irradiated HUVECs. Hence, high-dose-per-fraction irradiation appears to enhance eosinophil-mediated fibrotic responses, and IL-33 may be a key molecule operating in eosinophil-mediated fibrosis in high-dose-per fraction irradiated skin. - Highlights: • Single high-dose irradiation aggravates eosinophil-mediated fibrosis through IL-33. • Vascular endothelial cells damaged by high-dose radiation secrete IL-33. • Blocking IL-33 suppressed migration of inflammatory cells and cytokine secretion. • IL

  14. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  15. Dose-Response on the Chemopreventive Effects of Sarcophine-Diol on UVB-Induced Skin Tumor Development in SKH-1 Hairless Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guillermo, Ruth F.; Zhang, Xiaoying; Kaushik, Radhey S.; Zeman, David; Ahmed, Safwat A.; Khalifa, Sherief; Fahmy, Hesham; Dwivedi, Chandradhar

    2012-01-01

    Sarcophine-diol (SD) is a lactone ring-opened analogue of sarcophine. It has shown chemopreventive effects on chemically-induced skin tumor development in female CD-1 mice, as well as in a UVB-induced skin tumor development model in hairless SKH-1 mice at a dose of 30 μg SD applied topically and 180 mJ/cm2 UVB. The objective of this study was to determine the dose-response on the chemopreventive effects of SD on SKH-1 hairless mice when exposed to a UVB radiation dose of 30 mJ/cm2. This UVB dose better represents chronic human skin exposure to sunlight leading to skin cancer than previous studies applying much higher UVB doses. Carcinogenesis was initiated and promoted by UVB radiation. Female hairless SKH-1 mice were divided into five groups. The control group was topically treated with 200 μL of acetone (vehicle), and the SD treatment groups were topically treated with SD (30 μg, 45 μg, and 60 μg dissolved in 200 μL of acetone) 1 h before UVB radiation (30 mJ/cm2). The last group of animals received 60 μg SD/200 μL acetone without UVB exposure. These treatments were continued for 27 weeks. Tumor multiplicity and tumor volumes were recorded on a weekly basis for 27 weeks. Weight gain and any signs of toxicity were also closely monitored. Histological characteristics and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated in the mice skin collected at the end of the experiment. The dose-response study proved a modest increase in chemopreventive effects with the increase in SD dose. SD reduced the number of cells positively stained with PCNA proliferation marker in mice skin. The study also showed that SD application without UVB exposure has no effect on the structure of skin. The results from this study suggest that broader range doses of SD are necessary to improve the chemopreventive effects. PMID:23118725

  16. Characterization of skin reactions and pain reported by patients receiving radiation therapy for cancer at different sites

    PubMed Central

    Gewandter, Jennifer S.; Walker, Joanna; Heckler, Charles E.; Morrow, Gary R.; Ryan, Julie L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Skin reactions and pain are commonly reported side effects of radiation therapy (RT). Objective To characterize RT-induced symptoms according to treatment site subgroups and identify skin symptoms that correlate with pain. Methods A self-report survey, adapted from the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory and the McGill Pain Questionnaire, assessed RT-induced skin problems, pain, and specific skin symptoms. Wilcoxon Sign Ranked tests compared mean severity of pre- and post-RT pain and skin problems within each RT-site subgroup. Multiple linear regression (MLR) investigated associations between skin symptoms and pain. Results Survey respondents (n=106) were 58% female and on average 64 years old. RT sites included lung, breast, lower abdomen, head/neck/brain, and upper abdomen. Only patients receiving breast RT reported significant increases in treatment site pain and skin problems (p≤0.007). Patients receiving head/neck/brain RT reported increased skin problems (p<0.0009). MLR showed that post-RT skin tenderness and tightness were most strongly associated with post-RT pain (p=0.066 and p=0.122, respectively). Limitations Small sample size, exploratory analyses, and non-validated measure. Conclusions Only patients receiving breast RT reported significant increases in pain and skin problems at the RT site, while patients receiving head/neck/brain RT had increased skin problems, but not pain. These findings suggest that the severity of skin problems is not the only factor that contributes to pain, and interventions should be tailored to specifically target pain at the RT site, possibly by targeting tenderness and tightness. These findings should be confirmed in a larger sampling of RT patients. PMID:24645338

  17. Evaluation of a skin barrier cream for managing IAD in elderly patients using high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Andy; Arrowsmith, Martin; Young, Steve; Jaimes, Henry

    2014-12-01

    Incontinence-associated dermatitis (IAD) is a defined pathological entity and presents a significant burden for patients and health-care systems. The main objective of this evaluation was to test the efficacy and safety of a skin barrier cream in the management of uncomplicated IAD in elderly patients. Ten incontinent patients with mobility problems that presented with signs of IAD were included in the evaluation. The evaluation took place during a 2-week period. The product's efficacy was objectively evaluated in each patient with high-frequency ultrasound scans taken from the irritated skin compared with an ultrasound scan taken from normal adjacent (control) skin. Data analysis showed a statistical significance in favour of the capacity of the product to help reduce inflammatory signs. Photographic follow-up allowed correlation of ultrasound findings and clinical signs. The product was effective in treating the skin irritation and preventing further skin breakdown. There were no adverse events during the evaluation. PMID:25475672

  18. MO-F-16A-04: Case Study: Estimation of Peak Skin Dose Following a Physician Reported “High Dose” Case and Sentinel Event Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Supanich, M; Chu, J; Wehmeyer, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: This work offers as a teaching example a reported high dose fluoroscopy case and the workflow the institution followed to self-report a radiation overdose sentinel event to the Joint Commission. Methods: Following the completion of a clinical case in a hybrid OR room with a reported air kerma of >18 Gy at the Interventional Reference Point (IRP) the physicians involved in the case referred study to the institution's Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) for review. The RSC assigned a Diagnostic Medical Physicist (DMP) to estimate the patient's Peak Skin Dose (PSD) and analyze the case. Following the DMP's analysis and estimate of a PSD of >15 Gy the institution's adverse event committee was convened to discuss the case and to self-report the case as a radiation overdose sentinel event to the Joint Commission. The committee assigned a subgroup to perform the root cause analysis and develop institutional responses to the event. Results: The self-reporting of the sentinel event and the associated root cause analysis resulted in several institutional action items that are designed to improve process and safety. A formal reporting and analysis mechanism was adopted to review fluoroscopy cases with air kerma greater than 6 Gy at the IRP. An improved and formalized radiation safety training program for physicians using fluoroscopy equipment was implemented. Additionally efforts already under way to monitor radiation exposure in the Radiology department were expanded to include all fluoroscopy equipment capable of automated dose reporting. Conclusion: The adverse event review process and the root cause analysis following the self-reporting of the sentinel event resulted in policies and procedures that are expected to improve the quality and safe usage of fluoroscopy throughout the institution.

  19. Comparative Efficacy and Patient Preference of Topical Anaesthetics in Dermatological Laser Treatments and Skin Microneedling

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Yi Zhen; Al-Niaimi, Firas; Madan, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Topical anaesthetics are effective for patients undergoing superficial dermatological and laser procedures. Our objective was to compare the efficacy and patient preference of three commonly used topical anaesthetics: (2.5% lidocaine/2.5% prilocaine cream (EMLA®), 4% tetracaine gel (Ametop™) and 4% liposomal lidocaine gel (LMX4®)) in patients undergoing laser procedures and skin microneedling. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, double-blind study of patients undergoing laser and skin microneedling procedures at a laser unit in a tertiary referral dermatology centre. Materials and Methods: All 29 patients had three topical anaesthetics applied under occlusion for 1 hour prior to the procedure, at different treatment sites within the same anatomical zone. A self-assessment numerical pain rating scale was given to each patient to rate the pain during the procedure and each patient was asked to specify their preferred choice of topical anaesthetic at the end of the procedure. Statistical Analysis: Parametric data (mean pain scores and frequency of topical anaesthetic agent of choice) were compared using the paired samples t-test. A P-value of ≤0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results and Conclusions: Patients reported a mean (±SD; 95% confidence interval) pain score of 5 (±2.58; 3.66-6.46) with Ametop™, 4.38 (±2.53; 2.64-4.89) with EMLA® and 3.91 (±1.95; 2.65-4.76) with LMX4®. There was no statistically significant difference in pain scores between the different topical anaesthetics. The majority of patients preferred LMX4® as their choice of topical anaesthetic for dermatological laser and skin microneedling procedures. PMID:26644737

  20. Sensitization to Food Additives in Patients with Allergy: A Study Based on Skin Test and Open Oral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Hejrati, Zinatosadat; Dehghani, Zahra; Dehghani, Faranak; Kolahi, Niloofar

    2016-06-01

    There has been a great increase in the consumption of various food additives in recent years. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of sensitization to food additives by using skin prick test in patients with allergy and to determine the concordance rate between positive skin tests and oral challenge in hypersensitivity to additives. This cross-sectional study included 125 (female 71, male 54) patients aged 2-76 years with allergy and 100 healthy individuals. Skin tests were performed in both patient and control groups with 25 fresh food additives. Among patients with allergy, 22.4% showed positive skin test at least to one of the applied materials. Skin test was negative to all tested food additives in control group. Oral food challenge was done in 28 patients with positive skin test, in whom 9 patients showed reaction to culprit (Concordance rate=32.1%). The present study suggested that about one-third of allergic patients with positive reaction to food additives showed positive oral challenge; it may be considered the potential utility of skin test to identify the role of food additives in patients with allergy. PMID:27424134

  1. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: a dose escalating phase I/II study

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-01-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3–6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85–90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P=0.006) and high-dose groups (P=0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  2. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: A dose escalating phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-12-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3-6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85-90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P = 0.006) and high-dose groups (P = 0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  3. Behavior Modification and Risk Perception in Patients with Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, John S.; Davis-Malesevich, Melinda; Logan, Brent R.; Neuburg, Marcy; Burzynski, Mary; Nattinger, Ann B.

    2013-01-01

    Context Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common cancer among humans; yet risk perceptions and preventive health behaviors in this unique cancer survivorship population is relatively unknown. Objectives To assess the impact of the disease and its treatment on sun-protective behaviors, general preventive health behaviors, and risk perception in NMSC patients, and to determine factors associated with behavioral change. Design and Setting Prospective study of 211 consecutive NMSC patients presenting to a dermatologic surgery clinic at a tertiary care university medical center from February, 2005 to March, 2006. Patients Inclusion criteria consisted of NMSC of the head and neck, adult age, and fluency in English. Of the 211 eligible patients, complete data was obtained for 183 (87%). Most common reasons for dropout were voluntary withdrawal and incompletely answered surveys. Intervention and Outcome Measures Surveys that assessed disease-specific quality of life (QOL), preventive health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, exercise, diet, skin self exams), sun-protective behaviors (sunscreen, protective clothing use and ultraviolet light exposure minimization), and risk perception (chances of developing another NMSC, melanoma, or other non-skin cancers) were administered before and after surgical treatment of NMSC. Results Sun-protective behaviors improved post-surgery even after controlling for seasons (p<0.001). Predictor factors associated with increased sun-protective behavior included poor skin tanning ability, summer season, no employment, less comorbid conditions and previous NMSC treatment. Baseline QOL was not predictive of behavioral change. As for risk perception, respondents thought they were more likely than someone similar to themselves to develop future NMSC’s but thought they had similar risks of developing melanoma or other non-skin cancers (p<0.001). There was no significant change in any general preventive health behaviors after surgery except

  4. Multiparametric Classification of Skin from Osteogenesis Imperfecta Patients and Controls by Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Microimaging

