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Sample records for patients organ transplantation

  1. Ridge augmentation in an organ transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Dalla Torre, D; Burtscher, D

    2016-05-01

    With the continuing progress in medicine, the number of successful organ transplantations has continued to increase, a fact that also concerns dentists and implantologists. Implantology after organ transplantation remains controversial due to the patient's immunocompromised situation and the corresponding risk of infection. Only a few studies on this topic have been reported, with all of them showing the dental implant success rates in transplant patients to be similar to those in healthy subjects. However, immunosuppression has been identified as a contraindication to bone augmentation. Consequently, there is still a lack of knowledge regarding pre-implantology bone grafting procedures. The following case report describes the use of ridge augmentation and extended bilateral sinus lift procedures in a liver transplant patient. The patient was treated with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis in the upper jaw and was followed up for a total of 28 months after implant insertion. According to the findings presented, pre-implantology augmentation procedures may be performed successfully in immunosuppressed organ transplant patients. Stable peri-implant conditions were shown over a period of more than 2 years. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed to define a safe treatment protocol for these high-risk patients. PMID:26711250

  2. Cutaneous melanoma in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Russo, I; Piaserico, S; Belloni-Fortina, A; Alaibac, M

    2014-08-01

    Solid organ transplant patients are at greatly increased risk of developing a wide variety of skin cancers, particularly epithelial skin cancers. On the other hand, it is well known that an intact immune system limits the development of benign melanocytic lesions. The eruptive nevi phenomenon, which we can observe in solid organ transplant recipients, is indicative of the relationship between melanocyte proliferation and immune system. Regression of melanocytic nevi after restoration of complete immune responsiveness is a further clinical example the role of immunosurveillance on melanocyte proliferation. However, melanoma incidence in organ transplant recipients appears only 2-3 folds higher than in general population. To this regard, organ transplant recipients who develop de novo melanomas thicker than 2mm seem to have a significantly worse outcome with a greatly increased risk of dying of metastatic melanoma, whereas those who develop a ≤2 mm thickness melanoma seem to have a prognosis similar to that of the general population. Furthermore, there is no evidence supporting an increased risk of melanoma recurrences after transplant in patients with a history of low-risk melanoma. Melanoma is also one of the most frequent and lethal donor-derived malignancies suggesting that a history of invasive melanoma should be considered an absolute contraindication to donation. The aim of this review is to investigate the relationship between immunosuppression and melanoma and to discuss its clinical implications for the management of transplant-associated melanoma. PMID:25068225

  3. Organ Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... of hospital-associated infections for more information. Fungal infections can happen any time after your surgery. Fungal infections can happen ... Neofytos D, Fishman JA, Horn D, et al. Epidemiology and outcome of invasive ... in solid organ transplant recipients. Transplant Infectious Disease ...

  4. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... have to wait a long time for an organ transplant. Doctors must match donors to recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take ...

  5. Organ Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... donors to recipients to reduce the risk of transplant rejection. Rejection happens when your immune system attacks the new organ. If you have a transplant, you must take drugs the rest of your ...

  6. [Nosocomial infection in patients receiving a solid organ transplant or haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Moreno Camacho, Asunción; Ruiz Camps, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common infections in solid organ transplant recipients. These infections occur mainly in the first month after transplantation and are hospital-acquired. Nosocomial infections cause significant morbidity and are the most common cause of mortality in this early period of transplantation. These infections are caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, mainly Gram-negative enterobacteria, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, enterococci, and staphylococci. The patients at risk of developing nosocomial bacterial infections are those previously colonized with MDR bacteria while on the transplant waiting list. Intravascular catheters, the urinary tract, the lungs, and surgical wounds are the most frequent sources of infection. Preventive measures are the same as those applied in non-immunocompromised, hospitalized patients except in patients at high risk for developing fungal infection. These patients need antifungal therapy during their hospitalization, and for preventing some bacterial infections in the early transplant period, patients need vaccinations on the waiting list according to the current recommendations. Although morbidity and mortality related to infectious diseases have decreased during the last few years in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, they are still one of the most important complications in this population. Furthermore, as occurs in the general population, the incidence of nosocomial infections has increased during the different phases of transplantation. It is difficult to establish general preventive measures in these patients, as there are many risk factors conditioning these infections. Firstly, they undergo multiple antibiotic treatments and interventions; secondly, there is a wide variability in the degree of neutropenia and immunosuppression among patients, and finally they combine hospital and home stay during the transplant process. However, some simple measures could be

  7. Utility of monitoring mycophenolic acid in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Oremus, Mark; Zeidler, Johannes; Ensom, Mary H H; Matsuda-Abedini, Mina; Balion, Cynthia; Booker, Lynda; Archer, Carolyn; Raina, Parminder

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate whether monitoring concentrations of mycophenolic acid (MPA) in the serum or plasma of persons who receive a solid organ transplant will result in a lower incidence of transplant rejections and adverse events versus no monitoring of MPA. To investigate whether the incidence of rejection or adverse events differs according to MPA dose or frequency, type of MPA, the form of MPA monitored, the method of MPA monitoring, or sample characteristics. To assess whether monitoring is cost-effective versus no monitoring. DATA SOURCES The following databases were searched from their dates of inception (in brackets) until October 2007: MEDLINE (1966); BIOSIS Previews (1976); EMBASE (1980); Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (1995); and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (1995). REVIEW METHODS Studies identified from the data sources went through two levels of screening (i.e., title and abstract, full text) and the ones that passed were abstracted. Criteria for abstraction included publication in the English language, study design (i.e., randomized controlled trial [RCT], observational study with comparison group, case series), and patient receipt of allograft solid organ transplant. Additionally, any form of MPA had to be measured at least once in the plasma or serum using any method of measurement (e.g., AUC0-12, C0). Furthermore, these measures had to be linked to a health outcome (e.g., transplant rejection). Certain biomarkers (e.g., serum creatinine, glomular filtration rate) and all adverse events were also considered health outcomes. RESULTS The published evidence on MPA monitoring is inconclusive. Direct, head-to-head comparison of monitoring versus no monitoring is limited to one RCT in adult, kidney transplant patients. Inferences about monitoring can be made from some observational studies, although the evidence is equivocal for MPA dose and dose frequency, nonexistent for type of MPA, inconclusive for form of MPA monitored

  8. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors. PMID:25894125

  9. Immunosenescence and organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Heinbokel, Timm; Elkhal, Abdallah; Liu, Guangxiang; Edtinger, Karoline; Tullius, Stefan G.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing numbers of elderly transplant recipients and a growing demand for organs from older donors impose pressing challenges on transplantation medicine. Continuous and complex modifications of the immune system in parallel to aging have a major impact on transplant outcome and organ quality. Both, altered alloimmune responses and increased immunogenicity of organs present risk factors for inferior patient and graft survival. Moreover, a growing body of knowledge on age-dependent modifications of allorecognition and alloimmune responses may require age-adapted immunosuppression and organ allocation. Here, we summarize relevant aspects of immunosenescence and their possible clinical impact on organ transplantation. PMID:23639337

  10. Vaccination strategies in patients with solid organ transplant: evidences and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients need emphases on immunization that result in certainly decrease the risk of vaccine preventable diseases. Organ transplant candidate should complete the recommended full vaccination schedule as early as possible during the courses of underlying disease because the patients with end stage liver or renal disease have reduced immune response to vaccine. Furthermore, live attenuated vaccines are generally contraindicated after transplantation. This review summarizes current information and the evidences regarding the efficacy and safety of immunization in adult solid organ transplant candidates and recipients. PMID:27489802

  11. Outcomes of Cardiac Surgery in Patients With Previous Solid Organ Transplantation (Kidney, Liver, and Pancreas).

    PubMed

    Vargo, Patrick R; Schiltz, Nicholas K; Johnston, Douglas R; Smedira, Nicholas G; Moazami, Nader; Blackstone, Eugene H; Soltesz, Edward G

    2015-12-15

    A growing number of solid organ transplant survivors require surgery for cardiac disease. We examined the effect of having a previous transplant on outcomes after cardiac surgery in these patients from a population-based perspective. Of 1,709,735 patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, valve, or thoracic aorta surgery from 2004 to 2008 in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 3,535 patients (0.21%) had a previous organ transplant (2,712 kidney, 738 liver, 300 pancreas). Multivariate logistic regression analysis and propensity score matching were used to determine the effect of a previous solid organ transplant on outcomes. In-hospital mortality rate was 7% for patients who underwent transplantation versus 4% for patients who did not undergo transplantation (odds ratio [OR] 1.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.16 to 2.38). Patients who underwent transplantation were at an increased risk for acute renal failure (OR 1.62, CI 1.36 to 1.94) and blood transfusions (OR 1.63, CI 1.36 to 1.95). Median length of stay was longer (10 vs 9 days), with greater median total charges ($111,362 vs $102,221; both p <0.001). Occurrence of stroke, gastrointestinal complication, infection, and pneumonia was similar between groups. In conclusion, previous solid organ transplantation is an incremental risk factor for postoperative mortality after cardiac surgery. Renal protective strategies and bleeding control should be stressed to mitigate complications. PMID:26520471

  12. Attitude toward xenotransplantation of patients prior and after human organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stadlbauer, V; Stiegler, P; Müller, S; Schweiger, M; Sereingg, M; Tscheliessnigg, K H; Freidl, W

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is a potential strategy to overcome the shortage of human donor organs. As this technique has a major medical and psychological impact on patients and their family and friends, the attitude of patients currently waiting for organ transplantation is important. Therefore, we conducted a survey on the attitude toward xenotransplantation of patients on the waiting list and already transplanted patients. Patients received detailed information before being asked to fill in the questionnaire. We found that 65% would accept xenotransplantation, irrespective of gender, education level or if the patients were on the waiting list or already transplanted. The most common concern was transmission of diseases or genetic material, followed by psychological concerns and ethical issues. More patients had a positive attitude toward accepting cell or tissue transplantation when compared to whole organs. Pig pancreas islet cell transplantation is generally well accepted, patients with diabetes mellitus show even higher acceptance rates than patients without diabetes. In conclusion, xenotransplantation seems to be well accepted in patients who are potential future candidates for organ transplantation. Informing patients about the current status of research tended to decrease acceptance rates slightly. PMID:20560990

  13. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  14. Progress in abdominal organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kosieradzki, Maciej; Lisik, Wojciech; Rowiński, Wojciech; Małkowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Summary The excellent results of vascularized organ transplantation have resulted in an increasing number of end-stage organ failure patients seeking such treatment. The results of organ transplantation depend on a number of factors – the quality of the donor (and an organ), living vs. deceased donation, magnitude of ischemic injury (and its prevention), and recipient-dependent factors. Ischemia/reperfusion injury in organ transplantation is a multifactorial process, which may lead to delayed graft function. In addition, surgical and preservation techniques, type of immunosuppressive regimens, complications after transplantation and post-transplant management may also have a significant impact on short- and long-term results of transplantation. In this paper we describe advances in transplantation in recent years, with particular emphasis on kidney, liver, intestines, whole pancreas and pancreatic islets. PMID:22129915

  15. [Dental care of patients with organ transplants or prosthetic joints--a survey of specialty hospitals].

    PubMed

    Nusime, Anne; Heide, Clarissa V D; Hornecker, Else; Mausberg, Rainer F; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to collect information from specialized hospitals regarding dental care before and after organ transplantation or replacement of prosthetic joints. 50 transplantation centres and 100 orthopaedic hospitals in Germany were chosen. A questionnaire was used to elucidate the following aspects: Is a dental examination carried out preoperatively? When the patient is discharged, is he or she recommended to have antibiotic prophylaxis before dental treatment? If so, which antibiotic is recommended? The response rate was 56% (n = 28) for transplantation centres. 89% arranged a dental examination before the transplantation. 83% of those questioned recommend antibiotic prophylaxis before dental treatment: Amoxicillin was mentioned most frequently (36%). The response rate of the orthopaedic hospitals was 31% (n = 31). 3% of those questioned arranged a dental examination before insertion of an endoprothesis. 55% recommend antibiotic prophylaxis when dental treatment is to be carried out following the insertion of the endoprosthesis. Cephalosporine was most frequently mentioned (33%). It was not possible to identify a uniform recommendation regarding dental care before and after organ transplantation or replacement of prosthetic joints either for patients with an organ transplant or those having a prosthetic joint. PMID:21656390

  16. 42 CFR 413.203 - Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.203 Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries... for all organs is reduced by the costs associated with procuring organs sent to foreign...

  17. 42 CFR 413.203 - Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.203 Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries... for all organs is reduced by the costs associated with procuring organs sent to foreign...

  18. Treatment of HEV Infection in Patients with a Solid-Organ Transplant and Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamar, Nassim; Lhomme, Sébastien; Abravanel, Florence; Marion, Olivier; Peron, Jean-Marie; Alric, Laurent; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause hepatic and extra-hepatic manifestations. Treatment of HEV infection has been thoroughly studied in solid-organ-transplant patients who have developed a chronic HEV infection. In this review, we report on our current knowledge regarding treatment of HEV infection. PMID:27537905

  19. Treatment of HEV Infection in Patients with a Solid-Organ Transplant and Chronic Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Lhomme, Sébastien; Abravanel, Florence; Marion, Olivier; Peron, Jean-Marie; Alric, Laurent; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause hepatic and extra-hepatic manifestations. Treatment of HEV infection has been thoroughly studied in solid-organ-transplant patients who have developed a chronic HEV infection. In this review, we report on our current knowledge regarding treatment of HEV infection. PMID:27537905

  20. Psychiatric Aspects of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, G.; Desousa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical transplantation of human organs from deceased as well as living donors to sick and dying patients began after the Second World War. Over the past 50 years the transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells has become a worldwide practice which has extended, and greatly enhanced the quality of hundreds of thousands of lives. The field of transplantation medicine provides an important chance for liaison between psychiatric professionals and other transplant physicians and surgeons. The discrepancy between the ever-increasing demand for organs but the decreasing supply makes it important to evaluate and prioritize individuals who are in dire need of the organ. However, this also gives rise to certain ethical questions. The following paper discusses various psychiatric aspects of organ transplantation in general. PMID:25013589

  1. Organ transplantation in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Paris, Wayne; Nour, Bakr

    2010-09-01

    Concern has increasingly been expressed about the growing number of reports of medical personnel participating in the transplantation of human organs or tissues taken from the bodies of executed prisoners, handicapped patients, or poor persons who have agreed to part with their organs for commercial purposes. Such behavior has been universally considered as ethically and morally reprehensible, yet in some parts of the world the practice continues to flourish. The concept of justice demands that every person have an equal right to life, and to protect this right, society has an obligation to ensure that every person has equal access to medical care. Regrettably, the Egyptian system does not legally recognize brain death and continues to allow the buying and selling of organs. For more than 30 years in Egypt, the ability to pay has determined who receives an organ and economic need has determined who will be the donor. As transplant professionals, it is important that we advocate on behalf of all patients, potential recipients, and donors and for those who are left out and not likely to receive a donor organ in an economically based system. Current issues associated with this debate are reviewed and recommendations about how to address them in Egypt are discussed. PMID:20929113

  2. Stress and coping in caregivers of patients awaiting solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goetzinger, Amy M; Blumenthal, James A; O'Hayer, C Virginia; Babyak, Michael A; Hoffman, Benson M; Ong, Lephuong; Davis, R Duane; Smith, Stephen R; Rogers, Joseph G; Milano, Carmelo A; Smith, Alastair D; Kuo, Paul C; Palmer, Scott M

    2012-01-01

    Caregivers for patients undergoing solid organ transplantation play an essential role in the process of transplantation. However, little is known about stress and coping among these caregivers. Six hundred and twenty-one primary caregivers of potential candidates for lung (n = 317), liver (n = 147), heart (n = 115), and/or kidney (n = 42) transplantation completed a psychometric test battery at the time of the candidate's initial pre-transplant psychosocial evaluation. Caregivers were generally well adjusted, with only 17% exhibiting clinical symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory-II score >13) and 13% reporting clinical levels of anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory score >48). Greater caregiver burden and negative coping styles were associated with higher levels of depression. Greater objective burden and avoidant coping were associated with higher levels of anxiety. Caregivers evidenced a high degree of socially desirable (i.e., defensive) responding, which may reflect a deliberate effort to minimize fears or worries so as to not jeopardize patients' listing status. PMID:21395692

  3. Endoscopic and histological features of mycophenolate mofetil colitis in patients after solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Calmet, Fernando H.; Yarur, Andres J.; Pukazhendhi, Geetha; Ahmad, Jawad; Bhamidimarri, Kalyan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) is an immunosuppressive agent commonly used after organ transplantation. Gastrointestinal side effects occur in approximately 45% of patients. The spectrum of histologic features associated with MMF colitis has been well described, but data on the endoscopic features is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe the endoscopic features of MMF colitis in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTRs) as well as the frequency of histologic features and identify associated risk factors. Methods A retrospective review of all SOTRs taking MMF and who underwent colonoscopy between 2000 and 2010 was performed. 36 cases of MMF colitis were identified and 361 patients served as controls. Descriptive statistics and data analysis looking for associated risk factors were performed. Results Among SOTRs taking MMF who underwent colonoscopy, MMF colitis was diagnosed in 9%. Endoscopic findings ranged from erythema (33%) to erosions/ulcers (19%). 47% of patients had a normal colonoscopy and everyone had rectal sparing. Histological findings included acute colitis-like findings (50%), inflammatory bowel disease-like characteristics (36%), ischemia-like findings (5.6%), and graft-versus-host disease-like features (8.3%). Diarrhea occurred in 83%. Kidney transplantation was associated with a higher risk of MMF colitis (OR 5.8 [2.86-11.86], P<0.0001) whereas liver transplantation was associated with a lower risk (OR 0.06 [0.03-0.16], P<0.0001). Conclusion MMF colitis is fairly prevalent in SOTRs taking MMF who undergo colonoscopy. Diarrhea is the most common reason for colonoscopy referral (83%) and up to 47% of patients have normal colonoscopy, suggesting the need for routine biopsies to help confirm the diagnosis. PMID:26126799

  4. Early liver transplantation for patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis: public views and the effects on organ donation.

