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Sample records for patient treatment room

  1. SU-E-T-387: Achieving Optimal Patient Setup Imaging and Treatment Workflow Configurations in Multi-Room Proton Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H; Prado, K; Langen, K; Yi, B; Mehta, M; Regine, W; D'Souza, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To simulate patient flow in proton treatment center under uncertainty and to explore the feasibility of treatment preparation rooms to improve patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Methods: Three center layout scenarios were modeled: (S1: In-Tx room imaging) patient setup and imaging (planar/volumetric) performed in treatment room, (S2: Patient setup in preparation room) each treatment room was assigned with preparation room(s) that was equipped with lasers only for patient setup and gross patient alignment, and (S3: Patient setup and imaging in preparation room) preparation room(s) was equipped with laser and volumetric imaging for patient setup, gross and fine patient alignment. A 'snap' imaging was performed in treatment room. For each scenario, the number of treatment rooms and the number of preparation rooms serving each treatment room were varied. We examined our results (average of 100 16-hour (two shifts) working days) by evaluating patient throughput and cyclotron utilization. Results: When the number of treatment rooms increased ([from, to]) [1, 5], daily patient throughput increased [32, 161], [29, 184] and [27, 184] and cyclotron utilization increased [13%, 85%], [12%, 98%], and [11%, 98%] for scenarios S1, S2 and S3 respectively. However, both measures plateaued after 4 rooms. With the preparation rooms, the throughput and the cyclotron utilization increased by 14% and 15%, respectively. Three preparation rooms were optimal to serve 1-3 treatment rooms and two preparation rooms were optimal to serve 4 or 5 treatment rooms. Conclusion: Patient preparation rooms for patient setup may increase throughput and decrease the need for additional treatment rooms (cost effective). Optimal number of preparation rooms serving each gantry room varies as a function of treatment rooms and patient setup scenarios. A 5th treatment room may not be justified by throughput or utilization.

  2. Treatment of patients with immune thrombocytopenia admitted to the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Bavunoğlu, Işıl; Eşkazan, Ahmet Emre; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Cengiz, Mahir; Yavuzer, Serap; Salihoğlu, Ayşe; Öngören, Şeniz; Tunçkale, Aydın; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-08-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most frequent cause of acquired thrombocytopenia. In adult ITP patients, corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) are used as first-line treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate retrospectively the demographic and etiologic characteristics of patients with ITP admitted to the emergency room at our hospital. Seventy-five adult patients with ITP were included, and demographic data, bleeding characteristics, etiologic features and responses to treatments were evaluated retrospectively. Fifty-six patients (75 %) were female, and the median age was 43 years. Eighteen patients had a history of ITP, whereas in 57, thrombocytopenia was identified for the first time. During admission, the median platelet count was 5 × 10(9)/L. Cutaneous and/or mucosal bleeding was the most common clinical feature. High-dose dexamethasone was administered in 60 episodes, whereas IVIg and conventional-dose methylprednisolone were used in nine and six episodes, respectively. The overall response rate of the entire cohort following first-line treatments was 67 %, and complete remission was achieved in 31 patients, 19 patients achieved partial remission, and 25 patients were non-responders. In cases with life-threatening bleeding, concomitant infection, post-traumatic bleeding and need for emergency surgery, IVIg can be used as the first line of treatment option in addition to platelet transfusions. PMID:27129318

  3. Self-Medication: Initial Treatments Used by Patients Seen in an Ophthalmologic Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Regina Souza; Kara-José, Newton; Temporini, Edméa Rita; Kara-Junior, Newton; Noma-Campos, Regina

    2009-01-01

    OJECTIVE This study seeks to identify practices of self-medication in the treatment of ocular emergencies. We examine patients’ use of both homemade preparations and manufactured products before seeking specialized care. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted a cross-sectional analytic survey of consecutive patients seen in the ophthalmology emergency room of a teaching hospital. RESULTS The sample included 561 subjects, 51.3% males and 48.7% females, with a mean age of 39.8 years. Prior to seeking emergency care, 40.5% reported self-medicating; 29.4% used a homemade preparation (13.9% referred to an industrialized product like boric acid as a homemade preparation), and 11.1% used a manufactured product. The most frequently used products included a boric acid solution (53.3%), a normal saline solution (35.7%), herbal infusions (6.1%) and breast milk (4.8%). Viral conjunctivitis was the most frequent diagnosis (24.4%), followed by the presence of a corneal foreign body (7.4%). No significant differences were found in the self-treatment of ocular injuries according to gender (p = 0.95), level of education (p = 0.21) or age (p = 0.14). In addition, self-medication practices were not related to the medically judged severity of the condition. CONCLUSION Patients often attempt to treat conditions that require ophthalmologic emergency care by self-medicating with homemade or manufactured products. The most widely used products include boric acid, normal saline, leaf infusions and breast milk. This behavior occurs independently of educational level, gender, age or the nature of the ocular condition. Self-medication is a culturally driven practice that is used even in cases of acute ocular injuries. PMID:19690656

  4. The Impact of Emergency Room Utilization by Depression Patients on Medical Treatment Expense in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Sook

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the determinants of total medical expense for depression patients admitted through the emergency room (ER). Methods Data were selected from the Korean National Health Insurance sample data for 2009. SPSS version 18 was used for the statistical analysis such as descriptive analysis, correlation analysis, and multiple regression analysis. Data included 1203 cases admitted through the ER with ICD-10 codes (F31–F39). Results In the multiple regression analysis, significant variables affecting total payment were gender (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), main illness (p < 0.001), course of admission to the ER (p < 0.05), and length of stay (p < 0.001). Conclusion It is necessary to build a long-term program and system for high-risk depression groups. PMID:24298439

  5. RADIATION DOSIMETRY IN THE BNCT PATIENT TREATMENT ROOM AT THE BMRR.

    SciTech Connect

    HOLDEN, N.E.; RECINIELLO, R.N.; HU, J.-P.

    2005-05-08

    The Medical Research Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BMRR) was a heterogeneous, tank type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was operated on demand at a power level up to 3 mega-watts (MW) for medical and biological research [1]. The reactor first went critical on March 15, 1959, with 17 fresh fuel elements (2.52 kg uranium-235 in a total of 2.7 kg uranium) in the center core. The BMRR had two treatment rooms on opposite sides of the core. It had a predominately thermal neutron beam in the Thermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (TNE) on the west side of the core. By early 1990, a redesigned beam line had a predominately epithermal neutron beam in the Epithermal Neutron Irradiation Facility (ENIF) on the east side of the core [2]. The ENP was approximately 11 feet by 21 feet in size with its focal point consisting of a bismuth plate mounted in the wall adjacent to the reactor shield about 36 inches above the floor. The beam originated at a shutter constructed of 0.75 inch steel filled with concrete and weighing {approx}21 tons. Access to the ENIF was through a pair of hand operated steel shielding doors, each 42 inches wide, 84 inches high and 5 inches thick. The inner door had a 4-inch thick layer of paraffin on the side facing the reactor. The doors 5000 pounds weighed each. Additional shielding material had been added to the entire beam port at reactor wall within the ENIF. The shielding material consisted of 2-inch thick polyethylene sheets, which were impregnated with 95%-enriched {sup 6}Li in lithium carbonate (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). The shielding sheets around the port face were designed to allow the insertion of a variety of different beam collimators.

  6. [Emergency room management of contaminated patients].

    PubMed

    Strohm, P C; Hammer, T O; Kopp, K; Knobloch, V; Alawadi, K; Bannasch, H; Köstler, W; Zipfel, E; Südkamp, N P

    2008-06-01

    Accidents with the risk of exposure to hazardous nuclear, biological, or chemical materials are rare. Most emergency rooms are not familiar with the management of contaminated patients after this kind of incident. There are also ambiguous cases concerning the contamination status of the patient. The medical attendance should be performed carefully and under special security arrangements until a hazard for third persons can be excluded. The security arrangements should protect both (medical) personnel and third persons. Early medical treatment combined with decontamination should be the aim. Based on the case of a contaminated patient who was brought to our emergency department after an explosion of a fog grenade with red phosphorus, we discuss our management concept and the current literature. PMID:18066517

  7. A simplified way for the urgent treatment of somatic pain in patients admitted to the emergency room: the SUPER algorithm.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Marsiliani, Davide; Alesi, Andrea; Mancini, Maria Grazia; Ojetti, Veronica; Candelli, Marcello; Gabrielli, Maurizio; D'Aurizio, Gabriella; Gilardi, Emanuele; Adducci, Enrica; Proietti, Rodolfo; Buccelletti, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Somatic pain is one of the most frequent symptoms reported by patients presenting to the emergency department (ED), but, in spite of this, it is very often underestimated and under-treated. Moreover, pain-killers prescriptions are usually related to the medical examination, leading to a delay in its administration, thus worsening the patient's quality of life. With our study, we want to define and validate a systematic and homogeneous approach to analgesic drugs administration, testing a new therapeutic algorithm in terms of earliness, safety, and efficacy. 442 consecutive patients who accessed our ED for any kind of somatic pain were enrolled, and then randomly divided into two groups: group A follow the normal process of access to pain-control drugs, and group B follow our SUPER algorithm for early administration of drugs to relieve pain directly from triage. We excluded from the study, patients with abdominal pain referred to the surgeon, patients with headache, recent history of trauma, history of drug allergies, and life-threatening conditions or lack of cooperation. Drugs used in the study were those available in our ED, such as paracetamol, paracetamol/codeine, ketorolac-tromethamine, and tramadol-hydrochloride. Pain level, risk factors, indication, and contraindication of each drug were taken into account in our SUPER algorithm for a rapid and safe administration of it. The Verbal Numeric Scale (VNS) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to verify the patient's health and perception of it. Only 59 patient from group A (27.1 %) received analgesic therapy (at the time of the medical examination) compared to 181 patients (100 %) of group B (p < 0.001). Group B patients, received analgesic therapy 76 min before group A subjects (p < 0.01), resulting in a significant lower VNS (7.31 ± 1.68 vs 4.75 ± 2.3; p < 0.001), and a superior VAS after discharge (54.43 ± 22.16 vs 61.30 ± 19.13; p < 0.001) compared to group A subjects. No significant differences

  8. [Hemorrhoidal thrombosis: treatment at the consulting room].

    PubMed

    Nyst, J-F

    2015-09-01

    The hemorrhoidal thrombosis is an acute complication with no gravity but an emergency because of the severe pain. Oral or local medical treatments are rarely effective; they poorly relieve the pain. The realization of an incision with removal of the blood clot or of an excision is an easy procedure to perform in the consultation room. She brings an almost immediate pain relief. It only takes a few minutes and requires minimal equipment. PMID:26591313

  9. Neutron distribution and induced activity inside a Linac treatment room.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Miró, R; Verdú, G; Díez, S; Campayo, J M

    2015-08-01

    Induced radioactivity and photoneutron contamination inside a radiation therapy bunker of a medical linear accelerator (Linac) is investigated in this work. The Linac studied is an Elekta Precise electron accelerator which maximum treatment photon energy is 15 MeV. This energy exceeds the photonuclear reaction threshold (around 7 MeV for high atomic number metals). The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 has been used for quantifying the neutron contamination inside the treatment room for different gantry rotation configuration. Walls activation processes have also been simulated. The approach described in this paper is useful to prevent the overexposure of patients and medical staff. PMID:26737878

  10. The Impact of Patient-to-Patient Interaction in Health Facility Waiting Rooms on Their Perception of Health Professionals.

    PubMed

    Willis, William Kent; Ozturk, Ahmet Ozzie; Chandra, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Patients have to wait in waiting rooms prior to seeing the physician. But there are few studies that demonstrate what they are actually doing in the waiting room. This exploratory study was designed to investigate the types of discussions that patients in the waiting room typically engage in with other patients and how the conversations affected their opinion on general reputation of the clinic, injections/blocks as treatment procedures, waiting time, time spent with the caregiver, overall patient satisfaction, and the pain medication usage policy. The study demonstrates that patient interaction in the waiting room has a positive effect on patient opinion of the pain clinic and the caregivers. PMID:25839351

  11. 14. Water treatment plant interior view of chlorination room. View ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Water treatment plant interior view of chlorination room. View to N - Fort Benton Water Treatment Plant, Filtration Plant, Lots 9-13 of Block 7, Fort Benton Original Townsite at Missouri River, Fort Benton, Chouteau County, MT

  12. "Boarding" Psychiatric Patients in Emergency Rooms: One Court Says "No More".

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2015-07-01

    "Boarding" involuntary psychiatric patients in medical emergency rooms is common in many parts of the United States. The practice, driven by a shortage of alternative resources, including limited inpatient capacity, can result in patients' being held for days without treatment or a hospital room, often in busy corridors or treatment rooms. A recent challenge to this practice led the Washington Supreme Court to declare it illegal and resulted in the appropriation of substantial funding to create new psychiatric beds. Centralized psychiatric crisis services, with appropriate payment models, may offer another approach to reducing the need for holding patients awaiting inpatient admission. PMID:26130151

  13. 18. PLAIN OFFICE; SHOWS WOODWORK AND WALL TREATMENT. ROOM 2662, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. PLAIN OFFICE; SHOWS WOODWORK AND WALL TREATMENT. ROOM 2662, SECOND FLOOR, SOUTH SIDE. - Hughes Aircraft Company, Processing & Electronics Building, 6775 Centinela Avenue, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. [Clinical study of patients undergoing paperless electroencephalography in emergency room].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Nukui, Megumi; Kuki, Ichiro; Okazaki, Shin; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka; Amo, Kiyoko; Togawa, Masao; Rinka, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Masashi

    2012-07-01

    Fifty-eight patients who visited the emergency room of our center with febrile convulsions and impaired consciousness, and underwent paperless electroencephalography soon after arrival. They consisted of 25 male and 33 female children, ranging in age from 5 months to 15 years and 4 months, with a mean age of 4 years and 10 months. The final diagnoses were poor responsiveness associated with fever and febrile delirium in 5 patients, febrile convulsions in 26, encephalitis/encephalopathy in 24, convulsions associated with mild gastroenteritis in 2, and aseptic meningitis in 1. The appearance of spindle wave within 24 hours after admission was considered to be a favorable prognostic factor, whereas generalized high-amplitude delta waves without fast-wave components and dysrhythmic flat basic waves were considered poor prognostic factors. We conclude that bed-side paperless electroencephalography is useful for the evaluation of changes in the brain function and course of treatment. PMID:22844762

  15. Computational study of room scattering influence in the THOR BNCT treatment room.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Ming-Chen; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2014-06-01

    BNCT dosimetry has often employed heavy Monte Carlo calculations for the beam characterization and the dose determination. However, these calculations commonly ignored the scattering influence between the radiations and the room structure materials in order to facilitate the calculation speed. The aim of this article attempts to explore how the room scattering affects the physical quantities such as the capture reaction rate and the gamma-ray dose rate under in-phantom and free-air conditions in the THOR BNCT treatment room. The geometry and structure materials of the treatment room were simulated in detail. The capture reaction rates per atom, as well as the gamma-ray dose rate were calculated in various sizes of phantoms and in the free-air condition. Results of this study showed that the room scattering has significant influence on the physical quantities, whether in small phantoms or in the free-air condition. This paper may be of importance in explaining the discrepancies between measurements and calculations in the BNCT dosimetry using small phantoms, in addition to provide a useful consideration with a better understanding of how the room scattering influence acts in a BNCT facility. PMID:24365466

  16. Acoustical criteria for hospital patient rooms: Resolving competing requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Bennett M.

    2003-10-01

    The acoustical criteria for patient rooms in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation facilities may be based on several needs. One important requirement is that noise levels in the room be conducive to restful sleep. Also, caregivers must have easy auditory and visual access to the patients, and be able to hear vital sign monitor alarms. This often means that patient rooms are located near central nurse stations and that patient room doors are left open. Further, the recently published federal privacy standards developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) require that ``appropriate physical safeguards'' be put in place to protect the confidentiality of patient health information. The simultaneous and competing requirements for speech privacy, caregiver access, and good sleeping conditions present a serious acoustical challenge to health care facility designers. Specific facility design issues and potential solution strategies are presented.

  17. 20. VIEW OF WASTE TREATMENT CONTROL ROOM IN BUILDING 374. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW OF WASTE TREATMENT CONTROL ROOM IN BUILDING 374. THE BUILDING 371/374 COMPLEX WAS DESIGNED TO EMPHASIZE AUTOMATICALLY CONTROLLED, REMOTELY OPERATED PROCESSES. (1/80) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Recovery Facility, Northwest portion of Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  18. Alzheimer's treatment in nursing homes: room for improvement.

    PubMed

    Bright-Long, Lory

    2006-02-01

    Managing Alzheimer's disease (AD) continues to challenge long-term care physicians and administrators. Although pharmacologic treatment can substantially benefit AD patients in the nursing home setting, common misconceptions and skepticism about its value are barriers to treatment use. Aggressive treatment for AD maximizes patient function and independence and is cost-effective. Herein we discuss state-of-the-art treatment of AD with a view to providing nursing home physicians a framework from which to make treatment decisions. PMID:16461250

  19. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... treatment rooms and facilities. 590.548 Section 590.548 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND..., blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. (a) General. Processing rooms shall be... rooms shall be well-lighted and have ceilings and walls of a tile surface, enamel paint, or other...

  20. 33 CFR 149.685 - May a medical treatment room be used for other purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... other purposes? A medical treatment room may be used as a sleeping space if the room meets the requirements of this subpart for both medical treatment rooms and sleeping spaces. It may also be used as an office. However, when used for medical purposes, the room may not be used as a sleeping space or...

  1. 33 CFR 149.685 - May a medical treatment room be used for other purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... other purposes? A medical treatment room may be used as a sleeping space if the room meets the requirements of this subpart for both medical treatment rooms and sleeping spaces. It may also be used as an office. However, when used for medical purposes, the room may not be used as a sleeping space or...

  2. 33 CFR 149.685 - May a medical treatment room be used for other purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... other purposes? A medical treatment room may be used as a sleeping space if the room meets the requirements of this subpart for both medical treatment rooms and sleeping spaces. It may also be used as an office. However, when used for medical purposes, the room may not be used as a sleeping space or...

  3. 33 CFR 149.685 - May a medical treatment room be used for other purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... other purposes? A medical treatment room may be used as a sleeping space if the room meets the requirements of this subpart for both medical treatment rooms and sleeping spaces. It may also be used as an office. However, when used for medical purposes, the room may not be used as a sleeping space or...

  4. 33 CFR 149.685 - May a medical treatment room be used for other purposes?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... other purposes? A medical treatment room may be used as a sleeping space if the room meets the requirements of this subpart for both medical treatment rooms and sleeping spaces. It may also be used as an office. However, when used for medical purposes, the room may not be used as a sleeping space or...

  5. Quantification of Influenza Virus RNA in Aerosols in Patient Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Nancy H. L.; Zhou, Jie; Chu, Daniel K. W.; Yu, Han; Lindsley, William G.; Beezhold, Donald H.; Yen, Hui-Ling; Li, Yuguo; Seto, Wing-Hong; Peiris, Joseph S. M.; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The potential for human influenza viruses to spread through fine particle aerosols remains controversial. The objective of our study was to determine whether influenza viruses could be detected in fine particles in hospital rooms. Methods and Findings We sampled the air in 2-bed patient isolation rooms for four hours, placing cyclone samplers at heights of 1.5m and 1.0m. We collected ten air samples each in the presence of at least one patient with confirmed influenza A virus infection, and tested the samples by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We recovered influenza A virus RNA from 5/10 collections (50%); 4/5 were from particles>4 μm, 1/5 from 1–4 μm, and none in particles<1 μm. Conclusions Detection of influenza virus RNA in aerosols at low concentrations in patient rooms suggests that healthcare workers and visitors might have frequent exposure to airborne influenza virus in proximity to infected patients. A limitation of our study was the small sample size. Further studies should be done to quantify the concentration of viable influenza virus in healthcare settings, and factors affecting the detection of influenza viruses in fine particles in the air. PMID:26849130

  6. Suicide Mortality of Suicide Attempt Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Admitted Suicide Attempt Patients, and Admitted Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jae W.; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K.; Hong, Jin P.

    2012-01-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients…

  7. Clinical Application of in-room PET for in vivo Treatment Monitoring in Proton Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Chul Hee; Zhu, Xuping; Winey, Brian A.; Grogg, Kira; Testa, Mauro; Fakhri, Georges El; Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of using an in-room PET for treatment verification in proton therapy and to derive suitable PET scan times. Materials/Methods Nine patients undergoing passive scattering proton therapy were scanned immediately after treatment with an in-room PET scanner. The scanner was positioned next to the treatment head after treatment. The Monte Carlo (MC) method was employed to reproduce PET activities for each patient. To assess the proton beam range uncertainty we designed a novel concept where the measured PET activity surface distal to the target at the end of range was compared with MC predictions. The repositioning of patients for the PET scan took on average about 2 minutes. The PET images were reconstructed considering varying scan times to test the scan time dependency of the method. Results The measured PET images show overall good spatial correlations with MC predictions. Some discrepancies could be attributed to uncertainties in the local elemental composition and biological washout. For 8 patients treated with a single field, the average range differences between PET measurements and CT-image-based MC results were less than 5 mm (< 3 mm for 6 of 8 patients) and root-mean-square deviations (RMSD) were 4-11 mm with PET-CT image co-registration errors of about 2 mm. Our results also show that a short-length PET scan of 5 minutes can yield similar results compared to a 20 minutes PET scan. Conclusions Our first clinical trials of 9 patients using an in-room PET system demonstrated its potential for in vivo treatment monitoring in proton therapy. For a quantitative range prediction with arbitrary shape of target volume, we suggest employing the distal PET activity surface. PMID:23391817

  8. Improving Patients Experience in Peadiatric Emergency Waiting Room.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frederic; Siebert, Johan; Wipfli, Rolf; Duret, Cyrille; Gervaix, Alain; Lovis, Christian

    2016-01-01

    When visiting the emergency department, the perception of the time spent in the waiting room before the beginning of the care, may influence patients' experience. Based on models of service evaluation, highlighting the importance of informing people about their waiting process and their place in the queue, we have developed an innovative information screen aiming at improving perception of time by patients. Following an iterative process, a group of experts including computer scientists, ergonomists and caregivers designed a solution adapted to the pediatric context. The solution includes a screen displaying five lanes representing triage levels. Patients are represented by individual avatars, drawn sequentially in the appropriate line. The interface has been designed using gamification principle, aiming at increasing acceptance, lowering learning curve and improving satisfaction. Questionnaire based evaluation results revealed high satisfaction from the 278 respondents even if the informative content was not always completely clear. PMID:27332258

  9. Treatment of Pediatric Migraine in the Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Gelfand, Amy A.; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is a relatively common reason for pediatric emergency room visits. Given the paucity of randomized trials involving pediatric migraineurs in the emergency department setting compared to adults, recommendations for managing these children are largely extrapolated from adult migraine emergency room studies and trials involving outpatient home pediatric migraine therapy. This paper reviews what is known about pediatric migraineurs who present to the emergency room and how they are currently managed, then goes on to summarize the best evidence currently available to guide clinical decision making. PMID:22964436

  10. Suicide mortality of suicide attempt patients discharged from emergency room, nonsuicidal psychiatric patients discharged from emergency room, admitted suicide attempt patients, and admitted nonsuicidal psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae W; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K; Hong, Jin P

    2012-06-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients admitted for suicide attempt, and psychiatric inpatients admitted for other reasons were examined. The records of 3,897 patients who were treated at a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, from July 2003 to December 2006 were reviewed. Forty-three of the 3,897 subjects died by suicide during the 2.5-year observation period. Compared to the general Korean population, the suicide mortality rate was 82-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, admitted; 54-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, discharged; 21-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, admitted; and 11-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, discharged. In all four groups, diagnosis of a depressive disorder and suicide attempt at presentation were each significant independent risk factors for suicide completion. These results highlight the need for suicide prevention strategies for depressed patients who present to the ER or are admitted to a psychiatric ward after a suicide attempt. PMID:22380459

  11. Radiation shielding design of BNCT treatment room for D-T neutron source.

    PubMed

    Pouryavi, Mehdi; Farhad Masoudi, S; Rahmani, Faezeh

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that D-T neutron generator can be used as a proper neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of deep-seated brain tumors. In this paper, radiation shielding calculations have been conducted based on the computational method for designing a BNCT treatment room for a recent proposed D-T neutron source. By using the MCNP-4C code, the geometry of the treatment room has been designed and optimized in such a way that the equivalent dose rate out of the treatment room to be less than 0.5μSv/h for uncontrolled areas. The treatment room contains walls, monitoring window, maze and entrance door. According to the radiation protection viewpoint, dose rate results of out of the proposed room showed that using D-T neutron source for BNCT is safe. PMID:25732097

  12. A system model of work flow in the patient room of hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junwen; Li, Jingshan; Howard, Patricia K

    2013-12-01

    Modeling and analysis of patient flow in hospital emergency department (ED) is of significant importance. In a hospital ED, the patients spend most of their time in the patient room and most of the care delivery services are carried out during this time period. In this paper, we propose a system model to study patient (or work) flow in the patient room of an ED when the resources are partially available. A closed and re-entrant process model is developed to characterize the care service activities in the patient room with limited resources of doctors, nurses, and diagnosis tests. Analytical calculation of patient's length of stay in the patient room is derived, and monotonic properties with respect to care service parameters are investigated. PMID:23589322

  13. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Drying, blending, packaging, and heat..., blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. (a) General. Processing rooms shall be... seams and of materials that can be kept clean and which will have no deleterious effect on the...

  14. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Drying, blending, packaging, and heat..., blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. (a) General. Processing rooms shall be... seams and of materials that can be kept clean and which will have no deleterious effect on the...

  15. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Drying, blending, packaging, and heat..., blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. (a) General. Processing rooms shall be... seams and of materials that can be kept clean and which will have no deleterious effect on the...

  16. Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Decontamination in a Patient Room Using Feline Calicivirus and Murine Norovirus as Surrogate Markers for Human Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Holmdahl, Torsten; Walder, Mats; Uzcátegui, Nathalie; Odenholt, Inga; Lanbeck, Peter; Medstrand, Patrik; Widell, Anders

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether hydrogen peroxide vapor (HPV) could be used to decontaminate caliciviruses from surfaces in a patient room. DESIGN Feline calicivirus (FCV) and murine norovirus (MNV) were used as surrogate viability markers to mimic the noncultivable human norovirus. Cell culture supernatants of FCV and MNV were dried in triplicate 35-mm wells of 6-well plastic plates. These plates were placed in various positions in a nonoccupied patient room that was subsequently exposed to HPV. Control plates were positioned in a similar room but were never exposed to HPV. METHODS Virucidal activity was measured in cell culture by reduction in 50% tissue culture infective dose titer for FCV and by both 50% tissue culture infective dose titer and plaque reduction for MNV. RESULTS Neither viable FCV nor viable MNV could be detected in the test room after HPV treatment. At least 3.65 log reduction for FCV and at least 3.67 log reduction for MNV were found by 50% tissue culture infective dose. With plaque assay, measurable reduction for MNV was at least 2.85 log units. CONCLUSIONS The successful inactivation of both surrogate viruses indicates that HPV could be a useful tool for surface decontamination of a patient room contaminated by norovirus. Hence nosocomial spread to subsequent patients can be avoided. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:561-566. PMID:26861195

  17. Evaluation of Injuries Caused by Penetrating Chest Traumas in Patients Referred to the Emergency Room.

    PubMed

    Aghaei Afshar, M; Mangeli, F; Nakhaei, A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of different injuries caused by penetrating chest traumas, and also the cause and type of trauma and its accompanying injuries. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study, carried out on all patients referred to the emergency room of Shahid Bahonar Hospital, Kerman, from March 2000 to September 2008, due to penetrating chest trauma. The required information including age, sex, cause of trauma, type and site of injury, and accompanying injury was obtained and used to fill out a questionnaire and then was analyzed. 828 patients were included in the study; most of them were in the age range of 20-29. Of the patients, 97.6 % were males. The most frequent cause of trauma was stabbing, and the most frequent injuries following the trauma were pneumothorax and hemothorax. Orthopedic trauma was the most frequent accompanying injury. The most commonly used diagnostic method was plain chest radiography. In 93 % of the patients, the chest tube was placed and thoracotomy was performed for 97 % of the patients. Shahid Bahonar Hospital is a referral Trauma Centre and treats large number of chest trauma patients. Most patients need only chest tube placement as a definitive treatment. PMID:26246700

  18. USE OF EMERGENCY ROOM PATIENT POPULATIONS IN AIR POLLUTION EPIDEMIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The long-term objective of this project was the design and implementation of a particular epidemiological approach to investigation of ambient pollutant effects: the correlation of pollutant exposure with patterns of hospital emergency room utilization. The report covers the init...

  19. Introducing therapeutic lasers in the hospitals and treatment rooms in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siposan, Dan G.; Manastireanu, Dan I.

    2005-11-01

    Background: Presently, there is no unanimous consensus regarding the methods to introduce laser therapy, on a large scale, into a medical assistance system. These methods may vary from one country to another, depending on some factors. Although, there are some compulsory stages that must be reached. Purpose: This paper's purpose is to present the necessary stages, in our opinion, to successfully introduce laser therapy in hospitals and treatment rooms in our country. They include, among others: an information of the public at large, by brochures or other informative materials, on therapeutic lasers' action; the introducing in high level medicine schools of courses on the biological action of low-level lasers; laboratory studies on action mechanisms of low level laser radiation on live tissues; establishing the more objective methods of patients' assessment; obtaining approval from the Bioethics Committee for clinical studies on volunteers, according to current legislation. Materials and methods: There had been done a preliminary clinical study on volunteers (over 100 in number), using mainly subjective methods of evaluation. The patients have been also monitored also after the treatment, during one to six months. We present briefly a method of monitoring and objective assessment, by optical means, for laser therapy results, which we intend to use in the near future. Results:-There are presented the stages we reached till now. In the preliminary clinical study we have treated patients with various pathologies: skin diseases, dental, surgical and neuralgic pathology etc. We observed an amelioration or total remission on the most patients and also a good mood after the treatments. There are presented a few cases with significant results. Discussion and conclusion: We estimate the success rate of our treatments with over 60 percents. We hope this study shall be useful for the purpose mentioned in the paper's title. In a country where living standard is low, laser

  20. Three-dimensional conformal setup (3D-CSU) of patients using the coordinate system provided by three internal fiducial markers and two orthogonal diagnostic X-ray systems in the treatment room

    SciTech Connect

    Shirato, Hiroki . E-mail: hshirato@radi.med.hokudai.ac.jp; Oita, Masataka; Fujita, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Shinichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Uegaki, Shinji; Watanabe, Yoshiharu; Kato, Norio; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To test the accuracy of a system for correcting for the rotational error of the clinical target volume (CTV) without having to reposition the patient using three fiducial markers and two orthogonal fluoroscopic images. We call this system 'three-dimensional conformal setup' (3D-CSU). Methods and materials: Three 2.0-mm gold markers are inserted into or adjacent to the CTV. On the treatment couch, the actual positions of the three markers are calculated based on two orthogonal fluoroscopies crossing at the isocenter of the linear accelerator. Discrepancy of the actual coordinates of gravity center of three markers from its planned coordinates is calculated. Translational setup error is corrected by adjustment of the treatment couch. The rotation angles ({alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}) of the coordinates of the actual CTV relative to the planned CTV are calculated around the lateral (x), craniocaudal (y), and anteroposterior (z) axes of the planned CTV. The angles of the gantry head, collimator, and treatment couch of the linear accelerator are adjusted according to the rotation of the actual coordinates of the tumor in relation to the planned coordinates. We have measured the accuracy of 3D-CSU using a static cubic phantom. Results: The gravity center of the phantom was corrected within 0.9 {+-} 0.3 mm (mean {+-} SD), 0.4 {+-} 0.2 mm, and 0.6 {+-} 0.2 mm for the rotation of the phantom from 0-30 degrees around the x, y, and z axes, respectively, every 5 degrees. Dose distribution was shown to be consistent with the planned dose distribution every 10 degrees of the rotation from 0-30 degrees. The mean rotational error after 3D-CSU was -0.4 {+-} 0.4 (mean {+-} SD), -0.2 {+-} 0.4, and 0.0 {+-} 0.5 degrees around the x, y, and z axis, respectively, for the rotation from 0-90 degrees. Conclusions: Phantom studies showed that 3D-CSU is useful for performing rotational correction of the target volume without correcting the position of the patient on the treatment couch

  1. Patient health information materials in waiting rooms of family physicians: do patients care?

    PubMed Central

    Moerenhout, Tania; Borgermans, Liesbeth; Schol, Sandrina; Vansintejan, Johan; Van De Vijver, Erwin; Devroey, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient health information materials (PHIMs), such as leaflets and posters are widely used by family physicians to reinforce or illustrate information, and to remind people of information received previously. This facilitates improved health-related knowledge and self-management by patients. Objective This study assesses the use of PHIMs by patient. It also addresses their perception of the quality and the impact of PHIMs on the interaction with their physician, along with changes in health-related knowledge and self-management. Methods Questionnaire survey among patients of family practices of one town in Belgium, assessing: (1) the extent to which patients read PHIMs in waiting rooms (leaflets and posters) and take them home, (2) the patients’ perception of the impact of PHIMs on interaction with their physician, their change in health-related knowledge and self-management, and (3) the patients judgment of the quality of PHIMs. Results We included 903 questionnaires taken from ten practices. Ninety-four percent of respondents stated they read PHIMs (leaflets), 45% took the leaflets home, and 78% indicated they understood the content of the leaflets. Nineteen percent of respondents reportedly discussed the content of the leaflets with their physician and 26% indicated that leaflets allowed them to ask fewer questions of their physician. Thirty-four percent indicated that leaflets had previously helped them to improve their health-related knowledge and self-management. Forty-two percent reportedly discussed the content of the leaflets with others. Patient characteristics are of significant influence on the perceived impact of PHIMS in physician interaction, health-related knowledge, and self-management. Conclusion This study suggests that patients value health information materials in the waiting rooms of family physicians and that they perceive such materials as being helpful in improving patient–physician interaction, health-related knowledge, and

  2. Clinical Application of In-Room Positron Emission Tomography for In Vivo Treatment Monitoring in Proton Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Chul Hee; Zhu, Xuping; Winey, Brian A.; Grogg, Kira; Testa, Mauro; El Fakhri, Georges; Bortfeld, Thomas R.; Paganetti, Harald; Shih, Helen A.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of using in-room positron emission tomography (PET) for treatment verification in proton therapy and for deriving suitable PET scan times. Methods and Materials: Nine patients undergoing passive scattering proton therapy underwent scanning immediately after treatment with an in-room PET scanner. The scanner was positioned next to the treatment head after treatment. The Monte Carlo (MC) method was used to reproduce PET activities for each patient. To assess the proton beam range uncertainty, we designed a novel concept in which the measured PET activity surface distal to the target at the end of range was compared with MC predictions. The repositioning of patients for the PET scan took, on average, approximately 2 minutes. The PET images were reconstructed considering varying scan times to test the scan time dependency of the method. Results: The measured PET images show overall good spatial correlations with MC predictions. Some discrepancies could be attributed to uncertainties in the local elemental composition and biological washout. For 8 patients treated with a single field, the average range differences between PET measurements and computed tomography (CT) image-based MC results were <5 mm (<3 mm for 6 of 8 patients) and root-mean-square deviations were 4 to 11 mm with PET-CT image co-registration errors of approximately 2 mm. Our results also show that a short-length PET scan of 5 minutes can yield results similar to those of a 20-minute PET scan. Conclusions: Our first clinical trials in 9 patients using an in-room PET system demonstrated its potential for in vivo treatment monitoring in proton therapy. For a quantitative range prediction with arbitrary shape of target volume, we suggest using the distal PET activity surface.

  3. [Treatment of patients with osteoarthritis].

    PubMed

    Vargas Negrín, Francisco; Medina Abellán, María D; Hermosa Hernán, Juan Carlos; de Felipe Medina, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic management of patients with osteoarthritis aims to decrease pain and inflammation, improve physical function, and to apply safe and effective treatments. A patient-centered approach implies the active participation of the patient in the design of the treatment plan and in timely and informed decision-making at all stages of the disease. The nucleus of treatment is patient education, physical activity and therapeutic exercise, together with weight control in overweight or obese patients. Self-care by the individual and by the family is fundamental in day-to-day patient management. The use of physical therapies, technical aids (walking sticks, etc.) and simple analgesics, opium alkaloids, and antiinflammatory drugs have demonstrated effectiveness in controlling pain, improving physical function and quality of life and their use is clearly indicated in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Conservative surgery and joint replacement is indicated when treatment goals are not achieved in specific patients. PMID:24467960

  4. Emergency room thoracotomy for the resuscitation of patients with "fatal" penetrating injuries of the heart.

    PubMed

    Ivatury, R R; Shah, P M; Ito, K; Ramirez-Schon, G; Suarez, F; Rohman, M

    1981-10-01

    A total of 75 patients with penetrating cardiac injuries were treated at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center from January, 1974, to November, 1980. Twenty-two patients (29.3%) were unconscious on arrival and had no detectable vital signs, cardiac activity, or spontaneous respirations. Their last physical movement was observed in the ambulance. Immediate resuscitation of these patients employing intercostal or sternal splitting incisions in the emergency room revealed arrested hearts and permitted relief of tamponade, finger occlusion of the cardiac wound or wounds, and temporary suturing of the defect. Restoration of cardiac function was accomplished in 16 patients (72.7%). After transfer to the operating room for more definitive cardiorrhaphy and repair of other major wounds, 8 patients (36.4%) recovered without objective neurological disability. Our experience clearly supports the value of immediate emergency room thoracotomy in this group of patients. PMID:7305523

  5. Ventilation Rates and Airflow Pathways in Patient Rooms: A Case Study of Bioaerosol Containment and Removal.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Ehsan S; Grosskopf, Kevin R

    2015-11-01

    Most studies on the transmission of infectious airborne disease have focused on patient room air changes per hour (ACH) and how ACH provides pathogen dilution and removal. The logical but mostly unproven premise is that greater air change rates reduce the concentration of infectious particles and thus, the probability of airborne disease transmission. Recently, a growing body of research suggests pathways between pathogenic source (patient) and control (exhaust) may be the dominant environmental factor. While increases in airborne disease transmission have been associated with ventilation rates below 2 ACH, comparatively less data are available to quantify the benefits of higher air change rates in clinical spaces. As a result, a series of tests were conducted in an actual hospital to observe the containment and removal of respirable aerosols (0.5-10 µm) with respect to ventilation rate and directional airflow in a general patient room, and, an airborne infectious isolation room. Higher ventilation rates were not found to be proportionately effective in reducing aerosol concentrations. Specifically, increasing mechanical ventilation from 2.5 to 5.5 ACH reduced aerosol concentrations only 30% on average. However, particle concentrations were more than 40% higher in pathways between the source and exhaust as was the suspension and migration of larger particles (3-10 µm) throughout the patient room(s). Computational analyses were used to validate the experimental results, and, to further quantify the effect of ventilation rate on exhaust and deposition removal in patient rooms as well as other particle transport phenomena. PMID:26187326

  6. From the Test Tube to the Treatment Room

    PubMed Central

    Del Rosso, James Q.; Plattner, Jacob J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of new drug classes and novel molecules that are brought to the marketplace has been a formidable challenge, especially for dermatologic drugs. The relative absence of new classes of antimicrobial agents is also readily apparent. Several barriers account for slow drug development, including regulatory changes, added study requirements, commercial pressures to bring drugs to market quickly by developing new generations of established compounds, and the greater potential for failure and higher financial risk when researching new drug classes. In addition, the return on investment is usually much lower with dermatologic drugs as compared to the potential revenue from “blockbuster” drugs for cardiovascular or gastrointestinal disease, hypercholesterolemia, and mood disorders. Nevertheless, some researchers are investigating new therapeutic platforms, one of which is boron-containing compounds. Boron-containing compounds offer a wide variety of potential applications in dermatology due to their unique physical and chemical properties, with several in formal phases of development. Tavaborole, a benzoxaborole compound, has been submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration for approval for treatment of onychomycosis. This article provides a thorough overview of the history of boron-based compounds in medicine, their scientific rationale, physiochemical and pharmacologic properties, and modes of actions including therapeutic targets. A section dedicated to boron-based compounds in development for treatment of various skin disorders is also included. PMID:24578778

  7. [Medical intervention for attempted suicide patients in emergency room].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kenjiro; Takahashi, Takeshi

    2016-02-01

    Emergency department is an important location for suicide prevention activities. Past history of attempted suicides or deliberate self-harms is a predictable risk factor for future suicide completion. In Japan, most of the attempted suicide patients (ASP) are transported to the emergency hospitals. Therefore, the more improvement of intervention skills for ASP are needed. Emergency medical staffs are expected to communicate patients with warm and calm attitudes. To confirm the presence or absence of suicidal ideation, risk factors are important. If patients are suicidal, emergency physicians should not hesitate to consult to the psychiatrist. PMID:26915259

  8. Listening to "How the Patient Presents Herself": A Case Study of a Doctor-Patient Interaction in an Emergency Room

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delbene, Roxana

    2015-01-01

    This is a case-study based on a micro-ethnography analyzing a doctor-patient interaction in an emergency room (ER) in New York City. Drawing on the framework of narrative medicine (Charon, 2006), the study examines how a phenomenological approach to listening to the patient facilitated the patient's narrative orientation not only to relevant…

  9. Group Therapy with Patients in the Waiting Room of an Oncology Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnowitz, Edward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a therapy group for cancer patients, conducted by cotherapists in an oncology waiting room. Group members provided mutual support and shared concerns and coping methods. Medical staff members became more involved and were more able to address the affective needs of the patients and their families. (JAC)

  10. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards.

    PubMed

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.Air samplers were placed at a short (60-80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients' rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens.All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients' rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects.The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  11. Patient safety in the operating room: an intervention study on latent risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patient safety is one of the greatest challenges in healthcare. In the operating room errors are frequent and often consequential. This article describes an approach to a successful implementation of a patient safety program in the operating room, focussing on latent risk factors that influence patient safety. We performed an intervention to improve these latent risk factors (LRFs) and increase awareness of patient safety issues amongst OR staff. Methods Latent risk factors were studied using a validated questionnaire applied to the OR staff before and after an intervention. A pre-test/post-test control group design with repeated measures was used to evaluate the effects of the interventions. The staff from one operating room of an university hospital acted as the intervention group. Controls consisted of the staff of the operating room in another university hospital. The outcomes were the changes in LRF scores, perceived incident rate, and changes in incident reports between pre- and post-intervention. Results Based on pre-test scores and participants’ key concerns about organizational factors affecting patient safety in their department the intervention focused on the following LRFs: Material Resources, Training and Staffing Recourses. After the intervention, the intervention operating room - compared to the control operating room - reported significantly fewer problems on Material Resources and Staffing Resources and a significantly lower score on perceived incident rate. The contribution of technical factors to incident causation decreased significantly in the intervention group after the intervention. Conclusion The change of state of latent risk factors can be measured using a patient safety questionnaire aimed at these factors. The change of the relevant risk factors (Material and Staffing resources) concurred with a decrease in perceived and reported incident rates in the relevant categories. We conclude that interventions aimed at unfavourable

  12. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions "How much?" and "What kind?" of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room , patient "scatterer," and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h-1 was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. PMID:8887513

  13. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1996-11-01

    Protecting the facility personnel and the general public from radiation exposure is a primary safety concern of an accelerator-based epithermal neutron irradiation facility. This work makes an attempt at answering the questions {open_quotes}How much?{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}What kind?{close_quotes} of shielding will meet the occupational limits of such a facility. Shielding effectiveness is compared for ordinary and barytes concretes in combination with and without borated polyethylene. A calculational model was developed of a treatment room, patient {open_quotes}scatterer,{close_quotes} and the epithermal neutron beam. The Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used to compute the total effective dose equivalent rates at specific points of interest outside of the treatment room. A conservative occupational effective dose rate limit of 0.01 mSv h{sup {minus}1} was the guideline for this study. Conservative Monte Carlo calculations show that constructing the treatment room walls with 1.5 m of ordinary concrete, 1.2 m of barytes concrete, 1.0 m of ordinary concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene, or 0.8 m of barytes concrete preceded by 10 cm of 5% boron-polyethylene will adequately protect facility personnel. 20 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. 9 CFR 590.548 - Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Drying, blending, packaging, and heat treatment rooms and facilities. 590.548 Section 590.548 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT)...

  15. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN646) interior. Water treatment room contains ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-646) interior. Water treatment room contains water softeners, deionizers, and display panel. Note metal ceiling and walls. Photographer: Jack L. Anderson. Date: February 20, 1959. INEEL negative no. 59-856 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  16. Patient Preferences for OCD treatment

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sapana R.; Simpson, Helen Blair

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore preferences for the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). We hypothesized that OCD patients will select a combination of medication and psychotherapy as their most preferred choice overall. Methods The authors designed a treatment preference survey using two health economics methods, forced choice and contingent ranking methods, to elicit preferences for OCD treatment available in mainstream care (Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors [SRIs]), Exposure and Ritual Prevention [EX/RP], and their combination), and for novel treatments under development at OCD research clinics. This survey was given by telephone to 89 individuals with OCD who called the OCD research clinic at the New York State Psychiatric Institute between July 2008 and January 2009. Results Most participants chose combination treatment (43%) or EX/RP (42%) over SRI medication (16%). Participants ranked investigational psychotherapy as their most preferred novel treatment (endorsed by 48% of participants) and deep brain stimulation as their least preferred novel treatment (endorsed by 77% of participants). Qualitative data suggest that prior treatment experience, concerns about medications, and logistical and practical concerns about treatment regimens affect preferences. Conclusions Patients with OCD have identifiable treatment preferences. In this sample of convenience, most preferred either combination treatment or psychotherapy. Future studies should investigate prospectively what modifies these preferences and how these preferences affect treatment outcome. PMID:21114948

  17. Detection of Common Respiratory Viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in Patient-Occupied Rooms in Pediatric Wards

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Gwo-Hwa; Huang, Chung-Guei; Chung, Fen-Fang; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few studies have assessed viral contamination in the rooms of hospital wards. This cross-sectional study evaluated the air and objects in patient-occupied rooms in pediatric wards for the presence of common respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Air samplers were placed at a short (60–80 cm) and long (320 cm) distance from the head of the beds of 58 pediatric patients, who were subsequently confirmed to be infected with enterovirus (n = 17), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (n = 13), influenza A virus (n = 13), adenovirus (n = 9), or M pneumoniae (n = 6). Swab samples were collected from the surfaces of 5 different types of objects in the patients’ rooms. All air and swab samples were analyzed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for the presence of the above pathogens. All pathogens except enterovirus were detected in the air, on the objects, or in both locations in the patients’ rooms. The detection rates of influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae for the long distance air sampling were 15%, 67%, and 17%, respectively. Both adenovirus and M pneumoniae were detected at very high rates, with high concentrations, on all sampled objects. The respiratory pathogens RSV, influenza A virus, adenovirus, and M pneumoniae were detected in the air and/or on the objects in the pediatric ward rooms. Appropriate infection control measures should be strictly implemented when caring for such patients. PMID:27057827

  18. Use of Critical Access Hospital Emergency Rooms by Patients with Mental Health Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, David; Ziller, Erika C.; Loux, Stephenie L.; Gale, John A.; Lambert, David; Yousefian, Anush E.

    2007-01-01

    Context: National data demonstrate that mental health (MH) visits to the emergency room (ER) comprise a small, but not inconsequential, proportion of all visits; however, we lack a rural picture of this issue. Purpose: This study investigates the use of critical access hospital (CAH) ERs by patients with MH problems to understand the role these…

  19. Evaluation of Access, a Primary Care Program for Indigent Patients: Inpatient and Emergency Room Utilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Richard A.; Giancola, Angela; Gast, Andrea; Ho, Janice; Waddell, Rhondda

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of Accessing Community Care through Eastside Social Services (ACCESS), a program that provided indigent patients with free primary care, on inpatient admissions, emergency room (ER) visits, and subsequent charges. Data on 19 people before and after program enrollment showed significant decreases in ER visits following…

  20. Non-operating Room Anesthesia: The Principles of Patient Assessment and Preparation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Beverly; Urman, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    A significant number of anesthetics are performed outside of the operating room (OR). Despite the increased requirement for anesthesia services, the framework to perform the necessary preprocedural anesthesia assessments to optimize patients has not been uniformly developed. Performing anesthesia in non-OR locations poses significant and distinct challenges compared with the procedures in the OR. Anesthesiologists are faced with patients with increasingly complicated comorbidities undergoing novel, complex interventional procedures. With unique training in preoperative triaging, and an expertise in intraoperative and postoperative management of complex patients, anesthesiologists can contribute to greater efficiency and patient safety in the non-OR setting. PMID:26927750

  1. Evaluation of Drug Utilization Patterns during Initial Treatment in the Emergency Room: A Retroprospective Pharmacoepidemiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheekavolu, Chakrapani; Pathapati, Rama Mohan; Babasaheb Laxmansingh, Kudagi; Saginela, Satish Kumar; Makineedi, Veera Prasad; Siddalingappa; Kumar, Amitabh

    2011-01-01

    Background. We assessed the prescribing trends, average number of drugs per prescription, and cost per prescription during the initial contact of the patient with the physician in emergency room. Methods. This retro-prospective study was conducted over a period of six months. Medical records of two hundred patients were reviewed for prescribing patterns. Results. 52 different types of drugs (996 drugs) were prescribed in total 200 prescriptions during the mean time spent in emergency room of 2.8 ± 1.4 hours. The average number of drugs per prescription was 4.2 ± 1.2. 95% of drugs were prescribed by trade name. Average drugs cost per prescription was 784 ± 134 rupees (17USD). Conclusion. Polypharmacy remains the main form of irrational prescribing. Prescribing patterns of drugs were knowledge based rather than WHO criteria for rational use of drugs. PMID:22242208

  2. Hospital treatment of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Ola, Samuel Olawale

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria has progressed from the stage of inactivity, unconcern, abandonment and neglect to the present stage of holistic care involving treatment of the infection with Highly Active Anti Retroviral Agents, complications of the disease and side effects of antiretroviral therapy as well as that of human behavioural responses towards the disease with hope and promising outcome. The goal of the treatment is to prolong the patient's life while maintaining the best possible quality of health and life. It is now a continuum of care between the hospital and the different sectors of the community. Hospital treatment of patients with HIV-AIDS is complex and yet a simple task if there is healthy interaction of the patients and health care providers in a milieu of well equipped hospital setting with available treatment facilities for proper management of diseases. Similarly, for the care to achieve its goal, it requires a joint participation of the community and the commitment of the government not only on curtailment of the reservoir of HIV infection by antiretroviral therapy but total eradication of diseases, poverty and ignorance in all its entirety. PMID:18050774

  3. [Treatment of elderly diabetic patients].

    PubMed

    Rušavý, Zdeněk; Žourek, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes has become a pandemic disease over the past 50 years. Its incidence increases the most rapidly in the senior population, i.e. among people older than 65. In a number of countries 1/4 of the people with diabetes are now older than 65 years. Geriatrics now examines numerous differences regarding the senior patients, which often lead to somewhat different therapeutic procedures as compared to the treatment of other adult patients. This paper aims to show some different aspects of the treatment of an elderly patient with diabetes. The intensity of diabetes treatment in the elderly is mainly defined by the incidence of symptoms caused by diabetic decompensation which negatively affect quality of life and are likely to increase mortality. The treatment goals expressed by HbA1c, fasting and post-prandial glycemia, should be set individually based on age, initial HbA1c, present comorbidities and the level of frailty of an elderly patient. An effort to reduce weight regarding people at an older age is probably inappropriate and maybe even harmful, while physical activity reduces mortality and slows muscle catabolism at every age. Ideal is normal walking for 20-30 minutes a day. Except for "very fit elders" without renal insufficiency, the sulfonylurea treatment is unsuitable and perhaps even harmful. It significantly increases the incidence of different types of hypoglycemia and very likely overall mortality as well. The basis of diabetes treatment for the elderly is the effort to perform any regular exercise. In regard to medication treatment it is recommended to choose metformin or gliptin following the rule "start low, go slow", i.e. start with low medication doses and increase them at a slow pace. The main goal of the treatment is to maintain the good quality of life as long as possible, without symptoms associated with hyperglycemia with minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia development. PMID:25894262

  4. Shielding design of a treatment room for an accelerator-based neutron source for BNCT

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.F.; Blue, T.E.

    1995-12-31

    For several years, research has been ongoing in the Ohio State University (OSU) Nuclear Engineering Program toward the development of an accelerator-based irradiation facility (ANIF) neutron source for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ANIF, which is planned to be built in a hospital, has been conceptually designed and analyzed. After Qu, an OSU researcher, determined that the shielding design of a 6-MV X-ray treatment room was inadequate to protect personnel from an accelerator neutron source operating at 30 mA, we decided to analyze and determine the shielding requirements of a treatment room for an ANIF. We determined the amount of shielding that would be sufficient to protect facility personnel from excessive radiation exposure caused by operation of the accelerator at 30 mA.

  5. Antimicrobial Non-Susceptibility of Escherichia coli from Outpatients and Patients Visiting Emergency Rooms in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jann-Tay; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chang, Feng-Yee; Fung, Chang-Phone; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Chen, Yao-Shen; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Tan, Mei-Chen; Wang, Hui-Ying; Lai, Jui-Fen; Huang, I-Wen; Yang Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal nationwide surveillance data on antimicrobial non-susceptibility and prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) as well as AmpC β-lactamases producers among Escherichia coli from different sources in the community settings are limited. Such data may impact treatment practice. The present study investigated E. coli from outpatients and patients visiting emergency rooms collected by the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (TSAR) program. A total of 3481 E. coli isolates were studied, including 2153 (61.9%) from urine and 1125 (32.3%) from blood samples. These isolates were collected biennially between 2002 and 2012 from a total of 28 hospitals located in different geographic regions of Taiwan. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined using methods recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The prevalence and factors associated with the presence of ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase-producers were determined. Significant increases in non-susceptibility to most β-lactams and ciprofloxacin occurred during the study period. By 2012, non-susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin reached 21.1% and 26.9%, respectively. The prevalence of ESBL- and AmpC- producers also increased from 4.0% and 5.3%, respectively, in 2002–2004, to 10.7% for both in 2010–2012 (P < 0.001). The predominant ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase genes were CTX-M and CMY-types, respectively. Non-susceptibility of urine isolates to nitrofurantoin remained at around 8% and to fosfomycin was low (0.7%) but to cefazolin (based on the 2014 CLSI urine criteria) increased from 11.5% in 2002–2004 to 23.9% in 2010–2012 (P <0.001). Non-susceptibility of isolates from different specimen types was generally similar, but isolates from elderly patients were significantly more resistant to most antimicrobial agents and associated with the presence of ESBL- and AmpC- β-lactamases. An additional concern is that decreased ciprofloxacin

  6. Antimicrobial Non-Susceptibility of Escherichia coli from Outpatients and Patients Visiting Emergency Rooms in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jann-Tay; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chang, Feng-Yee; Fung, Chang-Phone; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Chen, Yao-Shen; Shiau, Yih-Ru; Tan, Mei-Chen; Wang, Hui-Ying; Lai, Jui-Fen; Huang, I-Wen; Yang Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal nationwide surveillance data on antimicrobial non-susceptibility and prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) as well as AmpC β-lactamases producers among Escherichia coli from different sources in the community settings are limited. Such data may impact treatment practice. The present study investigated E. coli from outpatients and patients visiting emergency rooms collected by the Taiwan Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (TSAR) program. A total of 3481 E. coli isolates were studied, including 2153 (61.9%) from urine and 1125 (32.3%) from blood samples. These isolates were collected biennially between 2002 and 2012 from a total of 28 hospitals located in different geographic regions of Taiwan. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined using methods recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The prevalence and factors associated with the presence of ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase-producers were determined. Significant increases in non-susceptibility to most β-lactams and ciprofloxacin occurred during the study period. By 2012, non-susceptibility to cefotaxime and ciprofloxacin reached 21.1% and 26.9%, respectively. The prevalence of ESBL- and AmpC- producers also increased from 4.0% and 5.3%, respectively, in 2002-2004, to 10.7% for both in 2010-2012 (P < 0.001). The predominant ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase genes were CTX-M and CMY-types, respectively. Non-susceptibility of urine isolates to nitrofurantoin remained at around 8% and to fosfomycin was low (0.7%) but to cefazolin (based on the 2014 CLSI urine criteria) increased from 11.5% in 2002-2004 to 23.9% in 2010-2012 (P <0.001). Non-susceptibility of isolates from different specimen types was generally similar, but isolates from elderly patients were significantly more resistant to most antimicrobial agents and associated with the presence of ESBL- and AmpC- β-lactamases. An additional concern is that decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility (MIC

  7. Seizure Treatment in Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Solid organ transplantation is frequently complicated by a spectrum of seizure types, including single partial-onset or generalized tonic-clonic seizures, acute repetitive seizures or status epilepticus, and sometimes the evolution of symptomatic epilepsy. There is currently no specific evidence involving the transplant patient population to guide the selection, administration, or duration of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, so familiarity with clinical AED pharmacology and application of sound judgment are necessary for successful patient outcomes. An initial detailed search for symptomatic seizure etiologies, including metabolic, infectious, cerebrovascular, and calcineurin inhibitor treatment-related neuro-toxic complications such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), is imperative, as underlying central nervous system disorders may impose additional serious risks to cerebral or general health if not promptly detected and appropriately treated. The mainstay for post-transplant seizure management is AED therapy directed toward the suspected seizure type. Unfavorable drug interactions could place the transplanted organ at risk, so choosing an AED with limited interaction potential is also crucial. When the transplanted organ is dysfunctional or vulnerable to rejection, AEDs without substantial hepatic metabolism are favored in post-liver transplant patients, whereas after renal transplantation, AEDs with predominantly renal elimination may require dosage adjustment to prevent adverse effects. Levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and lacosamide are drugs of choice for treatment of partial-onset seizures in post-transplant patients given their efficacy spectrum, generally excellent tolerability, and lack of drug interaction potential. Levetiracetam is the drug of choice for primary generalized seizures in post-transplant patients. When intravenous drugs are necessary for acute seizure management, benzodiazepines and

  8. Thermal neutron fluence in a treatment room with a Varian linear accelerator at a medical university hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Shan; Changlai, Sheng-Pin; Pan, Lung-Kwang; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The indium foil activation technique has been employed to measure thermal neutron fluences ( Φth) among various locations in the treatment room with a 20×20 cm 2 field size and a 15 and 10 MV X-ray beam. Spatial Φth are visualized using colored three-dimensional graphical representations; intensities are up to (1.97±0.13)×10 5 and (1.46±0.13)×10 4 n cm -2/Gy-X at isocenter, respectively. The Φth is found to increase with the X-ray energy of the LINAC and decreases as it moves away from the beam center. However, thermal neutron exposure is not assessed in routine dosimetry planning and radiation assessment of patients since neutron dose contributes <1% of the given therapy dose. However, unlike the accelerated beam limited within the gantry window, photoneutrons are widely spread in the treatment room. Distributions of Φth were measured in water phantom irradiated with 15 MV X-ray beams. The shielding effect of the maze was also evaluated. The experimentally estimated Φth along the maze distance was fitted explicate and the tenth-value layer (TVL) was calculated and discussed. Use of a 10 cm-thick polyethylene door placed at the maze was suitable for radiation shielding.

  9. Acute asthma: treatment and outcome of 2000 consecutive pediatric emergency room visits in Doha, Qatar.

    PubMed

    Dawod, S T; Ehlayel, M S; Osundwa, V M

    1996-01-01

    The case files of 2000 asthma episodes seen in our pediatric emergency room (PER) over a 2-month period were reviewed. Patients included 1429 males and 571 females with 66.2% < 48 months old. More than 60% of patients had been symptomatic for <24 hr and 88.5% had tried inhaled beta2-agonist before coming to the PER. In the PER, 57% responded to a single salbutamol aerosol and 35.5% responded to a combination of 2-3 salbutamol, IV hydrocortisone, and aminophylline drip < or = 6 hr. Only 7.5% were admitted to the hospital. Of the admitted patients, 82% had been symptomatic for > 24 hr and 60.6% were <4 years old. PMID:8609101

  10. Ultrafast Room-Temperature Crystallization of TiO2 Nanotubes Exploiting Water-Vapor Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, Andrea; Chiodoni, Angelica; Shahzad, Nadia; Bianco, Stefano; Quaglio, Marzia; Pirri, Candido F.