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Erin M.; Lin, Ping-Chang; Pleshko, Nancy; Raggio, Cathleen L.; Spencer, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to discriminate between skin biopsies from individuals with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and skin biopsies from individuals without OI. Skin biopsies from nine controls (unaffected) and nine OI patients were imaged to generate maps of five separate MR parameters, T1, T2, km, MTR and ADC. Parameter values were calculated over the dermal region and used for univariate and multiparametric classification analysis. A substantial degree of overlap of individual MR parameters was observed between control and OI groups, which limited the sensitivity and specificity of univariate classification. Classification accuracies ranging between 39% and 67% were found depending on the variable of investigation, with T2 yielding the best accuracy of 67%. When several MR parameters were considered simultaneously in a multivariate analysis, the classification accuracies improved up to 89% for specific combinations, including the combination of T2 and km. These results indicate that multiparametric classification by quantitative MRI is able to detect differences between the skin of OI patients and of unaffected individuals, which motivates further study of quantitative MRI for the clinical diagnosis of OI. PMID:27416032

  5. The Results of Autologous Skin Test in Patients with Chronic Urticaria in Hamadan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Mojgan; Sayemiri, Hooshyar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The etiology of chronic urticaria is unknown in many cases. In this study, we demonstrated the presence of autoimmune antibodies in patients with chronic urticaria by using of the Autologous Serum Skin Test (ASST). Methods We performed a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of autologous antibodies in the serum of 38 patients (25 females and 13 males) with idiopathic chronic urticaria who were referred to the Hamedan Allergy Clinic in 2014. All of the necessary tests for demonstrating chronic urticaria were performed, including complete blood count (CBC), thyroid and liver functionality tests, and the prick test but they did not confirm the cause of chronic urticaria. We conducted the Autologous Serum Skin Test on the patients and analyzed the results. Results In 15 patients (39%), the ASST was positive. Of the 15 patients with positive autoimmune chronic urticaria, five patients (33%) were males, and 10 patients (67%) were females. Conclusion We concluded that many patients with chronic urticaria have autoimmune urticaria. It is the reason for the lack of the response to treatment with common medications for urticaria. New ways of treatment must be considered for them. PMID:27504169

  6. Effects of sarpogrelate hydrochloride on skin ulcers and quality of life in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Ikeda, Takaharu; Uede, Koji; Kanazawa, Nobuo; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2012-06-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine 2A serotonin receptor (5-HT(2A) ) is associated with the contraction of vascular smooth muscle, platelet aggregation and thrombus formation and coronary artery spasms. Sarpogrelate hydrochloride (sarpogrelate) is a selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist and was supposed to be effective for Raynaud's phenomenon with collagen disease. Sarpogrelate has not been investigated regarding the effects, safety and quality of life (QOL) in patient with skin ulcers of collagen disease. Eleven patients with skin ulcers and systemic sclerosis (SSc) were administrated sarpogrelate p.o. three times a day for 3-6 months. The area (mean ± standard error) of skin ulcer at the pretreatment, and after 3 and 6 months of sarpogrelate intake was 2.1 ± 0.8, 0.2 ± 0.1 and 0.1 ± 0.1 mm(2), respectively. The reduction of skin ulcer area was significant after 3 months of sarpogrelate intake. In assessment of QOL, scores of symptoms and emotions but not of functioning were significantly improved after sarpogrelate intake. The global score (mean ± SE) of Skindex-16 at pretreatment, and after 3 and 6 months of sarpogrelate intake was 31.8 ± 8.7, 23.7 ± 8.3 and 10.9 ± 4.6, respectively. The score was significantly improved after 6 months of sarpogrelate intake. There were no obvious side-effects during this study. Sarpogrelate was considered to be a useful drug to improve skin ulcers and QOL in patients with SSc. PMID:22077618

  7. Reduction of Dose Delivered to Organs at Risk in Prostate Cancer Patients via Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlowski, Jason M.; Yang, Eddy S.; Malcolm, Arnold W.; Coffey, Charles W.; Ding, George X.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance can improve the dose delivered to target organs and organs at risk (OARs) for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Eight prostate cancer patients were treated with IMRT to 76 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Daily target localization was performed via alignment of three intraprostatic fiducials and weekly kV-cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The prostate and OARs were manually contoured on each CBCT by a single physician. Daily patient setup shifts were obtained by comparing alignment of skin tattoos with the treatment position based on fiducials. Treatment fields were retrospectively applied to CBCT scans. The dose distributions were calculated using actual treatment plans (an 8-mm PTV margin everywhere except for 6-mm posteriorly) with and without image guidance shifts. Furthermore, the feasibility of margin reduction was evaluated by reducing planning margins to 4 mm everywhere except for 3 mm posteriorly. Results: For the eight treatment plans on the 56 CBCT scans, the average doses to 98% of the prostate (D98) were 102% (range, 99-104%) and 99% (range, 45-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Using margin reduction, the average D98s were 100% (range, 84-104%) and 92% (range, 40-104%) with and without image guidance, respectively. Conclusions: Currently, margins used in IMRT plans are adequate to deliver a dose to the prostate with conventional patient positioning using skin tattoos or bony anatomy. The use of image guidance may facilitate significant reduction of planning margins. Future studies to assess the efficacy of decreasing margins and improvement of treatment-related toxicities are warranted.

  8. Tough-skinned kids: identifying psychosocial effects of psoriasis and helping pediatric patients and families cope.

    PubMed

    Lin, Virginia W

    2012-10-01

    Outward appearance is exquisitely and undeniably tied to self-perception. Pediatric patients with psoriasis face the challenge of coping with psychosocial issues because of the visibility of their skin lesions. The burden of psoriasis also affects the quality of life of family members. This article discusses pediatric psoriasis, current literature on psychosocial impact, role of the nurse to help patients and families cope, and recommendations for further research. Through clinical intervention, patient education, and referral to resources, the nurse can hope to relieve some stress and help the child, adolescent, and family maintain their improved quality of life. PMID:22101138

  9. High Rhodotorula sequences in skin transcriptome of patients with diffuse systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Arron, Sarah T; Dimon, Michelle T; Li, Zhenghui; Johnson, Michael E; A Wood, Tammara; Feeney, Luzviminda; G Angeles, Jorge; Lafyatis, Robert; Whitfield, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    Previous studies have suggested a role for pathogens as a trigger of systemic sclerosis (SSc), although neither a pathogen nor a mechanism of pathogenesis is known. Here we show enrichment of Rhodotorula sequences in the skin of patients with early, diffuse SSc compared with that in normal controls. RNA-seq was performed on four SSc patients and four controls, to a depth of 200 million reads per patient. Data were analyzed to quantify the nonhuman sequence reads in each sample. We found little difference between bacterial microbiome and viral read counts, but found a significant difference between the read counts for a mycobiome component, R. glutinis. Normal samples contained almost no detected R. glutinis or other Rhodotorula sequence reads (mean score 0.021 for R. glutinis, 0.024 for all Rhodotorula). In contrast, SSc samples had a mean score of 5.039 for R. glutinis (5.232 for Rhodotorula). We were able to assemble the D1-D2 hypervariable region of the 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of R. glutinis from each of the SSc samples. Taken together, these results suggest that R. glutinis may be present in the skin of early SSc patients at higher levels than in normal skin, raising the possibility that it may be triggering the inflammatory response found in SSc. PMID:24608988

  10. A systematic review of clinical outcomes for patients diagnosed with skin cancer spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, C Rory; Sankey, Eric W; Liu, Ann; Elder, Benjamin D; Kosztowski, Thomas; Lo, Sheng-Fu L; Fisher, Charles G; Clarke, Michelle J; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Surgical procedures and/or adjuvant therapies are effective modalities for the treatment of symptomatic spinal metastases. However, clinical results specific to the skin cancer spinal metastasis cohort are generally lacking. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature for treatments, clinical outcomes, and survival following the diagnosis of a skin cancer spinal metastasis and evaluate prognostic factors in the context of spinal skin cancer metastases stratified by tumor subtype. METHODS The authors performed a literature review using PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science to identify articles since 1950 that reported survival, clinical outcomes, and/or prognostic factors for the skin cancer patient population with spinal metastases. The methodological quality of reviews was assessed using the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) tool. RESULTS Sixty-five studies met the preset criteria and were included in the analysis. Of these studies, a total of 25, 40, 25, and 12 studies included patients who underwent some form of surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or observation alone, respectively. Sixty-three of the 65 included studies were retrospective in nature (Class of Evidence [CoE] IV), and the 2 prospective studies were CoE II. Based on the studies analyzed, the median overall survival for a patient with a spinal metastasis from a primary skin malignancy is 4.0 months; survival by tumor subtype is 12.5 months for patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 4.0 months for those with melanoma, 4.0 months for those with squamous cell carcinoma, 3.0 months for those with pilomatrix carcinoma, and 1.5 months for those with Merkel cell carcinoma (p < 0.0001). The overall percentage of known continued disease progression after spine metastasis diagnosis was 40.1% (n = 244/608, range 25.0%-88.9%), the rate of known recurrence of the primary skin cancer lesion was 3.5% (n = 21/608, range 0

  11. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in a patient with locally advanced breast cancer and taxane-induced skin toxicity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Taxanes have demonstrated effectiveness in the treatment of breast cancer, the most common type of cancer in women. The toxicity profile of taxanes (including skin toxicities) induces dose adjustment, delay, or discontinuation, which prevents a sufficient dose intensity to achieve a response. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel, a solvent-free form of paclitaxel, prevents toxicities and reduces the pharmacokinetic interferences between paclitaxel and other drugs. Case presentation We describe the case of a 55-year-old Caucasian woman with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy who developed secondary skin toxicity due to delayed hypersensitivity to taxanes. She received Adriamycin® (doxorubicin), cyclophosphamide and docetaxel and developed toxicity that promoted treatment delay and a switch to weekly paclitaxel. After the third and fourth weeks of treatment, paclitaxel toxicities also induced treatment delay and paclitaxel was switched to nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel. She completed the five planned nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel cycles with acceptable tolerability (including persistent grade 2 neuropathy) and without dose delay or adjustments. Clinical response was achieved although pathological response was not good. Conclusions Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel treatment is a good option for patients with breast cancer with taxanes-related skin toxicity. This drug allows the treatment to be completed with acceptable tolerance in our case. PMID:24386978

  12. Demographic characteristics and outcome of burn patients requiring skin grafts: a tertiary hospital experience

    PubMed Central

    Shlash, Saud Othman Al; Madani, Jamal Omran Al; Deib, Jamal Ismail El; Alsubhi, Fatemah Suliman; Saifi, Sara Saud Al; Helmi, Ayman Mohammed Adel; Al-Mutairi, Sultan Khalaf; Khurram, Javed Akhtar

    2016-01-01

    Split thickness skin graft (STSG) and full thickness skin graft (FTSG) are the integral part of burn wound management. However the impact of these graft types on the outcome still remain a matter of controversy. The purpose of this study was to determine the demographic characteristics and outcome of graft surgery of the patients undergone STSG and FTSG at Plastic Surgery Department of Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC), Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This retrospective study included 85 burn patients who received STSG (56 cases) and FTSG (29 cases) at PSMMC during 2010-2015. Demographic characteristics (age, gender, etiology of burn, and area of burn) and outcome (graft loss, graft contraction, skin pigmentation, altered sensation, infection rate and duration of hospital stay) were recorded among the patients who received STSG or FTSG. Out of 85 patients 50 patients were male and 35 female with a ratio of 1.42:1. The patients under the age of 10 years comprised the largest burn group with 28 cases (32.9%) out of total 85 patients. The number of patients above the age of 30 years was relatively smaller. Flame (49.3%) and scald (27%) burns constituted the majority of burn cases. The incidence of contraction among STSG (12.5%) and in FTSG (17.2%) cases was similar. Altered sensation was observed in 7.05% of STSG patients and 13.7% of FTSG cases. Loss of graft was observed in 16% of STSG and 20.6% of FTSG patients. The pigmentation was quite similar in STSG (21.4%) and FTSG (24. 1%). The hospitalization time in FTSG (28 days) patients was also comparable with STSG (26.9 days) group. This study showed that majority of the skin graft cases at PSMMC were male under the age of 30 years mostly affected by flame or scald burns. The outcome following STSG and FTSG surgery was comparable with no significant advantage of one over the other. It may be deduced that both STSG and FTSG have relative merits and demerits and either of these grafting procedure may be