    PubMed

    Stroh, G; Rosell, T; Dong, F; Forster, J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis may not survive to fulfill the standard 6 months of abstinence and counseling prior to transplantation. A prospective study demonstrated that early liver transplantation in such patients improved 2 year survival from 23% to 71% and only 3 of 26 patients returned to drinking after 1140 days; graft function was unaffected. Nonetheless, this treatment protocol may raise public concerns and affect organ donation rates. A total of 503 participants took a survey made available at an online crowdsourcing marketplace. The survey measured attitudes on liver transplantation generally and early transplantation for this patient population, in addition to measuring responses to nine vignettes describing fictional candidates. The majority of respondents (81.5%, n = 410) was at least neutral toward early transplantation for these patients; only a minority (26.3%) indicated that transplantation in any vignette would make them hesitant to donate their organs. Middle-aged patients with good social support and financial stability were viewed most favorably (p < 0.001). Age was considered the most important selection factor and financial stability the least important factor (each p < 0.001). Results indicate early transplantation for carefully selected patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis may not be as controversial to the public as previously thought. PMID:25707427

  5. Bioethics of organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well--to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation--rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate. PMID:24478386

  6. Attitude of patients with HIV infection towards organ transplant between HIV patients. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Taha, Huda; Newby, Katie; Das, Archik; Das, Satyajit

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the HIV patients' attitudes towards the practice of organ transplant between HIV patients using a cross-sectional survey design. In total, 206 patients participated with a mean age of 42 (±8.8) years. The majority (70%) were black African and women (54%), and 83% described themselves as heterosexual. Most participants (n = 171, 83%) were on treatment, and 159 (93%) had viral load less than 40 copies/ml. Mean duration of illness and mean duration of treatment were 77 (±42.7) and 68 (±41) months, respectively. Of all participants, 128 (62%) reported that they would consider donating either any organ or a specific organ/s to an HIV patient, 33 (16%) would not consider it and 45 (22%) were unsure about donating their organs. Furthermore, 113 (55%) participants would consider receiving an organ from an HIV patient, 37 (18%) would not consider it, and 56 (27%) were unsure. Ninety-eight participants (42%) reported that they would consider both donating and receiving an organ. Multinomial logistic regression analysis found that significantly more Black African than Caucasian participants were unsure about organ donation (p = 0.011, OR = 3.887). Participants with longer duration of infection were significantly less likely to consider receiving an organ from an HIV patient (p = 0.036, OR = 1.297). Overall, the study findings indicated that the majority of participants were in favour of organ transplant between HIV patients. Use of HIV-infected donors could potentially reduce current organ waiting list among HIV patients. PMID:25614524

  7. Frequency of musculoskeletal complications among the patients receiving solid organ transplantation in a tertiary health-care center.

    PubMed

    Movassaghi, Shafieh; Nasiri Toosi, Mohsen; Bakhshandeh, Alireza; Niksolat, Fatemeh; Khazaeipour, Zahra; Tajik, Ali

    2012-08-01

    Solid organ transplantation is an important lifesaving procedure mainly performed in patients with end-stage organ failure such as liver cirrhosis, congestive heart failure, and end-stage renal disease. While these complications are among the most preventable adverse effects of solid organ transplantation, these are generally neglected by physicians. Accordingly, this study was performed to evaluate the frequency of musculoskeletal complications among the patients receiving solid organ transplantation in a tertiary health-care center in a developing country. This cohort study was performed from 2000 to 2009, among fifty patients receiving organ transplantation (liver, heart, and lung) attending to a training hospital in Tehran, Iran. The main variables were musculoskeletal complaints and findings that were measured according to patients' self-report and clinical examination. The mean age of the patients was 40.2 ± 10.9 years ranging from 5 to 58 years. Twenty out of 50 patients (40%) had musculoskeletal complaints that the most common complaint was the arthralgia. Also, the mechanical arthritis was the most common clinical finding in clinical examination (24%). Low serum level of vitamin D (74.4%) and high serum alkaline phosphatase level (27.9%) were the most common biochemical abnormalities in understudy population. Finally, it may be concluded that nearly forty percent of patients receiving solid organ transplantation may develop musculoskeletal findings and/or complaints. These complications may be found and treated with regular examinations to reduce the burden of disease. PMID:21644040

  8. Bioethics of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well—to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation—rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate. PMID:24478386

  9. Organ transplantation and replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Cerilli, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 49 chapters. Some of the titles are: Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Aspects of the HLA System; The Normal Immune Response; Significance of the ABO Antigen System; The Role of Dialysis in the Management of End-Stage Renal Disease; Access for Dialysis; Patient Selection for Renal Transplantation; The Living Donor in Kidney Transplantation; and Kidney Preservation by Cold Storage.

  10. Approach to the Solid Organ Transplant Patient with Suspected Fungal Infection.

    PubMed

    Anesi, Judith A; Baddley, John W

    2016-03-01

    In solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients, invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Detection of IFIs can be difficult because the signs and symptoms are similar to those of viral or bacterial infections, and diagnostic techniques have limited sensitivity and specificity. Clinicians must rely on knowledge of the patient's risk factors for fungal infection to make a diagnosis. The authors describe their approach to the SOT recipient with suspected fungal infection. The epidemiology of IFIs in the SOT population is reviewed, and a syndromic approach to suspected IFI in SOT recipients is described. PMID:26739603

  11. Donor-derived tuberculosis after solid organ transplantation in two patients and a staff member.

    PubMed

    Bucher, J N; Schoenberg, M B; Freytag, I; Lange, U; Hofmann-Thiel, S; Guba, M O; Werner, J; Eder, A; Schelling, G; Stangl, M

    2016-06-01

    Because of global mobility and migration resulting in a growing diversity of the donor pool, the risk for donor-derived tuberculosis in solid organ transplant recipients becomes more and more relevant, even in countries with a low overall tuberculosis incidence. Here, we describe a case series of donor-derived tuberculosis in 2 of 3 solid organ transplant recipients and one medical staff member in Germany resulting in the death of one recipient. This case series highlights the relevance of this topic to clinicians. It advocates for a better communication between organ procurement organizations and transplant centers regarding donor information and transplant recipient outcome. Furthermore, it underpins the necessity for a standardized critical incident reporting system in the german transplant system to improve short- and long-term recipient's safety, health and survival. PMID:26498284

  12. History of deceased organ donation, transplantation, and organ procurement organizations.

    PubMed

    Howard, Richard J; Cornell, Danielle L; Cochran, Larry

    2012-03-01

    The historical development of deceased organ donation, transplantation, and organ procurement organizations is reviewed. The concept of transplantation, taking parts from one animal or person and putting them into another animal or person, is ancient. The development of organ transplantation brought on the need for a source of organs. Although many early kidney transplants used kidneys from living donors, these donors could not satisfy the ever-growing need for organs, and extrarenal organs were recovered only from deceased donors. This need for organs to satisfy the great demand led to specialized organizations to identify deceased donors, manage them until recovery occurred, and to notify transplant centers that organs were available for their patients. The functions of these organ procurement organizations expanded to include other required functions such as education, accounting, and compliance with state and federal requirements. Because of the shortage of organs relative to the demand, lack of a unified organ allocation system, the perception that organs are a national resource and should be governed by national regulations, and to improve results of organ procurement organizations and transplant centers, the federal government has regulated virtually all phases of organ procurement and transplantation. PMID:22489438

  13. [Organ transplantation and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Bonnefoy, F; Lang, P; Grimbert, P

    2011-04-01

    Pretransplant blood transfusion remains a controversial subject and its history can summarize the last 40 years of transplantation. Until 1971, transfusions were widely used in patients awaiting transplantation, especially due to the anemia induced by the chronic renal dysfunction. Then, a noxious effect of preformed anti-HLA antibodies on renal grafts survival was reported and pretransplant transfusions were stopped. Between 1972 and 1977, improvement of renal graft survival in patients who received pretransplant transfusions was noted. Therefore, from 1978 on, a systematic policy of pretransplant transfusions was adopted by almost all centres of transplantation. During the eighties, it was again abandoned for several reasons: absence of graft survival improvement in patients treated by cyclosporine, HLA immunization leading to an increased incidence of acute graft rejection, risk of viral diseases transmission and human recombinant erythropoietin development. The lack of improvement in graft survival for ten years has been leading the transplant community to look for antigen-specific immunosuppressive strategies to achieve transplantation tolerance. Donor-specific transfusion may have clinical benefits, as long-term grafts survival improvement, through modulation of the recipient's cellular immune system and has been recently reconsidered, especially before living donor transplantation. The immunological mechanisms inducing a tolerance-gaining effect of transfusions are still misunderstood, but the recent discovery of immunomodulatory effects of the apoptotic cells present in cellular products could enlighten our comprehension of pretransplant transfusions benefits and could help to develop specific tolerance induction strategies in solid organ transplantation. PMID:21398160

  14. Japanese organ transplant law: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Kita, Y; Aranami, Y; Aranami, Y; Nomura, Y; Johnson, K; Wakabayashi, T; Fukunishi, I

    2000-06-01

    Although organ transplantation following brain death has progressed in the West, it has lagged far behind in Japan, following the first such case in 1968. As effective immunosuppressants made transplantation a better option, Japanese patients increasingly sought treatment overseas. Japanese physician groups studied issues related to transplantation but did not succeed in making brain-dead donor transplants available to patients, and the matter was referred to the government. However, transplant medicine was still marked by controversy, and as political pressure was applied the controversy deepened, splintering public opinion. At the same time, transplant groups continued working to establish structures to allow transplantation to proceed. Public awareness and knowledge of brain death grew, and acceptance widened. Eventually, legislation was passed in June 1997 that allowed organ donations from some brain-dead donors. The law is restrictive, and such organ transplants in Japan are still limited. PMID:10933763

  15. Seizure Treatment in Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Solid organ transplantation is frequently complicated by a spectrum of seizure types, including single partial-onset or generalized tonic-clonic seizures, acute repetitive seizures or status epilepticus, and sometimes the evolution of symptomatic epilepsy. There is currently no specific evidence involving the transplant patient population to guide the selection, administration, or duration of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, so familiarity with clinical AED pharmacology and application of sound judgment are necessary for successful patient outcomes. An initial detailed search for symptomatic seizure etiologies, including metabolic, infectious, cerebrovascular, and calcineurin inhibitor treatment-related neuro-toxic complications such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), is imperative, as underlying central nervous system disorders may impose additional serious risks to cerebral or general health if not promptly detected and appropriately treated. The mainstay for post-transplant seizure management is AED therapy directed toward the suspected seizure type. Unfavorable drug interactions could place the transplanted organ at risk, so choosing an AED with limited interaction potential is also crucial. When the transplanted organ is dysfunctional or vulnerable to rejection, AEDs without substantial hepatic metabolism are favored in post-liver transplant patients, whereas after renal transplantation, AEDs with predominantly renal elimination may require dosage adjustment to prevent adverse effects. Levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and lacosamide are drugs of choice for treatment of partial-onset seizures in post-transplant patients given their efficacy spectrum, generally excellent tolerability, and lack of drug interaction potential. Levetiracetam is the drug of choice for primary generalized seizures in post-transplant patients. When intravenous drugs are necessary for acute seizure management, benzodiazepines and

  16. [Specific infections in organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Cornberg, M; Schlevogt, B; Rademacher, J; Schwarz, A; Sandherr, M; Maschmeyer, G

    2016-01-01

    This article is concerned with the important topic of infections associated with organ transplantation and includes a discussion on four subtopics. The first section describes the current options in the prevention and therapy of viral hepatitis in association with liver transplantation. Infections with hepatitis B, C, D (delta) and E are discussed with special emphasis on the interferon-free treatment of hepatitis C with the new antiviral drugs.The second section deals with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) infections following lung transplantation (LuTx), which is one of the most frequently detected pathogens in the airway after LuTx. Patients with cystic fibrosis are particularly affected. This is important because studies have shown a clear correlation between chronic PA infections after LuTx and development of chronic transplant failure. Even if the data are still sparse, recommendations on prevention and therapeutic strategies are given. The theme of the third section is the high importance of viral infections after kidney transplantation. In addition to acquired infections, the transplanted organ as well as the recipient can be the source of the infection. The better the transplanted organ is tolerated under moderate immunosuppression, the less common and severe virus infections are. The focus of this section is on three common pathogens: cytomegalovirus, polyomavirus BK and hepatitis viruses.The final section deals with Aspergillus infections following transplantation of various organs. In this context Aspergillus spp. are one of the most commonly occurring fungal diseases. The epidemiology, risk factors, diagnostics, prophylaxis and therapy of invasive aspergillosis are presented. PMID:26782282

  17. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... comment. View all news articles Organ Procurement & Transplantation Network U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health ... Privacy Policy Questions? Contact Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network United Network for Organ Sharing Post Office Box ...

  18. Nocardia thailandica Pulmonary Nocardiosis in a Post-Solid Organ Transplant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Canterino, Joseph; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Vientos, Wilson; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Wallace, Richard J.; Campbell, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia thailandica is a rare pathogen related to Nocardia asteroides, Nocardia neocaledoniensis, and Nocardia caishijiensis that, since its original description in 2004, has only been reported to cause wound and ocular infections in humans. We report a case of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia thailandica in a 66-year-old solid organ transplant patient from Connecticut, which was identified at the molecular taxonomic level by secA1 analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of N. thailandica in the United States and the first report of pulmonary infection by this pathogen in the literature. PMID:26292312

  19. Nocardia thailandica Pulmonary Nocardiosis in a Post-Solid Organ Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Canterino, Joseph; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vientos, Wilson; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Wallace, Richard J; Campbell, Sheldon

    2015-11-01

    Nocardia thailandica is a rare pathogen related to Nocardia asteroides, Nocardia neocaledoniensis, and Nocardia caishijiensis that, since its original description in 2004, has only been reported to cause wound and ocular infections in humans. We report a case of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia thailandica in a 66-year-old solid organ transplant patient from Connecticut, which was identified at the molecular taxonomic level by secA1 analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of N. thailandica in the United States and the first report of pulmonary infection by this pathogen in the literature. PMID:26292312

  20. [INFECTIONS IN THE TRANSPLANT PATIENT].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Pourcher, Valérie

    2015-10-01

    Infections in the transplant patient are common. There are infections related to the host (recipient), those related to the graft and the related donor. Infectious risk factors depend on the history of the underlying disease of the transplanted organ, the donor, the immunosuppressive treatment. All pathogens, bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are possible but their frequency varies according to the transplanted organ, the selected immunosuppressive therapy and prophylaxis. Indeed, it is important to detect and treat latent infections in pro-transplant and prevent post-transplant infections by lifestyle and dietary measures, vaccinations, intraoperative antibiotic, antiviral, antifugal, antiparasitic treatments according graft and a variable length depending on the immunosuppression and donor-recipient status. PMID:26749711

  1. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Richard B; Bernat, James L

    2012-01-01

    We discuss ethical issues of organ transplantation including the stewardship tension between physicians' duty to do everything possible for their patients and their duty to serve society by encouraging organ donation. We emphasize consideration of the role of the principles of justice, utility and equity in the just distribution of transplantable organ as scarce resources. We then consider ethical issues of determining death of the organ donor including the remaining controversies in brain death determination and the new controversies raised by circulatory death determination. We need uniformity in standards of death determination, agreement on the duration of asystole before death is declared, and consensus on the allowable circulatory interventions on the newly declared organ donor that are intended to improve organ function. We discuss the importance of maintaining the dead donor rule, despite the argument of some scholars to abandon it. PMID:23217432

  2. Solid organ transplantation and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Polak, Wojciech G; Gładysz, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection has been traditionally considered to be an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplantation. Recent advances in HIV treatment, as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), significantly reduced HIV-related mortality and morbidity. At the same time the number of HIV-infected patients with end-stage organ diseases constantly increased. Current data describing solid organ transplantation in HIV-infected patients demonstrated comparable outcome to that in the HIV-negative population. In light of this, solid organ transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for selected HIV-positive patients with end-stage organ disease. PMID:15171000

  3. Solid organ donation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Bryant

    2012-01-01

    Medical imaging plays a key role in solid organ donation and transplantation. In addition to confirming the clinical diagnosis of brain death, imaging examinations are used to assess potential organ donors and recipients, evaluate donated organs, and monitor transplantation outcomes. This article introduces the history, biology, ethics, and institutions of organ donation and transplantation medicine. The article also discusses current and emerging imaging applications in the transplantation field and the controversial role of neuroimaging to confirm clinically diagnosed brain death. PMID:22461345

  4. Multicultural issues in organ transplantation: the influence of patients' cultural perspectives on compliance with treatment.