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript a near-room temperature crystallization process of anodic nanotubes from amorphous TiO2 to anatase phase with a fast 30 minutes treatment is reported for the first time. This method involves the exposure of as-grown TiO2 nanotubes to water vapor flow in ambient atmosphere. The water vapor-crystallized samples are deeply investigated in order to gain a whole understanding of their structural, physical and chemical properties. The photocatalytic activity of the converted material is tested by dye degradation experiment and the obtained performance confirms the highly promising properties of this low-temperature processed material. PMID:25589038

  11. Escherichia coli inactivation by pressurized CO2 treatment methods at room temperature: Critical issues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongji; Huang, Doudou; Zhou, Lingling

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to increase the inactivation efficiency of CO2 against Escherichia coli under mild conditions to facilitate the application of pressurized CO2 technology in water disinfection. Based on an aerating-cycling apparatus, three different treatment methods (continuous aeration, continuous reflux, and simultaneous aeration and reflux) were compared for the same temperature, pressure (0.3-0.7MPa), initial concentration, and exposure time (25min). The simultaneous aeration and reflux treatment (combined method) was shown to be the best method under optimum conditions, which were determined to be 0.7MPa, room temperature, and an exposure time of 10min. This treatment achieved 5.1-log reduction after 25min of treatment at the pressure of 0.3MPa and 5.73-log reduction after 10min at 0.7MPa. Log reductions of 4.4 and 5.0 occurred at the end of continuous aeration and continuous reflux treatments at 0.7MPa, respectively. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images suggested that cells were ruptured after the simultaneous aeration and reflux treatment and the continuous reflux treatment. The increase of the solubilization rate of CO2 due to intense hydraulic conditions led to a rapid inactivation effect. It was found that the reduction of intracellular pH caused by CO2 led to a more lethal bactericidal effect. PMID:27155435

  12. Impact of healthcare design on patients' perception of a rheumatology outpatient infusion room: an interventional pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bukh, Gunhild; Tommerup, Anne Marie Munk; Madsen, Ole Rintek

    2015-07-01

    Evidence-based healthcare design is a concept aimed at reducing stress factors in the physical environment for the benefit of patients and the medical staff. The objective of this study was to examine the impact of room modifications on patients' perception of an outpatient infusion room used for treating rheumatologic diseases. Patient and nurse interviews, a staff workshop and field observations were performed to identify environmental room factors important for the patients, and the room was modified accordingly. The changes included the colours, atmosphere and functionality of the room. Artificial plants and a water bubble wall were added to the room. Forty-four patients receiving intravenous biologic therapy for inflammatory arthritis completed a questionnaire before and after the intervention. The agreement with 25 statements regarding the environmental room factors was scored (range 0-4). A total score was calculated as the sum of all 25 scores (range 0-100). The median (range) age was 55 (28-78) years. Seventeen out of 25 scores improved significantly (p < 0.000-0.050), none deteriorated. The amount of decorating and room colours, for example, was scored significantly higher after the intervention (p < 0.000), and the atmosphere was considered significantly more comfortable and "safe" (p < 0.005). The total score increased from 63.0 (34-88) to 81.0 (48-100) (p < 0.000). The study suggests that room modifications according to the principles of evidence-based healthcare design may have the potential to improve patients' perception of outpatient infusion rooms used for treating rheumatologic diseases. PMID:24705819

  13. Confidentiality and the physician-patient relationship -- ethical reflections from a surgical waiting room.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter A

    2002-11-01

    The physician-patient relationship is the primary focus of ethics in medicine. It is both a personal and a professional relationship that is founded on trust, confidence, dignity and mutual respect. Trust is the bridge to the physician-patient relationship, and the burden is on the physician not only to expect the patient's trust but also to build a solid foundation upon which the patient can place his or her trust. Great strides have been made by physicians in refining the physician-patient relationship especially in understanding and respecting the patients' right of self-determination regarding medical decision-making and protecting their rights of privacy and confidentiality. However, further refinements are needed on both sides regarding this relationship. Breaches of confidentiality are occurring in places like surgical waiting rooms and as a result, the physician-patient relationship is being damaged. This article identifies some legitimate concerns and offers some concrete solutions so that the physician-patient relationship can be further refined and the virtues and rights that support it can be reinforced. PMID:12444393

  14. Norovirus GII.4 detection in environmental samples from patient rooms during nosocomial outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Nenonen, Nancy P; Hannoun, Charles; Svensson, Lennart; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Westin, Johan; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is an important cause of nosocomial gastroenteric outbreaks. This 5-month study was designed to characterize NoV contamination and airborne dispersal in patient rooms during hospital outbreaks. Air vents, overbed tables, washbasins, dust, and virus traps designed to collect charged particles from the air were swabbed to investigate the possibility of NoV contamination in patient rooms during outbreaks in seven wards and in an outbreak-free ward. Symptomatic inpatients were also sampled. Nucleic acid extracts of the samples were examined for NoV RNA using genogroup I (GI) and GII real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The NoV strains were characterized by RT-PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase-N/S capsid-coding region (1,040 nucleotides [nt]). Patient strains from two outbreaks in one ward were sequenced across the RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase major capsid-coding region (2.5 kb), including the hypervariable P2 domain. In the outbreak wards, NoV GII was detected in 48 of 101 (47%) environmental swabs and 63 of 108 patients (58%); NoV genotype II.4 was sequenced from 18 environmental samples, dust (n = 8), virus traps (n = 4), surfaces (n = 6), and 56 patients. In contrast, NoV GII was detected in 2 (GII.4) of 28 (7%) environmental samples and in 2 (GII.6 and GII.4) of 17 patients in the outbreak-free ward. Sequence analyses revealed a high degree of similarity (>99.5%, 1,040 nt) between NoV GII.4 environmental and patient strains from a given ward at a given time. The strains clustered on 11 subbranches of the phylogenetic tree, with strong correlations to time and place. The high nucleotide similarity between the NoV GII.4 strains from patients and their hospital room environment provided molecular evidence of GII.4 dispersal in the air and dust; therefore, interventional cleaning studies are justified. PMID:24759712

  15. Norovirus GII.4 Detection in Environmental Samples from Patient Rooms during Nosocomial Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Hannoun, Charles; Svensson, Lennart; Torén, Kjell; Andersson, Lars-Magnus; Westin, Johan; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is an important cause of nosocomial gastroenteric outbreaks. This 5-month study was designed to characterize NoV contamination and airborne dispersal in patient rooms during hospital outbreaks. Air vents, overbed tables, washbasins, dust, and virus traps designed to collect charged particles from the air were swabbed to investigate the possibility of NoV contamination in patient rooms during outbreaks in seven wards and in an outbreak-free ward. Symptomatic inpatients were also sampled. Nucleic acid extracts of the samples were examined for NoV RNA using genogroup I (GI) and GII real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The NoV strains were characterized by RT-PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase-N/S capsid-coding region (1,040 nucleotides [nt]). Patient strains from two outbreaks in one ward were sequenced across the RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase major capsid-coding region (2.5 kb), including the hypervariable P2 domain. In the outbreak wards, NoV GII was detected in 48 of 101 (47%) environmental swabs and 63 of 108 patients (58%); NoV genotype II.4 was sequenced from 18 environmental samples, dust (n = 8), virus traps (n = 4), surfaces (n = 6), and 56 patients. In contrast, NoV GII was detected in 2 (GII.4) of 28 (7%) environmental samples and in 2 (GII.6 and GII.4) of 17 patients in the outbreak-free ward. Sequence analyses revealed a high degree of similarity (>99.5%, 1,040 nt) between NoV GII.4 environmental and patient strains from a given ward at a given time. The strains clustered on 11 subbranches of the phylogenetic tree, with strong correlations to time and place. The high nucleotide similarity between the NoV GII.4 strains from patients and their hospital room environment provided molecular evidence of GII.4 dispersal in the air and dust; therefore, interventional cleaning studies are justified. PMID:24759712

  16. Capturing patient benefits of treatment.

    PubMed

    Carr, Alan; Wolfaardt, John; Garrett, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Findings from the Academy of Osseointegration State of the Science on Implant Dentistry Conference clearly demonstrate that data are lacking regarding both quality of design and adequate outcome measures (standardization, validity, and relevance to patient) to support an evidence-based systematic evaluation of implant efficacy. Despite the dearth of controlled trials and the variability in defining implant survival/success, the preponderance of evidence is viewed as lending support for consideration of dental implant therapy as a safe and predictable alternative to conventional restorations for many applications. However, this minimal conclusion undermines the best intentions of the dental profession, which is striving to substantiate to the patient, third-party providers, and the government the relative benefits and risks of various prosthetic treatment alternatives. The conclusions of multiple consensus conferences have repeatedly stressed that additional research with good strength of evidence following a broad spectrum of outcomes is vital to extend the breadth of conclusions regarding dental implant treatment efficacy. However, without a set of consensus-based core outcome measures addressing pertinent clinical and patient-centered factors, future expensive, time-consuming, and technically complex clinical studies may suffer the same critical flaws seen in the current body of research. It may be possible and useful to establish a core set of well-defined, discriminatory, and feasible outcome measures for common utilization and a hierarchy of additional recommended outcome measures for specific benefit categories. Such a standardized group of outcome measures would be likely to significantly enhance the potential for future research. In addition, with the formation of consensus guidelines, there would be an opportunity for scientific journals to promote the quality of implant dentistry research by suggesting the inclusion of these core outcome measures in

  17. Photoneutron contamination from an 18 MV Saturne medical linear accelerator in the treatment room.

    PubMed

    Khosravi, Mostafa; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Jabbari, Keyvan; Nasri-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Baradaran-Ghahfarokhi, Milad; Siavashpour, Zahra; Gheisari, Ruhollah; Amiri, Behnam

    2013-09-01

    Dose escalation with high-energy X rays of medical linear accelerators (linacs) in radiotherapy offers several distinct advantages over the lower energy photons. However, owing to photoneutron reactions, interaction of high-energy photons (>8 MV) with various high-Z nuclei of the materials in the linac head components produces unavoidable neutrons. The aim of this study was to evaluate the photoneutron dose equivalent per unit therapeutic X-ray dose of 18 MV, GE Saturne 20 linac in the treatment room using Monte Carlo (MC) MCNP linac head full simulation as well as thermoluminescence dosemeter measurements. This machine is one of the old linac models manufactured by General Electric Company; however, it is widely used in the developing countries because of low cost and simple maintenance for radiotherapy applications. The results showed a significant photoneutron dose from Saturne 20 linac head components especially at distances near the linac head (<150 cm). Results of this work could be used in several applications, especially designing bunker and entrance door shielding against neutrons produced by photoneutron reactions in GE Saturne 20. However, a detailed cost optimisation for a specific room would require a dedicated calculation. PMID:23538892

  18. Hydrogen Treatment for Superparamagnetic VO2 Nanowires with Large Room-Temperature Magnetoresistance.

    PubMed

    Li, Zejun; Guo, Yuqiao; Hu, Zhenpeng; Su, Jihu; Zhao, Jiyin; Wu, Junchi; Wu, Jiajing; Zhao, Yingcheng; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-07-01

    One-dimensional (1D) transition metal oxide (TMO) nanostructures are actively pursued in spintronic devices owing to their nontrivial d electron magnetism and confined electron transport pathways. However, for TMOs, the realization of 1D structures with long-range magnetic order to achieve a sensitive magnetoelectric response near room temperature has been a longstanding challenge. Herein, we exploit a chemical hydric effect to regulate the spin structure of 1D V-V atomic chains in monoclinic VO2 nanowires. Hydrogen treatment introduced V(3+) (3d(2) ) ions into the 1D zigzag V-V chains, triggering the formation of ferromagnetically coupled V(3+) -V(4+) dimers to produce 1D superparamagnetic chains and achieve large room-temperature negative magnetoresistance (-23.9 %, 300 K, 0.5 T). This approach offers new opportunities to regulate the spin structure of 1D nanostructures to control the intrinsic magnetoelectric properties of spintronic materials. PMID:27265205

  19. Prehospital versus Emergency Room Intubation of Trauma Patients in Qatar: A-2-year Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Thani, Hassan; El-Menyar, Ayman; Latifi, Rifat

    2014-01-01

    Background: The impact of prehospital intubation (PHI) in improving outcome of trauma patients has not been adequately evaluated in the developing countries. Aims: The present study analyzed the outcome of PHI versus emergency room intubation (ERI) among trauma patients in Qatar. Materials and Methods: Data were retrospectively reviewed for all intubated trauma patients between 2010 and 2011. Patients were classified according to location of intubation (PHI: Group-1 versus ERI: Group-2). Data were analyzed and compared. Results: Out of 570 intubated patients; 482 patients (239 in group-1 and 243 in group-2) met the inclusion criteria with a mean age of 32 ΁ 14.6 years Head injury (P = 0.003) and multiple trauma (P = 0.004) were more prevalent in group-1, whereas solid organ injury predominated in group-2 (P = 0.02). Group-1 had significantly higher mean injury severity scoring (ISS), lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS), greater head abbreviated injury score and longer activation, response, scene and total emergency medical services times. The mortality was higher in group-1 (53% vs. 18.5%; P = 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that GCS [odds ratio (OR) 0.78, P = 0.005) and ISS (OR 1.12, P = 0.001) were independent predictors of mortality. Conclusions: PHI is associated with high mortality when compared with ERI. However, selection bias cannot be ruled out and therefore, PHI needs further critical assessment in Qatar. PMID:24678471

  20. Music and ambient operating room noise in patients undergoing spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Chakib M; Rizk, Laudi B; Yaacoub, Chadi I; Gaal, Dorothy; Kain, Zeev N

    2005-05-01

    Previous studies have indicated that music decreases intraoperative sedative requirements in patients undergoing surgical procedures under regional anesthesia. In this study we sought to determine whether this decrease in sedative requirements results from music or from eliminating operating room (OR) noise. A secondary aim of the study was to examine the relationship of response to intraoperative music and participants' culture (i.e., American versus Lebanese). Eighty adults (36 American and 54 Lebanese) undergoing urological procedures with spinal anesthesia and patient-controlled IV propofol sedation were randomly assigned to intraoperative music, white noise, or OR noise. We found that, controlling for ambient OR noise, intraoperative music decreases propofol requirements (0.004 +/- 0.002 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.014 +/- 0.004 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.012 +/- 0.002 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1); P = 0.026). We also found that, regardless of group assignment, Lebanese patients used less propofol as compared with American patients (0.005 +/- 0.001 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1) versus 0.017 +/- 0.003 mg . kg(-1) . min(-1); P = 0.001) and that, in both sites, patients in the music group required less propofol (P < 0.05). We conclude that when controlling for ambient OR noise, intraoperative music decreases propofol requirements of both Lebanese and American patients who undergo urological surgery under spinal anesthesia. PMID:15845676

  1. Time accuracy of a radio frequency identification patient tracking system for recording operating room timestamps.

    PubMed

    Marjamaa, Riitta A; Torkki, Paulus M; Torkki, Markus I; Kirvelä, Olli A

    2006-04-01

    A patient tracking system is a promising tool for managing patient flow and improving efficiency in the operating room. Wireless location systems, using infrared or radio frequency transmitters, can automatically timestamp key events, thereby decreasing the need for manual data input. In this study, we measured the accuracy and precision of automatically documented timestamps compared with manual recording. Each patient scheduled for urgent surgery was given an active radio frequency/infrared transmitter. The prototype software tracked the patient throughout the perioperative process, automatically documenting the timestamps. Both automatic and traditional data entry were compared with the reference data. The absolute value of median error was 64% smaller (P < 0.01), and the average quartile deviation of error was 69% smaller in automatic documentation. The average delay between an activity and the documentation was 80 seconds in automatic documentation and 735 seconds in manual documentation. Both the accuracy and the precision were better in automatic documentation and the data were immediately available. Automatic documentation with the Indoor Positioning System can help in managing patient flow and in increasing transparency with faster availability and better accuracy of data. PMID:16551921

  2. Treatment-resistant depression in Hispanic patients.

    PubMed

    Podawiltz, Alan; Culpepper, Larry

    2010-06-01

    About one-third of patients treated with antidepressants do not respond to initial treatment, and Spanish-speaking Hispanic patients with major depression may exhibit a worse response to initial medication than English-speaking patients. Patients and clinicians should be resolute and patient as different regimens are tried throughout the course of treatment. Other options include electroconvulsive therapy, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and the medicinal food L-methylfolate. PMID:20573322

  3. Emergency room resource utilization by patients with low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Nuño, Miriam; Patil, Chirag G; Yan, Kimberly; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine factors associated with admission to the hospital through the emergency room (ER) for patients with a primary diagnosis of low-back pain (LBP). The authors further evaluated the impact of ER admission and patient characteristics on mortality, discharge disposition, and hospital length of stay. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of patients with LBP discharged from hospitals according to the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) between 1998 and 2007. Univariate comparisons of patient characteristics according to the type of admission (ER versus non-ER) were conducted. Multivariate analysis evaluated factors associated with an ER admission, risk of mortality, and nonroutine discharge. RESULTS According to the NIS, approximately 183,151 patients with a primary diagnosis of LBP were discharged from US hospitals between 1998 and 2007. During this period, an average of 65% of these patients were admitted through the ER, with a significant increase from 1998 (54%) to 2005 (71%). Multivariate analysis revealed that uninsured patients (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.7-2.6, p < 0.0001) and African American patients (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-1.7, p < 0.0001) were significantly more likely to be admitted through the ER than private insurance patients or Caucasian patients, respectively. Additionally, a moderate but statistically significant increase in the likelihood of ER admission was noted for patients with more preexisting comorbidities (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2, p < 0.001). An 11% incremental increase in the odds of admission through the ER was observed with each year increment (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.2, p < 0.001). Highest income patients ($45,000+) were more likely to be admitted through the ER (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1-1.6, p = 0.007) than the lowest income cohort. While ER admission did not impact the risk of mortality (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.60-1.51, p = 0.84), it increased the odds of a nonroutine discharge (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1

  4. Microbiological evaluation of wet and dry floor sanitization systems in hospital patient rooms.

    PubMed Central

    Vesley, D; Klapes, N A; Benzow, K; Le, C T

    1987-01-01

    A new system for sanitizing floors in hospital patient rooms has been developed. The method consists of dry dusting with a cotton-blend, chemically treated (10% by dry mop weight) dust mop. This method was compared with a conventional cleaning protocol consisting of an initial predusting with the same nongermicidal chemical (3% by dry mop weight) followed by wet mopping with a fresh solution of a quaternary ammonium disinfectant-detergent. Each of six rooms was sampled by using RODAC plates (Becton Dickinson Labware, Oxnard, Calif.) on 10 consecutive days for each of the two methods. The study was initially performed during the summer and then repeated during the winter. Results imply that there is no significant difference between the new dry method (81.9% CFU reduction) and the conventional method (83.1% CFU reduction). Furthermore, the initial dry dusting step in the conventional method accounted for virtually all of the reduction by that method. Thus, wet mopping with a germicidal chemical produced no additional significant reduction of natural microbial populations on environmental surfaces beyond that achieved by dry dusting with dust-suppressant chemicals. PMID:3606089

  5. [Evaluation of Radiation Dose during Stent-graft Treatment Using a Hybrid Operating Room System].

    PubMed

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Kouichi; Kaga, Yuji; Saitou, Kazuhisa; Arai, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Iwaya, Yoshimi; Kumasaka, Eriko; Kataoka, Nozomi; Satou, Naoto; Abe, Mitsuya

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, aortic aneurysm treatment with stent graft grafting in the X-ray fluoroscopy is increasing. This is an endovascular therapy, because it is a treatment which includes the risk of radiation damage, having to deal with radiation damage, to know in advance is important. In this study, in order to grasp the trend of exposure stent graft implantation in a hybrid operating room (OR) system, focusing on clinical data (entrance skin dose and fluoroscopy time), was to count the total. In TEVAR and EVAR, fluoroscopy time became 13.40 ± 7.27 minutes, 23.67 ± 11.76 minutes, ESD became 0.87 ± 0.41 mGy, 1.11 ± 0.57 mGy. (fluoroscopy time of EVAR was 2.0 times than TEVAR. DAP of EVAR was 1.2 times than TEVAR.) When using the device, adapted lesions and usage are different. This means that care changes in exposure-related factors. In this study, exposure trends of the stent graft implantation was able to grasp. It can be a helpful way to reduce/optimize the radiation dose in a hybrid OR system. PMID:26685833

  6. Recruiting diverse patients to a breast cancer risk communication trial--waiting rooms can improve access.

    PubMed Central

    Bodurtha, Joann N.; Quillin, John M.; Tracy, Kelly A.; Borzelleca, Joseph; McClish, Donna; Wilson, Diane Baer; Jones, Resa M.; Quillin, Julie; Bowen, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Low participation among underserved populations in health research constrains progress in public health practices. From 2003 to 2005, Women's Health Clinic patients at the VCU Health System were recruited to a trial investigating breast cancer risk communication. In secondary analyses, we examined dimensions of the recruitment of these diverse women. The sample characteristics (age, insurance, race and previous mammograms) were compared to the overall clinic. Of recruitment attempts for eligible women, 45% consented; of those who declined, the top cited reasons were lack of time (40%) and lack of interest (18%). Of 899 participants, 35% qualified for the indigent care program, compared to 31% of the overall clinic (P<0.001). Forty-five percent of participants were African American, compared to 54% of overall clinic patients (P<0.001). Participants were younger (50 vs. 53 years, P<0.001) than the overall clinic population. Nonrepresentative enrollment of patients in clinical trials is common and could lead to suboptimal applicability of findings. Although there were statistically significant race and age differences between the study sample and the overall population, we demonstrate that waiting room recruitment can engage diverse women in a clinical trial and cancer risk communication. PMID:17722671

  7. Potable water and nosocomial Legionnaires' disease--check water from all rooms in which patient has stayed.

    PubMed Central

    Marrie, T. J.; Johnson, W.; Tyler, S.; Bezanson, G.; Haldane, D.; Burbridge, S.; Joly, J.

    1995-01-01

    We studied 7 patients with nosocomial Legionnaires' disease to determine the relationship between isolates of Legionella pneumophila recovered from potable water and those recovered from patients. Potable water was cultured from all rooms in which patients had stayed prior to the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease. The 38 isolates of L. pneumophila (31 environmental, 7 patient) were resolved into 9 distinct patterns by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), 3 by plasmid content and 2 each with monoclonal antibodies and conventional agarose gel electrophoresis of small fragments of DNA. Using PFGE it was determined that 4 of the 7 patients were infected with L. pneumophila identical to an isolate recovered from the potable water supply in one of the rooms each had occupied prior to the diagnosis of Legionnaires' disease. Patients had resided in a mean of 3.57 rooms before a diagnosis of nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. We conclude that in the setting of contaminated potable water and nosocomial Legionnaires' disease water from all the rooms which the patient has occupied prior to this diagnosis should be cultured. PFGE of large DNA fragments discriminated best among the isolates of L. pneumophila. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7705490

  8. The Effect of Continuity of Care on Emergency Room Use for Diabetic Patients Varies by Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiang; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Pu, Christy

    2016-01-01

    Background Although many studies have reported that high-quality continuity of care (COC) is associated with improved patient outcomes for patients with diabetes, few studies have investigated whether this positive effect of COC depends on the level of diabetes severity. Methods A total of 3781 newly diagnosed diabetic patients selected from the 2005 National Health Insurance database were evaluated for the period 2005–2011. Generalized estimating equations combined with negative binomial estimation were used to determine the influence of COC on the overall emergency room (ER) use and diabetes mellitus (DM)-specific ER use. Analyses were stratified according to diabetes severity (measured using the Diabetes Complications Severity Index [DCSI]), comorbidities (measured using the Charlson comorbidity score), and age. Results COC effects varied according to diabetes severity. Stratified analysis showed that the positive effect of COC on DM-specific ER use was the highest for a DCSI of 0 (least severe), with an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 0.49 (95% CI, 0.41–0.59) in the high-COC group (reference group: low-COC group). Compared with the low-COC group, high-quality COC had a significant beneficial effect on overall ER use in younger patients (IRR 0.51; 95% CI, 0.39–0.66 for the youngest [18–40 years] group, and IRR 0.67; 95% CI, 0.59–0.76 for the oldest [>65 years] group) and those with a high number of comorbidities. Conclusions The positive effects of high-quality COC on the treatment outcomes of patient with diabetes, based on the overall and DM-specific ER use, depends on the level of disease severity. Therefore, providing health education to enhance high-quality COC when the disease severity is low may be critical for ensuring optimal positive effects during diabetes disease progression. PMID:26902167

  9. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; McGowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2003-01-01

    Radiation treatment for cancer requires patients to receive frequent administrations and attend the treatment facility on a daily basis for several weeks. Travelling for radiation treatment has the potential to add to the distress an individual may be feeling. This study utilized in-depth interviews to capture 118 patients' perspectives about travelling for cancer treatment. Four themes emerged during the analysis of the data: (1) waiting was the most difficult part of the experience; (2) the idea of travelling for treatment was distressing; (3) travelling for treatment was tiring and posed difficulties for patients; and (4) being away from home had both benefits and drawbacks. Given the inevitability of travelling for radiation treatment, and the issues that arises for patients, supportive strategies need to be designed and implemented. PMID:14502591

  10. [Treatments for otorhinolaryngological patients with psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Nishio, Ayako; Sumi, Takuro; Yamada, Masato; Kuwahata, Yuko

    2013-02-01

    There are few systems in place for patients with psychiatric disorders who need treatments for physical complications. In Tokyo, "The Tokyo metropolitan psychiatric emergency system" was established in 1981, and Ome Municipal General Hospital participated in it. Under this system, fifteen patients with psychiatric disorders were treated for otorhinolaryngological diseases in our department from April 2005 to March 2011. We reviewed the fifteen patients. The coexisting psychiatric disorders were schizophrenia in twelve patients, and mental retardation, Korsakoff's syndrome, and Alzheimer's dementia in one patient each, respectively. All the patients had been receiving psychiatric treatment. The otorhinolaryngological diseases were head and neck cancer in nine patients, chronic sinusitis in three patients, and benign salivary gland tumor, cholesteatoma, and epistaxis in one patient each, respectively. Among the fifteen patients, thirteen could complete their treatment, but two dropped out due to exacerbation of their psychiatric symptoms. The therapeutic course is uncertain in otorhinolaryngological diseases occurring concomitantly with psychiatric disorders, especially in head and neck cancer, because it may be difficult to prioritize the problem when determining the treatment options and delivering the treatment. Thus, we should treat patients with psychiatric disorders carefully on a case-by-case basis depending on their psychiatric symptoms. It is also important to cooperate with psychiatrists and patients' families. PMID:23539958

  11. Meanings of Being Critically Ill in a Sound-Intensive ICU Patient Room - A Phenomenological Hermeneutical Study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Lotta; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Lindahl, Berit

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to illuminate the meanings of being critically ill in a sound-intensive ICU patient room, as disclosed through patients’ narratives. Patient rooms in ICUs are filled with loud activity and studies have revealed sound levels comparable to those of a busy road above the patient’s head. There is a risk that the sound or noise is disturbing and at worst a major problem for the patient, but there is a lack of knowledge concerning the patients’ own experiences. Thirteen patients were asked to narrate their experiences of the sound environment in ICU patient rooms. The interviews were analyzed using a phenomenological- hermeneutical method inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur. Six themes emerged from the analysis. Conclusion: The meanings of being a patient in a sound- intensive environment were interpreted as never knowing what to expect next regarding noise, but also of being situated in the middle of an uncontrollable barrage of noise, unable to take cover or disappear. This condition is not to be seen as static; for some patients there is movement and change over time. The meanings indicate that the unpredictable shifts between silence and disturbing sounds stress the critically ill patient and impede sleep and recovery. Our findings indicate the need to reduce disturbing and unexpected sounds and noise around critically ill patients in high-tech environments in order to facilitate wellbeing, sleep and recovery. Nurses have a vital role in developing such an environment. PMID:22977654

  12. Treatment Outcome in Patients Receiving Assertive Community Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, C. L.; Roosenschoon, B. J.; Wiersma, D.

    2009-01-01

    In an observational study of severely mentally ill patients treated in assertive community treatment (ACT) teams, we investigated how treatment outcome was associated with demographic factors, clinical factors, and motivation for treatment. To determine psychosocial outcome, patients were routinely assessed using the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Trends over time were analyzed using a mixed model with repeated measures. The HoNOS total score was modeled as a function of treatment duration and patient-dependent covariates. Data comprised 637 assessments of 139 patients; mean duration of follow-up was 27.4 months (SD = 5.4). Substance abuse, higher age, problems with motivation, and lower educational level were associated with higher HoNOS total scores (i.e., worse outcome). To improve treatment outcome, we recommend better implementation of ACT, and also the implementation of additional programs targeting subgroups which seem to benefit less from ACT. PMID:19847646

  13. Is there room for new non-dopaminergic treatments in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Pilleri, Manuela; Koutsikos, Konstantinos; Antonini, Angelo

    2013-02-01

    The contribution of non-dopaminergic degeneration to disability in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still debated. It has been argued that no additional advance can be expected in the management of PD by the development of new dopaminergic agents and suggested that future research should mainly focus on therapies targeting the non-dopaminergic systems involved in the pathogenesis of levodopa resistant motor and non-motor symptoms. We believe this is only partially true and the achievement of a stable dopaminergic restoration and modulation of the dopaminergic system is still an important, unmet need of current pharmacological therapies in PD. Currently available oral levodopa and dopamine agonist medications provide insufficient benefit, as the therapeutic window progressively narrows and motor fluctuations eventually develop in most patients. Conversely, the application of infusion and surgical therapies is limited by selective indications and possible irreversible adverse events and device-related problems. Research of new, safer and less invasive strategies, able to modulate the dopaminergic circuits, would certainly improve the management of motor complications, and most importantly such treatments would be also beneficial to axial and non-motor symptoms, which are universally regarded as the major cause of PD functional disability. Indeed, gait and balance problems may improve with dopaminergic treatment in most patients and they become unresponsive only at the very late stages of the disease. Moreover, several non-motor disturbances, including cognition and depression are often linked to oscillation of dopamine concentrations, and are frequently relieved by treatments providing continuous dopaminergic delivery. Finally, drug trials testing non-dopaminergic treatments for motor and non-motor symptoms of PD provided so far disappointing results. Despite the impressive advances of PD therapeutic strategy, we think there is still need for safe, non-invasive and easily

  14. Patient-relevant treatment goals in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Blome, Christine; Gosau, Ramona; Radtke, Marc A; Reich, Kristian; Rustenbach, Stephan J; Spehr, Christina; Thaçi, Diamant; Augustin, Matthias

    2016-03-01

    Patient-oriented care requires therapeutic decisions to agree with the patients' treatment needs and goals. This study addressed the following questions: What is important to psoriasis patients starting systemic treatment? How stable are these preferences within the first year of treatment? Are treatment goals associated with age, gender, or treatment success? The importance of treatment goals was assessed for patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis in the German Psoriasis Registry (PsoBest) at baseline (onset of a systemic treatment; n = 3066) and at a 1-year follow-up (n = 1444) using the Patient Benefit Index (PBI). Treatment success was measured with PBI global score and Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI). Patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis pursued a wide range of different goals. The most general treatment goals were rated most relevant, including skin healing and quick skin improvement (94.8/94.5 % "quite" or "very" important), confidence in the therapy (93.0 %), control over the disease (92.3 %), and a clear diagnosis and therapy (89.6 %). Further important goals related to not being in fear of the disease getting worse (84.8 %), reduction in itching (83.9 %), burning (70.6 %), and pain (60.6 %) as well as attaining a normal everyday life (78.4 %) and low treatment burden (64.2-77.9 %). Goals were mostly not associated with sex and gender. Goal importance slightly increased with treatment success. In a substantial proportion of patients (30.3-54.7 %) goal importance changed within 1 year after onset of systemic treatment. We conclude that treatment goal importance should be assessed in clinical practice on a regular basis. PMID:26688112

  15. Identifying Patients with Bacteremia in Community-Hospital Emergency Rooms: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Takeshima, Taro; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Noguchi, Yoshinori; Maki, Nobuyuki; Gibo, Koichiro; Tsugihashi, Yukio; Doi, Asako; Fukuma, Shingo; Yamazaki, Shin; Kajii, Eiji; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To develop a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with bacteremia, using only information that is readily available in the emergency room (ER) of community hospitals, and (2) to test the validity of that rule with a separate, independent set of data. Design Multicenter retrospective cohort study. Setting To derive the clinical prediction rule we used data from 3 community hospitals in Japan (derivation). We tested the rule using data from one other community hospital (validation), which was not among the three “derivation” hospitals. Participants Adults (age ≥ 16 years old) who had undergone blood-culture testing while in the ER between April 2011 and March 2012. For the derivation data, n = 1515 (randomly sampled from 7026 patients), and for the validation data n = 467 (from 823 patients). Analysis We analyzed 28 candidate predictors of bacteremia, including demographic data, signs and symptoms, comorbid conditions, and basic laboratory data. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to derive an integer risk score (the “ID-BactER” score). Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (i.e., the AUC) were computed. Results There were 241 cases of bacteremia in the derivation data. Eleven candidate predictors were used in the ID-BactER score: age, chills, vomiting, mental status, temperature, systolic blood pressure, abdominal sign, white blood-cell count, platelets, blood urea nitrogen, and C-reactive protein. The AUCs was 0.80 (derivation) and 0.74 (validation). For ID-BactER scores ≥ 2, the sensitivities for derivation and validation data were 98% and 97%, and specificities were 20% and 14%, respectively. Conclusions The ID-BactER score can be computed from information that is readily available in the ERs of community hospitals. Future studies should focus on developing a score with a higher specificity while maintaining the desired sensitivity

  16. Psychopharmacological treatment of aggression in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Brieden, T; Ujeyl, M; Naber, D

    2002-05-01

    Aggressive behavior is frequently observed in schizophrenic patients. More than 50 % of all psychiatric patients and 10 % of schizophrenic patients show aggressive symptoms varying from threatening behavior and agitation to assault. The pharmacological treatment of acute, persisting and repetitive aggression is a serious problem for other patients and staff members. Not only is violent behavior from mentally ill patients the most detrimental factor in their stigmatization, aggression is also a considerable direct source of danger for the patients themselves. Based on rather limited evidence, a wide variety of medications for the pharmacological treatment of aggression has been recommended: typical and atypical antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, beta-blockers and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Most clinical information on treating aggression has been collected for atypical neuroleptics, particularly for clozapine. Several retrospective and open studies indicate its efficacy. Treatment duration of 6 months is recommended to induce a stable reduction of physical and verbal aggression. Severe side effects have very rarely been seen. At the moment, clozapine seems to be the first choice in aggression treatment. Within the last few years, about 10 articles were published showing that this is the most effective antiaggressive agent in the treatment of aggression and agitation in psychiatric patients, independent of psychiatric diagnosis. However, clozapine, like all the other substances used, does not have an established indication for the treatment of aggressive symptoms. Noncompliance with medication makes it difficult to choose the right preparation for the medication: tablets, liquids, intramuscular injections and readily soluble "FDDFs" are available. Ethical, juridical and methodological problems prevent controlled studies from establishing a reference in the treatment of aggression in mentally ill patients. This review summarizes

  17. Reducing Cancer Patients' Painful Treatment

    NASA Video Gallery

    A NASA light technology originally developed to aid plant growth experiments in space has proved to reduce the painful side effects resulting from chemotherapy and radiation treatment in bone marro...

  18. Treatment of the depressed alcoholic patient.

    PubMed

    DeVido, Jeffrey J; Weiss, Roger D

    2012-12-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and depressive illnesses are highly prevalent, frequently co-occur, and are associated with worse outcomes when paired. The assessment and treatment of patients with co-occurring alcohol use disorders and depressive illnesses is wrought with many significant challenges. When it comes to advocating treatment guidelines for this dually-diagnosed population, the data are limited, but, nonetheless, do suggest that an integrated approach to patients presenting with co-occurring AUD and depressive symptoms can be efficacious. In this approach, ongoing evaluation and treatment are provided under one roof according to the evolving needs of each patient. Utilizing antidepressant medications in conjunction with psychosocial therapies may augment overall treatment efficacy; data also suggest that combining and tailoring psychosocial therapies, such as motivational enhancement therapies, cognitive therapies, and twelve-step facilitation may further improve treatment outcomes for patients with co-occurring depressive and alcohol use disorders. PMID:22907336

  19. Thinking in three's: changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-12-14

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to

  20. Thinking in three's: Changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Verna C

    2012-01-01

    The three surgical patient safety events, wrong site surgery, retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study. The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined. Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse. These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won’t ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do. Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes, which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices. These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions. Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions. More often than not, even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate. This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent. Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment. This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery, RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists, surgeons and nurses. A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to

  1. Patient age and general dentists' treatment decisions.

    PubMed

    Dolan, T A; McNaughton, C A; Davidson, S N; Mitchell, G S

    1992-01-01

    To test whether a patient's age plays a role in dentists' treatment planning decisions, a convenience sample of 159 general dentists attending a state dental society annual meeting was presented a vignette including intra-oral photographs, a brief case history and clinical diagnosis of a patient. The patient was partially dentate, and was described as having irreversible pulpitis of tooth #19. Three versions of the vignette were developed, with identical materials and information except for the patient's age (either 44, 65, or 84 years), and were randomly assigned to the participating dentists who were asked to develop a treatment plan for the patient's mandibular arch. The dentists planned limited therapy for the 84 year old because of their assumptions about the patient's brief life expectancy, cost, concern about the inability of the patient to tolerate extensive treatment, and a low cost/benefit ratio. These findings suggest that a patient's age influences general dentists' treatment planning decisions, perhaps limiting the treatment options offered to older adults. Additional research is necessary to further test these associations. PMID:10895734

  2. [The treatment of patients with imported helminthiases].

    PubMed

    Tokmalaev, A K; Bezborodov, N G; Polovinkina, N A; Makarova, I A; Golub, V P; Efimov, L L

    1994-01-01

    The authors treated helminth infestation in 856 patients who have arrived to Russia from tropical countries. Early diagnosis and treatment of helminthiasis in such patients reduce their susceptibility to other diseases in the course of relevant adaptation to new climatic conditions. The authors point to high efficacy of the drugs mebendazol, albendazol, medaminol (against ancylostomiasis, ascariasis, trichocephaliasis), praziquantel (against schistosomiasis and hymenolepiasis). PMID:7900008

  3. Suicidal Asian Patients: Recommendations for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Yoshitomo

    1989-01-01

    Discusses suicide prevention programs administered in United States, noting that treatment for suicidal patients is conducted in terms of basic tenets of Western culture. Cautions American therapists treating Asian patients, especially suicidal individuals who are regressed and show cultural characteristics, to consider importance of cultural…

  4. Treatment of acute bronchospasm in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E

    2005-12-01

    Both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often underdiagnosed and undertreated among the elderly. Patient compliance with treatments plans and medication schedules are often less than ideal. This paper presents results from clinical studies examining levalbuterol and racemic albuterol use among elderly patients who have asthma or COPD. PMID:19667714

  5. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; Mcgowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of describing cancer patients' satisfaction with their care when they had to travel unexpectedly away from home for treatment. Ontario initiated a rereferral program for cancer patients who needed radiation therapy when the waiting lists in southern Ontario became lengthy. Patients travelled to the United States or northern Ontario for their care. A standardized survey containing 25 items with five-point Likert scale responses was mailed to all patients who participated in the rereferral program, following completion of their treatment. Items covered patient experiences before leaving home, in preparing for travel, and staying at the cancer facilities away from home. A total of 466 (55.8%) patients returned the survey. Overall, patients were satisfied with their care. However, there were a number of areas identified by patients where improvements could be made. These areas included access to support prior to leaving home, access to information about supportive care services while away from home, and sensitivity to personal needs in making arrangements for travel. Provision of information and support are important to cancer patients having to travel for cancer treatment. PMID:15969333

  6. Ofatumumab treatment in lupus nephritis patients.

    PubMed

    Haarhaus, Malena Loberg; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-08-01

    Rituximab is frequently used in systemic lupus erythematosus; however, side effects such as infusion-related reactions limit its use. In this case report, we describe, for the first time, treatment with ofatumumab in four patients with lupus nephritis. The treatment was well tolerated in three of the patients, and a reduction of proteinuria was seen in all cases. This emphasizes the importance of alternative B-cell-depleting therapies in patients with an initial good response to rituximab, but who develop side effects. PMID:27478595

  7. Ofatumumab treatment in lupus nephritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Haarhaus, Malena Loberg; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is frequently used in systemic lupus erythematosus; however, side effects such as infusion-related reactions limit its use. In this case report, we describe, for the first time, treatment with ofatumumab in four patients with lupus nephritis. The treatment was well tolerated in three of the patients, and a reduction of proteinuria was seen in all cases. This emphasizes the importance of alternative B-cell-depleting therapies in patients with an initial good response to rituximab, but who develop side effects. PMID:27478595

  8. Dental Treatment in Patients with Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Meurer, Maria Inês; Grando, Liliane Janete; Gonzaga Del Moral, Joanita Ângela; da Silva Rath, Inês Beatriz; Schaefer Tavares, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Dental treatment of patients with leukemia should be planned on the basis of antineoplastic therapy which can be chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy and bone marrow transplantation. Many are the oral manifestations presented by these patients, arising from leukemia and/or treatment. In addition, performing dental procedures at different stages of treatment (before, during, or after) must follow certain protocols in relation to the haematological indices of patients, aimed at maintaining health and contributing to the effectiveness of the results of antineoplastic therapy. Through a literature review, the purpose of this study was to report the hematological abnormalities present in patients with leukemia, trying to correlate them with the feasibility of dental treatment at different stages of the disease. It is concluded in this paper that dental treatment in relation to haematological indices presented by patients with leukemia must follow certain protocols, mainly related to neutrophil and platelet counts, and the presence of the dentist in a multidisciplinary team is required for the health care of this patient. PMID:25784937

  9. Invisalign treatment in periodondal patient: case report

    PubMed Central

    BARLATTANI, A.; MAMPIERI, G.; OTTRIA, L.; BOLLERO, P.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Scope of work. To evaluate the results obtained from the use of removable orthodontic aligners in patients with periodontal and systemic issues to improve the aesthetics of the smile. Materials and methods. Invisalign technique, a new technique based on the use of orthodontic removable transparent overlay representing the mechanotherapy. This technique through a dedicated software (Clin-Check) enables you to view the 3D resolution of the malocclusion. Results. In the case study examined the results support the Invisalign treatment in periodontal patients with a systemic disease, both for an easier home oral hygiene and also to maintain alignment and an aesthetic smile achieved without the use of invasive techniques. Conclusion. The Invisalign orthodontic treatment is ideal for patients with periodontal problems. The removal of the masks ensures control of normal oral hygiene but also requires the cooperation of the patient during the treatment. PMID:23285373

  10. Elderly patients with glioblastoma: the treatment challenge.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Alba; De Bonis, Pasquale; Chiesa, Silvia; Balducci, Mario; Fusco, Vincenzo

    2013-10-01

    The treatment for elderly patients affected by glioblastoma represents a challenge in neuro-oncology. The recent randomized trials (the NOA-8 and the NCBTSG trials) showed an advantage of temozolomide for patients with O6-methylguanine methyltransferase methylated tumors. To date, no randomized trials compared the standard treatment (radiochemotherapy) with other therapeutic approaches, due to the idea that elderly patients do not tolerate aggressive therapy. Nonetheless, with the increased lifespan and the better quality of life, the nihilism in the treatment of elderly with cancer is obsolete. Molecular (including O6-methylguanine methyltransferase) and clinical tools (including the geriatric evaluation) are needed for choosing the proper therapy for patients over 70. PMID:24117272

  11. [Treatment of ascites in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Elizalde, I; Zozaya, J M

    2001-09-01

    Ascites is the most frequent complication of hepatic cirrhosis and its appearance brings a reduction of survival. The treatment aims to mobilise the intraperitoneal liquid and to prevent its reaccumulation. The first step of treatment includes rest in bed, a hyposodic and spironolactone diet, alone or in combination with furosemide or torasemide. However, 10-20% of patients do not respond to treatment or develop adverse effects that limit its use, which is termed refractory ascites. These patients must be considered as possible candidates for a liver transplant and, when this is not possible, the chosen treatment is total paracentesis with an intravenous infusion of albumin. In patients who do not tolerate paracentesis, or who require its realisation with great frequency, other therapeutic options can be evaluated, such as surgical anastomoses, intrahepatic portosystemic percutaneous derivation and, in the final instance, peritoneo-venous shunt. PMID:12876580

  12. Treatment Satisfaction Among Patients Taking Antidepressant Medication.

    PubMed

    López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús; López Gallardo, Yolanda; Párraga Martínez, Ignacio; Del Campo Del Campo, José María; Villena Ferrer, Alejandro; Morena Rayo, Susana

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to assess treatment satisfaction among patients on antidepressants, ascertaining whether there might be an association with depressive symptomatology and other variables. Cross-sectional study conducted on 564 adult patients taking antidepressant medication. Satisfaction with antidepressant treatment was assessed using the Assessment of Satisfaction with Antidepressant Treatment Questionnaire (ESTA/Evaluación de la Satisfacción con el Tratamiento Antidepresivo). A moderate negative correlation was observed between satisfaction and intensity of depressive symptoms, as assessed with the Montgomery-Asberg scale. A weak negative correlation was observed between greater satisfaction and less favourable views about taking medication. Satisfaction scale scores were higher among those who took antidepressant medication for 1 year or more versus shorter periods. Most patients reported being satisfied with the antidepressant treatment but the level of satisfaction was higher among those who presented with less marked depressive symptoms, received longer-term treatment and viewed drug treatments favourably. Treatment satisfaction is one of the patient-reported outcome measures that can serve to complement clinical evaluation of depressive disorders. PMID:25833726

  13. One size fits all? Mixed methods evaluation of the impact of 100% single-room accommodation on staff and patient experience, safety and costs

    PubMed Central

    Maben, Jill; Penfold, Clarissa; Simon, Michael; Anderson, Janet E; Robert, Glenn; Pizzo, Elena; Hughes, Jane; Murrells, Trevor; Barlow, James

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives There is little strong evidence relating to the impact of single-room accommodation on healthcare quality and safety. We explore the impact of all single rooms on staff and patient experience; safety outcomes; and costs. Methods Mixed methods pre/post ‘move’ comparison within four nested case study wards in a single acute hospital with 100% single rooms; quasi-experimental before-and-after study with two control hospitals; analysis of capital and operational costs associated with single rooms. Results Two-thirds of patients expressed a preference for single rooms with comfort and control outweighing any disadvantages (sense of isolation) felt by some. Patients appreciated privacy, confidentiality and flexibility for visitors afforded by single rooms. Staff perceived improvements (patient comfort and confidentiality), but single rooms were worse for visibility, surveillance, teamwork, monitoring and keeping patients safe. Staff walking distances increased significantly post move. A temporary increase of falls and medication errors in one ward was likely to be associated with the need to adjust work patterns rather than associated with single rooms per se. We found no evidence that single rooms reduced infection rates. Building an all single-room hospital can cost 5% more with higher housekeeping and cleaning costs but the difference is marginal over time. Conclusions Staff needed to adapt their working practices significantly and felt unprepared for new ways of working with potentially significant implications for the nature of teamwork in the longer term. Staff preference remained for a mix of single rooms and bays. Patients preferred single rooms. PMID:26408568

  14. Gender differences in the rate of restriction to room among Ontario forensic patients.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Krista; Hirdes, John P

    2015-07-01

    Gender can have separate and interacting effects on mental health. Gender-based analysis provides insight into these effects on mental health, and it can provide evidence to inform policy and practice to meet these gender-specific needs among persons in forensic mental health settings. Both individual and facility-level characteristics play a role in restriction to room as a form of control intervention in forensic mental health. Understanding the gender differences associated with the factors that increase a person's risk of restriction to room can allow for more targeted interventions and provide insight into policies that will help reduce these types of control interventions. PMID:26015491

  15. [Anemia treatment in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Janković, Nikola; Janković, Mateja

    2009-09-01

    Anemia is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and patients receiving renal replacement therapy. In this paper we will outline the prevention and treatment of anemia in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). PD patients are less anemic and more sensitive to erythropoesis-stimulating agent (ESA) than their hemodialysis (HD) counterparts and, in general, dosages required for achieving similar hemoglobin levels to those achieved in HD patients are remarkably less. Before starting with ESA treatment we have to evaluate the degree of anemia and excluded other causes which are not connected with CKD and method of treatment. Patient's compliance is crucial for a successful therapy and it can be improved by decreasing frequency of administration of ESA. Since ESAare expensive, "cost-effectivnes" studies represent an important factor in choosing a distinct drug. Subcutaneous administration provides better long-term utilization of ESA in comparison to intravenous administration and is therefore preferred in PD patients. Intraperitoneal administration is not recommended due to poor bioavailability. In some patients we can observe the reduced response to ESA therapy. The definition of reduced response is generally regarded as a failure to achieve target hemoglobin concentration of >11 g/dL. Identification of underlying cause is not always easy but every attempt should be made to investigate every patient with resistance to therapy because some causes are easily corrected. Since 2005 particular ESA drugs have been approved by Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and registered for use in Croatia. For PD patients the ESAcan be prescribed by general practitioner. The list of available drugs is available in the official government newspaper Nardone novine No.27, March 2nd, 2009. PMID:20232548

  16. Modification of a motel-type room to accommodate patients receiving radioiodine therapy: reduction of environmental exposure.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Charles A; Dykes, James N; Domingo, Michelle T; Patricko, Joseph; Yamauchi, Dave M; Williams, Lawrence E

    2012-08-01

    Patients receiving ¹³¹I-based therapies are generally restricted in leaving the medical institution. In the U.S., the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC) has developed the rule that a ≤ 7 mR h⁻¹ reading at 1 m from the patient (or 33 mCi) is sufficient to allow unrestricted release. Because of home situations and other constraints, it is preferable that a patient-specific release level be determined by the radiation safety staff. Locally, the City of Hope has instituted a general release criterion of ≤ 2 mR h⁻¹ at 1 m. While contributing to a reduction in public exposure, this as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) approach is difficult to justify on a cost basis due to the expense of maintaining the radioactive individual in a hospital room. Instead, it was determined that a motel-type room already on the campus be modified to allow the patient to remain on-site until at or below a locally permitted release level. By adding lead to the bathroom area and sealing the tile surfaces, the room may be converted for less than $5,000. Daily cost for the patient is $65. In comparing the use of this facility for thyroid cancer patients from 2006 to 2010, it was found that the public exposure at 1 m was reduced by approximately 70% as compared to release at the 7 mR h level. In addition, controlling the release reduces the likelihood of a radiation incident in the public environment such as on public transportation or in a hotel. PMID:22739966

  17. The vascular hybrid room--operating room of the future.

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis; Rogan, Suncica Andreja; Lovricević, Ivo; Zovak, Mario; Schmidt, Sasa

    2010-09-01

    The last two decades have seen a paradigm shift in the treatment of vascular related diseases from once traditional open surgical repairs to the entire vascular tree being amenable to percutaneous interventions. Neither the classic operating room nor the conventional angiography suite is optimal for both open surgery and endovascular procedures. Important issues for the vascular hybrid operating room include quality of the imaging equipment, radiation burden, ease of use of the equipment, need for specially trained personnel, ergonomics, ability to perform both open and percutaneous procedures, sterile environments, as well as quality and efficiency of patient care. The most important feature of working in a dedicated hybrid vascular suite should be the ability to attain best treatment of vascular patients. Whether the interventional radiologist or the vascular surgeon uses the facilities is of less importance. Establishment of an endovascular operating room suite has the benefit of a sterile environment, and the possibility of performing hybrid procedures and conversions when necessary. Moreover, angiography immediately before treatment gives contemporary anatomical information, and after treatment provides quality control. Consequently, better quality and service can be provided to the individual patient. These changes in the treatment of vascular disease require that a new type of vascular specialist, named 'vascular hybrid surgeon', trained to perform both endovascular and open surgical procedures in this highly complex patient group. PMID:21462818

  18. [Surgical treatment of bronchiectases in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Danilov, G P; Makeeva, R P; Shornikov, V A; Zil'ber, E K; Akopov, A L

    2010-01-01

    The authors present experiences with surgical treatment of 29 patients (aged 50-64 years) with bronchiectases. Early and late results were analyzed. It was shown that complex approach to the estimation of the findings of radiography, spiral computed tomography, investigation of the external respiration function, fibrobronchoscopy and bronchoscopy, if necessary, allowed operating the patients older than 50 years with local forms of bronchiectases which gave good results. PMID:21137257

  19. [Treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hack, Juliana; Bliemel, Christopher; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bücking, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Hip fractures are among the most common fractures in elderly people. The annual number of femoral fractures is even expected to increase because of an aging society. Due to the high number of comorbidities, there are special challenges in treating geriatric hip fracture patients, which require a multidisciplinary management. This includes surgical treatment allowing full weight bearing in the immediate postoperative period, osteoporosis treatment and falls prevention as well as an early ortho-geriatric rehabilitation program. PMID:25919823

  20. Combining Biomarkers to Optimize Patient Treatment Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chaeryon; Janes, Holly; Huang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Summary Markers that predict treatment effect have the potential to improve patient outcomes. For example, the Oncotype DX ® Recurrence Score® has some ability to predict the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy over and above hormone therapy for the treatment of estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer, facilitating the provision of chemotherapy to women most likely to benefit from it. Given that the score was originally developed for predicting outcome given hormone therapy alone, it is of interest to develop alternative combinations of the genes comprising the score that are optimized for treatment selection. However most methodology for combining markers is useful when predicting outcome under a single treatment. We propose a method for combining markers for treatment selection which requires modeling the treatment effect as a function of markers. Multiple models of treatment effect are fit iteratively by upweighting or “boosting” subjects potentially misclassified according to treatment benefit at the previous stage. The boosting approach is compared to existing methods in a simulation study based on the change in expected outcome under marker-based treatment. The approach improves upon methods in some settings and has comparable performance in others. Our simulation study also provides insights as to the relative merits of the existing methods. Application of the boosting approach to the breast cancer data, using scaled versions of the original markers, produces marker combinations that may have improved performance for treatment selection. PMID:24889663

  1. Criminological profile of patients in addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, Javier; López-Goñi, José J; Arteaga, Alfonso; Cacho, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the prevalence of criminal behaviour in patients addicted to drugs who are in treatment. A sample of 252 addicted patients (203 male and 49 female) who sought outpatient treatment at a specialized centre was assessed. Information on criminal behaviours, socio-demographic factors, consumption factors (assessed by the EuropAsi), psychopathological factors (assessed by SCL-90-R) and personality variables (assessed by MCMI-II) was collected. Patients presenting criminal behaviour were compared with those who were not associated with crime for all the variables studied. The rate of drug-addicted patients with criminal behaviour in this sample was 60.3% (n = 150), and it was mainly related to traffic offenses, followed by drug dealing offenses. Significant differences were observed between patients with and without criminal behaviour. Patients with criminal problems were mostly men and single. Moreover, they were more likely to report poly-consumption. Furthermore, significant differences were observed on several variables: EuropAsi, SCL-90-R and MCMI-II. According to these results, patients with associated criminal behaviour presented a more severe addiction problem. The implications of these findings for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:23748943

  2. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    SciTech Connect

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-09-15

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

  3. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience

    PubMed Central

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Methods Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to ‘positive’ or ‘negative’. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. Results The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients’ experiences during radiation therapy treatment. Conclusion The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department. PMID:26451241

  4. Radiation shielding evaluation of the BNCT treatment room at THOR: a TORT-coupled MCNP Monte Carlo simulation study.

    PubMed

    Chen, A Y; Liu, Y-W H; Sheu, R J

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the radiation shielding design of the treatment room for boron neutron capture therapy at Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor using "TORT-coupled MCNP" method. With this method, the computational efficiency is improved significantly by two to three orders of magnitude compared to the analog Monte Carlo MCNP calculation. This makes the calculation feasible using a single CPU in less than 1 day. Further optimization of the photon weight windows leads to additional 50-75% improvement in the overall computational efficiency. PMID:17825572

  5. Patient preferences in early glottic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael L; Wilke, Derek R; Taylor, S Mark

    2016-07-01

    Patients with early-stage glottic cancer are primarily treated with one of three options: endoscopic laser excision, external-beam radiation, or open conservation surgery. We sought to determine patient preferences for treatment when presented with a choice between CO2 laser resection and radiation (open conservation surgery was not offered because the endoscopic approach is preferred at our institution). This prospective cohort study was conducted at the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine in Halifax, Canada. Our patient population was made up of 54 men and 10 women, aged 30 to 84 years (mean: 65.0 ± 11.2). Their disease were staged as follows: carcinoma in situ, n = 11; T1a = 21; T1b = 6; and T2 = 26. Patients were quoted identical cure rates for the two treatment modalities. The controversial issue of voice outcomes was discussed, but no leading information was given to the study cohort. All 64 patients chose CO2 laser resection as opposed to radiation therapy for definitive treatment. PMID:27434477

  6. The evolution of a purpose designed hybrid trauma operating room from the trauma service perspective: the RAPTOR (Resuscitation with Angiography Percutaneous Treatments and Operative Resuscitations).

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Vis, Christine; Dubé, Mirette; Biesbroek, Susan; Ball, Chad G; Laberge, Jason; Shultz, Jonas; Rea, Ken; Sadler, David; Holcomb, John B; Kortbeek, John

    2014-09-01

    Traumatic injury is the leading cause of potentially preventable lost years of life in the Western world and exsanguination is the most potentially preventable cause of post-traumatic death. With mature trauma systems and experienced trauma centres, extra-abdominal sites, such as the pelvis, constitute the most frequent anatomic site of exsanguination. Haemorrhage control for such bleeding often requires surgical adjuncts most notably interventional radiology (IR). With the usual paradigm of surgery conducted within an operating room and IR procedures within distant angiography suites, responsible clinicians are faced with making difficult decisions regarding where to transport the most physiologically unstable patients for haemorrhage control. If such a critical patient is transported to the wrong suite, they may die unnecessarily despite having potentially salvageable injuries. Thus, it seems only logical that the resuscitative operating room of the future would have IR capabilities making it the obvious geographic destination for critically unstable patients, especially those who are exsanguinating. Our trauma programme recently had the opportunity to conceive, design, build, and operationalise a purpose-designed hybrid trauma operating room, designated as the resuscitation with angiographic percutaneous techniques and operative resuscitation (RAPTOR) suite, which we believe to be the first such resource designed primarily to serve the exsanguinating trauma patient. The project was initiated after consultations between the trauma programme and private philanthropists regarding the greatest potential impacts on regional trauma care. The initial capital construction costs were thus privately generated but coincided with a new hospital wing construction allowing the RAPTOR to be purpose-designed for the exsanguinating patient. Many trauma programmes around the world are now starting to navigate the complex process of building new facilities, or else retrofitting

  7. Effects of different postharvest treatments on the physiology and quality of 'Xiaobai' apricots at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Guo, Qin; Wang, Gang-Xia; Peng, Xin-Yuan; Wang, Ji-de; Che, Feng-Bin

    2015-04-01

    The effect of postharvest treatments on storage characteristics of harvested apricots in relation to fruit quality was investigated. 'Xiaobai' apricots treated with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), chlorine dioxide (ClO2), calcium, and heat in sealed container and then stored at 20 °C with 90 % relative humidity (RH) for 10 days. Results showed that the treatments could reduce respiration production and MDA content, delay softening, postharvest decay, the decrease of soluble solids (SSC), and visual changes. Furthermore, the polyphenol oxidase (PPO), polygalacturonase (PG), and pectin methylesterase (PME), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD) activities were reduced by treatments. Taken together, it is suggested that ClO2 treatment might be an effective way to maintain the quality of apricot fruit except 1-MCP treatment. PMID:25829606

  8. Effect of thermomechanical treatments on the room-temperature mechanical behavior of iron aluminide Fe{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Bhargava, S.

    1996-10-01

    The room-temperature hydrogen embrittlement (HE) problem in iron aluminides has restricted their use as high-temperature structural materials. The role of thermomechanical treatments (TMT), i.e., rolling at 500 C, 800 C, and 1,000 C, and post-TMT heat treatments, i.e., recrystallization at 750 C and ordering at 500 C, in affecting the room-temperature mechanical properties of Fe-25Al intermetallic alloy has been studied from a processing-structure-properties correlation viewpoint. It was found that when this alloy is rolled at higher temperature, it exhibits a higher fracture strength. This has been attributed to find subgrain size (28 {micro}) due to dynamic recrystallization occurring at the higher rolling temperature of 1,000 C. However, when this alloy is rolled at 1,000 C and then recrystallized, it shows the highest ductility but poor fracture strength. This behavior has been ascribed to the partially recrystallized microstructure, which prevents hydrogen ingress through grain boundaries and minimizes hydrogen embrittlement. When the alloy is rolled at 1,000 C and then ordered at 500 C for 100 hours, it shows the highest fracture strength, due to its finer grain size. The alloy rolled at 500 C and then ordered undergoes grain growth. Hence, it exhibits a lower fracture strength of 360 MPa. Fracture morphologies of the alloy were found to be typical of brittle fracture, i.e., cleavage-type fracture in all the cases.

  9. HIV treatment cascade in tuberculosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Lessells, Richard J.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Globally, the number of deaths associated with tuberculosis (TB) and HIV coinfection remains unacceptably high. We review the evidence around the impact of strengthening the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients and explore recent findings about how best to deliver integrated TB/HIV services. Recent findings There is clear evidence that the timely provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in TB/HIV coinfected adults. Despite this, globally in 2013, only around a third of known HIV-positive TB cases were treated with ART. Although there is some recent evidence exploring the barriers to achieve high coverage of HIV testing and ART initiation in TB patients, our understanding of which factors are most important and how best to address these within different health systems remains incomplete. There are some examples of good practice in the delivery of integrated TB/HIV services to improve the HIV treatment cascade. However, evidence of the impact of such strategies is of relatively low quality for informing integrated TB/HIV programming more broadly. In most settings, there remain barriers to higher-level organizational and functional integration. Summary There remains a need for commitment to patient-centred integrated TB/HIV care in countries affected by the dual epidemic. There is a need for better quality evidence around how best to deliver integrated services to strengthen the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients, both at primary healthcare level and within community settings. PMID:26352390

  10. [Legal particulars in treatment of minor patients].

    PubMed

    von Harder, Y

    2005-02-01

    According to current jurisdiction any intervention of the physical integrity of the body, even medical treatment and the administration of medication, constitutes a physical injury. The legal authority for this primarily comes from the consent of the patient. The problem for the medical doctor is whose consent is necessary when a patient is a minor. According to the jurisdiction and the literature, the consent of a minor to medical treatment is a legally binding decision not dependent on reaching the age of majority. Nevertheless, according to the overwhelming opinion it can be assumed that minors under the age of 14 years old are not yet capable of consent. The authority for consent lies with the parents or guardians. Because children are normally only accompanied by one of the parents when visiting a doctor, in routine practice the 3-stage theory developed by the Federal High Court pays a deciding role. According to this theory, for routine cases the doctor can assume that one of the parents is basically a representative of the other; for more complicated or severe cases the doctor must satisfy himself that this is true. For patients over 14 years old, the doctor must ascertain whether the patient is capable of consent. Even though a 15-year-old patient for example, can possess the necessary power of judgement and therefore be considered capable of consenting to routine measures or simple interventions, such as taking a blood sample, the yardstick for higher-risk operations, even routine ones is much higher. PMID:15791700

  11. [Inpatient treatment in the addicted patient].

    PubMed

    Capece, José

    2010-01-01

    We review the patient hospitalization criteria for Substance Abuse Disorder, taking into account current controversies and the weight of the evidence in the investigation in relation to clinical efficacy and effectiveness. We raise the parameters that mark the 24.455 law on the basic treatment plan from the current data in Argentina, which are inpatient detoxification and residential rehabilitation. We identify the need for detoxification and comprehensive for dual patients rehabilitation centers as peremptory. Criteria are defined according to international validation. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of hospitalization. Finally, we conclude in the need for a system where devices appropriate epidemiological needs, and that the clinical handle current information. PMID:20440409

  12. An exploration of the basis for patient complaints about the oldness of magazines in practice waiting rooms: cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Alrutz, Stowe; Moyes, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the basis for patient complaints about the oldness of most magazines in practice waiting rooms. Design Cohort study. Setting Waiting room of a general practice in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants 87 magazines stacked into three mixed piles and placed in the waiting room: this included non-gossipy magazines (Time magazine, the Economist, Australian Women’s Weekly, National Geographic, BBC History) and gossipy ones (not identified for fear of litigation). Gossipy was defined as having five or more photographs of celebrities on the front cover and most gossipy as having up to 10 such images. Interventions The magazines were marked with a unique number on the back cover, placed in three piles in the waiting room, and monitored twice weekly. Main outcome measures Disappearance of magazines less than 2 months old versus magazines 3-12 months old, the overall rate of loss of magazines, and the rate of loss of gossipy versus non-gossipy magazines. Results 47 of the 82 magazines with a visible date on the front cover were aged less than 2 months. 28 of these 47 (60%) magazines and 10 of the 35 (29%) older magazines disappeared (P=0.002). After 31 days, 41 of the 87 (47%, 95% confidence interval 37% to 58%) magazines had disappeared. None of the 19 non-gossipy magazines (the Economist and Time magazine) had disappeared compared with 26 of the 27 (96%) gossipy magazines (P<0.001). All 15 of the most gossipy magazines and all 19 of the non-gossipy magazines had disappeared by 31 days. The study was terminated at this point. Conclusions General practice waiting rooms contain mainly old magazines. This phenomenon relates to the disappearance of the magazines rather than to the supply of old ones. Gossipy magazines were more likely to disappear than non-gossipy ones. On the grounds of cost we advise practices to supply old copies of non-gossipy magazines. A waiting room science curriculum is urgently needed. PMID:25500116

  13. [SURGICAL TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH URETERAL RUPTURES].

    PubMed

    Komjakov, B K; Guliev, B G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the causes of ureteral ruptures and the types surgical procedures used for their management. Over the period from 2006 to 2014, 7 patients with ureteral ruptures underwent surgical treatment in the Mechnikov N-WSMU clinic. All of them were males aged 50 to 71 years. In all cases, the ureter was injured during ureteroscopy and contact lithotripsy. In two patients the right ureter was cut off at the border of the upper and middle third, in four--at 3-4 cm below pyeloureteral segment, one patient diagnosed with a complete separation of the ureter from the kidney pelvis. Patients, who have suffered a detachment of the ureter in other hospitals, previously underwent surgical exploration of the retroperitoneal space, drainage of the kidney by pyelonephrostomy (5) and ureterocutaneostomy (1). In a case of a patient with an injury that occurred in our clinic, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous renal transplantation was carried out. Five patients with extended ureter defects underwent ileo-ureteroplasty. The patient with left ureterocutaneostomy underwent nephrovesical bypass. Patency of the upper urinary tract and kidney function were restored in all patients, all of them were relieved from external drains. The duration of the intestinal plastic averaged 160 minutes, laparoscopic nephrectomy with autologous transplantation--210 min and nephrovesical bypass--110 min. Blood transfusion was required only in autologous graft patient. The ureteral rupture is a serious complication of ureteral endourological procedures in upper urinary tract. It requires such complicated reconstructive operations as autologous transplantation of the kidney or intestinal ureteroplasty. PMID:26390553

  14. Individualised treatment in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Mann, Karl; Hermann, Derik

    2010-11-01

    Long-term relapse prevention is the biggest challenge in treating alcohol-dependent patients. It is equally based on psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. Psychotherapy includes motivational interviewing, community reinforcement, cognitive behavioural therapy, motivational enhancement, twelve-step facilitation, social network behaviour therapy, cue exposure, etc. For pharmacological treatment, we dispose of disulfiram, acamprosate and naltrexone. Reviews and meta-analyses reveal only modest effect sizes of these approaches probably because they are usually tested in large and heterogeneous samples where "one size does not fit all". However, attempts to form more homogeneous subgroups for which specific psychotherapies should be more effective ("matching") also failed. We suppose that this failure may have to do with the fact that these studies used only psychopathology and behavioural analyses as a basis for subtyping. Things look more promising once biologically defined endophenotypes are used as well in order to form more homogeneous subgroups. For example, naltrexone treatment seems more effective in carriers of a specific variant of the mu-opioid receptor gene. The same could be true for acamprosate if a newly found polymorphism was used to preselect potential responders. Very recently biological differences between patient groups are also being detected using functional imaging. Naltrexone is suggested to work better in a subgroup of patients with higher cue reactivity when shown appetitive alcohol pictures. MR spectroscopy of brain glutamate levels may detect potential acamprosate responders. On such a basis, an individualised approach in the treatment of alcoholism ("personalised medicine") seems to hold promise. PMID:20953618

  15. Addiction treatment dropout: exploring patients' characteristics.

    PubMed

    López-Goñi, José J; Fernández-Montalvo, Javier; Arteaga, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the characteristics associated with treatment dropout in substance dependence patients. A sample of 122 addicted patients (84 treatment completers and 38 treatment dropouts) who sought outpatient treatment was assessed to collect information on sociodemographic, consumption (assessed by EuropASI), psychopathological (assessed by SCL-90-R), and personality variables (assessed by MCMI-II). Completers and dropouts were compared on all studied variables. According to the results, dropouts scored significantly higher on the EuropASI variables measuring employment/support, alcohol consumption, and family/social problems, as well as on the schizotypal scale of MCMI-II. Because most of the significant differences were found in EuropASI variables, three clusters analyses (2, 3, and 4 groups) based on EuropASI mean scores were carried out to determine clinically relevant information predicting dropout. The most relevant results were obtained when four groups were used. Comparisons between the four groups derived from cluster analysis showed statistically significant differences in the rate of dropout, with one group exhibiting the highest dropout rate. The distinctive characteristics of the group with highest dropout rate included the presence of an increased labor problem combined with high alcohol consumption. Furthermore, this group had the highest scores on three scales of the MCMI-II: phobic, dependent, and schizotypal. The implications of these results for further research and clinical practice are discussed.  PMID:22211350

  16. Treatment planning concepts for the ageing patient.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, R L

    2015-03-01

    There is an ageing imperative in Australia as in many other industrialized nations, and these populations are extremely heterogeneous. In young adults, the factors which influence decision making for oral health care are whether the patient has the will, the time or the finances to pay for care, while for clinicians, the decisions are whether they have the skill and the resources to carry out the treatment plan. For older adults, the decision making includes all of the previous identified factors, but they are now complicated by the patient's medical and medication problems, the side effects of the medications they are taking, their cognitive status as well as the cumulative effects of a lifetime of physiological, traumatic and iatrogenic effects on the dentition and the oral cavity. The decision-making process which has evolved has been called many names, from cost-effective care to minimal invasive dentistry to rational dental care. Fundamentally, they are similar. Rational dental care has been defined as the process of decision making, which develops a treatment plan that is in the best interest of the patient after evaluating all of the modifying factors. This article will discuss the various concepts, and the strengths and weaknesses of some of these systems. It will also illustrate some of the clinical problems as there is very little evidence-based data to support any of these concepts. However, treatment planning is still an art, which can only be carried out for an individual and not a group, and the result must serve the needs of the patient and enhance the quality of his or her life. PMID:25762044

  17. Sexual function in hypertensive patients receiving treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reffelmann, Thorsten; Kloner, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    In many forms of erectile dysfunction (ED), cardiovascular risk factors, in particular arterial hypertension, seem to be extremely common. While causes for ED are related to a broad spectrum of diseases, a generalized vascular process seems to be the underlying mechanism in many patients, which in a large portion of clinical cases involves endothelial dysfunction, ie, inadequate vasodilation in response to endothelium-dependent stimuli, both in the systemic vasculature and the penile arteries. Due to this close association of cardiovascular disease and ED, patients with ED should be evaluated as to whether they may suffer from cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, cardiovascular disease or silent myocardial ischemia. On the other hand, cardiovascular patients, seeking treatment of ED, must be evaluated in order to decide whether treatment of ED or sexual activity can be recommended without significantly increased cardiac risk. The guideline from the first and second Princeton Consensus Conference may be applied in this context. While consequent treatment of cardiovascular risk factors should be accomplished in these patients, many antihypertensive drugs may worsen sexual function as a drug specific side-effect. Importantly, effective treatment for arterial hypertension should not be discontinued as hypertension itself may contribute to altered sexual functioning; to the contrary, alternative antihypertensive regimes should be administered with individually tailored drug regimes with minimal side-effects on sexual function. When phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, such as sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil, are prescribed to hypertensive patients on antihypertensive drugs, these combinations of antihypertensive drugs and phosphodiesterase 5 are usually well tolerated, provided there is a baseline blood pressure of at least 90/60 mmHg. However, there are two exceptions: nitric oxide donors and α-adrenoceptor blockers. Any drug serving as a nitric oxide

  18. The Plasma Level of Proprotein Convertase FURIN in Patients with Suspected Infection in the Emergency Room: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Ranta, N; Turpeinen, H; Oksanen, A; Hämäläinen, S; Huttunen, R; Uusitalo-Seppälä, R; Rintala, E; Aittoniemi, J; Pesu, M

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing need for novel biomarkers that enable better diagnostic and prognostic stratification of patients with suspected infection. A proprotein convertase enzyme FURIN is upregulated upon immune cell activation, and it promotes infectivity by cleaving and activating pathogens. In this study, we determined FURIN levels in plasma using ELISA from 537 patients that were admitted to emergency room with suspected infection. Patients were sorted to high- and low-level FURIN groups with a cut-off level of 370 pg/ml. The study cohort included five diagnostic groups: Group 1, no systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, n = 59 patients); Group 2, bacterial infection without SIRS (n = 67); Group 3, SIRS, but no bacterial infection (n = 308); Group 4, sepsis without organ failure (n = 308); and Group 5, severe sepsis (n = 49). Statistically significant associations were not found between the plasma level of FURIN and the prevalence of sepsis (P = 0.957), diagnostic group of a patient (P = 0.737) or the bacteria in blood culture (P = 0.499). Additionally, the concentration of FURIN did not predict the severity or case fatality of the infectious disease. However, statistically significant associations were found between high plasma level of FURIN and diagnosed rheumatic disease (P < 0.001) as well as with the prevalence of non-smokers (P = 0.034). Thus, albeit the plasma level of FURIN does not predict the severity of infectious disease, it may be of use in the diagnostics of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26346780

  19. Effect of thermomechanical treatments on the room-temperature mechanical behavior of iron aluminide Fe3AI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Arvind; Balasubramaniam, R.; Bhargava, S.