  13. Quality of life in patients with skin diseases in central Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Al-Khowailed, Mohammad S; Suliman, Wijdan E; Al-Turaif, Deema A; Al-Bluwi, Eman; Al-Kahtani, Hassan S

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous national and international studies of quality of life (QoL) in patients with skin diseases have revealed different levels of QoL impairment. The aims of this study were to assess QoL in patients with skin diseases in central Saudi Arabia using the newly validated Skindex-16 instrument and to determine the association between QoL in patients with skin disease, sociodemographic data, and disease characteristics. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 283 adult patients who visited the outpatient dermatology clinics of King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, over 3 months. The patients were interviewed using a pretested Arabic version of the Skindex-16 to measure the effect of skin disorders on their QoL during the previous 7 days. Patient characteristics, medical history, and clinical findings were collected. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to relate the demographic and clinical characteristics to the percentage mean QoL score, and P ≤ 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results QoL was good in 69% of the respondents, with a total percent mean score of 31.80 ± 20.16. The emotional domain was the most affected (mean percentage score 44.27 ± 27.06), followed by symptoms (31.45 ± 28.40) and functioning (14.61 ± 22.75). After adjustment for potential confounders, poorer QoL was significantly associated with female gender (P = 0.03), older age (P = 0.003), rural origin (P = 0.03), positive family history of the same lesion(s) (P = 0.01), shorter duration of ≤6 months (P = 0.02), generalized spread (P ≤ 0.02), and lack of isotretinoin treatment (P = 0.02). Conclusion . The QoL results in this study were generally more optimistic than those of many previous studies. This discrepancy may be due to biases in questionnaire responses or to cultural differences in experience of skin disease and perception of disability. Significant predictors of QoL were not the same for the three domains of the

  14. Skin infection caused by Scedosporium apiospermum in immunocompromised patients. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela Salas, I; Martinez Peinado, C; Fernandez Miralbell, A; Soto Diaz, Augustin; Nogueras Morillas, P; Martin Castro, A; Tercedor Sanchez, J; Garcia Mellado, V

    2013-10-01

    Scedosporium apiospermum is a filamentous fungus that can cause cutaneous or extracutaneous disease. A large number of cases have been published over the last decades, mainly in patients immunocompromised as a result of their disease or treatment. These kinds of infections can progress rapidly and become disseminated, leading to very serious or even fatal complications. We report two new cases of skin infection by Scedosporium apiospermum from our hospital. PMID:24139365

  15. Atypical skin reaction in a patient treated with gefitinib for advanced lung cancer: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    FERRAZZI, ANNA; RUSSO, IRENE; PASELLO, GIULIA; ALAIBAC, MAURO

    2016-01-01

    Gefitinib is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor utilized for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma. The most commonly reported adverse event during gefitinib therapy is skin rash, particularly a papulopustular acne-like eruption. Cutaneous toxicities can affect treatment compliance and the quality of life of the patient. The present study reports a case of gefitinib-induced atypical skin reaction in a 73-year-old woman with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, who developed a squamous-crusted eruption on her face after 4 weeks of oral treatment with gefitinib at a dose of 250 mg/day. The patient was treated with 100 mg minocyclin (2 tablets/day, orally) and with ryfamicin topically. A complete resolution of the lesions was observed 2 weeks later. The present case report explored the pathogenesis of this skin manifestation, focusing on the underlying immunological mechanisms. A review of the literature concerning skin reactions to gefitinib was also conducted. PMID:26889239

  16. Calibration of GafChromic XR-RV3 radiochromic film for skin dose measurement using standardized x-ray spectra and a commercial flatbed scanner

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Bradley P.; Speidel, Michael A.; Pike, Tina L.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, newly formulated XR-RV3 GafChromic® film was calibrated with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceability for measurement of patient skin dose during fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures. Methods: The film was calibrated free-in-air to air kerma levels between 15 and 1100 cGy using four moderately filtered x-ray beam qualities (60, 80, 100, and 120 kVp). The calibration films were scanned with a commercial flatbed document scanner. Film reflective density-to-air kerma calibration curves were constructed for each beam quality, with both the orange and white sides facing the x-ray source. A method to correct for nonuniformity in scanner response (up to 25% depending on position) was developed to enable dose measurement with large films. The response of XR-RV3 film under patient backscattering conditions was examined using on-phantom film exposures and Monte Carlo simulations. Results: The response of XR-RV3 film to a given air kerma depended on kVp and film orientation. For a 200 cGy air kerma exposure with the orange side of the film facing the source, the film response increased by 20% from 60 to 120 kVp. At 500 cGy, the increase was 12%. When 500 cGy exposures were performed with the white side facing the x-ray source, the film response increased by 4.0% (60 kVp) to 9.9% (120 kVp) compared to the orange-facing orientation. On-phantom film measurements and Monte Carlo simulations show that using a NIST-traceable free-in-air calibration curve to determine air kerma in the presence of backscatter results in an error from 2% up to 8% depending on beam quality. The combined uncertainty in the air kerma measurement from the calibration curves and scanner nonuniformity correction was ±7.1% (95% C.I.). The film showed notable stability. Calibrations of film and scanner separated by 1 yr differed by 1.0%. Conclusions: XR-RV3 radiochromic film response to a given air kerma shows dependence on beam quality and film

  17. Organ and effective doses in newborn patients during helical multislice computed tomography examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staton, Robert J.; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Matt D.; Hintenlang, David E.; Arreola, Manuel M.; Williams, Jonathon L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-10-01

    In this study, two computational phantoms of the newborn patient were used to assess individual organ doses and effective doses delivered during head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and torso examinations using the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 helical multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scanner. The stylized phantom used to model the patient anatomy was the revised ORNL newborn phantom by Han et al (2006 Health Phys.90 337). The tomographic phantom used in the study was that developed by Nipper et al (2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 3143) as recently revised by Staton et al (2006 Med. Phys. 33 3283). The stylized model was implemented within the MCNP5 radiation transport code, while the tomographic phantom was incorporated within the EGSnrc code. In both codes, the x-ray source was modelled as a fan beam originating from the focal spot at a fan angle of 52° and a focal-spot-to-axis distance of 57 cm. The helical path of the source was explicitly modelled based on variations in collimator setting (12 mm or 24 mm), detector pitch and scan length. Tube potentials of 80, 100 and 120 kVp were considered in this study. Beam profile data were acquired using radiological film measurements on a 16 cm PMMA phantom, which yielded effective beam widths of 14.7 mm and 26.8 mm for collimator settings of 12 mm and 24 mm, respectively. Values of absolute organ absorbed dose were determined via the use of normalization factors defined as the ratio of the CTDI100 measured in-phantom and that determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the PMMA phantom and ion chamber. Across various technique factors, effective dose differences between the stylized and tomographic phantoms ranged from +2% to +9% for head exams, -4% to -2% for chest exams, +8% to +24% for abdominal exams, -16% to -12% for pelvic exams and -7% to 0% for chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) exams. In many cases, however, relatively close agreement in effective dose was accomplished at the expense of compensating errors in individual organ

  18. Dry skin (xerosis) in patients undergoing maintenance haemodialysis: the role of decreased sweating of the eccrine sweat gland.

    PubMed

    Park, T H; Park, C H; Ha, S K; Lee, S H; Song, K S; Lee, H Y; Han, D S

    1995-12-01

    The aetiology and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development of dry skin in uraemia are still unclear, but the hydration status of stratum corneum clearly influences the appearance of skin. The xerotic skin texture is often referred to as 'dry skin' and has been suggested as a cause of uraemic pruritus. To understand the aetiology of dry skin in uraemia we measured the status of skin surface hydration of uraemic patients with the corneometer and skin surface hydrometer, the functional capacity and the urea concentration of stratum corneum and the response of eccrine sweat gland to sudorific agent (0.05% pilocarpine HCL) in 18 age-matched haemodialysis patients and 10 healthy volunteers. We also performed the water sorption-desorption test to uraemic and control subjects after application of urea in various concentrations. Uraemic patient's skin showed decreased water content compared to control subjects. However, we found no correlation between dry skin and pruritus. Although the urea concentration of the horny layer in uraemic patients was elevated compared to control subjects (28.2 microgram/cm2 vs 5.04 micrograms/cm2, P < 0.05), its moisturizing effect to relieve pruritus is questionable because its artificial application revealed no improvement of the functional capacity of horny layer in concentration 5 times higher than the physiological concentration. Uraemic patients showed decreased sweating response to sudorific agent. In conclusion, the functional abnormalities of eccrine sweat glands may be account for dry skin in uraemic patients at least in part, but there is no correlation between xerosis and pruritus. PMID:8808224

  19. Preadmission Application of 2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate (CHG): Enhancing Patient Compliance While Maximizing Skin Surface Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Edmiston, Charles E; Krepel, Candace J; Spencer, Maureen P; Ferraz, Alvaro A; Seabrook, Gary R; Lee, Cheong J; Lewis, Brian D; Brown, Kellie R; Rossi, Peter J; Malinowski, Michael J; Edmiston, Sarah E; Ferraz, Edmundo M; Leaper, David J

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical site infections (SSIs) are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Preadmission skin antisepsis, while controversial, has gained acceptance as a strategy for reducing the risk of SSI. In this study, we analyze the benefit of an electronic alert system for enhancing compliance to preadmission application of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Following informed consent, 100 healthy volunteers in an academic, tertiary care medical center were randomized to 5 chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) skin application groups: 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 consecutive applications. Participants were further randomized into 2 subgroups: with or without electronic alert. Skin surface concentrations of CHG (μg/mL) were analyzed using a colorimetric assay at 5 separate anatomic sites. INTERVENTION Preadmission application of chlorhexidine gluconate, 2% RESULTS Mean composite skin surface CHG concentrations in volunteer participants receiving EA following 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 applications were 1,040.5, 1,334.4, 1,278.2, 1,643.9, and 1,803.1 µg/mL, respectively, while composite skin surface concentrations in the no-EA group were 913.8, 1,240.0, 1,249.8, 1,194.4, and 1,364.2 µg/mL, respectively (ANOVA, P<.001). Composite ratios (CHG concentration/minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 90% of organisms [MIC90]) for 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 applications using the 2% CHG cloth were 208.1, 266.8, 255.6, 328.8, and 360.6, respectively, representing CHG skin concentrations effective against staphylococcal surgical pathogens. The use of an electronic alert system resulted in significant increase in skin concentrations of CHG in the 4- and 5-application groups (P<.04 and P<.007, respectively). CONCLUSION The findings of this study suggest an evidence-based standardized process that includes use of an Internet-based electronic alert system to improve patient compliance while maximizing skin surface concentrations effective

  20. Tamoxifen-associated skin reactions in breast cancer patients: from case report to literature review.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Peter; Valiani, Sabira; MacIsaac, Jennifer; Mithoowani, Hamid; Verma, Shailendra

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to firstly present the maiden case of tamoxifen-induced acute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (ACLE), and secondly, to broaden the discussion into a systematic review of the various tamoxifen-related skin changes documented in patients with breast cancer. We searched PubMed, Cochrane, Embase, CancerLit, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases using keywords to identify reported cases of tamoxifen-related cutaneous adverse events. Outcomes captured included type of cutaneous reaction, time to adverse event, pathologic mechanism, and possible treatment. From 17 clinical studies identified, over ten distinct types of adverse reactions of the skin were itemized. The character of these cutaneous events ranged from the relatively common hot flashes to the rare, but potentially life-threatening, Steven Johnson syndrome. Overall, tamoxifen is generally a well-tolerated hormone therapy with decades of supporting safety data. Based on current medical literature, we present the first case of tamoxifen-induced ACLE. Our clinical experience of managing this case revealed that despite its broad use and the frequency of associated skin reactions, there is a lack of concise information detailing the cutaneous adverse events associated with tamoxifen. The absence of summarized information concerning tamoxifen-related skin changes prompted us to perform a review herein. PMID:25292419

  1. Detection of living Sarcoptes scabiei larvae by reflectance mode confocal microscopy in the skin of a patient with crusted scabies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Assi; Mumcuoglu, Kosta Y.; Ingber, Arieh; Enk, Claes D.