    PubMed

    Prieto, L R; Miller, D S; Gayowski, T; Marino, I R

    1997-12-01

    The potential influence of racially or ethnically diverse cultural perspectives on patient compliance with post-transplant treatments is discussed. Domains of competency regarding culturally sensitive clinical practice are outlined to assist providers in better understanding the perspectives that may influence the views and behavior of culturally diverse patients. PMID:9408680

  5. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  6. Challenges in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beyar, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Organ transplantation has progressed tremendously with improvements in surgical methods, organ preservation, and pharmaco-immunologic therapies and has become a critical pathway in the management of severe organ failure worldwide. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death; however, a substantial number of organs come from live donations, and a significant number can also be obtained from non-heart-beating donors. Yet, despite progress in medical, pharmacologic, and surgical techniques, the shortage of organs is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed internationally at the highest possible levels. This particular field involves medical ethics, religion, and society behavior and beliefs. Some of the critical ethical issues that require aggressive interference are organ trafficking, payments for organs, and the delicate balance in live donations between the benefit to the recipient and the possible harm to the donor and others. A major issue in organ transplantation is the definition of death and particularly brain death. Another major critical factor is the internal tendency of a specific society to donate organs. In the review below, we will discuss the various challenges that face organ donation worldwide, and particularly in Israel, and some proposed mechanisms to overcome this difficulty. PMID:23908807

  7. Kidney transplantation in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Minh-Ha; Foster, Clarence E; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Ichii, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that in 2014, over 600 million people met criteria for obesity. In 2011, over 30% of individuals undergoing kidney transplant had a body mass index (BMI) 35 kg/m2 or greater. A number of recent studies have confirmed the relationship between overweight/obesity and important comorbidities in kidney transplant patients. As with non-transplant surgeries, the rate of wound and soft tissue complications are increased following transplant as is the incidence of delayed graft function. These two issues appear to contribute to longer length of stay compared to normal BMI. New onset diabetes after transplant and cardiac outcomes also appear to be increased in the obese population. The impact of obesity on patient survival after kidney transplantation remains controversial, but appears to mirror the impact of extremes of BMI in non-transplant populations. Early experience with (open and laparoscopic) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy support excellent weight loss (in the range of 50%-60% excess weight lost at 1 year), but experts have recommended the need for further studies. Long term nutrient deficiencies remain a concern but in general, these procedures do not appear to adversely impact absorption of immunosuppressive medications. In this study, we review the literature to arrive at a better understanding of the risks related to renal transplantation among individuals with obesity. PMID:27011911

  8. The effect of music therapy on relaxation, anxiety, pain perception, and nausea in adult solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Madson, Amy T; Silverman, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients characteristically experience low levels of relaxation and high levels of anxiety, pain, and nausea. Although music therapy has demonstrated effectiveness in ameliorating these types of conditions with patients in other areas of medical hospitals, no studies have evaluated the effects of music therapy on solid organ transplant patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of music therapy on anxiety, relaxation, pain, and nausea levels in recovering patients on the adult transplant unit of the hospital utilizing a pre-posttest design. Participants (N = 58) received an individual 15-35 minute music therapy session consisting of live patient-preferred music and therapeutic social interaction. To remain consistent with the hospital's evaluative instruments during this pilot study, participants' self-reported levels of anxiety, relaxation, pain, and nausea, were based on separate 10-point Likert-type scales. The principal investigator observed affect and verbalizations at pre and posttest. Results indicated there were significant improvements in self-reported levels of relaxation, anxiety (both p < .001), pain (p < .01), and nausea (p < .05). Although there was no reliability measure, there were significant increases in positive verbalizations and positive affect (p < .001). All participants reported that they would desire music therapy again during a future long-term hospital stay. From the results of this exploratory study, it seems that music therapy can be a viable psychosocial intervention for hospitalized postoperative solid transplant patients. Implications for clinical practice and suggestions for future research are provided. PMID:21275333

  9. Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus Following Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Rodolfo J; Wallia, Amisha

    2016-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is common following organ transplantation, regardless of the pre-transplant diabetes status. Transient post-transplant hyperglycemia and/or new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) are common and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. NODAT and type 2 diabetes share similar characteristics, but the pathophysiology may differ. Immunosuppressive agents and steroids play a key role in the development of NODAT. Glycemic control is challenging in this population due to fluctuating renal/end-organ function, immunosuppressive dosing, nutritional status, and drug-drug interactions. A proactive and multidisciplinary approach is essential, along with flexible protocols to adjust to patient status, type of organ transplanted, and corticosteroid regimens. Insulin is the preferred agent for hospitalized patients and during the early post-transplant period; optimal glycemic control (BG < 180 mg/dl with minimal hypoglycemia [<70 mg/dl]) is desired. PMID:26803650

  10. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abouna, George M

    2003-01-01

    Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation, the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate

  11. Bioengineering in organ transplantation: targeting the liver.

    PubMed

    Fukumitsu, K; Yagi, H; Soto-Gutierrez, A

    2011-01-01

    About 27,000 deaths are registered annually in the United States due to liver disease. At this time, the only definitive treatment of hepatic failure is orthotopic transplantation. However, there is a critical shortage of organs with the total waiting list for all organs currently at 100,000 requests. The number is increasing by 5% every year. Given that only organs in pristine condition are transplantable and that the hidden demand for organs as an anti-aging solution will be many times the current figures, orthotopic transplantation will always remain a limited pool. The increasing donor organ shortage requires consideration of alternative emerging technologies. Regenerative medicine may offer novel strategies to treat patients with end-stage organ failure. The ultimate aim of cell transplantation, tissue engineering, and stem cells is to regenerate tissues and organs. With the development of whole organ decellularization methods, the equation of organ shortage may dramatically change in the near future. Decellularized organs provide the ideal transplantable scaffold with all the necessary microstructure and extracellular cues for cell attachment, differentiation, vascularization, and function. New techniques to re-engineer organs may have major implications for the fields of drug discovery, regeneration biology, and ultimately organ transplantation. In this review we have provided an overview of complementary approaches to study and enhance the success of organ repopulation strategies creating new grafts/organs for transplantation. PMID:21839215

  12. Organ Transplantation in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Faissal A M

    2016-07-01

    Organ transplantation started in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) in 1979 with a kidney transplanted from a live donor. The Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation has been established in 1985 as a governmental agency that supervises all national transplant activities in the KSA. Organ transplantation in the KSA has made great strides since 1985. Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation is playing a central role in all aspects of transplantation including education on all levels, allocation, coordination and procurement. A new initiative has started an ambitious program in 2014 to improve the identification and reporting of organ donors aiming at an annual rate of 15 donors per million populations within 3 years in the KSA. PMID:27326805

  13. Role of patient factors, preferences, and distrust in health care and access to liver transplantation and organ donation.

    PubMed

    Wilder, Julius M; Oloruntoba, Omobonike O; Muir, Andrew J; Moylan, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    Despite major improvements in access to liver transplantation (LT), disparities remain. Little is known about how distrust in medical care, patient preferences, and the origins shaping those preferences contribute to differences surrounding access. We performed a single-center, cross-sectional survey of adults with end-stage liver disease and compared responses between LT listed and nonlisted patients as well as by race. Questionnaires were administered to 109 patients (72 nonlisted; 37 listed) to assess demographics, health care system distrust (HCSD), religiosity, and factors influencing LT and organ donation (OD). We found that neither HCSD nor religiosity explained differences in access to LT in our population. Listed patients attained higher education levels and were more likely to be insured privately. This was also the case for white versus black patients. All patients reported wanting LT if recommended. However, nonlisted patients were significantly less likely to have discussed LT with their physician or to be referred to a transplant center. They were also much less likely to understand the process of LT. Fewer blacks were referred (44.4% versus 69.7%; P = 0.03) or went to the transplant center if referred (44.4% versus 71.1%; P = 0.02). Fewer black patients felt that minorities had as equal access to LT as whites (29.6% versus 57.3%; P < 0.001). For OD, there were more significant differences in preferences by race than listing status. More whites indicated OD status on their driver's license, and more blacks were likely to become an organ donor if approached by someone of the same cultural or ethnic background (P < 0.01). In conclusion, our analysis demonstrates persistent barriers to LT and OD. With improved patient and provider education and communication, many of these disparities could be successfully overcome. Liver Transplantation 22 895-905 2016 AASLD. PMID:27027394

  14. Solid Organ Transplantation in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD): Analysis of Transplantation Outcome and IBD Activity in a Large Single Center Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Fabian; Friedrich, Matthias; Stallhofer, Johannes; Schönermarck, Ulf; Fischereder, Michael; Habicht, Antje; Karbalai, Nazanin; Wolf, Christiane; Angelberger, Marianne; Olszak, Torsten; Beigel, Florian; Tillack, Cornelia; Göke, Burkhard; Zachoval, Reinhart; Denk, Gerald; Guba, Markus; Rust, Christian; Grüner, Norbert; Brand, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, limited data of the outcome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are available. We aimed to analyze effects of SOT on the IBD course in a large IBD patient cohort. Methods Clinical data from 1537 IBD patients were analyzed for patients who underwent SOT (n = 31) between July 2002 and May 2014. Sub-analyses included SOT outcome parameters, IBD activity before and after SOT, and efficacy of IBD treatment. Results 4.74% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 0.84% of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) underwent SOT (p = 2.69 x 10−6, UC vs. CD). 77.4% of patients with SOT underwent liver transplantation (LTx) with tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive therapy after SOT. All LTx were due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) or PSC overlap syndromes. Six patients (19.4%) required renal transplantation and one patient (3.2%) heart transplantation. A survival rate of 83.9% after a median follow-up period of 103 months was observed. Before SOT, 65.0% of patients were in clinical remission and 5 patients received immunosuppressive therapy (16.1%). After SOT, 61.0% of patients were in remission (p = 1.00 vs. before SOT) and 29.0% required IBD-specific immunosuppressive or anti-TNF therapy (p = 0.54 vs. before SOT). 42.9% of patients with worsening of IBD after SOT were at higher risk of needing steroid therapy for increased IBD activity (p = 0.03; relative risk (RR): 10.29; 95% CI 1.26–84.06). Four patients (13.0%) needed anti-TNF therapy after SOT (response rate 75%). Conclusions SOT was more common in UC patients due to the higher prevalence of PSC-related liver cirrhosis in UC. Despite mainly tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimens, outcome of SOT and IBD was excellent in this cohort. In this SOT cohort, concomitant immunosuppressive therapy due to IBD was well tolerated. PMID:26288187

  15. The Transplant Patient and Transplant Medicine in Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Lloyd D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades in particular there has been a remarkable increase in the number of solid organ transplants being performed worldwide alongside improvements in long-term survival rates. However, the infrastructure at transplant centres has been unable to keep pace with the current volume of the transplant patient work load. These pressures on transplant specialist centres has led to calls for an increased role of the general practitioner (GP) managing particular aspects of transplant patients’ medical care. Indeed, many aspects of follow-up care such as screening for malignancies, preventing infection through immunisation programmes, and managing cardiovascular risk factors are already important aspects of family practice medicine. This paper aims to review some of the aspects of transplant patient care that is important for healthcare workers in family practice to manage. PMID:25657941

  16. Results from a horizon scan on risks associated with transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells: from donor to patient.

    PubMed

    Herberts, C A; Park, M V D Z; Pot, J W G A; de Vries, C G J C A

    2015-03-01

    The successful transplantation of human materials such as organs, tissues and cells into patients does not only depend on the benefits, but also on the mitigation of risks. To gain insight into recent publications on risks associated with the process of transferring human materials from donor to recipient we performed a horizon scan by reviewing scientific literature and news websites of 2011 on this subject. We found there is ample information on how extended donor criteria, such as donor age, affect the survival rates of organs or patients. Interestingly, gender mismatch does not appear to be a major risk factor in organ rejection. Data on risks of donor tumor transmission was very scarce; however, risk categories for various tumor types have been suggested. In order to avoid rejection, a lot of research is directed towards engineering tissues from a patient's own tissues and cells. Some but not all of these developments have reached the clinic. Developments in the field of stem cell therapy are rapid. However, many hurdles are yet to be overcome before these cells can be applied on a large scale in the clinic. The processes leading to genetic abnormalities in cells differentiated from stem cells need to be identified in order to avoid transplantation of aberrant cells. New insights have been obtained on storage and preservation of human materials, a critical step for success of their clinical use. Likewise, quality management systems have been shown to improve the quality and safety of human materials used for transplantation. PMID:24789705

  17. Gout and organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Lisa K; Chapman, Peter T

    2012-04-01

    Acute and chronic gout are common complications following organ transplantation. Risk factors include those shared with the general population (eg, diuretic use) and transplant-specific risk factors (eg, cyclosporine). Clinical features of gout are similar to those seen in the general population, although tophi may be more common. A definitive diagnosis requires demonstration of monosodium urate crystals within synovial fluid or tophi. Treatment is often empiric, although a poor response should prompt joint aspiration to exclude septic arthritis. Corticosteroids are commonly used to treat acute gout due to the adverse profile and drug interactions with NSAIDs and colchicine. Sustained reduction of serum urate (≤6 mg/dL) is critical in long-term management. Allopurinol is the most commonly used agent, although vigilant monitoring is required if combined with azathioprine. Other options include febuxostat and benzbromarone. The role of newer agents such as interleukin-1 inhibitors and uricases remains to be determined. General measures should include minimizing diuretic use. PMID:22258500

  18. Bloodstream infections after solid-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kritikos, Antonios; Manuel, Oriol

    2016-04-01

    Solid-organ transplantation (SOT) has become the preferred strategy to treat a number of end-stage organ disease, because a continuous improvement in survival and quality of life. While preventive strategies has decreased the risk for classical opportunistic infections (such as viral, fungal and parasite infections), bacterial infections, and particularly bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain the most common and life-threatening complications in SOT recipients. The source of BSI after transplant depends on the type of transplantation, being urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and intraabdominal infections the most common infections occurring after kidney, lung and liver transplantation, respectively. The risk for candidemia is higher in abdominal-organ than in thoracic-organ transplantation. Currently, the increasing prevalence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative pathogens, such as extended-spectrum betalactamase-producing Enterobacteriaciae and carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae, is causing particular concerns in SOT recipients, a population which presents several risk factors for developing infections due to MDR organisms. The application of strict preventive policies to reduce the incidence of post transplant BSIs and to control the spread of MDR organisms, including the implementation of specific stewardship programs to avoid the overuse of antibiotics and antifungal drugs, are essential steps to reduce the impact of post transplant infections on allograft and patient outcomes. PMID:26766415

  19. Allocation of resources for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kandula, Praveen; Anderson, T Anthony; Vagefi, Parsia A

    2013-12-01

    Over the last 6 decades, organ transplantation has achieved great success to become standard therapy for the treatment of patients with end-stage organ failure. With this success has emerged candidate wait lists that greatly outnumber the current supply of deceased donor organs. The increasing number of candidates and transplants performed has resulted in an organ allocation process that occurs at a local, regional, and sometimes national level. A brief description of the history is presented as well as the methodologies involved in allocation of a donor organ to a single recipient. PMID:24287345

  20. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  1. Multivisceral and Small Bowel Transplantation at Shiraz Organ Transplant Center

    PubMed Central

    Nikeghbalian, S.; Mehdi, S. H.; Aliakbarian, M.; Kazemi, K.; Shamsaeefar, A.; Bahreini, A.; Mansoorian, M. R.; Malekhosseini, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multivisceral transplantations were initially done in animal models to understand the immunological effects. Later on, in human beings, it has been considered a salvage procedure for unresectable complex abdominal malignancies. With advancement in surgical techniques, availability of better immunosuppressive drugs, and development of better post-operative management protocols, outcomes have been improved after these complex surgical procedures. Objective: To analyze and report results of multivisceral, modified multivisceral, and small bowel transplantations done at Shiraz Organ Transplant Center, Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Medical records of all patients who underwent multivisceral, modified multivisceral, and small bowel transplants were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There were 18 patients. The most common indications for the procedure in our series were unresectable carcinoma of pancreas followed by short bowel syndrome. 10 patients were alive after a median follow-up of 8.7 (range: 3–32) months. The remaining 8 patients died post-operatively, mostly from septicemia. Conclusion: Multivisceral and small bowel transplantations are promising treatments for complex abdominal pathologies. PMID:25013680

  2. Transplant benefit for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Alessandro; Volk, Michael; Cillo, Umberto

    2013-12-28

    Although liver transplantation is theoretically the best treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is limited by the realities of perioperative complications, and the shortage of donor organs. Furthermore, in many cases there are available alternative treatments such as resection or locoregional therapy. Deciding upon the best option for a patient with HCC is complicated, involving numerous ethical principles including: urgency, utility, intention-to-treat survival, transplant benefit, harm to candidates on waiting list, and harm to living donors. The potential contrast between different principles is particularly relevant for patients with HCC for several reasons: (1) HCC candidates to liver transplantation are increasing; (2) the great prognostic heterogeneity within the HCC population; (3) in HCC patients tumor progression before liver transplantation may significantly impair post transplant outcome; and (4) effective alternative therapies are often available for HCC candidates to liver transplantation. In this paper we suggest that allocating organs by transplant benefit could help balance these competing principles, and also introduce equity between patients with HCC and nonmalignant liver disease. We also propose a triangular equipoise model to help decide between deceased donor liver transplantation, living donor liver transplantation, or alternative therapies. PMID:24409046

  3. Fungal infections in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Khan, Asif; El-Charabaty, Elie; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-06-01