    1996-10-01

    The room-temperature hydrogen embrittlement (HE) problem in iron aluminides has restricted their use as high-temperature structural materials. The role of thermomechanical treatments (TMT), i.e., rolling at 500 °C, 800 °C, and 1000 °C, and post-TMT heat treatments, i.e., recrystallization at 750 °C and ordering at 500 °C, in affecting the room-temperature mechanical properties of Fe-25A1 intermetallic alloy has been studied from a processing-structure-properties correlation viewpoint. It was found that when this alloy is rolled at higher temperature, it exhibits a higher fracture strength. This has been attributed to fine subgrain size (28 /μ) due to dynamic recrystallization occurring at the higher rolling temperature of 1000 °C. However, when this alloy is rolled at 1000 °C and then recrystallized, it shows the highest ductility but poor fracture strength. This behavior has been ascribed to the partially recrystallized microstructure, which prevents hydrogen ingress through grain boundaries and minimizes hydrogen embrittlement. When the alloy is rolled at 1000 °C and then ordered at 500 °C for 100 hours, it shows the highest fracture strength, due to its finer grain size. The alloy rolled at 500 °C and then ordered undergoes grain growth. Hence, it exhibits a lower fracture strength of 360 MPa. Fracture morphologies of the alloy were found to be typical of brittle fracture, i.e., cleavage-type fracture in all the cases.

  20. Implant treatment in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Mellado-Valero, Ana; Ferrer-García, Juan Carlos; Calvo-Catalá, Javier; Labaig-Rueda, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is very common, particularly in post-menopausal women and is characterized by a decrease in bone mass and strength. Osteoporosis also affects the jawbone and it is considered a potential contraindication to placement of dental implants. The present paper reviews the literature regarding the effect of osteoporosis on osseointegration of implants. Experimental models have shown that osteoporosis affects the process of osseointegration, which can be reversed by treatment. However, studies in subjects with osteoporosis have shown no differences in survival of the implants compared to healthy individuals. Therefore, osteoporosis cannot be considered a contraindication for implant placement. Oral bisphosphonates are the most commonly used pharmacological agents in the treatment of osteoporosis. Although there have been cases of osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients treated with bisphosphonates, they are very rare and it is more usually associated with intravenous bisphosphonates in patients with neoplasms or other serious diseases. Nevertheless, patients treated with bisphosphonates must be informed in writing about the possibility of this complication and must give informed consent. Ceasing to use bisphosphonates before implant placement does not seem to be necessary. PMID:19767691

  1. TBI ADAPTER: traumatic brain injury assessment diagnosis advocacy prevention and treatment from the emergency room--a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Latha; Daneshvar, Yasamin; Bodhit, Aakash; Ayala, Sarah; Patel, Pratik S; Lottenberg, Lawrence L; York, Donna; Counsell, Colleen; Peters, Keith R

    2015-04-01

    There is no standard treatment algorithm for patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). This is in part because of the heterogeneity of the injury pattern and the patient profile, and the lack of evidence-based guidelines, especially for mild TBI in adults. As TBI is seen more and more frequently in the ED, a standardized assessment would be beneficial in terms of efficiency. The authors present their ED approach to mild TBI evaluation in the ED, along with results to date. These data represent a prospective observational cohort study, where each patient provided individual, written informed consent. PMID:25826342

  2. Reduction of ohmic contact resistivity on p-GaN using N2 plasma surface treatment at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yingwen; You, Da; Xu, Jintong; Li, Xue; Li, Xiangyang; Gong, Haimei

    2006-12-01

    A reduction of Ni/Au ohmic contact resistivity on p-type GaN was obtained by surface treatment using N2 plasma at room temperature. For p-type GaN with a hole concentration of about 1 × 1017 cm-3, the contact resistivity decreased from 5.0 × 10-2 Ω cm2 to 3.1 × 10-4 Ω cm2 by the N2 plasma treatment, compared to that of the HCl only-treated sample. The O 1s core-level peak in the x-ray photoemission spectra shows that the N2 plasma treatment is effective in the removal of the surface oxide layer. Compared to the HCl only-treated surface, the surface Fermi level on the N2 plasma-treated surface lies about 0.58 eV closer to the valence band edge, resulting in a much smaller surface barrier height to p-GaN than the HCl only-treated surface. The smaller surface barrier height of p-GaN treated with N2 plasma can lead to a lower contact resistivity and can play an important role in lowering the metal contact resistivity to p-GaN.

  3. [Treatment of older patients with dyslipidemia].

    PubMed

    González, David Fierro

    2014-05-01

    Elderly persons represent a growing percentage of the total population, and this tendency will become stronger in the coming years. To date, the little evidence available on primary and secondary prevention indicates that this population has high cholesterol levels, that few are under treatment, and that the degree of control requires improvement. Current guidelines recommend that treatment targets in older persons should be the same as those in younger patients. Nevertheless, it is important to remember certain characteristics in older persons, such as biological and metabolic changes or the higher incidence of atherogenic dyslipidemia, which will affect them. Moreover, quality of life and maintaining independence rather than mere survival are especially important in older individuals, as demonstrated by various surveys. Consequently, pravastatin -the most widely studied statin- seems to be the statin of choice for the control of triglycerides and residual risk, although fenofibrate is also useful. PMID:25263639

  4. Treatment Modification in Young Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Scharl, Anton; Salterberg, Annette; Untch, Michael; Liedtke, Cornelia; Stickeler, Elmar; Papathemelis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Patients not older than 40 years are referred to as young patients. These women benefit from chemo-, endocrine and anti-HER2 therapy to a similar degree as older women. Surgery and radiation therapy also follow the same recommendations. This manuscript deals with the following topics that need special consideration in young women: endocrine therapy and ovarian suppression; fertility protection and family planning; and genetic counselling. There is an on-going debate on whether tamoxifen is sufficient as an endocrine treatment in young patients with endocrine-responsive tumours or whether suppression of ovarian function in combination with tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitor should be preferred. Recent data suggest a benefit from ovarian suppression plus exemestane in women of 35 years or younger with high-risk breast cancer. However, increased side effects bear the risk of lesser compliance, which eventually results in higher mortality. Child bearing is nowadays frequently postponed to the 4th decade of life, thereby increasing the number of women who have not yet finished their reproductive desires when diagnosed with breast cancer. These patients are in urgent need of counselling for fertility protection. Breast cancer diagnosis at young age is an indication for a possible mutation in breast cancer susceptibility genes. This has an impact on the cancer risk of the whole family, especially the offspring. Drugs that are specifically targeted to cancer cells with genetic alterations that impair DNA repair are already entering the arsenal of oncologists. PMID:27031253

  5. Pregabalin Abuse amongst Opioid Substitution Treatment Patients.

    PubMed

    McNamara, S; Stokes, S; Kilduff, R; Shine, A

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin (Lyrica®) is used in treating epilepsy, nerve pain and anxiety. Pregabalin was initially thought to have a low misuse potential however there are emerging reports of Pregabalin being abused. A study was commenced at the National Drug Treatment Centre's (NDTC) Drug Analysis Laboratory to determine the level of usage of Pregabalin within the addiction services population in Ireland. A total of 498 urine samples representing samples from 440 individual opioid substitution patients, initially screened by immunoassay for drugs of abuse, were subjected to further analysis for Pregabalin by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS). Of 440 patients tested, 39 tested positive for Pregabalin (9.2%). Only 10 patients from this group were prescribed this drug to our knowledge thus giving an estimated rate of misuse of 7.0%. Other drugs detected in the Pregabalin positive patients were Opiates (31.8%), Cocaine (11.4%), Benzodiazepines (79.5%) and Cannabis (77.8%). Our study confirms that Pregabalin abuse is taking place amongst the addiction services population. We believe that misuse of this prescription drug is a serious emerging issue which should be monitored carefully. PMID:26817289

  6. Brief behavioral treatment for patients with treatment-resistant insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihui; Wei, Qinling; Wu, Xiaoli; Zhong, Zhiyong; Li, Guanying

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of brief behavioral treatment for insomnia (BBTI) in treating patients with treatment-resistant insomnia. Methods Seventy-nine adults with treatment-resistant insomnia were randomly assigned to receive either individualized BBTI (delivered in two in-person sessions and two telephone “booster” sessions, n=40) or sleep hygiene education (n=39). The primary outcome was subjective (sleep diary) measures of self-report symptoms and questionnaire measures of Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), insomnia severity index (ISI), Epworth sleeping scale (ESS), and dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep scale (DBAS). Results The repeated-measures analysis of variance showed significant time effects between pretreatment and posttreatment in the scale ratings of PSQI, ESS, DBAS, ISI, sleep latency (SL), time in bed (TIB), sleep efficiency (SE), and wake after sleep onset (WASO) in both groups and group × time interaction (FPSQI =3.893, FESS =4.500, FDBAS =5.530, FISI =15.070, FSL =8.909, FTIB =7.895, FSE =2.926, and FWASO =2.595). The results indicated significant differences between BBTI and sleep hygiene in change scores of PSQI, ESS, DBAS, ISI, SL, TIB, SE, and WASO. Effect sizes were moderate to large. Conclusion BBTI is a simple and efficacious intervention for chronic insomnia in adults. PMID:27536119

  7. Behavioral Treatment of the Patient with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Alamuddin, Naji; Wadden, Thomas A

    2016-09-01

    Advisory panels encourage persons with obesity to lose 5% to 10% of body weight, which can be achieved with dietary change, increased physical activity, and behavioral therapy. Patients participate in weekly individual or group treatment sessions delivered in-person or by telephone. Large-scale trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach, with resulting improvement in cardiovascular disease risk factors. Weight regain is common. Several strategies improve weight loss maintenance, including monthly or more frequent follow-up with an interventionist. Digitally-delivered approaches are promising because they have the potential to reach more individuals. PMID:27519131

  8. [Surgical treatment for patients with hyperparathyroidism].

    PubMed

    Noda, Satoru; Onoda, Naoyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Although parathyroid surgery is not a complicated surgical procedure, enough knowledge of the surgical anatomy and accurate information for localization of involved gland are required from the fact of the variation in the number and the location of the parathyroid gland. Surgical treatment for patients with hyperparathyroidism has been in the transition state from the era of both sides exploration to minimally invasive surgery. In addition, intraoperative radio guide method, intraoperative iPTH measurement, and intraoperative neuromonitoring have been introduced for the safe and reliable operation. PMID:27230845

  9. [Shuttle Challenger disaster: what lessons can be learned for management of patients in the operating room?].

    PubMed

    Suva, Domizio; Poizat, Germain

    2015-02-01

    For many years hospitals have been implementing crew resource management (CRM) programs, inspired by the aviation industry, in order to improve patient safety. However, while contributing to improved patient care, CRM programs are controversial because of their limited impact, a decrease in effectiveness over time, and the underinvestment by some caregivers. By analyzing the space shuttle Challenger accident, the objective of this article is to show the potential impact of the professional culture in decision-making processes. In addition, to present an approach by cultural factors which are an essential complement to current CRM programs in order to enhance the safety of care. PMID:25854048

  10. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    integration of these services into national cancer control plans; the need for public education to reduce the fear and stigma associated with cancer so that patients are better able to make informed decisions regarding follow-up care and treatment; and the need to recognize the challenges and needs of survivors, their increasing number, the necessity to integrate survivorship into cancer control plans and the economic and societal value of functional survival after cancer. Discussions highlighted that coordinated care and treatment for cancer patients is both a ' systems'challenge and solution, requiring the consideration of patient and family circumstances, societal values and priorities, the functioning of the health system (access, capacity, resources, etc.) and the importance assigned to health and illness management within public policy. PMID:22631594

  11. Patients' and parents' concerns and decisions about orthodontic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Aydoğan, Cihan; Alkan, Özer

    2016-01-01

    Objective Patients' and parents' expectations are important in orthodontic treatment decision making. The literature generally demonstrates the perceived benefits of orthodontic treatment, but patients' and their parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment have not been investigated comprehensively. The aim of this study was to identify patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment and compare them according to sex, age, and treatment demand level. Methods One hundred and eighty-nine children and their parents were interviewed about concerns related to orthodontic treatment. Patients and parents were asked about orthodontic treatment decisions. Answers were recorded as "yes," "no," or "don't know." Chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests were used to compare concerns between age groups, sexes, and treatment demand levels. Kappa statistics were used to assess agreement between patients and their parents. Results Concerns about orthodontic treatment were gathered under 10 items as follows: "feeling pain," "the appearance of braces," "being teased," "avoiding smiling," "speech problems," "dietary changes," "problems with transportation," "economic problems," "long treatment duration," and "missing school." There was no statistically significant difference in concerns between the sexes or age groups. Some concern items and treatment demand were inversely related in patients. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate patients' and parents' concerns about orthodontic treatment. Differences between the concerns of patients with different treatment demands imply that children might reject orthodontic treatment because of their concerns. Appropriate consultation of patients addressing their concerns may help reduce anxiety and improve the acceptance of treatment. PMID:26877979

  12. Proportional differences in emergency room adult patients with PTSD, mood disorders, and anxiety for a large ethnically diverse geographic sample.

    PubMed

    Onoye, Jane; Helm, Susana; Koyanagi, Chad; Fukuda, Michael; Hishinuma, Earl; Takeshita, Junji; Ona, Celia

    2013-05-01

    Underserved populations often utilize the emergency room in place of primary care, particularly for short term behavioral health services. This study examined emergency department (ED) utilization rates for rurality, insurance, sex, and ethnicity in a large sample of adult patients in Hawai'i hospitals from 2000-2010 with a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), mood disorder, or other anxiety disorder. Findings showed a higher rate of use by rural and suburban residents with a diagnosis of PTSD or other anxiety than by urban residents. Utilization of EDs by African Americans and Other Pacific Islanders with PTSD was proportionally higher than for those with mood disorders or other anxiety disorders. Military ED visits were also proportionally higher for individuals with PTSD than for those with mood or other anxiety disorders. Limited economic resources and increasingly costly mental health disorders such as PTSD highlight the importance of better understanding the needs for behavioral health services for underserved populations. PMID:23728057

  13. Association between weather conditions and the number of patients at the emergency room in an Argentine hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusticucci, Matilde; Bettolli, Laura M.; de los Angeles Harris, M.

    2002-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the relationships between hospital emergencies and weather conditions by analysing summer and winter cases of patients requiring attention at the emergency room of a hospital in the city of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Hospital data have been sorted into seven different diagnostic groups as follows: (1) respiratory, cardiovascular and chest-pain complaints; (2) digestive, genitourinary and abdominal complaints; (3) neurological and psychopathological disorders; (4) infections; (5) contusion and crushing, bone and muscle complaints; (6) skin and allergies and (7) miscellaneous complaints. In general, there is an increase of 16.7% in winter while, for group 2 and group 6, there are more patients in summer, 54% and 75% respectively. In summer, the total number of patients for group 6 shows a significant positive correlation with temperature and dew-point temperature, and a negative correlation with the sea-level pressure for the same day. In winter, the same relationship exists, however its correlation is not as strong. The lags observed between these three variables: maximum dew-point temperature, maximum temperature, minimum air pressure and the peaks in admissions are 1, 2 and 4 days respectively. In winter, increases in temperature and dew point and decreases in pressure are followed by a peak in admissions for group 2. In winter, there are significantly more cases in group 5 on warm, dry days and on warm, wet days in the summer.

  14. Likelihood of Attending Treatment for Anxiety Among Veteran Primary Care Patients: Patient Preferences for Treatment Attributes.

    PubMed

    Shepardson, Robyn L; Funderburk, Jennifer S

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety is common, but under-treated, in primary care. Behavioral health providers embedded in primary care can help address this treatment gap. Guidance on anxiety treatment preferences would help inform tailoring of clinical practice and new interventions to be more patient-centered and increase treatment engagement. We surveyed 144 non-treatment seeking Veteran primary care patients (82.6 % male, 85.4 % White, age M = 59.8 years, SD = 13.9) reporting current anxiety symptoms (M = 13.87, SD = 3.66, on the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 Questionnaire) on their likelihood of attending anxiety treatment featuring various levels of 11 attributes (modality, type, location, format, provider, visit frequency, visit length, treatment duration, type of psychotherapy, symptom focus, and topic/skill). Participants indicated clear preferences for individual, face-to-face treatment in primary care, occurring once a month for at least 30 min and lasting at least three sessions. They also tended to prefer a stress management approach focused on trouble sleeping or fatigue, but all topics/skills were rated equivalently. For most attributes, the highest rated options were consistent with characteristics of integrated care. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:27465641

  15. A medical cost estimation with fuzzy neural network of acute hepatitis patients in emergency room.

    PubMed

    Kuo, R J; Cheng, W C; Lien, W C; Yang, T J

    2015-10-01

    Taiwan is an area where chronic hepatitis is endemic. Liver cancer is so common that it has been ranked first among cancer mortality rates since the early 1980s in Taiwan. Besides, liver cirrhosis and chronic liver diseases are the sixth or seventh in the causes of death. Therefore, as shown by the active research on hepatitis, it is not only a health threat, but also a huge medical cost for the government. The estimated total number of hepatitis B carriers in the general population aged more than 20 years old is 3,067,307. Thus, a case record review was conducted from all patients with diagnosis of acute hepatitis admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) of a well-known teaching-oriented hospital in Taipei. The cost of medical resource utilization is defined as the total medical fee. In this study, a fuzzy neural network is employed to develop the cost forecasting model. A total of 110 patients met the inclusion criteria. The computational results indicate that the FNN model can provide more accurate forecasts than the support vector regression (SVR) or artificial neural network (ANN). In addition, unlike SVR and ANN, FNN can also provide fuzzy IF-THEN rules for interpretation. PMID:26153643

  16. [The emergency treatment of the psychotic patient].

    PubMed

    Naumann, Ute; Mavrogiorgou, Paraskevi; Pajonk, Frank-Gerald B; Juckel, Georg

    2012-06-01

    Psychosis can cause multiple psychiatric and somatic emergencies. Due to the complex character of the disease the communication and accessibility of the patient can be severely disturbed. In the pre-clinical emergency medical care the etiology of a psychosis remains often unclear, the most common causes are schizophrenia and drug-induced psychosis. Frequent emergencies are states of psychomotor agitation, self-endangerment and endangerment of others including suicidal tendencies/acts as well as catatonic and manic states. Antipsychotic drugs and benzodiazepines are the most efficient pharmacotherapeutic treatments. Extrapyramidal side effects of the prescribed medication can also cause the need for urgent medical care. In any case needs to be considered a severe somatic comorbidity. It is particularly necessary that all available information at the scene of emergency should be transferred to the clinicians since the further diagnostic and therapeutic assessment will rely hereon. PMID:22744852

  17. [Patients' rights act. Consequences for medical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ulsenheimer, K

    2014-02-01

    With the justification that the treatment and medical liability act suffers from a lack of transparency and reliability due to being characterized by many isolated decisions, in 2013 this was made into statute law in the form of the patients rights act in the German Civil Code (BGB). It was considered that "currently existing comprehensive rights of patients" would be strengthened through clarity and "legal transparency" and that the practical "implementation" would be improved. That this target will be achieved with these new statutory provisions is doubtful. Instead of more clarity, transparency and legal security, there now exists substantial need for interpretation of many aspects which will keep courts and lawyers occupied for many years. Furthermore, this has given rise to more bureaucratization of medicine with the compulsion to fulfil new formalities in clinics and doctors' offices. In this article the most important regulations for physicians will be presented and explained. Due to limited space and with due respect to the readership a subtle legal analysis of the regulations will be dispensed with. PMID:24499957

  18. Treatment of small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    1999-01-01

    Small cell lung cancers, comprising approximately 20% of lung cancers, are rapidly growing and disseminating carcinomas which are initially chemosensitive but acquire drug resistance during the course of disease. Thus, outcome is poor with median survival of 10-16 months for patients with limited and 7-11 months for patients with extensive disease. Polychemotherapy with established drugs (platins, etoposide, anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and Vinca alkaloids) plays the major role in the treatment of this disease and results in overall response rates between 80%-95% for limited disease and 60%-80% for extensive disease. Dose-intensified chemotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell support were tested in several trials but their exact impact on outcome remains to be determined. New drugs including the taxanes (paclitaxel, docetaxel), the topoisomerase I inhibitors (topotecan, irinotecan), vinorelbine and gemcitabine are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In limited disease, thoracic radiotherapy improves survival and prophylactic cranial irradiation should be administered to those with a reasonable chance of cure. PMID:10676558

  19. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Risk of Adverse Respiratory Events in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Te-Chun; Chang, Pei-Ying; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Chia-Hung; Tu, Chih-Yen; Hsia, Te-Chun; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of periodontal diseases has been associated with benefit outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, no population-based cohort study has been conducted. We evaluated this relationship by retrospective cohort study using a large population data. Using the National Health Insurance claims data of Taiwan, we identified 5562 COPD patients with periodontal diseases who had received periodontal treatment as the treatment group. The comparison group was selected at a 1:1 ratio matched by the propensity score estimated with age, sex, date of COPD diagnosis and periodontal treatment, and comorbidities. Both groups were followed up for 5 years to compare risks of acute exacerbation, pneumonia, and acute respiratory failure. The incidence rates of adverse respiratory events were significantly lower in the treatment group than in the comparison group: 3.79 versus 4.21 per 100 person-years for emergency room visits, 2.75 versus 3.65 per 100 person-years for hospitalizations, and 0.66 versus 0.75 per 100 person-years for intensive care unit admissions. The treatment group also had a 37% reduced risk of deaths (1.81 vs 2.87 per 100 person-years), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.52–0.62). Periodontal treatment for COPD patients could reduce the risk of adverse respiratory events and mortality. The adequate periodontal health care is important for COPD patients with periodontal diseases. PMID:27196497

  20. Patient perceptions of multiple sclerosis and its treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Seze, Jérôme; Borgel, Florent; Brudon, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to improve the treatment outcome in multiple sclerosis, it is important to document the factors that influence adherence to therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine patient perceptions and awareness of multiple sclerosis and its treatment, treatment adherence, and impact on quality of life and daily living. Methods This was a cross-sectional observational study performed in France. Each participating neurologist included the first three patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who consulted after the start of the study. Data on clinical features were collected from a physician questionnaire and on disease and treatment perception and on quality of life from a patient autoquestionnaire. Results A total of 175 neurologists entered 202 patients in the study. The mean duration of disease was 8.0 ± 7.0 years, and immunomodulatory treatment had been administered for a mean duration of 3.0 ± 2.0 years. A total of 166 patients (82.2%) were treated with interferon-β preparations and 36 patients (17.8%) with glatiramer acetate. Eighty-five patients (42.1%) reported missing their injections from time to time and 36 patients (17.8%) reported “drug holidays”. The most frequently given reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness (38.7% of cases). Eighty-six patients (42.6%) and 70 patients (34.7%) claimed to be well informed about their disease and treatment, respectively. Adherence was significantly higher in well informed patients (P = 0.035). The majority of patients (176 patients, 87.1%) intended continuing their current treatment and 49.5% considered that their current treatment might reduce relapses. The most frequently reported side effect was muscle pain (124 patients, 61.4%). Conclusion Patient understanding of treatment for disease enhances treatment adherence. Greater patient involvement in disease management requires better communication between physicians and their patients. PMID:22536062

  1. Treating Insomnia: A Review of Patient Perceptions Toward Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Janet M Y; Bartlett, Delwyn J; Armour, Carol L; Saini, Bandana

    2016-01-01

    Patient views about their treatment for insomnia often dictate outcome. This review explores the literature relating to the patients' global perceptions toward treatment for insomnia. A strategic literature search was conducted using five databases (PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, PsycINFO, and Embase). The 57 research articles included for this review were mapped out chronologically across three key stages of treatment-seeking (pretreatment appraisal, actual treatment experiences, and posttreatment evaluation). Patient perceptions played an important role across these three key stages and influenced subsequent health behaviors such as the initiation of help-seeking, treatment uptake, treatment adherence, and treatment adjustment. Patients' perceptions toward treatment were heavily grounded by their psychosocial contexts. Clinical implications and future directions for including patient-centered metrics in mainstream practice and research are discussed. PMID:26240937

  2. An Estimation for Availability of Battery less LF Band RFID Tag to Identify Patients in Operation Room from Viewpoint of Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Ryosuke

    Nowadays, medical accidents increase in Japanese patient environment. Especially, misidentification of the patients occurred in operation room of higher level hospitals. It is considered that the great deals of accidents are due to mistakes by nurse. However, the accidents are prevented by management of patients. If a suitable patient identification system is developed, the accidents are prevented. In this study, new patient identification system using battery less LF band RFID(Radio Frequency Identification) is proposed. In the method, battery less RFID tag is attached to patient. In operation room, patient is identified before operation using the proposed system. However, identification distance of RFID is small. It is important that extension of the distance. In this study, antennas of RFID tag and sensor are designed. Two types of tag are proposed. One of them is set on wristband. An antenna for the tag is designed as a circular shape with 30mm in diameter. The other one is shaped like a necklace. The antenna is also designed 220mm, 240mm and 260mm in diameter. Using necklace type new antenna, sufficient identification distance for detection of the tag in the operation room is realized. The patient identification is realized using the proposed system

  3. Room Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttruff, Heinrich; Mommertz, Eckard

    The traditional task of room acoustics is to create or formulate conditions which ensure the best possible propagation of sound in a room from a sound source to a listener. Thus, objects of room acoustics are in particular assembly halls of all kinds, such as auditoria and lecture halls, conference rooms, theaters, concert halls or churches. Already at this point, it has to be pointed out that these conditions essentially depend on the question if speech or music should be transmitted; in the first case, the criterion for transmission quality is good speech intelligibility, in the other case, however, the success of room-acoustical efforts depends on other factors that cannot be quantified that easily, not least it also depends on the hearing habits of the listeners. In any case, absolutely "good acoustics" of a room do not exist.

  4. Patient Satisfaction after Treatment of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asgari, Maryam M.; Bertenthal, Daniel; Sen, Saunak; Sahay, Anju; Chren, Mary-Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of patient-centered care, but has not been systematically studied after treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most prevalent cancer. Objective To compare patient satisfaction after treatment for NMSC and to determine factors associated with better satisfaction. Methods We prospectively measured patient, tumor and care characteristics in 834 consecutive patients at two centers before and after destruction, excision and Mohs surgery. We evaluated factors associated with short-term and long-term satisfaction. Results In all treatment groups, patients were more satisfied with the interpersonal manners of the staff, communication, and financial aspects of their care, than with the technical quality, time with the clinician, and accessibility of their care (p<0.05). Short-term satisfaction did not differ across treatment groups. In multivariable regression models adjusting for patient, tumor, and care characteristics, higher long-term satisfaction was independently associated with younger age, better pre-treatment mental health and skin-related quality of life, and treatment with Mohs surgery (p<0.05). Conclusions Long-term patient satisfaction after treatment of NMSC is related to pre-treatment patient characteristics (mental health, skin-related quality of life) as well as treatment type (Mohs) but not related to tumor characteristics. These results can guide informed decision-making for treatment of NMSC. PMID:19438672

  5. Pharmacological primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention among diabetic patients in a multiethnic general practice population: still room for improvements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnic minority groups have higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We assessed general practitioners’ (GPs’) performance with respect to the pharmacological prevention of CVD in patients with T2DM from different ethnic backgrounds in Oslo. Methods Of 1653 T2DM patients cared for by 49 GPs in 2005, 380 had a diagnosis of CVD. Ethnicity was categorized as Norwegian, South Asian and other. Risk factor levels, medication use, achievement of treatment targets (HbA1c ≤ 7.5%, systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤ 140 mmHg, total cholesterol/HDL-cholesterol < 4) and therapeutic intensity (number of drugs targeting each risk factor) were recorded. Chi-square, Wald tests and multiple linear regression analyses were used. Results Of the 1273 patients receiving primary prevention, 1.5% had their Hb1Ac, 4.8% SBP and 12.7% lipids levels above treatment thresholds without relevant prescriptions. Among patients on pharmacological therapy, 66% reached the HbA1c, 62% SBP and 62% lipid target. Proportions not achieving the HbA1c target were 26% in Norwegians, 38% in South Asians and 29% in others (p = 0.008). Proportions not achieving the SBP target were 42% in Norwegians, 22% in South Asians and 25% in others (p ≤ 0.001). Of those not achieving the HbA1c and SBP targets, 43% and 35% respectively, used only one agent. In secondary prevention, 0.8% of the patients had their HbA1c, 0.5% SBP and 7.4% lipid levels above treatment thresholds without relevant prescriptions. Among patients on pharmacological therapy, 65% reached the HbA1c, 64% SBP and 66% lipid target. Proportions not achieving the HbA1c target were 26% in Norwegians, 47% in South Asians and 40% in others (p = 0.03). Proportions not achieving the SBP target were 36% in Norwegians, 22% in South Asians and 56% in others (p = 0.050). Of those not achieving HbA1c and SBP targets, 49% and 21% respectively, were on mono-therapy. Conclusions Norwegian GPs comply

  6. Is there room for combined modality treatments? Dosimetric comparison of boost strategies for advanced head and neck and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Góra, Joanna; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Kuess, Peter; Paskeviciute, Brigita; Georg, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the dosimetric difference between three emerging treatment modalities—volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), intensity-modulated proton beam therapy (IMPT) and intensity-modulated carbon ion beam therapy (IMIT)—for two tumour sites where selective boosting of the tumour is applied. For 10 patients with locally advanced head and neck (H&N) cancer and 10 with high-risk prostate cancer (PC) a VMAT plan was generated for PTVinitial that included lymph node regions, delivering 50 Gy (IsoE) for H&N and 50.4 Gy (IsoE) for PC patients. Furthermore, separate boost plans (VMAT, IMPT and IMIT) were created to boost PTVboost up to 70 Gy (IsoE) and 78 Gy (IsoE) for H&N and PC cases, respectively. Doses to brainstem, myelon, larynx and parotid glands were assessed for H&N cases. Additionally, various OARs (e.g. cochlea, middle ear, masticator space) were evaluated that are currently discussed with respect to quality of life after treatment. For PC cases, bladder, rectum and femoral heads were considered as OARs. For both tumour sites target goals were easily met. Looking at OAR sparing, generally VMAT + VMAT was worst. VMAT + IMIT had the potential to spare some structures in very close target vicinity (such as cochlea, middle ear, masticator space ) significantly better than VMAT + IMPT. Mean doses for rectal and bladder wall were on average 4 Gy (IsoE) and 1.5 Gy (IsoE) higher, respectively, compared to photons plus particles scenarios. Similar results were found for parotid glands and larynx. Concerning target coverage, no significant differences were observed between the three treatment concepts. Clear dosimetric benefits were observed for particle beam therapy as boost modality. However, the clinical benefit of combined modality treatments remains to be demonstrated. PMID:23824134

  7. Is there room for combined modality treatments? Dosimetric comparison of boost strategies for advanced head and neck and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Góra, Joanna; Hopfgartner, Johannes; Kuess, Peter; Paskeviciute, Brigita; Georg, Dietmar

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the dosimetric difference between three emerging treatment modalities--volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), intensity-modulated proton beam therapy (IMPT) and intensity-modulated carbon ion beam therapy (IMIT)--for two tumour sites where selective boosting of the tumour is applied. For 10 patients with locally advanced head and neck (H&N) cancer and 10 with high-risk prostate cancer (PC) a VMAT plan was generated for PTV initial that included lymph node regions, delivering 50 Gy (IsoE) for H&N and 50.4 Gy (IsoE) for PC patients. Furthermore, separate boost plans (VMAT, IMPT and IMIT) were created to boost PTV boost up to 70 Gy (IsoE) and 78 Gy (IsoE) for H&N and PC cases, respectively. Doses to brainstem, myelon, larynx and parotid glands were assessed for H&N cases. Additionally, various OARs (e.g. cochlea, middle ear, masticator space) were evaluated that are currently discussed with respect to quality of life after treatment. For PC cases, bladder, rectum and femoral heads were considered as OARs. For both tumour sites target goals were easily met. Looking at OAR sparing, generally VMAT + VMAT was worst. VMAT + IMIT had the potential to spare some structures in very close target vicinity (such as cochlea, middle ear, masticator space ) significantly better than VMAT + IMPT. Mean doses for rectal and bladder wall were on average 4 Gy (IsoE) and 1.5 Gy (IsoE) higher, respectively, compared to photons plus particles scenarios. Similar results were found for parotid glands and larynx. Concerning target coverage, no significant differences were observed between the three treatment concepts. Clear dosimetric benefits were observed for particle beam therapy as boost modality. However, the clinical benefit of combined modality treatments remains to be demonstrated. PMID:23824134

  8. Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158339.html Only Half of Rectal Cancer Patients Get Recommended Treatment: ... therapy for rectal cancer in the United States, only slightly more than half of patients receive it, ...

  9. Useless Treatments Common in Young, Terminal Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159214.html Useless Treatments Common in Young, Terminal Cancer Patients 3 in 4 get aggressive therapies ... quarters of young or middle-aged Americans with terminal cancer receive aggressive treatment during the last month ...

  10. Elderly Patients Get Unnecessary End-Of-Life Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159579.html Elderly Patients Get Unnecessary End-of-Life Treatments Family members may pressure doctors to attempt ... of old age often receive unnecessary end-of-life medical treatments in hospitals, a new global study ...

  11. Iatrosedation: The Treatment of Fear in the Dental Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Nathan

    1983-01-01

    A course to help dental students learn techniques of putting fearful patients at ease includes use of physician-patient interviews in a clinical setting, patient reviews of the taped interview, interview evaluation, student-instructor conferences, and group discussion, followed by an actual treatment session and review discussion with the patient.…

  12. Monte Carlo estimation of photoneutrons contamination from high-energy X-ray medical accelerators in treatment room and maze: a simplified model.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Mesbahi, Asghar; Mahdavi, Seyed Rabee; Shahriari, Majid

    2009-07-01

    Despite all advantages associated with high-energy radiotherapy to improve therapeutic gain, the production of photoneutron via interaction of high-energy photons with high atomic number (Z) materials increases undesired dose to the patient and staff. Owing to the limitation and complication of experimental neutron dosimetry in mixed beam environment, including photon and neutron, the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is a gold standard method for calculation of photoneutron contaminations. On the other hand, the complexity of treatment head makes the MC simulation more difficult and time-consuming. In this study, the possibility of using a simplified MC model for the simulation of treatment head has been investigated using MCNP4C general purpose MC code. As a part of comparative assessment strategy, the fluence, average energy and dose equivalent of photoneutrons were estimated and compared with other studies for several fields and energies at different points in treatment room and maze. The mean energy of photoneutrons was 0.17, 0.19 and 0.2 MeV at the patient plan for 10, 15 and 18 MeV, respectively. The calculated values differed, respectively, by a factor of 1.4, 0.7 and 0.61 compared with the reported measured data for 10, 15 and 18 MeV. Our simulation results in the maze showed that the neutron dose equivalent is attenuated by a factor of 10 for every 4.6 m of maze length while the related factor from Kersey analytical method is 5 m. The neutron dose equivalent was 4.1 mSv Gy(-1) at the isocentre and decreased to 0.79 mSv Gy(-1) at a distance of 100 cm away from the isocentre for 40 x 40 cm(2). There is good agreement between the data calculated using simplified model in this study and measurements. Considering the reported high uncertainties (up to 50%) in experimental neutron dosimetry, it can be concluded that the simplified model can be used as a useful tool for estimation of photoneutron contamination associated with high-energy photon radiotherapy. PMID

  13. Emergency room referral to internal medicine wards or to coronary care units of patients with first acute myocardial infarction. Israel Study Group on First Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Drory, Y; Shapira, I; Goldbourt, U; Fisman, E Z; Villa, Y; Tenenbaum, A; Pines, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with ward assignment in the emergency room for patients < or = 65 years old with first acute myocardial infarction. We analysed uni- and multivariate predictors for ward assignment (coronary care unit versus internal ward). Eight major centrally located Israeli hospitals provided data during one year. The study population included 1252 patients, of whom 83% were men, 37% were hypertensives, 22% were diabetics, and 14% had previous anginal syndrome. Most patients (83%) were admitted to the coronary care unit. Internal medicine ward assignment was significantly associated with advanced age, history of hypertension or diabetes, a longer time from appearance of symptoms to arrival at the hospital, and myocardial infarction type (non-Q-wave or non-anterior). The likelihood of medical ward referral increased stepwise with the increasing number of a patient's predictive factors: those with > or = 4 factors had a > 30% chance of being assigned to a medical ward compared to a < 10% chance when there were 0-3 risk factors. Exclusion of patients with thrombolysis had no effect on the results. The shortage of cardiac care unit beds apparently leads to emergency room selection acting in detriment of patients with poorest prognoses. Clear guidelines for decision making in the emergency room are needed to resolve this paradoxical situation. PMID:10998758

  14. Patient-adapted treatment for prosthetic hip joint infection.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard P; Furustrand Tafin, Ulrika; Borens, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Hip joint replacement is 1 of the most successful surgical procedures of the last century and the number of replacements implanted is steadily growing. An infected hip arthroplasty is a disaster, it leads to patient suffering, surgeon's frustration and significant costs to the health system. The treatment of an infected hip replacement is challenging, healing rates can be low, functional results poor with decreased patient satisfaction. However, if a patient-adapted treatment of infected hip joints is used a success rate of above 90% can be obtained.Patient-adapted treatment is based on 5 important concepts: teamwork; understanding the biofilm; diagnostic accuracy; correct definition and classification of PJI; and patient-tailored treatment.This review presents a patient-adapted treatment strategy to prosthetic hip infection. It incorporates the best aspects of the single and staged surgical strategies and promotes the short interval philosophy for the 2-stage approach. PMID:26044528

  15. [Treatment of severely injured patients : Impact of the German Trauma Registry DGU®].

    PubMed

    Bouillon, B; Lefering, R; Paffrath, T; Sturm, J; Hoffmann, R

    2016-06-01

    The German Trauma Registry DGU® started in 1993 as an initiative of five dedicated trauma centers and has evolved significantly since then. Data were obtained at four points of time from the site of the accident until discharge from hospital. In the first year (1993), the registry collected data of 260 patients from 5 hospitals. In 2015 more than 38.000 were included from 640 hospitals.This paper focusses on the impact of the trauma registry on the treatment of severely injured patients. Several authors could show that the data can be used by hospitals for benchmarking. This can help to detect problems in individual hospitals and to find solutions that can be implemented into the process of care and its subsequent reevaluation. Due to structural and process-related changes, the time necessary for the management in the emergency room could be reduced significantly. Various scientific analyses of the Trauma Registry DGU® data were implemented in the treatment of severely injured patients. In the prehospital treatment, this changed the criteria for intubation and led to a reduction of volume replacement. In the hospital setting, the analysis influenced the radiologic work-up and the treatment of coagulopathy of severely injured patients. Moreover, the risk-adjusted mortality of severely injured patients in Germany could be continuously reduced over the past 20 years. PMID:27240850

  16. Patient preference and willingness to pay for knee osteoarthritis treatments

    PubMed Central

    Posnett, John; Dixit, Sanjeev; Oppenheimer, Brooks; Kili, Sven; Mehin, Nazanin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To review treatments for osteoarthritis of the knee (OAK) received by patients across five European countries, and to obtain patients’ perceptions and willingness to pay for current treatments. Patients and methods A prospective, internet-based, double-blind survey of adults with OAK was conducted in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. The questionnaire included questions about diagnosis, treatment history, and perceptions of OAK treatments, followed by a discrete choice-based conjoint exercise to identify preferred attributes of OAK treatments, evaluating 14 sets of four unbranded products. Results Two thousand and seventy-three patients with self-reported OAK completed the survey; 17.4% of patients rated their knee pain as drastically affecting their ability to perform normal daily activities, and 39.3% of employed patients reported that they had lost work time because of OAK. The most common treatments were exercise (69.7%), physical therapy (68.2%), and nonprescription oral pain medication (73.9%). Treatments perceived as most effective were: viscosupplement injections (74.1%), narcotics (67.8%), and steroid injection (67.6%). Patient co-pay, duration of pain relief, and type of therapy exhibited the largest impact on patient preference for OAK treatments. The average patient was willing to pay €35 and €64 more in co-pay for steroid and viscosupplement injections, respectively, over the cost of oral over-the-counter painkillers (per treatment course, per knee) (each P<0.05). Conclusion OAK is a debilitating condition that affects normal daily activities. In general, treatments most commonly offered to patients are not those perceived as being the most effective. Patients are willing to pay a premium for treatments that they perceive as being more effective and result in longer-lasting pain relief, and those that can be administered with fewer visits to a physician. PMID:26089650

  17. Tuberculosis in hospitalized patients: clinical characteristics of patients receiving treatment within the first 24 h after admission*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise Rossato; da Silva, Larissa Pozzebon; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients hospitalized for tuberculosis, comparing those in whom tuberculosis treatment was started within the first 24 h after admission with those who did not. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study involving new tuberculosis cases in patients aged ≥ 18 years who were hospitalized after seeking treatment in the emergency room. Results: We included 305 hospitalized patients, of whom 67 (22.0%) received tuberculosis treatment within the first 24 h after admission ( ≤24h group) and 238 (88.0%) did not (>24h group). Initiation of tuberculosis treatment within the first 24 h after admission was associated with being female (OR = 1.99; 95% CI: 1.06-3.74; p = 0.032) and with an AFB-positive spontaneous sputum smear (OR = 4.19; 95% CI: 1.94-9.00; p < 0.001). In the ≤24h and >24h groups, respectively, the ICU admission rate was 22.4% and 15.5% (p = 0.258); mechanical ventilation was used in 22.4% and 13.9% (p = 0.133); in-hospital mortality was 22.4% and 14.7% (p = 0.189); and a cure was achieved in 44.8% and 52.5% (p = 0.326). Conclusions: Although tuberculosis treatment was initiated promptly in a considerable proportion of the inpatients evaluated, the rates of in-hospital mortality, ICU admission, and mechanical ventilation use remained high. Strategies for the control of tuberculosis in primary care should consider that patients who seek medical attention at hospitals arrive too late and with advanced disease. It is therefore necessary to implement active surveillance measures in the community for earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25029651

  18. Assignment of Dental School Patients Using Periodontal Treatment Need Indices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mubarak, Ala

    1990-01-01

    The validity of the Periodontal Treatment Need System and the Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Need as screening tests for allocation of patients to dental students was assessed and compared. Sixty-one patients reporting to the Department of Periodontology at the University of Oslo were studied. (MLW)

  19. Infection prevention and treatment in patients with major burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Conwy, G

    Infection is a significant challenge in burn care, particularly for those patients who have major burn injuries. This article aims to review the literature and establish best practice in prevention and treatment of infection in patients with major burns. The article considers the causes and clinical features of wound infection, and examines systemic and local methods of prevention and treatment. PMID:21138123

  20. Follow up of patients who start treatment with antidepressants: treatment satisfaction, treatment compliance, efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Measuring satisfaction with treatment has proved useful to ascertain the treatment features that are most important to the patients, and to explain increased treatment compliance. However, there are few studies that relate satisfaction to other clinical or self-perceived health status indicators. Recent studies have shown the close relationship between satisfaction with treatment, treatment compliance, and effectiveness. This study attempts to design and validate a scale to evaluate satisfaction with antidepressant drug therapy, assess treatment compliance (self-reported, validated questionnaire, drug accountability and electronic monitorization system), assess efficacy in reducing depressive symptoms and safety in patients who initiate antidepressant drug therapy, as well as to establish predictors of satisfaction, compliance and effectiveness with these drugs. Methods/design This is an observational longitudinal study with a cohort of adults initiating treatment with antidepressant drugs. A multi-centre study will be performed in which 20 Primary Care practices from Castilla-La Mancha are expected to participate. An initial interview and follow-up visits at 15 days, 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months will be conducted with all study participants. 706 subjects will be studied (95% confidence interval, precision ± 3%, expected rate of non-compliance 50%, expected non-responders and lost to follow up rate 15%). The following measurements will be performed: development and validation of a scale of satisfaction with antidepressant therapy, participant and antidepressant characteristics, treatment compliance evaluation (Haynes-Sackett Test, Morisky-Green Test, drug accountability and Medication Event Monitoring System), depression symptom reduction (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale), observation of adverse effects, and beliefs about treatment (The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire). Discussion Antidepressant drugs are

  1. Craniospinal treatment with the patient supine

    SciTech Connect

    Thomadsen, Bruce; Mehta, Minesh; Howard, Steven; Das, Rupak

    2003-03-31

    Radiotherapy of the craniospinal axis in young children is frequently complicated by the need for access to the patient's airway for sedation and anesthesia delivery or by frequent, unanticipated movement. Positioning the patient supine, instead of in the conventional prone position, allows the use of immobilization facemasks with body molds and more positive patient fixation, and improved airway access. The procedure for establishing the various fields differs from the prone approach. In this paper, we describe the methodology to achieve successful supine positioning.

  2. [Treatment of primary hypothyroidism in adult patients].

    PubMed

    Salmela, Pasi; Metso, Saara; Moilanen, Leena; Niskanen, Leo; Nuutila, Pirjo; Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of hypothyroidism is based on the findings of an increased serum TSH (above the reference range) and decreased serum free T4 (below the reference range) concentration. Treatment of subclinical hypothyroidism is indicated if serum THS is above 10 mU/l. For less severe forms of subclinical hypothyroidism, the treatment should be individually tailored. The treatment of choice is synthetic human levothyroxine. The goals for treatment are amelioration of symptoms and normalization of TSH and free T4 concentrations. PMID:27044179

  3. Genetic Similarity among One Aspergillus flavus Strain Isolated from a Patient Who Underwent Heart Surgery and Two Environmental Strains Obtained from the Operating Room

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Guerra, Teresa M.; Mellado, Emilia; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Gaztelurrutia, Lourdes; Navarro, Jose Ignacio Villate; Tudela, Juan L. Rodríguez

    2000-01-01

    We report the simultaneous isolation of one Aspergillus flavus strain from the aortic prosthesis of a heart surgery patient and another two isolates recovered from a dual-reservoir cooler-heater used in the operating room where this patient was operated on. Genetic typing of these three isolates by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) revealed identical genotypes. Eight unrelated control strains of A. flavus had eight different genotypes. These results clearly indicated the nosocomial origin of the A. flavus strain isolated from the patient. We suggest that the RAPD technique is a rapid and reliable tool to ascertain the epidemiology of infections caused by A. flavus. PMID:10835021

  4. Evaluation and Treatment of the Patient with Vertigo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasscock, Michael E. III; Haynes, David S.

    1997-01-01

    The sensation of vertigo is a complex symptom that patients find difficult to describe, and physicians often find evaluating and treating patients with the vertigo a difficult task. This article outlines types and causes of vertigo and the work up, evaluation, and treatment of a patient with vertigo. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  5. Factors predicting a change in diagnosis in patients hospitalised through the emergency room: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Hautz, Stefanie C; Schuler, Luca; Kämmer, Juliane E; Schauber, Stefan K; Ricklin, Meret E; Sauter, Thomas C; Maier, Volker; Birrenbach, Tanja; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emergency rooms (ERs) generally assign a preliminary diagnosis to patients, who are then hospitalised and may subsequently experience a change in their lead diagnosis (cDx). In ERs, the cDx rate varies from around 15% to more than 50%. Among the most frequent reasons for diagnostic errors are cognitive slips, which mostly result from faulty data synthesis. Furthermore, physicians have been repeatedly found to be poor self-assessors and to be overconfident in the quality of their diagnosis, which limits their ability to improve. Therefore, some of the clinically most relevant research questions concern how diagnostic decisions are made, what determines their quality and what can be done to improve them. Research that addresses these questions is, however, still rare. In particular, field studies that allow for generalising findings from controlled experimental settings are lacking. The ER, with its high throughput and its many simultaneous visits, is perfectly suited for the study of factors contributing to diagnostic error. With this study, we aim to identify factors that allow prediction of an ER's diagnostic performance. Knowledge of these factors as well as of their relative importance allows for the development of organisational, medical and educational strategies to improve the diagnostic performance of ERs. Methods and analysis We will conduct a field study by collecting diagnostic decision data, physician confidence and a number of influencing factors in a real-world setting to model real-world diagnostic decisions and investigate the adequacy, validity and informativeness of physician confidence in these decisions. We will specifically collect data on patient, physician and encounter factors as predictors of the dependent variables. Statistical methods will include analysis of variance and a linear mixed-effects model. Ethics and dissemination The Bern ethics committee approved the study under KEK Number 197/15. Results will be published in

  6. Depression Treatment Preferences in Older Primary Care Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gum, Amber M.; Arean, Patricia A.; Hunkeler, Enid; Tang, Lingqi; Katon, Wayne; Hitchcock, Polly; Steffens, David C.; Dickens, Jeanne; Unutzer, Jurgen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: For depressed older primary care patients, this study aimed to examine (a) characteristics associated with depression treatment preferences; (b) predictors of receiving preferred treatment; and (c) whether receiving preferred treatment predicted satisfaction and depression outcomes. Design and Methods: Data are from 1,602 depressed older…

  7. Antipsychotic treatment in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Tahir; Clevenger, Charles V; Kaklamani, Virginia; Lauriello, John; Campbell, Austin; Malwitz, Kari; Kirkland, Robert S

    2014-06-01

    Special consideration is required when prescribing antipsychotic drugs for patients with an existing diagnosis of breast cancer. The package inserts of all approved antipsychotics contain precautions regarding their administration in this patient group. These drugs are well known to elevate serum prolactin levels to varying degrees. Overexpression of the prolactin receptor is seen in more than 95% of human breast cancers. Many genes that are activated by the prolactin receptor are associated with tumorigenesis and cancer cell proliferation. The authors discuss the pathophysiology, clinical implications, and pertinent preclinical data and make specific recommendations regarding the use of antipsychotics in patients with breast cancer. PMID:24880509

  8. Access to chronic disease care in general practice: the acceptability of implementing systematic waiting-room screening using computer-based patient-reported risk status

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Christine L; Carey, Mariko; Yoong, Sze Lin; D’Este, Catherine; Makeham, Meredith; Henskens, Frans

    2013-01-01

    Background Routine screening and advice regarding risky lifestyle behaviours is appropriate in the primary care setting, but often not implemented. Routine electronic collection of patients’ self-reported data may streamline the collection of such information. Aim To explore the perceptions of GPs and their attending patients regarding the acceptability of waiting-room touchscreen computers for the collection of health behaviour information. Uptake, ease of operation, and the perceived likelihood of future implementation were studied. Design and setting Cross-sectional health-risk survey. General practices in metropolitan areas in Australia. Method Practices were randomly selected by postcode. Consecutive patients who were eligible to take part in the study were approached in the waiting room and invited to do so. Participants completed the touchscreen health survey. A subsample of patients and GPs completed additional items regarding acceptability. Results Twelve general practices participated in the study, with 4058 patients (86%) and 51 of 68 (75%) GPs consenting to complete the health-risk survey, 596 patients and 30 GPs were selected to complete the acceptability survey. A majority of the 30 GPs indicated that the operation of the survey was not disruptive to practice and more than 90% of patients responded positively to all items regarding its operation. More than three-quarters of the patient sample were willing to consider allowing their responses to be kept on file and complete such surveys in the future. Conclusion As waiting-room-based collection of this information appears to be both feasible and acceptable, practitioners should consider collecting and incorporating routine patient-reported health behaviours for inclusion in the medical record. PMID:23998842

  9. Treatment Outcome of Patients with Buruli Ulcer Disease in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Arens, Nathalie; Wiedemann, Franz; Piten, Ebekalisaï; Kobara, Basile; Bauer, Malkin; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Badziklou, Kossi; Banla Kere, Abiba; Löscher, Thomas; Nitschke, Jörg; Bretzel, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Background Following introduction of antimycobacterial treatment of Buruli ulcer disease (BUD), several clinical studies evaluated treatment outcomes of BUD patients, in particular healing times, secondary lesions and functional limitations. Whereas recurrences were rarely observed, paradoxical reactions and functional limitations frequently occurred. Although systematic BUD control in Togo was established as early as 2007, treatment outcome has not been reviewed to date. Therefore, a pilot project on post-treatment follow-up of BUD patients in Togo aimed to evaluate treatment outcomes and to provide recommendations for optimization of treatment success. Methodology/Principal Findings Out of 199 laboratory confirmed BUD patients, 129 could be enrolled in the study. The lesions of 109 patients (84.5%) were completely healed without any complications, 5 patients (3.9%) had secondary lesions and 15 patients (11.6%) had functional limitations. Edema, category III ulcers >15cm, healing times >180 days and a limitation of movement at time of discharge constituted the main risk factors significantly associated with BUD related functional limitations (P<0.01). Review of all BUD related documentation revealed major shortcomings, in particular concerning medical records on adjuvant surgical and physiotherapeutic treatment. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first systematic analysis of treatment outcome of BUD patients from Togo. Median times to healing and the absence of recurrences were in line with findings reported by other investigators. The percentage of functional limitations of 11.6% was lower than in other studies, and edema, category III ulcers, healing time >180 days and limitation of movement at discharge constituted the main risk factors for functional limitations in Togolese BUD patients. Standardized treatment plans, patient assessment and follow-up, as well as improved management of medical records are recommended to allow for intensified

  10. Pharmacological Management of Elderly Patients with Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome: Room for Speculation?

    PubMed

    Castiglia, Daniela; Battaglia, Salvatore; Benfante, Alida; Sorino, Claudio; Scichilone, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two distinct diseases that share a condition of chronic inflammation of the airways and bronchial obstruction. In clinical settings, it is not rare to come across patients who present with clinical and functional features of both diseases, posing a diagnostic dilemma. The overlap condition has been termed asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS), and mainly occurs in individuals with long-standing asthma, especially if they are also current or former smokers. Patients with ACOS have poorer health-related quality of life and a higher exacerbation rate than subjects with asthma or COPD alone. Whether ACOS is a distinct nosological entity with genetic variants or rather a condition of concomitant diseases that overlap is still a matter of debate. However, there is no doubt that extended life expectancy has increased the prevalence of asthma and COPD in older ages, and thus the probability that overlap conditions occur in clinical settings. In addition, age-associated changes of the lung create the basis for the two entities to converge on the same subject. ACOS patients may benefit from a stepwise treatment similar to that of asthma and COPD; however, the proposed therapeutic algorithms are only speculative and extrapolated from studies that are not representative of the ACOS population. Inhaled corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy, and always in conjunction with long-acting bronchodilators. The potential heterogeneity of the overlap syndrome in terms of inflammatory features (T helper-1 vs. T helper-2 pathways) may be responsible for the different responses to treatments. The interaction between respiratory drugs and concomitant diseases should be carefully evaluated. Similarly, the effect of non-respiratory drugs, such as aspirin, statins, and β-blockers, on lung function needs to be properly assessed. PMID:27138954

  11. Nonpharmacological treatments for patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Vries, Nienke M; Ebersbach, Georg

    2015-09-15

    Since 2013, a number of studies have enhanced the literature and have guided clinicians on viable treatment interventions outside of pharmacotherapy and surgery. Thirty-three randomized controlled trials and one large observational study on exercise and physiotherapy were published in this period. Four randomized controlled trials focused on dance interventions, eight on treatment of cognition and behavior, two on occupational therapy, and two on speech and language therapy (the latter two specifically addressed dysphagia). Three randomized controlled trials focused on multidisciplinary care models, one study on telemedicine, and four studies on alternative interventions, including music therapy and mindfulness. These studies attest to the marked interest in these therapeutic approaches and the increasing evidence base that places nonpharmacological treatments firmly within the integrated repertoire of treatment options in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26274930

  12. The Effects of Positive Patient Testimonials on PTSD Treatment Choice

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Larry D.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.; Caldwell, Daniel; Hanson, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Despite the existence of effective treatment options for PTSD, these treatments are failing to reach those that stand to benefit from PTSD treatment. Understanding the processes underlying an individual’s treatment seeking behavior holds the potential for reducing treatment-seeking barriers. The current study investigates the effects that positive treatment testimonials have on decisions regarding PTSD treatment. An undergraduate (N = 439) and a trauma-exposed community (N = 203) sample were provided with videotaped treatment rationales for prolonged exposure (PE) and sertraline treatments of PTSD. Half of each sample also viewed testimonials, detailing a fictional patient’s treatment experience. All participants then chose among treatment options and rated the credibility of- and personal reactions toward- those options. Among treatment naïve undergraduates, testimonials increased the proportion choosing PE alone; and among treatment naïve members of the trauma-exposed community sample, testimonials increased the proportion choosing a combined PE plus sertraline treatment. These effects were not observed for those with prior history of either psychotherapeutic or pharmacological treatment. Major barriers exist that prevent individuals with PTSD from seeking treatment. For a critical unreached treatment sample, those who are treatment naïve, positive patient testimonials offer a mechanism in which to make effective treatments more appealing and accessible. PMID:23103234

  13. Design and study of ultrasound-based automatic patient movement monitoring device for quantifying the intrafraction motion during teletherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumar, S; Vinothraj, R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to fabricate indigenously ultrasonic-based automatic patient's movement monitoring device (UPMMD) that immediately halts teletherapy treatment if a patient moves, claiming accurate field treatment. The device consists of circuit board, magnetic attachment device, LED indicator, speaker, and ultrasonic emitter and receiver, which are placed on either side of the treatment table. The ultrasonic emitter produces the ultrasound waves and the receiver accepts the signal from the patient. When the patient moves, the receiver activates the circuit, an audible warning sound will be produced in the treatment console room alerting the technologist to stop treatment. Simultaneously, the electrical circuit to the teletherapy machine will be interrupted and radiation will be halted. The device and alarm system can detect patient movements with a sensitivity of about 1 mm. Our results indicate that, in spite of its low-cost, low-power, high-precision, nonintrusive, light weight, reusable and simplicity features, UPMMD is highly sensitive and offers accurate measurements. Furthermore, UPMMD is patient-friendly and requires minimal user training. This study revealed that the device can prevent the patient's normal tissues from unnecessary radiation exposure, and also it is helpful to deliver the radiation to the correct tumor location. Using this alarming system the patient can be repositioned after interrupting the treatment machine manually. It also enables the technologists to do their work more efficiently. PMID:23149769

  14. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Halperin, Abigail C; Saxon, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared with the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses, which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with a psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques for implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider when treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  15. Differential patient-caregiver opinions of treatment and care for advanced lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Amy Y; Zyzanski, Stephen J; Siminoff, Laura A

    2010-04-01

    This study examined the differences of opinion between cancer patients and caregivers with regard to treatment and care decisions. 184 advanced lung cancer patients and 171 primary caregivers were recruited as a convenience sample from hospitals in Cleveland, Ohio. A telephone interview was conducted to collect data using a semi-structured questionnaire. Nonparametric tests and regression analysis were performed. The findings showed that patients and caregivers reported significant disagreement on three main issues: trade-off between treatment side effects and benefits; reporting treatment side effects to physicians, and hospice care. Caregivers were more concerned about patient's quality of life and more willing to discuss hospice issues than were patients (p < or = 01). Perceived family disagreement is associated with depression in both patients and caregivers (p < or = 01; R(2)=8%). The study provided empirical evidence for patient-caregiver disagreement about treatment and care decisions and its significant adverse impact on both patients and caregivers. PMID:20137849

  16. Tolerance of intragastric balloon and patient's satisfaction in obesity treatment

    PubMed Central

    Garnysz, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The dietary management of obesity is associated with a high failure rate. Methods which enable the long-term reduction of food intake have been developed. Patients treated with an intragastric balloon may experience some unwanted symptoms during therapy. The severity of these symptoms may result in poor tolerance of treatment, while patients who do not experience these symptoms may refuse to follow dietary modifications. In these cases, weight reduction at the end of treatment may be below expectations. Aim To assess the tolerance of intragastric balloon treatment in obese patients as well as their satisfaction with this treatment. Material and methods Fifty-seven gastric balloon procedures were performed in 51 females and 6 males aged 17 to 65 years (39.5 ±10.7 years). Baseline weight was 104 ±14.5 kg (78–140 kg), body mass index 37.2 ±4.1 kg/m2 (29.8–48.1 kg/m2), mean excess body weight 41.2 ±11.5 kg (20.4–63.1 kg). The balloon was filled with 669 ±25.8 ml of saline solution (550–700 ml). Upon balloon removal 6 months later, the patients completed a 12-question survey. Results We obtained 57 surveys. The most common symptoms included vomiting, heartburn, abdominal pain and others. Twenty-two patients reported > 2 symptoms. Two patients were symptom-free. The mean duration of symptoms was 24.8 days. Patients reported better control of hypertension, diabetes and resolution of obstructive sleep apnoea and joint symptoms. Only 14 patients did not observe any significant improvement in their bodily function. Fifty-four patients expressed satisfaction after treatment, 6 patients were dissatisfied with the weight loss, and 5 patients would not opt for balloon re-treatment. Conclusions The balloon treatment is a safe and well-tolerated therapy with a low complication rate. PMID:26649094

  17. Effects of Program and Patient Characteristics on Retention of Drug Treatment Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Joshi, Vandana; Maglione, Margaret; Chou, Chih Ping; Anglin, M. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Studied the effects of program and patient characteristics on patient retention in residential, out-patient, and methadone maintenance drug treatment programs. Data for 26,047 patients in 87 programs show that threshold retention rates were generally low for all 3 program types, although program practice and service provision played important…

  18. [Aspirin treatment for patients with Kawasaki disease].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Hiromichi

    2014-09-01

    Aspirin was first used for patients with Kawasaki disease(KD) at 1970s. Favorable outcomes of KD patients treated with aspirin were reported in 1970-80s and now it is one of the standard therapeutic agents for KD. Its anti-inflammation effects suppress vascular wall inflammation of KD at acute phase. In addition, its antiplatelet effects heal endothelial dysfunction and prevent clot formation in coronary arteries at sub-acute and convalescent phase. Long-term dosage for patients with coronary artery aneurysms(CAA) is also important, however, there are few evidences of risk-benefit assessment for its long-term use especially for middle-aged and senior adults with KD and CAA. PMID:25518411

  19. Treatment choices and outcomes of patients with manometrically diagnosed achalasia.

    PubMed

    Yeung, J C; Finley, C; Hanna, W C; Miller, L; Ferri, L; Urbach, D R; Darling, G E

    2016-07-01

    This prospective population-based study was designed to evaluate treatment choices in patients with new manometrically diagnosed achalasia and their outcomes. Patients referred to the esophageal function laboratory were enrolled after a new manometric diagnosis of achalasia. Patients completed an initial achalasia symptom score validated questionnaire on their symptom severity, duration, treatment pre-diagnosis and Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form (SF-36) survey. Treatment decisions were made by the referring physician and the patient. Follow-up questionnaires were completed every 3 months for 1 year. Patients who chose not to undergo treatment at 1-year follow-up completed another questionnaire after 5 years. Between January 2004 and January 2005, 83 of 124 eligible patients were enrolled. Heller myotomy was performed on 31 patients, three patients received botulinum toxin injections, and 25 patients received 29 pneumatic balloon dilatations. Twenty-four patients chose to receive no treatment. Following treatment, patients treated with surgery, dilatation and botulinum toxin had an average improvement in achalasia symptom score of 23 +/- 12.2, 17 +/- 10.9, and 9 +/- 14, respectively. Patients receiving no treatment had worsening symptoms with a symptom score change of -3.5 +/- 11.4. Surgery and dilatation resulted in significant improvement (P < 0.01) relative to no treatment. In univariate logistic regression, symptom severity score (odds ratio [OR] 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00 to 1.08), sphincter tone (OR 1.04, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.09), difficulty swallowing liquids (OR 3.21, 95% 1.15 to 8.99), waking from sleep (OR 2.75, 95% 1.00 to 7.61), and weight loss (OR 5.99, 95% CI 1.93 to 18.58) were all significant in predicting that patients would select treatment. In the multivariate analysis, older age (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.09) and weight loss (OR 3.91, 95% CI 1.02 to 15.2) were statistically significant for undergoing treatment. At 5 years

  20. Negotiating treatment preferences: Physicians' formulations of patients' stance.

    PubMed

    Landmark, Anne Marie Dalby; Svennevig, Jan; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Eliciting patients' values and treatment preferences is an essential element in models of shared decision making, yet few studies have investigated the interactional realizations of how physicians do this in authentic encounters. Drawing on video-recorded encounters from Norwegian secondary care, the present study uses the fine-grained empirical methodology of conversation analysis (CA) to identify one conversational practice physicians use, namely, formulations of patients' stance, in which physicians summarize or paraphrase their understanding of the patient's stance towards treatment. The purpose of this study is twofold: (1) to explore what objectives formulations of patients' stance achieve while negotiating treatment and (2) to discuss these objectives in relation to core requirements in shared decision making. Our analysis demonstrates that formulating the patient's stance is a practice physicians use in order to elicit, check, and establish patients' attitudes towards treatment. This practice is in line with general recommendations for making shared decisions, such as exploring and checking patients' preferences and values. However, the formulations may function as a device for doing more than merely checking and establishing common ground and bringing up patients' preferences and views: Accompanied by subtle deprecating expressions, they work to delegitimize the patients' stances and indirectly convey the physicians' opposing stance. Once established, these positions can be used as a basis for challenging and potentially altering the patient's attitude towards the decision, thereby making it more congruent with the physician's view. Therefore, in addition to bringing up patients' views towards treatment, we argue that physicians may use formulations of patients' stance as a resource for directing the patient towards decisions that are congruent with the physician's stance in situations with potential disagreement, whilst (ostensibly) avoiding a more

  1. Neutron measurements with ultra-thin 3D silicon sensors in a radiotherapy treatment room using a Siemens PRIMUS linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guardiola, C.; Gómez, F.; Fleta, C.; Rodríguez, J.; Quirion, D.; Pellegrini, G.; Lousa, A.; Martínez-de-Olcoz, L.; Pombar, M.; Lozano, M.