    2012-06-01

    Scabies is an intensely pruritic disorder induced by a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to infestation of the skin by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The diagnosis of scabies is established clinically and confirmed by identifying mites or eggs by microscopic examination of scrapings from the skin or by surface microscopy using a dermatoscope. Reflectance-mode confocal microscopy is a novel technique used for noninvasive imaging of skin structures and lesions at a resolution compatible to that of conventional histology. Recently, the technique was employed for the confirmation of the clinical diagnosis of scabies. We demonstrate the first ever documentation of a larva moving freely inside the skin of a patient infected with scabies.

  2. Accuracy of patient dose calculation for lung IMRT: A comparison of Monte Carlo, convolution/superposition, and pencil beam computations

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderstraeten, Barbara; Reynaert, Nick; Paelinck, Leen; Madani, Indira; Wagter, Carlos de; Gersem, Werner de; Neve, Wilfried de; Thierens, Hubert

    2006-09-15

    between MCDE and Pinnacle-CS were below 5%. For both Pinnacle-CS and Helax-CC, deviations from MCDE above 5% were found within the OARs: within the lungs for two (6 MV) and six (18 MV) patients for Pinnacle-CS, and within other OARs for two patients for Helax-CC (for D{sub max} of the heart and D{sub 33} of the expanded esophagus) but only for 6 MV. For one patient, all four algorithms were used to recompute the dose after replacing all computed tomography voxels within the patient's skin contour by water. This made all differences above 5% between MCDE and the other dose calculation algorithms disappear. Thus, the observed deviations mainly arose from differences in particle transport modeling within the lungs, and the commissioning of the algorithms was adequately performed (or the commissioning was less important for this type of treatment). In conclusion, not one pair of the dose calculation algorithms we investigated could provide results that were consistent within 5% for all 10 patients for the set of clinically relevant dose-volume indices studied. As the results from both CS algorithms differed significantly, care should be taken when evaluating treatment plans as the choice of dose calculation algorithm may influence clinical results. Full Monte Carlo provides a great benchmarking tool for evaluating the performance of other algorithms for patient dose computations.

  3. Accuracy of patient dose calculation for lung IMRT: A comparison of Monte Carlo, convolution/superposition, and pencil beam computations.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, Barbara; Reynaert, Nick; Paelinck, Leen; Madani, Indira; De Wagter, Carlos; De Gersem, Werner; De Neve, Wilfried; Thierens, Hubert

    2006-09-01

    Pinnacle-CS and Helax-CC, deviations from MCDE above 5% were found within the OARs: within the lungs for two (6 MV) and six (18 MV) patients for Pinnacle-CS, and within other OARs for two patients for Helax-CC (for Dmax of the heart and D33 of the expanded esophagus) but only for 6 MV. For one patient, all four algorithms were used to recompute the dose after replacing all computed tomography voxels within the patient's skin contour by water. This made all differences above 5% between MCDE and the other dose calculation algorithms disappear. Thus, the observed deviations mainly arose from differences in particle transport modeling within the lungs, and the commissioning of the algorithms was adequately performed (or the commissioning was less important for this type of treatment). In conclusion, not one pair of the dose calculation algorithms we investigated could provide results that were consistent within 5% for all 10 patients for the set of clinically relevant dose-volume indices studied. As the results from both CS algorithms differed significantly, care should be taken when evaluating treatment plans as the choice of dose calculation algorithm may influence clinical results. Full Monte Carlo provides a great benchmarking tool for evaluating the performance of other algorithms for patient dose computations. PMID:17022207

  4. Assessment of patient dose and image quality for cardiac CT with breast shields.

    PubMed

    Midgley, S M; Einsiedel, P F; Langenberg, F; Lui, E H; Heinze, S B

    2012-09-01

    Breast shielding can reduce dose to the female breast, a radiosensitive organ receiving significant radiation during computed tomography (CT) chest examinations, particularly in cardiac CT, where Electrocardiogram dose modulation currently precludes the use of radial dose modulation to reduce breast dose. However, breast shields may produce artefacts affecting interpretation of coronary arteries. This study explores the dose savings and the effect of breast shields on image quality with torso and CT dose index body phantoms and an organ dose calculator. Change in dose calculated: 53-63 % (female breast), 82-85 % (lung), 79-84 % (oesophagus) and 76-80 % (effective dose) with larger dose reductions at lower kVp. Image quality is preserved when breast shields are placed after the scout no closer than 10 mm from the skin. Therefore, breast shields can be used in cardiac CT to reduce breast dose without compromising image quality. Revised conversion factors for dose length product to effective dose are suggested for cardiac CT without and with breast shields. PMID:22492837

  5. [The humoral immunity indices of patients with malignant skin melanoma using the viral immunomodulator rigvir].

    PubMed

    Glinkina, L S; Heisele, O G; Garklava, R R; Muceniece, A J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of a viral immunomodulator rigvir on humoral immunity was studied in patients with skin malignant melanoma. Peripheral blood levels of B-lymphocytes, IgA, G and M and circulating immune complexes were assayed and immunoglobulin/B-cell ratio (Ig/B) calculated. Preoperative treatment with rigvir brought the indexes of humoral immunity to normal. Response of melanoma patients to rigvir treatment was different from that seen in healthy subjects and was determined by the course of disease. PMID:1300751

  6. “Il Corpo Ritrovato”: Dermocosmetological Skin Care Project for the Oncologic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, G.; Romano, M. C.; Cameli, N.; Mariano, M.; Pastore, F.; Annunziata, M. C.; Mazzella, C.; De Vita, Valerio; Mauriello, Maria Chiara; Monfrecola, G.

    2011-01-01

    Neoplastic disease and its therapeutic options have a huge impact on the patient's quality of life from both the emotional and the working point of view. The project “Il Corpo Ritrovato” aims at creating an interdisciplinary network of physicians to improve the quality of life of the oncologic patient, focusing on such important aspects as dermocosmetological skin care but also on the evaluation of new therapeutic and diagnostic algorithms in order to make further progress in the field of prevention. PMID:22084736

  7. Reference air kerma and kerma-area product as estimators of peak skin dose for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deukwoo; Little, Mark P.; Miller, Donald L.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To determine more accurate regression formulas for estimating peak skin dose (PSD) from reference air kerma (RAK) or kerma-area product (KAP). Methods: After grouping of the data from 21 procedures into 13 clinically similar groups, assessments were made of optimal clustering using the Bayesian information criterion to obtain the optimal linear regressions of (log-transformed) PSD vs RAK, PSD vs KAP, and PSD vs RAK and KAP. Results: Three clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs RAK, seven clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs KAP, and six clusters of clinical groups were optimal in regression of PSD vs RAK and KAP. Prediction of PSD using both RAK and KAP is significantly better than prediction of PSD with either RAK or KAP alone. The regression of PSD vs RAK provided better predictions of PSD than the regression of PSD vs KAP. The partial-pooling (clustered) method yields smaller mean squared errors compared with the complete-pooling method.Conclusion: PSD distributions for interventional radiology procedures are log-normal. Estimates of PSD derived from RAK and KAP jointly are most accurate, followed closely by estimates derived from RAK alone. Estimates of PSD derived from KAP alone are the least accurate. Using a stochastic search approach, it is possible to cluster together certain dissimilar types of procedures to minimize the total error sum of squares.

  8. Grenz ray-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Frentz, G.

    1989-09-01

    In 28 patients, nonmelanoma skin cancers developed in areas previously exposed to grenz rays. In 17 patients who did not have psoriasis, no other relevant carcinogenic exposure could be incriminated. Women were more often affected than men. Most of the tumors were basal cell cancers, and most of the patients had multiple tumors. No threshold dose could be established. The distribution of the latency time among patients without psoriasis was strictly normal (median 18 years). These observations suggest that usual therapeutic doses of grenz rays, as a single agent, are capable of causing skin cancer, but only in those persons who are abnormally sensitive to x-rays. 9 references.

  9. A retrospective analysis of skin bacterial colonisation, susceptibility and resistance in atopic dermatitis and impetigo patients.

    PubMed

    Salah, Louai A; Faergemann, Jan

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and impetigo are skin conditions where bacterial colonisation and infection, especially with Staphylococcus aureus play an important role. We compared skin bacterial population, resistance patterns and choice of antimicrobial agents in patients diagnosed with AD and impetigo during 2005 and 2011 in our department. Number of positive cultures in the AD group were 40 and 53 in 2005 and 2011, with S. aureus found in 97.5% and 100%, respectively. Differences in resistance were marginal. In impetigo, S. aureus was found in all 70 patients in 2005 and all 40 patients in 2011. Antibiotic resistance to specifically fusidic acid was more common in 2005 impetigo patients (22.8%) versus 2011 (5%) (p = 0.078). The most commonly used oral antimicrobial was cefadroxil (in 57.5% and 52.8% of AD and 58.6% and 35% of impetigo patients in 2005 and 2011, respectively). Our observations confirm the high prevalence of S. aureus in both diseases and, interestingly, show a declining resistance trend in impetigo. PMID:25367860

  10. Patterns of lymphatic drainage from the skin in patients with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Uren, Roger F; Howman-Giles, Robert; Thompson, John F

    2003-04-01

    An essential prerequisite for a successful sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) procedure is an accurate map of the pattern of lymphatic drainage from the primary tumor site in each patient. In melanoma patients, mapping requires high-quality lymphoscintigraphy, which can identify the actual lymphatic collecting vessels as they drain into the sentinel lymph nodes. Small-particle radiocolloids are needed to achieve this goal, and imaging protocols must be adapted to ensure that all true sentinel nodes, including those in unexpected locations, are found in every patient. Clinical prediction of lymphatic drainage from the skin is not possible. The old clinical guidelines based on Sappey's lines therefore should be abandoned. Patterns of lymphatic drainage from the skin are highly variable from patient to patient, even from the same area of the skin. Unexpected lymphatic drainage from the skin of the back to sentinel nodes in the triangular intermuscular space and, in some patients, through the posterior body wall to sentinel nodes in the para-aortic, paravertebral, and retroperitoneal areas has been found. Lymphatic drainage from the head and neck frequently involves sentinel nodes in multiple node fields and can occur from the base of the neck up to nodes in the occipital or upper cervical areas or from the scalp down to nodes at the neck base, bypassing many node groups. The sentinel node is not always found in the nearest node field and is best defined as "any lymph node receiving direct lymphatic drainage from a primary tumor site." Lymphatic drainage can occur from the upper limb to sentinel nodes above the axilla. Drainage to the epitrochlear region from the hand and arm as well as to the popliteal region from the foot and leg is more common than was previously thought. Interval nodes, which lie along the course of a lymphatic vessel between a lesion site and a recognized node field, are not uncommon, especially in the trunk. Drainage across the midline of the body