    Organ transplantation has always been considered to be the standard therapeutic interventions in patients with end-stage organ failure. In 2008, more than 29,000 organ transplants were performed in US. Survival rates among transplant recipients have greatly improved due to better understanding of transplant biology and more effective immunosuppressive agents. After transplant, the extent of the immune response is influenced by the amount of interleukin 2 (IL-2) being produced by the T-helper cells. Transplant immunosuppressive therapy primarily targets T cell-mediated graft rejection. Calcineurin inhibitor, which includes cyclosporine, pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, impairs calcineurin-induced up-regulation of IL-2 expression, resulting in increased susceptibility to invasive fungal diseases. This immunosuppressive state allows infectious complication, leading to a high mortality rate. Currently, overall mortality due to invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in solid organ transplant recipients ranges between 25% and 80%. The risk of IFI following renal transplant is associated with the dosage of immunosuppressive agents given, environmental factors and post-transplant duration. Most fungal infections occur in the first 6 months after transplant because of the use of numerous immunosuppressors. Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. are the yeasts most frequently isolated, while most frequent filamentous fungi (molds) isolated are Aspergillus spp. The symptoms of systemic fungal infections are non-specific and early detection of fungal infections and proper therapy are important in improving survival and reducing mortality. This article will provide an insight on the risk factors and clinical presentation, compare variation in treatment of IFIs in renal transplant patients, and evaluate the role of prophylactic therapy in this group of patients. We also report the course and management of two renal transplant recipients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital, both of

  4. Fungal Infections in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Asif; El-Charabaty, Elie; El-Sayegh, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation has always been considered to be the standard therapeutic interventions in patients with end-stage organ failure. In 2008, more than 29,000 organ transplants were performed in US. Survival rates among transplant recipients have greatly improved due to better understanding of transplant biology and more effective immunosuppressive agents. After transplant, the extent of the immune response is influenced by the amount of interleukin 2 (IL-2) being produced by the T-helper cells. Transplant immunosuppressive therapy primarily targets T cell-mediated graft rejection. Calcineurin inhibitor, which includes cyclosporine, pimecrolimus and tacrolimus, impairs calcineurin-induced up-regulation of IL-2 expression, resulting in increased susceptibility to invasive fungal diseases. This immunosuppressive state allows infectious complication, leading to a high mortality rate. Currently, overall mortality due to invasive fungal infections (IFIs) in solid organ transplant recipients ranges between 25% and 80%. The risk of IFI following renal transplant is associated with the dosage of immunosuppressive agents given, environmental factors and post-transplant duration. Most fungal infections occur in the first 6 months after transplant because of the use of numerous immunosuppressors. Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. are the yeasts most frequently isolated, while most frequent filamentous fungi (molds) isolated are Aspergillus spp. The symptoms of systemic fungal infections are non-specific and early detection of fungal infections and proper therapy are important in improving survival and reducing mortality. This article will provide an insight on the risk factors and clinical presentation, compare variation in treatment of IFIs in renal transplant patients, and evaluate the role of prophylactic therapy in this group of patients. We also report the course and management of two renal transplant recipients admitted to Staten Island University Hospital, both of

  5. Canadian Forum on Combined Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cantarovich, Marcelo; Blydt-Hansen, Tom D; Gill, John; Tinckam, Kathryn; Schiff, Jeffrey; Alwayn, Ian; Bain, Vince; Dipchand, Anne I; Isaac, Debra; Kim, S Joseph; Lien, Dale; Zaltzman, Jeffrey; Young, Kimberly; Nickerson, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The Canadian Society of Transplantation and Canadian Blood Services conducted a consensus forum on combined renal/nonrenal transplants, as they are not part of Canadian organ-specific allocation models at present. The purpose of this initiative was to make recommendations, develop eligibility criteria, and a decision-making model on listing and allocation. Forty-two participants with expertise in combined transplantation participated in the consensus forum. The United States and Canadian data were reviewed. The consensus forum made recommendations regarding the following: (1) investigation of etiology, severity, duration, and level of renal dysfunction; (2) documentation of degree of nonreversible kidney injury; (3) eligibility for combined (either simultaneous or staged) transplantation; (4) research. Key recommendations were: (1) patients with end-stage nonrenal disease with estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 30 mL/min per 1.73 m for longer than 1 month or on dialysis less than 3 months, who fulfill criteria for nonreversibility of renal dysfunction (by level and duration of renal dysfunction, imaging, and pathology findings), would be eligible for combined renal/nonrenal transplantation; (2) patients on dialysis longer than 3 months would be eligible for combined renal/nonrenal transplantation; (3) staged renal after nonrenal transplantation with subsequent prioritized allocation of renal transplant was endorsed in selected cases. The validation and impact of these recommendations on allocation will require further studies. PMID:26588007

  6. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques. PMID:23775735

  7. Psychosocial Challenges in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Kristin; Weinland, Stephan R; Butt, Zeeshan

    2015-09-01

    Organ transplantation is often a life-saving surgery for individuals with end-stage organ disease. However, for most types of solid organ transplant, the demand for organs outweighs the supply, resulting in the need to institute a waiting list for suitable patients who cannot immediately receive an organ. Individuals who need transplants must undergo an assessment process that includes medical, surgical, and psychosocial evaluations. The transplant psychosocial evaluation considers whether surgical candidates are able and willing to care for the transplanted organ for many years. The evaluation must also consider a number of psychosocial risk factors that can lead to complications, which may cause premature loss of the graft. Some of these risk factors include a history of poor medical adherence, psychopathology (including substance use disorders), poor social support, and cognitive dysfunction. This article briefly summarizes the assessment of each of these risk factors and how they can be mitigated to ensure the best outcomes for patients and their families. PMID:26370201

  8. [Christian religions and organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kinnaert, P

    2008-01-01

    The present paper describes the position of catholic, protestant and orthodox Churches concerning the various aspects of organ retrieval and transplantation. The official position of the catholic Church, defined by the pope favors these activities if they respond to strict rules. The absence of magisterium in the protestant and orthodox Churches causes sometimes divergent opinions among the members of the clergy. However, there are convergences between the three religions. Theologians who are in favour of organ transplantation promote organ donation but consider that it is not mandatory. They do not admit the principle of presumed consent and organ commerce is expressly forbidden. PMID:18705602

  9. Liver transplantation: evolving patient selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Yu, A S; Ahmed, A; Keeffe, E B

    2001-11-01

    The widespread recognition of the success of liver transplantation as a treatment for most types of acute and chronic liver failure has led to increased referrals for transplantation in the setting of a relatively fixed supply of cadaver donor organs. These events have led to a marked lengthening of the waiting time for liver transplantation, resulting in increased deaths of those on the waiting list and sicker patients undergoing transplantation. Nearly 5000 liver transplantations were performed in the United States in 2000, while the waiting list grew to over 17,000 patients. The mounting disparity between the number of liver transplant candidates and the limited supply of donor organs has led to reassessment of the selection and listing criteria for liver transplantation, as well as revision of organ allocation and distribution policies for cadaver livers. The development of minimal listing criteria for patients with chronic liver disease based on a specific definition for decompensation of cirrhosis has facilitated the more uniform listing of patients at individual centres across the United States. The United Network for Organ Sharing, under pressure from transplant professionals, patient advocacy groups and the federal government, has continuously revised allocation and distribution policies based on the ethical principles of justice for the individual patient versus optimal utility of the limited organ supply available annually. Beginning in 2002, it is likely that the Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score will be implemented to determine disease severity and direct donor organs to the sickest patients rather than to those with the longest waiting times. PMID:11727003

  10. Cadaveric organ transplantation and religion.

    PubMed

    Vuković, Milivoje; Moljević, Nebojsa; Katanić, Nenad; Krivokuća, Dragan; Vuković, Vesna; Milosević, Zoran

    2010-01-01

    Multiple organ procurement is a surgical procedure by which organs of a brain dead donor are taken for transplantation. Cadaveric organ donors must be those who have suffered a sudden structural and irreversible damage of the brain or brainstem. Social and scientific aspects of organ transplantation have been widely discussed so far, whereas the religious factor, which should be also respected, has rarely been analyzed. Considering the fact that Serbia is a multicultural and multi-confessional society, opinions of all confessions practised in the Republic of Serbia should be taken into account. The Orthodox Church permits transplantation from one man to another and transplantation is strongly recommended from the standpoint of Christian morality. These attitudes are accepted and respected by the Roman Catholic Church, Reformers, Judaism and Islam as well. For the future development of organ transplantation it is necessary to have a sufficient number of organ donors. Valid and complete laws must strictly define brain death, organ donation and waiting lists. The public should be fully informed about this issue in order to build mutual confidence between the population and medical staff. PMID:21443156

  11. Both patient and caregiver gender impact depressive symptoms among organ transplant caregivers: who is at risk and why?

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Susan; Abbey, Susan E; Singer, Lianne G; Ross, Heather J; Stewart, Donna E

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the impact of patient and caregiver gender on caregiver depressive symptoms. Caregivers' use of relationship-focused coping and dimensions of caregiver burden were examined as potential mediators of gender differences in depressive symptoms. Ninety-three organ transplant candidates and their caregivers completed written questionnaires (N = 186). Females providing care to male patients reported significantly higher depressive symptoms than the other caregivers in our sample. Multiple mediation analyses revealed that less support from family members and a greater negative health impact of caregiving helped explain these gender differences. Women caring for men were also perceived as more overprotective, but this did not explain gender differences in depression. Results highlight the benefits of a contextual, dyadic approach to studying caregiver distress. PMID:21421644

  12. Development and organization of a multiple organ transplantation program.

    PubMed Central

    Bahnson, H T; Starzl, T E; Hakala, T R; Hardesty, R L; Griffith, B P; Iwatsuki, S

    1986-01-01

    Multiple organ transplantation has come of age. Indications are that it will continue to grow, if not flourish. The complexity of modern surgical care, its multiperson dependency, and the need for the surgeon to retain knowledge and involvement with his patient's care and problems are nowhere more evident than in multiple organ transplantation. Each organ presents its own associated challenges, the prime solution of which lies with a skillful and dedicated surgeon; but with all organs there are challenges of expectantly waiting patients, housing during the wait and for postoperative observation, procurement, erratic scheduling of the operating room, nursing, social service, immunosuppression, immunopathology, interest of hospital public relations and of the news media, and perennial care. This report concerns the growth and development of the multiple organ transplant program at the University Health Center of Pittsburgh and describes some answers to the challenges presented. PMID:3521507

  13. The start of the transplant journey: referral for pediatric solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shellmer, Diana; Brosig, Cheryl; Wray, Jo

    2014-03-01

    The focus of the majority of the psychosocial transplant literature is on post-transplant outcomes, but the transplant journey starts much earlier than this, at the point when transplantation is first considered and a referral for transplant evaluation is made. In this review, we cover information regarding the meaning of the referral process for solid organ transplantation. We discuss various factors of the referral for transplantation including the impact of referral on the pediatric patient and the family, potential expectations and misconceptions held by pediatric patients and parents, the role of health literacy, decision-making factors, and the informational needs of pediatric patients and parents. We elucidate steps that providers can take to enhance transplant referral and provide suggestions for much needed research within this area. PMID:24438194

  14. Long-term outcomes of children after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jon Jin; Marks, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has transformed the lives of many children and adults by providing treatment for patients with organ failure who would have otherwise succumbed to their disease. The first successful transplant in 1954 was a kidney transplant between identical twins, which circumvented the problem of rejection from MHC incompatibility. Further progress in solid organ transplantation was enabled by the discovery of immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids and azathioprine in the 1950s and ciclosporin in 1970. Today, solid organ transplantation is a conventional treatment with improved patient and allograft survival rates. However, the challenge that lies ahead is to extend allograft survival time while simultaneously reducing the side effects of immunosuppression. This is particularly important for children who have irreversible organ failure and may require multiple transplants. Pediatric transplant teams also need to improve patient quality of life at a time of physical, emotional and psychosocial development. This review will elaborate on the long-term outcomes of children after kidney, liver, heart, lung and intestinal transplantation. As mortality rates after transplantation have declined, there has emerged an increased focus on reducing longer-term morbidity with improved outcomes in optimizing cardiovascular risk, renal impairment, growth and quality of life. Data were obtained from a review of the literature and particularly from national registries and databases such as the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies for the kidney, SPLIT for liver, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation and UNOS for intestinal transplantation. PMID:24860856

  15. Long-term outcomes of children after solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jon Jin; Marks, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has transformed the lives of many children and adults by providing treatment for patients with organ failure who would have otherwise succumbed to their disease. The first successful transplant in 1954 was a kidney transplant between identical twins, which circumvented the problem of rejection from MHC incompatibility. Further progress in solid organ transplantation was enabled by the discovery of immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids and azathioprine in the 1950s and ciclosporin in 1970. Today, solid organ transplantation is a conventional treatment with improved patient and allograft survival rates. However, the challenge that lies ahead is to extend allograft survival time while simultaneously reducing the side effects of immunosuppression. This is particularly important for children who have irreversible organ failure and may require multiple transplants. Pediatric transplant teams also need to improve patient quality of life at a time of physical, emotional and psychosocial development. This review will elaborate on the long-term outcomes of children after kidney, liver, heart, lung and intestinal transplantation. As mortality rates after transplantation have declined, there has emerged an increased focus on reducing longer-term morbidity with improved outcomes in optimizing cardiovascular risk, renal impairment, growth and quality of life. Data were obtained from a review of the literature and particularly from national registries and databases such as the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies for the kidney, SPLIT for liver, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation and UNOS for intestinal transplantation. PMID:24860856

  16. The Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism.

    PubMed

    2008-09-01

    Organ commercialism, which targets vulnerable populations (such as illiterate and impoverished persons, undocumented immigrants, prisoners, and political or economic refugees) in resource-poor countries, has been condemned by international bodies such as the World Health Organization for decades. Yet in recent years, as a consequence of the increasing ease of Internet communication and the willingness of patients in rich countries to travel and purchase organs, organ trafficking and transplant tourism have grown into global problems. For example, as of 2006, foreigners received two-thirds of the 2000 kidney transplants performed annually in Pakistan. The Istanbul Declaration proclaims that the poor who sell their organs are being exploited, whether by richer people within their own countries or by transplant tourists from abroad. Moreover, transplant tourists risk physical harm by unregulated and illegal transplantation. Participants in the Istanbul Summit concluded that transplant commercialism, which targets the vulnerable, transplant tourism, and organ trafficking should be prohibited. And they also urged their fellow transplant professionals, individually and through their organizations, to put an end to these unethical activities and foster safe, accountable practices that meet the needs of transplant recipients while protecting donors. Countries from which transplant tourists originate, as well as those to which they travel to obtain transplants, are just beginning to address their respective responsibilities to protect their people from exploitation and to develop national self-sufficiency in organ donation. The Declaration should reinforce the resolve of governments and international organizations to develop laws and guidelines to bring an end to wrongful practices. "The legacy of transplantation is threatened by organ trafficking and transplant tourism. The Declaration of Istanbul aims to combat these activities and to preserve the nobility of organ

  17. The Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Organ commercialism, which targets vulnerable populations (such as illiterate and impoverished persons, undocumented immigrants, prisoners, and political or economic refugees) in resource-poor countries, has been condemned by international bodies such as the World Health Organization for decades. Yet in recent years, as a consequence of the increasing ease of Internet communication and the willingness of patients in rich countries to travel and purchase organs, organ trafficking and transplant tourism have grown into global problems. For example, as of 2006, foreigners received two-thirds of the 2000 kidney transplants performed annually in Pakistan. The Istanbul Declaration proclaims that the poor who sell their organs are being exploited, whether by richer people within their own countries or by transplant tourists from abroad. Moreover, transplant tourists risk physical harm by unregulated and illegal transplantation. Participants in the Istanbul Summit concluded that transplant commercialism, which targets the vulnerable, transplant tourism, and organ trafficking should be prohibited. And they also urged their fellow transplant professionals, individually and through their organizations, to put an end to these unethical activities and foster safe, accountable practices that meet the needs of transplant recipients while protecting donors. Countries from which transplant tourists originate, as well as those to which they travel to obtain transplants, are just beginning to address their respective responsibilities to protect their people from exploitation and to develop national self-sufficiency in organ donation. The Declaration should reinforce the resolve of governments and international organizations to develop laws and guidelines to bring an end to wrongful practices. “The legacy of transplantation is threatened by organ trafficking and transplant tourism. The Declaration of Istanbul aims to combat these activities and to preserve the nobility of organ

  18. Predictive factors of brain death in severe stroke patients identified by organ procurement and transplant coordination in Lorrain, France.