    2013-05-01

    The accurate detection and dosimetry of neutrons in mixed and pulsed radiation fields is a demanding instrumental issue with great interest both for the industrial and medical communities. In recent studies of neutron contamination around medical linacs, there is a growing concern about the secondary cancer risk for radiotherapy patients undergoing treatment in photon modalities at energies greater than 6 MV. In this work we present a promising alternative to standard detectors with an active method to measure neutrons around a medical linac using a novel ultra-thin silicon detector with 3D electrodes adapted for neutron detection. The active volume of this planar device is only 10 µm thick, allowing a high gamma rejection, which is necessary to discriminate the neutron signal in the radiotherapy peripheral radiation field with a high gamma background. Different tests have been performed in a clinical facility using a Siemens PRIMUS linac at 6 and 15 MV. The results show a good thermal neutron detection efficiency around 2% and a high gamma rejection factor.

  2. Treatment for patients with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    PAN, TAO; LIU, XIAOYUN; XIANG, SHOUGUI; JI, WENLI

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common but have become increasingly resistant to drugs. The aim of the present study was to examine the combined treatment of traditional Chinese and Western medicine in 30 cases of pulmonary infection with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Patients were divided into groups A and B according to drug treatments. Cefoperazone or sulbactam and tanreqing were administered in group A, and cefoperazone or sulbactam in group B. The curative effect and prognosis of the two groups were recorded and the remaining treatments were performed routinely in the clinic. For the combined therapy group, which was administered sulperazone and tanreqing, 8 patients were recovered, 6 patients had significant effects, 3 patients exhibited some improvement and 1 patient had no response. One of the patients did not survive after 28 days. By contrast, there were 4 patients that were successfully treated, 3 patients with significant effects, 2 patients with some improvement and 2 patients had no response in the sulperazone group, and 4 patients did not survive after 28 days. In conclusion, the combined therapy of cefoperazone or sulbactam supplemented with tanreqing was identified to be more effective than cefoperazone or sulbactam as monotherapy, for treating multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. PMID:27073447

  3. Management Overview: Taking a Patient with Intracranial Hemorrhage Related to Direct Oral Anticoagulants to the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Alturki, Abdulrahman; Alamri, Abdullah; Badawy, Mohamed; Teitelbaum, Jeanne

    2016-06-01

    Options for anticoagulation have been expanding constantly during the past few years, providing a greater number of agents for prevention and management of thromboembolic disease. Although heparins and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) has been used extensively for many decades, their narrow therapeutic range, interactions with other medications and food, and the need for routine monitoring of blood levels have led to the search for less problematic alternatives. Direct oral anticoagulants represent an important advance in anticoagulation therapy, directly inhibiting thrombin (dabigatran) or factor Xa (rivaroxaban, apixaban) they represent an effective and safe alternatives to VKAs and heparins in the prevention and treatment of several thromboembolic disorders. DOCAs are associated with a low overall intracranial hemorrhage risk; however, life-threatening bleeding can occur. Reversal agents are approved for some and under development for others, concerns over the lack of antidotes or difficulty in obtaining them has tempered enthusiasm for their use because of the perception of better safety with heparins and VKAs as a result of the availability of effective reversal strategies. Appropriate use of these agents requires knowledge of their individual characteristics, mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics, ways of monitoring, and when needed, manage patients in need of urgent surgery especially in life-threatening bleeds. This article provides a suggested comprehensive approach to manage patients with intracranial hemorrhage while on direct oral anticoagulants who require an urgent surgical intervention and who cannot wait for plasma concentration to decline. PMID:26960279

  4. Hospital–Physician Affiliations and Patient Treatments, Expenditures, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Kristin

    2004-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations and the treatments, expenditures, and outcomes of patients. Data Sources Sources include the Medicare Provider Analysis and Review dataset, the American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and the Area Resource File (ARF). Study Design A multivariate regression analysis of the relationship between hospital–physician affiliations (such as physician–hospital organizations [PHOs] or salaried employment) and the treatment of Medicare patients with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction admitted to general medical-surgical hospitals between 1994 and 1998. Dependent variables include whether the patient received a catheterization or angioplasty or bypass surgery; whether a patient was readmitted, or died within 90 days of initial admission; and expenditures. Independent variables include patient, admission hospital, and market characteristics, as well as hospital and year fixed effects. Principal Findings The integrated salary model form of hospital–physician affiliation is associated with slightly higher procedure rates, and higher patient expenditures. At the same time, there is little evidence that hospital–physician affiliations in the aggregate have had any measurable impact on patient treatment or outcomes. Conclusions The limited effect of hospital–physician affiliations on patient outcomes is consistent with previous research showing that affiliations have not much changed the nature of health care delivery. However, the finding that the integrated salary model is associated with higher treatment intensity suggests that affiliations may have had some impact on patients, and could have more in the future. PMID:15032954

  5. Many Patients with Cancer Need Better Treatments for Pain

    Cancer.gov

    Inadequate pain treatment in patients with cancer remains a significant problem and appears to be more frequent among minorities, according to a new study published online April 16, 2012, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Novel treatment strategies for patients with relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jona, Adam; Younes, Anas

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), especially those who relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation, remains challenging. Patients with HL whose disease relapses after stem cell transplantation are rarely cured with current treatment modalities, and have a median survival is less than 3 years. With no new drugs have been approved by the FDA for HL in more than three decades, there is a clear unmet medical need for drug development for this patients population. New treatment strategies that are based on targeting oncogenic signaling pathways are currently explored. This review will focus on emerging new treatment modalities that are currently under investigation for patients with relapsed classical HL. PMID:20828898

  7. Useless Treatments Common in Young, Terminal Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Young, Terminal Cancer Patients 3 in 4 get aggressive therapies with painful side effects in last months ... or middle-aged Americans with terminal cancer receive aggressive treatment during the last month of their lives, ...

  8. Dental treatment of handicapped patients using endotracheal anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Y.; Filippi, A.; Geiger, G.; Kirschner, H.; Boll, M.

    1996-01-01

    Dental treatment using endotracheal anesthesia is indicated where acute odontogenic infections, accidental injuries, or multiple caries and periodontitis marginalis require surgical and/or restorative treatment. It is also indicated where it is not possible to use psychological support during local anesthesia or during premedication or analgosedation. Dental treatment of handicapped patients using endotracheal anesthesia is described, along with indication and frequency of such treatment. The state of the dentition is illustrated, along with its relationship to the oral hygiene the handicapped patients receive. The main points of the intraoperative dental procedures and the follow-up of patient care are reported. Postoperative dental or general medical complications have not occurred within the patient population under study. PMID:10323121

  9. [Personality changes of neurotic patients as outcome of the treatment].

    PubMed

    Jodzio, K

    1993-01-01

    The present article attempted to assess the importance of outcomes which appeared during the treatment of 30 neurotic patients. This study specially concentrates on measures of emotional empathy, self-confidence and introspection. There were two surveys in the clinical group: before and after the treatment was completed. Data were compared with a control group, also consisting of 30 persons (15 male and 15 female) matched for age and education. All patients attending group psychotherapy were also treated by pharmacotherapy. As it appeared from the analysis before treatment high empathy in patients was found, but this declined after therapy, however it was still significantly higher than in the control group. The first survey revealed also that patients demonstrated lower levels of self-confidence and introspection. After treatment there were no important differences between the groups. Relationships between the studied qualities were not statistically significant. PMID:8134493

  10. Cluster Headache: Special Considerations for Treatment of Female Patients of Reproductive Age and Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    VanderPluym, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Cluster headache is a rare disorder that is more common in adult male patients. It has a unique phenotype of unilateral, severe, to very severe headaches lasting 15 to 180 min with ipsilateral autonomic symptoms. Time to correct diagnosis can be protracted. A number of treatment options exist for the standard cluster headache patient, but special considerations must be made for female patients of reproductive age and pediatric patients. The objective of this article is to explore the current literature pertaining to special considerations in cluster headache management, including treatment of pregnant or breastfeeding patients and pediatric patients. PMID:26711274

  11. Memory's Room.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Mary

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Liberal Arts Studiolo from the Ducal Palace at Guibbio, Italy. Discusses how the room's design and decoration mirrors its educational uses. Notes that the object of education was to provide the young person with a kind of mental library of materials that could be drawn upon quickly. (RS)

  12. Treatment options for thalassemia patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Terpos, Evangelos; Voskaridou, Ersi

    2010-08-01

    Osteoporosis represents a prominent cause of morbidity in patients with thalassemia. The delay in sexual maturation, the presence of diabetes and hypothyroidism, the parathyroid gland dysfunction, the progressive marrow expansion, the iron toxicity on osteoblasts, the iron chelators, and the deficiency of growth hormone or insulin growth factors have been identified as major causes of osteoporosis in thalassemia. Adequate hormonal replacement, effective iron chelation, improvement of hemoglobin levels, calcium and vitamin D administration, physical activity, and smoking cessation are the main to-date measures for the management of the disease. During the last decade, novel pathogenetic data suggest that the reduced osteoblastic activity, which is believed to be the basic mechanism of bone loss in thalassemia, is accompanied by a comparable or even greater increase in bone resorption. Therefore, the role of bisphosphonates, potent inhibitors of osteoclast activation, arises as a major factor in the management of osteoporosis in thalassemia patients. PMID:20712799

  13. [Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Elderly Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Yokode, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Age-specific analyses of mortality rates in Japan show that cancer was the leading cause of death for the age group 40-89 years in the year 2013. Although the crude mortality rate from cancer has recently increased, the age-adjusted cancer mortality rate has shown a decreasing trend. This suggests that the increases in the crude mortality rate may have been caused by the aging of the population. Cancer patients who are old present many comorbidities and newly diagnosed geriatric problems. Several tools provide determinants of survival in cancer patients who are old (including the comprehensive geriatric assessment [CGA]) in order to improve the quality of cancer care in this population. PMID:27539034

  14. Lack of tolerable treatment options for patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie; Eramo, Anna; Francois, Clement; Duffy, Ruth; Legacy, Susan N; Offord, Steve J; Krasa, Holly B; Johnston, Stephen S; Guiraud-Diawara, Alice; Kamat, Siddhesh A; Rohman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Atypical antipsychotics (AAs), an effective treatment for schizophrenia, have a range of pharmacologic properties leading to differences in tolerability as well as heterogeneity in treatment response. Individual patient characteristics must be considered when making treatment choices, especially from an adverse event (AE) or tolerability perspective. Despite the availability of numerous AAs, after appraising patient characteristics at the time of treatment selection, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options. Patients and methods AE risk factors, defined as having either a prior history of an AE or a risk factor for that AE, were determined for Medicaid-insured and Commercially insured patients using database analysis. Patients receiving AA treatment between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012 defined the index date of first observed AA prescription during this period. Nine AAs were evaluated for association with AE risk factors as informed by drug prescribing information from the different manufacturers and published meta-analyses. The proportion of patients with pre-index AE risk factors prescribed an AA associated with that risk factor was then determined. Results A high proportion of patients (>80%) were prescribed an AA associated with extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia despite experiencing extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia prior to AA treatment initiation. Similar trends were observed among patients with diabetes (>60%) and obesity (>40%). From the nine treatment options available, the number of optimal choices for individual patient segments were limited based on their prior history, including those with cardiometabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities (four); experiencing prolactin elevation-related problems (seven); needing to avoid excessive sedation (four); or at risk of extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia (two). Options were then further restricted among patients in more than one segment when multiple pre-index AE

  15. Complementary treatment of psychotic and epileptic patients in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Razali, Salleh Mohd; Yassin, Azhar Mohd

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this article is to describe and compare the use of traditional/complementary medicine (T/CM) among psychotic (schizophrenia and schizophreniform disorder) and epileptic Malay patients in peninsular Malaysia. There were 60 patients in each group. T/CM consultation was uniformly spread across all levels of education and social status. We could not find a single over-riding factor that influenced the decision to seek T/CM treatment because the decision to seek such treatment was complex and the majority of decisions were made by others. Fifty-three patients (44.2%), consisting of 37 (61.7%) psychotic and 16 (26.7%) epileptic patients had consulted Malay traditional healers (bomoh) and/or homeopathic practitioners in addition to modern treatment; of these, only three had consulted bomoh and homeopathic practitioners at the same time. The use of T/CM was significantly higher in psychotic than in epileptic Malay patients. PMID:18799643

  16. Patient-centred care: making cancer treatment centres accountable.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Alison; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Waller, Amy; Carey, Mariko

    2014-07-01

    Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which indicates the quality of patient-centred care provided by cancer treatment centres. Patient-centred care covers six domains including physical comfort; emotional support; respect for patients' preferences and values; integration and coordination; involvement of family and friends; and the provision of information, communication and education to enable patients to understand and make informed decisions about their care. First, we identify priority areas within each domain. Next, we propose three questions that should be asked of every patient across the six domains of patient-centred care. The first question explores whether patients were specifically asked by a healthcare provider at the cancer treatment centre about their concerns, values and preferences. Research indicates that it cannot be assumed that clinicians are aware of patient's needs or preferences in these six areas. Second, if the answer from the patient suggests that they would like assistance, then it would be expected that this would be offered. Thirdly, if the patient indicates that they would like such assistance and it is provided, then it might be expected that the patient would report that the provided assistance did relieve their suffering, or the assistance provided was consistent with their preferences, needs and values. Regular measurement and reporting of these aspects of patient-centred cancer care has the potential to identify deficits and inequities in care delivery, allow for comparisons across treatment centres and stimulate an improvement in the patient-centred care provided to cancer patients. PMID:24696084

  17. [Amifostine used in the treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Xia; Zhu, Hong-Li; Lu, Xue-Chun; Fan, Hui; Yao, Shan-Qian; Ma, Jian; Yang, Qing-Ming; Cai, Li-Li; Zhuang, Xiao-Meng; Yang, Yang

    2007-02-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the curative effects and adverse effects of amifostine in the treatment of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Amifostine (AMF) was used alone (4/12) or combined with recombinant human erythropoietin (rh-EPO) (8/12) in 12 MDS patients. The therapeutic regimen was adopted with AMF 0.4 g/day for 5 days, then took a break of 2 days and then went on for 3 weeks consecutively, that was reputed as one treatment cycle. rh-EPO 6 000 U was used for 3 days per week. The results showed that 12 patients all attained hematological improvement in peripheral blood. 11 cases showed major effective response rate (91.7%), while 1 case showed minor response rate (8.3%). The effective response rate of hemoglobin, leukocytes and platelets was 100%, 75% and 58.3% respectively. The intervals of red cell transfusions (RCT) in 2 cases living on red cell transfusion before AMF treatment were prolonged after AMF treatments, and the amount of each RCT was decreased obviously. The side effect was usually discomfort of digestive system, but all patients can endure. In conclusion, Amifostine is a potential drug in the treatment of MDS patients with safety especially to those elder patients who often suffered from other multiple organ disfunctions, and the curative effect will be improved by more treatment cycles. PMID:17490528

  18. Predictors of outpatient treatment retention: patient versus substance use characteristics.

    PubMed

    McCaul, M E; Svikis, D S; Moore, R D

    2001-03-01

    The present study examined predictors of participation and retention for patients treated at an urban, hospital-based outpatient substance abuse treatment clinic. All patients were interviewed using the Addiction Severity Index (ASI) at the time of admission. Based on lifetime diagnostic history of psychoactive substance abuse/dependence, patients (N=268) were classified as: alcohol-only, drug(s)-only, and alcohol+drug(s). Alcohol-only patients were significantly older, more likely to be Caucasian, married, have less than a high school education, and be employed than drug-only or alcohol/drug patients. Using multiple regression analysis, substance use status did not predict treatment participation and retention, whereas race, gender and employment composite score were significant predictors. Specifically, patients attended more sessions and remained in treatment longer if they were Caucasian, male and had a high employment composite score. These findings suggest that type of substance abuse may be overemphasized as a predictor of outpatient drug-free treatment retention, and that greater emphasis should be placed on tailoring treatment to patients' cultural, gender and vocational needs. PMID:11173163

  19. Some folded issues related to over-shielded and unplanned rooms for medical linear accelerators - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, Wazir; Ullah, Asad; Hussain, Amjad; Ali, Nawab; Alam, Khan; Khan, Gulzar; Matiullah; Maeng, Seongjin; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2015-08-01

    A medical linear accelerator (LINAC) room must be properly shielded to limit the outside radiation exposure to an acceptable safe level defined by individual state and international regulations. However, along with this prime objective, some additional issues are also important. The current case-study was designed to unfold the issues related to over-shielded and unplanned treatment rooms for LINACs. In this connection, an apparently unplanned and over-shielded treatment room of 610 × 610 cm2 in size was compared with a properly designed treatment room of 762 × 762 cm2 in size ( i.e., by following the procedures and recommendations of the IAEA Safety Reports Series No. 47 and NCRP 151). Evaluation of the unplanned room indicated that it was over-shielded and that its size was not suitable for total body irradiation (TBI), although the license for such a treatment facility had been acquired for the installed machine. An overall 14.96% reduction in the total shielding volume ( i.e., concrete) for an optimally planned room as compared to a non-planned room was estimated. Furthermore, the inner room's dimensions were increased by 25%, in order to accommodate TBI patients. These results show that planning and design of the treatment rooms are imperative to avoid extra financial burden to the hospitals and to provide enough space for easy and safe handling of the patients. A spacious room is ideal for storing treatment accessories and facilitates TBI treatment.

  20. [Treatment of constipation in palliative care patients is a challenge].

    PubMed

    Jarlbæk, Lene; Johnsen, Berit; Hansen, Ole Bo; Hedal, Birte

    2016-08-15

    The evidence for treatment of constipation in palliative care patients is poor. The condition of these patients is often complex, and results from studies performed in other patient groups cannot be extrapolated unconditionally. However, macrogol (polyethylene glycol), lactulose and sodium picosulphate seem to be well tolerated, and methylnaltrexone could be used in opioid-induced constipation, if the patients are not at risk from gastrointestinal perforation. The patients should be offered quiet and private surroundings, and attention should be payed to securing an optimal body position for defecation. PMID:27550785

  1. [Patient non-compliance as a cause of treatment failure].

    PubMed

    Kardas, P

    2000-10-01

    Patient non-compliance is a phenomenon which physician meets in his every-day practice. It covers different aspects of patient behaviour, but the most important role plays non-compliance with medication. Medication non-compliance is common among patients, with no respect to kind of disease or its severity. The consequences of non-compliance are serious. The inefficacy of conducted treatment, patient health status deterioration, additional hospitalisations or even deaths are some of them. Another negative influence of patient non-compliance is the increase of health system expenses. Nevertheless, numerous physicians are not fully conscious of this problem and its consequences, although in many instances treatment failure is caused by lack of patient adherence to medication. Many useful methods of compliance improvement are attainable in every physician work. Their broader use may lead to better therapy effectiveness. PMID:11144070

  2. Treatment of elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Elisa; Grassi, Paolo; Cavo, Alessia; Verzoni, Elena; Maggi, Claudia; De Braud, Filippo; Boccardo, Francesco; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The risk of developing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) increases with age, and given the constant gain in life expectancy of the general population, both localized RCC and metastatic RCC (mRCC) are more frequently observed in the elderly population. The elderly are a heterogeneous group of patients often characterized by the presence of comorbidities, different compliance to treatment and polypharmacy. Here we review the available data with the aim to analyze the safety and efficacy of new targeted therapies (TTs) in elderly mRCC patients. TTs seem to be effective in both older and younger patients, but elderly patients appear to show reduced tolerance to treatments compared to younger patients. Prospective trials are needed to better understand how to manage mRCC in elderly patients. PMID:26654225

  3. Long-term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham J; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M

    2016-02-01

    With earlier cancer diagnosis among older patients with cancer, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have a long-lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose, and properly manage the long-term toxicities of cancer treatment in order to maintain the quality of life of older cancer survivors. PMID:26614861

  4. Heterogeneity Moderates Treatment Response among Patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom; Wilson, G. Terence; Wilfley, Denise E.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore heterogeneity and differential treatment outcome among a sample of patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Method: A latent class analysis was conducted with 205 treatment-seeking, overweight or obese individuals with BED randomized to interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioral weight loss…

  5. Association of glycerol to dexamethasone in treatment of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Albizzati, M G; Candelise, L; Capitani, E; Colombo, A; Spinnler, H

    1979-08-01

    A prospective study of 93 acute stroke patients randomly selected by type of antiedema treatment given (hypertonic glicerol infusion plus dexamethasone versus dexamethasone alone) failed to elicit any statistically significant difference between the two treatments on survival rates and quality of survival 7 and 30 days after the stroke. PMID:495045

  6. Acute myocardial imaging with TC-99m sestamibi identifies the culprit coronary artery in the emergency room assessment of patients with chest pain

    SciTech Connect

    Stowers, S.A.; Thompson, R.C.; Fulmer, H.

    1994-05-01

    Acute myocardial perfusion scintigraphy significantly increases diagnostic accuracy and provides independent predictive information in emergency room (ER) patients with typical angina and a normal or non-diagnostic ECG. We evaluated the correlation between location of perfusion defect on the acute nuclear perfusion scan and location of coronary arterial narrowing demonstrated by pre-hospital discharge coronary angiography. ER patients (n=150) with typical angina and a normal or non-diagnostic ECG had 10-30 mCi of Tc-99m Sestamibi injected while acutely symptomatic. 11 patients with a normal scan and 33 patients with an abnormal scan (total n=44) underwent pre-hospital discharge coronary angiography. Overall diagnostic accuracy in the detection of any significant ({ge}70%) angiographic stenosis was high (84%, p=.001). The diagnostic accuracy of anterior, lateral, and inferior perfusion abnormalities in the detection of significant stenosis of the left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA), respectively was determined.

  7. Ethical Consideration in Wound Treatment of the Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Prachi; Aung, Thet Han; Ferguson, Richard; Ortega, Gerardo; Shah, Jayesh

    2016-01-01

    Today, an advance in clinical medicine and public health has given patients the opportunity to live longer and more productive lives despite progressive illnesses. For some patients, however, this progress has resulted in prolonged dying which is associated with huge emotional and financial expenses. A review article is written based on proceedings of panel discussion on Ethical Consideration in wound treatment of the elderly patient on July 25, 2015, Baptist Wound Symposium at Marriot Northwest, San Antonio, Texas. PMID:27104145

  8. [Improvement of QOL in osteoporotic patients by calcitonin treatment].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Yoshizawa, Minako; Yoh, Kousei

    2005-03-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is impaired in patients with osteoporosis, to which bodily pain greatly contributes. The presence of vertebral fractures detrimentally affects the patients' QOL in a dose-dependent manner. Calcitonin, with its potent analgesic action, markedly improves the various aspects of patients' QOL. Efficacy for the treatment of osteoporosis should be evaluated in terms of QOL also, in addition to the increase in bone mineral density and fracture prevention. PMID:15741699

  9. Ethical Consideration in Wound Treatment of the Elderly Patient.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prachi; Aung, Thet Han; Ferguson, Richard; Ortega, Gerardo; Shah, Jayesh

    2014-12-01

    Today, an advance in clinical medicine and public health has given patients the opportunity to live longer and more productive lives despite progressive illnesses. For some patients, however, this progress has resulted in prolonged dying which is associated with huge emotional and financial expenses. A review article is written based on proceedings of panel discussion on Ethical Consideration in wound treatment of the elderly patient on July 25, 2015, Baptist Wound Symposium at Marriot Northwest, San Antonio, Texas. PMID:27104145

  10. Treatment of patients with OSAS using Nd-YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Zajac, Andrzej; Dudziec, Katarzyna

    2000-06-01

    The authors present their clinical experience regarding the possibilities of application of Nd:YAG and Ho:YAG lasers for the treatment of disorders in the are of the upper respiratory tract. The patients with symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Aphnoe Syndrom need a various operations techniques. Lasers techniques makes it possible to perform a number of procedures in local anesthesia which considerably improves the economic effectiveness of the treatment. The surgeries performed using laser beam enabled very good effect of treatment.

  11. Hospitalized patients with COPD: analysis of prior treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, Irai Luis; Steidle, Leila John Marques; Moreira, Frederico Fernandes; Meyer, Igor Varela; Souza, Ricardo Goetten; Pincelli, Mariângela Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although COPD is a prevalent disease, it is undertreated, and there are no available data regarding previous treatment of COPD in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the appropriateness of maintenance treatment in COPD patients prior to their hospitalization and to identify variables associated with inappropriate treatment. Methods: This was an observational, cross-sectional, analytical study involving 50 inpatients with COPD at two hospitals in the city of Florianópolis, Brazil. The patients completed a questionnaire on parameters related to the maintenance treatment of COPD. Non-pharmacological management and pharmacological treatment were assessed based on the recommendations made by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) in 2011 and by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health in the chronic respiratory diseases section of its Caderno de Atenção Básica (CAB, Primary Care Guidebook). Results: In most of the patients, the COPD was classified as being severe or very severe. Regarding non-pharmacological management, 33% of the patients were smokers, only 32% had been advised to receive the flu vaccine, 28% had received pneumococcal vaccine, and only 6.5% of the patients in the B, C, and D categories received pulmonary rehabilitation. Regarding GOLD and CAB recommendations, pharmacological treatment was inappropriate in 50% and 74% of the patients, respectively. Based on GOLD recommendations, 38% were undertreated. A low level of education, low income, not receiving oxygen therapy, and not receiving the flu vaccine were associated with inappropriate treatment. Conclusions: The application of various non-pharmacological management recommendations was unsatisfactory. Regarding the GOLD recommendations, the high rate of inappropriate maintenance treatment was mainly due to undertreatment. In Brazil, even in severe COPD cases, optimizing treatment to achieve greater benefits continues to be a challenge. PMID:25029645

  12. The endovenous laser treatment for patients with varicose veins

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Fan, Long-Hua; Xu, De-Chun; Li, Xu; Dong, Zhi-Hui; Fu, Wei-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effect of endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) for patients with varicose veins. Methods: Our series included 117 patients who underwent EVLT combined with high ligation and stripping since the introduction of the technique in our institution. All EVLT procedures were performed with local skin cooling to prevent skin burns, as well as stripping after exsanguinations to prevent thrombotic phlebitis. Results: A total of 146 limbs in 117 patients were ablated by EVLT. Bilateral EVLT was performed in 29 patients, with the remaining 88 patients undergoing unilateral EVLT. The mean age of the patients was 57 years ± 12 years (range: 21 years to 80 years), and 56 were male and 61 were female. Follow-up for all patients lasted three to six months. The most common complication was induration and swelling, which was observed in 64 patients, followed by paraesthesia in 27, and skin burns in 12. Conclusion: The treatment with endovenous laser treatment for patients with varicose veins is safe and effective. PMID:27022345

  13. Acute diverticulitis. Comparison of treatment in immunocompromised and nonimmunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Perkins, J D; Shield, C F; Chang, F C; Farha, G J

    1984-12-01

    The clinical course and required treatment of diverticulitis were reviewed in 76 nonimmunocompromised patients and 10 immunocompromised patients. The immunocompromised patients presented with either minimal or no symptoms and findings. Therefore, to make the diagnosis of acute diverticulitis in this group, a high index of suspicion must be maintained. The required treatment varied considerably between the two groups. In 45 nonimmunocompromised patients (76 percent), medical therapy was successful. Medical treatment failed in the other 14 patients (24 percent). However, the compromised group had no patients in whom medical therapy was successful (100 percent failure rate). Thirty-one of the nonimmunocompromised patients (41 percent) required an operation, whereas 100 percent of the immunocompromised patients with acute diverticulitis required an operation. By relating postoperative complications, we were unable to determine the initial operative procedure of choice in the nonimmunocompromised group; however, in the immunocompromised group, colostomy and resection had fewer surgical complications than colostomy and drainage. The immunocompromised patient with acute diverticulitis requires operation. We believe the operation of choice is colostomy and resection of the involved segment. PMID:6507744

  14. Understanding and Utilizing Patient Preferences in Cancer Treatment Decisions.

    PubMed

    Ubel, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Shared decision-making is a complex endeavor that should take into account the patient's personal preferences regarding treatment options. To truly empower patients to be partners in decision-making, especially in situations in which their preferences are important, physicians must learn to communicate better and to distinguish between what is "medical fact" versus a "value judgement." Knowing what are, when to ask, and how to ask the right questions will help physicians be effective in guiding patients toward the right treatments. PMID:27226516

  15. [Tulozin in combined treatment of patients with acute urinary retention].

    PubMed

    Avdoshin, V P; Andriukhin, M I; Mikhaĭlikov, T G; Ol'shanskaia, E V; Khunov, A Z

    2009-01-01

    There is much evidence that tulozin promotes recovery of spontaneous urination, Qmax and is effective in combined treatment of patients with acute retention of urine caused by prostatic adenoma. Tulozin produces positive changes in the lower urinary tract symptoms. Rare occurrence of side effects enables long-term treatment and achievement of good therapeutic response. Tulozin is recommended for patients of younger age, with minimal comorbid pathology, hypotonic with orthostatic reactions, history of side effects in the treatment of other alpha-adrenoblockers, in comorbid hypertention, hypercholesterolemia, retrograde ejaculation, low potention, overactive bladder, prostatitis, after prostatic TUR, transvesical adenomectomy. PMID:19824378

  16. Management and treatment outcomes of patients enrolled in MDR-TB treatment in Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Nhung, N. V.; Hoa, N. B.; Thuy, H. T.; Takarinda, K. C.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: The programmatic management of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) in Viet Nam has been rapidly scaled up since 2009. Objectives: To document the annual numbers of patients enrolled for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) treatment during 2010–2014 and to determine characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients initiating treatment during 2010–2012. Design: A retrospective cohort study using national reports and data from the national electronic data system for drug-resistant TB. Results: The number of patients enrolled annually for MDR-TB treatment increased from 97 in 2010 to 1522 in 2014. The majority of patients were middle-aged men who had pulmonary disease and had failed a retreatment regimen; 77% had received ⩾2 courses of TB treatment. Favourable outcomes (cured and treatment completed) were attained in 73% of patients. Unfavourable outcomes included loss to follow-up (12.5%), death (8%) and failure (6.3%). Having had ⩾2 previous treatment courses and being human immunodeficiency virus-positive were associated with unfavourable outcomes. Conclusion: Increasing numbers of patients are being treated for MDR-TB each year with good treatment outcomes under national programme management in Viet Nam. However, there is a need to increase case detection—currently at 30% of the estimated 5100 MDR-TB cases per year, reduce adverse outcomes and improve monitoring and evaluation. PMID:27051608

  17. The effects of warmed intravenous fluids, combined warming (warmed intravenous fluids with humid-warm oxygen), and pethidine on the severity of shivering in general anesthesia patients in the recovery room

    PubMed Central

    Nasiri, Ahmad; Akbari, Ayob; Sharifzade, GholamReza; Derakhshan, Pooya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shivering is a common complication of general and epidural anesthesia. Warming methods and many drugs are used for control of shivering in the recovery room. The present study is a randomized clinical trial aimed to investigate the effects of two interventions in comparison with pethidine which is the routine treatment on shivering in patients undergoing abdominal surgery with general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Eighty-seven patients undergoing abdominal surgery by general anesthesia were randomly assigned to three groups (two intervention groups in comparison with pethidine as routine). Patients in warmed intravenous fluids group received pre-warmed Ringer serum (38°C), patients in combined warming group received pre-warmed Ringer serum (38°C) accompanied by humid-warm oxygen, and patients in pethidine group received intravenous pethidine routinely. The elapsed time of shivering and some hemodynamic parameters of the participants were assessed for 20 min postoperatively in the recovery room. Then the collected data were analyzed by software SPSS (v. 16) with the significance level being P < 0.05. Results: The mean of elapsed time in the warmed intravenous serum group, the combined warming group, and the pethidine group were 7 (1.5) min, 6 (1.5) min, and 2.8 (0.7) min, respectively, which was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The body temperatures in both combined warming and pethidine groups were increased significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Combined warming can be effective in controlling postoperative shivering and body temperature increase. PMID:26793258

  18. Floor of mouth cancer: patient selection and treatment results

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.E.; Lee, F.; Smith, P.G.; Ogura, J.H.

    1983-04-01

    Retrospective review of 126 primarily treated floor of mouth (FOM) cancers was done to study patient selection and to search for more optimum treatment strategies. Small surface lesions were treated by local excision (LE); small lesions invading FOM without lymph nodes were treated by radiation alone (RA), while larger lesions and those with palpable nodes were treated by preoperative irradiation and surgery (R + S). Ultimate control of the FOM cancer and nodes was achieved for 100% of the LE, 71% of the RA, and 75% of the R + S patients. The majority of primary tumor and nodal recurrences developed by 15 months and 35% of the failures were salvaged by additional treatment. Change in treatment strategies are suggested for surface lesions because of a poor rate of initial tumor control (43%), for patients treated by RA because of a high rate of complications (41%), and for patients without palpable lymph nodes who can be successfully treated by elective neck irradiation.

  19. Treatment of hydropic patients by immunoglobulin with methyl B12.

    PubMed

    Futaki, T; Semba, T; Kudo, Y

    1988-03-01

    Recently several investigations have been reported suggesting that the cause of endolymphatic hydrops might be an immunologic disorder of the endolymphatic space, including the endolymphatic sac. As the first choice in a conservative treatment by medication, the authors have used a combination of prednisolone and furosemide per os, which is rather safe and effective for hydrops patients in a subacute stage. However, some patients do not respond to this treatment or gradually become immune to this medication. With these patients, we have tried an intravenous administration of immunoglobulin G with methyl B12, expecting a curative effect on immunologic deficiency in the endolymphatic space. Compared with a group of patients without this treatment, the group receiving it showed rather good scores in hearing improvement; however, vertigo and tinnitus remained almost unchanged. PMID:3407745

  20. Outpatient treatment of sleep disorders in Alzheimer patients

    PubMed Central

    Scoralick, Francisca Magalhães; Camargos, Einstein Francisco; Freitas, Marco Polo Dias; Nóbrega, Otávio Toledo

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disorders are common in patients with Alzheimer dementia and affect the quality of life of patients and of their caregivers. Despite the rising number of studies in the area, almost all of them are about non-pharmacological treatment. Our objective was to review the literature concerning pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches to treat sleep disorders of elderly patients with Alzheimer dementia in the ambulatory setting. The treatments revised consisted of sleep hygiene and/or use of intense light coupled or not with use of melatonin, cholinesterase inhibitors, antipsychotics, hypnotics or antidepressants. In addition to the non-pharmacological measures, there is evidence that the use of trazodone may aid the treatment of sleep disorders of older individuals with Alzheimer dementia. More studies are necessary to examine the non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments revised herein. PMID:25946052

  1. What do patients want from acute migraine treatment?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rm

    2004-01-01

    Clinical observations have shown that migraine is a progressive disorder, both within an acute attack, and within the disease itself. Rates of diagnosis for migraine have increased in the last decade, but more than half of migraineurs remain undiagnosed. Patient expectations of migraine therapies have also increased (patients require rapid and sustained pain relief with a treatment that has good tolerability), and can differ greatly from those of physicians. Management decisions should be made with these expectations in mind, to enhance patient outcomes and compliance with treatment. Improved understanding of acute migraine attack pathophysiology has led to the strategy of early treatment to modify both the progression of the current attack and, potentially, the progression of the disease itself in the individual. The triptans are effective acute migraine therapies. Each agent has its own distinct profile of efficacy and tolerability, enabling individualization of treatment. PMID:15595989

  2. Optimizing Operating Room Scheduling.

    PubMed

    Levine, Wilton C; Dunn, Peter F

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews the management of an operating room (OR) schedule and use of the schedule to add value to an organization. We review the methodology of an OR block schedule, daily OR schedule management, and post anesthesia care unit patient flow. We discuss the importance of a well-managed OR schedule to ensure smooth patient care, not only in the OR, but throughout the entire hospital. PMID:26610624

  3. Psoriasis Patients' Knowledge about the Disease and Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Astrid Klopstad; Moum, Torbjørn; Larsen, Marie Hamilton; Krogstad, Anne Lene

    2013-01-01

    Patients' knowledge about psoriasis and its treatment has been randomly studied previously. The aim of the study is to investigate patients' knowledge about psoriasis in relation to undergoing patient education in the context of climate therapy (CT). The psoriasis knowledge questionnaire (PKQ) was used in a follow-up pre–post study design of Norwegian patients with psoriasis at the age of 20 years and older undergoing CT at Gran Canaria (Spain). Patients completed the PKQ and provided selected demographic, clinical and health information before (T1), immediately after (T2), and 3 months after (T3) CT. Disease severity was assessed using the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI). 254 psoriasis patients were included (74%). The PKQ score improved significantly from T1 to T2 and T3 (P < 0.001 for both comparisons). Although patient's knowledge improved, further research should use gold standard designs (experiments) to study the effects of educational interventions in different contexts. PMID:23864852

  4. Resilience and Treatment Adhesion in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Daniella Antunes Pousa; Revoredo, Luciana Silva; Vilar, Maria José; Eulália Maria Chaves, Maia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune, rheumatic inflammatory disease that can cause significant morbidity with evident psychological impacts and obvious harm to quality-of-life that require the patient to adapt treatment. Objective: Assessment of resilience and the self-reported treatment adhesion behaviors of patients with SLE, investigating which of these factors are associated to resilience. Method: Cross-sectional study of 40 women with SLE. A questionnaire with social demographic data, health history and the Wagnild Young Resilience Scale were used. Results: 62.5% followed the medical treatment properly but 55% found it difficult. 27.5% of the patients presented low resilience, 57.5% medium and 15% high resilience. Resilience was associated in the chi-square test (p-value < 0.05) with the variables work, understanding SLE, trying to find out about SLE, following the treatment correctly, difficulty in following the treatment and stopping some activity because of the disease. In the correlation analysis, resilience was associated with age (-0.3960), number of working hours (0.5533), specialized treatment duration (-0.8103) and disease duration from diagnosis (-0.8014). Conclusion: Patients with high resilience tended to follow treatment correctly, tried to understand the disease and adhered more to the treatment to avoid risks and promote protection factors. Therefore knowledge of resilience in patients with SLE is necessary. It is important that the state takes necessary actions to facilitate access to treatment, to educational programs and to medical support. Awareness and counselling sessions must be initiated to develop and promote individual capacities to learn how to tackle with the disease for which psychological support of family and doctors can play a significant role. PMID:24665352

  5. Conducting Peer Outreach to Migrants: Outcomes for Drug Treatment Patients

    PubMed Central

    Deren, Sherry; Kang, Sung-Yeon; Mino, Milton; Guarino, Honoria

    2011-01-01

    Peer outreach models have been successful in addressing HIV risk behaviors of drug users. Patients in methadone maintenance treatment programs who were migrants from Puerto Rico and/or familiar with drug use there were trained to conduct HIV-related peer outreach. A group randomized design was implemented; patients in the Experimental (E) condition (n = 80) received training and conducted 12 weeks of outreach. Half of the patients completed the training and outreach. At follow-up, patients in the E condition who conducted outreach felt they were more helpful to their community, showed a trend for engaging in more vocational activities, and were more likely to talk with others about HIV, compared to those who did not conduct outreach and those in the Control condition (n = 78). Drug treatment patients who are migrants can be trained as peer outreach workers and short-term benefits were found. Longer term maintenance of benefits should be assessed. PMID:21479888

  6. Management of patients with resistant hypertension: current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nilay; Calhoun, David A; Dudenbostel, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RHTN) is an increasingly common clinical problem that is often heterogeneous in etiology, risk factors, and comorbidities. It is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure on optimal doses of three antihypertensive agents, ideally one being a diuretic. The definition also includes controlled hypertension with use of four or more antihypertensive agents. Recent observational studies have advanced the characterization of patients with RHTN. Patients with RHTN have higher rates of cardiovascular events and mortality compared with patients with more easily controlled hypertension. Secondary causes of hypertension, including obstructive sleep apnea, primary aldosteronism, renovascular disease, are common in patients with RHTN and often coexist in the same patient. In addition, RHTN is often complicated by metabolic abnormalities. Patients with RHTN require a thorough evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and optimize treatment, which typically includes a combination of lifestyle adjustments, and pharmacologic and interventional treatment. Combination therapy including a diuretic, a long-acting calcium channel blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, a beta blocker, and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist where warranted is the classic regimen for patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists like spironolactone or eplerenone have been shown to be efficacious in patients with RHTN, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and primary aldosteronism. Novel interventional therapies, including baroreflex activation and renal denervation, have shown that both of these methods may be used to lower blood pressure safely, thereby providing exciting and promising new options to treat RHTN. PMID:24231917

  7. Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Patients With Unresectable Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ghafoori, A. Paiman; Nelson, John W.; Willett, Christopher G.; Chino, Junzo; Tyler, Douglas S.; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Uronis, Hope E.; Morse, Michael A.; Clough, Robert W.; Czito, Brian G.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma is an uncommon but lethal malignancy. We analyzed the role of definitive chemoradiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic, locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma treated at a single institution. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis included 37 patients who underwent external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with concurrent chemotherapy and/or brachytherapy (BT) for locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were assessed, and univariate regression analysis was used to evaluate the effects of patient- and treatment-related factors on clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-three patients received EBRT alone, 8 patients received EBRT plus BT, and 6 patients received BT alone (median follow-up of 14 months). Two patients were alive without evidence of recurrence at the time of analysis. Actuarial OS and LC rates at 1 year were 59% and 90%, respectively, and 22% and 71%, respectively, at 2 years. Two patients lived beyond 5 years without evidence of recurrence. On univariate analysis, EBRT with or without BT improved LC compared to BT alone (97% vs. 56% at 1 year; 75% vs. 56% at 2 years; p = 0.096). Patients who received EBRT alone vs. BT alone also had improved LC (96% vs. 56% at 1 year; 80% vs. 56% at 2 years; p = 0.113). Age, gender, tumor location (proximal vs. distal), histologic differentiation, EBRT dose ({<=} or >50 Gy), EBRT planning method (two-dimensional vs. three-dimensional), and chemotherapy were not associated with patient outcomes. Conclusions: Patients with locally advanced extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma have poor survival. Long-term survival is rare. The majority of patients treated with EBRT had local control at the time of death, suggesting that symptoms due to the local tumor effect might be effectively controlled with radiation therapy, and EBRT is an important element of treatment. Novel treatment approaches are indicated in the therapy

  8. [Treatment response of depressive patients with comorbid problem drink].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Hiromi; Hashimoto, Eri; Tayama, Masaya; Saito, Toshikazu

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of Problem Drink on depression. Forty participants with depression were divided into 2 groups: non-Problem Drinker (NPD) group (n = 22) and Problem Drinker (PD) group (n = 18) according to Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) score (NPD < 12, PD > or = 12). Depression was assessed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The effect of medication on depressive symptoms was monitored over 12 weeks using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D). Significant improvement in HAM-D score was observed at 2 weeks in NPD patients but not until 4 weeks in PD patients. Total HAM-D scores were lower in NPD than in PD patients at the end of the treatment period. Therapeutic doses (dose of antidepressant used was equivalent to greater than 75 mg of imipramine) of antidepressants resulted in significant improvement in HAM-D scores at 2 weeks in NPD patients, but not until 8 weeks in PD patients and brought lower HAM-D scores in NPD than in PD patients at the end of the treatment period. The AUDIT score and total alcohol consumption during the study period were negatively correlated to the improvement in HAM-D score. In NPD patients, the level of education of patients in remission was higher than those by patients not in remission. In contrast, level of education of patients in remission were similar to those in PD patients not in remission. The above results suggest that co-occurrence of alcohol use disorders with depression is associated with a lower response to antidepressants which may reflect not only the result of biological alterations in the brain by chronic ethanol ingestion but also an inhibitory effect of ethanol on antidepressant action in the brain. Drinking-related cognitive dysfunction may also relate to the decreased response to treatment in the depressed patients with comorbid Problem Drinker. PMID:24427900

  9. Conventional and Unconventional Treatments for Stress among Methadone-Maintained Patients: Treatment Willingness and Perceived Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Declan T.; Beitel, Mark; Breuer, Timothy; Cutter, Christopher J.; Savant, Jonathan; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    We surveyed 150 methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) program patients about willingness to use, and perceived efficacy of, conventional and unconventional nonpharmacological stress-related treatments. Although levels of treatment willingness and perceived efficacy for both conventional and unconventional treatments were high, ratings for conventional interventions were, on average, significantly higher than those for unconventional ones. Dimensions of psychiatric distress—but not demographic or MMT characteristics—predicted treatment willingness for conventional therapies and treatment willingness and perceived efficacy for unconventional therapies. These findings are likely to have implications for resource and program planning in MMT programs. PMID:21314756

  10. Treatment failure in patients with chronic Blastocystis infection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Tamalee; Ellis, John; Harkness, John; Marriott, Deborah; Stark, Damien

    2014-02-01

    This article reports long-term infection and treatment failure in 18 symptomatic individuals infected with Blastocystis spp. Patients were initially treated with either metronidazole, iodoquinol or triple combination therapy consisting of nitazoxanide, furazolidone and secnidazole. Following treatment, resolution of clinical symptoms did not occur and follow-up testing revealed ongoing infection with the same subtype. Patients then underwent secondary treatment with a variety of antimicrobial agents but remained symptomatic with Blastocystis spp. still present in faeces. Sequencing of the SSU rDNA was completed on all isolates and four subtypes were identified in this group: ST1, ST3, ST4 and ST5. This study highlights the lack of efficacy of several commonly used antimicrobial regimens in the treatment of Blastocystis and the chronic nature of some infections. It also demonstrates the need for further research into treatment options for Blastocystis infection. PMID:24243286

  11. Treatment options for patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease composed of different subtypes, characterized by their different clinicopathological characteristics, prognoses and responses to treatment. In the past decade, significant advances have been made in the treatment of breast cancer sensitive to hormonal treatments, as well as in patients whose malignant cells overexpress or amplify HER2. In contrast, mainly due to the lack of molecular targets, little progress has been made in the treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Recent improved understanding of the natural history, pathophysiology, and molecular features of triple-negative breast cancers have provided new insights into management and therapeutic strategies for women affected with this entity. Ongoing and planned translational clinical trials are likely to optimize and improve treatment of women with this disease. PMID:20979652

  12. Prophylactic treatment of migraine; the patient's view, a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prophylactic treatment is an important but under-utilised option for the management of migraine. Patients and physicians appear to have reservations about initiating this treatment option. This paper explores the opinions, motives and expectations of patients regarding prophylactic migraine therapy. Methods A qualitative focus group study in general practice in the Netherlands with twenty patients recruited from urban and rural general practices. Three focus group meetings were held with 6-7 migraine patients per group (2 female and 1 male group). All participants were migraine patients according to the IHS (International Headache Society); 9 had experience with prophylactic medication. The focus group meetings were analysed using a general thematic analysis. Results For patients several distinguished factors count when making a decision on prophylactic treatment. The decision of a patient on prophylactic medication is depending on experience and perspectives, grouped into five categories, namely the context of being active or passive in taking the initiative to start prophylaxis; assessing the advantages and disadvantages of prophylaxis; satisfaction with current migraine treatment; the relationship with the physician and the feeling to be heard; and previous steps taken to prevent migraine. Conclusion In addition to the functional impact of migraine, the decision to start prophylaxis is based on a complex of considerations from the patient's perspective (e.g. perceived burden of migraine, expected benefits or disadvantages, interaction with relatives, colleagues and physician). Therefore, when advising migraine patients about prophylaxis, their opinions should be taken into account. Patients need to be open to advice and information and intervention have to be offered at an appropriate moment in the course of migraine. PMID:22405186

  13. Treatment and maintenance of a dentate patient with 'radiation caries'.

    PubMed

    Craddock, H L

    2008-11-01

    Patients with xerostomia are presenting dental practitioners with challenges in caries control, long-term restoration and prosthodontic difficulties. In many cases, extraction may be the best option, but for younger, dentate patients, this may be inappropriate. This paper describes the management of a young partially dentate patient with severe xerostomia following irradiation of the salivary glands. Preventive and restorative management are discussed, together with treatment and healing of peri-radicular pathology. The case report demonstrates that long-term stabilization and management of caries and peri-radicular lesions are possible over a seven-year period for a patient with severe radiation caries. PMID:19322963

  14. Dental treatment for handicapped patients; sedation vs general anesthesia and update of dental treatment in patients with different diseases

    PubMed Central

    Corcuera-Flores, José R.; Delgado-Muñoz, José M.; Ruiz-Villandiego, José C.; Maura-Solivellas, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Dental treatment on Handicapped Patients is often difficult because many people with a wide range of ages (from children to the elderly) with different pathologies that can affect the oral cavity and differ widely are included in this group. This situation creates some controversy, because according to pathology, each patient will be treated differently depending on collaboration, general health status, age or medication used to treat this pathologies. According to this situation we can opt for an outpatient treatment without any kind of previous medication, a treatment under conscious or deep sedation or a under general anesthesia treatment. With this systematic review is intended to help clarify in which cases patients should be treated under general anesthesia, sedation (conscious or deep) or outpatient clinic without any medication, as well as clarify what kind of treatments can be carried in private dental clinics and which should be carried out in a hospital. It will also discuss the most common diseases among this group of patients and the special care to be taken for their dental treatment. Key words:Hospital dentistry, handicapped patient. PMID:24121922

  15. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a six-week mortality rate of approximately 20%. Patients with medium- or large-sized varices can be treated for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding using two strategies: non-selective beta-blockers (NSBBs) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Both treatments are equally effective. Patients with acute variceal bleeding are critically ill patients. The available data suggest that vasoactive drugs, combined with endoscopic therapy and antibiotics, are the best treatment strategy with EVL being the endoscopic procedure of choice. In cases of uncontrolled bleeding, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents are recommended. Approximately 60% of the patients experience rebleeding, with a mortality rate of 30%. Secondary prophylaxis should start on day six following the initial bleeding episode. The combination of NSBBs and EVL is the recommended management, whereas TIPS with PTFE-covered stents are the preferred option in patients who fail endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. Apart from injection sclerotherapy and EVL, other endoscopic procedures, including tissue adhesives, endoloops, endoscopic clipping and argon plasma coagulation, have been used in the management of esophageal varices. However, their efficacy and safety, compared to standard endoscopic treatment, remain to be further elucidated. There are safety issues accompanying endoscopic techniques with aspiration pneumonia occurring at a rate of approximately 2.5%. In conclusion, future research is needed to improve treatment strategies, including novel endoscopic techniques with better efficacy, lower cost, and fewer adverse events. PMID:25278695

  16. Treatment of Osteitis Pubis in Non-Athlete Female Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kavroudakis, E; Karampinas, P.K; Evangelopoulos, D.S; Vlamis, J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Osteitis pubis represents a non-infectious inflammation of the pubic symphysis causing varying degrees of lower abdominal and pelvic pain. Although, the disease is believed to affect mainly young athletic patients, it is also encountered in other specific patient groups. Both conservative and surgical treatment options are available. While for elite athletes surgical treatment is indicated, leading to fast pain relief and mobilization, for non-athletic patients no clear indication can be established. Methods: Eight non-athletic women with osteitis pubis, referred to our Department for treatment, were evaluated. All were initially treated conservatively with bed rest, per os non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy. Results: Seven patients improved significantly with conservative treatment while one displayed no improvement and was treated surgically with arthrodesis. Conclusion: We conclude that, for non-athletic female patients suffering from osteitis pubis, surgery is rarely required and that conservative treatment by means of non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs and physical modalities represents a fair option regarding pain and limitation of everyday activity. PMID:21966337

  17. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Triantos, Christos; Kalafateli, Maria

    2014-09-28

    Variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of portal hypertension with a six-week mortality rate of approximately 20%. Patients with medium- or large-sized varices can be treated for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding using two strategies: non-selective beta-blockers (NSBBs) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Both treatments are equally effective. Patients with acute variceal bleeding are critically ill patients. The available data suggest that vasoactive drugs, combined with endoscopic therapy and antibiotics, are the best treatment strategy with EVL being the endoscopic procedure of choice. In cases of uncontrolled bleeding, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents are recommended. Approximately 60% of the patients experience rebleeding, with a mortality rate of 30%. Secondary prophylaxis should start on day six following the initial bleeding episode. The combination of NSBBs and EVL is the recommended management, whereas TIPS with PTFE-covered stents are the preferred option in patients who fail endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. Apart from injection sclerotherapy and EVL, other endoscopic procedures, including tissue adhesives, endoloops, endoscopic clipping and argon plasma coagulation, have been used in the management of esophageal varices. However, their efficacy and safety, compared to standard endoscopic treatment, remain to be further elucidated. There are safety issues accompanying endoscopic techniques with aspiration pneumonia occurring at a rate of approximately 2.5%. In conclusion, future research is needed to improve treatment strategies, including novel endoscopic techniques with better efficacy, lower cost, and fewer adverse events. PMID:25278695

  18. Treatment of psoriasis with etanercept: the typical patient profile.

    PubMed

    Prinz, J C; Puig, L; Girolomoni, G

    2016-07-01

    The chronic nature of psoriasis means that patients often require lifetime treatment. Over this time, treatment frequently has to be adapted to meet variable demands resulting from changes in life course and life events. Biological drugs used to treat psoriasis vary in their dosing regimens, convenience and flexibility. Dermatologists need to understand which biologic agent is best suited for each individual patient. A wealth of evidence supports the safe and effective use of etanercept, which offers a rapid and sustained response, flexibility of dosing, maintenance of response after dose reduction or interruption, and efficacy against non-skin manifestations such as psoriatic arthritis. An expert panel met to agree the typical patient profile of a psoriasis patient treated with etanercept, the main benefits of etanercept in psoriasis, and the patient group most likely to benefit from its use. They agreed that flexibility of dosing, the potential to individualize therapy by stopping and starting treatment while maintaining efficacy, and the possibility of cost saving through the use of flexible treatment regimens were important benefits supporting the use of etanercept in many patients with psoriasis. PMID:27073046

  19. Diagnosis & treatment of tuberculosis in HIV co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Padmapriyadarsini, C.; Narendran, G.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global public health challenge, with an estimated 1.4 million patients worldwide. Co-infection with HIV leads to challenges in both the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis. Further, there has been an increase in rates of drug resistant tuberculosis, including multi-drug (MDR-TB) and extensively drug resistant TB (XDRTB), which are difficult to treat and contribute to increased mortality. Because of the poor performance of sputum smear microscopy in HIV-infected patients, newer diagnostic tests are urgently required that are not only sensitive and specific but easy to use in remote and resource-constrained settings. The treatment of co-infected patients requires antituberculosis and antiretroviral drugs to be administered concomitantly; challenges include pill burden and patient compliance, drug interactions, overlapping toxic effects, and immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Also important questions about the duration and schedule of anti-TB drug regimens and timing of antiretroviral therapy remain unanswered. From a programmatic point of view, screening of all HIV-infected persons for TB and vice-versa requires good co-ordination and communication between the TB and AIDS control programmes. Linkage of co-infected patients to antiretroviral treatment centres is critical if early mortality is to be prevented. We present here an overview of existing diagnostic strategies, new tests in the pipeline and recommendations for treatment of patients with HIV-TB dual infection. PMID:22310818

  20. Iron Therapy Challenges for the Treatment of Nondialysis CKD Patients.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Yee, Jerry

    2016-07-01

    The clinical consequences of untreated, severe anemia in patients with nondialysis CKD can be significant, but disparities exist in the anemia treatment guidelines and position papers issued from working groups and associations across the world. These differ in hemoglobin target and iron levels and their emphasis on various iron markers and other clinical outcomes. Not surprisingly, disparities are observed in anemia treatment strategies among patients with nondialysis CKD across different areas of the world. Over the past decade, the prescription and dosage of both iron therapies and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have shifted, with notable regional differences observed. Moreover, there is ongoing debate regarding oral versus intravenous administration of iron. Compared with oral iron therapy, which often leads to gastrointestinal adverse events, low patient adherence, and low efficacy, intravenous iron administration has been associated with potential serious adverse events, such as anaphylaxis. New iron-based compounds and drugs currently under development are reviewed to describe their potential benefits in the treatment of anemia in patients with CKD. New oral compounds, including iron-based phosphate binders, heme iron polypeptide, and liposomal iron, show different rates of absorption with possibly different efficacy and improved tolerability. These new potential therapies offer health care providers additional anemia treatment options for their patients with CKD; however, the management of anemia in the CKD population continues to present challenges that require prospective studies to identify the optimal iron therapy for patients. PMID:27185524

  1. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B in renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Ridruejo, Ezequiel

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B infection is frequent in renal transplant patients. It negatively impacts long term outcomes reducing graft and patient survival. Current guidelines clearly define who needs treatment, when to start, what is the first line therapy, how to monitor treatment response, when to stop, and how patients must be controlled for its safety. There is some data showing a favorable safety and efficacy profile of nucleos(t)ide analogue (NUC) treatment in the renal transplant setting. Entecavir, a drug without major signs of nephrotoxicity, appears to be the first option for NUC naïve patients and tenofovir remains the preferred choice for patients with previous resistance to lamivudine or any other NUC. Renal transplant recipients under antiHBV therapy should be monitored for its efficacy against HBV but also for its safety with a close renal monitoring. Studies including a large number of patients with long term treatment and follow up are still needed to better demonstrate the safety and efficacy of newer NUCs in this population. PMID:25729474

  2. Photoinduced superhydrophilicity of amorphous TiOx-like thin films by a simple room temperature sol-gel deposition and atmospheric plasma jet treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrakatseli, V. E.; Pagonis, E.; Amanatides, E.; Mataras, D.

    2014-11-01

    A room temperature sol gel process of TTIP / iPrOH / H2O /HNO3 sol was applied for the deposition of functional Ti alkoxide thin films on glass and polymeric substrates (PEEK). The unheated - amorphous films become superhydrophilic after 7 minutes of UV exposure which deteriorates after one day of storage in dark, exhibiting stable amphiphilic behavior. Superhydrophilicity is also obtained after 5 min of atmospheric pressure Ar - O2 plasma jet treatment. As the plasma power and the oxygen content of the mixture of the treatment increase (70W, 3.2 -5% O2) the films high hydrophilicity is maintained for many days even in dark atmospheric conditions providing long term hydrophilic coatings.