  11. Skin and wound issues in patients with Parkinson's disease: an overview of common disorders.

    PubMed

    Beitz, Janice M

    2013-06-01

    Parkinson's Disease is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder that is expected to increase in coming decades as the American population continues to age. Although the motor dysfunction (bradykinesia, tremor, rigidity) of Parkinson's Disease is well described in the literature, the nonmotor dysfunction related to autonomic system changes is not as commonly addressed. Ironically, nonmotor changes, such as seborrhea, sialorrhea, hyperhidrosis, and sensory denervation occur earlier in the disease process and exert a profound effect on patients' quality of life. The depletion of dopamine, a critically important neurotransmitter, is the critical pathology of Parkinson's disease. Therapies targeting this abnormality and the effect of insufficient dopamine itself can affect the integumentary system and potentially wound healing. The purpose of this review is to describe changes in the autonomic nervous system due to Parkinson's Disease with a focused overview of common skin and wound care issues that may affect wound care clinician practice. Implications for nurses and other clinicians caring for Parkinson's Disease patients include surveillance for melanoma and other skin cancers, skin protection against excessive moisture or the effects of insufficient moisture, monitoring of wound healing progress, and interventions to prevent or ameliorate complications of immobility. PMID:23749660

  12. Radioimmunotherapy treatment planning based on radiation absorbed dose or patient size

    SciTech Connect

    Eary, J.F.; Krohn, K.A.; Press, O.W. |

    1996-05-01

    Several approaches have been used to plan treatment doses for patients undergoing radioimmunotherapy. Investigators often use fixed doses, or doses based on patient size (mCi/kg or mCi/m{sup 2}). Our treatment protocols for lymphoma and leukemia involved calculation of tissue radiation absorbed dose based on images from a trace labeled infusion of antibody prior to treatment. In a recent analysis of patients treated in the Phase I and II dose escalation trial for treatment of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma with I-131 anti-CD20 antibody (B1), we investigated the relationship between our dosimetry based treatment and dose based on patient size. Tissue radiation dose for several normal organs and for tumors were plotted versus the mCi administered per kg or m{sup 2} of the patient to evaluate the relationship between the two treatment approaches. These graphs showed correlation coefficients ranging from 0.021 to 0.684, demonstrating the variability in antibody catabolism between patients. This means that fixed doses or administrations based on patient size do not deliver consistent radiation doses to normal organs or tumors. This finding was extrapolated to show that toxicity from doses based on patient size di not correlate with treatment dose; those based on calculated rad/organ did. Phase I clinical trials using treatment doses based on patient size where there are likely to be variations in patient antibody catabolism will result in confounding toxicities at apparently similar mCi dose levels. Use of pre-treatment scans for treatment dose planning are worth the additional effort by normalizing the normal tissue toxicity.

  13. Risk of skin cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus: A nationwide retrospective cohort study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hui-Wen; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Huang, Wei-Chun; Tang, Pei-Ling; Lam, Hing-Chung

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that certain types of cancers are more common in people with diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to investigate the risk of skin cancer in patients with DM in Taiwan. In this retrospective cohort study using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Research Database, the risk of developing overall skin cancer, including nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma, was compared by Poisson regression analysis and Cox regression analysis between the DM and non-DM cohorts. The DM cohort with newly diagnosed DM (n = 41,898) and a non-DM cohort were one-to-one matched by age, sex, index date, and comorbidities (coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and obesity). Compared with non-DM cohort statistically, for the people with DM aged ≥60 years, the incidence rates of overall skin cancer and NMSC were significantly higher (overall: DM/non-DM: number [n] = 99/76, incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 1.44, P = 0.02; NMSC: DM/non-DM: n = 94/66, IRR = 1.57, P = 0.005). By Cox regression analysis, the risk of developing overall skin cancer or NMSC was significantly higher after adjusting for sex, comorbidities, and overall diseases with immunosuppression status (overall: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.46, P = 0.01; NMSC: AHR = 1.6, P = 0.003). Other significant risk factors were older males for skin cancer (overall: AHR = 1.68, P = 0.001; NMSC: AHR = 1.59, P = 0.004; melanoma: AHR = 3.25, P = 0.04), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for NMSC (AHR = 1.44, P = 0.04), and coronary artery disease for melanoma (AHR = 4.22, P = 0.01). The risk of developing melanoma was lower in the DM cohort than in the non-DM cohort, but without significance (AHR = 0.56, P = 0.28; DM/non-DM: n = 5/10). The incidence rate and risk of developing overall skin cancer, including NMSC, was significantly higher in older adults with DM. Other significant risk factors for older adults

  14. Estimation of patient doses for common diagnostic X-ray examinations in Latvian hospitals, analysis of radiographic techniques and comparison with European guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bogucarskis, K; Salmins, A; Gfirtner, H; Anatschkowa, E

    2005-01-01

    This article deals with the estimation of doses received by patients undergoing radiological examinations in order to establish dose reference levels (DRLs) in Latvia. Several large hospitals, small hospitals and private practices were selected for patient dose measurements. The measurements were carried out using calibrated thermoluminiscence dosemeters attached to the patient's skin. Exposure parameters and patient's data were recorded. The entrance surface doses (ESDs) to patients undergoing several common X-ray examinations (chest AP/PA, chest LAT, lumbar spine AP/PA, lumbar spine LAT and pelvis) were measured. Data concerning the kV(p) settings, used type of films, focus-film distance and the ESD values were analysed and compared with those recommended by the European Community (EC). Among the different hospitals and private practices, discrepancies in the patient doses and techniques used for the examination were found, where the doses exceeded the EC recommended values owing to a very low kV(p) and a very low sensitivity of the screen film combinations used. PMID:15933103

  15. Nursing care of patients receiving high-dose, continuous-infusion interleukin-2 with pulse dose and famotidine.

    PubMed

    Tyre, Charley Cowan; Quan, Walter

    2007-08-01

    High-dose, continuous-infusion interleukin-2 (IL-2) followed by pulse dose and concurrent administration of famotidine has demonstrated response rates of 64% and 33% in patients with metastatic melanoma and metastatic renal cell carcinoma, respectively. Currently, no information is available concerning the nursing care of patients receiving that IL-2 regimen. Given the high response rates of patients on the treatment, attention by the nursing profession is warranted. Effective nursing care of patients receiving IL-2 is essential to the regimen's success. Recognition and prompt treatment of common side effects lead to better patient outcomes. This article provides nurses with an overview of the treatment regimen, expected side effects, psycho-social considerations, and discharge instructions for patients receiving continuous-infusion plus pulse IL-2 and famotidine. PMID:17723964

  16. Functional cloning of a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from vitiligo patient skin.

    PubMed

    Klarquist, Jared; Eby, Jonathan M; Henning, Steven W; Li, Mingli; Wainwright, Derek A; Westerhof, Wiete; Luiten, Rosalie M; Nishimura, Michael I; Le Poole, I Caroline

    2016-05-01

    We isolated gp100-reactive T cells from perilesional skin of a patient with progressive vitiligo with superior reactivity toward melanoma cells compared with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes 1520, a melanoma-derived T-cell line reactive with the same cognate peptide. After dimer enrichment and limited dilution cloning, amplified cells were subjected to reverse transcription and 5' RACE to identify the variable TCRα and TCRβ subunit sequences. The full-length sequence was cloned into a retroviral vector separating both subunits by a P2A slippage sequence and introduced into Jurkat cells and primary T cells. Cytokine secreted by transduced cells in response to cognate peptide and gp100-expressing targets signifies that we have successfully cloned a gp100-reactive T-cell receptor from actively depigmenting skin. PMID:26824221

  17. Abnormal Collagen Metabolism in Cultured Skin Fibroblasts from Patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodemann, H. Peter; Bayreuther, Klaus

    1984-08-01

    Total collagen synthesis is decreased by about 29% (P < 0.01) in skin fibroblasts established in vitro from male patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) as compared with that in normal male skin fibroblasts in vitro. The reduction in collagen synthesis is associated with an approximately 2-fold increase in collagen degradation in DMD fibroblasts. Correlated to these alterations in the metabolism of collagen, DMD fibroblasts express a significantly higher hydroxyproline/proline ratio (DMD: 1.36-1.45; P < 0.01) than do normal fibroblasts (controls: 0.86-0.89). The increased hydroxylation of proline residues of collagen (composed of type I and type III) could be the cause for the enhanced degradation of collagen in DMD fibroblasts.

  18. Alternate-day dosing of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients controlled on once daily dose: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Manash P.; Bhuyan, Sonali B.; Deka, Jumi; Bora, Jatin; Bora, Smritisikha; Barkakati, Murchana

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) inhibitor with a long terminal half life, significantly inhibits the DPP 4 enzyme at a steady state up to 48 h after the last dose. The present case series examined the hypothesis that linagliptin retains its efficacy during alternate day dosing in type 2 diabetes patients when switched over from once daily (OD) dosing. Eight type 2 diabetes patients maintaining stable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with acceptable fasting plasma glucose and postprandial glucose levels and receiving linagliptin 5 mg OD for at least 6 weeks, with a stable dose of concomitant antidiabetic medications were given linagliptin 5 mg every alternate day. The median HbA1c while on the OD regimen was 6.1% (43 mmol/mol) (range: 5.8–6.9% [40–52 mmol/mol]) and median duration of diabetes was 7 years (range: 0.75–16 years). After a median follow-up period of 21weeks,the glycemic control was maintained in all patients similar to their baseline values (median HbA1c: 6.0% [42 mmol/mol], range: 5.1–7.1% [32–54 mmol/mol]). The body weight, fasting, and random glucose levels at baseline were also well maintained at the end of treatment. Optimal glycemic status maintained in our study population favors our hypothesis that linagliptin used alternate daily after switching from initial OD dose of the drug in patients on a stable background antidiabetic medications retains its efficacy. Paradoxically, alternate day dosing may affect compliance if the patient forgets when they took the last dose. Further studies including larger cohorts are needed to validate this finding and identify patients who can benefit from the alternate day regimen. PMID:27366728

  19. Alternate-day dosing of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients controlled on once daily dose: A case series.