    PubMed

    Humbertjean, Lisa; Mione, Gioia; Fay, Renaud; Durin, Laurent; Planel, Sophie; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Enea, Ana-Maria; Richard, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    There are no established predictive factors to identify patients at the acute phase of severe stroke with a high probability of presenting brain death (BD). We retrospectively collected clinical and paraclinical data of consecutive patients at the acute phase of severe stroke with a potential progression to BD through the hospital organ procurement and transplant coordination system in five centres in Lorrain (France) between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013. Final endpoint was adjudicated BD. Of 400 included patients, 91 (23%) presented adjudicated BD. Initial Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤6 (P = 0.008), herniation (P = 0.009), hydrocephalus (P = 0.019), initial systolic blood pressure >150 mmHg (P = 0.002), past history of alcohol abuse (P = 0.019) and stroke volume >65 ml (P = 0.040) were significantly associated with BD progression. Two prognostic scores for stroke with unquantifiable or quantifiable volume were built according to the number of risk factors presented. Following internal validation, the respective bias-corrected predictive performance (c-index) of the two scores was 72% (95% confidence interval: 67-78%) and 77% (95% confidence interval: 72-82%). These scores could form the basis of a simple tool of six criteria to help physicians make the difficult decision of intensive care unit management to preserve organs in potential donors. PMID:26402792

  19. Organ transplant & the psychiatrist: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Anil Kumar, B.N.; Mattoo, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation has emerged as the saving grace for those who are suffering from end organ disease. Advent of modern surgical procedures and immunosuppressants further decrease morbidity and mortality. Meta-analyses have shown that post-organ transplantation quality of life improves for social, physical and daily activity functioning, but not consistently for psychological health. Psychiatrists can play a useful role not only in selecting the best suitable candidate for the procedure by psychosocial screening but also to tackle post-operation psychological issues that trouble patients as well as caretakers and decrease their quality of life. Issues like selection of patients with psychiatric disorders and substance abuse for transplantation process and their treatment both pre- and post- operation, risky health behaviours, treatment adherence for immunosuppressants and psychological support for caretakers can be better addressed by a psychiatrist who is sensitive towards these issues. Prescribing various psychotropics and immunosuppressants in the background of impaired organ function and drug-drug interaction is further challenging. Thus, psychiatrists need to be knowledgeable about these issues and should be an integral part of organ transplantation team for overall better outcome. PMID:26112841

  20. [Comparative study of needs of transplanted patients or those waiting for an organ transplantation and the nurses' attitudes of these needs].

    PubMed

    Baert, C; Cocula, N; Delran, J; Faubel, E; Foucaud, C; Martins, V

    2000-12-01

    Literature has shown that information, education and support had a beneficial effect on how the patients and their family lived through the transplant process. In our daily practice, we are permanently confronted with requests for information and psychological adjustments from our patients. Do the needs of this population meet the representations of the care-takers? Our theoretical framework is based on the theories of Maslow and Callista Roy, on the concept of social representations according to Moscovici and on the steps of the transplant process. To carry out this survey, we used a questionnaire which we gave to the patients at the different phases of the graft and to the nurses of the services involved in the transplant. There was a similarity of the results between the two populations, despite some differences for certain items. The development of a programme for information and for education will enable an improvement of the care quality thanks to the adaptation of knowledge to the needs of the transplanted patients. PMID:12037958

  1. Organ Donation and Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... my body to medical science? Can non-resident aliens donate and receive organs? Why should minorities be ... improving lives. Return to top Can non-resident aliens donate and receive organs? Non-resident aliens can ...

  2. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished in connection with organ transplant procedures only if the State plan includes written standards for...

  3. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished in connection with organ transplant procedures only if the State plan includes written standards for...

  4. An Asian perspective on organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Michael Cheng-tek

    2009-01-01

    The organ transplantation seems to have become a route practice of modern medical treatment when a patient's organ fails providing that she/he can afford the cost and a suitable organ is found. This practice, however, was not without scepticism and reservation at least to some Asians, for instance, Japan has been reluctant to launch a brave search for organs to save any patient whose organs fail. The western world including Vatican has seen donating one's organ for transplantation to save others as an act of love. Compassion is one of the main teachings in Asian tradition too, therefore culturally, Asians should be in favour of this modern medical treatment. But the ancient teachings of Asia also call for respecting parents by carefully safeguarding the gift of body that they gave and abiding in Tao to follow the flow of nature. What will the Asian ancient sages say to this new modern medical technology? This article will examine the teachings of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism to find out how they respond to the procedures of organ transplantation. PMID:19823791

  5. What Kind of Information About Marginal Donors Is Available Through Sources Other Than Health Care Professionals for Patients on the Waiting List for Organ Transplantation?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The current organ shortage has necessitated expanding the criteria for potential donations to marginal donors (older or sick donors whose organs would have been considered unsuitable before). In France, physicians are not required to provide information to recipients about marginal donors except for hepatitis C or hepatitis B infection and non-heart-beating donations. We hypothesized that patients can be informed about these risks by other information sources than health care professionals, such as websites and patient associations. Objective The objectives of the study were to identify the main health information sources of transplant patients other than health professionals and to evaluate the information provided by websites and associations to patients about the risks of transplantation from marginal donors. Methods In this study, the information sources for kidney, liver, heart, and lung patients that had already received transplants or registered on waiting lists were identified by a survey in four transplant centers. Further, the information proposed by French and English language websites and patient associations were evaluated, respectively, by a systematic review of websites and a survey among the presidents of kidney, liver, heart, and lung patient associations. Results For the first survey, (367/402) 91.3% responses were registered. Apart from health professionals identified as the principal information source (363/367) 98.9%, 19 liver and 28 heart patients searched for information on the websites, while 37 kidney and 42 lung patients were more informed by patients’ associations. Our two last surveys showed that information about marginal donors is accessible by websites and (10/34) 30% of associations. All of the 60 Internet documents evaluated on French language and English language websites proposed information about marginal donors. Otherwise, (52/65) 80% of these documents were dedicated to health professionals and contained

  6. Donor organ distribution according to urgency of need or outcome maximization in liver transplantation. A questionnaire survey among patients and medical staff.

    PubMed

    Umgelter, Katrin S; Tobiasch, Moritz; Anetsberger, Aida; Blobner, Manfred; Thorban, Stefan; Umgelter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Low donor rates in Germany cause a trade-off between equity in the distribution of chances for survival and efficiency in dead-donor liver transplantation. Public attitudes concerning the principles that should govern organ allocation are of interest. We performed a questionnaire-based study among patients and medical staff. 1826 of 2200 questionnaires were returned. 79.2%, 67.1%, and 24.4% patients wanted to accept liver transplantation for themselves if expected 1-year survival was 80%, 50%, and 20%, respectively. 57.7% affirmed 'averting immediate risk of death (urgency) is a more important criterion for organ allocation than expected long-term success' (P = 0.002 against indifference). The majority of medical staff took the opposite decision. 20.7%, 8.8%, and 21.2% of patients chose 50%, 33%, and 10% as lowest acceptable 5-year survival, respectively. 49.3% accepted a survival of <10%. Variables associated with preferring urgency over efficiency as criterion for allocation were age (OR 1.009; 95% CI: 1.000-1.017; female gender (OR 1.331; 95%CI 0.992-1.784); higher education (OR 0.881; 95%CI 0.801-0.969); and refusal of transplantation for oneself (OR 1.719; 95%CI 1.272-2.324). Most patients supported urgency-based liver allocation. Patients and medical staff would accept lower survival rates than the transplant community. PMID:25557453

  7. Psychiatric issues in pediatric organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Margaret L

    2011-08-01

    Solid organ transplantation has become the first line of treatment for a growing number of life-threatening pediatric illnesses. With improved survival, research into the long-term outcome of transplant recipients has become important to clinicians. Adherence to medical instructions remains a challenge, particularly in the adolescent population. New immunosuppressant approaches promise to expand organ transplantation in additional directions. Extension of transplantation into replacement of organs such as faces and hands raises complex ethical issues. PMID:21855712

  8. Psychiatric issues in pediatric organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stuber, Margaret L

    2010-04-01

    Solid organ transplantation has become the first line of treatment for a growing number of life-threatening pediatric illnesses. With improved survival, research into the long-term outcome of transplant recipients has become important to clinicians. Adherence to medical instructions remains a challenge, particularly in the adolescent population. New immunosuppressant approaches promise to expand organ transplantation in additional directions. Extension of transplantation into replacement of organs such as faces and hands raises complex ethical issues. PMID:20478500

  9. Psychiatric Issues in Pediatric Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Solid organ transplantation has become the first line of treatment for a growing number of life-threatening pediatric illnesses. With improved survival, research into the long-term outcome of transplant recipients has become important to clinicians. Adherence to medical instructions remains a challenge, particularly in the adolescent population. New immunosuppressant approaches promise to expand organ transplantation in additional directions. Extension of transplantation into replacement of organs such as faces and hands raises complex ethical issues. PMID:20478500

  10. Selection of uremic patients for kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, G; Svensson, M

    2001-08-01

    Selection of patients for kidney transplantations is necessary due to the shortage of organs. The process has not been greatly studied. Twelve hypothetical cases were constructed, each with one or several relative contraindications, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, old age or a mental disorder. The cases were submitted to 40 nephrologists, chosen to represent the recruitment areas of the four Swedish transplant units. They were asked to declare whether the 'patient' was suitable for transplantation or not, and, independently, whether the patient would be referred to the transplant unit. The same cases were evaluated by 3-4 representatives of each transplant unit. The response rate was 100%. A median of 6 cases was considered suitable (range 3-11). The acceptance rate differed significantly between the four unit areas, from 4 cases (3-7) to 7 (4-11), p=0.014. Nephrologists would accept fewer patients than staff from the transplant units, 5 (3-10) vs. 7 (3-11), p=0.009. Most of the latter difference was compensated for by referral of borderline cases to the unit. Only 5 individual cases were equally judged by at least 75% of the respondents. Discrepancies in view were noted with respect to the significance of old or young age, the patient's determination and severe obesity. PMID:11683821

  11. Editorial: Immune monitoring in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shipkova, Maria; Wieland, Eberhard

    2016-03-01

    Solid organ transplantation is inevitably associated with the activation of the immune system of the graft recipient. An advanced knowledge of the immunological mechanisms leading to acute and chronic rejection, the advent of powerful immunosuppressive drugs, and refined surgical techniques have made solid organ transplantation a standard therapy to replace irretrievable loss of vital functions. The immune system is a complex network involving immune cells, cytokines, chemokines, antibodies, and the complement system. Monitoring and ideally influencing the allo-response of the organ recipient against the donor antigens may help to personalize the immunosuppressive therapy including the disclosure of those patients who are suitable for weaning or even discontinuation of immunosuppression. Immune monitoring comprises as plethora of candidate biomarkers capable of reflecting the donor specific and non-donor specific net activation state of the immune system in transplant recipients both before and after initiation of the immunosuppressive therapy. This special issue of Clinical Biochemistry on Immune Monitoring addresses the basic effects of immune activation in solid organ transplantation and critically reviews candidate biomarkers for immune monitoring and their analytical as well as clinical performance. PMID:26794634

  12. Organ donation and pre-emptive kidney transplantation: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that pre-emptive transplants have several clinical advantages. However, pre-emptive transplants raise a number of ethical issues. Pre-emptive transplants from living donors offer distinctly greater benefits than those from deceased donors and some pre-emptive transplantation programmes actively encourage living organ donations. Moreover, the offer of a pre-emptive transplant to a patient who is not yet on dialysis unquestionably penalises patients already on dialysis who may have been on the waiting list for a long time. Therefore preemptive transplants give rise to conflicts between justice and utility. Several factors should be considered: health conditions, clinical urgency, probability of imminent worsening of a patient's clinical condition, the future chances of finding a matching organ, and others. From the various values at stake, ethical issues are analysed in search of an acceptable synthesis. PMID:24045524

  13. Neuropathologic findings after organ transplantation. An autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Schwechheimer, K; Hashemian, A

    1995-05-01

    Since 1972 organ transplantations of kidney, bone marrow, liver, heart and lung have been performed at the University Hospital of Essen, Germany. Out of 2535 transplantations until September 1993, autopsies were performed in 157 patients In 25 patients (15.9%) neuropathologic findings (n = 26) were found. In 97 autopsies after bone marrow transplantation, 9 patients (9.3%) exhibited a severe neuropathologic alteration. In six patients (6/9; 66.6%), necrotisizing toxoplasmose encephalitis was found. Other cases showed a septic-metastatic mycotic encephalitis with crypto-coccus neoformans and candida albicans (n = 2) and leucemia infiltrates (n = 1). Massive cerebral hemorrhage was the most frequent neuropathologic finding after liver (4/8) and kidney transplantation (3/6). In addition liver-transplanted patients exhibited septic-metastatic encephalitis (3/8) and embolic brain infarct (1/8) as well as cerebral metastases (2/6) and primary malignant cerebral lymphoma in kidney transplantation (1/6). CNS findings in five autopsies after heart-lung-transplantation were diverse. They comprised intracerebral hemorrhage, intravasal lymphoma and septic-metastatic encephalitis, respectively. In summary, neuropathologic autopsy findings after organ transplantation are diverse and preferentially comprise infections, cerebral hemorrhages, and malignant lymphomas. After bone marrow transplantation, the most frequent neuropathologic autopsy finding was toxoplasmose encephalitis and massive cerebral hemorrhages after liver and kidney transplantations. PMID:8542505

  14. Ethical issues in organ and tissue transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abouna, George M

    2003-12-01

    Clinical organ transplantation provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues, which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate and ethically acceptable ways of utilizing the recent advances of stem cell

  15. Probable Rabies Virus Transmission through Organ Transplantation, China, 2015.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hang; Zhu, Wuyang; Zeng, Jun; He, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Li, Yu; Zhou, Shuwu; Mu, Di; Zhang, Kechun; Yu, Pengcheng; Li, Zhijian; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Xueqiong; Guo, Chun; Yu, Hongjie

    2016-08-01

    During July 2015, physicians at a hospital in Beijing, China, diagnosed rabies in 2 patients who had each received a kidney from a common organ donor who had died from acute progressive encephalitis of unknown cause. The patients had rabies incubation periods of 42 and 48 days. Altered mental status developed in both patients and progressively worsened to deep coma within 80 days after transplantation; both patients died. Two other transplant recipients received corneas but remained well after receiving timely rabies prophylaxis. An effective regulatory system for testing donors should be implemented to decrease the occurrence of donor-derived infectious diseases. In addition, health education should be improved to enhance public awareness of transplant-associated infectious diseases. Transplant recipients and other persons with exposure to organs or tissues from donors with rabies must be provided consistent health monitoring and follow-up, including rabies postexposure prophylaxis; any remaining organs and tissues must be quarantined and not transplanted. PMID:27331337

  16. Probable Rabies Virus Transmission through Organ Transplantation, China, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hang; Zhu, Wuyang; Zeng, Jun; He, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Li, Yu; Zhou, Shuwu; Mu, Di; Zhang, Kechun; Yu, Pengcheng; Li, Zhijian; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Xueqiong; Guo, Chun

    2016-01-01

    During July 2015, physicians at a hospital in Beijing, China, diagnosed rabies in 2 patients who had each received a kidney from a common organ donor who had died from acute progressive encephalitis of unknown cause. The patients had rabies incubation periods of 42 and 48 days. Altered mental status developed in both patients and progressively worsened to deep coma within 80 days after transplantation; both patients died. Two other transplant recipients received corneas but remained well after receiving timely rabies prophylaxis. An effective regulatory system for testing donors should be implemented to decrease the occurrence of donor-derived infectious diseases. In addition, health education should be improved to enhance public awareness of transplant-associated infectious diseases. Transplant recipients and other persons with exposure to organs or tissues from donors with rabies must be provided consistent health monitoring and follow-up, including rabies postexposure prophylaxis; any remaining organs and tissues must be quarantined and not transplanted. PMID:27331337

  17. Anesthetic Considerations for the Parturient After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moaveni, Daria M; Cohn, Jennifer H; Hoctor, Katherine G; Longman, Ryan E; Ranasinghe, J Sudharma

    2016-08-01

    Over the past 40 years, the success of organ transplantation has increased such that female solid organ transplant recipients are able to conceive and carry pregnancies successfully to term. Anesthesiologists are faced with the challenge of providing anesthesia care to these high-risk obstetric patients in the peripartum period. Anesthetic considerations include the effects of the physiologic changes of pregnancy on the transplanted organ, graft function in the peripartum period, and the maternal side effects and drug interactions of immunosuppressive agents. These women are at an increased risk of comorbidities and obstetric complications. Anesthetic management should consider the important task of protecting graft function. Optimal care of a woman with a transplanted solid organ involves management by a multidisciplinary team. In this focused review article, we review the anesthetic management of pregnant patients with solid organ transplants of the kidney, liver, heart, or lung. PMID:27285002

  18. Bioengineering for Organ Transplantation: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Welman, Ted; Michel, Sebastian; Segaren, Nicholas; Shanmugarajah, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Organ transplantation can offer a curative option for patients with end stage organ failure. Unfortunately the treatment is severely limited by the availability of donor organs. Organ bioengineering could provide a solution to the worldwide critical organ shortage. The majority of protocols to date have employed the use of decellularization-recellularization technology of naturally occurring tissues and organs with promising results in heart, lung, liver, pancreas, intestine and kidney engineering. Successful decellularization has provided researchers with suitable scaffolds to attempt cell reseeding. Future work will need to focus on the optimization of organ specific recellularization techniques before organ bioengineering can become clinically translatable. This review will examine the current progress in organ bioengineering and highlight future challenges in the field. PMID:26259720

  19. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia in transplant patients: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Eun-Young Kang; Patz, E.F. Jr.; Mueller, N.L.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the CT findings of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia in transplant patients. The study included 10 transplant patients who had chest CT scan and pathologically proven isolated pulmonary CMV infection. Five patients had bone marrow transplant and five had solid organ transplant. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for pattern and distribution of disease and the CT findings compared with the findings on open lung biopsy (n = 9) and autopsy (n = 1). Nine of 10 patients had parenchymal abnormalities apparent at CT and I had normal CT scans. The findings in the nine patients included small nodules (n = 6), consolidation (n = 4), ground-glass attenuation (n = 4), and irregular lines (n = 1). The nodules had a bilateral and symmetric distribution and involved all lung zones. The consolidation was most marked in the lower lung zones. The CT findings of CMV pneumonia in transplant patients are heterogeneous. The most common patterns include small nodules and areas of consolidation. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The role of the psychiatrist in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Klapheke, M M