  3. Using Computer Vision and Depth Sensing to Measure Healthcare Worker-Patient Contacts and Personal Protective Equipment Adherence Within Hospital Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junyang; Cremer, James F.; Zarei, Kasra; Segre, Alberto M.; Polgreen, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. We determined the feasibility of using computer vision and depth sensing to detect healthcare worker (HCW)-patient contacts to estimate both hand hygiene (HH) opportunities and personal protective equipment (PPE) adherence. Methods. We used multiple Microsoft Kinects to track the 3-dimensional movement of HCWs and their hands within hospital rooms. We applied computer vision techniques to recognize and determine the position of fiducial markers attached to the patient's bed to determine the location of the HCW's hands with respect to the bed. To measure our system's ability to detect HCW-patient contacts, we counted each time a HCW's hands entered a virtual rectangular box aligned with a patient bed. To measure PPE adherence, we identified the hands, torso, and face of each HCW on room entry, determined the color of each body area, and compared it with the color of gloves, gowns, and face masks. We independently examined a ground truth video recording and compared it with our system's results. Results. Overall, for touch detection, the sensitivity was 99.7%, with a positive predictive value of 98.7%. For gowned entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.15%. For masked entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.75%; for gloved entrances, the sensitivity was 86.21% and specificity was 98.28%. Conclusions. Using computer vision and depth sensing, we can estimate potential HH opportunities at the bedside and also estimate adherence to PPE. Our fine-grained estimates of how and how often HCWs interact directly with patients can inform a wide range of patient-safety research. PMID:26949712

  4. Using Computer Vision and Depth Sensing to Measure Healthcare Worker-Patient Contacts and Personal Protective Equipment Adherence Within Hospital Rooms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junyang; Cremer, James F; Zarei, Kasra; Segre, Alberto M; Polgreen, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Background.  We determined the feasibility of using computer vision and depth sensing to detect healthcare worker (HCW)-patient contacts to estimate both hand hygiene (HH) opportunities and personal protective equipment (PPE) adherence. Methods.  We used multiple Microsoft Kinects to track the 3-dimensional movement of HCWs and their hands within hospital rooms. We applied computer vision techniques to recognize and determine the position of fiducial markers attached to the patient's bed to determine the location of the HCW's hands with respect to the bed. To measure our system's ability to detect HCW-patient contacts, we counted each time a HCW's hands entered a virtual rectangular box aligned with a patient bed. To measure PPE adherence, we identified the hands, torso, and face of each HCW on room entry, determined the color of each body area, and compared it with the color of gloves, gowns, and face masks. We independently examined a ground truth video recording and compared it with our system's results. Results.  Overall, for touch detection, the sensitivity was 99.7%, with a positive predictive value of 98.7%. For gowned entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.15%. For masked entrances, sensitivity was 100.0% and specificity was 98.75%; for gloved entrances, the sensitivity was 86.21% and specificity was 98.28%. Conclusions.  Using computer vision and depth sensing, we can estimate potential HH opportunities at the bedside and also estimate adherence to PPE. Our fine-grained estimates of how and how often HCWs interact directly with patients can inform a wide range of patient-safety research. PMID:26949712

  5. Ultrasound guided percutaneous treatment for splenic abscesses: The significance in treatment of critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Zerem, Enver; Bergsland, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the results of ultrasound guided percu-taneous needle aspiration (PNA) and percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in the treatment of splenic abscess. METHODS: Thirty-six patients (14 females and 22 males, with an average age of 54.1 ± 14.1 years) with splenic abscess were treated with ultrasound guided PNA and/or PCD. Patients with splenic abscess < 50 mm in diameter were initially treated by PNA and those with abscess ≥ 50 mm and bilocular abscesses were initially treated by an 8-French catheter drainage. The clinical characteristics, underlying diseases, organism spectra, therapeutic methods, and mortality rates were analyzed. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients had unilocular and 9 bilocular abscess. PNA was performed in 19 patients (52.8%), and 8 of them (42.1%) required PCD because of recurrence of abscess. In 17 patients (47.2%), PCD was performed initially. PCD was performed twice in six patients and three times in two. PNA was definitive treatment for 10 and PCD for 21 patients. One patient with PCD was referred for splenectomy, with successful outcome. In all 4 deceased patients, malignancy was the underlying condition. Twenty-one patients (58.3%) underwent 33 surgical interventions on abdomen before treatment. Cultures were positive in 30 patients (83.3%). Gram-negative bacillus predominated (46.7%). There were no complications related to the procedure. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous treatmnet of splenic abscess is an effective alternative to surgery, allowing preservation of the spleen. This treatment is especially indicative for the patients in critical condition postoperatively. We recommend PNA as primary treatment for splenic abscesses < 50 mm, and PCD for those ≥ 50 mm in diameter and for bilocular abscesses. PMID:17143953

  6. Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of Retreatment Tuberculosis Patients in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Ade, Serge; Adjibodé, Omer; Wachinou, Prudence; Toundoh, Narcisse; Awanou, Bérénice; Agodokpessi, Gildas; Affolabi, Dissou; Adè, Gabriel; Harries, Anthony D.; Anagonou, Séverin

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine among retreatment tuberculosis patients in Benin baseline characteristics, culture, and drug sensitivity testing (DST) results and treatment outcomes. Materials and Methods. A retrospective national cohort study of all retreatment tuberculosis patients in Benin in 2013 using registers and treatment cards. Results. Of 3957 patients with tuberculosis, 241 (6%) were retreatment cases. Compared to new pulmonary bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (NPBCT) patients, there were significantly higher numbers of males (P = 0.04), patients from “Atlantique-Littoral” (P = 0.006), patients aged 45–64 years (P = 0.007), and HIV-positive patients (P = 0.04) among those retreated. Overall, 171 (71%) patients submitted sputum for DST, of whom (163) 95% were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Xpert MTB/RIF and/or culture and 17 (10%) were rifampicin resistant (9 with MDR-TB and 8 monoresistant to rifampicin). For those without MDR-TB (n = 224), treatment success was 93%. Worse outcomes occurred in those with unknown HIV status (RR: 0.27; 0.05–1.45; P < 0.01) while better outcomes occurred in those who relapsed (RR: 1.06, 95 CI: 1.02–1.10, P = 0.04). Conclusion. In 2013, a high proportion of retreatment patients received DST. Treatment success was good although more needs to be done to systematically increase the final follow-up smear examination. Reasons of high losses to follow-up from “Oueme-Plateau” should be investigated. PMID:27110400

  7. Obstructive sleep apnoea: patients' experiences of oral appliance treatment.

    PubMed

    Nordin, E; Stenberg, M; Tegelberg, Å

    2016-06-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a pronounced increase in the number of patients being treated by general dental practitioners for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The purpose of this study was to survey the care and patient experiences and the self-reported effectiveness of OSA treatment with an oral appliance (OA) incorporating mandibular advancement. The design was a retrospective, cross-sectional study, with follow-up between 6 months to 1 year after commencement of treatment. A survey form was posted to 1150 subjects, identified in the regional register over a 1-year period as having been treated with an OA for OSA. The questionnaire comprised 70 questions and assertions in various domains, such as general health/lifestyle, changes in symptoms/quality of life and sleep-related experiences, daytime sleepiness, changes in life situation, evaluation of treatment and the value of treatment. The overall response rate was 64% (n = 738). Treatment with OA gave relief of symptoms in 83% of the respondents. Quality of life, somatic and cognitive symptoms improved significantly in patients who used the appliance frequently (P < 0·001). Daytime sleepiness decreased significantly (P < 0·001). Treatment satisfaction and willingness to recommend the similar treatment to a friend were high (>85%). OA treatment of OSA by general dental practitioners is a safe procedure. Most of the survey respondents experienced relief of symptoms. Those who used their appliance frequently reported improvement in quality of life, somatic and cognitive symptoms. Excessive daytime sleepiness was reduced in the majority of the patients under treatment. PMID:26969447

  8. Process evaluation of podiatric treatment of patients with forefoot pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Foot pain is a common problem for people aged 50 and over and occurs more often in women than in men. About 60% of the foot problems are forefoot problems and slightly more than half of these patients seek medical help, mainly in the form of podiatric care. Podiatric treatment of forefoot problems is known to be heterogeneous. The aims of the present study are to describe the podiatric treatment of patients with forefoot pain and to evaluate the podiatric examination and treatment using an expert panel. Method We invited twenty-five randomly selected subjects with forefoot problems who had received podiatric treatment in a pragmatic randomised clinical trial to participate in an analysis of their treatment by an expert panel. The panel retrospectively established the cause of the foot problem as well as the therapeutic goals and evaluated the treatment. These findings were compared to those reported by the treating podiatrist. Results Two fundamentally different approaches were found in approach of podiatric examination; a functional approach (n =13) and a non-functional approach (n =12). In nine cases the expert panel agreed with the cause recorded by the podiatrist. In five other cases the expert panel concluded that the treatment of the podiatrist was not consistent with the cause of the problem recorded by the podiatrist. Of the 10 patients for whom the podiatrist had recorded to have given shoe advice, only two were able to recollect the proper advice. Three patients did not remember receiving advice at all. Conclusion In this study almost half of the podiatrists worked according to a non-functional approach where the other half (like the expert panel) chose a functional strategy that analyses the underlying problem. Fundamental differences in treatment plans and thus heterogeneous treatments could be a consequence. PMID:23919765

  9. Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia for Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prebet, Thomas; Gore, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a remarkable disease in which leukemogenesis is driven by the PML-RARα oncogene and for which targeted treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)–based therapy allows substantial chance of cure. APL is seen in a small subset of older patients, with age representing one of the most important prognostic factors for outcome of treatment. Unlike other acute leukemias, the inferior outcomes for APL in older patients relates less to changes in disease biology and more to increased toxicity of ATRA and chemotherapy combination regimens used to induce hematologic and molecular responses. Risk-adapted strategies that use less-toxic agents, such as arsenic trioxide, allow treatment of older patients, with greater efficiency and better chances of cure. PMID:21393443

  10. Treatment of Clostridium difficile infection in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Umbrello, Giulia; Castellazzi, Luca; Principi, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile causes infections that can either remain asymptomatic or manifest as clinical disease. In this report, problems, possible solutions, and future perspectives on the treatment of C. difficile infections (CDIs) in pediatric patients are discussed. CDI, despite increasing as a consequence of the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, remains relatively uncommon in pediatrics mainly because younger children are poorly susceptible to the action of C. difficile toxins. In most such cases, C. difficile disease is mild to moderate and discontinuation of the administered antibiotics in patients receiving these drugs when CDI develops, or administration of metronidazole, is sufficient to solve this problem. In severe or frequently relapsing cases, vancomycin is the drug of choice. Probiotics do not seem to add significant advantages. Other treatment options must be reserved for severe cases and be considered as a salvage treatment, although potential advantages in pediatric patients remain unclear. PMID:25912469

  11. Type 2 Diabetes Treatment in the Patient with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Malin, Steven K; Kashyap, Sangeeta R

    2016-09-01

    Lifestyle modification is the cornerstone treatment of type 2 diabetes in the obese patient, and is highly effective at promoting glucose regulation. However, many individuals struggle over time to maintain optimal glycemic control and/or body weight with lifestyle modification. Therefore, additional therapeutic approaches are needed. Pharmacologic interventions have shown promising results for obesity-related diabetes complications. Not surprisingly though lifestyle modification and pharmacology may become ineffective for treating diabetes over time. Bariatric surgery is considered by some, but not all, to be the most effective and durable treatment for combating obesity. In fact many patients with type 2 diabetes have normalized glucose concentrations within days postoperation. Taken together, treatment of obesity in the patient with type 2 diabetes requires a multi-faceted approach. PMID:27519130

  12. [Patient receiving peritoneal dialysis after treatment of ovarian cancer].

    PubMed

    Jaśkowski, Piotr; Krzanowska, Katarzyna; Miarka, Przemysław; Krzanowski, Marcin; Sułowicz, Wiadysław

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is one of the three available options for renal replacement therapy. This method of treatment of end-stage renal disease gives patients relatively high sense of independence and control over their disease, especially in comparison with hemodialysis, and therefore is often preferable method for young individuals wishing to lead an active lifestyle. We present a case of 22 year old female patient with stage 5 of chronic kidney disease, which is a consequence of multi-agent chemotherapy for endo-dermal sinus tumor of the right ovary (diagnosed at the age of 13). Particularly important in the context of treating our patient with peritoneal dialysis is the fact of confirmed metastases into the peritoneum, which was the reason for the use of chemotherapy reserved for high-risk patients (ifosfamide + etoposide + cisplatin). The selected program of chemotherapy provided effective eradication of cancer, but a side effect of treatment was renal tubular damage. In the period from 03.2006 to 05.2007 our patient required hemodialysis (with gradually reduce dose of dialysis), at a later time to 12.2011 patient did not require renal replacement therapy (stable renal function were observed at the stage 4 of chronic kidney disease), but in 12.2011 resumption of dialysis was necessary and the patient, in accordance with her selection, is receiving peritoneal dialysis. Qualification of our patient for treatment with peritoneal dialysis was associated with reasonable concern about the ability to provide acceptable adequacy of dialysis. Apprehensions proved to be unfounded, the clinical observation of the patient presents proper ratios of dialysis adequacy. Our patient was also qualified for renal transplantation. PMID:25546920

  13. Profiling cognitive impairment in treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Frydecka, Dorota; Beszłej, Jan Aleksander; Gościmski, Piotr; Kiejna, Andrzej; Misiak, Błażej

    2016-01-30

    The aim of this study was to compare cognitive performance between schizophrenia patients with and without treatment resistance (TRS and non-TRS patients) taking into account psychopathological symptoms and antipsychotic treatment. The following cognitive tests were administered to 53 TRS patients and 32 non-TRS subjects: Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT), Trail Making Tests (TMT-A and TMT-B), verbal fluency tests (FAS test and Supermarket), as well as selected Wechsler Adults Intelligence Scale (WAIS-R-PI) subtests: Digit Symbol Coding Test, Digit Span Forward and Backward and Similarities. TRS patients performed significantly worse in comparison with non-TRS patients on the measures of processing speed (TMT-A, Stroop test, FAS test, Supermarket test, Digit Symbol Coding test), verbal fluency (FAS test, Supermarket test), cognitive flexibility and executive functions (Stroop test) after controlling for age, illness duration, clinical symptoms severity, the number of years of completed education and antipsychotics' dose. Cognitive performance was associated with negative and general symptomatology. Anticholinergic activity of antipsychotics had debilitating effect on cognitive functioning in non-TRS patients (FAS test) and in TRS patients (TMT-B test, Stroop test, RAVLT subtests, Digit Coding test and Similarities test), while low anticholinergic activity of antipsychotics was associated with better cognitive performance in non-TRS patients (Backward Digit Span test) and in TRS patients (Similarities test). Results of this study indicate that cognitive deficits are more robust in TRS patients than in non-TRS subjects, and are associated with clinical symptoms as well as the treatment with antipsychotics that exert high anticholinergic activity. PMID:26706131

  14. [Non-pharmacologic treatment of arterial hypertension in hemodialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Chazot, C; Charra, B

    2007-10-01

    High blood pressure in dialysis patients is related to extracellular volume excess and the related increase of systemic vascular resistances. Scribner has early described the treatment of hypertension with ultrafiltration and low salt diet, without any drugs. The dry weight method relies on the progressive reduction of the postdialysis body weight until blood pressure is normalized. Additional measures are needed such as low salt diet, neutral sodium balance during dialysis treatment, stop of antihypertensive drugs, adequate length of the dialysis session, and patient education. It may exist a lag time between the normalization of the extracellular volume and blood pressure. It is related to the correction of the hemodynamic consequences of the extracellular volume overload. Moreover, the dry weight may potentially vary in patients undergoing catabolic intercurrent events. The complications of these changes (severe hypertension, pulmonary oedema) must be anticipated by the nephrologist and the staff to avoid additional morbidity to the patient. PMID:18340684

  15. Endoscopic bronchial valve treatment: patient selection and special considerations

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Ralf; Gompelmann, Daniela; Herth, Felix JF; Schuhmann, Maren

    2015-01-01

    As well as lung volume reduction surgery, different minimally invasive endoscopic techniques are available to achieve lung volume reduction in patients with severe emphysema and significant hyperinflation. Lung function parameters and comorbidities of the patient, as well as the extent and distribution of the emphysema are factors to be considered when choosing the patient and the intervention. Endoscopic bronchial valve placement with complete occlusion of one lobe in patients with heterogeneous emphysema is the preferred technique because of its reversibility. The presence of high interlobar collateral ventilation will hinder successful treatment; therefore, endoscopic coil placement, polymeric lung volume reduction, or bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation as well as lung volume reduction surgery can be used for treating patients with incomplete fissures. The effect of endoscopic lung volume reduction in patients with a homogeneous distribution of emphysema is still unclear and this subgroup should be treated only in clinical trials. Precise patient selection is necessary for interventions and to improve the outcome and reduce the risk and possible complications. Therefore, the patients should be discussed in a multidisciplinary approach prior to determining the most appropriate treatment for lung volume reduction. PMID:26504379

  16. Conservative treatment of arterial pseudoaneurism in patients with behcet disease.

    PubMed

    Unal, O; Citgez, B; Cipe, G; Toydemir, T; Karatepe, O

    2013-02-01

    Behcet's Disease (BD) is a rare disease, of unknown origin that generally causes an inflammation in the subcutaneous tissue, eyes and brain vessels, and related with the immune system, predominantly seen in male patients and the mean age at onset is mainly in the third decade. The aim of the study was to present our experiences with the cases of arterial pseudoaneurysms that we treated conservatively without surgical or radiological intervention. Eleven patients with Behcet's disease who developed arterial pseudoaneuryms and responsed to the medical treatment are included in the study. The operation requirement, the complication rates, and factors that influence morbidity and mortality are evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 29,5 (18-35) years. Nine of the patients were male and 2 were female. The mean period of hospitalization was 18 (11-34) days. Six patients redeveloped aneurysm during their follow-up. Three of these patients were treated with surgery. Five patients had no complication during an average of 20 months of follow-up period. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is a rare complication of Behcet's disease. Despite the good response to conservative treatment at the beginning period, the patients should be closely followed up and redevelopment of the aneurysm should be kept in mind. PMID:23482359

  17. Endoscopic bronchial valve treatment: patient selection and special considerations.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Ralf; Gompelmann, Daniela; Herth, Felix J F; Schuhmann, Maren

    2015-01-01

    As well as lung volume reduction surgery, different minimally invasive endoscopic techniques are available to achieve lung volume reduction in patients with severe emphysema and significant hyperinflation. Lung function parameters and comorbidities of the patient, as well as the extent and distribution of the emphysema are factors to be considered when choosing the patient and the intervention. Endoscopic bronchial valve placement with complete occlusion of one lobe in patients with heterogeneous emphysema is the preferred technique because of its reversibility. The presence of high interlobar collateral ventilation will hinder successful treatment; therefore, endoscopic coil placement, polymeric lung volume reduction, or bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation as well as lung volume reduction surgery can be used for treating patients with incomplete fissures. The effect of endoscopic lung volume reduction in patients with a homogeneous distribution of emphysema is still unclear and this subgroup should be treated only in clinical trials. Precise patient selection is necessary for interventions and to improve the outcome and reduce the risk and possible complications. Therefore, the patients should be discussed in a multidisciplinary approach prior to determining the most appropriate treatment for lung volume reduction. PMID:26504379

  18. Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Basement utility room (room 24; air handling room), near the west end of the combat operations center, looking southwest towards fan system one, air ducts, and walk-in filter rooms. The exterior equipment well is visible at the left - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

  19. Tailored Tamoxifen Treatment for Breast Cancer Patients: A Perspective.

    PubMed

    Jager, Nynke G L; Linn, Sabine C; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-08-01

    Tamoxifen, an endocrine agent, is widely used in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. It has greatly reduced disease recurrence and mortality rates of breast cancer patients, however, not all patients benefit from tamoxifen treatment because in approximately 25% to 30% of the patients the disease recurs. Many researchers have sought to find factors associated with endocrine treatment outcome in the past years, however, this quest has not been finished. In this article, we focus on a factor that might influence outcome of tamoxifen treatment: interpatient variability in tamoxifen pharmacokinetics. In recent years it has become clear that tamoxifen undergoes extensive metabolism and that some of the formed metabolites are much more pharmacologically active than tamoxifen itself. Despite the wide interpatient variability in tamoxifen pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, all patients receive a standard dose of 20 mg tamoxifen per day. Different approaches can be pursued to individualize tamoxifen dosing: genotyping, phenotyping, and therapeutic drug monitoring. Therapeutic drug monitoring seems to be the most direct and promising approach, however, further clinical research is warranted to establish the added value of individual dosing in tamoxifen treatment optimization. PMID:25997856

  20. Patient adherence issues in the treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Larrey, Dominique; Ripault, Marie-Pierre; Pageaux, Georges-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The current standard-of-care treatments for chronic hepatitis C, based on a bitherapy that combines peginterferon alpha-2a or -2b and ribavirin for all genotypes, and on a triple therapy with the addition of an antiprotease specifically for genotype 1, are associated with a limited adherence that decreases their efficacy. The main factors limiting adherence are difficulties in taking the treatment and side effects that worsen the quality of life of the patients. Programs of therapeutic education are essential to improve adherence, quality of life, likelihood of viral suppression, improvement of liver disease, and decrease of late complications. Therapeutic education should be understood as an acquisition of decisional, technical, and social competency with the purpose of making the patient able to make health choices, realize their own life plans, and use health care resources in the best manner. The patient should be placed in the center of an organization, comprising various care workers who include social service professionals and medical staff. For hepatitis C, therapeutic education may be separated into three phases: a first phase corresponding to the educative diagnosis; a second phase corresponding to support during treatment; and the third phase corresponding to support after treatment. Therapeutic education is performed using various instruments and methods specifically adapted to the needs and expectations of individual patients. Upcoming treatments for hepatitis C, with evidence for high efficacy, few side effects, and shorter duration, will certainly change the landscape of adherence and the management of therapeutic education. PMID:24920888

  1. Effects of hydroxyurea treatment for patients with hemoglobin SC disease.

    PubMed

    Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Pressel, Sara; Hilliard, Lee; Brown, R Clark; Smith, Mary G; Thompson, Alexis A; Lee, Margaret T; Rothman, Jennifer; Rogers, Zora R; Owen, William; Imran, Hamayun; Thornburg, Courtney; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Aygun, Banu; Nelson, Stephen; Roberts, Carla; Gauger, Cynthia; Piccone, Connie; Kalfa, Theodosia; Alvarez, Ofelia; Hassell, Kathryn; Davis, Barry R; Ware, Russell E

    2016-02-01

    Although hemoglobin SC (HbSC) disease is usually considered less severe than sickle cell anemia (SCA), which includes HbSS and HbS/β(0) -thalassemia genotypes, many patients with HbSC experience severe disease complications, including vaso-occlusive pain, acute chest syndrome, avascular necrosis, retinopathy, and poor quality of life. Fully 20 years after the clinical and laboratory efficacy of hydroxyurea was proven in adult SCA patients, the safety and utility of hydroxyurea treatment for HbSC patients remain unclear. Recent NHLBI evidence-based guidelines highlight this as a critical knowledge gap, noting HbSC accounts for ∼30% of sickle cell patients within the United States. To date, only 5 publications have reported short-term, incomplete, or conflicting laboratory and clinical outcomes of hydroxyurea treatment in a total of 71 adults and children with HbSC. We now report on a cohort of 133 adult and pediatric HbSC patients who received hydroxyurea, typically for recurrent vaso-occlusive pain. Hydroxyurea treatment was associated with a stable hemoglobin concentration; increased fetal hemoglobin (HbF) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV); and reduced white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil count (ANC), and absolute reticulocyte count (ARC). Reversible cytopenias occurred in 22% of patients, primarily neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Painful events were reduced with hydroxyurea, more in patients >15 years old. These multicenter data support the safety and potentially salutary effects of hydroxyurea treatment for HbSC disease; however, a multicenter, placebo-controlled, Phase 3 clinical trial is needed to determine if hydroxyurea therapy has efficacy for patients with HbSC disease. PMID:26615793

  2. Treatment Strategies for Patients with an INTERMACS I Profile

    PubMed Central

    Abu Saleh, Walid K.; Jabbari, Odeaa Al; Guha, Ashrith; Loebe, Matthias; Bruckner, Brian A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with INTERMACS class I heart failure can be very challenging, and temporary long-term device support may be needed. In this article, we review the currently available temporary support devices in order to support these severely ill patients with decompensated heart failure. Strategies of using a temporary assist as a bridge to long-term device support are also discussed. PMID:25793022

  3. Surgical treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in "Krokodil" drug addicted patients.

    PubMed

    Poghosyan, Yuri M; Hakobyan, Koryun A; Poghosyan, Anna Yu; Avetisyan, Eduard K

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study of jaw osteonecrosis treatment in patients using the "Krokodil" drug from 2009 to 2013. On the territory of the former USSR countries there is widespread use of a self-produced drug called "Krokodil". Codeine containing analgesics ("Sedalgin", "Pentalgin" etc), red phosphorus (from match boxes) and other easily acquired chemical components are used for synthesis of this drug, which used intravenously. Jaw osteonecrosis develops as a complication in patients who use "Krokodil". The main feature of this disease is jawbone exposure in the oral cavity. Surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". 40 "Krokodil" drug addict patients with jaw osteonecrosis were treated. Involvement of maxilla was found in 11 patients (27.5%), mandible in 21 (52.5%), both jaws in 8 (20%) patients. 35 Lesions were found in 29 mandibles and 21 lesions in 19 maxillas. Main factors of treatment success are: cessation of "Krokodil" use in the pre- (minimum 1 month) and postoperative period and osteonecrosis area resection of a minimum of 0.5 cm beyond the visible borders of osteonecrosis towards the healthy tissues. Surgery was not delayed until sequestrum formation. In the mandible marginal or segmental resection (with or without TMJ exarticulation) was performed. After surgery recurrence of disease was seen in 8 (23%) cases in the mandible, with no cases of recurrence in the maxilla. According to our experience in this case series, surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". Cessation of drug use and jaw resection minimize the rate of recurrences in such patients. PMID:24969764

  4. Treatment strategies for patients with an INTERMACS I profile.

    PubMed

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Jabbari, Odeaa Al; Guha, Ashrith; Loebe, Matthias; Bruckner, Brian A

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with INTERMACS class I heart failure can be very challenging, and temporary long-term device support may be needed. In this article, we review the currently available temporary support devices in order to support these severely ill patients with decompensated heart failure. Strategies of using a temporary assist as a bridge to long-term device support are also discussed. PMID:25793022

  5. Pathogenesis and treatment of pain in patients with chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Gordon; Cean, Conrad; Duron, Vincent; Tarnovskaya, Alina; Brem, Harold

    2003-01-01

    Pain must be managed during treatment of a patient with a chronic wound. Failure to do so will impair the patient's ability to heal significantly. Understanding the wound's etiology is essential for designing the wound-healing protocol and implementing its pain management regimen, of which a critical part is the chronic-wound patient's self-assessed scores of pain and functionality. In this report we present a paradigm for treating all chronic wounds, which was subsequently applied to 32 consecutive patients. Our integrated-team approach to managing the treatment of wounds includes accurate evaluation of the progression of patients' pain. Directors of the pain-management team and wound team have jointly managed hundreds of patients--either hospitalized or seen in both outpatient clinical practices. The three general categories for etiologies of the 10 most common types of chronic wounds are: ischemia, neuropathy, and direct tissue damage (e.g. pressure ulcers and venous stasis ulcers). Each of these are treated with unique analgesic regimens focused on surgical/medical management of the wound: oral and parenteral medications in combinations designed to facilitate specific additive analgesic effects and nerve blocks and implantable devices for correcting underlying wound pathophysiology. Successful treatment of pain generally results in increased functional independence and improvement of the patient's quality of life. We integrated wound-care pain-management team established guidelines that delineate the causes of chronic wounds and categorize treatment options for practical clinical use. The expectation is that all pain should be resolved in all patients if both the wound-healing and pain-healthcare providers use current technologies and drugs. PMID:12931299

  6. Predictors of engagement in vocational counseling for methadone treatment patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sung-Yeon; Magura, Stephen; Blankertz, Laura; Madison, Elizabeth; Spinelli, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Employment enhances the outcomes of substance dependency treatment. Unfortunately, although unemployed methadone treatment patients frequently state they are interested in a job, many fail to participate in vocational services when available. Unless patients become engaged, vocational services do not have an opportunity to be effective. This is the first study to explore a broad array of factors that may be associated with differential engagement in vocational services among methadone patients. The study was conducted in two methadone programs in New York City during 2001-2004. Unemployed methadone patients (n = 211) were voluntarily randomly assigned to either of two vocational counseling programs (standard vs. experimental) and followed for 6 months. The sample was 59% male, 75% minority group, aged 45 years on average, and in methadone treatment for 5 years on average. Being engaged in the vocational counseling programs was defined as five or more sessions with the counselor in the first 6 months after study entry. In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with higher engagement in vocational counseling were being non-Hispanic, having more education, a drug injection history, a crack use history, having chronic emotional/mental problems, better work attitudes, and assignment to the experimental vocational program. The results indicate that it is often the most "needy" unemployed methadone patients who become more engaged in vocational counseling. A vocational counseling model which emphasizes assertive outreach and attends to nonvocational clinical issues as well is more likely to engage patients. PMID:16798680

  7. Narrative medicine and the personalisation of treatment for elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Cenci, C

    2016-07-01

    Healthcare organisations, medical knowledge and clinical practice are among the contexts that have most strongly felt the impact of the over 75 population. This is a population of multimorbidity and polypharmacy patients. They are often seen as a conglomeration of juxtaposed guidelines resulting in the intake of more than 10 drugs a day, with absolutely no certainty of their efficacy. The scientific community is increasingly calling into question the current disease-focused approach. Narrative medicine can provide the tools for a treatment plan which is instead more patient-centred. Narrative medicine can promote the development of a systemic, integrated and multi-disciplinary approach to elderly patients. The stories of patients and caregivers, their representations, perceptions, experiences and preferences can reduce the risk of inappropriate tests and treatments. They can promote deprescribing procedures based on a careful analysis of a specific patient's needs. Narration time is treatment time which does not necessarily create a burden on organisations and caregivers. Quite the contrary since by facilitating adherence and team work, it can significantly reduce time and costs. Given their training and the importance of their relationship with elderly patients, internists, together with geriatricians, can play a key role in promoting and coordinating a narrative medicine approach. PMID:27210901

  8. Palliative treatment of patients with malignant structures of esophagus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavodnov, Victor Y.; Kuzin, M. I.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Linkov, Kirill G.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Posypanova, Anna M.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy with the use of laser endoscopic spectrum analyzer (LESA-5), spectral- analyzing video-imaging system, Kr laser and various types of catheters for different localizations and different geometry of tumor, and phthalocyanine aluminum photosensitizers in patients with malignant strictures of esophagus is discussed. Photodynamic therapy was carried out to four patients: with esophageal cancer (3 patients) and gastric cancer with infiltration of lower esophagus (1 patient). All patients suffered from severe dysphagia. Photosensitizer was used in a dose 1-1.5 mg/kg of weight. Usually we used 3-4 seances of laser treatment 10-30 minutes long. The accumulation of photosensitizer was controlled by LESA-5. Laser induced fluorescent image was monitored by the video-imaging system in order to control laser treatment. There were no side-effects. The results show high efficiency of photodynamic therapy. There was marked reduction of dysphagia symptoms in all cases. It seems that photodynamic therapy is a good alternative to palliative surgical treatment of patients with malignant strictures of esophagus.

  9. Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Mesenteric Ischemia: Results in 14 Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chahid, Tamam; Alfidja, Agaicha T.; Biard, Marie; Ravel, Anne; Garcier, Jean Marc; Boyer, L.

    2004-11-15

    We evaluated immediate and long-term results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement to treat stenotic and occluded arteries in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia. Fourteen patients were treated by 3 exclusive celiac artery (CA) PTAs (2 stentings), 3 cases with both Superior Mesenteric Artery (SMA) and CA angioplasties, and 8 exclusive SMA angioplasties (3 stentings). Eleven patients had atheromatous stenoses with one case of an early onset atheroma in an HIV patient with antiphospholipid syndrome. The other etiologies of mesenteric arterial lesions were Takayashu arteritis (2 cases) and a postradiation stenoses (1 case). Technical success was achieved in all cases. Two major complications were observed: one hematoma and one false aneurysm occurring at the brachial puncture site (14.3%). An immediate clinical success was obtained in all patients. During a follow-up of 1-83 months (mean: 29 months), 11 patients were symptom free; 3 patients had recurrent pain; in one patient with inflammatory syndrome, pain relief was obtained with medical treatment; in 2 patients abdominal pain was due to restenosis 36 and 6 months after PTA, respectively. Restenosis was treated by PTA (postirradiation stenosis), and by surgical bypass (atheromatous stenosis). Percutaneous endovascular techniques are safe and accurate. They are an alternative to surgery in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia due to short and proximal occlusive lesions of SMA and CA.

  10. Facile, room-temperature pre-treatment of rice husks with tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide: Enhanced enzymatic and acid hydrolysis yields.

    PubMed

    Lau, B B Y; Luis, E T; Hossain, M M; Hart, W E S; Cencia-Lay, B; Black, J J; To, T Q; Aldous, L

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous solutions of tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide have been evaluated as pretreatment media for rice husks, prior to sulphuric acid hydrolysis or cellulase enzymatic hydrolysis. Varying the water:tetrabutylphosphonium hydroxide ratio varied the rate of delignification, as well as silica, lignin and cellulose solubility. Pre-treatment with 60wt% hydroxide dissolved the rice husk and the regenerated material was thus heavily disrupted. Sulphuric acid hydrolysis of 60wt%-treated samples yielded the highest amount of glucose per gram of rice husk. Solutions with good lignin and silica solubility but only moderate to negligible cellulose solubility (10-40wt% hydroxide) were equally effective as pre-treatment media for both acid and enzymatic hydrolysis. However, pre-treatment with 60wt% hydroxide solutions was incompatible with downstream enzymatic hydrolysis. This was due to significant incorporation of phosphonium species in the regenerated biomass, which significantly inhibited the activity of the cellulase enzymes. PMID:26342336

  11. Onsite QTc interval screening for patients in methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Fareed, Ayman; Vayalapalli, Sreedevi; Byrd-Sellers, Johnita; Casarella, Jennifer; Drexler, Karen; Amar, Richard; Smith-Cox, Jocelyn; Lutchman, Tamara Shaw

    2010-01-01

    To improve the electrocardiogram screening process and early detection of patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias, the authors created a model in their clinic where they provided an onsite electrocardiogram screening that might be feasible and practical. The authors then performed a retrospective chart review to access the efficacy and feasibility of their new onsite procedure in identifying methadone maintained patients at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias. Records from all patients who are currently or had previously been maintained on methadone in the methadone maintenance program at the Atlanta VA Medical Center between 2002 and 2009 were evaluated. Of the 140 patients treated at the clinic between 2002 and 2009, 85 were excluded from the study because they had been treated as guests (had been in treatment in other clinics but received methadone dosing temporarily from our clinic), were treated in the clinic for less than 6 months, or dropped out of treatment. Thus, 55 patient charts were selected for review. Most patients (95%) received baseline and annual electrocardiogram screening. The average baseline QTc was (417 +/- 30) and most recent QTc (442 +/- 25). This QTc prolongation from baseline showed statistical significance (P < .0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline but was less than 450 ms (mean: 428 +/- 16, P = .008). Twenty-seven percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline of more 450 ms but was less than 500 ms (mean: 460 +/- 8, P < .0001). Six percent of patients had statistically significant QTc prolongation from baseline of more 500 ms (mean: 503 +/- 1.15, P = .027). Recent cocaine use was the only individual variable that showed statistically significant correlation with QTc prolongation (F = 6.98, P = .01). The authors demonstrated in this study that providing an onsite electrocardiogram screening with a focus on patient education and limiting

  12. Financial burden experienced by patients undergoing treatment for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kumthekar, Priya; Stell, Becky V.; Jacobs, Daniel I.; Helenowski, Irene B.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Grimm, Sean A.; Bennett, Charles L.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing treatment for malignant gliomas (MGs) can encounter medical costs beyond what their insurance covers. The magnitude and type of costs experienced by patients are unknown. The purpose of this study was to have patients or their families report on the medical costs incurred during the patients MG treatment. Methods Patients with MG were eligible if they were within 6 months of diagnosis or tumor recurrence. Patients had to be ≥18 years of age, fluent in English, and not aphasic. Weekly logbooks were issued to patients for recording associated costs for ∼6 months or until tumor progression. “Out-of-pocket” (OOP) costs included medical and nonmedical expenses that were not reimbursed by insurance. Direct medical costs included hospital and physician bills. Direct nonmedical costs included transportation, parking, and other related items. Indirect medical costs included lost wages. Costs were analyzed to provide mean and medians with range of expenses. Results Forty-three patients provided cost data for a median of 12 weeks. There were 25 men and 18 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 24y–73y); 79% were married, and 49% reported annual income >$75 000. Health insurance coverage was preferred provider organizations for 58% of patients, and median deductible was $1 500. Median monthly OOP cost was $1 342 (mean, $2 451; range, $333.41–$17 267.16). The highest OOP median costs were medication copayments ($710; range, $0–13 611.20), transportation ($327; range, $0–$1 927), and hospital bill copayments ($403; range, $0–$4 000). Median lost wages were $7 500, and median lost days of work were 12.8. Conclusions OOP costs for MG patients can be significant and comprise direct and indirect costs across several areas. Informing patients about expected costs could limit additional duress and allow financial support systems to be implemented. PMID:26034619

  13. Recommended treatment strategies for patients with excessive daytime sleepiness.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Russell P

    2015-10-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a common and bothersome phenomenon. It can be associated with insufficient sleep syndrome, narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, shift work disorder, Kleine-Levin syndrome, or Parkinson's disease. Once the underlying cause of the excessive sleepiness is determined, clinicians must select the most appropriate behavioral and pharmacologic interventions to reduce daytime sleepiness, alleviate other symptoms, improve functioning, and ensure the safety of patients and those around them. Patient history, adverse effects, and efficacy in specific conditions should be considered in pharmacologic treatment options for patients with EDS. PMID:26528660

  14. The evaluation and treatment of the sexually assaulted patient.

    PubMed

    Hochbaum, S R

    1987-08-01

    There are several significant problems encountered in treating the assault victim in the Emergency Department setting. In a busy Emergency Department, the patient who has been assaulted may be prioritized behind other patients with more significant life-threatening illnesses or injuries. The delay in treatment that ensues may aggravate the emotional trauma already experienced. Additionally, the legal and technical aspects involved in the evaluation and subsequent testimony may erect a psychological barrier on the part of the physician or nurse. This article provides guidelines and handling all of the above problems with regard to the sexually assaulted patient. PMID:3308430

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of hyponatraemia in neurosurgical patients.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Martín; Hannon, Mark J; Thompson, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Hyponatraemia is the most common electrolyte imbalance in neurosurgical patients. Acute hyponatraemia is particularly common in neurosurgical patients after any type of brain insult, including brain tumours and their treatment, pituitary surgery, subarachnoid haemorrhage or traumatic brain injury. Acute hyponatraemia is an emergency condition, as it leads to cerebral oedema due to passive osmotic movement of water from the hypotonic plasma to the relatively hypertonic brain which ultimately is the cause of the symptoms associated with hyponatraemia. These include decreased level of consciousness, seizures, non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema or transtentorial brain herniation. Prompt treatment is mandatory to prevent such complications, minimize permanent brain damage and therefore permit rapid recovery after brain insult. The infusion of 3% hypertonic saline is the treatment of choice with different rates of administration based on the severity of symptoms and the rate of drop in plasma sodium concentration. The pathophysiology of hyponatraemia in neurotrauma is multifactorial; although the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIADH) and central adrenal insufficiency are the commonest causes encountered. Fluid restriction has historically been the classical treatment for SIADH, although it is relatively contraindicated in some neurosurgical patients such as those with subarachnoid haemorrhage. Furthermore, many cases admitted have acute onset hyponatraemia, who require hypertonic saline infusion. The recently developed vasopressin receptor 2 antagonist class of drug is a promising and effective tool but more evidence is needed in neurosurgical patients. Central adrenal insufficiency may also cause acute hyponatraemia in neurosurgical patients; this responds clinically and biochemically to hydrocortisone. The rare cerebral salt wasting syndrome is treated with large volume normal saline infusion. In this review, we summarize the current evidence based on the

  16. Pasireotide: a novel treatment for patients with acromegaly

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Fleseriu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality rates in patients with active acromegaly are higher than the general population. Adequate biochemical control restores mortality to normal rates. Now, medical therapy has an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients with acromegaly. Somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) are considered the standard medical therapy, either after surgery or as a first-line therapy when surgery is deemed ineffective or is contraindicated. Overall, octreotide and lanreotide are first-generation SRLs and are effective in ~20%–70% of patients. Pegvisomant, a growth hormone receptor antagonist, controls insulin-like growth factor 1 in 65%–90% of cases. Consequently, a subset of patients (nonresponders) requires other treatment options. Drug combination therapy offers the potential for more efficacious disease control. However, the development of new medical therapies remains essential. Here, emphasis is placed on new medical therapies to control acromegaly. There is a focus on pasireotide long-acting release (LAR) (Signifor LAR®), which was approved in 2014 by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicine Agency for the treatment of acromegaly. Pasireotide LAR is a long-acting somatostatin multireceptor ligand. In a Phase III clinical trial in patients with acromegaly (naïve to medical therapy or uncontrolled on a maximum dose of first-generation SRLs), 40 and 60 mg of intramuscular pasireotide LAR achieved better biochemical disease control than octreotide LAR, and tumor shrinkage was noted in both pasireotide groups. Pasireotide LAR tolerability was similar to other SRLs, except for a greater frequency and degree of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus. Baseline glucose may predict hyperglycemia occurrence after treatment, and careful monitoring of glycemic status and appropriate treatment is required. A precise definition of patients with acromegaly who will derive the greatest therapeutic benefit from pasireotide LAR remains to

  17. Pasireotide: a novel treatment for patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Ramos, Daniel; Fleseriu, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality rates in patients with active acromegaly are higher than the general population. Adequate biochemical control restores mortality to normal rates. Now, medical therapy has an increasingly important role in the treatment of patients with acromegaly. Somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs) are considered the standard medical therapy, either after surgery or as a first-line therapy when surgery is deemed ineffective or is contraindicated. Overall, octreotide and lanreotide are first-generation SRLs and are effective in ~20%-70% of patients. Pegvisomant, a growth hormone receptor antagonist, controls insulin-like growth factor 1 in 65%-90% of cases. Consequently, a subset of patients (nonresponders) requires other treatment options. Drug combination therapy offers the potential for more efficacious disease control. However, the development of new medical therapies remains essential. Here, emphasis is placed on new medical therapies to control acromegaly. There is a focus on pasireotide long-acting release (LAR) (Signifor LAR®), which was approved in 2014 by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicine Agency for the treatment of acromegaly. Pasireotide LAR is a long-acting somatostatin multireceptor ligand. In a Phase III clinical trial in patients with acromegaly (naïve to medical therapy or uncontrolled on a maximum dose of first-generation SRLs), 40 and 60 mg of intramuscular pasireotide LAR achieved better biochemical disease control than octreotide LAR, and tumor shrinkage was noted in both pasireotide groups. Pasireotide LAR tolerability was similar to other SRLs, except for a greater frequency and degree of hyperglycemia and diabetes mellitus. Baseline glucose may predict hyperglycemia occurrence after treatment, and careful monitoring of glycemic status and appropriate treatment is required. A precise definition of patients with acromegaly who will derive the greatest therapeutic benefit from pasireotide LAR remains to be

  18. Assessing Patient Exposure to a Video-Based Intervention in STD Clinic Waiting Rooms: Findings From the Safe in the City Trial.

    PubMed

    Besera, Ghenet T; Cox, Shanna; Malotte, C Kevin; Rietmeijer, Cornelis A; Klausner, Jeffrey D; O'Donnell, Lydia; Margolis, Andrew D; Warner, Lee

    2016-09-01

    Safe in the City, a video intervention for clinic waiting rooms, was previously shown to reduce sexually transmitted disease (STD) incidence. However, little is known about patients' recall of exposure to the intervention. Using data from a nested study of patients attending clinics during the trial, we assessed whether participants recalled Safe in the City, and, if so, how the intervention affected subsequent attitudes and behaviors. Analyses were restricted to responses to a 3-month follow-up questionnaire among participants who were exposed to the video (n = 708). Impact was measured as participants' reports of the video's effect on behaviors and attitudes. Associations were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression. Of participants who were exposed, 685 (97%) recalled viewing the video, and 68% recalled all three vignettes. After watching the video, participants felt more positive about condoms (69%) and comfortable acquiring condoms (56%), were reminded of important information about STDs and condoms (90%), and tried to apply what they learned to their lives (59%). Compared with those who recalled viewing one or two vignettes, participants who recalled viewing all three vignettes reported more positive attitudes toward condoms and peer/provider communication. These findings demonstrate that a low-resource video intervention for waiting rooms can provide sufficient exposure to positively influence STD-related attitudes/behaviors. PMID:27091608

  19. Long-term drug treatment of patients with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Drug therapy for alcohol dependence should only be used in conjunction with a comprehensive treatment plan. Naltrexone and acamprosate have well established efficacy and are first-line treatments. Naltrexone is recommended for patients aiming to cut down their alcohol intake who do not have severe liver disease or an ongoing need for opioids. Acamprosate is recommended for those who have achieved and wish to maintain abstinence. Disulfiram is no longer considered first-line treatment due to difficulties with compliance and toxicity. Although baclofen and topiramate have evidence of benefit, they are not registered for alcohol dependence and should only be considered in specialist practice. PMID:26648614

  20. Oral complications in the treatment of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mosel, D D; Bauer, R L; Lynch, D P; Hwang, S T

    2011-09-01

    While treatment for cancer in terms of chemotherapy and radiation therapy have evolved significantly since their inception, both of these cancer treatment modalities, especially if used in combination (e.g., as with head and neck cancers), have a very real potential to result in painful and debilitating adverse effects that clearly decrease quality of life and, potentially, increase mortality due to cancer. Herein, we discuss the prevalence and etiology of three broad categories of oral complications found during the treatment of cancer patients: mucositis, dysgeusia, and infectious disease. Lastly, we present therapeutic options that may be helpful in ameliorating these uncomfortable and, sometimes, life-threatening oral complications. PMID:21306481

  1. Treatment of severe metastatic calcification and calciphylaxis in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Goel, Saurabh K; Bellovich, Keith; McCullough, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic calcification is a frequent complication encountered in patients undergoing maintenance dialysis and has a complex pathogenesis. It is often difficult to treat and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and prompt initiation of treatment is vital. Local wound care and aggressive metabolic control remain the cornerstones of the therapy. Various novel treatment strategies including sodium thiosulfate and hyperbaric oxygen therapy have been utilized and reviewed in this paper. The response rate to treatment is poor and prevention is the best approach. PMID:21423552

  2. African American Patients Seeking Treatment in the Public Sector: Characteristics of Buprenorphine v. Methadone Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Kelly, Sharon M.; Gryczynski, Jan; Myers, C. Patrick; Jaffe, Jerome H.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Olsen, Yngvild K.; Schwartz, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Background To expand its public-sector treatment capacity, Baltimore City made buprenorphine treatment accessible to low-income, largely African American residents. This study compares the characteristics of patients entering methadone treatment v. buprenorphine treatment to determine whether BT was attracting different types of patients. Methods Participants consisted of two samples of adult heroin-dependent African Americans. The first sample was newly-admitted to a health center or a mental health center providing buprenorphine (N=200), and the second sample was newly-admitted to one of two hospital-based methadone programs (N=178). The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and the Friends Supplemental Questionnaire were administered at treatment entry and data were analyzed with logistic regression. Results BT participants were more likely to be female (p=.017) and less likely to inject (p=.001). Participants with only prior buprenorphine treatment experience were nearly five time more likely to enter buprenorphine than methadone treatment (p<.001). Those with experience with both treatments were more than twice as likely to enter BT (OR=2.7, 95% CI=1.11–6.62; p=.028). In the 30 days prior to treatment entry, BT participants reported more days of medical problems (p=.002) and depression (p=.044), and were more likely to endorse a lifetime history of depression (p<.001). Conclusion Methadone and buprenorphine treatment provided in the public sector may attract different patient subpopulations. Providing buprenorphine treatment through drug treatment programs co-located with a health and mental health center may have accounted for their higher rates of medical and psychiatric problems and appears to be useful in attracting a diverse group of patients into public-sector funded treatment. PMID:21962726

  3. Challenges of treatment adherence in older patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Jacquelyn L; Ruscin, J Mark

    2009-01-01

    Patient adherence to a medication regimen is critical to treatment outcome, quality of life and future healthcare costs. For elderly patients with Parkinson's disease, obstacles to adherence can be particularly complex. Beyond age-related and economic factors, elderly patients with Parkinson's disease often require complicated dosing or titration schedules and have multiple co-morbidities that necessitate administration of therapies from multiple drug classes. In addition, neuropsychiatric disturbances and cognitive impairment, which are often part of the disease process, can affect adherence, as can variable responses to anti-parkinsonian agents as the disease progresses. Several recent studies in patients with Parkinson's disease point to the need for establishing good adherence patterns early and maintaining these throughout the course of treatment. To achieve optimal adherence in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease, a combination of pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches appears to be the best strategy for success. Examples include a strong provider-patient relationship, educational intervention by phone or face-to-face contact, simplified dosing and administration schedules, management and understanding of medication adverse events, and the use of adherence aids such as pill boxes and hour-by-hour organizational charts. Research into new avenues that include improved drug monitoring, pharmacogenetics and neuroprotective regimens may give rise to better adherence in elderly patients with Parkinson's disease in the future. PMID:19220071

  4. Treatment with Ziprasidone for schizophrenia patients with OCD.

    PubMed

    Juven-Wetzler, Alzbeta; Fostick, Leah; Cwikel-Hamzany, Shlomit; Balaban, Evgenya; Zohar, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Comorbidity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been observed in about 15% of schizophrenic patients and has been associated with poor prognosis. Therefore, there is a need for specific treatment options for these patients (schizo-obsessive, ScOCD). This is an open, prospective study, aiming to test the efficacy of Ziprasidone (80-200mg/d) in ScOCD patients and comparing the response to the treatment between stable schizophrenic (N=16) and stable ScOCD (N=29) patients. Treatment effect with Ziprasidone was different in schizophrenic patients when stratified based on OCD comorbidity. Overall, the effect on OCD symptoms (as measured by the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, YBOCS) was found to be bimodal-either no response or exacerbation (for 45% of the patients, n=13) or significant improvement of symptoms (55%, n=16). Those who improved in OCD symptoms, improved also in negative and general schizophrenia symptoms, while ScOCD-unimproved group worsened in all symptoms. Whereas schizophrenic patients without OCD responded in a modest Gaussian distribution, they improved in schizophrenia negative symptoms and in general anxiety. This data suggests that schizo-obsessive disorder is a distinct and complex condition with more than one underlying pathogenesis. Definition of these ScOCD subgroups defined by their response to Ziprasidone might contribute to personalized medicine within the OCD-schizophrenia spectrum. Moreover, this finding suggests that ScOCD may be considered as a special schizophrenic subtype and its inclusion in schizophrenia treatment studies need to be further explored due to its divergent response. PMID:25048540

  5. The Right Treatment for the Right Patient – Personalised Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scharl, A.; Kühn, T.; Papathemelis, T.; Salterberg, A.

    2015-01-01

    The probability of healing breast cancer has been greatly improved in recent decades through the introduction and optimisation of multi-modal therapies and interdisciplinary treatments. Today, in addition to surgery or radiation, most patients receive a systemic treatment. To prevent excessive treatment, patients whose prognosis is so good that certain adjuvant therapies can be foregone or reduced must be identified. A lack of compliance with therapy, especially in the endocrine therapies stretching over years, is a further problem. As only treatments that are also carried out can improve chances of survival, efforts to improve compliance must be intensified. Studies show that lifestyle changes influence the efficiency of medication on the one hand, and on the other hand can also by themselves achieve a relevant improvement of the prognosis. Therefore, it is time not only to treat the tumour, but to also focus on the patient as a whole in therapeutic interventions. PMID:26257405

  6. HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE (HMI) EVALUATION OF ROOMS TA-50-1-60/60A AT THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY (RLWTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Walter E.; Stender, Kerith K.

    2012-08-29

    This effort addressed an evaluation of human machine interfaces (HMIs) in Room TA-50-1-60/60A of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The evaluation was performed in accordance with guidance outlined in DOE-STD-3009, DOE Standard Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, 2006 [DOE 2006]. Specifically, Chapter 13 of DOE 2006 highlights the 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, 2012, [CFR 2012] and DOE G 421.1-2 [DOE 2001a] requirements as they relate to the human factors process and, in this case, the safety of the RLWTF. The RLWTF is a Hazard Category 3 facility and, consequently, does not have safety-class (SSCs). However, safety-significant SSCs are identified. The transuranic (TRU) wastewater tanks and associated piping are the only safety-significant SSCs in Rooms TA-50-1-60/60A [LANL 2010]. Hence, the human factors evaluation described herein is only applicable to this particular assemblage of tanks and piping.

  7. Faster assessment of patients receiving unnecessary thyroid treatment: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Stoffer, S.S.; Szpunar, W.E.; Meier, D.A.

    1983-02-01

    Forty-five consecutive patients on thyroid hormone treatment without obvious indication were evaluated. Twenty-five of these cases were found to have no evidence of thyroid disease. Biochemical testing was not helpful in making the diagnosis of hypothyroidism in the majority of thyroid-treated hypothyroid patients. Normal technetium images were obtained in 25 patients, 22 of which had no thyroid disease. In contrast, abnormal technetium images were obtained in 20 patients, 16 of whom were thought to be hypothyroid, and one of whom developed a goiter within 2 mo after discontinuing levothyroxine. The use of technetium imaging seems useful for the rapid (20 min) evaluation of those patients likely to benefit from discontinuing thyroid medication.

  8. Does phasic trauma treatment make patients with dissociative identity disorder treatment more dissociative?

    PubMed

    Brand, Bethany; Loewenstein, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Proponents of the iatrogenic model of the etiology of dissociative identity disorder (DID) have expressed concern that treatment focused on direct engagement and interaction with dissociated self-states harms DID patients. However, empirical data have shown that this type of DID treatment is beneficial. Analyzing data from the prospective Treatment of Patients With Dissociative Disorders (TOP DD) Study, we test empirically whether DID treatment is associated with clinically adverse manifestations of dissociated self-states: acting so differently that one feels like different people, hearing voices, and dissociative amnesia. We show that, over the course of the study, there were significant decreases in feeling like different people and hearing voices. These results indicate that this form of DID treatment does not lead to symptomatic worsening in these dimensions, as predicted by the iatrogenic model. Indeed, treatment provided by TOP DD therapists reduced, rather than increased, the extent to which patients experienced manifestations of pathological dissociation. Because severe symptomatology and impairment are associated with DID, iatrogenic harm may come from depriving DID patients of treatment that targets DID symptomatology. PMID:24377972

  9. African American Patients' Psychosocial Support Needs and Barriers to Treatment: Patient Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Davey, Maureen P; Bilkins, Brianna; Diamond, Guy; Willis, Alliric I; Mitchell, Edith P; Davey, Adam; Young, Faith M

    2016-09-01

    This study assessed adult patient's psychosocial support needs and treatment barriers in an urban diverse cancer center. A needs assessment was conducted with a convenience sample of adult oncology patients (n = 113; 71.7 % African American). Most patients were parenting school-age children and worried about them (96 %); 86.7 % would attend a family support program. Among patients who were married or partnered (68 %), 63.7 % were concerned about communication, coping, and emotional support; 53.9 % would attend a couple support program. Patients identified similar treatment barriers: transportation, babysitting for younger children, convenience of time/place, and refreshments. Findings suggest that behavioral health care providers should be available to screen cancer patients and improve access to appropriate psychosocial oncology support programs. PMID:26048632

  10. HIV Patients Less Likely to Get Treatment for Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158881.html HIV Patients Less Likely to Get Treatment for Cancer: ...

  11. Treatment considerations for patient with Amelogenesis Imperfecta: a review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiung-Fen; Hu, Jan CC; Bresciani, Eduardo; Peters, Mathilde C; Estrella, Maria Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of inherited disorders primary affecting the structural of enamel. Patients with AI experience poor esthetic, excessive tooth sensitivity and compromised chewing function that dental treatments are frequently required at early age. This review describes the non-enamel implications, stage-specific management strategies and outcomes of selected restorative materials based on literature evidence.

  12. Integrating Fieldwork into Employment Counseling for Methadone-Treatment Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankertz, Laura; Spinelli, Michael; Magura, Stephen; Bali, Priti; Madison, Elizabeth M.; Staines, Graham L.; Horowitz, Emily; Guarino, Honoria; Grandy, Audrey; Fong, Chunki; Gomez, Augustin; Dimun, Amy; Friedman, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    An innovative employment counseling model, Customized Employment Supports, was developed for methadone-treatment patients, a population with historically low employment rates. The effectiveness of a key component of the model, "vocational fieldwork," the delivery of services in the community rather than only within the clinic, was assessed through…

  13. Treatment planning for image-guided neuro-vascular interventions using patient-specific 3D printed phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, M.; O'Hara, R.; Setlur Nagesh, S. V.; Mokin, M.; Jimenez, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C.

    2015-03-01

    Minimally invasive endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are the preferred procedures for treatment of a wide range of vascular disorders. Despite benefits including reduced trauma and recovery time, EIGIs have their own challenges. Remote catheter actuation and challenging anatomical morphology may lead to erroneous endovascular device selections, delays or even complications such as vessel injury. EIGI planning using 3D phantoms would allow interventionists to become familiarized with the patient vessel anatomy by first performing the planned treatment on a phantom under standard operating protocols. In this study the optimal workflow to obtain such phantoms from 3D data for interventionist to practice on prior to an actual procedure was investigated. Patientspecific phantoms and phantoms presenting a wide range of challenging geometries were created. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) data was uploaded into a Vitrea 3D station which allows segmentation and resulting stereo-lithographic files to be exported. The files were uploaded using processing software where preloaded vessel structures were included to create a closed-flow vasculature having structural support. The final file was printed, cleaned, connected to a flow loop and placed in an angiographic room for EIGI practice. Various Circle of Willis and cardiac arterial geometries were used. The phantoms were tested for ischemic stroke treatment, distal catheter navigation, aneurysm stenting and cardiac imaging under angiographic guidance. This method should allow for adjustments to treatment plans to be made before the patient is actually in the procedure room and enabling reduced risk of peri-operative complications or delays.

  14. [Results of surgical treatment of pelvic fractures in polytraumatized patients].

    PubMed

    Roder, J D; Stübinger, B; Gmeinwieser, J; Müller, E; Claudi, B F

    1988-06-01

    High-speed accidents involving automobiles and two-wheeled vehicles with resultant entrapment and crush injuries have led to an ever-increasing incidence of pelvic fracture within the realm of multiple trauma. Between the years 1982 and 1986 ninety-eight cases of pelvic fracture were operatively stabilised by the Department of Surgery and the Outpatient Department of the Technical University, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich, West Germany. This paper is a report on fifty-five of these patients who were discovered to have suffered additional multitrauma. Independent from those patients found to have sustained multitraumatisation, twenty-four cases of isolated acetabulum fracture as well as four instances of pelvic ring fracture and one fracture of the pelvic brim were also documented. Combinations of the above mentioned fractures were uncovered in twenty-six patients. With fifty-four of the fracture injuries, osteosynthesis was carried out while in one case primary alloarthroplasty was deemed necessary. Following a mean post-treatment period of twenty-six months forty-five of the patients were objectively evaluated for results of treatment according to the methodology of Merle d'Aubigne. 70% of those patients assessed were rated with a "good" result. At the time of follow-up thirty-five (78%) of the forty-five reexamined individuals reported to be once again employed. Early operative treatment along with internal stabilisation and prompt initiation of physiotherapy have proved decisive in obtaining a favourable postoperative result. PMID:2900595

  15. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world. PMID:25782187

  16. Laser-assisted treatment of patients with hemorrhagic diathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neckel, Claus P.

    2000-03-01

    Today more and more patients with bleeding disorder come to our office for treatment. The number of patients with therapeutic anticoagulation is growing steadily. Discontinuation of this therapy can often be crucial. On the other hand are oralsurgical procedures extremely sensitive to bleeding due to the constant presents of saliva with its high fibrinolytic activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a surgical diode (wavelength 810 nm) laser as accessory tool in the treatment of patients with hemorrhagic diathesis. Enclosed in the study were 123 patients with: (1) Coumarintherapy, a Quick test ratio of 15 - 25%; (2) More than 300 mg of ASS/die; (3) Hemophilia, a factor activity under 35%; (4) Morbus Werlhof with less than 30000 thrombocytes. 179 Surgical procedures: (1) Tooth extraction 86%; (2) Apexectomy 3%; (3) Tumorexcision 9%; (4) Curettage and flapsurgery 1%; (5) Gingivectomy 1%. All procedures were laser-assisted with a diode laser emitting 810 nm. The glass fibers used were depending on the procedures either 200, 400, or 600 micron. No coagulating agents or tissue adhesives were used in addition. The postoperative outcome and complication rates were compared to substitution therapy and tissue adhesives. Laser-assisted treatment of these patients shows a high predictability and success rate leaving out side effects of drugs and human cryoprecipitates. Postoperative impairment is diminished.

  17. [Endoscopic treatment in critically ill patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Kheladze, Z S; Dzhaiani, S V; Tsutskiridze, B N; Kheladze, Zv Z; Chakhunashvili, G K; Chakhunashvili, D K

    2010-03-01

    The goal of the current research was to ascertain the optimal methods of an endoscopic haemostasis in critical care patients with GDB. The research was conducted on critically ill patients. The different endoscopic methods of treatment: injectional hemostasis, irrigation with local hemostatics, thermo coagulation, and combined method were used. Treatment with injectional hemostasis resulted in hemostasis in 75% of patients. Irrigation with local hemostatics was conducted using the local hemostatic agent caprofer and (or) 10% solution of epsylonaminocapronal acid. The final hemostasis was achieved in the 90% of the cases; bleeding was stopped in 85% of the cases when the hemorrhages occurred from chronic ulcers. The effect of thermo coagulation method was 80-85%. Combined method of treatment (combination of the irrigation with caprofer and thermo coagulation) helped to achieve 95% of the final hemostasis in critically ill patients. The achieved results certify that the combined use of caprofer and method of electro coagulation in critical care patients with GDB is very perspective. Simultaneously with this, it is also recommended to use anti-segregation therapy with blockers of proton pomp and boosting the defense of the mucous tissue with high doses of mucogen. PMID:20413810

  18. Treatment Considerations for Elderly and Frail Patients With Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schmader, Kenneth E.; Baron, Ralf; Haanpää, Maija L.; Mayer, John; O'Connor, Alec B.; Rice, Andrew S. C.; Stacey, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Currently, an estimated 38 million individuals 65 years or older live in the United States, and more than 11 million of these individuals are 80 years or older. Older people are at high risk of neuropathic pain because many diseases that cause neuropathic pain increase in incidence with age. Depending on their underlying health, older adults with neuropathic pain may have to cope with multiple coexisting diseases, polypharmacy, and impaired functional ability. The objective of this article is to review how aging and frailty affect the treatment of older adults with neuropathic pain. Specific topics reviewed include the complexity of treatment decisions in older patients due to aged heterogeneity, multimorbidity, and polypharmacy; selection of treatment in an effort to maximize patients' functional abilities in addition to relieving their pain; more careful dosing (usually lower) and monitoring of pharmacotherapy relative to younger patients due to age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; and underrepresentation of older adults in clinical trials of neuropathic pain treatments, which further compromises physicians' ability to make informed treatment decisions. PMID:20194145

  19. Survey finds that many prisons and jails have room to improve HIV testing and coordination of postrelease treatment.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Liza; Montague, Brian T; Beckwith, Curt G; Baillargeon, Jacques; Costa, Michael; Dumont, Dora; Kuo, Irene; Kurth, Ann; Rich, Josiah D

    2014-03-01

    Early diagnosis of HIV and effective antiretroviral treatment are key elements in efforts to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV. Incarcerated populations are disproportionately affected by HIV, with the disease's prevalence among inmates estimated to be three to five times higher than among the general population. Correctional institutions offer important opportunities to test for HIV and link infected people to postrelease treatment services. To examine HIV testing and policies that help HIV-positive people obtain treatment in the community after release, we administered a survey to the medical directors of the fifty state prison systems and of forty of the largest jails in the United States. We found that 19 percent of prison systems and 35 percent of jails provide opt-out HIV testing, which is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Additionally, fewer than 20 percent of prisons and jails conform to the CDC's recommendations regarding discharge planning services for inmates transitioning to the community: making an appointment with a community health care provider, assisting with enrollment in an entitlement program, and providing a copy of the medical record and a supply of HIV medications. These findings suggest that opportunities for HIV diagnosis and linking HIV-positive inmates to community care after release are being missed in the majority of prison systems and jails. PMID:24590942

  20. Antithrombotic treatment in elderly patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Suárez Fernández, C; Camafort, M; Cepeda Rodrigo, J M; Díez-Manglano, J; Formiga, F; Pose Reino, A; Tiberio, G; Mostaza, J M

    2015-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) in the elderly is a complex condition due to the high number of frequently associated comorbidities, such as cardiovascular and kidney disease, cognitive disorders, falls and polypharmacy. Except when contraindicated, anticoagulation is necessary for preventing thromboembolic events in this population. Both vitamin K antagonists and direct oral anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) are indicated in this context. Renal function should be closely monitored for this age group when these drugs are used. In recent years, various clinical practice guidelines have been published on patients with AF. The majority of these guidelines make specific recommendations on the clinical characteristics and treatment of elderly patients. In this update, we review the specific comments on the recommendations concerning antithrombotic treatment in elderly patients with nonvalvular AF. PMID:25618495

  1. Treatment strategies for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Imano, Motohiro; Okuno, Kiyotaka

    2014-03-01

    Although the treatment of gastric cancer improves the clinical outcomes, the survival of gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis is still very poor. Effective drugs against peritoneal metastasis, coupled with new therapeutic modalities, are needed to improve the prognoses of these patients. Paclitaxel and TS-1 are candidate drugs for peritoneal metastasis, and intraperitoneal chemotherapy and targeted therapy are potential new therapeutic modalities. Two phase II studies using TS-1 and intraperitoneal and systemic paclitaxel for gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis showed respectable survival results. In addition, peritoneal metastatic lesions showed high levels of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (ECAM) and very low levels of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), thus indicating that an anti-ECAM monoclonal antibody, catumaxomab, would be effective against gastric cancer-derived peritoneal metastasis. Although catumaxomab and intraperitoneally administered paclitaxel are not generally used in Japan at present, these treatment strategies might therefore be effectively used in Japan in the near future. PMID:23677598

  2. Canagliflozin Treatment in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Triplitt, Curtis; Cornell, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Current guidelines for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) indicate a patient-centered approach that should go beyond glycemic control. Of the many antihyperglycemic agents available for treatment of T2DM, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors offer the advantages of reduced glycated hemoglobin (A1C), body weight (BW), and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and are associated with a low risk of hypoglycemia when used either as monotherapy or with other agents not typically associated with increased risk of hypoglycemia. Collaborative, multidisciplinary teams are best suited to provide care to patients with diabetes, and clinical pharmacists can enhance the care provided by these teams. This review aims to provide insight into the mode of action, pharmacology, potential drug–drug interactions, clinical benefits, and safety considerations associated with use of the SGLT2 inhibitor canagliflozin in patients with T2DM and to provide information to enhance clinical pharmacists’ understanding of canagliflozin. PMID:26523120

  3. Flunarizine treatment in dizzy patients with vestibular hyperreactivity and hyperventilation.

    PubMed

    Theunissen, E J; Huygen, P L; Nicolasen, M G

    1986-01-01

    Flunarizine (10 mg/day) was given in an open pilot study to 14 patients with the primary complaint of dizziness, who showed vestibular hyperreactivity in the velocity step (VS) test and were proven to have a hyperventilation syndrome (HVS) without any other disease. The VS test was repeated after 4-6 weeks of treatment. Twelve of these HVS patients reported alleviation of dizziness. Objective evaluation of the results of treatment was attempted by defining suitable response parameters and comparing their values to those obtained in a control group of 14 healthy volunteers tested twice with the same interval. A significant decrease in right-left asymmetry in the VS responses of the patients on drug was found. PMID:3523367

  4. Dental treatment in a patient with epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Maria Alice; de Souza Silva, Juliana; Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia de Paula E; Díaz-Serrano, Kranya Victória; Freitas, Aldevina Campos de; Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino de

    2008-01-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa (EB) is a rare inherited group of genodermatoses characterized by mucocutaneous fragility and blister formation, either spontaneously or as a result of minimal mechanical trauma. The repetition of these episodes in the oral cavity leads to atrophy of the mucosa, causing microstomia, ankyloglossia, tongue denudation, and vestibule obliteration, characteristics that make dental treatment difficult. Patients with EB are at high risk for caries due to the presence of dental anomalies; they also tend to have a soft diet and difficulties with mechanical removal of the dental biofilm. This case report presents a patient diagnosed with EB and describes the difficulties faced by the clinician during dental treatment as well as the measures adopted to safely manage the patient's dental care. PMID:18489655

  5. Successful intrauterine treatment of a patient with cobalamin C defect.

    PubMed

    Trefz, Friedrich K; Scheible, Dagmar; Frauendienst-Egger, Georg; Huemer, Martina; Suomala, Terttu; Fowler, Brian; Haas, Dorothea; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-03-01

    Cobalamin C (cblC) defect is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder that affects cobalamin metabolism. Patients are treated with hydroxycobalamin to ameliorate the clinical features of early-onset disease and prevent clinical symptoms in late-onset disease. Here we describe a patient in whom prenatal maternal treatment with 30 mg/week hydroxycobalamin and 5 mg/day folic acid from week 15 of pregnancy prevented disease manifestation in a girl who is now 11 years old with normal IQ and only mild ophthalmic findings. The affected older sister received postnatal treatment only and is severely intellectually disabled with severe ophthalmic symptoms. This case highlights the potential of early, high-dose intrauterine treatment in a fetus affected by the cblC defect. PMID:27014578

  6. Successful intrauterine treatment of a patient with cobalamin C defect

    PubMed Central

    Trefz, Friedrich K.; Scheible, Dagmar; Frauendienst-Egger, Georg; Huemer, Martina; Suomala, Terttu; Fowler, Brian; Haas, Dorothea; Baumgartner, Matthias R.