    PubMed

    Baruah, Manash P; Bhuyan, Sonali B; Deka, Jumi; Bora, Jatin; Bora, Smritisikha; Barkakati, Murchana

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) inhibitor with a long terminal half life, significantly inhibits the DPP 4 enzyme at a steady state up to 48 h after the last dose. The present case series examined the hypothesis that linagliptin retains its efficacy during alternate day dosing in type 2 diabetes patients when switched over from once daily (OD) dosing. Eight type 2 diabetes patients maintaining stable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with acceptable fasting plasma glucose and postprandial glucose levels and receiving linagliptin 5 mg OD for at least 6 weeks, with a stable dose of concomitant antidiabetic medications were given linagliptin 5 mg every alternate day. The median HbA1c while on the OD regimen was 6.1% (43 mmol/mol) (range: 5.8-6.9% [40-52 mmol/mol]) and median duration of diabetes was 7 years (range: 0.75-16 years). After a median follow-up period of 21weeks,the glycemic control was maintained in all patients similar to their baseline values (median HbA1c: 6.0% [42 mmol/mol], range: 5.1-7.1% [32-54 mmol/mol]). The body weight, fasting, and random glucose levels at baseline were also well maintained at the end of treatment. Optimal glycemic status maintained in our study population favors our hypothesis that linagliptin used alternate daily after switching from initial OD dose of the drug in patients on a stable background antidiabetic medications retains its efficacy. Paradoxically, alternate day dosing may affect compliance if the patient forgets when they took the last dose. Further studies including larger cohorts are needed to validate this finding and identify patients who can benefit from the alternate day regimen. PMID:27366728

  20. Four-Dimensional Patient Dose Reconstruction for Scanned Ion Beam Therapy of Moving Liver Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Daniel; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Härtig, Martin; Ellerbrock, Malte; Jäkel, Oliver; Combs, Stephanie E.; Habermehl, Daniel; Herfarth, Klaus; Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the actual delivered 4-dimensional (4D) dose in treatments of patients with mobile hepatocellular cancer with scanned carbon ion beam therapy. Methods and Materials: Six patients were treated with 4 fractions to a total relative biological effectiveness (RBE)–weighted dose of 40 Gy (RBE) using a single field. Respiratory motion was addressed by dedicated margins and abdominal compression (5 patients) or gating (1 patient). 4D treatment dose reconstructions based on the treatment records and the measured motion monitoring data were performed for the single-fraction dose and a total of 17 fractions. To assess the impact of uncertainties in the temporal correlation between motion trajectory and beam delivery sequence, 3 dose distributions for varying temporal correlation were calculated per fraction. For 3 patients, the total treatment dose was formed from the fractional distributions using all possible combinations. Clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was analyzed using the volumes receiving at least 95% (V{sub 95}) and 107% (V{sub 107}) of the planned doses. Results: 4D dose reconstruction based on daily measured data is possible in a clinical setting. V{sub 95} and V{sub 107} values for the single fractions ranged between 72% and 100%, and 0% and 32%, respectively. The estimated total treatment dose to the CTV exhibited improved and more robust dose coverage (mean V{sub 95} > 87%, SD < 3%) and overdose (mean V{sub 107} < 4%, SD < 3%) with respect to the single-fraction dose for all analyzed patients. Conclusions: A considerable impact of interplay effects on the single-fraction CTV dose was found for most of the analyzed patients. However, due to the fractionated treatment, dose heterogeneities were substantially reduced for the total treatment dose. 4D treatment dose reconstruction for scanned ion beam therapy is technically feasible and may evolve into a valuable tool for dose assessment.

  1. Effect of topical local anesthetic application to skin harvest sites for pain management in burn patients undergoing skin-grafting procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Jellish, W S; Gamelli, R L; Furry, P A; McGill, V L; Fluder, E M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if topical administration of local anesthesia, applied to fresh skin-harvest sites, reduces pain and analgesic requirements after surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Nonopioid treatments for pain after therapeutic procedures on patients with burns have become popular because of the side effects associated with narcotics. The topical administration of local anesthesia originally offered little advantage because of poor epidermal penetration. METHODS: This study compares 2% lidocaine with 0.5% bupivacaine or saline, topically applied after skin harvest, to determine what effect this may have on pain and narcotic use. Sixty patients with partial- or full-thickness burns to approximately 10% to 15% of their body were randomly divided into three groups: group 1 received normal saline, group 2 had 0.5% bupivacaine, and group 3 had 2% lidocaine sprayed onto areas immediately after skin harvest. Blood samples were subsequently obtained to measure concentrations of the local anesthetic. Hemodynamic variables after surgery, wake-up times, emetic symptoms, pain, and narcotic use were compared. RESULTS: Higher heart rates were noted in the placebo group than in those receiving lidocaine or bupivacaine. No differences were noted in recovery from anesthesia or emetic symptoms. Pain scores were lower and 24-hour narcotic use was less in patients who received lidocaine. Plasma lidocaine levels were greater than bupivacaine at all time points measured. CONCLUSIONS: Topical lidocaine applied to skin-harvest sites produced an analgesic effect that reduced narcotic requirements compared with patients who received bupivacaine or placebo. Local anesthetic solutions aerosolized onto skin-harvest sites did not affect healing or produce toxic blood concentrations. PMID:9923808

  2. Sex and the skin: a qualitative study of patients with acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema.

    PubMed

    Magin, Parker; Heading, Gaynor; Adams, Jon; Pond, Dimity

    2010-08-01

    Quantitative questionnaire-based research has suggested a considerable effect of skin disease on the sexual life of sufferers. In this study, we explored the effects of acne, psoriasis and atopic eczema upon sexual functioning and sexual relationships in the context of a wider exploration of the psychological sequelae of these diseases. We employed a qualitative methodology employing in-depth semi-structured interviews and involving thematic analysis and constant comparison. Participants were patients with currently active acne, psoriasis or atopic eczema. Purposive sampling aimed to obtain a sample reflecting a wide range of participant characteristics including skin disease severity, age, sex, and care by general practitioner or dermatologist. Sixty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted. Acne had adverse effects on participants' self-perceived sexual attractiveness and self-confidence, as did psoriasis and eczema. But psoriasis and eczema also had marked effects on sexual well-being and on capacity for intimacy. These were related to issues of self-esteem and sexual self-image and were often pervasive, resulting in marked behavioural avoidance of intimate situations and continuing effects on sexual well-being even in long-established sexual relationships. Effects of psoriasis and eczema on sexual well-being and sexual relationships were mediated more by appearance and texture of non-genital skin than by involvement of genital skin. We conclude that, while recognising the distressing effects of acne on self-perceived sexual attractiveness, clinicians should be especially aware of the capacity of psoriasis and eczema to profoundly affect patients' psychological and sexual well-being. PMID:20677083

  3. Sensitization to Aeroallergens in Patients with Respiratory Allergies Based on Skin-Prick Test Results

    PubMed Central

    Lokaj-Berisha, V; Berisha, N; Lumezi, B; Ahmetaj, L; Bejtullahu, G; Karahoda, N; Pupovci, H

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to identify the most common aeroallergens in patients with asthma and rhinitis. Methods: The study enrolled 102 participants including 64 patients with respiratory allergies (among them 15 were clinically diagnosed as asthma patients, 41 with rhinitis, 8 were both) and 38 healthy controls. All of participants were subject of skin prick tests (SPT) with series of common allergenic extracts. Sera from all participants were tested for total IgE and eosinophil count. To measure airflow limitation and reversibility in asthma patients the pulmonary function testing were carried out. Results: M/F ratio was 1:1.6 in patients and 1:0.7 in control group with mean age 28.88 year (SD 13.16; range 6 – 55 year) and 20.47 respectively (SD 1.16; range 19–23 year). The most common risk factors in these patients were total IgE more than 100 IU/ml, eosinophils above 4% and positive family history of atopy. Skin prick testing results showed prevalence rates for allergen groups in this manner: house dust mites 81.3 %, pollens 57.8 %, animal dandruff 12.5% and moulds 4.9%. Polysensitization was common in 51.6% of all sensitized patients being positive to more than one group of allergens. Conclusion: House dust mites are the main sensitizing allergens among our allergic patients as well as healthy controls. Next in importance, in all participants, are grasses. This pattern of prevalence was expected based on herbal geography, climate and specially lifestyle. It was also compatible with the results from studies carried out in places with the same habitat. PMID:23304660

  4. The influence of acute kidney injury on antimicrobial dosing in critically ill patients: are dose reductions always necessary?

    PubMed

    Blot, Stijn; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Darren M; Roberts, Jason A

    2014-05-01

    Optimal dosing of antimicrobial therapy is pivotal to increase the likelihood of survival in critically ill patients with sepsis. Drug exposure that maximizes bacterial killing, minimizes the development of antimicrobial resistance, and avoids concentration-related toxicities should be considered the target of therapy. However, antimicrobial dosing is problematic as pathophysiological factors inherent to sepsis that alter may result in reduced concentrations. Alternatively, sepsis may evolve to multiple-organ dysfunction including acute kidney injury (AKI). In this case, decreased clearance of renally cleared drugs is possible, which may lead to increased concentrations that may cause drug toxicities. Consequently, when dosing antibiotics in septic patients with AKI, one should consider factors that may lead to underdosing and overdosing. Drug-specific pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data may be helpful to guide dosing in these circumstances. Yet, because of the high interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics of antibiotics during sepsis, this issue remains a significant challenge. PMID:24602849

  5. In vitro activity of tedizolid against gram-positive bacteria in patients with skin and skin structure infections and hospital-acquired pneumonia: a Korean multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yangsoon; Hong, Sung Kuk; Choi, Sunghak; Im, Weonbin; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-09-01

    We compared the activities of tedizolid to those of linezolid and other commonly used antimicrobial agents against gram-positive cocci recovered from patients with skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) in Korean hospitals. Gram-positive isolates were collected from 356 patients with SSSIs and 144 patients with HAP at eight hospitals in Korea from 2011 to 2014. SSSIs included impetigo, cellulitis, erysipelas, furuncles, abscesses, and infected burns. Antimicrobial susceptibility was tested by using the CLSI agar dilution method. All of the gram-positive isolates were inhibited by ≤1 μg/mL tedizolid. The minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]₉₀ of tedizolid was 0.5 μg/mL for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was 4-fold lower than that of linezolid. Tedizolid may become a useful option for the treatment of SSSIs and HAP caused by gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26206690

  6. Assessing Quality of Life in Older Adult Patients with Skin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Farage, Miranda A.; Miller, Kenneth W.; Sherman, Susan N.; Tsevat, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Significance for Public Health The global population is aging. In the industrial world, adults over 65 outnumber children and comprise almost 20% of the population in some countries. Older adults experience a number of skin diseases and disorders that substantially affect their quality of life. Opportunity exists for developing and validating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measures specifically for dermatological conditions most pertinent to older patients. Older adults experience a number of skin diseases and disorders that substantially affect quality of life. In the last two decades, a number of instruments have been developed for use among general dermatology patients to assess the effects of treatment and disease progression, perceptions of well-being, and the value that patients place on their dermatologic state of health. This chapter reviews some health-related quality of life (HRQoL) (HRQoL) measures developed and validated specifically for dermatological conditions. However, opportunity exists for developing and validating HRQoL measures specifically for dermatological conditions most pertinent to older patients. PMID:22980159

  7. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution.

    PubMed

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA. PMID:26661854

  8. Curtailing patient-specific IMRT QA procedures from 2D dose error distribution

    PubMed Central

    Kurosu, Keita; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Otani, Yuki; Oda, Michio; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) test is conducted to verify the accuracy of dose delivery. It generally consists of three verification processes: the absolute point dose difference, the planar dose differences at each gantry angle, and the planar dose differences by 3D composite irradiation. However, this imposes a substantial workload on medical physicists. The objective of this study was to determine whether our novel method that predicts the 3D delivered dose allows certain patient-specific IMRT QAs to be curtailed. The object was IMRT QA for the pelvic region with regard to point dose and composite planar dose differences. We compared measured doses, doses calculated in the treatment planning system, and doses predicted by in-house software. The 3D predicted dose was reconstructed from the per-field measurement by incorporating the relative dose error distribution into the original dose grid of each beam. All point dose differences between the measured and the calculated dose were within ±3%, whereas 93.3% of them between the predicted and the calculated dose were within ±3%. As for planar dose differences, the gamma passing rates between the calculated and the predicted dose were higher than those between the calculated and the measured dose. Comparison and statistical analysis revealed a correlation between the predicted and the measured dose with regard to both point dose and planar dose differences. We concluded that the prediction-based approach is an accurate substitute for the conventional measurement-based approach in IMRT QA for the pelvic region. Our novel approach will help medical physicists save time on IMRT QA. PMID:26661854

  9. Noninvasive assessment of skin iron content in hemodialysis patients. An index of parenchymal tissue iron content

    SciTech Connect

    Friedlaender, M.M.; Kaufman, B.; Rubinger, D.; Moreb, J.; Popovtzer, M.M.; Goredetsky, R.