    1999-01-01

    The psychiatrist has multiple roles on the transplant team, beginning with the transplantation psychiatry consultation (TPC). It addresses such issues as risks of exacerbation or recurrence of a psychiatric illness, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations due to organ failure, potential drug interactions involving psychotropic and immunosuppressant medications, adequacy of support system, history of medical compliance, emotional and cognitive preparedness for transplantation, mental status findings supplemented by standardized cognitive testing and psychosocial rating instruments, and decision-making capacity. The consultation concludes with an overall assessment of the patient's psychosocial strengths and limitations, and recommended interventions to optimize his or her candidacy for transplantation. The consultation findings aid the psychiatrist and the transplant team in striving for fairness and the ideal of "neutrality" in an effort to serve the needs of the patient, other transplant candidates, and society with regard to optimal organ stewardship. PMID:10028744

  1. The neurology of solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Avila, J David; Živković, Saša

    2015-07-01

    Transplantation is the rescue treatment for end-stage organ failure with more than 110,000 solid organs transplantations performed worldwide annually. Recent advances in transplantation procedures and posttransplantation management have improved long-term survival and quality of life of transplant recipients, shifting the focus from acute perioperative critical care needs toward long-term chronic medical problems. Neurologic complications affect up to 30-60 % of solid organ transplant recipients. Common etiologies include opportunistic infections and toxicities of antirejection medications, and wide spectrum of toxic and metabolic disturbances. Most complications are common to all allograft types, but some are relatively specific for individual allograft types (e.g., central pontine myelinolysis in liver transplant recipients). Close collaboration between neurologists and other transplant team members is essential for effective management. Early recognition of complications and accurate diagnosis leading to timely treatment is essential to reduce the morbidity and improve the overall transplant outcome. PMID:26008808

  2. [Solid organ transplantation in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Kuman, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (heart, lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, small interesting and their combinations) are standard therapy of terminal organ failure. Czech Republic belongs to the states with developed transplantation program. The results correspond with current knowledge and results of leading centers in the world, as demostrated in this article. Organ donor shortage is major factor limiting development of organ transplantations as elsewhere in the Europe or in the world. PMID:26375707

  3. Obama's 3-Pronged Effort to Speed Organ Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cooperation of dozens of corporations, universities, hospitals, foundations and patient advocacy organizations in this ongoing project. ... and survival after lung transplantation, the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is committing $15 million for new projects. Another ...

  4. Immunosuppression in Solid-Organ Transplantation: Essentials and Practical Tips.

    PubMed

    Jasiak, Natalia M; Park, Jeong M

    2016-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team approach is essential for successful management of patients with solid-organ transplant. Transplant nursing encompasses care and support of transplant recipients as well as caregivers and organ donors through all phases of transplantation, from pretransplant evaluation to posttransplant recovery and maintenance. The field of solid-organ transplantation has advanced rapidly, and new treatments continue to emerge. Nurses who are responsible for the care of transplant recipients should have a knowledge base in transplant immunology and pharmacology. This review discusses mechanism of action, indication, side effects, and drug interactions of commonly used immunosuppressive medications in solid-organ transplantation. Nonoral routes of drug administration, therapeutic drug monitoring, and patient monitoring strategies are also included as practical tips for bedside nurses who are responsible for delivery of direct patient care and education of patients and their caregivers. This review focuses on the following medications: antithymocyte globulins, basiliximab, alemtuzumab, corticosteroids, tacrolimus, cyclosporine, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil/mycophenolate sodium, sirolimus, everolimus, belatacept, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab. PMID:27254639

  5. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  6. A brief history of cross-species organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cross-species transplantation (xenotransplantation) offers the prospect of an unlimited supply of organs and cells for clinical transplantation, thus resolving the critical shortage of human tissues that currently prohibits a majority of patients on the waiting list from receiving transplants. Between the 17th and 20th centuries, blood was transfused from various animal species into patients with a variety of pathological conditions. Skin grafts were carried out in the 19th century from a variety of animals, with frogs being the most popular. In the 1920s, Voronoff advocated the transplantation of slices of chimpanzee testis into aged men whose “zest for life” was deteriorating, believing that the hormones produced by the testis would rejuvenate his patients. Following the pioneering surgical work of Carrel, who developed the technique of blood vessel anastomosis, numerous attempts at nonhuman primate organ transplantation in patients were carried out in the 20th century. In 1963–1964, when human organs were not available and chronic dialysis was not yet in use, Reemtsma transplanted chimpanzee kidneys into 13 patients, one of whom returned to work for almost 9 months before suddenly dying from what was believed to be an electrolyte disturbance. The first heart transplant in a human ever performed was by Hardy in 1964, using a chimpanzee heart, but the patient died within 2 hours. Starzl carried out the first chimpanzee-to-human liver transplantation in 1966; in 1992, he obtained patient survival for 70 days following a baboon liver transplant. With the advent of genetic engineering and cloning technologies, pigs are currently available with a number of different manipulations that protect their tissues from the human immune response, resulting in increasing pig graft survival in nonhuman primate models. Genetically modified pigs offer hope of a limitless supply of organs and cells for those in need of a transplant. PMID:22275786

  7. Haematuria in postrenal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziting; Vathsala, Anantharaman; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-01-01

    Haematuria has a prevalence of 12% in the postrenal transplant patient population. It heralds potentially dangerous causes which could threaten graft loss. It is important to consider causes in light of the unique, urological, and immunological standpoints of these patients. We review the literature on common causes of haematuria in postrenal transplant patients and suggest the salient approach to the evaluation of this condition. A major cause of haematuria is urinary tract infections. There should be a higher index of suspicion for mycobacterial, fungal, and viral infection in this group of immunosuppressed patients. Measures recommended in the prevention of urinary tract infections include early removal of foreign bodies as well as prophylactic antibiotics during the early transplant phase. Another common cause of haematuria is that of malignancies, in particular, renal cell carcinomas. When surgically managing cancer in the setting of a renal transplant, one has to be mindful of the limited retropubic space and the need to protect the anastomoses. Other causes include graft rejections, recurrences of primary disease, and calculus formation. It is important to perform a comprehensive evaluation with the aid of an experienced multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:25918706

  8. Haematuria in Postrenal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziting; Vathsala, Anantharaman; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-01-01

    Haematuria has a prevalence of 12% in the postrenal transplant patient population. It heralds potentially dangerous causes which could threaten graft loss. It is important to consider causes in light of the unique, urological, and immunological standpoints of these patients. We review the literature on common causes of haematuria in postrenal transplant patients and suggest the salient approach to the evaluation of this condition. A major cause of haematuria is urinary tract infections. There should be a higher index of suspicion for mycobacterial, fungal, and viral infection in this group of immunosuppressed patients. Measures recommended in the prevention of urinary tract infections include early removal of foreign bodies as well as prophylactic antibiotics during the early transplant phase. Another common cause of haematuria is that of malignancies, in particular, renal cell carcinomas. When surgically managing cancer in the setting of a renal transplant, one has to be mindful of the limited retropubic space and the need to protect the anastomoses. Other causes include graft rejections, recurrences of primary disease, and calculus formation. It is important to perform a comprehensive evaluation with the aid of an experienced multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:25918706

  9. Donor to recipient sizing in thoracic organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M

    2016-03-24

    Donor-to-recipient organ size matching is a critical aspect of thoracic transplantation. In the United States potential recipients for lung transplant and heart transplant are listed with limitations on donor height and weight ranges, respectively. Height is used as a surrogate for lung size and weight is used as a surrogate for heart size. While these measures are important predictors of organ size, they are crude surrogates that fail to incorporate the influence of sex on organ size. Independent of other measures, a man's thoracic organs are approximately 20% larger than a woman's. Lung size can be better estimated using the predicted total lung capacity, which is derived from regression equations correcting for height, sex and age. Similarly, heart size can be better estimated using the predicted heart mass, which adjusts for sex, age, height, and weight. These refined organ sizing measures perform better than current sizing practice for the prediction of outcomes after transplantation, and largely explain the outcome differences observed after sex-mismatch transplantation. An undersized allograft is associated with worse outcomes. In this review we examine current data pertaining to size-matching in thoracic transplantation. We advocate for a change in the thoracic allocation mechanism from a height-or-weight-based strategy to a size-matching process that utilizes refined estimates of organ size. We believe that a size-matching approach based on refined estimates of organ size would optimize outcomes in thoracic transplantation without restricting or precluding patients from thoracic transplantation. PMID:27011913

  10. Organic tomato transplant production and supplemental fertilizers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producing healthy transplants for organic production systems is an essential step in the process of maximizing crop yields. All components entering into the organic crop production system must be approved for organic use, including the seed, soil media, and fertilizer used in transplant production....

  11. [Prophylaxis against respiratory viral disease in pediatric and adult patients undergoing solid organ and hematopoietic stem cells transplantation].

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Ana M; Catalán, Paula; Alba, Andrea; Zubleta, Marcela

    2012-09-01

    Respiratory viruses have been identified as a cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing SOT and HSCT, specially in children. The most frequent are respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza (FLU), parainfluenza (PI) and adenovirus (ADV). These infections are associated with progression to severe lower respiratory tract infections in up to 60% of the cases. It is advised to apply universal protection recommendations for respiratory viruses (A2) and some specific measures for FLU and AD. FLU: Annual anti-influenza vaccination (from 4-6 months post-transplantation in SOT, 6 months in HSCT (A2)); post- exposure prophylaxis in FLU (oseltamivir for 10 days (B2)). In lung transplantion, the prophylaxis should last as long as the risk period (B2). ADV: There is no vaccine nor valid chemoprophylaxis strategy to prevent ADV disease. In some specific HSCT recipients, weekly PCR monitoring is recommended until day+100 (A3). PMID:23282554

  12. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  13. The Emerging Role of Nanotechnology in Cell and Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tasciotti, Ennio; Cabrera, Fernando J; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Martinez, Jonathan O; Thekkedath, Usha R; Kloc, Malgorzata; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Li, Xian C; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation is often the only choice many patients have when suffering from end-stage organ failure. Although the quality of life improves after transplantation, challenges, such as organ shortages, necessary immunosuppression with associated complications, and chronic graft rejection, limit its wide clinical application. Nanotechnology has emerged in the past 2 decades as a field with the potential to satisfy clinical needs in the area of targeted and sustained drug delivery, noninvasive imaging, and tissue engineering. In this article, we provide an overview of popular nanotechnologies and a summary of the current and potential uses of nanotechnology in cell and organ transplantation. PMID:27257995

  14. Philosophical and ethical issues in human organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, K M

    Organ transplantation has moved over 30 years from being experimental and heroic to being the treatment of choice in many terminal diseases of vital organs, such as biliary atresis, which would require a liver transplant, or pulmonary fibrosis, which would require a heart/lung transplant. There are now many more older and chronically sick people than ever before (Hudak et al, 1998). Transplantation offers hope for an improved quality of life. All patients have a right to care, although there remains a dichotomy between the holistic model of care and the medical model. The UKCC's (1992) Code of Professional Conduct informs practice, and clauses 1 and 5 are of particular importance in relation to this client group. This article looks at some of the problems patients may develop pre- and post-transplant and the support required to overcome or minimize these problems. Implications for healthcare staff are considered. PMID:12070387

  15. Neurotoxicity of Immunosuppressive Therapies in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    ANGHEL, Daniela; TANASESCU, Radu; CAMPEANU, Ana; LUPESCU, Ioana; PODDA, Giulio; BAJENARU, Ovidiu

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Immunosuppressive agents have revolutionized clinical transplantation medicine, allowing the avoidance of immune system attack on the transplanted graft. Nevertheless, the use of medications such as cyclosporine, tacrolimus and others also brought the side effects of these drugs. Early identification of drug-induced neurotoxicity in transplanted patients and of its specific causes is important, not only because of patient's poor clinical status but because of concomitant systemic and metabolic disorders which may obscure symptoms. Treatment and prognosis are highly dependent on the type of complication and it's early recognition. This review focuses on the clinical entities of neurotoxicity caused by immunosuppressive drugs in transplanted patients. PMID:24371481

  16. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... contact. What questions should I ask the transplant team? What kind of medical tests are done in ... listing? Who are the members of the transplant team and what are their jobs? How many attending ...

  17. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished...

  18. Issues in organ procurement, allocation, and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nierste, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Organ transplantation extends lives and improves health but presents complex ethical dilemmas for nurses caring for donors, recipients, and their families. This article overviews organ procurement and allocation, discusses ethical dilemmas in transplantation, and offers strategies from professional and biblical perspectives for coping with moral distress and maintaining compassionate care. PMID:23607154

  19. Organ shortage: the greatest challenge facing transplant medicine.

    PubMed

    Shafran, David; Kodish, Eric; Tzakis, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The success of organ transplantation as a treatment for end-stage organ disease has yielded a series of ethical quandaries originating from the issue of organ shortage. Scarcity of organs for transplantation necessitates formulation of just and fair allocation policies as well as ethically viable solutions to bridging the vast gap between organ supply and demand. The concept of "triage" provides a useful paradigm in which to contextualize the organ shortage issue. This entails subjugating the welfare of the individual patient for the benefit of the wider community as an ethically justified response to the challenge of scarcity. PMID:24831673

  20. Organ transplantation: legal, ethical and islamic perspective in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bakari, Abubakar A; Abbo Jimeta, Umar S; Abubakar, Mohammed A; Alhassan, Sani U; Nwankwo, Emeka A

    2012-07-01

    Organ transplantation dates back to the ancient times and since then it has become one of the important developments in modern medicine; saving the lives, as well as improving the quality of life of many patients. As the demand for organ transplantation far exceeds the organ availability, the transplant program is often saddled with complex legal and ethical issues. This review article highlights the legal and ethical issues that might arise regarding organ transplantation and appraises the existing legal frame work governing organ transplantation in Nigeria. Information on legal, cultural, religious and medical ethical issues regarding organ transplantation in Nigeria was obtained by searching the PubMed and Google Scholar, conference proceedings, seminar paper presentations, law library and other related publications were collated and analyzed. In decision making for organ transplantation, the bioethical principles like autonomy, beneficence and justice must be employed. It was believed by Catholic theologians that to mutilate one living person to benefit another violates the principle of Totality. Among Muslim scholars and researchers, there are those who throw legal support as to its permissibility while the other group sees it as illegal. Organ/tissues transplantation is considered a medical intervention that touches on the fundamental rights of the donor or the recipient. Where there is an unlawful infringement of the right of such persons in any way may be regarded as against Section 34 of the 1999 Nigerian Constitution dealing with right to dignity of the human person. Worldwide, the researchers and government bodies have agreed on informed consent for organ/tissue donation and for recipient should be obtained without coercion before embarking on such medical treatment Worldwide organ transplantation has become the best medical treatment for patients with end stage organ failure. However, there is no law/legislation backing organ/tissues transplantation in

  1. Organ Transplantation: Legal, Ethical and Islamic Perspective in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Bakari, Abubakar A; Abbo Jimeta, Umar S; Abubakar, Mohammed A; Alhassan, Sani U; Nwankwo, Emeka A

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation dates back to the ancient times and since then it has become one of the important developments in modern medicine; saving the lives, as well as improving the quality of life of many patients. As the demand for organ transplantation far exceeds the organ availability, the transplant program is often saddled with complex legal and ethical issues. This review article highlights the legal and ethical issues that might arise regarding organ transplantation and appraises the existing legal frame work governing organ transplantation in Nigeria. Information on legal, cultural, religious and medical ethical issues regarding organ transplantation in Nigeria was obtained by searching the PubMed and Google Scholar, conference proceedings, seminar paper presentations, law library and other related publications were collated and analyzed. In decision making for organ transplantation, the bioethical principles like autonomy, beneficence and justice must be employed. It was believed by Catholic theologians that to mutilate one living person to benefit another violates the principle of Totality. Among Muslim scholars and researchers, there are those who throw legal support as to its permissibility while the other group sees it as illegal. Organ/tissues transplantation is considered a medical intervention that touches on the fundamental rights of the donor or the recipient. Where there is an unlawful infringement of the right of such persons in any way may be regarded as against Section 34 of the 1999 Nigerian Constitution dealing with right to dignity of the human person. Worldwide, the researchers and government bodies have agreed on informed consent for organ/tissue donation and for recipient should be obtained without coercion before embarking on such medical treatment Worldwide organ transplantation has become the best medical treatment for patients with end stage organ failure. However, there is no law/legislation backing organ/tissues transplantation in

  2. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... child or an adult How does the matching process work? The matching process contains five steps: An organ is donated. When ... next patient on the list is contacted. This process continues until a match is made. What policies ...

  3. [Long-term-management of organ transplant recipients].