    2016-01-01

    Cobalamin C (cblC) defect is an inherited autosomal recessive disorder that affects cobalamin metabolism. Patients are treated with hydroxycobalamin to ameliorate the clinical features of early-onset disease and prevent clinical symptoms in late-onset disease. Here we describe a patient in whom prenatal maternal treatment with 30 mg/week hydroxycobalamin and 5 mg/day folic acid from week 15 of pregnancy prevented disease manifestation in a girl who is now 11 years old with normal IQ and only mild ophthalmic findings. The affected older sister received postnatal treatment only and is severely intellectually disabled with severe ophthalmic symptoms. This case highlights the potential of early, high-dose intrauterine treatment in a fetus affected by the cblC defect. PMID:27014578

  7. Provider and patient correlates of provider decisions to recommend HCV treatment to HIV co-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Glenn; Osilla, Karen Chan; Garnett, Jeffrey; Ghosh-Dastidar, Bonnie; Bhatti, Laveeza; Witt, Mallory; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell

    2012-01-01

    Despite low uptake of hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment among HIV co-infected patients, few studies have examined the factors that contribute to provider decisions to recommend treatment. Surveys of 173 co-infected patients and their primary care providers, as well as patient chart data, were collected at 3 HIV clinics in Los Angeles; 73% of the patients had any history of being recommended HCV treatment. Multivariate predictors of being offered treatment included being Caucasian, greater HCV knowledge, receiving depression treatment if depressed, and one's provider having a lower weekly patient load and more years working at the study site. These findings suggest that provider decisions to recommend HCV treatment are influenced by patient factors including race and psychosocial treatment readiness, as well as characteristics of their own practice and treatment philosophy. With changes to HCV treatment soon to emerge, further evaluation of factors influencing treatment decisions is needed to improve HCV treatment uptake. PMID:22564797

  8. Selecting patients for treatment with 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin).

    PubMed

    Gregory, Stephanie A

    2003-12-01

    Yttrium 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin; Biogen Idec Inc, Cambridge, MA) was the first radioimmunotherapeutic agent approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. It is indicated for treating patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or transformed B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, including patients with rituximab-refractory follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Proper patient selection is essential for optimizing the efficacy and safety of treatment with (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan. It may be advisable to use (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan relatively early in a patient's course of treatment because overall and complete response rates, and the estimated median duration of response, are higher among patients who have had fewer median prior antineoplastic regimens than among those who have had a greater median number of such regimens. Furthermore, the myeloablative effect of multiple courses of chemotherapy can preclude the later use of (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan. In contrast, other therapies, including chemotherapy and rituximab, can be used safely and successfully after (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan without concerns about increased hematologic toxicity from the previous radioimmunotherapy. The main adverse event associated with (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan therapy is hematologic toxicity and, as a result, only patients with adequate bone marrow reserves and less than 25% lymphoma marrow involvement should currently be considered for clinical therapy. PMID:14710399

  9. Surgical treatment of labyrinthine fistula in patients with cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Y; Kurita, T; Matsuda, Y; Ito, S; Nakashima, T

    2009-01-01

    Labyrinthine fistula is one of the most common complications of chronic otitis media associated with cholesteatoma. The optimal management of labyrinthine fistula, however, remains controversial. Between 1995 and 2005, labyrinthine fistulae were detected in 31 (6 per cent) patients in our institution. The canal wall down technique was used in 27 (87 per cent) patients. The cholesteatoma matrix was completely removed in the first stage in all patients. Bone dust and/or temporalis fascia was inserted to seal the fistula in 29 (94 per cent) patients. A post-operative hearing test was undertaken in 27 patients; seven (26 per cent) patients showed improved hearing, 17 (63 per cent) showed no change and three (11 per cent) showed a deterioration. The study findings indicate that there are various treatment strategies available for cholesteatoma, and that the treatment choice should be based on such criteria as auditory and vestibular function, the surgeon's ability and experience, and the location and size of the fistula. PMID:19460207

  10. SU-E-T-590: An Activation Study of Materials and Devices Present in a Proton Treatment Room

    SciTech Connect

    Spitznagel, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The use of protons for radiation therapy is growing rapidly. One consequence of protons interacting with different media is activation. These nuclear reactions induced by the protons, scattered neutrons, and gamma rays, activate different materials encountered, particularly by the therapists. The purpose of this study was to examine the derived nuclides from the activation, and also the decay rate. Methods: The study was conducted in our proton therapy facility. Protons are derived from a synchrocyclotron and pass through field shipping systems, apertures, and range compensators to define the beam within the patient.Included materials of concerns measured; the patient support couch, sheet rock in the wall, solid plastics used for quality assurance and dosimetry, and the passive scattering system itself, which includes brass apertures, and Lucite or blue wax compensators. All devices were studied post irradiation using gamma spectroscopy to determine the nuclides, and a sodium iodine scintillation detector to measure decay, particularly when the dose rate fell to background levels. Results: We have also determined from the measurements we will maintain brass apertures for three months before sending them for scrap. Some of the radionuclides arrived from these measurements included Na-22 for the blue wax compensator, C1-34m for the sheetrock, and Sc-44 and Co-60 for the brass apertures. We found compensators made out of Lucite or wax decayed to background in 2 hours. The patient support couch decayed to background in approximately 40 minutes, and sheet rock decayed in 80 minutes. In terms of the aperture layers, the most proximal aperture slab had much higher activity than the distal slab. Also the proximal sides of the slabs were much more activate than the distal. Conclusion: We have given proper instruction to therapists performing quality assurance in terms of the handled plastics, and to handle apertures rapidly as possible.

  11. Patient or treatment centre? Where are efforts invested to improve cancer patients' psychosocial outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Carey, ML; Clinton-McHarg, T; Sanson-Fisher, RW; Campbell, S; Douglas, HE

    2011-01-01

    The psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients may be influenced by individual-level, social and treatment centre predictors. This paper aimed to examine the extent to which individual, social and treatment centre variables have been examined as predictors or targets of intervention for psychosocial outcomes of cancer patients. Medline was searched to find studies in which the psychological outcomes of cancer patient were primary variables. Papers published in English between 1999 and 2009 that reported primary data relevant to psychosocial outcomes for cancer patients were included, with 20% randomly selected for further coding. Descriptive studies were coded for inclusion of individual, social or treatment centre variables. Intervention studies were coded to determine if the unit of intervention was the individual patient, social unit or treatment centre. After random sampling, 412 publications meeting the inclusion criteria were identified, 169 were descriptive and 243 interventions. Of the descriptive papers 95.0% included individual predictors, and 5.0% social predictors. None of the descriptive papers examined treatment centre variables as predictors of psychosocial outcomes. Similarly, none of the interventions evaluated the effectiveness of treatment centre interventions for improving psychosocial outcomes. Potential reasons for the overwhelming dominance of individual predictors and individual-focused interventions in psychosocial literature are discussed. PMID:20646035

  12. Redefining self: patients' decision making about treatment for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lowden, Diane; Lee, Virginia; Ritchie, Judith A

    2014-08-01

    The treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has become possible with the advent of disease-modifying therapies, but little is known about patients' experiences when faced with a complex array of treatment options. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the lived experience of making a first decision about treatment with disease-modifying therapies for relapsing-remitting MS. Nine participants shared their perspectives on negotiating the decision to accept, refuse, or delay treatment. All individuals described a core theme in which decision making about treatment was part of a process of coming to a "redefined self." This core theme included reflections about self-image, quality of life, goals, and being a person with MS. Six common themes supporting this core theme were (a) weighing and deciding what's important, (b) acknowledging the illness as part of oneself, (c) playing the mental game, (d) seeking credible resources, (e) evaluating symptoms and fit with quality of life, and (f) managing the roles and involvement of family. The findings of this study provide a greater understanding about the experience of making a therapeutic choice for those with MS and offer insights for nurses when supporting patients faced with options about treatment. PMID:24875289

  13. The treatment of ambulatory venous ulcer patients with warming therapy.

    PubMed

    Cherry, G W; Wilson, J

    1999-09-01

    The standard treatment for ambulatory patients with venous ulcers is compression therapy. The aim of the present study was to develop a warming regimen to treat venous ulcers, which could be easily used by patients in their home or work environment. Five patients with a mean age of 66 years (51-80) who had venous ulcers for an average of 8 months (3-13) were treated with zip-up compression stockings (gradient compression 40 mmHg at the ankle) and a warming dressing. The latter was controlled by the patient to warm the ulcer to 38 degrees C for 1 hour three times daily. Warming therapy was carried out for 2 weeks and patients' ulcers were monitored for healing for 12 weeks. In all but one of the patients following warming therapy, there was marked increase in granulation tissue as well as a decrease in pain. Four of the five patients completely healed during the 12-week period. In conclusion, this study has demonstrated that warming therapy can be used by ambulatory patients with venous ulcers in conjunction with compression therapy. A randomized prospective study is in progress. PMID:10655876

  14. From the Test Tube to the Treatment Room: Fundamentals of Boron-containing Compounds and their Relevance to Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Del Rosso, James Q; Plattner, Jacob J

    2014-02-01

    The development of new drug classes and novel molecules that are brought to the marketplace has been a formidable challenge, especially for dermatologic drugs. The relative absence of new classes of antimicrobial agents is also readily apparent. Several barriers account for slow drug development, including regulatory changes, added study requirements, commercial pressures to bring drugs to market quickly by developing new generations of established compounds, and the greater potential for failure and higher financial risk when researching new drug classes. In addition, the return on investment is usually much lower with dermatologic drugs as compared to the potential revenue from "blockbuster" drugs for cardiovascular or gastrointestinal disease, hypercholesterolemia, and mood disorders. Nevertheless, some researchers are investigating new therapeutic platforms, one of which is boron-containing compounds. Boron-containing compounds offer a wide variety of potential applications in dermatology due to their unique physical and chemical properties, with several in formal phases of development. Tavaborole, a benzoxaborole compound, has been submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration for approval for treatment of onychomycosis. This article provides a thorough overview of the history of boron-based compounds in medicine, their scientific rationale, physiochemical and pharmacologic properties, and modes of actions including therapeutic targets. A section dedicated to boron-based compounds in development for treatment of various skin disorders is also included. PMID:24578778

  15. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ... Physicians The full report is titled “Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice ...

  16. Optimising the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension patients: emergency treatments.

    PubMed

    Delcroix, M; Naeije, R

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare and potentially fatal disease whose management is usually restricted to a few specialised centres. As patients do not necessarily live in the neighbourhood of these centres, daily care and emergencies have to be delegated to first and second lines. Treatment guidelines do not usually provide recommendations for acute emergency situations as evidence is scarce. This short review provides a description of our therapeutic protocols based on available data. A model of transmural organisation of care for PAH patients, currently applied in Belgium, is described. Thereafter, based on an analysis of the reasons of death in the PAH population, a review of the main emergencies is provided. Cardiac arrest and resuscitation, decompensated right heart failure, respiratory failure, arrhythmia, pericardial effusion, haemoptysis, surgery and drug-related adverse events will be discussed successively. Case reports showing the precariousness of PAH patients will enforce our thesis of the need for optimal patient management organisation. PMID:20956193

  17. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with methotrexate in Congolese patients.

    PubMed

    Malemba, J J; Mbuyi Muamba, J M; Mukaya, J; Bossuyt, X; Verschueren, P; Westhovens, R

    2013-09-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is the anchor drug in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) but data concerning the effectiveness of treatment with this compound are lacking in the Congolese population. In the present study, the evolution of RA in Congolese patients on MTX treatment is reported from before disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) initiation till 20 months later. All consecutive DMARD-naïve RA patients (ACR 1987 criteria) attending the rheumatology unit of the University Hospital of Kinshasa from January 2008 to September 2010 were included. All were treated with MTX (started at 7.5 mg/week) and bridging steroids (started at 30mg/day). Treatment adaptations of MTX and concomitant drugs are reported as well as evolution of disease activity (DAS28-ESR), functionality (Health Assessment Questionnaire), radiological damage, and safety over 20 months. Of 98 patients recruited, more than one third were lost at follow-up. A follow-up visit at 20 months was available for 51 patients. These 48 women and 3 men had a mean age of 51.2 ± 13 years and a mean delay from symptom onset till their first visit of 3.2 years. At 20 months, the average MTX dose was 9.7 mg weekly. A second DMARD was added in three patients. The average dose of prednisone at 20 months was 7.5 mg daily. A significant improvement of DAS28 and functional disability was observed and 35.3 % of patients entered remission (DAS28 <2.6). A progression of X-ray damage was observed in one third of patients. Two patients had to stop MTX because of severe side effects and two patients developed diabetes. Methotrexate and bridging steroids therapy is effective also in sub-Saharan Africa but the average weekly MTX dose remains low. Implementation of a regular follow-up is a major issue. PMID:23649482

  18. Mifepristone Treatment of Cushing's Syndrome in a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Ronadip R; Marina, Neyssa; Katznelson, Laurence; Feldman, Brian J

    2015-11-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) in the pediatric population is challenging to diagnose and treat. Although next-generation medical therapies are emerging for adults with CS, none are currently approved or used in children. Here we describe the first use of mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, to treat CS in a pediatric subject. The patient, a 14-year-old girl with an 18-month history of metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma, suffered from fatigue, profound myopathy, irritability, and depression. She was found to have hypertension, hypokalemia, and worsening control of her preexisting type 1 diabetes. In this report, we detail our clinical evaluation that confirmed CS caused by an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone secreting tumor. Surgical and radiation therapies were not pursued because of her poor functional status and limited life expectancy, and medical treatment of CS was indicated for symptom relief. Mifepristone treatment provided rapid improvement in glycemic control, insulin resistance, and hypertension as well as significant diminishment of her myopathy and fatigue. Hypokalemia was managed with an oral potassium replacement and dose escalation of spironolactone; no other significant adverse effects were observed. Despite successful palliation of Cushing's signs and symptoms, the patient died of progression of her cancer. This case demonstrates the safety and efficacy of mifepristone treatment in a pediatric patient with symptomatic, ectopic CS. We conclude that, in appropriate pediatric patients with CS, glucocorticoid receptor antagonism with mifepristone should be considered to control the effects of hypercortisolism and to improve quality of life. PMID:26459648

  19. Substance use treatment barriers for patients with frequent hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Raven, Maria C; Carrier, Emily R; Lee, Joshua; Billings, John C; Marr, Mollie; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2010-01-01

    Substance use (SU) disorders adversely impact health status and contribute to inappropriate health services use. This qualitative study sought to determine SU-related factors contributing to repeated hospitalizations and to identify opportunities for preventive interventions. Fifty Medicaid-insured inpatients identified by a validated statistical algorithm as being at high-risk for frequent hospitalizations were interviewed at an urban public hospital. Patient drug/alcohol history, experiences with medical, psychiatric and addiction treatment, and social factors contributing to readmission were evaluated. Three themes related to SU and frequent hospitalizations emerged: (a) barriers during hospitalization to planning long-term treatment and follow-up, (b) use of the hospital as a temporary solution to housing/family problems, and (c) unsuccessful SU aftercare following discharge. These data indicate that homelessness, brief lengths of stay complicating discharge planning, patient ambivalence regarding long-term treatment, and inadequate detox-to-rehab transfer resources compromise substance-using patients' likelihood of avoiding repeat hospitalization. Intervention targets included supportive housing, detox-to-rehab transportation, and postdischarge patient support. PMID:19540700

  20. [Successful sunitinib treatment of a patient with Stauffer's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Küronya, Zsófia; Kovács, Eszter; Lahm, Erika; Géczi, Lajos

    2014-09-01

    Several potential biomarkers of response to targeted therapies are being evaluated in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to improve drug development and to determine which patient may benefit the most from the different treatment options. Stauffer's syndrome is a paraneoplastic syndrome that presents with the elevation of hepatic enzymes without hepatic metastases in patients with renal cell carcinoma. Hereby we report the case of our patient who suffered from multiple peritoneal metastases of renal cell cancer accompanied by Stauffer's syndrome. During his course of disease, the change in the serum gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) levels correlated well with the extent of metastatic spread. Hypertension, grade 2 hand-foot syndrome and hypothyreosis also developed in relation to the successful sunitinib treatment. These side effects are predictive biomarkers in patients responding well to sunitinib. As other potential causes of increased GGT and ALP were excluded, the elevation of these enzymes were attributed to Stauffer's syndrome. During treatment, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up showed complete regression, while the serum GGT and ALP levels halved. In this case, besides the known biomarkers, changes in serum GGT and ALP levels correlated well with the regression of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first case published in the medical literature to show GGT and ALP levels in Stauffer's syndrome as potential biomarkers. PMID:25260079

  1. Antidepressant treatment of the depressed patient with insomnia.

    PubMed

    Thase, M E

    1999-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are an integral part of depressive disorder. As such, they are a part of all contemporary sets of diagnostic criteria for major depression and of all major symptom-based rating scales for depression. Insomnia is a particularly frequent complaint, and it is reported by more than 90% of depressed patients. Although the "kindling" or "illness transduction" model of depression remains hypothetical, there is evidence that people with recurrent depression have more pronounced abnormalities of sleep neurophysiology than those experiencing a single or initial episode. Therefore, early relief of insomnia in a depressed patient, in addition to alleviating other symptoms, may increase adherence to treatment and increase daytime performance and overall functioning, while complete relief of insomnia may improve prognosis. Stimulation of serotonin-2 (5-HT2) receptors is thought to underlie insomnia and changes in sleep architecture seen with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). This is the reason why hypnotics or low-dose trazodone are commonly coprescribed at the initiation of the treatment with either the SSRIs or SNRIs. On the other hand, antidepressant drugs with 5-HT2 blocking properties, such as mirtazapine or nefazodone, alleviate insomnia and improve sleep architecture. In depressed patients, mirtazapine produces a significant shortening of sleep-onset latency, increases a total sleep time, and leads to a marked improvement in sleep efficiency. Antidepressants with preferential 5-HT2 blocking properties are therefore a good treatment option for depressed patients with marked insomnia. PMID:10446739

  2. Prosthodontic treatment of the edentulous adult cleft palate patient.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Leanne M

    2003-03-01

    Clefts of the upper lip and plate are relatively common, yet dental treatment of these patients is still very poor and many grow up suffering dental neglect. Dental practitioners should become involved in the treatment team as dental needs are present from birth to death. Adult cleft patients often need tooth replacement with obturation of any residual clefts. They are best treated with tooth-supported removable appliances including partial and complete overdentures, thus preservation of their natural dentition is desirable. Edentulous cleft palate patients present with restorative difficulties due to their compromised maxillary arches as well as the presence of scar tissue in their palates and lips. An outline of these complications and guidelines for their treatment is illustrated in the form of three case reports from members of one family all presenting with varying cleft lip and palate defects. This article highlights the need for dental students to be exposed to dentally compromised patients so that they will feel confident enough to treat them in private practice. PMID:12800267

  3. [The fertility-associated treatment of young breast cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunshu; Wu, Kejin

    2016-01-01

    There is no treatment norm on the fertility issue of breast cancer patients. The clinical studies show that the effects of chemotherapy and endocrine treatment on menstrual cycle and ovarian function have connection with patients' age, therapeutic regimen and drug dose. The time to be pregnant should be decided according to the stage of tumor and the therapeutic regimen. The trimester of pregnancy and tumor stage should be considered when making the therapeutic regimen for the breast cancer patients during pregnancy. And it is not recommended to choose the induced abortion for the therapeutic aim. Theoretically, ovarian function inhibition drugs have great application prospects, while, of which the long-term affect on human body and the relation with tumor development need more researches to study. The available evidence-based practices consider that the pregnancy after breast cancer treatment has no adverse affects on the prognosis of early and middle stage breast cancer patients. More study results are needed to normalize and detail the therapeutic regimen and fertility guidance. PMID:26792357

  4. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: Treatment and outcomes of 93 patients

    PubMed Central

    Brode, Sarah K; Varadi, Robert; McNamee, Jane; Malek, Nina; Stewart, Sharon; Jamieson, Frances B; Avendano, Monica

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a leading cause of death worldwide and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR TB) poses a threat to its control. There is scanty evidence regarding optimal management of MDR TB. The majority of Canadian cases of MDR TB are diagnosed in Ontario; most are managed by the Tuberculosis Service at West Park Healthcare Centre in Toronto. The authors reviewed 93 cases of MDR TB admitted from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2011. RESULTS: Eighty-nine patients were foreign born. Fifty-six percent had a previous diagnosis of TB and most (70%) had only pulmonary involvement. Symptoms included productive cough, weight loss, fever and malaise. The average length of inpatient stay was 126 days. All patients had a peripherally inserted central catheter for the intensive treatment phase because medications were given intravenously. Treatment lasted for 24 months after bacteriologic conversion, and included a mean (± SD) of 5±1 drugs. A successful outcome at the end of treatment was observed in 84% of patients. Bacteriological conversion was achieved in 98% of patients with initial positive sputum cultures; conversion occurred by four months in 91%. CONCLUSIONS: MDR TB can be controlled with the available anti-TB drugs. PMID:25493698

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Anxiety in Patients With Dementia

    PubMed Central

    KRAUS, CYNTHIA A.; SEIGNOUREL, PAUL; BALASUBRAMANYAM, VALLI; SNOW, A. LYNN; WILSON, NANCY L.; KUNIK, MARK E.; SCHULZ, PAUL E.; STANLEY, MELINDA A.

    2008-01-01

    Anxiety is common in dementia and is associated with decreased independence and increased risk of nursing home placement. However, little is known about the treatment of anxiety in dementia. This article reports results from two patients who were treated with a modified version of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in dementia (CBT-AD). Modifications were made in the content, structure, and learning strategies of CBT to adapt skills to the cognitive limitations of these patients and include collaterals (i.e., family members, friends, or other caregivers) in the treatment process. The patients received education and awareness training and were taught the skills of diaphragmatic breathing, coping self-statements, exposure, and behavioral activation. The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale was used to characterize dementia severity and determine eligibility for treatment (a CDR score of 0.5 to 2.0 was required for participation). Other measures included the Rating Anxiety in Dementia scale, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Anxiety subscale, and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Outcome data showed improvement in anxiety as measured by standardized rating scales. We conclude that CBT-AD is potentially useful in treating anxiety in dementia patients and that this technique merits further study. PMID:18520790

  6. [Inpatient psychoanalytic treatment of patients with structural ego disorders].

    PubMed

    Ehl, M; Tress, W

    1988-01-01

    Psychoneurotic and psychosomatic patients with severe personality disorders suffer from structural defects of their ego-functions and are in need of specific treatment techniques which can be supplied by the differentiated strategies of inpatient psychoanalysis. The experiences of a specific inpatient ward of the Psychosomatic department at the Central Institute of Mental Health in Mannheim are summarized whereby the use of the inward setting to initiate long term psychotherapeutic processes is emphasized. According to an integrative treatment concept various verbal and non-verbal modalities of experience and working through represented by different members of the therapeutic team co-operate within their well defined functions. The main task of the team is to identify the various splitting mechanisms of the patients with personality disorders and to combine all the walled off ways of experiencing and social behavior into a complete picture of his person. To this end close attention is payed to the dynamics within the group of the patients as well as with the group of the therapists. As a precondition the setting of the ward and its rules of conduct for inpatient group life have closely to be watched and the respective behavior of the patients and the team has to be monitored. We describe our setting, the time phases of treatment, the tasks of the different therapists, and explicitely emphasize sociotherapeutic aspects for the final therapy phase. At last, we mention special emotional difficulties waiting for therapists who work in this setting. PMID:3239270

  7. Sex coaching for physicians: combination treatment for patient and partner.

    PubMed

    Perelman, M A

    2003-10-01

    Physicians dealing with sexual dysfunction (SD) must consider the psychological and behavioral aspects of their patient's diagnosis and management, as well as organic causes and risk factors. Integrating sex therapy and other psychological techniques into their office practice will improve effectiveness in treating SD. This presentation provides information about the psychological forces of patient and partner resistance, which impact patient compliance and sex lives beyond organic illness and mere performance anxiety. Four key areas are reviewed: (1). 'Sex coaching for physicians' uses the 'Cornell Model' for conceptualizing and treating SD. A 5-min 'sex status,' manages 'time crunch' by rapidly identifying common causes of sexual dysfunction (insufficient stimulation, depression, etc). (2). Augmenting pharmacotherapy with sex therapy when treating erectile dysfunction (ED) specifically, or SD generally is stressed. Sex therapy is useful as a monotherapy or an adjunctive treatment and is often the 'combination therapy' of choice when treating SD. The following therapeutic integrations are highlighted: modifying patient's initial expectations; sexual pharmaceuticals use as a therapeutic probe; 'follow-up' to manage noncompliance and improve outcome; relapse prevention. (3). Issues specific to the role of the partner of the ED patient are described. The physician must appreciate the role of couple's issues in causing and/or exacerbating the ED and the impact of the ED on the patient/partner relationship. Successful treatment requires a supportive available sexual partner, yet partner cooperation may be independent of partner attendance during the office visit. Preliminary data from a survey of SMSNA members practice patterns, regarding partner issues, is presented and discussed. The importance of evoking partner support and cooperation independent of actual attendance during office visits is emphasized. (4). Finally, the need for more patient and partner educational

  8. Treatment-emergent mania/hypomania in unipolar patients

    PubMed Central

    Benvenuti, Antonella; Rucci, Paola; Miniati, Mario; Papasogli, Alessandra; Fagiolini, Andrea; Cassano, Giovanni B; Swartz, Holly; Frank, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of treatment-emergent mania/hypomania (TEMH) and to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with major depression experiencing this event during treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and/or interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods Following an algorithm-based protocol, 344 patients with major depression confirmed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV disorders were treated with an SSRI, interpersonal psychotherapy, or their combination for nine months. The emergence of mania/hypomania was carefully monitored throughout the study using the Young Mania Rating Scale and clinical assessment. Results Overall, eight patients experienced TEMH. The incidence of this event was 3.0% in patients treated with an SSRI and 0.9% in patients treated with IPT alone. Among patients treated with an SSRI, the difference between sites was higher than expected by chance alone (6.8% at Pisa and 0% at Pittsburgh, p = 0.002). Despite the adoption of an identical protocol at the two sites, some demographic and clinical characteristics of participants may account for this unexpected result. Alternatively, the greater number of episodes and earlier age of onset at the Pittsburgh site suggests that the unipolar course of illness was more clearly established prior to study entry. Conclusions TEMH is an infrequent event, occurring in 2.3% of patients treated for major depression. Nevertheless, its consequences are clinically relevant and require prompt and appropriate therapeutic interventions. For this reason, recognising those patients at risk for such an event is of paramount clinical significance. The observed difference in the incidence of TEMH between the two sites requires further investigation. PMID:18837867

  9. Plasma Biomarkers Can Predict Treatment Response in Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Tsai, Chia-Jung; Wang, Wei-Jie; Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Yang, Chih-Mann; Chang, Lih-Yu; Lin, Ching-Kai; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Shu, Chin-Chong; Lee, Li-Na; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Despite numerous studies, there has been little progress in the use of biomarkers for predicting treatment response in patients with tuberculosis (TB). Patients with culture-confirmed pulmonary TB between 2010 and 2014 were prospectively recruited. Blood samples were taken upon diagnosis and 2 months after the start of standard anti-TB treatment. A pilot study utilizing measurement of TB-antigen-stimulated cytokines was conducted to select potential biomarkers for further testing. Outcome was defined as persistent culture positivity at 2 months into treatment. Of 167 enrolled patients, 26 had persistent culture positivity. RANTES, IL-22, MMP-8, IL-18, MIG, and Granzyme A were selected as potential biomarkers. For predicting persistent culture positivity, receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed that initial RANTES (AUC: 0.725 [0.624–0.827]) and 2-month MMP-8 (AUC: 0.632 [0.512–0.713]) had good discriminative ability. Using a logistic regression model, low initial RANTES level (<440 pg/mL), initial smear positivity, and high 2-month MMP-8 level (>3000 pg/mL) were associated with persistent culture positivity. Low initial RANTES level and initial smear positivity had a positive predictive value of 60% (12/20) for persistent culture positivity, compared with 4% (3/75) among patients with high RANTES level and smear negativity upon diagnosis. In the 72 patients with either low RANTES/smear negativity or high RANTES/smear positivity upon diagnosis, the 2-month MMP-8 level had a positive and negative predictive value of 24 and 94%, respectively, for 2-month culture status. Aside from an initial sputum smear status, serum RANTES level at diagnosis and MMP-8 level at 2 months of treatment may be used to stratify risk for culture persistence. PMID:26426648

  10. [Monotherapy in treatment-naïve patients].

    PubMed

    Arranz Caso, José Alberto

    2008-12-01

    The development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) with current triple drug combinations has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. However, there is a need for less toxic treatments without sacrificing efficacy, as well as for less expensive drugs to facilitate universal access to this therapy. The protease inhibitors (PI) administered with ritonavir have a favorable pharmacokinetic profile and high genetic barrier and consequently are ideal candidates for use in monotherapy, thus avoiding the toxicity and cost associated with nucleoside analogs, as well as preserving drugs for future options. The promising results of studies performed with lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) in induction-maintenance regimens in patients without prior failure to PIs encourage research into the cost-effectiveness of LPV/r in monotherapy from the beginning of ART. The few studies performed in this context seem to indicate the following: a) LPV/r monotherapy achieves undetectable viral loads in a large proportion of treatment-naïve patients, b) future treatment options are not compromised in patients not achieving undetectable viral loads since the likelihood of resistance mutations is low and treatment intensification achieves suppression of viral replication, and c) strategies for early detection can probably be considered in patients who will not achieve complete suppression with LPV/r monotherapy. Nevertheless, before LPV/r monotherapy can be considered a first-line option, new studies with larger samples and longer follow-up are required. These studies should pay particular attention to viral replication in areas where PI show less penetration. PMID:19572437

  11. Assessment of DICOM Viewers Capable of Loading Patient-specific 3D Models Obtained by Different Segmentation Platforms in the Operating Room.

    PubMed

    Lo Presti, Giuseppe; Carbone, Marina; Ciriaci, Damiano; Aramini, Daniele; Ferrari, Mauro; Ferrari, Vincenzo

    2015-10-01

    Patient-specific 3D models obtained by the segmentation of volumetric diagnostic images play an increasingly important role in surgical planning. Surgeons use the virtual models reconstructed through segmentation to plan challenging surgeries. Many solutions exist for the different anatomical districts and surgical interventions. The possibility to bring the 3D virtual reconstructions with native radiological images in the operating room is essential for fostering the use of intraoperative planning. To the best of our knowledge, current DICOM viewers are not able to simultaneously connect to the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and import 3D models generated by external platforms to allow a straight integration in the operating room. A total of 26 DICOM viewers were evaluated: 22 open source and four commercial. Two DICOM viewers can connect to PACS and import segmentations achieved by other applications: Synapse 3D® by Fujifilm and OsiriX by University of Geneva. We developed a software network that converts diffuse visual tool kit (VTK) format 3D model segmentations, obtained by any software platform, to a DICOM format that can be displayed using OsiriX or Synapse 3D. Both OsiriX and Synapse 3D were suitable for our purposes and had comparable performance. Although Synapse 3D loads native images and segmentations faster, the main benefits of OsiriX are its user-friendly loading of elaborated images and it being both free of charge and open source. PMID:25739346

  12. The treatment of multiple myeloma patients not eligible for asct.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Paul; Laubach, Jacob; Mahindra, Anuj; Mitsiades, Constantine; Schlossman, Robert; Ghobrial, Irene; Hideshima, Teru; Raje, Noopur; Munshi, Nikhil; Anderson, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Advances in therapies for younger patients with multiple myeloma have resulted in significant improvements in outcome over recent years, on the contrary the progress in treatments for elderly patients has remained more modest. Traditionally, patients who are not eligible for transplantation, like the older patients, have been treated with the combination of melphalan plus prednisone (MP), which leads to responses in approximately 50% of patients; however, patients rarely achieve a complete response (CR) and long-term outcomes are disappointing, with a relapse-free survival of approximately 18 months and an overall survival (OS) of approximately 3 years.With the arrival of novel agents, including the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib, and the immunomodulatory agents, thalidomide and lenalidomide, a shift in the management of older patients and/or those not eligible for transplantation has taken place. Increasingly, novel agents are now being incorporated into therapy, based on the positive findings from clinical trials in this setting, and outcomes have improved accordingly. PMID:21415962

  13. Treatment discontinuation and clinical outcomes in the 1-year naturalistic treatment of patients with schizophrenia at risk of treatment nonadherence

    PubMed Central

    Kelin, Katarina; Lambert, Timothy JR; Brnabic, Alan JM; Newton, Richard; Ye, Wendy; Escamilla, Raúl I; Chen, Kuang-Peng; Don, Liana; Montgomery, William; Karagianis, Jamie; Ascher-Svanum, Haya

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to improve physicians’ understanding of the treatment circumstances and needs of outpatients with schizophrenia at risk of nonadherence, by naturalistically assessing antipsychotic treatment patterns, clinical outcomes, and health care service use in this little-studied patient population. Methods: In this one-year, prospective, multicenter, noninterventional, observational study, patients considered at risk of nonadherence by their physicians were switched from their primary oral antipsychotic to another oral or a depot antipsychotic at study entry. All cause treatment discontinuation (antipsychotic switch, augmentation, or discontinuation) during the study was assessed using Kaplan–Meier survival analyses and descriptive statistics. Patients’ illness severity, quality of life, attitude towards medication, patient-reported adherence, and health care resource utilization were assessed during the study. Results: Of the 406 enrolled patients, 43 (10.6%) were switched to depot and 363 (89.4%) were switched to oral antipsychotics at study entry. During the study, 99 (24.4%) patients switched, augmented, or discontinued their antipsychotic (all cause treatment discontinuation). Of the 99 patients who switched, augmented, or discontinued their antipsychotic, 8 (18.6%) were taking depot and 91 (25.0%) were taking oral antipsychotics. These patients were switched to either depot (n = 15) or oral (n = 78) antipsychotics, or discontinued their antipsychotic medication (n = 6). Inadequate response was the most frequently reported reason for medication discontinuation. During the study, patients’ clinical and functional status improved significantly and service use was low. Most patients considered themselves to be adherent at study entry, and this favorable self-perception increased during the study (from 68.5% to 88.1%). Conclusion: Although identified as at risk of nonadherence, few patients in this naturalistic study discontinued their

  14. Patient factors influencing dermal filler complications: prevention, assessment, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    De Boulle, Koenraad; Heydenrych, Izolda

    2015-01-01

    While rare, complications do occur with the esthetic use of dermal fillers. Careful attention to patient factors and technique can do much to avoid these complications, and a well-informed practitioner can mitigate problems when they do occur. Since cosmetic surgery is usually an elective process, requested by the patient, clinical trials are complex to organize and run. For this reason, an international group of practicing physicians in the field of esthetics came together to share knowledge and to try and produce some informed guidance for their colleagues, considering the literature and also pooling their own extensive clinical experience. This manuscript aims to summarize the crucial aspects of patient selection, including absolute contraindications as well as situations that warrant caution, and also covers important considerations for the pre- and posttreatment periods as well as during the procedure itself. Guidance is given on both immediate and long-term management of adverse reactions. The majority of complications are related to accepting patients inappropriate for treatment or issues of sterility, placement, volume, and injection technique. It is clear that esthetic practitioners need an in-depth knowledge of all aspects of treatment with dermal fillers to achieve optimal outcomes for their patients. PMID:25926750

  15. The person in the room: how relating holistically contributes to an effective patient-care provider alliance.

    PubMed

    Penner, Leslie A; Roger, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how relating to the 'whole' person--both the physical body and the invisible aspects of the 'self'--is essential in the establishment of a strong therapeutic alliance between patients and health care providers. Our work is based on interviews conducted with individuals affected by neurological illnesses (patients and family care providers). Hsieh and Shannon's (2005) conventional content analysis was used to analyze the data. Under the broad theme of 'maintaining a coherent sense of self' we identified four distinct sub-themes related to interactions with health care providers. The results elucidate the more complex and deep needs of patients who must access care on an ongoing basis, and highlight the important role that care providers play in supporting individuals who are experiencing physical, spiritual and social losses. Care must attend to the deep needs of these individuals by communicating in a style that addresses both emotional and cognitive needs of patients, by thorough and holistic assessment and by appropriate referrals. PMID:23763236

  16. Greater Postimplant Swelling in Small-Volume Prostate Glands: Implications for Dosimetry, Treatment Planning, and Operating Room Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Evans, Cheryl; Narayana, Vrinda; McLaughlin, Patrick W.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Postimplant prostatic edema has been implicated in suboptimal permanent implants, and smaller prostates have been reported to have worse dosimetric coverage. In this study we compare the degree of postimplant edema between larger and smaller prostates and examine the effects of prostate size on the dose delivered to 90% of the prostate (D90). Methods and Materials: From September 2003 to February 2006, 105 hormone-naive patients underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy with {sup 125}I Rapid Strand (Oncura Inc., Arlington Heights, IL). All patients underwent pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 3 weeks before implant, transrectal ultrasound at the time of implant, and both computed tomography and MRI 2.5 to 3 weeks after implant. Prostates were divided into 5 subgroups based on preimplant MRI volumes: less than 25 mL, 25 to 35 mL, 35 to 45 mL, 45 to 55 mL, and greater than 55 mL. Prostate swelling was assessed by use of preimplant and postimplant MRI volumes. Postimplant dosimetry was determined by MRI and compared between the subgroups. Results: All prostates showed postimplant swelling on MRI when compared with preimplant MRI, with a mean increase of 31% {+-} 31% (p < 0.0001). The greatest swelling was noted in small prostates (volume less than 25 mL), with a mean increase of 70% {+-} 36%. The degree of swelling in the group with a volume less than 25 mL was significantly larger than the degree of swelling in all other prostate subgroups (p < 0.003). Transrectal ultrasound significantly overestimates the prostate volume when compared with MRI by a mean of 15% {+-} 25% (p = 0.0006) and is more pronounced for smaller prostates. Although prostates with volumes less than 25 mL did not have significantly worse D90 compared with larger prostates, they had the largest percent of suboptimal implants by the standard ratio of D90 divided by the prescription dose. Conclusions: Although small prostates have the greatest postimplant edema, planning

  17. Necrotising fasciitis after acupuncture treatment in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Glas, Ariene Wypkjen; Jüttner, Anna M F M; Kooter, Albertus Jozef

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year old male with no significant medical history was admitted to our hospital with a painful, red, swollen right arm and fever. The rash and swelling had started in the cubital fossa. 7 days earlier, needles had been placed exactly at that site during an acupuncture treatment. After deterioration of his condition, surgical exploration of the arm revealed necrotising fasciitis. Although acupuncture is a relatively safe intervention, serious complications do occur. Necrotising fasciitis after acupuncture has been described in immunocompromised patients. To the best of our knowledge this is the first immunocompetent patient with necrotising fasciitis and toxic shock, caused by acupuncture. PMID:27413025

  18. International patients on operation vacation – perspectives of patients travelling to Hungary for orthopaedic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, Eszter; Szocska, Gabor; Knai, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Background: The importance of cross-border healthcare, medical and health tourism plays a significant role in the European health policy and health management. After dentistry, orthopaedic treatments are the leading motivation for seeking care in Hungary, as patients with rheumatic and motion diseases are drawn to the thermal spas and well-established orthopaedic centres. This paper aims to gain insight into foreign patients’ perspectives on their experience of having sought medical tourism in orthopaedic care in Hungary. Methods: A patient survey was conducted in 2012 on motivations for seeking treatment abroad, orthopaedic care received and overall satisfaction. In addition, health professionals’ interviews, and 17 phone interviews were conducted in 2013 with Romanian patients who had orthopaedic treatment in Hungary. Finally, medical records of foreign patients were analysed. Results: The survey was completed by 115 participants – 61.1% females, mean age= 41.9, 87% Romanian origin. Most of the patients came to Hungary for orthopaedic surgeries, e.g. arthroscopy, knee/hip prosthesis or spinal surgery. 72.6% chose Hungary because of related to perceived better quality and longstanding culture of Hungarian orthopaedic care. Over 57% of patients reported being ‘very satisfied’ with care received and 41.6% ‘satisfied’. The follow-up interviews further reflected this level of satisfaction, therefore many respondents stating they have already recommended the Hungarian healthcare to others. Conclusion: Based on the findings, patients from neighbouring regions are increasingly seeking orthopaedic care in Hungary. Patients having orthopaedic care are highly satisfied with the quality of care, the whole treatment process from the availability of information to discharge summaries and would consider returning for further treatments. PMID:25396209

  19. Orthodontic and surgical treatment of a patient with hemifacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Gustavo; Parente, Eduardo Varela; Esteves, Lucas Senhorinho; Louro, Rafael Seabra; Capelli, Jonas

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the surgical and orthodontic treatment of a 12-year-old boy with a significant deformity and functional involvement caused by hemifacial microsomia. The left mandibular ramus and condyle were hypoplastic and abnormal in form and location. The lower third of the face was increased, with mandibular retrusion and significant facial asymmetry. He had difficulties in speaking and chewing and problems related to his facial appearance, which caused severe psychosocial disturbances. The patient received orthodontic treatment and temporomandibular joint reconstruction with a costochondral graft on the left side while he was still growing. Three-year follow-up records are presented. PMID:22449593

  20. Starting, Choosing, Changing, and Discontinuing Drug Treatment for Epilepsy Patients.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Dieter

    2016-05-01

    Epilepsy is a serious brain disease with seizures as the main symptom, which can be successfully treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). AEDs are usually started as soon as the epilepsy diagnosis has been established. About 80% of adults with new-onset epilepsy will achieve lasting seizure remission on AEDs. However, 20% continue to have seizures despite treatment (drug-resistant epilepsy). AEDs can be safely discontinued after several years of seizure remission during early treatment. Remarkably, 60% of all treated patients remain in remission off AEDs, making epilepsy one of the best treatable among chronic brain diseases. PMID:27086984

  1. Patient compliance behavior: the effects of time on patients' values of treatment regimens.

    PubMed

    Christensen-Szalanski, J J; Northcraft, G B

    1985-01-01

    Present medical models of treatment compliance have not addressed the role that time plays in the perception of a treatment regimen's costs and benefits. This paper re-evaluates the role of time in understanding compliance behavior. Models from the economic and psychological literature are used to demonstrate that the 'discounting effect' associated with future events, and the 'sunk cost effect' associated with past events may have a direct and predictable impact on the patient's values in health care choices. This article suggests that when the effects of time are incorporated into expectancy models of compliance behavior (such as the Health Belief Model) the resulting predictions are supported by numerous findings in the compliance literature, many of which were previously unaccountable by these expectancy models. From this finding an explanation is derived for the variable results of educational and attitudinal change programs upon compliance behavior, the success of patient contracts, the sudden occurrence of preference reversals in health care choices, and the 'confusing' effect of treatment cost on treatment adherence. This paper also introduces to the compliance literature the concept of a treatment's 'time adjusted rate of return', and speculates upon how this concept may be used to understand the relationship between a treatment's 'desirability' or its ability to motivate a person to start the treatment, and its 'resistance' or its capacity to help a person to finish the treatment once it has begun. It proposes that changes in the temporal distribution of a treatment's benefits and costs can improve the treatment's desirability and resistance, and that a treatment's time adjusted rate of return can be used to allocate more efficiently the effort that providers spend monitoring patient compliance. PMID:3929392

  2. Antiretroviral adherence and treatment outcomes among adult Ethiopian patients.

    PubMed

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R; Gee, Peter; Peterson, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Developing appropriate strategies to sustain optimal medication adherence among the increasing number of HIV-positive patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa is a major challenge. The objective of this study was to determine patient, regimen, disease, patient-provider, and healthcare-related factors associated with adherence with ART over a one-year period, and assess the impact of adherence on treatment outcomes. We performed a prospective, observational study among 246 patients who were initiated on ART in Ethiopia. Of 172 who completed follow-up, 130 (75.6%) had ≥95% adherence. In the multivariate analyses, a higher baseline BMI (OR, 1.2; 95% CI 1.0, 1.4) and use of reminder devices (OR, 9.1; 95% CI 2.0, 41.6) remained positively associated with adherence, while a higher HIV symptom and adverse drug reaction distress score was an independent negative predictor of adherence (OR, 0.90; 95% CI 0.9, 1.0) CD4 count increase was significantly higher in the adherent patients compared to non-adherent patients at 12 months (159 cells/µL [interquartile range (IQR), 72-324 cells/µL] vs. 132 cells/µL [IQR, 43-190 cells/µL]; p = 0.026). Our findings indicate that interventions aimed at improving adherence and thereby treatment outcomes in patients initiated on ART should promote the use of reminder devices, and monitor HIV symptoms and adverse reaction distress and nutritional status. PMID:26829232

  3. Treatment strategies for osteoarthritis patients with pain and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Paolo; Angeli, Fabio; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Martire, Paola; Garofoli, Marta; Gentile, Giorgio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo

    2010-08-01

    Out of 100 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), almost 40 have a concomitant diagnosis of hypertension. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors may trigger a rise in blood pressure (BP), which is more marked in patients with established hypertension. NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors attenuate the antihypertensive effect of several antihypertensive agents. Frequent BP controls are needed in treated hypertensive patients who are concomitantly receiving NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors because even a small increase in BP may be associated with an important rise in the risk of major cardiovascular complications. In meta-analyses, an increase in systolic BP of 5mmHg was associated with a 25% higher risk of cardiovascular events. These data have been confirmed in randomized studies with rofecoxib and celecoxib, where a modest increase in BP was associated with a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease. There is emerging evidence that the COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD) class is promising in the treatment of patients with OA. Naproxcinod, the first CINOD investigated in clinical trials, is composed of the traditional NSAID naproxen covalently bound to the nitric oxide (NO)-donating moiety butanediol mono-nitrate (BDMN). The molecule has the potential to provide a sustained release of NO. In clinical studies, naproxcinod prevented the BP rise in normotensive and hypertensive patients observed with naproxen. The BP benefit of naproxcinod over naproxen was greater in patients concomitantly receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. These investigational data suggest that naproxcinod is a valuable alternative to NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors for treatment of OA patients. PMID:22870450

  4. Treatment Strategies for Osteoarthritis Patients with Pain and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Verdecchia, Paolo; Angeli, Fabio; Mazzotta, Giovanni; Martire, Paola; Garofoli, Marta; Gentile, Giorgio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo

    2010-01-01

    Out of 100 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), almost 40 have a concomitant diagnosis of hypertension. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors may trigger a rise in blood pressure (BP), which is more marked in patients with established hypertension. NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors attenuate the antihypertensive effect of several antihypertensive agents. Frequent BP controls are needed in treated hypertensive patients who are concomitantly receiving NSAIDs or COX-2 inhibitors because even a small increase in BP may be associated with an important rise in the risk of major cardiovascular complications. In meta-analyses, an increase in systolic BP of 5mmHg was associated with a 25% higher risk of cardiovascular events. These data have been confirmed in randomized studies with rofecoxib and celecoxib, where a modest increase in BP was associated with a significantly higher risk of cardiovascular disease. There is emerging evidence that the COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD) class is promising in the treatment of patients with OA. Naproxcinod, the first CINOD investigated in clinical trials, is composed of the traditional NSAID naproxen covalently bound to the nitric oxide (NO)-donating moiety butanediol mono-nitrate (BDMN). The molecule has the potential to provide a sustained release of NO. In clinical studies, naproxcinod prevented the BP rise in normotensive and hypertensive patients observed with naproxen. The BP benefit of naproxcinod over naproxen was greater in patients concomitantly receiving angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. These investigational data suggest that naproxcinod is a valuable alternative to NSAIDs and COX-2 inhibitors for treatment of OA patients. PMID:22870450

  5. Treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Marina Amaral de Ávila; de Moura, Cristiano Soares; Ferré, Felipe; Bernatsky, Sasha; Rahme, Elham; Acurcio, Francisco de Assis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate treatment persistence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis who started therapies with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARD) and tumor necrosis factor blockers (anti-TNF drugs). METHODS This retrospective cohort study from July 2008 to September 2013 evaluated therapy persistence, which is defined as the period between the start of treatment until it is discontinued, allowing for an interval of up to 30 days between the prescription end and the start of the next prescription. Odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated by logistic regression models to estimate the patients’ chances of persisting in their therapies after the first and after the two first years of follow-up. RESULTS The study included 11,642 patients with rheumatoid arthritis – 2,241 of these started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 9,401 patients started on DMARD – and 1,251 patients with ankylosing spondylitis – 976 of them were started on anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 275 were started on DMARD. In the first year of follow-up, 63.5% of the patients persisted in their therapies with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) and 54.1% remained using DMARD in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. In regards to ankylosing spondylitis, 79.0% of the subjects in anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group and 41.1% of the subjects in the DMARD group persisted with their treatments. The OR (95%CI) for therapy persistence was 1.50 (1.34-1.67) for the anti-TNF (+/-DMARD) group as compared with the DMARD group in the first year for the patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and 2.33 (1.74-3.11) for the patients with ankylosing spondylitis. A similar trend was observed at the end of the second year. CONCLUSIONS A general trend of higher rates of therapy persistence with anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) was observed as compared to DMARD in the study period. We observed higher persistence rates for anti-TNF drugs (+/-DMARD) in patients with ankylosing

  6. Prognosis and treatment of patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Papastergiou, Vassilios; Burroughs, Andrew K; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2014-07-01

    Despite alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is the most acute manifestation of alcohol-related liver disease, its treatment remains controversial. Corticosteroids, given either as monotherapy or together with N-acetylecysteine, have been associated with a moderate short-term survival benefit in patients with severe disease. The Maddrey's discriminant function; Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score; age, bilirubin, INR and creatinine score; and the Model for end-stage liver disease have been proposed for stratifying prognosis in AH enabling selection of the patients to treat. Definition of treatment non-responders using the Lille model after 7 days of therapy may prevent a detrimental impact of prolonged corticosteroids. Pentoxifylline is an effective alternative reducing the occurrence of hepatorenal syndrome. Emerging evidence supports use of liver transplantation in a strictly selected subset of corticosteroid non-responders. PMID:24716632

  7. [OPTIMAL APPROACH TO COMBINED TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH UROGENITAL PAPILLOMATOSIS].

    PubMed

    Breusov, A A; Kulchavenya, E V; Brizhatyukl, E V; Filimonov, P N

    2015-01-01

    The review analyzed 59 sources of domestic and foreign literature on the use of immunomodulator izoprinozin in treating patients infected with human papilloma virus, and the results of their own experience. The high prevalence of HPV and its role in the development of cervical cancer are shown, the mechanisms of HPV development and the host protection from this infection are described. The authors present approaches to the treatment of HPV-infected patients with particular attention to izoprinozin. Isoprinosine belongs to immunomodulators with antiviral activity. It inhibits the replication of viral DNA and RNA by binding to cell ribosomes and changing their stereochemical structure. HPV infection, especially in the early stages, may be successfully cured till the complete elimination of the virus. Inosine Pranobex (izoprinozin) having dual action and the most abundant evidence base, may be recognized as the optimal treatment option. PMID:26859953

  8. Estimating Preferences for Treatments in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ávila, Mónica; Becerra, Virginia; Guedea, Ferran; Suárez, José Francisco; Fernandez, Pablo; Macías, Víctor; Mariño, Alfonso; and others

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Studies of patients' preferences for localized prostate cancer treatments have assessed radical prostatectomy and external radiation therapy, but none of them has evaluated brachytherapy. The aim of our study was to assess the preferences and willingness to pay of patients with localized prostate cancer who had been treated with radical prostatectomy, external radiation therapy, or brachytherapy, and their related urinary, sexual, and bowel side effects. Methods and Materials: This was an observational, prospective cohort study with follow-up until 5 years after treatment. A total of 704 patients with low or intermediate risk localized prostate cancer were consecutively recruited from 2003 to 2005. The estimation of preferences was conducted using time trade-off, standard gamble, and willingness-to-pay methods. Side effects were measured with the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC), a prostate cancer-specific questionnaire. Tobit models were constructed to assess the impact of treatment and side effects on patients' preferences. Propensity score was applied to adjust for treatment selection bias. Results: Of the 580 patients reporting preferences, 165 were treated with radical prostatectomy, 152 with external radiation therapy, and 263 with brachytherapy. Both time trade-off and standard gamble results indicated that the preferences of patients treated with brachytherapy were 0.06 utilities higher than those treated with radical prostatectomy (P=.01). Similarly, willingness-to-pay responses showed a difference of €57/month (P=.004) between these 2 treatments. Severe urinary incontinence presented an independent impact on the preferences elicited (P<.05), whereas no significant differences were found by bowel and sexual side effects. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that urinary incontinence is the side effect with the highest impact on preferences and that brachytherapy and external radiation therapy are more valued than radical prostatectomy

  9. Prevention and treatment of bone fragility in cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Ottanelli, Silva

    2015-01-01

    Summary It is well known that fractures increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. The various mechanisms responsible for bone loss in cancer patients may have a different impact depending on the characteristics of the clinical case and correlates with the therapies used, or caused by the therapies used against cancer. Some hormonal treatments cause hypogonadism, event which contributes to the progressive loss of bone mass. This is detectable in patients with breast cancer receiving determines that estrogen-deprivation and in men with prostate cancer with therapies that determine androgen deprivation. Chemotherapy treatments used in cancer patients have reduced bone mass. In addition, low bone mass is detectable in patients with lymphoma treated with corticosteroids or radiation or alkylating agents. In premenopausal patients suffering from breast cancer, treatment with cytotoxic therapy or ablation of ovarian function, can lead to an 8% reduction in bone mineral density at the spine and 4% in the femur. With a chemotherapy regimen in CMF, the reduction of BMD is 6.5%; this bone loss is not recovered after discontinuation of therapy. Tamoxifen given for five years reduces bone remodeling and cause a 32% increase in the risk of osteoporotic fractures when used in premenopausal. After menopause, tamoxifen has a protective effect on bone mass, with a reduced risk of new fractures. Aromatase inhibitors in post-menopausal women, depending on the formulation can cause different effects on the reduction of BMD and fracture risk. We have in fact steroids, exemestane and nonsteroidal, letrozole and anastrozole. Patients at increased risk of fragility fractures should undergo preventive therapies as soon as possible after tests performed for the study of bone health. They can be used DEXA and the FRAX algorithm, which can define a secondary osteoporosis. Prevention and treatment of the increased risk of osteoporotic fracture is to maintain adequate levels of calcium and

  10. Mutagenicity of inhalation anaesthetics studied by the sister chromatid exchange test in lymphocytes of patients and operating room personnel.

    PubMed

    Husum, B

    1987-06-01

    Retrospective studies have indicated that operating room personnel may have increased risks of spontaneous abortion, congenital malformations in offspring, and cancer (Cohen et al 1980, Buring et al 1985). Occupational exposure to waste anaesthetic gases may be responsible for these possible adverse health effects, but a cause-effect relationship has never been proved. Induction of changes in the DNA in the chromosomes leading to mutations may play a role in teratogenicity and carcinogenicity. Along with an increasing concern in society regarding occupational diseases and working and living environment in general, cytogenetic methods have been developed for rapid detection of potential mutagenicity in vitro of chemical agents. One such method is the SCE test, which is based on examination of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), i.e. exchanges of chromatid-segments between the two chromatids in a chromosome, during cell replication. SCEs are not mutations, but an increased frequency of SCE is a sensitive indicator of exposure to agents that are capable of producing damage to the DNA and thus possibly mutations. In vitro tests like the SCE test are very useful for evaluation of specific chemical agents, which may be added to the culture in known concentrations. In studies of possible hazards from chemical agents in the working or living environment, the exposure is often poorly defined. Also, biotransformation may be different in different species, and the duration and the level of the exposure may play a role. Examination of SCEs is, therefore, increasingly performed directly on human lymphocytes from peripheral blood. Thus, although the examination of SCEs is still performed in vitro, the exposure has taken place in vivo. Increased SCE levels are then regarded as a non-specific indicator that the donor has been exposed to potentially mutagenic agents in the environment. The author and his associates used the SCE test to investigate the possible mutagenicity of

  11. Treatment of in-transit and metastatic melanoma in two patients treated with ipilimumab and topical imiquimod.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Richard W; Cappel, Mark; Tzou, Katherine; Bagaria, Sanjay; Gilstrap, Cheryl; Swaika, Abhisek; Jambusaria-Pahlajani, Anokhi

    2016-08-01

    Checkpoint blockade inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Despite the success of these agents in improving the overall survival of patients with metastatic melanoma, not all patients achieve clinical benefit, leaving room for improvement. The presence of cutaneous metastases in patients with metastatic melanoma provides the unique opportunity to treat the cutaneous lesions with a local modality while simultaneously treating systemic disease with systemic therapy. Herein, we describe the treatment of two patients with both in-transit and metastatic melanoma with the combination of the topical toll-like receptor 7 agonist imiquimod with systemic ipilimumab. Both patients appeared to have progressed and developed new cutaneous and systemic metastases while on single agent ipilimumab only to respond when started on topical imiquimod. Both patients tolerated the combination of imiquimod and ipilimumab without serious adverse events, and both patients had excellent clinical responses. These cases provide a proof of principle of the possibility of the combination of toll-like receptor 7 agonists with immune checkpoint blockade inhibitors. PMID:27138458

  12. [Nondrug methods in the combined treatment of peptic ulcer patients].

    PubMed

    Degtiareva, I I; Kharchenko, N V

    1992-09-01

    Use of treatment complexes including non-drug methods (auricular acupuncture, pathogenetic dietotherapy, ILBR) or reduced doses of modern pharmacopreparations allowed to achieve rapid clinical and endoscopic remission in patients with ulcer disease. Simultaneously occurs normalization of the aggressive and defensive properties of the gastric juice, immunological, microcirculatory changes in the body and gastroduodenal mucosa. The vascular laser blood radiation reduced antacid dose and pathogenetic dietotherapy. PMID:1481513

  13. Onychomycosis: Evaluation, Treatment Options, Managing Recurrence, and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vlahovic, Tracey C

    2016-07-01

    Onychomycosis is the most common nail disease seen in podiatric practice. Effective long-term management remains problematic. We need to treat onychomycosis effectively to prevent its progression into a severe, debilitating, and painful condition, and to manage recurrence. With new agents now available and greater discussion on management strategies, this article reviews the appropriate evaluation of the disease, treatment options, and optimal patient outcomes. PMID:27215153

  14. Treatment of Generalized Convulsive Status Epilepticus in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Elizabeth L.; Wheless, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized convulsive status epilepticus (GCSE) is one of the most common neurologic emergencies and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality if not treated promptly and aggressively. Management of GCSE is staged and generally involves the use of life support measures, identification and management of underlying causes, and rapid initiation of anticonvulsants. The purpose of this article is to review and evaluate published reports regarding the treatment of impending, established, refractory, and super-refractory GCSE in pediatric patients. PMID:26380568

  15. [Global treatment of cardiovascular risk in the hypertensive patient].

    PubMed

    Mazón-Ramos, Pilar; Bertomeu-Martínez, Vicente; Palma-Gámiz, José L; Quiles-Granado, Juan; Guindo-Soldevilla, José; González-Juanatey, José R

    2007-02-01

    During 2006, new evidence supporting the need to adopt a global approach to the treatment of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients has been reported. It is increasingly clear that it is not sufficient to aim for optimum blood pressure control, which in any case is not easy to achieve, and that it is essential to treat all cardiovascular risk factors by using drugs with proven benefits, even when those benefits are supplementary to the drug's principal effects. In addition, drugs that could have a detrimental effect or that are, merely, less beneficial should be avoided or kept as a last resort. This appears to have happened with atenolol, and with beta-blockers in general, which have been withdrawn as first-line treatment in the recommendations of some professional societies. To lower cardiovascular risk, it is essential to prevent the development of conditions like diabetes, which are known to have drastic effect on the patient's prognosis. Recently, the results of the DREAM study, which are discussed in detail in this article, have been reported. They could lead to a change in therapeutic strategy in patients who are expected to develop diabetes. In addition, this year has seen the publication of substantial data on a new antihypertensive agent, aliskiren, the first oral renin inhibitor. It is awaiting approval by the international medicine agencies (i.e., the FDA and the EMEA), but should provide a very promising tool in the difficult area of high blood pressure management. Despite numerous advances in the pharmacologic treatment of high blood pressure, control is very difficult to achieve, principally in the elderly, in whom the prevalence of hypertension is high. In these patients, social factors and difficulties with treatment compliance also have an influence and must be dealt with by public health measures aimed at improving blood pressure control. PMID:17352858

  16. Treatment options in the young patient with Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, Tim; Bliss, Richard

    2016-08-01

    The treatment options in the young patient with Graves' disease are the same as in adults, namely antithyroid drug (ATD), surgery (partial or total thyroidectomy) and radioiodine. However, the emphasis and expectation is different in the young person, reflecting a range of considerations including age, pubertal status, disease natural history, likely impact of ATD on disease course and the implications of radiation exposure. New therapeutic strategies that could increase the likelihood of long-term remission are being explored. PMID:26252256

  17. [Filamentous fungal infections in immunosuppressed patients: prophylaxis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camps, Isabel; Peghin, Maddalena

    2015-09-01

    Although the incidence of invasive aspergillosis has decreased in haematologic patients and solid organ transplant recipients due to the use of prophylaxis; aspergillosis has emerged in other populations undergoing immunosuppressive drugs where prophylaxis is not well defined presenting different clinical patterns. Voriconazole is the gold standard in the treatment of aspergillosis and probably combined therapy, with voriconazole plus anidulafungin, could have a role in the initial management of the infection. PMID:26365733

  18. Mutation breeding of high 4-androstene-3,17-dione-producing Mycobacterium neoaurum ZADF-4 by atmospheric and room temperature plasma treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Zhang, Xian; Rao, Zhi-Ming; Shao, Ming-Long; Zhang, Le-Le; Wu, Dan; Xu, Zheng-Hong; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Steroid medication is used extensively in clinical applications and comprises a large and vital part of the pharmaceutical industry. However, the difficulty of separating 4-androstene-3,17-dione (AD) from 1,4-androstadiene-3,17-dione (ADD) restricts the application of the microbial transformation of phytosterols in the industry. A novel atmospheric and room temperature plasma (ARTP) treatment, which employs helium as the working gas, was used to generate Mycobacterium neoaurum mutants producing large amounts of AD. After treatment of cultures with ARTP, four mutants were selected using a novel screening method with a color assay. Among the mutants, M. neoaurum ZADF-4 was considered the best candidate for industrial application. When the fermentation medium contained 15 g/L phytosterols and was cultivated on a rotary shaker at 160 r/min at 30 °C for 7 d, (6.28±0.11) g/L of AD and (0.82±0.05) g/L of ADD were produced by the ZADF-4 mutant, compared with (4.83±0.13) g/L of AD and (2.34±0.06) g/L of ADD by the original strain, M. neoaurum ZAD. Compared with ZAD, the molar yield of AD increased from 48.3% to 60.3% in the ZADF-4 mutant. This result indicates that ZADF-4 may have potential for industrial production of AD. PMID:25845362

  19. Treatment of the psychotic patient who is violent.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Peter F; Noffsinger, Stephen G; Smith, Douglas A; Hrouda, Debra R; Knoll, James L

    2003-03-01

    Aggression among patients with serious mental illness occurs relatively infrequently, but it is a significant concern for patients, relatives, mental health professionals, and the public. Recognition of this risk and providing access and continuity of appropriate psychiatric care should be major clinical and administrative objectives in the management of violence in psychotic patients. To date, pharmacologic approaches have been unclear and inconsistent. At present, typical antipsychotics continue to have a primary role in acute management and in long-term management, in which noncompliance necessitates the use of long-acting depot neuroleptic preparations. Atypical antipsychotics in acute and long-acting intramuscular forms doubtless will influence and expand the choice for acute management of hostile psychotic patients and the long-term management of poorly compliant patients who are at risk to become violent on relapse. Persistent aggression should be managed by atypical antipsychotics with a preferential indication for clozapine, for which the most data on efficacy are available. The role of adjunctive medications is presently unclear. A major focus of care should be to refine legal processes and to conduct intervention studies aimed at enhancing treatment compliance. Violence risk reduction is not only crucial from a societal perspective, but also it is a humanitarian necessity to alleviate the burden and stigma for patients with serious mental illness. PMID:12683268

  20. [Individualized treatment of diabetic patients in special clinical situations].