    1988-07-01

    Iron overload has been described in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate a rapid, noninvasive method for determination of skin iron by the technique of diagnostic x-ray spectrometry (DXS). Thirty-five patients receiving chronic hemodialysis treatment entered the study and were compared with 25 normal controls. Since pathological skin iron deposition occurs mainly at the dermal-epidermal junction in the basal cells of the epidermis, measurements were made in the thenar eminence representing mainly epidermal tissue (FeE), and in the forearm representative mainly of dermis (FeD). The mean +/- SD FeE iron concentrations were equivalent to 14.5 +/- 8.8 and 18.2 +/- 10.2 parts per million wet weight tissue (ppm) and both were significantly higher than in normal controls in which they averaged 9.2 +/- 2.5 ppm (P less than 0.005) and 10.2 +/- 3.2 ppm (P less than 0.001), respectively. There was significant positive correlation between individual skin iron determinations with the total number of blood transfusions received, the rate of blood transfusion, and with serum ferritin levels. Bone marrow hemosiderin was examined in six patients and showed a similar trend. Despite correlation only with indirect indices of tissue iron, our findings suggest that DXS may serve as a reliable quick method for noninvasive estimation of nonreticuloendothelial tissue iron deposition in hemodialysis patients suspected of having transfusional iron overload. The method may be valuable in monitoring the effects of chelation therapy.

  10. Treatment of Disseminated Mycobacterial Infection with High-Dose IFN-γ in a Patient with IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Alangari, Abdullah A.; Al-Zamil, Fahad; Al-Mazrou, Abdulrahman; Al-Muhsen, Saleh; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Awadallah, Sitalbanat; Kambal, Abdelmageed; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2011-01-01

    IFN-γ has been used in the treatment of IL-12Rβ1 deficiency patients with disseminated BCG infection (BCGosis), but the optimal dose to reach efficacy is not clear. We used IFN-γ in the treatment of a 2.7-year-old patient with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency and refractory BCG-osis. IFNγ was started at a dose of 50 μg/m2 3 times per week. The dose was upgraded to 100 mcg/m2 after 3 months, then to 200 mcg/m2 6 months afterwards. Serum mycobactericidal activity and lymphocytes number and function were evaluated throughout the study. There was no clinical response to IFN-γ with 50 or 100 μg/m2 doses. However, there was some response to the 200 μg/m2 dose with no additional adverse effects. The serum mycobactericidal activity was not significantly different during the whole treatment period. Lymphocytes proliferation in response to PHA was significantly higher after 3 months of using the highest dose as compared to the lowest dose. The tuberculin skin test reaction remained persistently negative. We conclude that in a patient with IL-12Rβ1 deficiency, IFN-γ at a dose of 200 μg/m2, but not at lower dosages, was found to have a noticeable clinical effect with no additional adverse effects. PMID:21234109

  11. Radiation dose to patients from X-ray radiographic examinations using computed radiography imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Reena; Sharma, Sunil Dutt; Pawar, Shramika; Chaubey, Ajay; Kantharia, S; Babu, D A R

    2015-01-01

    The screen-film system is replaced by computed radiography system for recording the images of the patients during X-ray radiography examinations. The change in imaging system requires the re-establishment of the institutional diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of X-ray examinations conducted at the hospital. For this purpose, patient specific parameters [age, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), object to image distance (OID)] and machine specific parameters (kVp, mAs, distance and field sizes) of 1875 patients during 21 different types of X-ray examinations were recorded for estimating the entrance skin dose (ESD). The ESD for each of these patients were estimated using measured X-ray beam output and the standard value of the back scatter factor. Five number summary was calculated for all the data for their presentation in the Box-Whisker plot, which provides the statistical distribution of the data. The data collected indicates that majorly performed examinations are cervical spine AP, Chest PA and Knee Lat with percentage contributions of 16.05, 16 and 8.27% respectively. The lowest contribution comes from Hip Lat which is about 1.01%. The ratio of measured ESD (maximum to minimum) for these examinations is found to be highest for the cervical spine AP with a value of 50 followed by Thoracic spine AP of 32.36. The ESD ratio for Chest PA, Knee Lat and Lumbar Spine AP are 30.75, 30.4 and 30.2 respectively. The lowest ESD ratio is for Hip Lat which is 2.68. The third quartile values of ESDs are established as the institutional DRLs. The ESD values obtained for 21 different X-ray projections are either comparable or lesser than the reported national/international values. PMID:26150685

  12. Dose-Dependent Effect of Granulocyte Transfusions in Hematological Patients with Febrile Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Teofili, Luciana; Valentini, Caterina Giovanna; Di Blasi, Roberta; Orlando, Nicoletta; Fianchi, Luana; Zini, Gina; Sica, Simona; De Stefano, Valerio; Pagano, Livio

    2016-01-01

    It is still under debate whether granulocyte transfusions (GTs) substantially increase survival in patients with febrile neutropenia. We retrospectively examined data relative to 96 patients with hematological malignancies receiving 491 GTs during 114 infectious episodes (IE). Patients were grouped according to the median doses of granulocytes transfused during the infectious episode (low-dose group: <1.5-x108 cells/Kg; standard-dose group: 1.5-3.0x108 cells/Kg and high-dose group: >3.0x108 cells/Kg). The impact of clinical, microbiological and GT-related variables on the infection-related mortality (IRM) was investigated. The IRM was not influenced by the number of GTs or by the total amount of granulocytes received, whereas a dose-related effect of the median dose received for IE was detected at univariate analysis (IRM of 18.4% in the standard-dose group, 44.4% in the low-dose group and 48.4% in the high-dose group, p = 0.040) and confirmed at multivariate analysis (OR 3.7, IC 95% 1.5-8.9; 0.004 for patients not receiving standard doses of GTs). Moreover, patients receiving GTs at doses lower or greater than standard had increased risk for subsequent ICU admission and reduced overall survival. The dose-related effect of GTs was confirmed in bacterial but not in fungal infections. Preliminary findings obtained from a subgroup of patients candidate to GTs revealed that levels of inflammatory response mediators increase in a dose-related manner after GTs, providing a possible explanation for the detrimental effect exerted by high-dose transfusions. GTs can constitute a valuable tool to improve the outcome of infections in neutropenic patients, provided that adequate recipient-tailored doses are supplied. Further investigations of the immunomodulatory effects of GTs are recommended. PMID:27487075

  13. Dose-Dependent Effect of Granulocyte Transfusions in Hematological Patients with Febrile Neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Di Blasi, Roberta; Orlando, Nicoletta; Fianchi, Luana; Zini, Gina; Sica, Simona; De Stefano, Valerio; Pagano, Livio

    2016-01-01

    It is still under debate whether granulocyte transfusions (GTs) substantially increase survival in patients with febrile neutropenia. We retrospectively examined data relative to 96 patients with hematological malignancies receiving 491 GTs during 114 infectious episodes (IE). Patients were grouped according to the median doses of granulocytes transfused during the infectious episode (low-dose group: <1.5-x108 cells/Kg; standard-dose group: 1.5–3.0x108 cells/Kg and high-dose group: >3.0x108 cells/Kg). The impact of clinical, microbiological and GT-related variables on the infection-related mortality (IRM) was investigated. The IRM was not influenced by the number of GTs or by the total amount of granulocytes received, whereas a dose-related effect of the median dose received for IE was detected at univariate analysis (IRM of 18.4% in the standard-dose group, 44.4% in the low-dose group and 48.4% in the high-dose group, p = 0.040) and confirmed at multivariate analysis (OR 3.7, IC 95% 1.5–8.9; 0.004 for patients not receiving standard doses of GTs). Moreover, patients receiving GTs at doses lower or greater than standard had increased risk for subsequent ICU admission and reduced overall survival. The dose-related effect of GTs was confirmed in bacterial but not in fungal infections. Preliminary findings obtained from a subgroup of patients candidate to GTs revealed that levels of inflammatory response mediators increase in a dose-related manner after GTs, providing a possible explanation for the detrimental effect exerted by high-dose transfusions. GTs can constitute a valuable tool to improve the outcome of infections in neutropenic patients, provided that adequate recipient-tailored doses are supplied. Further investigations of the immunomodulatory effects of GTs are recommended. PMID:27487075

  14. SU-F-BRF-11: Dose Rearrangement in High Dose Locally Advanced Lung Patients Based On Perfusion Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Matrosic, C; Jarema, D; Kong, F; McShan, D; Stenmark, M; Owen, D; Ten Haken, R; Matuszak, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The use of mean lung dose (MLD) limits allows individualization of lung patient tumor doses at safe levels. However, MLD does not account for local lung function differences between patients, leading to toxicity variability at the same MLD. We investigated dose rearrangement to minimize dose to functional lung, as measured by perfusion SPECT, while maintaining target coverage and conventional MLD limits. Methods: Retrospective plans were optimized for 15 locally advanced NSCLC patients enrolled in a prospective imaging trial. A priority-based optimization system was used. The baseline priorities were (1) meet OAR dose constraints, (2) maximize target gEUD, and (3) minimize physical MLD. As a final step, normal tissue doses were minimized. To determine the benefit of rearranging dose using perfusion SPECT, plans were reoptimized to minimize functional lung gEUD as the 4th priority. Results: When only minimizing physical MLD, the functional lung gEUD was 10.8+/−5.0 Gy (4.3–19.8 Gy). Only 3/15 cases showed a decrease in functional lung gEUD of ≥4% when rearranging dose to minimize functional gEUD in the cost function (10.5+/−5.0 Gy range 4.3−19.7). Although OAR constraints were respected, the dose rearrangement resulted in ≥10% increases in gEUD to an OAR in 4/15 cases. Only slight reductions in functional lung gEUD were noted when omitting the minimization of physical MLD, suggesting that constraining the target gEUD minimizes the potential to redistribute dose. Conclusion: Prioritydriven optimization permits the generation of plans that respect traditional OAR limits and target coverage, but with the ability to rearrange dose based on functional imaging. The latter appears to be limited due to the decreased solution space when constraining target coverage. Since dose rearrangement may increase dose to other OARs, it is also worthwhile to investigate global biomarkers of lung toxicity to further individualize treatment in this population

  15. Oxidative stress in skin fibroblasts cultures from patients with Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, increased lipid peroxidation, decreased activities of the mitochondrial complex I of the respiratory chain, catalase and glutathione-peroxidase, and decreased levels of reduced glutathione have been reported. These observations suggest that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction play a role in the neurodegeneration in PD. We assessed enzymatic activities of respiratory chain and other enzymes involved in oxidative processes in skin fibroblasts cultures of patients with PD. Methods We studied respiratory chain enzyme activities, activities of total, Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide-dismutase, gluthatione-peroxidase and catalase, and coenzyme Q10 levels in skin fibroblasts cultures from 20 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and 19 age- and sex- matched healthy controls. Results When compared with controls, PD patients showed significantly lower specific activities for complex V (both corrected by citrate synthase activity and protein concentrations). Oxidized, reduced and total coenzyme Q10 levels (both corrected by citrate synthase and protein concentrations), and activities of total, Cu/Zn- and Mn-superoxide-dismutase, gluthatione-peroxidase and catalase, did not differ significantly between PD-patients and control groups. Values for enzyme activities in the PD group did not correlate with age at onset, duration, scores of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating scales and Hoehn-Yahr staging. Conclusions The main result of this study was the decreased activity of complex V in PD patients. This complex synthesizes ATP from ADP using an electrochemical gradient generated by complexes I-IV. These results suggest decreased energetic metabolism in fibroblasts of patients with PD. PMID:20958999

  16. Computational assessment of effective dose and patient specific doses for kilovoltage stereotactic radiosurgery of wet age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanlon, Justin Mitchell