    PubMed

    Bürger, Christin; Schmidt, Martina; Maschmeier, Miriam; Stella, Jaqueline; Hüsing, Anna; Wilms, Christian; Schmidt, Hartmut Hans-Jürgen; Kabar, Iyad

    2016-07-01

    Due to advances in immunosuppressive therapy and surgical techniques, survival rates after solid organ transplantation have constantly improved over the last decades. In long-term care after transplantation, physicians need to focus as much on diagnosis and treatment of allograft-related complications as they should consider comorbidities and evaluate risk-factors and adverse events of immunosuppressive agents to prevent secondary diseases. In particular, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, malignancy and infection play a major role in long-term survival. Therefore, screening of organ transplant recipients in regard to these complications and adverse events is a crucial part of follow up in these patients. PMID:27359310

  4. Perioperative Monitoring in Liver Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  5. Perioperative monitoring in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-09-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  6. Invasive candidiasis serological diagnosis in solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Magdalena; Gołaś, Marlena; Dąbkowska, Maria; Pączek, Leszek; Swoboda-Kopeć, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at high risk of fungal infections, because of ongoing immunosuppressive treatment. There are three post organ transplant phases: early, intermediate, and late, all of them at risk of Candida infections. Since conventional tests are insufficient, specific secondary diagnostic tests are still being explored. Serological tests are currently the most common choice. The present study was to determine the usefulness of mannan antigen and anti-mannan antibody detection in diagnosing invasive candidiasis in liver or kidney transplant recipients. The levels of mannan and anti-mannan antibodies were assessed with Platelia Candida Ag Plus, and Platelia Candida Ab Plus (Biorad, Marne-la-Coquette, France) commercial tests, according to manufacturer's guidelines. Sixty six serum samples were obtained from 25 patients (9 liver transplant recipients, 7 kidney transplant recipients, and 9 patients prepared for a kidney transplant), 29 serum samples from 15 patients tested positive for mannan antigen. Serum samples were obtained from 14 patients tested positive for anti- mannan antibodies. Fungal antigen detection in blood serum in patients under immunosuppression, especially with neutropenia, suggests that antifungal treatment should be administered. Serological tests, especially mannan and anti-mannan ones, are very useful for confirmation or exclusion of invasive candidiasis in high-risk patients. PMID:26155122

  7. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth KEY POINTS n Have a dental checkup before your transplant procedure. n See your ... problems . SEE YOUR DENTIST Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth BEFORE ...

  8. The potential advantages of transplanting organs from pig to man: A transplant Surgeon's view.

    PubMed

    Groth, Carl G

    2007-07-01

    Once pig organs can be transplanted into humans, transplantation will move into a new era. There will be unlimited access to undamaged organs and cells for transplantation and, eventually, donation from deceased or live human beings will become obsolete. Furthermore, it will be possible to alleviate graft rejection, at least in part, by genetic modification of the source animal. Currently, there are three major obstacles to performing transplantations from pig to man: 1) a powerful immune barrier, 2) a potential risk of transmitting microorganisms, particularly endogenous retrovirus and 3) ethical issues related to the future recipients and to society at large.This article will first discuss ongoing work with regards to overcoming the current obstacles. Then, the many potential advantages of using pig organs will be listed. Next, the criteria for selecting the first patients for transplantation with pig organs, will be briefly discussed. Finally, some promising observations made in the context of early attempts at transplanting porcine cells to patients, will be mentioned. PMID:19718335

  9. [Nursing participation in the coordination of organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Méndez, Claudia; Suárez Vázquez, María Guadalupe; Pinson Guerra, Ana Guadalupe

    2002-01-01

    The significant growth and development in the field of transplantation has enabled people who suffer from a terminal disease to live longer and with a better quality of life. However, there is still a lack of sensibility for organ/tissue donation in our society. The list of people waiting for an organ grows every day, but not the list of donors. The truth is that without a donor, there is no transplant. Nurses play an important role in this process. They have the knowledge, clinical experience, and management skills to collaborate, organize, and implement specific activities in the transplant process. These activities will be explained in this article. Transplant Coordinator Nurses have the potential to develop their skills in different areas of nursing: patient care, research, teaching and humanism. PMID:12001855

  10. Primary Care of the Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher J; Pagalilauan, Genevieve

    2015-09-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is one of the major advances in medicine. Care of the SOT recipient is complex and continued partnership with the transplant specialist is essential to manage and treat complications and maintain health. The increased longevity of SOT recipients will lead to their being an evolving part of primary care practice, with ever more opportunities for care, education, and research of this rewarding patient population. This review discusses the overall primary care management of adult SOT recipients. PMID:26320047

  11. Comparison of cytomegalovirus viral load measure by real-time PCR with pp65 antigenemia for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus disease in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hernando, S; Folgueira, L; Lumbreras, C; San Juan, R; Maldonado, S; Prieto, C; Babiano, M J; Delgado, J; Andres, A; Moreno, E; Aguado, J M; Otero, J R

    2005-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most frequent complication in solid organ transplant recipients. Currently, the antigenemia assay is widely used to detect this infection, although its success is being questioned to a great extent nowadays. The aim of our study is to compare a quantitative real time PCR to measure CMV DNA to the antigenemia assay, for the diagnosis to CMV disease. For our research, we prospectively processed 1198 samples (plasma and peripheral blood leukocytes [PBMC]), which belonged to 158 transplant recipients. In every sample the detection of the pp65 antigen in PBMC was carried out, as well as the quantification of CMV DNA by PCR (Light Cycler, LC-PCR). For this process, FRET probes, which detect a 254-bp fragment from the CMV gB gene, were used. The dynamic range of the LC-PCR was 500 to 5.10(7) copies/mL plasma and from 62 to 6.10(6) copies/10(6) PBMC. Twenty-three episodes of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease occurred in 22 out of 158 patients and PCR displayed levels of sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 67%, respectively. The antigenemia assay obtained values of 91% and 57%. We established a cutoff value of 10(3) copies/mL plasma and 315 copies/10(6) cells. According to these cutoff values, PCR showed levels of sensitivity, specificity, VPN and VPP of 95.6%, 81.6%, 99%, and 53% respectively. Moreover, the LC-PCR assay anticipated the antigenemia assay in 10 patients out of 22 who developed CMV disease and the appearance of any clinical symptoms in 12 out of 22 patients. In conclusion, we believe that the quantification of CMV DNA by LC-PCR is a superior assay to pp65 antigenemia test regarding the early diagnosis of CMV disease in solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:16386635

  12. [Vaccinations for immunocompromised hosts – focussing on patients after a hematological stem cell or organ transplantation, with HIV or with functional or anatomical asplenia].

    PubMed

    Staehelin, Cornelia; Hirzel, Cédric; Hauser, Christoph; Furrer, Hansjakob

    2016-01-01

    Patients with an acquired immune deficiency, for example due to HIV-infection, after a solid organ or haematological stem cell transplantation or due to functional or anatomical asplenia, have a greater risk to experience severe complications or a chronic course of infection compared to healthy individuals. Vaccinations would pose an ideal primary preventive method. However, their efficacy is reduced if applied during the immunosuppressed period. Therefore, whenever possible, vaccinations should be administered before the period of immunosuppression starts – or caught up later during the period of minimal possible immunosuppression. Nevertheless, the benefit conveyed through vaccines is undisputed, particularly if indications regarding dosing of vaccines (amount and frequency of doses) are optimized according to the given state of immunosuppression. Live attenuated vaccines are contraindicated during severe immunosuppression. Serologies should still be analysed and documented however, since these vulnerable patients require passive immunization through specific or standard intravenous immunoglobulins in case of relevant exposure to the respective antigens. For all patients therefore, careful documentation and communication of previous vaccinations and serologies (protective or not) among the various medical specialties is required to optimize patient management. For all immunosuppressed patients the efficacy of polysaccharide vaccines (such as the pneumococcal and meningococcal vaccines PSV-23 and MPV-ACWY) is strongly reduced compared to the conjugated ones (PCV13 and MCV-ACWY). Therefore, contrary to most other national guidelines, the Swiss guidelines recommend to use only the conjugated versions in primary vaccination series as well as in boosters – this applies strongly for immunosuppressed patients, but is recommended also for the general population in Switzerland. Another common management recommendation specific for transplant patients is the indication

  13. Organ Donation and Transplantation Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... KS KEEP Healthy Event at Charlotte Convention Center Sat, 07/23/2016 - 8:00am Charlotte, NC Patient ... Capital City 5K for Organ, Tissue & Eye Donation Sat, 07/30/2016 - 5:30pm Madison, WI Register ...

  14. The high cost of organ transplant commercialism.

    PubMed

    Danovitch, Gabriel M

    2014-02-01

    The Declaration of Istanbul defines organ transplant commercialism as '…a policy or practice in which an organ is treated as a commodity, including by being bought or sold or used for material gain.' It is this treatment of the organ that inevitably leads to its financial value being placed before the welfare of either its donor or its recipient or others in need of organ transplantation. International experience over the past two decades has proven this point and outcomes of commercial donation for both organ donors and their recipients have been poor. Commercial organ donation also comes at the expense of, not in addition to, unpaid, 'altruistic' donation. Other consequences of commercial donation are discussed in addition to a review of measures taken by the international community to put an end to the exploitation of vulnerable organ donors and the provision of ethically acceptable options for those in need of organ transplantation. PMID:24284519

  15. FAQ: Blood Donation and Organ Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mosquito Surveillance Software Health Education Public Service Videos Blood Donation & Organ Transplant Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... get infected with West Nile virus by donating blood? No. You cannot get West Nile virus by ...

  16. Risk for transmission of Naegleria fowleri from solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Roy, S L; Metzger, R; Chen, J G; Laham, F R; Martin, M; Kipper, S W; Smith, L E; Lyon, G M; Haffner, J; Ross, J E; Rye, A K; Johnson, W; Bodager, D; Friedman, M; Walsh, D J; Collins, C; Inman, B; Davis, B J; Robinson, T; Paddock, C; Zaki, S R; Kuehnert, M; DaSilva, A; Qvarnstrom, Y; Sriram, R; Visvesvara, G S

    2014-01-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) caused by the free-living ameba (FLA) Naegleria fowleri is a rare but rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) affecting predominantly young, previously healthy persons. No effective chemotherapeutic prophylaxis or treatment has been identified. Recently, three transplant-associated clusters of encephalitis caused by another FLA, Balamuthia mandrillaris, have occurred, prompting questions regarding the suitability of extra-CNS solid organ transplantation from donors with PAM. During 1995-2012, 21 transplant recipients of solid organs donated by five patients with fatal cases of PAM were reported in the United States. None of the recipients developed PAM, and several recipients tested negative for N. fowleri by serology. However, historical PAM case reports and animal experiments with N. fowleri, combined with new postmortem findings from four patients with PAM, suggest that extra-CNS dissemination of N. fowleri can occur and might pose a risk for disease transmission via transplantation. The risks of transplantation with an organ possibly harboring N. fowleri should be carefully weighed for each individual recipient against the potentially greater risk of delaying transplantation while waiting for another suitable organ. In this article, we present a case series and review existing data to inform such risk assessments. PMID:24279908

  17. Risk for Transmission of Naegleria fowleri from Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, SL; Metzger, R; Chen, JG; Laham, FR; Martin, M; Kipper, SW; Smith, LE; Lyon, GM; Haffner, J; Ross, JE; Rye, AK; Johnson, W; Bodager, D; Friedman, M; Walsh, DJ; Collins, C; Inman, B; Davis, BJ; Robinson, T; Paddock, C; Zaki, SR; Kuehnert, M; DaSilva, A; Qvarnstrom, Y; Sriram, R; Visvesvara, GS

    2015-01-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) caused by the free-living ameba Naegleria fowleri is a rare but rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) affecting predominantly young, previously healthy persons. No effective chemotherapeutic prophylaxis or treatment has been identified. Recently, three transplant-associated clusters of encephalitis caused by another free-living ameba, Balamuthia mandrillaris, have occurred, prompting questions regarding the suitability of extra-CNS solid organ transplantation from donors with PAM. During 1995–2012, 21 transplant recipients of solid organs donated by five patients with fatal cases of PAM were reported in the United States. None of the recipients developed PAM and several recipients tested negative for N. fowleri by serology. However, historical PAM case reports and animal experiments with N. fowleri, combined with new post-mortem findings from four PAM patients, suggest that extra-CNS dissemination of N. fowleri can occur and might pose a risk for disease transmission via transplantation. The risks of transplantation with an organ possibly harboring N. fowleri should be carefully weighed for each individual recipient against the potentially greater risk of delaying transplantation while waiting for another suitable organ. In this article we present a case series and review existing data to inform such risk assessments. PMID:24279908

  18. Solid organ transplant training objectives for residents.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Vicente, R; Ballesteros, M A; Sabater, J; Roca, O; Rello, J

    2012-11-01

    With the aim of analyzing the current state of the educational objectives in the training of medical residents in solid organ transplantation (SOT), we conducted a review of the status of the official programs of the specialities involved in SOT, focusing particularly on lung transplantation. A survey of medical residents was also conducted to allow reflexion about the topic. We obtained 44 surveys from 4 University Hospitals with active programs in SOT, mainly from intensive care medicine and anesthesiology residents. We detected an important number of courses oriented to organ donation but very limited in terms of basic training in the management of the immediate postoperative period, principles of immunosuppression and updates on immunosuppressive therapy and complications (particularly rejection and infection). We also identified that these educational aspects should be directed not only to medical residents from specialities with a close retation to SOT, but also to all who may at some time have a relation to such patients. The use of information and communication techniques (ICTs), on-line courses and also simulations should be instruments to take into account in the biomedical training of medical residents. We conclude that we need a specific training program in complications of SOT, as well as fundamental principles in immunology and immunosuppressor pharmacology. PMID:22980670

  19. Donor to recipient sizing in thoracic organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Donor-to-recipient organ size matching is a critical aspect of thoracic transplantation. In the United States potential recipients for lung transplant and heart transplant are listed with limitations on donor height and weight ranges, respectively. Height is used as a surrogate for lung size and weight is used as a surrogate for heart size. While these measures are important predictors of organ size, they are crude surrogates that fail to incorporate the influence of sex on organ size. Independent of other measures, a man’s thoracic organs are approximately 20% larger than a woman’s. Lung size can be better estimated using the predicted total lung capacity, which is derived from regression equations correcting for height, sex and age. Similarly, heart size can be better estimated using the predicted heart mass, which adjusts for sex, age, height, and weight. These refined organ sizing measures perform better than current sizing practice for the prediction of outcomes after transplantation, and largely explain the outcome differences observed after sex-mismatch transplantation. An undersized allograft is associated with worse outcomes. In this review we examine current data pertaining to size-matching in thoracic transplantation. We advocate for a change in the thoracic allocation mechanism from a height-or-weight-based strategy to a size-matching process that utilizes refined estimates of organ size. We believe that a size-matching approach based on refined estimates of organ size would optimize outcomes in thoracic transplantation without restricting or precluding patients from thoracic transplantation. PMID:27011913

  20. The history of organ donation and transplantation in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghods, Ahad J

    2014-03-01

    The first kidney transplant in Iran was performed in 1967, and this was the first organ transplant in countries that are current members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation. In 1988, in response to the long waiting list at the Iranian Ministry of Health for kidney transplant, a state-regulated living-unrelated donor kidney transplant program was adopted. By 1999, the kidney transplant waiting list in Iran was eliminated. In 1989, a fatwa (religious approval) from the Supreme Religious Leader was obtained that recognized brain death and allowed deceased-donor organ transplant. Subsequently, transplant centers began performing deceased-donor kidney, liver, and heart transplants. In 2000, the Brain Death and Organ Transplantation Act was passed by the Iranian parliament, legalizing deceased-donor organ transplant. The transplant team at Shiraz began performing more deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants and became a successful deceased-donor organ transplant model in the country. By the end of 2012, there were 34166 kidney (including 4436 deceased-donor) and 2021 liver (including 1788 deceased-donor), 482 heart, 147 pancreas, 63 lung, and several intestine and multiorgan transplants performed in Iran. In 2011, there were 2771 solid-organ transplants performed in Iran (37 transplants per million population), and Iran ranked as number 33 among the 50 most active countries worldwide. In 2011 and 2012, Iran was ahead of all country members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation in performing deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants. PMID:24635790

  1. Microsporidiosis Acquired Through Solid Organ Transplantation: A Public Health Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Hocevar, Susan N.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Spak, Cedric W.; Rosenblatt, Randall; Diaz-Luna, Hector; Castillo, Isabel; Luna, Sergio; Friedman, Glen C.; Antony, Suresh; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Tiller, Rebekah V.; Peterson, Tammie; Blau, Dianna M.; Sriram, Rama R.; da Silva, Alexandre; de Almeida, Marcos; Benedict, Theresa; Goldsmith, Cynthia S.; Zaki, Sherif R.; Visvesvara, Govinda S.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Encephalitozoon cuniculi, a microsporidial species most commonly recognized as a cause of renal, respiratory, and central nervous system infections in immunosuppressed patients, was identified as the cause of a temporally associated cluster of febrile illness among 3 solid organ transplant recipients from a common donor. Objective To confirm the source of the illness, assess donor and recipient risk factors, and provide therapy recommendations for ill recipients. Design Public health investigation. Setting Two transplant hospitals and community interview with the deceased donor’s family. Patients Three transplant recipients and the organ donor. Measurements Specimens were tested for microsporidia by using culture, immunofluorescent antibody, polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. Donor medical records were reviewed and a questionnaire was developed to assess for microsporidial infection. Results Kidneys and lungs were procured from the deceased donor and transplanted to 3 recipients who became ill with fever 7 to 10 weeks after the transplant. Results of urine culture, serologic, and polymerase chain reaction testing were positive for Encephalitozoon cuniculi of genotype III in each recipient; the organism was also identified in biopsy or autopsy specimens in all recipients. The donor had positive serologic test results for Encephalitozoon cuniculi. Surviving recipients received albendazole. Donor assessment did not identify factors for suspected Encephalitozoon cuniculi infection. Limitation Inability to detect organism by culture or polymerase chain reaction in donor due to lack of autopsy specimens. Conclusion Transmission of microsporidiosis through organ transplantation is described. Microsporidiosis is now recognized as an emerging transplant-associated disease and should be considered in febrile transplant recipients when tests for routinely encountered agents are unrevealing. Donor-derived disease is critical

  2. Nonhuman Primate Infections after Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Haustein, Silke V.; Kolterman, Amanda J.; Sundblad, Jeffrey J.; Fechner, John H.; Knechtle, Stuart J.