    PubMed

    Franch Nadal, J

    2014-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex disease that is frequently associated with a constellation of risk factors that contribute to worsening morbidity and mortality in affected individuals. To increase quality of life in these persons, both hyperglycemia and other risk factors need to be considered. The first step is probably to establish the glycemic targets for each patient at each stage of the disease. Currently, clinical practice guidelines recommend individualizing glycemic targets with HbA1c values that range from 6-8.5%, depending on the patient's characteristics. Nine different antidiabetic drug families are available, each with distinct characteristics, thus allowing multiple combinations to aid the individual approach to hyperglycemia in each patient at each time point. There are numerous treatment algorithms that aim to simplify and summarize the various therapeutic possibilities. However, with some exceptions, these algorithms do not take into account the individual characteristics of each patient and are excessively general. To select the most appropriate drug for each patient at distinct moments, it is essential to evaluate the patient's comorbidities, such as heart failure, frailty, and the risk of hypoglycemias. PMID:25311719

  1. [From a Service to a Brand: TUR-Room Inspection, Patient Journals, After-Sales Greetings in the Witten Marketing Concept].

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, A; Gellisch, O; Abrolat, J; Füsgen, I; Heppner, H J

    2015-05-01

    Marketing in economic systems means to create a brand in a competitive surrounding to serve customers as a target. Thereby, elements of marketing are product policy and pricing as well as distribution. Due to the fact that not only products and services are almost not modifiable at all and that price variation is impossible due to the DRG system but also common distribution channels, such as retail or wholesale, are prohibited, the fist mentioned marketing elements are of special importance. Primary customers are the referring physicians who are well served by medical education or presentations, which belong to the common facilities of a hospital department. Nowadays one can observe an increasing mobility of patients and an increasing willingness to inform themselves about medical topics and the service provider behind them. In conclusion, the maintenance of patients is a growing field for the economic success of a hospital or a hospital department. The marketing elements are ruled by the "Heilmittelwerbegesetz" and must fulfill the standards which are defined by this statute. Patient´s journals, a guided tour around the procedure rooms with technical equipment, an after-sales postcard and the participation in events not only with medical contents, such as fairs, can help to steadily establish an image, for example, as an ambitious and caring service provider. PMID:26077302

  2. The treatment of patients with mycotoxin-induced disease.

    PubMed

    Rea, William J; Pan, Yaqin; Griffiths, Bertie

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-eight incapacitated individuals (average 43 years old, 7 males, 21 females, range 12-70) exposed to molds and mycotoxins were studied and treated with a protocol of cleaning up or changing their environment to be mold free. Injections of the optimum dose of antigens were given as part of the treatment protocol as was oral and intravenous (i.v.) antioxidants; heat depuration (sauna); physical therapy with massage and exercise under environmentally controlled conditions; oxygen therapy at 4-8 L/min for 2 hours with a special wood-grade cellophane reservoir and a glass oxygen container. Many patients were sensitive to plastics; therefore, exposures to these were kept to a minimum. Autogenous lymphocytic factor was given as an immune modulator. Of 28 patients, 27 did well and returned to work. One patient improved but did not return to work during the period of study. PMID:19854821

  3. [Clinical manifestations, complications and treatment of brucellosis: 45-patient study].

    PubMed

    Zribi, M; Ammari, L; Masmoudi, A; Tiouiri, H; Fendri, C

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical, laboratory findings and therapeutic features of patients with brucellosis. The diagnosis was made by clinical findings, automated blood culture, serology (Rose Bengal plate agglutination test, standard tube agglutination (Wright) and immunofluorerescence). The susceptibility of 13 strains was tested in vitro. The base sequence was determined for four strains. Forty-five cases were collected (31 acute and 14 sub-acute). Contamination was digestive in 62%. Symptoms of patients were fever (93%), sweating (82%), arthralgia (78%) and splenomegaly (51%). Elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate was determined in 80%, leukopenia in 49% and anaemia in 37% of cases. Blood cultures were positives in 39% of cases. The four sequenced strains were identified as Brucella melitensis biovar abortus. Six strains were resistant to sufomethoxazol-trimetoprim (54%). In 93% of cases, the treatment was associated rifampicin and doxycyclin. One patient died. No relapse was reported. PMID:18387752

  4. Treatment of Dientamoeba fragilis in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engsbro, Anne Line; Stensvold, C. Rune; Nielsen, Henrik V.; Bytzer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The role of Dientamoeba fragilis in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is incompletely known. We aimed to investigate whether eradication of D. fragilis alleviates symptoms in IBS. Twenty-five D. fragilis-positive IBS patients were treated with Metronidazole (MZ) or Tetracycline. The patients were mostly female (89%), and mean age (SD) was 35.1 (8.2) years. Microbiological response, evaluated 2 weeks post-treatment, was observed in 15 of 25 patients (60%), all by MZ. Clinical response, defined as adequate relief of symptoms, was observed in 7 of 22 patients (32%), all by MZ. In a logistic regression analysis, we found no significant association between clinical and microbiological response. This case study did not support our hypothesis of a simple association between D. fragilis and IBS. Some D. fragilis-infections were insufficiently treated by MZ. Further studies into the prevalence and effect of eradication of D. fragilis in IBS and into efficient treatments of D. fragilis are warranted. PMID:23091195

  5. Nurses' perceptions of patient participation in hemodialysis treatment.

    PubMed

    Aasen, Elin Margrethe; Kvangarsnes, Marit; Heggen, Kåre

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study is to explore how nurses perceive patient participations of patients over 75 years old undergoing hemodialysis treatment in dialysis units, and of their next of kin. Ten nurses told stories about what happened in the dialysis units. These stories were analyzed with critical discourse analysis. Three discursive practices are found: (1) the nurses' power and control; (2) sharing power with the patient; and (3) transferring power to the next of kin. The first and the predominant discursive practice can be explained with an ideology of paternalism, in which the nurses used biomedical explanations and the ethical principle of benefice to justify their actions. The second can be explained with an ideology of participation, in which the nurses used ethical narratives as a way to let the patients participate in the treatment. The third seemed to involve autonomous decision-making and the ethical principle of autonomy for the next of kin in the difficult end-of-life decisions. PMID:22323398

  6. Inpatient treatment of the psychiatric patient with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Bean-Bayog, M

    1987-05-01

    Patients with both alcoholism and mental illness, or the one masquerading as the other, are very common and often puzzling and discouraging to clinicians. This article reviews several aspects of these problems: epidemiologic studies show that substantial proportions of mentally ill people suffer from alcoholism, and these disorders interlock in complex ways, each exacerbating the other. Many physicians feel uncomfortable working with alcoholic people, mostly because of poor training, and this impinges on difficulties of giving excellent care to these taxing patients. Complexities and resistances to interviewing obstruct evaluation. Interviewing and history taking techniques and the reason for them are discussed. The decision whether a patient needs medical or psychiatric hospitalization, alcoholism rehabilitation, or outpatient psychiatric or alcoholism treatment is reviewed along with the management and sequencing of treatment for primary and secondary alcoholism with concomitant psychosis, mania, depression, panic disorder, and adult attention deficit disorder. Clinical intervention and referral for the patient on a medical or surgical floor who may have alcoholism is discussed. Two special clinical problems, the differential diagnosis of postdetoxification depression and the risks of using alcohol cross-tolerant drugs, are also reviewed. PMID:2884166

  7. [Drug treatment and interventional pain therapy in back pain patients].

    PubMed

    Sprott, Haiko; Klauke, Wolfgang

    2013-09-01

    The treatment of chronic, non-malignant low-back pain is based on the patients' history and the clinical examination. It can be assumed that half of the cases present with a neuropathic pain component which needs to be treated with antidepressive and antiepileptic drugs instead of "pure" analgesics. Opioids should be considered with extreme caution because of their toxicity. Chronic non-malignant back pain is the prototype for interdisciplinary treatment approaches and multi-modal interdisciplinary settings, including pain programmes. However, a personalised strategy has to be preferred in most cases. A quick relief of pain is important in order to improve function as well as to re-integrate the patient into professional life. Spinal infiltrations can be of both diagnostic as well as therapeutic benefits. Their indication must be considered carefully, especially if the invasive diagnostic intervention has no therapeutic consequences. The interventional procedures should only be used as part of a multimodal approach in patients without any psychological problem. The sole use of interventions supports the purely somatic orientation of many patients and thus leads us in the wrong direction. PMID:23985154

  8. Evidence-based treatment of patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, QIANG; YANG, JIE; QIAN, QUN

    2016-01-01

    Rectal cancer is a worldwide disease whose incidence has increased significantly. Evidence-based medicine is a category of medicine that optimizes decision making by using evidence from well-designed and conducted research. Evidence-based medicine can be used to formulate a reasonable treatment plan for newly diagnosed rectal cancer patients. The current review focuses on the application of evidence-based treatment on patients with rectal cancer. The relationship between perioperative blood transfusion and recurrence of rectal cancer after surgery, the selection between minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery and traditional laparotomy, choice of chemotherapy for patients with rectal cancer prior to surgery, selection between stapled and hand-sewn methods for colorectal anastomosis during rectal cancer resection, and selection between temporary ileostomy and colostomy during the surgery were addressed. Laparoscopy is considered to have more advantages but is time-consuming and has high medical costs. In addition, laparoscopic rectal cancer radical resection is preferred to open surgery. In radical resection surgery, use of a stapling device for anastomosis can reduce postoperative anastomotic fistula, although patients should be informed of possible anastomotic stenosis. PMID:26998054

  9. [Patient education and treatment documentation - Law to Improve the Rights of Patients].

    PubMed

    Meltendorf, G; Meltendorf, C

    2013-07-01

    The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the (German) Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should themselves acquaint with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation. PMID:23824480

  10. [Patient education and treatment documentation - law to improve the rights of patients].

    PubMed

    Meltendorf, Gerhard; Meltendorf, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The Law to Improve the Rights of Patients came into force with the promulgation in the German Federal Law Gazette on February 25, 2013. Thus administrations of medical institutions and doctors of all disciplines should acquaint themselves with the statutory regulations and their impact on the daily practice. The present article describes and explains the statutory regulations concerning patient education and treatment documentation. PMID:23888409

  11. The neutron dose equivalent evaluation and shielding at the maze entrance of a Varian Clinac 23EX treatment room

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xudong; Esquivel, Carlos; Nes, Elena; Shi Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Charlton, Michael

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rate (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}) at the outer maze entrance and the adjacent treatment console area after the installation of a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator with a higher beam energy than its predecessor. The evaluation was based on measurements and comparison with several empirical calculations. The effectiveness of borated polyethylene (BPE) boards, as a maze wall lining material, on neutron dose and photon dose reduction is also reported. Methods: A single energy Varian 6 MV photon linear accelerator (linac) was replaced with a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator capable of producing 18 MV photons in a vault originally designed for the former accelerator. In order to evaluate and redesign the shielding of the vault, the neutron dose equivalent H{sub n,D} was measured using an Andersson-Braun neutron Rem meter and the photon dose equivalent H{sub G} was measured using a Geiger Mueller and an ion chamber {gamma}-ray survey meter at the outer maze entrance. The measurement data were compared to semiempirical calculations such as the Kersey method, the modified Kersey method, and a newly proposed method by Falcao et al. Additional measurements were taken after BPE boards were installed on the maze walls as a neutron absorption lining material. Results: With the gantry head tilted close to the inner maze entrance and with the jaws closed, both neutron dose equivalent and photon dose equivalent reached their maximum. Compared to the measurement results, the Kersey method overestimates the neutron dose equivalent H{sub n,D} by about two to four times (calculation/measurement ratio{approx_equal}2.4-3.8). Falcao's method largely overestimates the H{sub n,D} (calculation/measurement ratio{approx_equal}3.9-5.5). The modified Kersey method has a calculation to measurement ratio about 0.6-0.9. The photon dose equivalent calculation including McGinley's capture gamma dose equivalent equation estimates about 77%-98% of the

  12. [Hypertensive crises in patients with arterial hypertension in ambulatory treatment].

    PubMed

    Gomes Guedes, Nirla; Chaves Costa, Francisca Bertilia; Moreira, Rafaella Pessoa; Moreira, Tahissa Frota; Soares Chavess, Emilia; de Araújo, Thelma Leite

    2005-06-01

    This study assessed the sociodemographic characteristics and the characteristics of therapeutic adhesion of 27 bearers of arterial hypertension undergoing ambulatorial treatment who had hypertensive urgencies crises or emergencies in the city of Fortaleza in the period between October of 2002 and May of 2003. The majority were women, between 50 and 60-years old, with little formal education, treatment time shorter than 5 years and time of diagnosis varying from 5 to 10 years. The use of medicine was the treatment that was most mentioned, followed by the reduction of the consumption of salt and attendance to medical appointments. However, attending the appointments and receiving orientation did not seem to change their behavior, since most of the patients that were interviewed practiced no physical exercises and demonstrated little knowledge of the illness, for they attributed the rise of the arterial pressure to emotional factors. PMID:16060305

  13. Orthodontic treatment in the severely compromised periodontal patient.

    PubMed

    Feu, Daniela; Menezes, Fernanda Catharino; Augusto Mendes Miguel, José; Cardoso Abdo Quintão, Catia

    2012-12-01

    We describe the diagnosis and treatment of a class II division 1 malocclusion complicated by severe periodontal disease, tooth loss, dentoalveolar protrusion associated with tipping and extrusion of the maxillary incisors, and a traumatic occlusion. Treatment involved the use of a modified palatal arch to intrude and retract the maxillary incisors and high-pull headgear to enhance anchorage and correct the Class II relationship. After active treatment for 19 months, a good anterior occlusion was achieved, with 17° of lingual retroclination and 3 mm of intrusion at the apex of the maxillary incisors. An acceptable occlusion and periodontal status was maintained over a retention period of 2 years. With the patient's cooperation, a successful outcome was achieved with this approach. PMID:23269694

  14. Support of vulnerable patients throughout TB treatment in the UK.

    PubMed

    Potter, J L; Inamdar, L; Okereke, E; Collinson, S; Dukes, R; Mandelbaum, M

    2016-06-01

    Despite well-established treatment regimens, tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health burden; it disproportionately affects poor and marginalized populations who may not have access to social support, including migrants, homeless people and those dependent on drugs or alcohol. There is a clearly demonstrated need for housing and other appropriate social support, as part of a package of integrated clinical and social care. However, TB prevention and control efforts in the UK often do not address the specific vulnerabilities of these groups and it can be a challenge to support the continued TB treatment of these underserved populations. This challenge is exacerbated by complex issues concerning funding, immigration and the law. In this paper, we have reviewed current UK guidance and legislation, discussed several case studies and highlighted examples of existing models of community support for TB patients. Finally, we lay out our recommendations for ensuring a co-ordinated, whole system approach to successful TB treatment. PMID:25889386

  15. Patient satisfaction with treatment for alcohol use disorders: comparing patients with and without severe mental health symptoms

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Stacey L; Andrews, Jane M; Gaughwin, Matthew D; Turnbull, Deborah A; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest patients with co-occurring alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and severe mental health symptoms (SMHS) are less satisfied with standard AUD treatment when compared to patients with an AUD alone. This study compared patient satisfaction with standard AUD treatment among patients with and without SMHS and explored how standard treatment might be improved to better address the needs of these patients. Methods Eighty-nine patients receiving treatment for an AUD either at an inpatient hospital, outpatient clinic, inpatient detoxification, or residential/therapeutic community services were surveyed. Patient satisfaction with treatment was assessed using the Treatment Perception Questionnaire (range: 0–40). Patients were stratified according to their score on the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale. Forty patients scored in the extremely severe range of depression (score >14) and/or anxiety (score >10) (indicating SMHS) and 49 patients did not. An inductive content analysis was also conducted on qualitative data relating to areas of service improvement. Results Patients with SMHS were found to be equally satisfied with treatment (mean =25.10, standard deviation =8.12) as patients with an AUD alone (mean =25.43, standard deviation =6.91). Analysis revealed that being an inpatient in hospital was associated with reduced treatment satisfaction. Patients with SMHS were found to be significantly less satisfied with staffs’ understanding of the type of help they wanted in treatment, when compared to patients with AUDs alone. Five areas for service improvement were identified, including staff qualities, informed care, treatment access and continuity, issues relating to inpatient stay, and addressing patients’ mental health needs. Conclusion While findings suggest that AUD treatment services adequately meet the needs of patients with SMHS in treatment, patients with SMHS do feel that staff lack understanding of their treatment needs. Findings have

  16. One-year follow-up of neurological status of patients after cardiac arrest seen at the emergency room of a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Vancini, Rodrigo Luiz; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib; de Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe neurological status and associated factors of survivors after cardiac arrest, upon discharge, and at 6 and 12 month follow-up. Methods: A cohort, prospective, descriptive study conducted in an emergency room. Patients who suffered cardiac arrest and survived were included. A one-year consecutive sample, comprising 285 patients and survivors (n=16) followed up for one year after discharge. Neurological status was assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category before the cardiac arrest, upon discharge, and at 6 and 12 months after discharge. The following factors were investigated: comorbidities, presence of consciousness upon admission, previous cardiac arrest, witnessed cardiac arrest, location, cause and initial rhythm of cardiac arrest, number of cardiac arrests, interval between collapse and start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and between collapse and end of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Results: Of the patients treated, 4.5% (n=13) survived after 6 and 12 months follow-up. Upon discharge, 50% of patients remained with previous Cerebral Performance Category of the cardiac arrest and 50% had worsening of Cerebral Performance Category. After 6 months, 53.8% remained in the same Cerebral Performance Category and 46.2% improved as compared to discharge. After 12 months, all patients remained in the same Cerebral Performance Category of the previous 6 months. There was no statistically significant association between neurological outcome during follow-up and the variables assessed. Conclusion: There was neurological worsening at discharge but improvement or stabilization in the course of a year. There was no association between Cerebral Performance Category and the variables assessed. PMID:26154538

  17. Patient Participation in Surgical Treatment Decision Making from the Patients' Perspective: Validation of an Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Heggland, Liv-Helen; Øgaard, Torvald; Mikkelsen, Aslaug; Hausken, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the development of a new, brief, easy-to-administer self-reported instrument designed to assess patient participation in decision making in surgical treatment. We describe item generation, psychometric testing, and validity of the instrument. The final scale consisted of four factors: information dissemination (5 items), formulation of options (4 items), integration of information (4 items), and control (3 items). The analysis demonstrated a reasonable level of construct validity and reliability. The instrument applies to patients in surgical wards and can be used to identify the health services that are being provided and the areas that could strengthen patient participation. PMID:22830010

  18. Catha edulis chewing effects on treatment of paranoid schizophrenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Kotb El-Sayed, Mohamed-I; Amin, Hatem-K

    2015-01-01

    Background The current study’s aim is to evaluate the possible interaction effects of khat chewing on treatment of paranoid schizophrenic patients. Patients and methods In the study group, 42 male subjects suffered from paranoid schizophrenia and were classified according to their khat chewing habits into two subgroups: either khat-chewer subgroup (SKc; n=21; r=11, h=10) or non-khat-chewer subgroup (SNKc; n=21, r=11, h=10). Each subgroup was further subdivided according to type of treatment into r (risperidone) and h (haloperidol). Healthy male subjects (37) were subdivided into healthy khat-chewer as positive controls (HKc, n=17) and healthy non-khat-chewer as negative controls (HNKc, n=20). Plasma dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, epinephrine, and norepinephrine were estimated. Results ANOVA and post hoc analysis showed that dopamine was illustrating significant elevation in all khat chewing groups. DOPAC was illustrating significant decrease in all khat chewing groups with an interesting outcome showing significant increase in DOPAC in SNKcr group due to risperidone effect. Homovanillic acid, serotonin, hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and norepinephrine were illustrating significant elevations in all khat chewing groups. Epinephrine was illustrating significant elevation in all chewers than non-chewers groups. Unexpected significant decrease in epinephrine in the SNKcr group indicated that risperidone drug is decreasing epinephrine through indirect mechanism involving calcium. Conclusion Khat chewing in schizophrenic patients is contraindicated because it aggravates the disease symptoms, attenuates all used treatment medications, and deteriorates all biochemical markers of the patients. PMID:25926735

  19. Treatment of young patients with lupus nephritis using calcineurin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tsuruga, Kazushi; Aizawa-Yashiro, Tomomi; Watanabe, Shojiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of lupus nephritis, together with earlier renal biopsy and selective use of aggressive immunosuppressive therapy, have contributed to a favorable outcome in children and adolescents with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Nevertheless, we believe that a more effective and less toxic treatment is needed to attain an optimal control of the activity of lupus nephritis. Recent published papers and our experiences regarding treatment of young patients with lupus nephritis using calcineurin inhibitors are reviewed. Although it has been reported that intermittent monthly pulses of intravenous cyclophosphamide (IVCY) are effective for preserving renal function in adult patients, CPA is a potent immunosuppressive agent that induces severe toxicity, including myelo- and gonadal toxicity, and increases the risk of secondary malignancy. Thus, treatment for controlling lupus nephritis activity, especially in children and adolescents, remains challenging. Cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (Tac) are T-cell-specific calcineurin inhibitors that prevent the activation of helper T cells, thereby inhibiting the transcription of the early activation genes of interleukin (IL)-2 and suppressing T cell-induced activation of tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6. Therefore, both drugs, which we believe may be less cytotoxic, are attractive therapeutic options for young patients with lupus nephritis. Recently, a multidrug regimen of prednisolone (PDN), Tac, and mycophenolate mofetile (MMF) has been found effective and relatively safe in adult lupus nephritis. Since the mechanisms of action of MMF and Tac are probably complementary, multidrug therapy for lupus nephritis may be useful. We propose as an alternative to IVCY, a multidrug therapy with mizoribine, which acts very similarly to MMF, and Tac, which has a different mode of action, combined with PDN for pediatric-onset lupus nephritis. We also believe that a multidrug therapy including CsA and

  20. The meaning of pharmacological treatment for schizophrenic patients1

    PubMed Central

    Vedana, Kelly Graziani Giacchero; Miasso, Adriana Inocenti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the meaning of medication therapy for schizophrenic patients and formulate a theoretical model about the study phenomenon. METHOD: a qualitative approach was employed, using Symbolic Interactionism as the theoretical and Grounded Theory as the methodological framework. The research was developed between 2008 and 2010 at three community mental health services in the interior of the State of São Paulo - Brazil. Thirty-six patients and thirty-six family members were selected through theoretical sampling. The data were mainly collected through open interviews and observation and simultaneously analyzed through open, axial and selective coding. RESULTS: the meaning of the pharmacotherapy is centered on the phenomenon "Living with a help that bothers", which expresses the patients' ambivalence towards the medication and determines their decision making. The insight, access, limitations for self-administration of the drugs and interactions with family members and the health team influenced the patient's medication-related behavior. CONCLUSION: the theory presented in this study provides a comprehensive, contextualized, motivational and dynamic understanding of the relation the patient experiences and indicates potentials and barriers to follow the medication treatment. PMID:25296152

  1. [Treatment of patients with foreign bodies in rectum].

    PubMed

    Biriukov, Iu V; Volkov, O V; An, V K; Borisov, E Iu; Dodina, A N

    2000-01-01

    The analysis of treatment results in 112 patients with foreign bodies in the rectum, aged from 16 to 80 years, was carried out. 99.1% of the patients were men. All the patients were examined and treated in proctology department of the Moscow municipal clinical hospital N 67 from 1969 to 1998. The examination was made by standard scheme, including rectal touch, rectoromanoscopy, X-ray and ultrasonic examinations. In 107 patients the foreign body was removed without surgery, 5 patients required laparotomy. When possible it was removed by fingers and also with use of forceps. When small foreign bodies could not be reached by finger, they were removed through rectoscope. Foreign bodies of big sizes, proximal end of which was in the sigmoid colon, were removed under anasthesia with the help of the assistant who fixed the foreign body through the abdominal wall in the left ileac region. In impossibility of the subject removal by these methods and presence of complications (perforation, peritonitis), laparotomy with subsequent transanal subject removal without colon section was performed, in case of perforation--with wound suturing or colostomy. PMID:10958068

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of infection in cardiac transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gentry, L O; Zeluff, B J

    1986-06-01

    Despite major advances in the management of rejection and the development of newer and more potent antimicrobials, infection still constitutes a major problem in transplant patients and other immunosuppressed hosts. Infectious complications in transplant patients clearly occur in two phases. The first phase includes the first 30 to 60 days after transplantation. During this period, nosocomial bacterial infections are most commonly encountered. Pulmonary, renal, and wound infections have all been encountered, and prophylactic antibiotics appear to decrease their frequency. Opportunistic infections usually do not occur during this period unless the patient undergoes treatment for acute rejection. The second phase of infectious complications usually follows the first month after transplantation. In this period, the level of immunosuppression is high, and opportunistic infections are common. Opportunistic pulmonary infections caused by P. carinii, L. pneumophila, cytomegalovirus, Aspergillus, and Nocardia spp. all are potentially life-threatening complications to the transplant patient. Aggressive diagnostic tests such as bronchoscopy, percutaneous needle biopsy, or open lung biopsy are frequently needed to make a diagnosis. Empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy is indicated in the ill patient; however, more specific therapy should be instituted once the diagnosis is confirmed. PMID:3520889

  3. Treatment and survival among 1594 patients with ATL.

    PubMed

    Katsuya, Hiroo; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Utsunomiya, Atae; Hanada, Shuichi; Eto, Tetsuya; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Saburi, Yoshio; Miyahara, Masaharu; Sueoka, Eisaburo; Uike, Naokuni; Yoshida, Shinichiro; Yamashita, Kiyoshi; Tsukasaki, Kunihiro; Suzushima, Hitoshi; Ohno, Yuju; Matsuoka, Hitoshi; Jo, Tatsuro; Amano, Masahiro; Hino, Ryosuke; Shimokawa, Mototsugu; Kawai, Kazuhiro; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2015-12-10

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is a malignancy of mature T lymphocytes caused by human T-lymphotropic virus type I. Intensive combination chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been introduced since the previous Japanese nationwide survey was performed in the late 1980s. In this study, we delineated the current features and management of ATL in Japan. The clinical data were collected retrospectively from the medical records of patients diagnosed with ATL between 2000 and 2009, and a total of 1665 patients' records were submitted to the central office from 84 institutions in Japan. Seventy-one patients were excluded; 895, 355, 187, and 157 patients with acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types, respectively, remained. The median survival times were 8.3, 10.6, 31.5, and 55.0 months, and 4-year overall survival (OS) rates were 11%, 16%, 36%, and 52%, respectively, for acute, lymphoma, chronic, and smoldering types. The number of patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was 227, and their median survival time and OS at 4 years after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was 5.9 months and 26%, respectively. This study revealed that the prognoses of the patients with acute and lymphoma types were still unsatisfactory, despite the recent progress in treatment modalities, but an improvement of 4-year OS was observed in comparison with the previous survey. Of note, one-quarter of patients who could undergo transplantation experienced long survival. It is also noted that the prognosis of the smoldering type was worse than expected. PMID:26361794

  4. Bringing the Hospital to the Patient: First Treatment of Stroke Patients at the Emergency Site

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Silke; Kostpopoulos, Panagiotis; Haass, Anton; Helwig, Stefan; Keller, Isabel; Licina, Tamara; Schlechtriemen, Thomas; Roth, Christian; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Anna; Vierra, Julio; Körner, Heiko; Schmidt, Kathrin; Romann, Marie-Sophie; Alexandrou, Maria; Yilmaz, Umut; Grunwald, Iris; Kubulus, Darius; Lesmeister, Martin; Ziegeler, Stephan; Pattar, Alexander; Golinski, Martin; Liu, Yang; Volk, Thomas; Bertsch, Thomas; Reith, Wolfgang; Fassbender, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Background Early treatment with rt-PA is critical for favorable outcome of acute stroke. However, only a very small proportion of stroke patients receive this treatment, as most arrive at hospital too late to be eligible for rt-PA therapy. Methods and Findings We developed a “Mobile Stroke Unit”, consisting of an ambulance equipped with computed tomography, a point-of-care laboratory system for complete stroke laboratory work-up, and telemedicine capabilities for contact with hospital experts, to achieve delivery of etiology-specific and guideline-adherent stroke treatment at the site of the emergency, well before arrival at the hospital. In a departure from current practice, stroke patients could be differentially treated according to their ischemic or hemorrhagic etiology even in the prehospital phase of stroke management. Immediate diagnosis of cerebral ischemia and exclusion of thrombolysis contraindications enabled us to perform prehospital rt-PA thrombolysis as bridging to later intra-arterial recanalization in one patient. In a complementary patient with cerebral hemorrhage, prehospital diagnosis allowed immediate initiation of hemorrhage-specific blood pressure management and telemedicine consultation regarding surgery. Call-to-therapy-decision times were 35 minutes. Conclusion This preliminary study proves the feasibility of guideline-adherent, etiology-specific and causal treatment of acute stroke directly at the emergency site. PMID:21060800

  5. Patient-Provider Communication: Understanding the Role of Patient Activation for Latinos in Mental Health Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Dharma E.; Mulvaney-Day, Norah; Fortuna, Lisa; Reinfeld, Sarah; Alegria, Margarita

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights results from the Right Question Project-Mental Health (RQP-MH), an intervention designed to teach skills in question formulation and to increase patients' participation in decisions about mental health treatment. Of participants in the RQP-MH intervention, 83% were from a Latino background, and 75% of the interviews were…

  6. Chemotherapy-free treatment in patients with follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Salles, Gilles; Bachy, Emmanuel

    2015-04-01

    The outcome of patients with follicular lymphoma (FL) has improved over the last two decades through the introduction of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, usually used in combination with chemotherapy. However, patients with FL still experience multiple relapses, requiring several lines of treatment. Early toxicity of chemotherapy is a significant concern and as the life expectancy of patients with FL is increasing, late toxicities become an increasingly important concern. Progress made in understanding the biology of FL, especially dysregulation of intracellular pathways and immunological antitumor responses, recently allowed for the development of innovative chemo-free therapeutic approaches. In this report, different options such as new anti-CD20 antibodies, antibodies targeting other cell surface antigens, bi-specific antibodies, immunomodulation, idiotype vaccine and other targeted therapies are presented. The article also highlights how, although promising in early phase studies, the cost-effectiveness of new agents will have to be justified in Phase III trials. Furthermore, chemo-free regimen might not mean toxicity-free treatment and monitoring of early and late toxicities is required. PMID:25585961

  7. Infliximab treatment reduces complement activation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Familian, A; Voskuyl, A; van Mierlo, G J; Heijst, H; Twisk, J; Dijkmans, B; Hack, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) blocking agents decrease C reactive protein (CRP) levels in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It has been shown that CRP may contribute to complement activation in RA. Objective: To assess the effect of intravenous infliximab treatment on complement activation, especially that mediated by CRP, in RA. Methods: 35 patients with active RA (28 joint count Disease Activity Score (DAS28) >4.4) were treated with intravenous injections of infliximab (3 mg/kg, at weeks 0, 2, 6, 14, and 22). Clinical response and plasma levels of complement activation products, of CRP and of CRP-complement complexes, which are specific markers for CRP mediated complement activation, were assessed at the indicated time points up to 22 weeks. The relationship between CRP and CRP-complement complexes was analysed by paired t test between two time points and by generalised estimated equation, to test differences of variables over time. Results: At 2 weeks after the first dose, infliximab significantly reduced overall C3 and C4 activation and plasma levels of CRP and CRP-complement complexes were also significantly reduced at this time point. The effects of infliximab on CRP and complement continued throughout the observation period and were more pronounced in patients with a good response to infliximab treatment. Conclusion: Treatment with infliximab decreases plasma levels of CRP and CRP dependent complement activation products and concomitantly may reduce complement activation in RA. Complement activation may be among the effector mechanisms of TNF in RA. PMID:15958758

  8. Heterogeneity Moderates Treatment Response among Patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom; Wilson, G. Terence; Wilfley, Denise E.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study was to explore heterogeneity and differential treatment outcome among a sample of patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Method A latent class analysis was conducted with 205 treatment-seeking, overweight or obese individuals with BED randomized to Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT), Behavioral Weight Loss (BWL), or guided self-help based on Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBTgsh). A latent transition analysis tested the predictive validity of the latent class analysis model. Results A 4-class model yielded the best overall fit to the data. Class 1 was characterized by a lower mean body mass index (BMI) and increased physical activity. Individuals in class 2 reported the most binge eating, shape and weight concerns, compensatory behaviors, and negative affect. Class 3 patients reported similar binge eating frequencies to class 2 with lower levels of exercise or compensation. Class 4 was characterized by the highest average BMI, the most overeating episodes, fewer binge episodes, and an absence of compensatory behaviors. Classes 1 and 3 had the highest and lowest percentage of individuals with a past eating disorder diagnosis, respectively. The latent transition analysis found a higher probability of remission from binge eating among those receiving IPT in Class 2 and CBTgsh in Class 3. Conclusions The latent class analysis identified four distinct classes using baseline measures of eating disorder and depressive symptoms, body weight, and physical activity. Implications of the observed differential treatment response are discussed. PMID:20873903

  9. Optimizing prophylactic treatment of migraine: Subtypes and patient matching

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of migraine have resulted in important breakthroughs in treatment. For example, understanding of the role of serotonin in the cerebrovascular circulation has led to the development of triptans for the acute relief of migraine headaches, and the identification of cortical spreading depression as an early central event associated wih migraine has brought renewed interest in antiepileptic drugs for migraine prophylaxis. However, migraine still remains inadequately treated. Indeed, it is apparent that migraine is not a single disease but rather a syndrome that can manifest itself in a variety of pathological conditions. The consequences of this may be that treatment needs to be matched to particular patients. Clinical research needs to be devoted to identifying which sort of patients benefit best from which treatments, particularly in the field of prophylaxis. We propose four patterns of precipitating factors (adrenergic, serotoninergic, menstrual, and muscular) which may be used to structure migraine prophylaxis. Finally, little is known about long-term outcome in treated migraine. It is possible that appropriate early prophylaxis may modify the long-term course of the disease and avoid late complications. PMID:19209286

  10. Treatment Planning for Image-Guided Neuro-Vascular Interventions Using Patient-Specific 3D Printed Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Russ, M.; O’Hara, R.; Setlur Nagesh, S.V.; Mokin, M.; Jimenez, C.; Siddiqui, A.; Bednarek, D.; Rudin, S.; Ionita, C.

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive endovascular image-guided interventions (EIGIs) are the preferred procedures for treatment of a wide range of vascular disorders. Despite benefits including reduced trauma and recovery time, EIGIs have their own challenges. Remote catheter actuation and challenging anatomical morphology may lead to erroneous endovascular device selections, delays or even complications such as vessel injury. EIGI planning using 3D phantoms would allow interventionists to become familiarized with the patient vessel anatomy by first performing the planned treatment on a phantom under standard operating protocols. In this study the optimal workflow to obtain such phantoms from 3D data for interventionist to practice on prior to an actual procedure was investigated. Patient-specific phantoms and phantoms presenting a wide range of challenging geometries were created. Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA) data was uploaded into a Vitrea 3D station which allows segmentation and resulting stereo-lithographic files to be exported. The files were uploaded using processing software where preloaded vessel structures were included to create a closed-flow vasculature having structural support. The final file was printed, cleaned, connected to a flow loop and placed in an angiographic room for EIGI practice. Various Circle of Willis and cardiac arterial geometries were used. The phantoms were tested for ischemic stroke treatment, distal catheter navigation, aneurysm stenting and cardiac imaging under angiographic guidance. This method should allow for adjustments to treatment plans to be made before the patient is actually in the procedure room and enabling reduced risk of peri-operative complications or delays. PMID:26778878

  11. Clinical Outcomes for Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Mastectomy and Reconstruction with Use of DermACELL, a Sterile, Room Temperature Acellular Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Vashi, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background. Decellularized human skin has been used in a variety of medical applications, primarily involving soft tissue reconstruction, wound healing, and tendon augmentation. Theoretically, decellularization removes potentially immunogenic material and provides a clean scaffold for cellular and vascular in growth. The use of acellular dermal matrix in two-stage postmastectomy breast reconstruction is described. Methods. Ten consecutive breast cancer patients were treated with mastectomies and immediate reconstruction from August to November 2011. There were 8 bilateral and 1 unilateral mastectomies for a total of 17 breasts, with one exclusion for chronic tobacco use. Reconstruction included the use of a new 6 × 16 cm sterile, room temperature acellular dermal matrix patch (DermACELL) soaked in a cefazolin bath. Results. Of the 17 breasts, 15 reconstructions were completed; 14 of them with expander to implant sequence and acellular dermal matrix. Histological analysis of biopsies obtained during trimming of the matrix at the second stage appeared nonremarkable with evidence of normal healing, cellularity, and vascular infiltration. Conclusion. Postoperative observations showed that this cellular dermal matrix appears to be an appropriate adjunct to reconstruction with expanders. This acellular dermal matrix appeared to work well with all patients, even those receiving postoperative chemotherapy, postoperative radiation, prednisone, or warfarin sodium. PMID:24738030

  12. Biopsychosocial Health Care Needs at the Emergency Room: Challenge of Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Matzer, Franziska; Wisiak, Ursula V.; Graninger, Monika; Söllner, Wolfgang; Stilling, Hans Peter; Glawischnig-Goschnik, Monika; Lueger, Andreas; Fazekas, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Background In an emergency room of internal medicine, triage and treatment of patients deserve first priority. However, biopsychosocial case complexity may also affect patient health outcome but has not yet been explored in this setting. Therefore, the aims of the study are (1) to estimate prevalence rates of complex patients in the emergency room (ER), (2) to describe biopsychosocial complexity in this population and (3) to evaluate possible correlations between patient profiles regarding case complexity and further clinical treatment. Methods During a study period of one week, all patients of an emergency room of internal medicine who were triaged to Manchester levels three to five were invited to participate in the study. Biopsychosocial case complexity was assessed by the INTERMED method. Psychosocial interventions were evaluated based on all documented interventions and recommendations given at the emergency room and during inpatient treatment. Results Study participants consisted of 167 patients with a subgroup of 19% (n = 32) receiving subsequent inpatient-treatment at the department. High biopsychosocial case complexity was found in 12% (n = 20) of the total sample (INTERMED score >20). This finding was paralleled by a cluster analysis suggesting three clusters with one highly complex patient group of 14%. These highly complex patients differed significantly from the other clusters as they had visited the emergency room more often within the last year and lived alone more frequently. In addition, admission rates were highest in this group. During ER treatment and subsequent inpatient treatment, 21% of highly complex patients received interventions addressing psychosocial factors as compared to 6% and 7%, respectively, in the other clusters. Conclusions A standardized screening of biopsychosocial case complexity among ‘frequent utilizers’ of the ER would be helpful to detect specific multidisciplinary health care needs among this particularly

  13. Preoperative Imatinib Treatment in Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Patient Experiences and Systematic Review of 563 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia; Ling, Tian-Long; Wang, Ming; Zhao, Wen-Yi; Cao, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Preoperative IM therapy for GIST is now a research focus. Due to the low incidence of the disease, there are few RCTs on the preoperative treatment for advanced GIST, let alone relevant meta-analysis. Efficacy of this therapy and targeting population are still undetermined. Therefore, the first part of this article is composed of a controlled retrospective study and demonstrates that preoperative therapy with IM can significantly improve the outcome of advanced GIST. In the second part of the paper, we further investigated what portion of advanced GIST patients benefit more from the therapy, based on a meta-analysis. As the disease is relatively rare, we involved 563 cases in the meta-analysis, much higher than in the controlled clinical studies (51 cases). The objective of this paper is to investigate effects of surgical resection on imatinib-treated advanced GIST. Twenty-two consecutive advanced GIST patients (Group A) with preoperative IM treatment were compared to 29 patients (Group B) who underwent initial tumor resection during the same period. Subsequently, a systematic review of 563 patients was applied to identify the benefit of the advanced GIST patients receiving imatinib before surgery. Compared with Group B, less patients in Group A underwent multivisceral resection (18.2% versus 48.3%, P = 0.026) or suffered tumor rupture at time of surgery (0% versus 17.2%, P = 0.04). The 3-year estimated progression-free survival of Group A (94.4%) was also superior to that of Group B (61.4%; P = 0.045). Subsequent meta-analysis indicated that primarily unresectable patients had higher complete resection and 2-year PFS rates than recurrent/metastasis patients (P = 0.005 and 0.20, respectively); (b) stable disease (SD) patients had better outcome in resection including resectability rate (P < 0.0001), PFS (P < 0.00001) and OS (P = 0.0008) than progressive disease (PD) patients; (c) in recurrent/metastatic PD patients, surgery played a minor role, because they had a

  14. Six-item self-administered questionnaires in the waiting room: an aid to explain uncontrolled hypertension in high-risk patients seen in general practice.

    PubMed

    Mulazzi, Isabelle; Cambou, Jean Pierre; Girerd, Xavier; Nicodeme, Robert; Chamontin, Bernard; Amar, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    We designed a cross-sectional study to determine whether 6-item self-administered questionnaires addressing difficulties in taking treatment provide independent and relevant information on uncontrolled hypertension in high-risk cardiovascular patients seen in general practice. Patients with both treated hypertension and a history of vascular diseases-myocardial infarction, stroke, or peripheral artery disease-were included. Risk factors, treatment, history of vascular diseases, blood pressure, and difficulties in taking treatment were assessed by 6-item self-administered questionnaires and recorded. Each positive response to the questions was weighted by 1 and each negative response by 0. Individual item scores were added together to produce 1 composite score for all 6 questions. A total of 11,096 patients were analyzed. Among them, 5,288 (51.4%) were controlled at 140/90 mm Hg threshold. In multivariate analysis, in addition to age, male gender, treated diabetes, peripheral artery disease, treatment, and alcohol consumption, the adherence score was negatively and independently associated with hypertension control (odds ratio score >/= 3, 0.73; [95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.81; P < .0001]. This study overwhelmingly confirms on a very large scale the effectiveness of this self-administered questionnaire in identifying difficulties in taking treatment in general practice. This questionnaire constitutes an inexpensive and timesaving tool capable of helping general practitioners to understand why hypertension is not controlled in patients at high cardiovascular risk. Whether the use of this questionnaire will improve hypertension control remains to be established. PMID:20409962

  15. Midostaurin: an emerging treatment for acute myeloid leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Gallogly, Molly Megan; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that carries a poor prognosis and has garnered few treatment advances in the last few decades. Mutation of the internal tandem duplication (ITD) region of fms-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) is considered high risk for decreased response and overall survival. Midostaurin is a Type III receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor found to inhibit FLT3 and other receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptors, cyclin-dependent kinase 1, src, c-kit, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor. In preclinical studies, midostaurin exhibited broad-spectrum antitumor activity toward a wide range of tumor xenografts, as well as an FLT3-ITD-driven mouse model of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Midostaurin is orally administered and generally well tolerated as a single agent; hematologic toxicity increases substantially when administered in combination with standard induction chemotherapy. Clinical trials primarily have focused on relapsed/refractory AML and MDS and included single- and combination-agent studies. Administration of midostaurin to relapsed/refractory MDS and AML patients confers a robust anti-blast response sufficient to bridge a minority of patients to transplant. In combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors, responses appear comparable to historic controls, while the addition of midostaurin to standard induction chemotherapy may prolong survival in FLT3-ITD mutant patients. The response of some wild-type (WT)-FLT3 patients to midostaurin therapy is consistent with midostaurin’s ability to inhibit WT-FLT3 in vitro, and also may reflect overexpression of WT-FLT3 in those patients and/or off-target effects such as inhibition of kinases other than FLT3. Midostaurin represents a well-tolerated, easily administered oral agent with the potential to bridge mutant and WT-FLT3 AML patients to transplant and possibly deepen response to induction chemotherapy. Ongoing studies are

  16. [Nursing of tuberculosis patients--quality nursing to support patient's compliance to treatment].

    PubMed

    Nasu, Ayako; Kobayashi, Noriko

    2004-12-01

    Tuberculosis control program in Japan focuses more on completion of treatment. The activities for patients to complete treatment are being actively done with collaboration between nurses of hospitals and public health nurses of the health centers. In 2000, Ministry of Health Welfare announced DOTS program version Japan. As a result, health centers of big cities implemented DOTS for homeless tuberculosis patients and hospitals DOT for in-patients. In 2003, the government demonstrated the scheme of DOTS strategy Expansion Program version Japan, which includes community DOTS types to be selected depend upon the risk of default with an individual patient. It is necessary to develop and utilize social and human resources in the community to expand surely supporting system for patient's compliance. Mutual understanding and collaboration of the relevant organizations become very important. In this symposium, four panels from hospital, clinic and public health center discuss on the current situation and challenge of supporting system and the assessment of treatment outcome. 1. DOTS implementation with collaboration on nursing activities between hospital and public health center in Kyoto Prefecture: Ikuyo HIROHATA (National Hospital Organization Minami Kyoto National Hospital). 2. From standpoint of clinical practice: Hidenori MASUYAMA (Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association Shibuya Clinic). 3. The activities for case support based on DOTS Program in Wakayama Prefecture: Kimiko KAWASAKI (Tanabe Public Health Center, Wakayama Prefecture). 4. Assessment of supporting activities for patient's compliance: Tomoko TAKANO (Uki Public Health Center, Kumamoto Prefecture). Three speakers gave additional comments and advice on quality supporting and nursing activities for patient's compliance through good coordination between hospitals and publics health centers. PMID:15782620

  17. Anakinra treatment in patients with gout and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Antonio; Cantarini, Luca; Rigante, Donato; Bardelli, Marco; Galeazzi, Mauro

    2015-05-01

    We report three Caucasian patients affected by gout and type 2 diabetes, who were treated with the recombinant nonglycosylated human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist anakinra (100 mg/day subcutaneously) after an unsatisfactory or incomplete response to urate-lowering therapy, colchicine, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and prednisone. The remarkable clinical improvement in joint symptoms within 24 h and in glycemic control during a 6-month period gives anakinra a potential therapeutic role in the management of gout and type 2 diabetes. When anakinra was discontinued, a gout attack occurred within 3-25 days in all three patients. The contribution of anakinra in the treatment of such syndromes is encouraging, but requires further studies to establish its long-term efficacy. PMID:24733251

  18. [Multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of patients with diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Pityk, O I; Prasol, V O; Boĭko, V V; Babynkin, A B

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is considered now the main cause of amputations of lower limbs. The analysis of the results of 266 percutaneous endovascular interventions (EV) performed during 2008-2012 in 245 patients with ischemic and neuroishemic DF was carried out. 76% of the patients underwent percutaneous balloon angioplasty (PBA), 24%--PBA + stenting. 91% of EV were technically successful. In 95% of the patients who achieved recovery of the main flow in the occluded arterial segment, clinical improvement was observed in the form of disappearance of the pain and start of the healing of ulcer-necrotic lesions of the foot. The main causes of technical failure (9%) were impossibility to pass through long calcified occlusions of infrainguinal arteries. The complication rate was 10.5%, major amputation--5.2%, mortality--0.8%. Long-term results were shown by the combined rate of amputation-free survival after 1, 3 and 5 years follow-up which made up respectively, 86%, 70% and 43%. EV is an effective treatment for patients with DF and an integrated multidisciplinary approach to achieve high limb salvage rates in the long-term period. PMID:25726682

  19. [Subjective feeling of patient on his illness and his treatment].

    PubMed

    Llorca, P-M

    2013-09-01

    Subjective feeling of schizophrenic patients has been underestimated in the study of this illness. Subjective experience associated with the onset of the disease is of interest in a clinical point of view but also in the study of the underlying mechanisms. The fields of cognitive psychology, but also neuroscientific inputs, provide new paradigms to understand schizophrenia. In a more global perspective, subjective experience has an important impact on quality of life and is highly related to symptomatology and treatments. Identification of these subjective dimensions is needed to develop more efficacious strategies. PMID:24084429

  20. Rapid Clozapine Titration in Patients with Treatment Refractory Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Özdemir, Armağan; Sağlam, Nazife Gamze Usta; Turan, Şenol; Poyraz, Burç Çağrı; Tomruk, Nesrin; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rapid clozapine titration in patients with schizophrenia in hospital settings. We conducted a retrospective two-center cohort study to compare the safety and effectiveness of clozapine with different titration rates in treatment-refractory patients with schizophrenia. In the first center, clozapine was started at 25-50 mg followed by 50-100 mg as needed every 6 h on day 1, followed by increases of 50-100 mg/day. In the second center, titration was slower; clozapine initiated with 12.5-50 mg on day 1 followed by increases of 25-50 mg/day. The number of days between starting of clozapine until discharge was shorter in the rapid titration group (22.4 ± 8.72 vs 27.0 ± 10.5, p = 0.1). Number of days of total hospital stay were significantly shorter in the rapid titration group (29.6 ± 10.6 vs 41.2 ± 14.8, p = 0.002). Hypotension was more common in the rapid titration group and one patient had suspected myocarditis. Rapid clozapine titration appeared safe and effective. The length of stay following initiation of clozapine was shorter in the rapid-titration group, although this was not statistically significant. However starting clozapine earlier together with rapid titration has significantly shortened the length of hospital stay in patients with treatment refractory schizophrenia. PMID:26433727

  1. Disorders as undifferentiated selfobject formations: treatment of a multidisordered patient.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Crayton E

    2014-06-01

    This paper offers a new understanding of disorders as undifferentiated selfobject formations. A treatment example of a multipledisordered patient is presented to illustrate how disorders diminished as a result of this understanding. This paper highlights the developmental importance of the undifferentiated selfobject and suggests that early interruptions of this discovery experience that take place during the infant's positive moments of freedom and enthusiasm are traumatic. If they go beyond the tolerance of the infant, they can be imprinted as unconscious core traumatic experiences. They remain as implicit memories that can act as warnings of repetitions of the trauma that occurred at the time of freedom and enthusiasm in the act of discovering. It can be suggested that the threat of repetitions of the traumatic loss is associated with these positive moments of discovery. This threat directs the needed self-sustaining undifferentiated selfobject discovery experience away from the positive, thereby leaving the posttraumatic effects of the loss as the focus of discovery. This focus leads to destructive preoccupations and obsessions that are considered disorders such as depression, suicidal thinking, self-mutilation, and eating disorders. Once patients understand the importance of the undifferentiated selfobject discovery need, the delinking of the undifferentiated selfobject from the negative preoccupations takes place. As a result, disorders diminish, and patients begin to consider positive possibilities for their lives. This paper suggests that early interferences in the development of the undifferentiated selfobject lead to the formation of disorders. A treatment of a multidisordered patient is presented to illustrate how this understanding was central to the diminishing of the disorders. PMID:24866159

  2. Physical therapy methods in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherova, T. Ya.; Velikaya, V. V.; Gribova, O. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Tuzikov, S. A.; Vusik, M. V.; Doroshenko, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The results of the effective use of magnetic laser therapy in the treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients were presented. The effect of magnetic-laser therapy in the treatment of radiation-induced reactions in the patients with head and neck cancer and in the patients with breast cancer was analyzed. High efficiency of lymphedema and lymphorrhea treatment in the postoperative period in the patients with breast cancer was proved. The results of rehabilitation of the patients with gastric cancer after surgical treatment were presented. These data indicate a high effectiveness of different physical methods of treatment and rehabilitation of cancer patients.

  3. Clinician and cancer patient views on patient participation in treatment decision-making: a quantitative and qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    Pieterse, A H; Baas-Thijssen, M C M; Marijnen, C A M; Stiggelbout, A M

    2008-09-16

    Patient participation in treatment decision-making is being increasingly advocated, although cancer treatments are often guideline-driven. Trade-offs between benefits and side effects underlying guidelines are made by clinicians. Evidence suggests that clinicians are inaccurate at predicting patient values. The aim was to assess what role oncologists and cancer patients prefer in deciding about treatment, and how they view patient participation in treatment decision-making. Seventy disease-free cancer patients and 60 oncologists (surgical, radiation, and medical) were interviewed about their role preferences using the Control Preferences Scale (CPS) and about their views on patient participation using closed- and open-ended questions. Almost all participants preferred treatment decisions to be the outcome of a shared process. Clinicians viewed participation more often as reaching an agreement, whereas 23% of patients defined participation exclusively as being informed. Of the participants, > or = 81% thought not all patients are able to participate and > or = 74% thought clinicians are not always able to weigh the pros and cons of treatment for patients, especially not quality as compared with length of life. Clinicians seemed reluctant to share probability information on the likely impact of adjuvant treatment. Clinicians should acknowledge the legitimacy of patients' values in treatment decisions. Guidelines should recommend elicitation of patient values at specific decision points. PMID:18781148

  4. Depression in cancer patients: Pathogenesis, implications and treatment (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SMITH, HAMISH R.

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a common comorbidity in cancer cases, affecting >10% of patients. A cancer diagnosis is life-changing, and is a source of considerable psychological and emotional stress. Non-pathological sadness may be a normal response to a cancer diagnosis, however, stress beyond the coping mechanisms of patients may result in major depressive disorder. The current review, in addition to the obvious psychosocial elements of depression, explores its biological mechanisms, including tissue damage, inflammatory mediators and the chronic stress response, and how these immune and endocrine pathways may underlie depression in cancer. Possible iatrogenic causes of depression in cancer are also explored. There is a strong need to identify and treat depression in cancer patients in order to increase quality of life and reduce mortality. The most popular clinical and potential future biochemical screening tools for depression in cancer are briefly discussed. The interventions used will vary for every patient, but may include psychosocial therapies or pharmacotherapy; however, a paucity of research on the most effective management of depression in cancer means the optimal combination of therapies is unknown. Selection of antidepressants should be carefully considered, given the common side effects of chemotherapy (such as nausea), and the necessity to avoid serious interactions, including reducing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic drugs. The possible link between the chronic stress response, which may predispose patients to depression, and the risk of mortality from cancer is also explored. The complex interactions between the endocrine, nervous and immune systems, which continue to be elucidated, may offer the opportunity for the development of more rapid and efficacious treatments for depression in cancer in the future. PMID:25788991

  5. Conjunctival and corneal sensitivity in patients under topical antiglaucoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Romero-Díaz de León, Lorena; Morales-León, Jorge-Emmanuel; Ledesma-Gil, Jasbeth; Navas, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study is to measure corneal and conjunctival sensitivity in patients under glaucoma topical treatment as compared to a control group. It is a case-control study. Corneal and conjunctival esthesiometry were carried out through a Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer. We took healthy individuals as controls, who did not use any type of ophthalmic topical medications and without history of ocular surface pathology or irritation. The study group was subdivided per number of applications (1, 2, and 3 or more applications). From a total 182 eyes from 91 patients, of which 26 (28.57 %) were controls and 65 (71.43 %) were in the study group, a mean corneal sensitivity of 58.98 ± 2.25 mm was found in the control group and 52.97 ± 6.41 mm in patients using topical medication. Mean conjunctival sensitivity was 18.80 ± 5.40 mm in the control group and 11.76 ± 5.45 mm in the study group. There was no statistically significant difference among groups when separated by 1, 2, and 3 or more applications. Eyes under use of timolol-containing medications showed lower sensitivity values as compared to other topical antiglaucoma medications. Corneal and conjunctival sensitivities are diminished in patients with chronic use of topical hypotensive medications and these results can explain the lack of correlation between signs and symptoms that is typically found in patients treated for glaucoma or ocular hypertension. PMID:26272426

  6. HIV Care and Treatment Beliefs among Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment (ART) in Oromia, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tymejczyk, Olga; Hoffman, Susie; Kulkarni, Sarah Gorrell; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Lahuerta, Maria; Remien, Robert H; Elul, Batya; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Melaku, Zenebe; Nash, Denis

    2016-05-01

    To better understand patient beliefs, which may influence adherence to HIV care and treatment, we examined three dimensions of beliefs among Ethiopian adults (n = 1177) initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Beliefs about benefits of ART/HIV clinical care were largely accurate, but few patients believed in the ability of ART to prevent sexual transmission and many thought Holy Water could cure HIV. Factors associated with lower odds of accurate beliefs included advanced HIV, lack of formal education, and Muslim religion (benefits of ART/clinical care); secondary or university education and more clinic visits (ART to prevent sexual transmission); and pregnancy and Orthodox Christian religion (Holy Water). Assessment of patient beliefs may help providers identify areas needing reinforcement. In this setting, counselors also need to stress the benefits of ART as prevention and that Holy Water should not be used to the exclusion of HIV care and ART. PMID:26346333

  7. Guidelines for treatment of patients with diabetes and infected ulcers.

    PubMed

    Mansilha, A; Brandão, D

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers and their consequences do not only represent a major tragedy for the patient and his/her family, but also place a significant burden on the healthcare systems and society in general. Diabetic patients may develop foot ulcers due to neuropathy (autonomic, sensory, and motor deficits), angiopathy or both. As a result of the additional immunopathy associated with diabetes, the probability of these wounds to become infected is extremely high. Diabetic foot infections can be classified in mild, moderate and severe according to local and systemic signs. Their identification should lead to a prompt and systematic evaluation and treatment, ideally performed by a multidisciplinary team. Decisions concerning empirical initial antibiotic agent(s), desirable route of administration, duration and need of hospitalization should be based on the more likely involved pathogen(s), the severity of the infection, the ulcer chronicity and the presence of significant ischemia. Wound cultures, ideally from ulcer tissue, are strongly advisable and can help guiding and narrowing the antibiotic spectrum. Appropriate wound care and off-loading should not be neglected. When revascularization is required, the correct timing can be crucial for limb salvage. Since the recurrence of ulcer and infection is high, the implementation of appropriate preventive measures can be critical. Ultimately, the definitive goal in the treatment of diabetic foot infections is to prevent the amputation catastrophe. PMID:23443604

  8. Vertebroplasty: Patient and treatment variations studied through parametric computational models☆

    PubMed Central

    Wijayathunga, Vithanage N.; Oakland, Robert J.; Jones, Alison C.; Hall, Richard M.; Wilcox, Ruth K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebroplasty is increasingly used in the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. However there are concerns that this intervention may lead to further fractures in the adjacent vertebral segments. This study was designed to parametrically assess the influence of both treatment factors (cement volume and number of augmentations), and patient factors (bone and disc quality) on the biomechanical effects of vertebroplasty. Methods Specimen-specific finite element models of two experimentally-tested human three-vertebral-segments were developed from CT-scan data. Cement augmentation at one and two levels was represented in the respective models and good agreement in the predicted stiffness was found compared to the corresponding experimental specimens. Parametric variations of key variables associated with the procedure were then studied. Findings The segmental stiffness increased with disc degeneration, with increasing bone quality and to a lesser extent with increasing cement volume. Cement modulus did not have a great influence on the overall segmental stiffness and on the change in the elemental stress in the adjoining vertebrae. However, following augmentation, the stress distribution in the adjacent vertebra changed, indicating possible load redistribution effects of vertebroplasty. Interpretation This study demonstrates the importance of patient factors in the outcomes of vertebroplasty and suggests that these may be one reason for the variation in clinical results. PMID:23953004

  9. Hydroxychloroquine treatment of patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Sperber, K; Louie, M; Kraus, T; Proner, J; Sapira, E; Lin, S; Stecher, V; Mayer, L

    1995-01-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), an antimalarial agent used to treat patients with autoimmune diseases, has been shown to suppress human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in vitro in T cells and monocytes by inhibiting posttranscriptional modification of the virus. These in vitro observations have been expanded into an in vivo study of HCQ as a potential anti-HIV-1 agent in HIV-1-infected patients. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted in 40 asymptomatic HIV-1-infected patients who had CD4+ counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either HCQ 800 mg/d or placebo for 8 weeks. Virologic and immunologic parameters, including HIV-1 ribonucleic acid (RNA) via use of polymerase chain reaction, viral culture, antigen and mitogen responses, and proinflammatory cytokine levels were measured at the beginning and end of the study. The amount of recoverable HIV-1 RNA in plasma declined significantly in the HCQ group over the 8-week period (P = 0.022), while it increased in the placebo group. The percentage of CD4+ T cells remained stable in the HCQ-treated group (18.1 +/- 9.2% before treatment vs 18.6 +/- 10.5% after treatment) and fell significantly in the placebo group (21 +/- 7% before treatment vs 19.3 +/- 6.3% after treatment; P = 0.032). However, this was not reflected as a change in absolute CD4+ counts for either group (HCQ, 262.8 +/- 166 cells/mm3 vs 251 +/- 163 cells/mm3; placebo, 312 +/- 121 cells/mm3 vs 321 +/- 124 cells/mm3). Mitogen- and antigen-specific responses remained constant in the HCQ group while T cell proliferative responses to Candida decreased in the placebo group (4.8 +/- 3.6 x 10(3) SI [stimulation index] vs 3.0 +/- 3.0 x 10(3) SI; P = 0.032). Lastly, serum interleukin 6 levels declined in the HCQ group (14.3 +/- 13.5 U/mL vs 12.0 +/- 16.7 U/mL; P = 0.023) but not in the placebo group (11.3 +/- 8.8 U/mL vs 7.0 +/- 11.7 U/mL); this was coincident with a decrease in

  10. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) Is Associated with Severe Sepsis and Fatal Disease in Emergency Room Patients with Suspected Infection: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Uusitalo-Seppälä, Raija; Huttunen, Reetta; Aittoniemi, Janne; Koskinen, Pertti; Leino, Aila; Vahlberg, Tero; Rintala, Esa M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Early diagnostic and prognostic stratification of patients with suspected infection is a difficult clinical challenge. We studied plasma pentraxin 3 (PTX3) upon admission to the emergency department in patients with suspected infection. Methods The study comprised 537 emergency room patients with suspected infection: 59 with no systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and without bacterial infection (group 1), 67 with bacterial infection without SIRS (group 2), 54 with SIRS without bacterial infection (group 3), 308 with sepsis (SIRS and bacterial infection) without organ failure (group 4) and 49 with severe sepsis (group 5). Plasma PTX3 was measured on admission using a commercial solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The median PTX3 levels in groups 1–5 were 2.6 ng/ml, 4.4 ng/ml, 5.0 ng/ml, 6.1 ng/ml and 16.7 ng/ml, respectively (p<0.001). The median PTX3 concentration was higher in severe sepsis patients compared to others (16.7 vs. 4.9 ng/ml, p<0.001) and in non-survivors (day 28 case fatality) compared to survivors (14.1 vs. 5.1 ng/ml, p<0.001). A high PTX3 level predicted the need for ICU stay (p<0.001) and hypotension (p<0.001). AUCROC in the prediction of severe sepsis was 0.73 (95% CI 0.66–0.81, p<0.001) and 0.69 in case fatality (95% CI 0.58–0.79, p<0.001). PTX3 at a cut-off level for 14.1 ng/ml (optimal cut-off value for severe sepsis) showed 63% sensitivity and 80% specificity. At a cut-off level 7.7 ng/ml (optimal cut-off value for case fatality) showed 70% sensitivity and 63% specificity in predicting case fatality on day 28.In multivariate models, high PTX3 remained an independent predictor of severe sepsis and case fatality after adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusions A high PTX3 level on hospital admission predicts severe sepsis and case fatality in patients with suspected infection. PMID:23341967

  11. On designing room sheilding for total-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Barish, R.J.

    1996-05-01

    When designing shielding for total-body irradiation as an additional modality of treatment in an ordinary radiation therapy room, the extended treatment distance used for these patients greatly increases the workload because of the inverse-square factor. In a seeming contradiction to logic, for a facility with an exterior wall in the path of one lateral primary beam, and a restricted area behind the other primary wall, the overall shielding requirements are lower if the TBI patients are treated with the machine oriented toward the occupied interior. 4 refs.

  12. [Diagnostic and treatment measures in patients with sympathetically maintained pain].