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss and a major health problem for people over the age of 50 in industrialized nations. The current standard of care, ranibizumab, is used to help slow and in some cases stabilize the process of AMD, but requires frequent invasive injections into the eye. Interest continues for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an option that provides a non-invasive treatment for the wet form of AMD, through the development of the IRay(TM) (Oraya Therapeutics, Inc., Newark, CA). The goal of this modality is to destroy choroidal neovascularization beneath the pigment epithelium via delivery of three 100 kVp photon beams entering through the sclera and overlapping on the macula delivering up to 24 Gy of therapeutic dose over a span of approximately 5 minutes. The divergent x-ray beams targeting the fovea are robotically positioned and the eye is gently immobilized by a suction-enabled contact lens. Device development requires assessment of patient effective dose, reference patient mean absorbed doses to radiosensitive tissues, and patient specific doses to the lens and optic nerve. A series of head phantoms, including both reference and patient specific, was derived from CT data and employed in conjunction with the MCNPX 2.5.0 radiation transport code to simulate treatment and evaluate absorbed doses to potential tissues-at-risk. The reference phantoms were used to evaluate effective dose and mean absorbed doses to several radiosensitive tissues. The optic nerve was modeled with changeable positions based on individual patient variability seen in a review of head CT scans gathered. Patient specific phantoms were used to determine the effect of varying anatomy and gaze. The results showed that absorbed doses to the non-targeted tissues were below the threshold levels for serious complications; specifically the development of radiogenic cataracts and radiation induced optic neuropathy (RON). The effective dose

  17. Quality of life and self-esteem in patients submitted to surgical treatment of skin carcinomas: long-term results*

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Paula Curitiba; Veiga-Filho, Joel; de Carvalho, Marcelo Prado; Fonseca, Fernando Elias Martins; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Veiga, Daniela Francescato

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancer is a multifactorial disease and skin carcinomas are the most common type of cancer. Assessing quality of life and self-esteem outcomes in skin cancer patients is important because these are indicators of the results of the treatment, translating how patients face their lives and their personal relationships. OBJECTIVE To assess the late impact of the surgical treatment of head and/or neck skin carcinomas on quality of life and self-esteem of the patients. METHODS Fifty patients with head or neck skin carcinomas were enrolled. Their age ranged between 30 and 75 years, 27 were men and 23 were women. Patients were assessed with regard to quality of life and self-esteem, preoperatively and five years postoperatively. Validated instruments were used: the MOS 36-item Short-form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Rosenberg Self-esteem/EPM-UNIFESP Scale. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for the statistical analysis. RESULTS Twenty-two patients completed the five-year follow-up, 54.5% women and 45.5% men. Compared to the preoperative assessment, patients had an improvement in mental health (p=0.011) and in self-esteem (p=0.002). There was no statistical difference with regard to the other domains of the SF-36. CONCLUSION Patients submitted to surgical treatment of skin carcinoma improved mental health and self-esteem in the late postsurgical testing. PMID:25054746

  18. A Dosing/Cross-Development Study of the Multikinase Inhibitor Sorafenib in Patients With Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gomberg-Maitland, M; Maitland, ML; Barst, RJ; Sugeng, L; Coslet, S; Perrino, TJ; Bond, L; LaCouture, ME; Archer, SL; Ratain, MJ

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and cancer share elements of pathophysiology. This provides an opportunity for the cross-development of anticancer agents that can be used in improving PAH care. The adaptation of new drugs across these disease populations warrants a structured approach. This study was a 16-week, phase Ib, single-center, open-label trial of the multikinase/angiogenesis inhibitor sorafenib. In order to assess the safety of sorafenib in PAH, patients with advanced but stable disease on parenteral prostanoids (with or without oral sildenafil) were initiated on treatment at the lowest active dosage administered to cancer patients: 200 mg daily. Patients underwent weekly clinical evaluations and monthly functional testing and dose escalations to a final dosage of 400 mg twice daily. Among 12 patients (10 of them women), sorafenib was well tolerated at 200 mg twice daily. The most common adverse events were moderate skin reactions on the hands and feet and alopecia. Our conclusion was therefore that this is a tolerable dosing regimen for testing the therapeutic activity of sorafenib in PAH patients. PMID:20010555

  19. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Newhauser, Wayne D.; Yepes, Pablo

    2009-03-10

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  20. Effective Dose from Stray Radiation for a Patient Receiving Proton Therapy for Liver Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Krishnan, Sunil; Mirkovic, Dragan; Yepes, Pablo; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2009-03-01

    Because of its advantageous depth-dose relationship, proton radiotherapy is an emerging treatment modality for patients with liver cancer. Although the proton dose distribution conforms to the target, healthy tissues throughout the body receive low doses of stray radiation, particularly neutrons that originate in the treatment unit or in the patient. The aim of this study was to calculate the effective dose from stray radiation and estimate the corresponding risk of second cancer fatality for a patient receiving proton beam therapy for liver cancer. Effective dose from stray radiation was calculated using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a double-scattering proton therapy treatment unit and a voxelized human phantom. The treatment plan and phantom were based on CT images of an actual adult patient diagnosed with primary hepatocellular carcinoma. For a prescribed dose of 60 Gy to the clinical target volume, the effective dose from stray radiation was 370 mSv; 61% of this dose was from neutrons originating outside of the patient while the remaining 39% was from neutrons originating within the patient. The excess lifetime risk of fatal second cancer corresponding to the total effective dose from stray radiation was 1.2%. The results of this study establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for an adult patient undergoing proton radiotherapy for liver cancer and provide new evidence to corroborate the suitability of proton beam therapy for the treatment of liver tumors.

  1. Pediatric Chest and Abdominopelvic CT: Organ Dose Estimation Based on 42 Patient Models

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Paulson, Erik K.; Frush, Donald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To estimate organ dose from pediatric chest and abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations and evaluate the dependency of organ dose coefficients on patient size and CT scanner models. Materials and Methods The institutional review board approved this HIPAA–compliant study and did not require informed patient consent. A validated Monte Carlo program was used to perform simulations in 42 pediatric patient models (age range, 0–16 years; weight range, 2–80 kg; 24 boys, 18 girls). Multidetector CT scanners were modeled on those from two commercial manufacturers (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wis; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). Organ doses were estimated for each patient model for routine chest and abdominopelvic examinations and were normalized by volume CT dose index (CTDIvol). The relationships between CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients and average patient diameters were evaluated across scanner models. Results For organs within the image coverage, CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients largely showed a strong exponential relationship with the average patient diameter (R2 > 0.9). The average percentage differences between the two scanner models were generally within 10%. For distributed organs and organs on the periphery of or outside the image coverage, the differences were generally larger (average, 3%–32%) mainly because of the effect of overranging. Conclusion It is feasible to estimate patient-specific organ dose for a given examination with the knowledge of patient size and the CTDIvol. These CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients enable one to readily estimate patient-specific organ dose for pediatric patients in clinical settings. This dose information, and, as appropriate, attendant risk estimations, can provide more substantive information for the individual patient for both clinical and research applications and can yield more expansive information on dose profiles

  2. A multi-head intradermal electroporation device allows for tailored and increased dose DNA vaccine delivery to the skin.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Gomez, Alan F; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The identification of an effective and tolerable delivery method is a necessity for the success of DNA vaccines in the clinic. This article describes the development and validation of a multi-headed intradermal electroporation device which would be applicable for delivering multiple DNA vaccine plasmids simultaneously but spatially separated. Reporter gene plasmids expressing green and red fluorescent proteins were used to demonstrate the impact of spatial separation on DNA delivery to increase the number of transfected cells and avoid interference through visible expression patterns. To investigate the impact of plasmid interference on immunogenicity, a disease target was investigated where issues with multi-valent vaccines had been previously described. DNA-based Hantaan and Puumala virus vaccines were delivered separately or as a combination and the effect of multi-valence was determined by appropriate assays. While a negative impact was observed for both antigenic vaccines when delivered together, these effects were mitigated when the vaccine was delivered using the multi-head device. We also demonstrate how the multi-head device facilitates higher dose delivery to the skin resulting in improved immune responses. This new multi-head platform device is an efficient, tolerable and non-invasive method to deliver multiple plasmid DNA constructs simultaneously allowing the tailoring of delivery sites for combination vaccines. Additionally, this device would allow the delivery of multi-plasmid vaccine formulations without risk of impacted immune responses through interference. Such a low-cost, easy to use device platform for the delivery of multi-agent DNA vaccines would have direct applications by the military and healthcare sectors for mass vaccination purposes. PMID:25839221

  3. A multi-head intradermal electroporation device allows for tailored and increased dose DNA vaccine delivery to the skin.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Gomez, Alan F; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2014-01-01

    The identification of an effective and tolerable delivery method is a necessity for the success of DNA vaccines in the clinic. This manuscript describes the development and validation of a multi-headed intradermal electroporation device which would be applicable for delivering multiple DNA vaccine plasmids simultaneously but spatially separated. Reporter gene plasmids expressing green and red fluorescent proteins were used to demonstrate the impact of spatial separation on DNA delivery to increase the number of transfected cells and avoid interference through visible expression patterns. To investigate the impact of plasmid interference on immunogenicity, a disease target was investigated where issues with multi-valent vaccines had been previously described. DNA-based Hantaan and Puumala virus vaccines were delivered separately or as a combination and the effect of multi-valence was determined by appropriate assays. While a negative impact was observed for both antigenic vaccines when delivered together, these effects were mitigated when the vaccine was delivered using the multi-head device. We also demonstrate how the multi-head device facilitates higher dose delivery to the skin resulting in improved immune responses. This new multi-head platform device is an efficient, tolerable and non-invasive method to deliver multiple plasmid DNA constructs simultaneously allowing the tailoring of delivery sites for combination vaccines. Additionally, this device would allow the delivery of multi-plasmid vaccine formulations without risk of impacted immune responses through interference. Such a low-cost, easy to use device platform for the delivery of multi-agent DNA vaccines would have direct applications by the military and healthcare sectors for mass vaccination purposes. PMID:25483486

  4. A multi-head intradermal electroporation device allows for tailored and increased dose DNA vaccine delivery to the skin

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jay R; Mendoza, Janess M; Spik, Kristin W; Badger, Catherine; Gomez, Alan F; Schmaljohn, Connie S; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Broderick, Kate E

    2015-01-01

    The identification of an effective and tolerable delivery method is a necessity for the success of DNA vaccines in the clinic. This article describes the development and validation of a multi-headed intradermal electroporation device which would be applicable for delivering multiple DNA vaccine plasmids simultaneously but spatially separated. Reporter gene plasmids expressing green and red fluorescent proteins were used to demonstrate the impact of spatial separation on DNA delivery to increase the number of transfected cells and avoid interference through visible expression patterns. To investigate the impact of plasmid interference on immunogenicity, a disease target was investigated where issues with multi-valent vaccines had been previously described. DNA-based Hantaan and Puumala virus vaccines were delivered separately or as a combination and the effect of multi-valence was determined by appropriate assays. While a negative impact was observed for both antigenic vaccines when delivered together, these effects were mitigated when the vaccine was delivered using the multi-head device. We also demonstrate how the multi-head device facilitates higher dose delivery to the skin resulting in improved immune responses. This new multi-head platform device is an efficient, tolerable and non-invasive method to deliver multiple plasmid DNA constructs simultaneously allowing the tailoring of delivery sites for combination vaccines. Additionally, this device would allow the delivery of multi-plasmid vaccine formulations without risk of impacted immune responses through interference. Such a low-cost, easy to use device platform for the delivery of multi-agent DNA vaccines would have direct applications by the military and healthcare sectors for mass vaccination purposes. PMID:25839221

  5. Merkel cell polyomavirus and human papilloma virus in proliferative skin lesions arising in patients treated with BRAF inhibitors.