    PubMed

    Maier, C; Gleim, M

    1998-08-27

    The term "sympathetically maintained pain" (SMP) describes a symptom that might accompany a variety of diseases (CRPS, (post-) herpetic and post-injury neuralgia), which might transform into sympathetically independent pain (SIP) after some time. Patients with SMP present a bunch of disorders of the autonomic and sensory system, but the only reliable way to diagnose a pain as SMP is a positive response to an intervention at the sympathetic nervous system. Three ways of influencing the sympathetic system are commonly used: (a) local anesthetic sympathetic blockade (SB), (b) intravenous regional sympathectomy (IVRS) and (c) ganglionic local opioid application (GLOA). A review of current literature shows that SB has certain advantages in diagnostic sensitivity, whereas GLOA might be slightly superior in therapy of some diseases with longstanding pain history. Obviously, the therapeutic benefit of all interventions is complete independent of the accompanying autonomic disorder and of a blockade of efferent fibers. A new heuristic model of the SMP mechanism is presented, including both experimental and clinical data. For reducing the risks of false positive or negative diagnosis of SMP and SIP, a diagnostic algorithm is proposed. This includes optimizing the technique, changes of interventional measures, and adequate monitoring both of analgesia and as well of the extend of efferent sympathetic blockade (e.g. measurement of sympathetic reflexes). The treatment recommendations in patients with SMP vary in dependence of the kind of disease. In SMP, invasive measures play an important, but only limited role within the comprehensive treatment concept. As an example a three-stage, symptom-adapted treatment algorithm is demonstrated for CRPS, including also drug therapy, psychologic and physiotherapeutic approaches. PMID:12799969

  13. Congruence or Discrepancy? Comparing Patients' Health Valuations and Physicians' Treatment Goals for Rehabilitation for Patients with Chronic Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagl, Michaela; Farin, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the congruence of patients' health valuations and physicians' treatment goals for the rehabilitation of chronically ill patients. In addition, patient characteristics associated with greater or less congruence were to be determined. In a questionnaire study, patients' health valuations and physicians' goals were…

  14. Treatment of hypopituitarism in patients receiving antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Prete, Alessandro; Kaplan, Peter W; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Salvatori, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Evidence suggests that there may be drug interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormonal therapies, which can present a challenge to endocrinologists dealing with patients who have both hypopituitarism and neurological diseases. Data are scarce for this subgroup of patients; however, data for the interaction of antiepileptic drugs with the pituitary axis have shown that chronic use of many antiepileptic drugs, such as carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and topiramate, enhances hepatic cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity, and can decrease serum concentrations of sex hormones. Other antiepileptic drugs increase sex hormone-binding globulin, which reduces the bioactivity of testosterone and estradiol. Additionally, the combined oestrogen-progestagen contraceptive pill might decrease lamotrigine concentrations, which could worsen seizure control. Moreover, sex hormones and their metabolites can directly act on neuronal excitability, acting as neurosteroids. Because carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine can enhance the sensitivity of renal tubules, a reduction in desmopressin dose might be necessary in patients with central diabetes insipidus. Although the effects of antiepileptic drugs in central hypothyroidism have not yet been studied, substantial evidence indicates that several antiepileptic drugs can increase thyroid hormone metabolism. However, although it is reasonable to expect a need for a thyroxine dose increase with some antiepileptic drugs, the effect of excessive thyroxine in lowering seizure threshold should also be considered. There are no reports of significant interactions between antiepileptic drugs and the efficacy of human growth hormone therapy, and few data are available for the effects of second-generation antiepileptic drugs on hypopituitarism treatment. PMID:24898833

  15. [Management and treatment of patients with hepatitis B].

    PubMed

    den Eynde, Eva Van; Riveiro-Barciela, Mar

    2016-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis B is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Approximately one third of the world's population has serological evidence of past or present infection by hepatitis B virus (HBV) and 350-400 million people are chronic HBV surface antigen carriers. The aim of therapy is to prevent the onset of liver fibrosis and development of cirrhosis or hepatocarcinoma by sustained suppression of viral replication. Currently there are 2 strategies for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B: the pegylated interferon and long-term treatment with nucleoside/nucleotide analogues. Pegylated interferon has the advantage of being a treatment of limited duration, and is particularly suitable for patients with chronic hepatitis with positive HBeAg (hepatitis B e antigen), but the unfavorable adverse event profile and route of parenteral administration makes it less used than nucleoside/nucleotide analogues. Tenofovir and entecavir have shown to be potent inhibitors of HBV with a high genetic barrier to resistance and few adverse effects, so are considered as the first line therapy. PMID:27474247

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment of the patient with trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Peraire, M

    1997-01-01

    Neuralgia of the trigeminus (NT) is the most common of cranial nerve neuralgias. Its diagnosis is entirely clinical and its most common form of presentation is well understood. Questions of differential diagnosis can emerge with certain entities such as atypical trigeminal neuralgia, short-duration unilateral neuralgiform cephalea of the trigeminus (SUNCT) arising from injection to the conjunctival, lacrimal or other glands, cluster headache, chronic paroxymal hemicrania, pain arising in the teeth and myofacial pain syndrome. The three main causative factors of NT are compression of the nerve root by an artery in the prepontine space, thereby creating an area of demyelinization, compression of the nerve by a tumor, and multiple sclerosis. The first is the most common of the three. NT can be classified as essential in 10 to 30% of patients. Recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR), and its advantages over other imaging systems, have made MR the diagnostic method of choice. The first treatment is medical and the basic drugs involved can be considered classic. Other therapies have been suggested in recent years, however, and should probably be studied further. Two substances stand out among those proposed: tocainide, an antiarrhythmic drug, and pimozide, an antipsychotic. Surgical treatment of NT can address either the cause (tumor or vascular compression) or symptoms, the latter being indicated when medical treatment fails. Surgery can be performed on peripheral nerves, on the gasserian ganglion and on the posterior fossa. The indications, outcomes and possible complications are quite different for each approach, making choice controversial. PMID:9131907

  17. A view from Riggs: treatment resistance and patient authority-IX. Integrative psychodynamic treatment of psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Tillman, Jane G

    2008-01-01

    Psychotic spectrum disorders present treatment challenges for patients, families, and clinicians. This article addresses the history of the dualism in the field between biological and psychological approaches to mental disorders, and surveys the contemporary literature about the etiology and treatment of psychotic spectrum disorders. An integrative approach to treatment derived from work at Austen Riggs with previously treatment refractory patients with psychotic spectrum disorders is described that combines individual psycho- dynamic psychotherapy, psychopharmacology, family systems approaches, and intensive psychosocial engagement. Helping patients develop their own authority to join the treatment, use relationships for learning, and understand the meaning of their symptoms is central to the treatment at Austen Riggs. An extended case vignette of a patient diagnosed with a schizoaffective disorder is presented illustrating this integrative psychodynamic treatment approach. PMID:19113964

  18. Smartphones in the Operating Room: Distraction or Diagnostic Aid? A Case of Newly Diagnosed Wolff-Parkinson White in a Pediatric Patient Having Bronchoscopy Under General Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Esenther, Brandon; Ko, Riva

    2015-08-01

    A 4-year-old boy presented for elective bronchoscopy after years of pharmacologically unresponsive reactive airway disease that limited physical activity. After mask induction with nitrous oxide and sevoflurane, the patient was noted to be intermittently in a hemodynamically stable tachyarrhythmia. The anesthesia machine, though equipped with electrocardiogram (ECG) recording capabilities, malfunctioned during the case and was not able to print a rhythm strip. As a substitute, a smartphone picture and video were recorded. In the recovery room, initial 12-lead ECG showed sinus tachycardia. Shortly after, a presumptive diagnosis of Wolff-Parkinson White was given upon review of the smartphone recordings by the pediatric cardiologist on service. Twelve lead ECG was repeated which showed intermittent Wolff-Parkinson White. This case highlights 2 points. First, any prolonged or sustained pediatric dysrhythmia revealed during anesthesia warrants further investigation and should not be assumed secondary to an anesthetic drug. Second, ubiquitous smartphones are an excellent tool for capturing data that the monitor is unable to capture. PMID:26230306

  19. A review of treatment options for Graves' disease: why total thyroidectomy is a viable option in selected patients.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vinuta; Lind, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. If left untreated, patients may have multiple systemic complications such as cardiac, reproductive, and skeletal disease. Thionamides, such as methimazole and propylthiouracil, and I(131) iodine ablation are the most commonly prescribed treatment for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy is often overlooked for treatment and is usually only offered if the other options have failed. In our case, we discuss a patient who was admitted to our medical center with symptomatic hyperthyroidism secondary to long-standing Graves' disease. She had a history of non-compliance with medications and medical clinic follow-up. The risks and benefits of total thyroidectomy were explained and she consented to surgery. A few months after the procedure, she was biochemically and clinically euthyroid on levothyroxine. She had no further emergency room visits or admissions for uncontrolled thyroid disease. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of the more typically prescribed treatments, thionamides and I(131)iodine ablation. We also review the importance of shared decision making and the benefits of total thyroidectomy for the management of Graves' disease. Given the improvement in surgical techniques over the past decade and a significant reduction of complications, we suggest total thyroidectomy be recommended more often for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27609732

  20. The value of patient-doctor dialog in the treatment of early prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, R O; Mensink, P; Ernemo, B; Ligensa, C

    2002-01-01

    A lack of information about the characteristics of prostate cancer, the treatment options available, and the negative effects associated with each treatment option leaves many newly diagnosed patients feeling anxious, depressed and confused, and can ultimately lead to feelings of distrust towards the treating physician. Improving patient-doctor dialog increases the chances of successfully achieving the patient's goals in managing their disease. Factors considered important for improving patient-doctor dialog include an individualized approach to care, providing the patient with complete, comprehensive and unbiased information on treatment options, and allowing the patient sufficient time to come to a treatment decision. PMID:12496991

  1. Validation of the patient benefit index for the assessment of patient-relevant benefit in the treatment of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Feuerhahn, Julia; Blome, Christine; Radtke, Marc; Augustin, Matthias

    2012-08-01

    Empirical evidence of the efficacy of drugs and therapeutic procedures becomes more important in industrial countries. The assessment of patient benefit from the patient's perspective is of particular relevance. The Patient Benefit Index (PBI) for skin diseases is a validated instrument to assess patient-relevant benefit in patients with skin diseases. So far, no instrument for the assessment of patient-relevant needs and benefits in patients with psoriasis has been published. Objective of the study was the validation of an instrument to assess patient benefit in psoriasis treatment. Patient-relevant treatment needs and benefits in psoriasis patients were recorded with the PBI questionnaire in two studies conducted in 2007. Treatment goals and benefits were used to calculate an importance-weighted PBI. Data of n = 2,009 patients in the cross-sectional study and n = 93 patients in the longitudinal study were used to test validity, feasibility and reliability of the PBI. The PBI was feasible with a rate of missing values ≤1.5 % in PNQ and ≤2.0 % in PBQ. The subscales of the PBI were internally consistent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.68-0.87). The PBI showed convergent validity regarding the quality of life, psoriasis area and severity index, and two single questions on treatment benefit used in the longitudinal study. The PBI is a suitable instrument for the assessment of patient-reported benefit in the treatment of psoriasis. PMID:22722916

  2. Biomechanical analysis of spasticity treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wininger, Michael; Craelius, William; Settle, Jill; Robinson, Stephanie; Isaac, Bobbi; Maloni, Heidi; Moradi, Minoosh; Newby, Nicki Ann; Wallin, Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: New metrics for clinical spasticity are needed to assess motor performance, since scales such as the Ashworth and Tardieu are unreliable. Here, we assessed outcomes of baclofen treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using biomechanical analysis of voluntary movements. Methods: Patients with MS and symptomatic limb spasticity were recruited for a pre–post baclofen titration study, along with age-matched healthy controls. Oral baclofen was titrated to optimize spasticity symptoms in all MS cases over 4 weeks. Clinical assessments included the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Tardieu Scale (TS); elbow kinematics were measured via the Transient Acceleration Measurement Interface (TAMI); performance was measured as the score at 4 weeks minus the baseline score in all measures. Movement proficiency within TAMI was quantified through a scale-free smoothness measure, according to the regional excursion deviation (RED) from a constant-velocity approximant. Results: Twelve patients with MS [age: 47.8 ± 9.8 years; women: 4; disease duration: 20 ± 10 years; disease-modifying therapy use: 7; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS): 6.8 ± 1.4] and eight age-matched healthy controls were evaluated concurrently (mean age: 49.5 ± 13.1 years; women = 3). In MS cases, no significant improvement in arm spasticity was observed with main effects: MAS: −41.6 ± 72.6 (p = 0.09); EDSS: −1.6 ± 10.4% (p = 0.49); and TS: −8.3 ± 2.1% (p = 0.32), −24.9 ± 63.6% (p = 0.42), and −30.7 ± 79.9% (p = 0.06), at slow, moderate, and fast speeds, respectively. However, voluntary motion smoothness, as measured by TAMI: RED, decreased significantly: 0.62 ± 0.08 versus 0.54 ± 0.09, p < 0.001, indicating significant increase in movement smoothness post treatment. Conclusion: A simple biomechanical analysis of voluntary movements revealed a significant reduction of spasticity after 30 days of baclofen therapy in patients with MS that was not detected by clinical

  3. Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of “Transfer-Out” Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Gondar, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Belayneh, Tadesse; Kassu, Afework; Tigabu, Desalgne; Asmare, Gashaw; Tilaye, Sofanit; Klinkenberg, Eveline

    2016-01-01

    Background. During tuberculosis treatment, patients may transfer to continue treatment at another health facility. To ensure adherence until treatment completion, keeping track of patients is paramount. This study aimed to investigate treatment outcomes of patients who transferred out from the University of Gondar Hospital. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort evaluation of patients registered from 2009 to 2013. Treatment outcomes were collected from the TB registers of receiving units using a standardized data capture format. Results. During the study period 3,707 patients initiated treatment and 47.5% (1,760) transferred out. The study evaluated the outcome of 26% (457/1,760) patients, of whom 403 (88%) arrived in the receiving units. Overall, 79% were successfully treated and 13.8% transferred out for a second time. For all transferred-out cases, treatment outcomes were not reported to the referring unit. Conclusion and Recommendation. About half of the patients were transferred out to complete treatment elsewhere. Although successful treatment outcome was obtained in 79% of patients, these results were not fed back to the referring unit. Implementing a clear mechanism to communicate the arrival of and treatment outcome for transfer-out patients and appropriate patient education on treatment unit selection before treatment and during transfer-out are recommended. PMID:27313887

  4. Factors Associated with Effectiveness of Treatment and Reproductive Outcomes in Patients with Thin Endometrium Undergoing Estrogen Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Si-Miao; Zhou, Yuan-Zheng; Wang, Han-Bi; Sun, Zheng-Yi; Zhen, Jing-Ran; Shen, Keng; Deng, Cheng-Yan; Lang, Jing-He

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thin endometrium is associated with poor reproductive outcomes; estrogen treatment can increase endometrial thickness (EMT). The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to investigate the factors influencing the effectiveness of estrogen treatment and reproductive outcomes after the treatment in patients with thin endometrium. Methods: Relevant clinical data of 101 patients with thin endometrium who had undergone estrogen treatment were collected. Possible factors influencing the effectiveness of treatment were analyzed retrospectively by logistic regression analysis. Eighty-seven infertile women without thin endometrium who had undergone assisted reproduction served as controls. The cases and controls were matched for age, assisted reproduction method, and number of embryos transferred. Reproductive outcomes of study and control groups were compared using Student's t-test and the Chi-square test. Results: At the end of estrogen treatment, EMT was ≥8 mm in 93/101 patients (92.1%). Effectiveness of treatment was significantly associated with maximal pretreatment EMT (P = 0.017) and treatment duration (P = 0.004). The outcomes of assisted reproduction were similar in patients whose treatment was successful in increasing EMT to ≥8 mm and the control group. The rate of clinical pregnancy in patients was associated with the number of good-quality embryos transferred in both fresh (P = 0.005) and frozen-thawed (P = 0.000) embryo transfer cycles. Conclusions: Thinner EMT before estrogen treatment requires longer treatment duration and predicts poorer treatment outcomes. The effectiveness of treatment depends on the duration of estrogen administration. Assisted reproductive outcomes of patients whose treatment is successful (i.e., achieves an EMT ≥8 mm) are similar to those of controls. The quality of embryos transferred is an important predictor of assisted reproductive outcomes in patients treated successfully with exogenous estrogen. PMID:26612292

  5. [PPI treatment for gastric ulcer patients in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Toshiyuki; Minami, Maya; Naito, Chisako; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2010-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is an effective and safe medication for the elderly people for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. However, some PPIs have been reported that they have metabolic interactions with some drugs. Therefore, drug-interactions should be considered when the PPI is prescribed to the elderly people. The number of NSAIDs ulcer patients is thought to increase along with the increase of those who take NSAIDs in the elderly. Although PPI is indispensable for the prevention of the NSAIDs ulcer, PPI has not obtained authorization for the purpose of prevention in Japan. PPIs are strongly expected to be approved for prevention of NSAIDs ulcer by the Japanese government in the near future. PMID:21061533

  6. Teriparatide treatment of osteoporosis in a patient with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shibli-Rahhal, Amal; McCormick, Laurie

    2013-06-01

    Osteoporosis commonly occurs in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and is often irreversible even after weight restoration. We describe a 52-year-old woman with AN and severe osteoporosis, discovered after she sustained multiple fractures from a fall. She had low weight for most of her life, but was only formally diagnosed with AN 6 years prior to her presentation. She received therapy for her eating disorder and was able to restore weight, which led to a 4.1 % improvement in her bone density. We then treated her with teriparatide for 2 years, which lead to a further 21 % increase in bone density and she has had no recurrence of fractures. Since AN-associated osteoporosis is characterized by low bone formation, teriparatide may be a useful treatment option. PMID:23760852

  7. [Renal osteodystrophy (3); its treatment in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Ghitu, S; Oprisiu, R; Benamar, L; Said, S; Tataru Albu, A; Arsenescu, I; el Esper, N; Morinière, P; Fournier, A

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence and the clinical gravity of the various histopathological varieties of renal osteodystrophy in dialysis patients depends on the severity of both the aluminium intoxication and that of hyperparathyroidism. The prevalence of bone pains, fractures and hypercalcemias are the highest in adynamic bone diseases (ABD) with severe aluminium intoxication, then in osteitis fibrosa and mixed osteopathy, in the ABD with moderate aluminium intoxication and rare in the mild lesion in spite of similar moderate aluminium intoxication. In the absence of aluminium intoxication, hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia prevalence is higher only when intact PTH is more that 4 times the upper limit of normal. When PTH is between 1 and 2 folds the ULN this prevalence is null and bone mineral density is the highest. 2. The low turnover aluminic bone diseases (osteomalacic or adynamic) will be cured by long term deferoxamine treatment. The hazards of such treatment justify the performance of a bone biopsy to ensure the diagnosis. Their prevention relies on adequate treatment of tapwater and definitive exclusion of long term administration of aluminum phosphate binders. 3. Non aluminic osteomalacia will be treated according to the same guidelines given for the uremic patients before dialysis. 4. Non aluminic adynamic bone disease will be cured by means aiming at stimulating PTH secretion as discontinuing 1 alpha hydroxylated vitamin D derivatives, and, if there is no hyperphosphatemia by discontinuation of calcium supplement. In case of hyperphosphatemia in dialysis patients CaCO3 doses have to be nevertheless increased after the dialysate calcium concentration (DCa) has been decreased in order to induce a negative perdialytic calcium balance for PTH secretion stimulation. In the near future substitution of CaCO3 by non calcemic non aluminic phosphate binders will suffice. 5. Osteitis fibrosa due to hyperparathyroidism will be treated first by securing an optimal vitamin D

  8. [EMERGENCY TREATMENT OF BLEEDING IN PATIENTS TAKING WARFARIN].

    PubMed

    Prasolov, N V; Shulutko, E M; Bulanov, A Yu; Yatskov, K V; Shcherbakov, O V

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy with vitamin K antagonists (AVK) is an effective treatment and prevention of thrombosis. One of the major disadvantages of the AVK is a risk for serious bleeding. Prothrombin complex concentrates (PCC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and vitamin K1 are available for control of these situations. The experience of special team ofthe Scientific Center for Hematology was the basis for presented retrospective study. Three regimens of warfarin-related bleeding were compared: PCC+ VK for several bleeding, FFP+ VK for different clinical situations and VKfor light bleeding. PCC showed himself as effective and safe hemostatic agent. Transfusions of FFP were sometimes not effective, sometimes led to TACO. Supplementation of vitamin K1 for patients of I and II groups provided more stable control of hemostasis. In III group VK vas effective to stop bleeding. Two impotent sings for conclusion: necessary of laboratory monitoring, TEG first of all; individual balance of hemostasis base of bleeding or thrombotic risks. PMID:26148369

  9. Treatment of patients with spontaneous pneumothorax during videothoracoscopy.

    PubMed

    Janssen, J P; van Mourik, J; Cuesta Valentin, M; Sutedja, G; Gigengack, K; Postmus, P E

    1994-07-01

    Thoracoscopy for spontaneous pneumothorax has been performed over the years by many pulmonologists. The aim of the procedure was merely diagnostic: the detection of blebs and bullae. Therapeutic modalities were restricted to chemical pleurodesis. The development of videothoracoscopy has made more complex interventions, such as bullectomy possible. A protocol for videothoracoscopic treatment of spontaneous pneumothorax, with all treatment modalities in one session, has been developed. All patients with spontaneous pneumothorax underwent videothoracoscopy under general anaesthesia with double lumen tube intubation. If no abnormalities were found on the visceral pleura, talc pleurodesis was performed. Small lesions, blebs or bullae < 2 cm, were coagulated prior to pleurodesis. In case of blebs or bullae > 2 cm, thoracoscopic resection with an EndoGIA stapling device was performed, followed by scarification, i.e. electrocoagulation, of the parietal pleura. In 43 patients, 44 procedures were performed. In 15 cases (34%) no blebs or bullae were found. In 6 cases (14%) only blebs < 2 cm were found. In 23 cases (52%) blebs and bullae > 2 cm were found. In 21 out of 44 cases (48%), talc pleurodesis was performed, and in 23 cases (52%) bullectomy was performed. No major complication occurred. The average hospital stay was 5.7 days after talc pleurodesis and 6.0 days after bullectomy. There were 2 recurrences (5%) after a follow-up of at least 18 months. In conclusion, the use of videothoracoscopy in spontaneous pneumothorax makes it possible to continue a diagnostic procedure as a therapeutic session.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7925907

  10. Foot ulcers in the diabetic patient, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Stephanie C; Driver, Vickie R; Wrobel, James S; Armstrong, David G

    2007-01-01

    Lower extremity complications in persons with diabetes have become an increasingly significant public health concern in both the developed and developing world. These complications, beginning with neuropathy and subsequent diabetic foot wounds frequently lead to infection and lower extremity amputation even in the absence of critical limb ischemia. In order to diminish the detrimental consequences associated with diabetic foot ulcers, a com-mon-sense-based treatment approach must be implemented. Many of the etiological factors contributing to the formation of diabetic foot ulceration may be identified using simple, inexpensive equipment in a clinical setting. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcers can be accomplished in a primary care setting with a brief history and screening for loss of protective sensation via the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament. Specialist clinics may quantify neuropathy, plantar foot pressure, and assess vascular status with Doppler ultrasound and ankle-brachial blood pressure indices. These measurements, in conjunction with other findings from the history and physical examination, may enable clinicians to stratify patients based on risk and help determine the type of intervention. Other effective clinical interventions may include patient education, optimizing glycemic control, smoking cessation, and diligent foot care. Recent technological advanced combined with better understanding of the wound healing process have resulted in a myriad of advanced wound healing modalities in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. However, it is imperative to remember the fundamental basics in the healing of diabetic foot ulcers: adequate perfusion, debridement, infection control, and pressure mitigation. Early recognition of the etiological factors along with prompt management of diabetic foot ulcers is essential for successful outcome. PMID:17583176

  11. Diagnostic Dilemmas and Cultural Diversity in Emergency Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Charlotte; Sklar, David

    1980-01-01

    Language and cultural beliefs play an extremely important role in the interaction between patients from diverse cultural groups and physicians. Especially in emergency rooms, there are many dangers in missed communications. A patient from a foreign culture, especially one who does not speak English, often expresses symptoms in ways that are unfamiliar to many American physicians. Specific areas of cultural vulnerability can be identified for the major ethnic groups in the United States as they interact with the scientific medical system. A short review of folk medical beliefs and recommendations for improving diagnostic accuracy and treatment may assist emergency room staffs in offering care that is culturally acceptable to patients of diverse ethnic backgrounds. PMID:7347053

  12. Virus diffusion in isolation rooms.

    PubMed

    Kao, P H; Yang, R J

    2006-03-01

    In hospitals, the ventilation of isolation rooms operating under closed-door conditions is vital if the spread of viruses and infection is to be contained. Engineering simulation, which employs computational fluid dynamics, provides a convenient means of investigating airflow behaviour in isolation rooms for various ventilation arrangements. A cough model was constructed to permit the numerical simulation of virus diffusion inside an isolation room for different ventilation system configurations. An analysis of the region of droplet fallout and the dilution time of virus diffusion of coughed gas in the isolation room was also performed for each ventilation arrangement. The numerical results presented in this paper indicate that the parallel-directional airflow pattern is the most effective means of controlling flows containing virus droplets. Additionally, staggering the positions of the supply vents at the door end of the room relative to the exhaust vents on the wall behind the bed head provides effective infection control and containment. These results suggest that this particular ventilation arrangement enhances the safety of staff when performing medical treatments within isolation rooms. PMID:16359753

  13. Two-year treatment patterns and costs in glaucoma patients initiating treatment with prostaglandin analogs

    PubMed Central

    Schmier, Jordana K; Lau, Edmund C; Covert, David W

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine treatment patterns and costs over a two-year period among new initiators of topical prostaglandin analogs in a managed care population by retrospective cohort analysis of an insurance claims database. Methods Patients who initiated therapy with a prostaglandin analog between September 2006 and March 2007 were identified. The use of monotherapy and adjunctive therapies were compared by index prostaglandin. Days to initiation of adjunctive therapy and rates of glaucoma surgical procedures were also calculated. Medical costs (antiglaucoma medications and ophthalmic visits) over the two-year period were estimated. Results The analysis identified 5018 patients with at least one prostaglandin analog prescription (bimatoprost, n = 747; latanoprost, n = 1651; benzalkonium chloride (BAK)-free travoprost, n = 203). The majority (51%–54%) had repeat prescriptions. Among those with repeat prescriptions, 52% were female (not significant) and mean age was 64 years (P < 0.01). Rates of adjunctive therapy use varied across groups (bimatoprost 51%, latanoprost 37%, and BAK- free travoprost 35%, P < 0.0001). Median and mean days to initiation of adjunctive therapy were 83 and 140 for bimatoprost, 101 and 181 for latanoprost, and 113 and 221 for BAK- free travoprost. Two-year medical costs were $3147, $2843, and $2557 for patients initiating treatment with bimatoprost, latanoprost, and BAK-free travoprost, respectively. Use of glaucoma surgical procedures across the treatment groups was similar over the two-year period. Conclusions Over a two-year period, the rate and time to initiation of adjunctive therapy use, as well as medical costs, varied between index prostaglandins. However, the rate of glaucoma surgical interventions did not vary significantly across index medications. PMID:20957061

  14. Tobacco cessation treatment education for dental students using standardized patients.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Jacqueline A; Carrico, Ruth M; Myers, John A; Scott, David A; Wilson, Richard W; Worth, Celeste T

    2014-06-01

    The use of standardized patients (SPs) shows promise in tobacco cessation treatment (TCT) training by providing a simulated clinical environment for dental students to practice counseling skills with individuals trained to portray patients. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a difference in attitudes, perceptions, and knowledge between dental students who received a lecture and practice sessions with SPs and those who received a lecture only. Dental students in an introductory clinical course at one dental school were invited to participate in the study by completing a pre and post questionnaire. The pre questionnaire was administered to all students prior to a tobacco cessation lecture. Students were group-randomized to either the intervention or control group. The intervention group completed the post questionnaire after the lecture and practice sessions with SPs, and the control group completed it after the lecture only. Of ninety-eight students who attended the lecture and were invited to participate in the study, a total of ninety-four from the two groups (96 percent) provided two linkable questionnaires for analysis. In the results, training with lecture and SPs increased the students' understanding of barriers, subjective norms, perceived skills, self-efficacy, and intentions to provide TCT more than those in the lecture only; however, it did not significantly increase their attitudes and knowledge. These findings suggest that using SPs is a valuable educational method to promote the provision of TCT by dental students and graduates. PMID:24882775

  15. Adequate peritoneal dialysis: theoretical model and patient treatment.

    PubMed

    Tast, C

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adequate PD with sufficient weekly Kt/V (2.0) and Creatinine clearance (CCR) (60l) and necessary daily dialysate volume. This recommended parameter was the result of a recent multi-centre study (CANUSA). For this there were 40 patients in our hospital examined and compared in 1996, who carried out PD for at least 8 weeks and up to 6 years. These goals (CANUSA) are easily attainable in the early treatment of many individuals with a low body surface area (BSA). With higher BSA or missing RRF (Residual Renal Function) the daily dose of dialysis must be adjusted. We found it difficult to obtain the recommended parameters and tried to find a solution to this problem. The simplest method is to increase the volume or exchange rate. The most expensive method is to change from CAPD to APD with the possibility of higher volume or exchange rates. Selection of therapy must take into consideration: 1. patient preference, 2. body mass, 3. peritoneal transport rates, 4. ability to perform therapy, 5. cost of therapy and 6. risk of peritonitis. With this information in mind, an individual prescription can be formulated and matched to the appropriate modality of PD. PMID:10392062

  16. [Treatment of patients with Alzheimer's disease: a breakthrough or not?].

    PubMed

    van Marum, Rob J

    2015-01-01

    The results of an open-label extension study of the Expedition I and II studies with solanezumab in patients with Alzheimer's disease, neither of which had shown an effect on cognition and functional ability, were recently presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto. Placebo and intervention patients with mild Alzheimer's disease from both studies were offered the option of continuing with solanezumab for 2 additional years. The data from this group were re-analysed using a new analysis technique, the so-called 'delayed start analysis'. On the basis of the re-analysis it was concluded that solanezumab does show disease-modifying activity and should be considered a promising candidate for treatment of Alzheimer's disease in the near future. This conclusion, however, is poorly supported by the data presented in the study. A more definite positioning of solanezumab will not be possible until data from the ongoing Expedition III study becomes available in 2017 at the earliest. PMID:26271177

  17. [Neuropsychological performance and demographic characteristics in alcoholic patients in treatment].

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Rigoni, Maisa; Quarti Irigaray, Tatiana; Feliz Duarte de Moraes, João; Ferrão, Ygor; da Silva Oliveira, Margareth

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the cognitive performance of alcoholics (AG) and participants from the general population (CG) without alcohol dependence. The sample consisted of 141 men, aged 18 and 59. Divided into two groups, 101 alcoholic patients without comorbidities, hospitalized for drug abuse treatment, and 40 healthy individuals from the general population, matched for age and socioeconomic status. The instruments assessed the sociodemographics data and economic classification, alcohol dependence, psychiatric comorbidities, cognitive performance, executive functions, memory and perception. The results showed that the AG group presented severe dependence on alcohol and 92.1% indicated having a family with problems associated with alcohol for only 41.5 % of the CG. At the moment of the evaluation, 59.4 % of the participants of the AG group were abstinent between 8 and 15 days, and the in CG, 43.9%, were more than 60 days alcohol free. The neuropsychological performance verified that there was a decline in cognitive functions in alcoholics’ participants, whereas the AG suggests psychomotor retardation. Thus, it can be inferred that alcohol greatly affects cognitive functions of people who depend on this substance. In addition, there was a greater number of family stories with prevalence of symptoms of anxiety and depression and nicotine addiction in alcoholic patients compared with the general population. PMID:25314037

  18. Adjusting Treatment for an Inmate-Patient Receiving Medication Involuntarily.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joseph B

    2015-06-01

    Correctional psychiatrists can pursue authorization for forcible medication of pretrial detainees housed in a federal prison hospital through two pathways: an administrative process based upon the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Washington v. Harper and a judicial process founded on the Court's ruling in Sell v. United States. The pathway associated with Harper pertains to the involuntary treatment of a mentally ill inmate believed to be dangerous or gravely disabled, or both, to protect the inmate-patient and others from harm, whereas the avenue linked with Sell involves the forcible treatment of an incompetent pretrial defendant to restore competence to stand trial. Given the difference in objectives between these two processes, there is rarely confusion regarding which pathway the correctional psychiatrist should pursue. However, circumstances can arise that blur the distinction between the Harper and Sell processes. I present a composite case highlighting such a scenario and provide discussion and commentary to assist the correctional psychiatrist in deciding on the most appropriate course of action. PMID:26071513

  19. [Psychopharmaceuticals for treatment of suicidal patients and for suicide prevention].

    PubMed

    Haußmann, R; Bauer, M; Lewitzka, U; Müller-Oerlinghausen, B

    2016-05-01

    Suicidality represents a frequent phenomenon in affective and psychotic disorders but the treatment of acute and chronic suicidality is still a controversial issue. Especially the efficacy of antidepressant and neuroleptic drugs for prevention of suicide continues to be debated. There is a lack of evidence due to limitations of methodological studies and ethical concerns are a major issue. Considering methodological problems in the conducted studies the often insufficiently valued differentiation between suicidal thoughts and actual suicidal behavior has to be emphasized. With the exception of lithium and clozapine suicide-preventing effects of antidepressants and neuroleptics could not yet be demonstrated. Regarding new antidepressant drugs, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI) even the possible new onset of suicidal thoughts and ideations as an adverse effect needs to be stressed. Considering the frequent occurrence of suicidality the currently available evidence is undoubtedly insufficient. The improvement of study concepts and especially a more differentiated consideration of the vague term "suicidality" seems to be essential. An underrepresentation of the evidence-based therapeutic options with lithium and clozapine in the treatment of suicidal patients needs to be avoided. PMID:26952239

  20. [Remote results of prosthetic treatment of patients with nickel hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Spiechowicz, E; Grochowski, P; Glantz, P O; Axell, T

    1990-01-01

    Economic reasons are the cause that ever more frequently prosthetic replacements are made from alloys other than gold. The most widely used are: alloys based on nickel and chromium, and stainless steel. In some alloys the content of nickel may be over 80%. The studies carried out in early 1980s showed that these materials had a higher hardness, mechanical strength and elasticity module than gold alloys. Nickel is one of the main components of these alloys, and its compounds may exert a harmful toxic, and even more frequently, allergic effect on the human organism. In the light of a survey of the literature and own clinical, experimental and epidemiological investigations it was tried to trace the effect of dental replacements made of nickel-containing alloys on the mucous membranes and skin of subjects with confirmed hypersensitivity to nickel. The studied material comprised a group of patients selected at random from those attending the Allergology Outpatient Clinic at the Department of Dermatology, Medical Academy in Warsaw, who had verified hypersensitivity to nickel and had indications to preparation of crowns and bridges for wearing. In each case before and after prosthetic treatment and before any control stomatological examination patch tests were done for demonstrating nickel hypersensitivity. In all patients permanent prostheses were done from an allow containing up to 70% of nickel with baked porcelain. In most cases fragments of oral mucosa were taken for histological examination. The patients were examined twice yearly. The longest follow-up is presently over 8 years. In no case exacerbation of hypersensitivity reactions was noted. PMID:2103014

  1. Prostate and Patient Intrafraction Motion: Impact on Treatment Time-Dependent Planning Margins for Patients With Endorectal Balloon

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Elisabeth; Georg, Dietmar; Goldner, Gregor; Stock, Markus

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate intrafraction prostate and patient motion during different radiation therapy treatments as a function of treatment time; included were prostate patients with an endorectal balloon (ERB). Margins accounting for setup uncertainties and intrafraction motion were determined. Methods and Materials: The study included 17 patients undergoing prostate cancer radiation therapy. All patients received 3 fiducial gold markers implanted in the prostate and were then immobilized in the supine position with a knee support and treated with an ERB. Twelve patients with intermediate risk for pelvic lymph node metastases received intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 5 patients at low risk received a 4-field box treatment. After setup based on skin marks, patients were imaged with a stereoscopic imaging system. If the marker displacement exceeded a 3-mm tolerance relative to planning computed tomography, patients were shifted and verification images were taken. All patients underwent additional imaging after treatment; IMRT patients also received additional imaging at halftime of treatment. Prostate and bone drifts were evaluated as a function of treatment time for more than 600 fractions, and margins were extracted. Results: Patient motion evaluated by bone match was strongly patient dependent but in general was smallest in the superior-inferior (SI) direction. Prostate drifts were less patient dependent, showing an increase with treatment time in the SI and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. In the lateral (LAT) direction, the prostate stayed rather stable. Mean treatment times were 5.5 minutes for 4-field box, 10 minutes for 5-field boost IMRT, and 15 minutes or more for 9-field boost and 9-field pelvic IMRT treatments. Margins resulted in 2.2 mm, 3.9 mm, and 4.3 mm for 4-field box; 3.7 mm, 2.6 mm, and 3.6 mm for 5-field boost IMRT; 2.3 mm, 3.9 mm, and 6.2 mm for 9-field boost IMRT; and 4.2 mm, 5.1 mm, and 6.6 mm for 9-field pelvic IMRT in the

  2. Involving Patients in Weighting Benefits and Harms of Treatment in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weernink, Marieke G. M.; van Til, Janine A.; van Vugt, Jeroen P. P.; Movig, Kris L. L.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina G. M.; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about how patients weigh benefits and harms of available treatments for Parkinson’s Disease (oral medication, deep brain stimulation, infusion therapy). In this study we have (1) elicited patient preferences for benefits, side effects and process characteristics of treatments and (2) measured patients’ preferred and perceived involvement in decision-making about treatment. Methods Preferences were elicited using a best-worst scaling case 2 experiment. Attributes were selected based on 18 patient-interviews: treatment modality, tremor, slowness of movement, posture and balance problems, drowsiness, dizziness, and dyskinesia. Subsequently, a questionnaire was distributed in which patients were asked to indicate the most and least desirable attribute in nine possible treatment scenarios. Conditional logistic analysis and latent class analysis were used to estimate preference weights and identify subgroups. Patients also indicated their preferred and perceived degree of involvement in treatment decision-making (ranging from active to collaborative to passive). Results Two preference patterns were found in the patient sample (N = 192). One class of patients focused largely on optimising the process of care, while the other class focused more on controlling motor-symptoms. Patients who had experienced advanced treatments, had a shorter disease duration, or were still employed were more likely to belong to the latter class. For both classes, the benefits of treatment were more influential than the described side effects. Furthermore, many patients (45%) preferred to take the lead in treatment decisions, however 10.8% perceived a more passive or collaborative role instead. Discussion Patients weighted the benefits and side effects of treatment differently, indicating there is no “one-size-fits-all” approach to choosing treatments. Moreover, many patients preferred an active role in decision-making about treatment. Both results stress

  3. Does prewarming the i-gel supraglottic airway device fit the larynx better compared to keeping it at room temperature for non-paralysed, sedated patients: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Nishihara, Isao; Tatsumi, Shinichi; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the i-gel supraglottic airway device would fit the larynx and provide better sealing pressure if prewarmed to 42°C relative to the device kept at room temperature in non-paralysed, sedated patients. Methods A total of 74 adult patients were assigned to the warm (i-gel prewarmed to 42°C; W group; 37 patients) or the control (i-gel kept at room temperature; C group; 37 patients) groups. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and fentanyl. The i-gel was prewarmed to 42°C for 30 min before insertion in the W group, but kept at room temperature (approximately 23°C) for the C group. The number of attempts made until successful insertion and sealing pressure were compared between the two groups. Results Insertion was successful with one attempt in 35 cases each for the W and C groups. Two attempts were needed in two cases for the W group and one case for the C group. There was one failed attempt in the C group, but none in the W group. None of the differences between the two groups were significant (p=0.51). Sealing pressure was slightly, but not significantly, higher in the W group than in the C group (W group 22.6±6.1 cm H2O; C group 20.7±6.1 cm H2O; p=0.15). Conclusions Prewarming of the i-gel to 42°C did not increase the success rate of insertion, nor did it significantly increase sealing pressure in anaesthetised, non-paralysed patients. Our data suggest that we can keep the i-gel at room temperature for emergency airway management for non-paralysed, sedated patients. Trial registration number University Medical Information Network, Japan 000012287. PMID:25586372

  4. Multinational development of a questionnaire assessing patient satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment: the 'Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaire' (PACT-Q©)

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Martin H; Marrel, Alexia; Carita, Paulo; Anderson, David; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Crijns, Harry; Consoli, Silla; Arnould, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Background The side effects and burden of anticoagulant treatments may contribute to poor compliance and consequently to treatment failure. A specific questionnaire is necessary to assess patients' needs and their perceptions of anticoagulant treatment. Methods A conceptual model of expectation and satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment was designed by an advisory board and used to guide patient (n = 31) and clinician (n = 17) interviews in French, US English and Dutch. Patients had either atrial fibrillation (AF), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), or pulmonary embolism (PE). Following interviews, three PACT-Q language versions were developed simultaneously and further pilot-tested by 19 patients. Linguistic validations were performed for additional language versions. Results Initial concepts were developed to cover three areas of interest: 'Treatment', 'Disease and Complications' and 'Information about disease and anticoagulant treatment'. After clinician and patient interviews, concepts were further refined into four domains and 17 concepts; test versions of the PACT-Q were then created simultaneously in three languages, each containing 27 items grouped into four domains: "Treatment Expectations" (7 items), "Convenience" (11 items), "Burden of Disease and Treatment" (2 items) and "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" (7 items). No item was deleted or added after pilot testing as patients found the PACT-Q easy to understand and appropriate in length in all languages. The PACT-Q was divided into two parts: the first part to measure the expectations and the second to measure the convenience, burden and treatment satisfaction, for evaluation prior to and after anticoagulant treatment, respectively. Eleven additional language versions were linguistically validated. Conclusion The PACT-Q has been rigorously developed and linguistically validated. It is available in 14 languages for use with thromboembolic patients, including AF, PE and DVT patients. Its validation and

  5. [Perampanel in the treatment of a patient with glioblastoma multiforme without IDH1 mutation and without MGMT promotor methylation].

    PubMed

    Rösche, J; Piek, J; Hildebrandt, G; Grossmann, A; Kirschstein, T; Benecke, R

    2015-05-01

    Malignant gliomas like glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) release glutamate which causes excitotoxic death to surrounding neurons, thereby vacating room for tumor expansion. We report the case of a patient with GBM treated with the AMPA receptor blocker Perampanel (PER) in combination therapy for partial seizures. Histological work-up of a biopsy showed the tissue of a GBM without mutation of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and without promotor methylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT). In a group of patients with IDH 1 wild type and non-methylated MGMT a median survival of 199 days after surgery (i. e. 6.5 months) was described. Our patient lived about one year longer. PER rendered our patient seizure-free for at least the last seven months of his life. It was well tolerated and did not increase the toxicity of temozolomide. When choosing an antiepileptic drug (AED) for the treatment of seizures in patients with malignant brain tumors, the efficacy, the tolerability and perhaps possible effects on tumor progression of the AED should be taken into account. PMID:26018396

  6. [Management for the operating room].

    PubMed

    Tschudi, O; Schüpfer, G

    2015-03-01

    Business companies, which in the current times also includes hospitals, must create customer benefits and as a prerequisite for this must sustainably generate profits. Management in the world of business means the formation and directing of a company or parts of a company on a permanent basis, whereby management in this context is not exercising power but function. This concept of management is exemplary developed in this article for the important services sector of the operating room (OR) and individual functions, such as resource control, capacity planning and materials administration are presented in detail. Some OR-specific management challenges are worked out. From this it becomes clear that the economic logic of the most efficient implementation possible is not a contradiction of medical ethics, enabling the most effective treatment possible for patients while safeguarding the highest possible levels of safety and quality. The article aims to build a bridge for medical specialists to the language and world of commerce, emphasizing the profession-based competence and hopefully to arouse interest to go into more detail. PMID:25782780

  7. The effect of pharmacological treatment on gait biomechanics in peripheral arterial disease patients

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacological treatment has been advocated as a first line therapy for Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) patients suffering from intermittent claudication. Previous studies document the ability of pharmacological treatment to increase walking distances. However, the effect of pharmacological treatment on gait biomechanics in PAD patients has not been objectively evaluated as is common with other gait abnormalities. Methods Sixteen patients were prescribed an FDA approved drug (Pentoxifylline or Cilostazol) for the treatment of symptomatic PAD. Patients underwent baseline gait testing prior to medication use which consisted of acquisition of ground reaction forces and kinematics while walking in a pain free state. After three months of treatment, patients underwent repeat gait testing. Results Patients with symptomatic PAD had significant gait abnormalities at baseline during pain free walking as compared to healthy controls. However, pharmacological treatment did not produce any identifiable alterations on the biomechanics of gait of the PAD patients as revealed by the statistical comparisons performed between pre and post-treatment and between post-treatment and the healthy controls. Conclusions Pharmacological treatment did not result in statistically significant improvements in the gait biomechanics of patients with symptomatic PAD. Future studies will need to further explore different cohorts of patients that have shown to improve significantly their claudication distances and/or their muscle fiber morphology with the use of pharmacological treatment and determine if this is associated with an improvement in gait biomechanics. Using these methods we may distinguish the patients who benefit from pharmacotherapy and those who do not. PMID:20529284

  8. Which patients do not recover from shoulder impingement syndrome, either with operative treatment or with nonoperative treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Ketola, Saara; Lehtinen, Janne; Rousi, Timo; Nissinen, Maunu; Huhtala, Heini; Arnala, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose — Shoulder impingement syndrome is common, but treatment is controversial. Arthroscopic acromioplasty is popular even though its efficacy is unknown. In this study, we analyzed stage-II shoulder impingement patients in subgroups to identify those who would benefit from the operation. Patients and methods — In a previous randomized study, 140 patients were either treated with a supervised exercise program or with arthroscopic acromioplasty followed by a similar exercise program. The patients were followed up at 2 and 5 years after randomization. Self-reported pain was used as the primary outcome measure. Results — Both treatment groups had less pain at 2 and 5 years, and this was similar in both groups. Duration of symptoms, marital status (single), long periods of sick leave, and lack of professional education appeared to increase the risk of persistent pain despite the treatment. Patients with impingement with radiological acromioclavicular (AC) joint degeneration also had more pain. The patients in the exercise group who later wanted operative treatment and had it did not get better after the operation. Interpretation — The natural course probably plays a substantial role in the outcome. Based on our findings, it is difficult to recommend arthroscopic acromioplasty for any specific subgroup. Regarding operative treatment, however, a concomitant AC joint resection might be recommended if there are signs of AC joint degeneration. Even more challenging for the development of a treatment algorithm is the finding that patients who do not recover after nonoperative treatment should not be operated either. PMID:25809315

  9. Treatment patterns, treatment satisfaction, severity of disease problems, and quality of life in patients with psoriasis in three Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Ragnarson Tennvall, Gunnel; Hjortsberg, Catharina; Bjarnason, Anton; Gniadecki, Robert; Heikkilä, Hannele; Jemec, Gregor B E; Kragballe, Knud; Miller, Iben M; Svensson, Åke

    2013-07-01

    Biological drugs are expensive, but can reduce symptoms and increase quality of life for patients with psoriasis. The aim of this study was to examine quality of life, disease severity and treatment satisfaction in Danish, Finnish and Swedish patients with psoriasis. Based on 12 months' data from patient surveys and chart reviews, 3 treatment groups were identified: topical, systemic and/or biological <12 months, and biological for 12 months. Regression analyses were performed to investigate influence on treatment satisfaction, disease problems and quality of life. Patients treated with biological drugs for 12 months showed the highest treatment satisfaction and the lowest Dermatology Life Quality Index score. A number of patients with topical treatment reported low quality of life, severe or very severe disease problems, and low treatment satisfaction. Some patients with psoriasis may be under-treated and might benefit from a more aggressive treatment strategy. It is important, however, that resource utilization is optimized and patients are not treated with more advanced agents than necessary. PMID:23138500

  10. Comparison of treatment outcomes in severe personality disorder patients with or without substance use disorders: a 36-month prospective pragmatic follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Lana, Fernando; Sánchez-Gil, Carmen; Adroher, Núria D; Pérez, Víctor; Feixas, Guillem; Martí-Bonany, Josep; Torrens, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Background Concurrent personality disorder (PD) and substance use disorder (SUD) are common in clinical practice. However, SUD is the main criterion for study exclusion in most psychotherapeutic studies of PD. As a result, data on treatment outcomes in patients with concurrent PD/SUD are scarce. Methods The study sample consisted of 51 patients diagnosed with severe PD and admitted for psychotherapeutic treatment as a part of routine mental health care. All patients were diagnosed with PD according to the Structured Clinical Interview for PD. Patients were further assessed (DSM-IV diagnostic criteria) to check for the presence of concurrent SUD, with 28 patients diagnosed with both disorders (PD-SUD). These 28 cases were then compared to the 23 patients without SUD (PD-nSUD) in terms of psychiatric hospitalizations and psychiatric emergency room (ER) visits before and during the 6-month therapeutic intervention and every 6 months thereafter for a total of 36 months. Results The baseline clinical characteristics correspond to a sample of PD patients (78% met DSM-IV criteria for borderline PD) with poor general functioning and a high prevalence of suicide attempts and self-harm behaviors. Altogether, the five outcome variables – the proportion and the number of psychiatric inpatient admissions, the number of days hospitalized, and the proportion and the number of psychiatric ER visits – improved significantly during the treatment period, and this improvement was maintained throughout the follow-up period. Although PD-SUD patients had more psychiatric hospitalizations and ER visits than PD-nSUD patients during follow-up, the differences between these two groups remained stable over the study period indicating that the treatment was equally effective in both groups. Conclusion Specialized psychotherapy for severe PD can be effectively applied in patients with concurrent PD-SUD under usual practice conditions. These findings suggest that exclusion of patients with

  11. Meta analysis: underutilization and disparities of treatment among patients with hepatocellular carcinoma in the united states

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Debra; Yopp, Adam; Beg, Muhammad S; Gopal, Purva; Singal, Amit G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite wide availability of treatment options for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), several studies have suggested underutilization in clinical practice. Aims To quantify utilization rates for HCC treatment among patients with HCC in the United States and summarize patterns of association between utilization rates and patient socio-demographic characteristics. Methods We performed a systematic literature review using the Medline database from January 1989 through March 2013. Two investigators independently extracted data on patient populations, study methods, and results using standardized forms. Pooled treatment rates for any treatment and curative treatment, with 95% confidence intervals, were calculated. Pre-specified subgroup analysis was performed to identify patient-level correlates of treatment utilization. Results We identified 24 studies that met inclusion criteria. The pooled rates of any treatment and curative treatment were 52.8% (95%CI 52.2-53.4%) and 21.8% (95%CI 21.4-22.1%) respectively. Among patients diagnosed at an early stage, the pooled curative treatment rate was 59.0% (95%CI 58.1-59.9%). Elderly, non-Caucasians and patients of low socioeconomic status had lower treatment rates than their counterparts. Conclusions Rates of HCC treatment in the United States, including curative treatment rates among patients detected at an early stage, are disappointingly low. Future efforts should focus on identifying appropriate intervention targets to increase treatment rates and reduce socio-demographic disparities. PMID:23957569

  12. Relationships among satisfaction, treatment motivation, and expectations in orthodontic patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weihong; Wang, Shimei; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2016-01-01

    Background Few research projects have looked at patient satisfaction with treatment outcome and factors contributing to satisfaction. The aim of this study was to examine treatment motivation and expectation associated with treatment-outcome satisfaction in a group of adolescent nonextraction orthodontic patients. We hypothesized that there would be significant correlations among treatment-outcome satisfaction, motivation, and expectations. Subjects and methods A sample of 120 patients who received orthodontic treatment at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine completed two questionnaires. Before treatment, questionnaire 1 was given to patients to assess treatment motivation and expectations. When treatment had been completed, questionnaire 2, concerning treatment satisfaction, was assessed. Spearman’s rank correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the relationships among treatment satisfaction, expectations, and motivation. Results A total of 110 patients completed the two questionnaires. There was a tendency toward significant correlations between treatment motivation and overall satisfaction with treatment (β-coefficient −0.264, 95% confidence interval −0.456 to 2.314; P<0.001). However, correlations among treatment motivation and satisfaction with changes made and satisfaction with one’s appearance posttreatment were more fragmented. No relationship between treatment expectation and satisfaction was found (β-coefficient −0.126; 95% confidence interval −0.024 to 0.524; P>0.05). Conclusion Motivation was correlated with satisfaction with treatment outcome. Patients’ expectations had no correlation with treatment satisfaction. PMID:27110100

  13. Managing Osteoporosis Patients after Long-Term Bisphosphonate Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Robert A.; Fuleihan, Ghada El-Hajj; Bauer, Douglas C.; Camacho, Pauline M.; Clarke, Bart L.; Clines, Gregory A.; Compston, Juliet E.; Drake, Matthew T.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Favus, Murray J.; Greenspan, Susan L.; McKinney, Ross; Pignolo, Robert J.; Sellmeyer, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are the most commonly used medications for osteoporosis, but optimal duration of therapy is unknown. This ASBMR report provides guidance on BP therapy duration with a risk benefit perspective. Two trials provided evidence for long-term BP use. In the Fracture Intervention Trial Long-term Extension (FLEX), postmenopausal women receiving alendronate for 10 years had fewer clinical vertebral fractures than those switched to placebo after 5 years. In the HORIZON extension, women who received 6 annual infusions of zoledronic acid had fewer morphometric vertebral fractures compared with those switched to placebo after 3 years. Low hip T-score between −2 and −2.5 in FLEX and below −2.5 in HORIZON extension predicted a beneficial response to continued therapy. Hence, the Task Force suggests that after 5 years of oral BP or 3 years of intravenous BP, women should be reassessed. Women with previous major osteoporotic fracture, those who fracture on therapy, or others at high risk should generally continue therapy for up to 10 years (oral) or 6 years (intravenous), with periodic risk-benefit evaluation. Older women, those with a low hip T-score or high fracture risk score are considered high risk. The risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw and atypical femoral fracture increases with BP therapy duration, but such rare events are far outweighed by fracture risk reduction with BPs in high risk patients. For women not at high fracture risk after 3–5 years of BP treatment, a drug holiday of 2–3 years can be considered, with periodic reassessment. The algorithm provided for long term BP use is based on limited evidence in mostly Caucasian postmenopausal women and only for vertebral fracture reduction. It is probably applicable to men and patients with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis, with some adaptations. It is unlikely that future osteoporosis trials will provide data for formulating definitive recommendations. PMID:26350171

  14. The patient's duty to adhere to prescribed treatment: an ethical analysis.

    PubMed

    Resnik, David B

    2005-04-01

    This article examines the ethical basis for the patient's duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions. The article argues that patients have a moral duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions, once they have accepted treatment. Since patients still retain the right to refuse medical treatment, their duty to adhere to treatment prescriptions is a prima facie duty, which can be overridden by their other ethical duties. However, patients do not have the right to refuse to adhere to treatment prescriptions if their non-adherence poses a significant threat to other people. This paper also discusses the use of written agreements between physicians and patients as a strategy for promoting patient adherence. PMID:16025851

  15. [Surgical treatment of patients with cancer of the larynx with lesions of the anterior commissure].

    PubMed

    Bariliak, Iu R

    1990-01-01

    Eighty two patients with glottic tumors extending to the anterior commissure underwent surgical treatment: 11 patients for cordectomy in its classic form, 11 patients for fronto-lateral cordectomy, 59 patients for extended cordectomy, and 1 patient for hemilaryngectomy according to Otan. Analysis of the postoperative clinical state of the patients suggests that surgery for vocal cord carcinoma involving the anterior commissure should not necessarily include tracheostomy and laryngeal tamponade. PMID:2316118

  16. Dysfunctional Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders: Evaluating the Efficacy of a Tailored Treatment Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turk, Dennis C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Forty-eight dysfunctional patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were randomly assigned to treatments consisting of an intraoral appliance, stress management, and either nondirective supportive counseling or cognitive therapy. Results support tailored treatment of dysfunctional TMD. (KW)

  17. H.P. Acthar Gel (repository corticotropin injection) treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kutz, Christen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses can be complex in patients with concomitant diabetes. Corticosteroids and adrenocorticotropic hormones are known to cause alterations in glucose tolerance. Many patients have poor tolerability to therapy, necessitating alternative treatment options. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (H.P. Acthar Gel, repository corticotropin injection, Mallinckrodt ARD Inc., Hazelwood, MO, USA) is currently indicated for the treatment of MS relapses. Objectives: The objective of this study was to review patients’ experiences of Acthar Gel for the treatment of MS exacerbations in patients with MS and diabetes. Methods: A retrospective review of 13 patients’ experiences with treatment. Qualified healthcare providers completed a questionnaire following Acthar Gel treatment for MS relapse. Results: Previous corticosteroid treatment with either intravenous methylprednisolone or prednisone was reported by 84.6% of patients; eight patients had complications following administration of prior steroid treatment, seven of whom experienced elevated blood glucose levels. Acthar Gel was administered daily for a mean of 5.3 days, with 61.5% of patients reporting relapse resolution. Two patients experienced elevated blood glucose. Conclusion: The majority of patients experienced a timely resolution of their MS relapse with few hyperglycemic adverse events. Although more studies are necessary, these data suggest that Acthar Gel may be a well-tolerated and effective treatment option for patients with diabetes experiencing an MS relapse. PMID:27433309

  18. Systemic treatment of patients with metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis of colorectal origin

    PubMed Central

    van Oudheusden, T. R.; Razenberg, L. G.; van Gestel, Y. R.; Creemers, G. J.; Lemmens, V. E.; de Hingh, I. H.

    2015-01-01

    Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies has resulted in an enhanced survival in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. However, the result of this palliative treatment in patients with metachronous peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) remains unknown. The current population-based study aims to investigate the use and effect of palliative systemic treatment in patients with metachronous PC of colorectal origin. Data on metachronous PC were collected between 2010 and 2011 for all patients who were diagnosed with M0 colorectal cancer between 2003 and 2008 in the Dutch Eindhoven Cancer Registry. Patient demographics and detailed data on chemotherapeutic treatment were collected and compared. Ninety-two patients with metachronous PC received chemotherapy in a palliative setting compared to 94 patients without treatment. In 36 patients, Bevacizumab was added to the treatment (39%). Overall survival was 3.4, 13, and 20.3 months in the no treatment, systemic treatment and systemic treatment + Bevacizumab respectively (P < 0.001). Male gender was a positive predictor and right sided primary tumor location a negative predictor of receiving bevacizumab. Approximately 40% of patients with metachronous PC received bevacizumab in addition to chemotherapy. Treatment with systemic chemotherapy in combination with bevacizumab may increase survival in a patients with metachronous colorectal PC. PMID:26686250

  19. Adalimumab Treatment in Pediatric-Onset Crohn's Disease Patients after Infliximab Failure: A Single Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Won Jae; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in pediatric-onset Crohn's disease patients who had failed treatment with infliximab. Methods In this retrospective study, patients included were those who had been diagnosed with Crohn's disease before 18 years old, and had received treatment with adalimumab after infliximab failure. The efficacy of adalimumab treatment was investigated at 1 month and 1 year, and adverse events that had occurred during treatment with adalimumab were explored. Results Ten patients were included in this study. The median duration from diagnosis to adalimumab treatment was 5.5 years (range: 2.4-7.9 years). At 1 month after adalimumab initiation, 80% (8/10) of patients showed clinical response, and 40% (4/10) achieved clinical remission. At 1 year, 71% (5/7) of patients showed clinical response, and 43% (3/7) were under clinical remission. Among the total included patients, 5 patients (50%) showed clinical response at 1 year. Primary non-response to adalimumab was observed in 2 patients (20%), and secondary failure to adalimumab was observed in 3 patients (30%) during 1 year treatment with adalimumab. No serious adverse event had occurred during adalimumab treatment. Conclusion Adalimumab was effective for 1 year without serious adverse events in half of pediatric-onset Crohn's disease patients who had failed treatment with infliximab. PMID:27437188

  20. Prevalence of otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses in the pediatric emergency room

    PubMed Central

    Signorelli, Luiz Gabriel; Mendes, Elaine de Abreu

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Fever and pain, which are very common in ear, nose, and throat pathologies, are among the most frequent complaints recorded during emergency room pediatric patient treatment. Most of time, the pediatricians are called on to evaluate otorhinolaryngology disorders that requires specialist assessment. Aim: To determine the prevalence of otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses in a pediatric population in a reference hospital in the city of Itatiba, São Paulo. Methods: We evaluated 2,054 pediatric patients (age range, 0–12 years, 11 months) in this descriptive, transversal observational (survey) study. Data collection was performed by a single observer during 103 night shifts (07:00 p.m. to 07:00 a.m.) between January and December 2011, and included documentation of the main diagnosis, and patient age and sex. The ethics committee and research institution approved study. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on diagnosis: Group A otorhinolaryngology disease and Group B included diagnoses not contained in Group A. Results: Of the total enrolled patients, 52.2% corresponded to Group A and 47.8% to Group B; 51.9% were male and 48.1% were female. The average age was 4.5 years (Group A, 3.93 years; Group B, 5.03 years). We compared the prevalence of the diagnostic hypotheses of the 2 groups. Conclusion: A large number of patients sought treatment at pediatric emergency rooms for otorhinolaryngologic diagnoses. PMID:25991987

  1. Geriatric consultation can aid in complex treatment decisions for elderly cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Schiphorst, A H W; Ten Bokkel Huinink, D; Breumelhof, R; Burgmans, J P J; Pronk, A; Hamaker, M E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment decisions for elderly cancer patients can be challenging. A geriatric assessment may identify unknown medical conditions, give insight on patients' ability to tolerate treatment and guide treatment decisions. Our aim was to study the value of a geriatric consultation in oncological decision-making. Data on cancer patients referred for geriatric consultation for clinical optimisation or due to uncertainty regarding their optimal treatment strategy were prospectively analysed. Outcome of geriatric evaluations, non-oncological interventions and suggested adaptations of oncological treatment proposals were evaluated. Seventy-two patients were referred for consultation, over half of which in a curative treatment setting. Prevalence of geriatric syndromes was 93%, previously undiagnosed conditions were identified in 49% of patients and non-oncological interventions were initiated in 56%. Time was spent discussing patients' priorities (53% of consultations), expectations on treatment (50%) and advance care planning (14%). For 82% of patients, suggestions were made regarding the optimal treatment decision: a more intensive treatment was recommended in 39%, a less intensive therapy for 42% and in 19% only supportive care was suggested. The results demonstrate that a geriatric consultation can aid in complex treatment decisions and may allow for a reduction in over- and undertreatment of elderly cancer patients. PMID:26211484

  2. Multivariable Model for Time to First Treatment in Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wierda, William G.; O'Brien, Susan; Wang, Xuemei; Faderl, Stefan; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Do, Kim-Anh; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Thomas, Deborah; Koller, Charles A.; Burger, Jan A.; Lerner, Susan; Schlette, Ellen; Abruzzo, Lynne; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Keating, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The clinical course for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is diverse; some patients have indolent disease, never needing treatment, whereas others have aggressive disease requiring early treatment. We continue to use criteria for active disease to initiate therapy. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors independently associated with time to first treatment for patients with CLL. Patients and Methods Traditional laboratory, clinical prognostic, and newer prognostic factors such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), IGHV mutation status, and ZAP-70 expression evaluated at first patient visit to MD Anderson Cancer Center were correlated by multivariable analysis with time to first treatment. This multivariable model was used to develop a nomogram—a weighted tool to calculate 2- and 4-year probability of treatment and estimate median time to first treatment. Results There were 930 previously untreated patients who had traditional and new prognostic factors evaluated; they did not have active CLL requiring initiation of treatment within 3 months of first visit and were observed for time to first treatment. The following were independently associated with shorter time to first treatment: three involved lymph node sites, increased size of cervical lymph nodes, presence of 17p deletion or 11q deletion by FISH, increased serum lactate dehydrogenase, and unmutated IGHV mutation status. Conclusion We developed a multivariable model that incorporates traditional and newer prognostic factors to identify patients at high risk for progression to treatment. This model may be useful to identify patients for early interventional trials. PMID:21969505

  3. Multidisciplinary teamwork in the treatment and rehabilitation of the head and neck cancer patient.

    PubMed

    King, G E; Lemon, J C; Martin, J W

    1992-06-01

    The advantages of multidisciplinary treatment planning of head and neck cancer patients is described. Planning rehabilitation concurrently with curing the malignancy results in the most effective application of treatment modalities coordinated with rehabilitative care. Concentrated multidisciplinary treatment reduces post treatment morbidity by shortening recovery and rehabilitation time. PMID:1631776

  4. Long-term survival of patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis according to treatment outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Nakwon; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Yim, Jae-Joon

    2016-07-01

    Survival times of 219 patients diagnosed with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were calculated and treatment outcomes compared. Mean survival of 20 patients who failed to be cured was 109.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 87.4-132.1), shorter than that of 150 patients who were cured (140.4 months; 95% CI, 136.1-144.7; P < .01) and that of 28 patients classified as treatment completed (138.5 months; 95% CI, 131.0-146.1; P = .02). The results demonstrate that patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis with poor treatment outcomes live 9 years, on average. PMID:26922891

  5. Personal Factors Determining Patient Satisfaction with All-Ceramic Crown Treatment for Single Anterior Teeth.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yun; Zhan, DeSong

    2016-01-01

    The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire's (EPQ) N value (neuroticism) was used to evaluate informati