    2016-01-01

    Nonhuman primates, primarily rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), and baboons (Papio spp.), have been used extensively in research models of solid organ transplantation, mainly because the nonhuman primate (NHP) immune system closely resembles that of the human. Nonhuman primates are also frequently the model of choice for preclinical testing of new immunosuppressive strategies. But the management of post-transplant nonhuman primates is complex, because it often involves multiple immunosuppressive agents, many of which are new and have unknown effects. Additionally, the resulting immunosuppression carries a risk of infectious complications, which are challenging to diagnose. Last, because of the natural tendency of animals to hide signs of weakness, infectious complications may not be obvious until the animal becomes severely ill. For these reasons the diagnosis of infectious complications is difficult among post-transplant NHPs. Because most nonhuman primate studies in organ transplantation are quite small, there are only a few published reports concerning infections after transplantation in nonhuman primates. Based on our survey of these reports, the incidence of infection in NHP transplant models is 14%. The majority of reports suggest that many of these infections are due to reactivation of viruses endemic to the primate species, such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), polyomavirus, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)–related infections. In this review, we address the epidemiology, pathogenesis, role of prophylaxis, clinical presentation, and treatment of infectious complications after solid organ transplantation in nonhuman primates. PMID:18323582

  3. European research on cell and organ transplantation: towards novel opportunities?

    PubMed

    Goldman, Michel; Wood, Kathryn

    2007-12-01

    Recent developments in basic and translational immunology open new exciting perspectives for clinical cell and organ transplantation, including the development of novel immunosuppressive agents, new diagnostic tools and validation of biomarkers for the prediction of rejection as well as the induction of tolerance. With respect to tolerance, a number of hurdles still need to be overcome before immunosuppressive drugs can be safely minimized or withdrawn in solid organ transplant recipients. Indeed, the human immune system appears more resistant to tolerance induction than expected from experimental studies in animals. Furthermore, the basic ethical principle 'primum non-nocere' prevents the implementation of clinical protocols endowed with a significant risk for graft and/or patient survival. With this background, the European Commission recently launched several initiatives to tackle unmet needs in transplantation medicine. Herein, we focus attention on the ongoing collaborative effort across the European Union aiming at identifying the current priorities requiring better integration of resources dedicated to transplantation research. PMID:17803662

  4. Many Kidney Transplant Patients Land in ER Within 2 Years: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_157959.html Many Kidney Transplant Patients Land in ER Within 2 Years: Study Findings show need to coordinate care after organ transplant, researcher says To use the sharing features on this page, please enable ...

  5. Revisiting multi-organ transplantation in the setting of scarcity.

    PubMed

    Reese, P P; Veatch, R M; Abt, P L; Amaral, S

    2014-01-01

    In the setting of organ scarcity, the ethics of multi-organ transplantation (MOT) deserve new examination. MOT offers substantial benefits to certain recipients, including avoiding serial surgeries. However, MOT candidates in the United States commonly receive priority for their nonprimary organ over many individuals who need that organ, which may undermine equity. The absence of standard criteria for MOT eligibility also enables large and unfair regional variation in MOT, such as simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. Unfortunately, MOT may also undermine utility (optimal patient and graft survival) in circumstances where providing multiple organs to one person fails to achieve the greater collective benefit attained by providing transplants to multiple people. Policy reforms should include the adoption of minimal clinical criteria for MOT candidacy with the attendant goal of decreasing regional variation in MOT. In the future, these minimal criteria can be revised to accommodate new research about which patients derive the most benefit from MOT. Incentives to perform MOT should also be reduced, such as by including MOT outcomes in center-specific reports. These reforms run the risk that the transplant community could be perceived as abandoning MOT candidates, but offer an opportunity to align transplant practice and ethical principles. PMID:24354869

  6. Organ transplantation: the Latin American legislative response.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida-Puelma, H L

    1990-01-01

    As medical barriers to human organ transplants have fallen, serious legal and ethical obstacles have emerged. This article provides an overview of those obstacles, taking into account the relevant legislation in force in 16 Latin American countries in 1989. The author proceeds by considering postmortem and inter-vivos organ donations separately and examining the principal ethical and legal issues relating to each kind. In the case of postmortem donation these deal mainly with donor consent, recipient selection, funding of transplant costs, and possible conflict of interest. In the case of inter-vivos donation they relate again to donor consent and funding as well as to certain other matters-notably donor compensation, commerce in organs, and international sharing of organs. On the whole it is concluded that the countries of Latin America, together with the nations of the world in general, urgently need to develop more comprehensive legislation on organ procurement and transplantation. PMID:2073558

  7. Primate models in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Douglas J; Kirk, Allan D

    2013-09-01

    Large animal models have long served as the proving grounds for advances in transplantation, bridging the gap between inbred mouse experimentation and human clinical trials. Although a variety of species have been and continue to be used, the emergence of highly targeted biologic- and antibody-based therapies has required models to have a high degree of homology with humans. Thus, the nonhuman primate has become the model of choice in many settings. This article will provide an overview of nonhuman primate models of transplantation. Issues of primate genetics and care will be introduced, and a brief overview of technical aspects for various transplant models will be discussed. Finally, several prominent immunosuppressive and tolerance strategies used in primates will be reviewed. PMID:24003248

  8. Mental health disorders and solid-organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Chris; Armstrong, Matthew J; Parker, Richard; Webb, Kerry; Neuberger, James M

    2013-10-15

    Depression affects up to 60% of solid-organ recipients and is independently associated with both mortality (hazard ratio for death of ~2) and de novo malignancy after transplantation, although the mechanism is not clear. Both pretransplantation psychosis and depression occurring more than 2 years after transplantation are associated with increased noncompliance and graft loss. It remains to be shown that effective treatment of depression is associated with improved outcomes and quality of life. Immunosuppressive drugs (especially corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors) and physiologic challenges can precipitate deterioration in mental health. All potential transplant candidates should be assessed for mental health problems and preexisting medical conditions that can mimic mental health problems, such as uremic, hepatic, or hypoxic encephalopathy, should be identified and treated appropriately. Expert mental health review of those with identified risk factors (such as previous suicide attempts, history of mental illness or noncompliance with medications) is advisable early in the transplant assessment process to mitigate risk and support the patient. Patients with mental health disorders, when adequately controlled and socially supported, have outcomes similar to the general transplant population. Therefore, exclusion from transplantation based on the diagnosis alone is neither ethically nor medically justified. However, it is ethically and clinically justifiable to deny access to transplantation to those who, despite full support, would have a quality of life that is unacceptable to the candidate or are likely to be noncompliant with treatment or follow-up, which would lead to graft loss. PMID:23743726

  9. Enigmatic pruritus in a kidney transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Yates, John E; Bleyer, Anthony J; Yosipovitch, Gil; Sangueza, Omar P; Murea, Mariana

    2013-04-01

    Pruritus is a common problem following a kidney transplant and is usually attributable to new medications related to transplantation. We present an unusual case of pruritus that began several months after kidney transplantation. After changing several immunosuppressive medications, numerous clinical visits and consideration by the patient of stopping immunosuppression, scabies was diagnosed as the cause. Treatment with oral ivermectin and topical permethrin resulted in complete resolution of symptoms within 1 week. Transplant physicians should consider common causes of pruritus unrelated to transplantation; diagnostic skin lesions of scabies may be absent. PMID:26019849

  10. Role of tacrolimus combination therapy with mycophenolate mofetil in the prevention of organ rejection in kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, P; Shah, G; Chhabra, D; Gallon, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Several new medications are now available for immunosuppression in the kidney transplant field. Tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil were first introduced for immunosuppression in renal transplantation in the mid 1990s. Since then, the combination of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil has been evaluated in numerous clinical trials. The outcomes of these trials have varied due to differences in induction and/or maintenance therapy, drug dosing and monitoring protocols, and study design. The aim of this review is to analyze the literature critically and to provide an overview of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil combination therapy in renal transplantation. PMID:21694936

  11. Optimized donor management and organ preservation before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Heiko M; Yard, Benito A; Krämer, Bernhard K; Benck, Urs; Schnülle, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is a major medical improvement for patients with end-stage renal disease, but organ shortage limits its widespread use. As a consequence, the proportion of grafts procured from extended criteria donors (ECD) has increased considerably, but this comes along with increased rates of delayed graft function (DGF) and a higher incidence of immune-mediated rejection that limits organ and patient survival. Furthermore, most grafts are derived from brain dead organ donors, but the unphysiological state of brain death is associated with significant metabolic, hemodynamic, and pro-inflammatory changes, which further compromise patient and graft survival. Thus, donor interventions to preserve graft quality are fundamental to improve long-term transplantation outcome, but interventions must not harm other potentially transplantable grafts. Several donor pretreatment strategies have provided encouraging results in animal models, but evidence from human studies is sparse, as most clinical evidence is derived from single-center or nonrandomized trials. Furthermore, ethical matters have to be considered especially concerning consent from donors, donor families, and transplant recipients to research in the field of donor treatment. This review provides an overview of clinically proven and promising preclinical strategies of donor treatment to optimize long-term results after kidney transplantation. PMID:26563531

  12. Organ transplant tissue rejection: detection and staging by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Whitehead, Peter D.; McManus, Bruce; Zeng, Haishan; Wilson-McManus, Janet; MacKinnon, Nick; Morgan, David C.; Dong, Chunming; Gerla, Paul; Kenyon, Jennifer

    1998-07-01

    Patients receiving heart or other organ transplants usually require some level of anti-rejection drug therapy, most commonly cyclosporine. The rejection status of the organ must be monitored to determine the optimal anti-rejection drug therapy. The current method for monitoring post-transplant rejection status of heart transplant patients consists of taking biopsies from the right ventricle. In this work we have developed a system employing optical and signal-processing techniques that will allow a cardiologist to measure spectral changes associated with tissue rejection using an optical catheter probe. The system employs time gated illumination and detection systems to deal with the dynamic signal acquisition problems associated with in vivo measurements of a beating heart. Spectral data processing software evaluates and processes the data to produce a simple numerical score. Results of measurements made on 100 excised transplanted isograft and allograft rat hearts have demonstrated the ability of the system to detect the presence of rejection and to accurately correlate the spectroscopic results with the ISHLT (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) stage of rejection determined by histopathology. In vivo measurements using a pig transplant model are now in process.

  13. Immunogenicity of quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine in organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D; Unger, E R; Panicker, G; Medvedev, P; Wilson, L; Humar, A

    2013-09-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at risk of morbidity from human papillomavirus (HPV)-related diseases. Quadrivalent HPV vaccine is recommended for posttransplant patients but there are no data on vaccine immunogenicity. We determined the immunogenicity of HPV vaccine in a cohort of young adult transplant patients. Patients were immunized with three doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine containing viral types 6, 11, 16 and 18. Immunogenicity was determined by type-specific viral-like protein ELISA. Four weeks after the last dose of vaccine, a vaccine response was seen in 63.2%, 68.4%, 63.2% and 52.6% for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18, respectively. Factors that led to reduced immunogenicity were vaccination early after transplant (p = 0.019), having a lung transplant (p = 0.007) and having higher tacrolimus levels (p = 0.048). At 12 months, there were significant declines in antibody titer for all HPV types although the number of patients who remained seropositive did not significantly differ. The vaccine was safe and well tolerated. We show suboptimal immunogenicity of HPV vaccine in transplant patients. This is important for counseling patients who choose to receive this vaccine. Further studies are needed to determine an optimal HPV vaccine type and schedule for this population. PMID:23837399

  14. Ethical and scientific issues surrounding solid organ transplantation in HIV-positive patients: Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

    PubMed

    Christie, Timothy; Jiwani, Bashir; Asrat, Getnet; Montessori, Valentina; Mathias, Richard; Montaner, Julio

    2006-01-01

    End-stage liver disease is emerging as a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients. Historically, an HIV diagnosis was a contraindication for a liver transplant; however, because of the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-positive patients have one-year, two-year, and three-year post-transplantation survival rates similar to that of HIV-negative patients. Based on this evidence, HIV-positive patients are now considered eligible for transplantation. However, newly emerging guidelines include the stipulation that HIV-positive patients must be on HAART to be placed on a waiting list for transplantation. The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the scientific and ethical probity of requiring HIV-positive patients to be on HAART as a condition for being on a liver transplant waiting list. It is argued that the emphasis should be placed on the probability of post-transplantation HAART tolerance, and that concerns about pretransplantation HAART tolerance are of secondary importance. PMID:18418478

  15. Is ABPM clinically useful after pediatric solid organ transplantation?

    PubMed

    Soergel, Marianne

    2004-10-01

    When ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is performed in populations with a high risk for secondary hypertension, such as solid organ transplant recipients, hypertension or abnormalities in circadian blood pressure variability are often discovered even in patients with normal office blood pressure (BP). To discuss whether ABPM should be routinely assessed in pediatric solid organ recipients, the available information on pathological findings, association of ABPM abnormalities with outcome parameters, and treatment options is reviewed. ABPM is a useful tool to optimize therapy in the large proportion of transplant recipients with confirmed hypertension. Whether the use of ABPM on a routine basis should be recommended for pediatric transplantation patients without office hypertension remains to be determined. PMID:15367277

  16. Organ Allocation for Liver Transplantation According to the Public Opinion

    PubMed Central

    Danesh, Ahmad; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Asghari, Fariba; Jafarian, Ali; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2012-01-01

    Background Although liver transplantation is the last resort for treating end stage liver diseases, this medical procedure is not available for all needful patients because of inadequate organ supply. Therefore, guidelines have been developed by medical experts to regulate the process. Some professionals believe that medical criteria are inadequate for organ allocation in all situations and may not secure fairness of organ allocation. Objectives The current study has been designed to identify decision criteria about allocation of donated liver to potential recipients from public points of view. Patients and Methods This is a qualitative study that was conducted through individual interviews and Focus Group Discussions. Individual interviews were conducted among patients’ companions and nurses in one of the two liver transplant centers in Iran. Group discussions were conducted among groups of ordinary people who had not dealt previously with the subject. Data was analyzed by Thematic Analysis method. Results Most of the participants in this study believe that in equal medical conditions, some individual and societal criteria could be used to prioritize patients for receiving donated livers. The criteria include psychological acceptance, ability to pay post-operative care costs, being breadwinner of the family, family support, being socially valued, ability to be instructed, lack of mental disorders, young age of the recipient, being on waiting list for a long time, lack of patient’s role in causing the illness, first time transplant recipient, critical medical condition, high success rate of transplantation, lack of concurrent medical illnesses, not being an inmate at the time of receiving transplant, and bearing Iranian nationality. Conclusions Taking public opinion into consideration may smooth the process of organ allocation to needful patients with equal medical conditions. It seems that considering these viewpoints in drafting organ allocation guidelines

  17. Transplantation immunology: Solid Organ and bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Javier; Buckley, Rebecca H.

    2010-01-01

    Development of the field of organ and tissue transplantation has accelerated remarkably since the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) was discovered in 1967. Matching of donor and recipient for MHC antigens has been shown to have a significant positive effect on graft acceptance. The roles of the different components of the immune system involved in the tolerance or rejection of grafts and in graft-versus-host disease have been clarified. These components include: antibodies, antigen presenting cells, helper and cytotoxic T cell subsets, immune cell surface molecules, signaling mechanisms and cytokines that they release. The development of pharmacologic and biological agents that interfere with the alloimmune response and graft rejection has had a crucial role in the success of organ transplantation. Combinations of these agents work synergistically, leading to lower doses of immunosuppressive drugs and reduced toxicity. Reports of significant numbers of successful solid organ transplants include those of the kidneys, liver, heart and lung. The use of bone marrow transplantation for hematological diseases, particularly hematological malignancies and primary immunodeficiencies, has become the treatment of choice in many of these conditions. Other sources of hematopoietic stem cells are also being used, and diverse immunosuppressive drug regimens of reduced intensity are being proposed to circumvent the mortality associated with the toxicity of these drugs. Gene therapy to correct inherited diseases by infusion of gene-modified autologous hematopoietic stem cells has shown efficacy in two forms of severe combined immunodeficiency, providing an alternative to allogeneic tissue transplantation. PMID:20176267

  18. Severe anemia, gastric ulcer, pneumonitis and cholangitis in a liver transplant patient: multiple organic dysfunction and one etiology: a case report.

    PubMed

    García-Pajares, F; Santos-Santamarta, F; Fernández-Fontecha, E; Sánchez-Ocaña, R; Amo-Alonso, R; Loza-Vargas, A; Madrigal, B; Pérez-Saborido, B; Almohalla, C; Sánchez-Antolín, G

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common viral pathogen that negatively affects the outcome of liver transplantation. CMV causes febrile illness often accompanied by bone marrow suppression, and in some cases it invades tissues, including the transplanted allograft. In addition, CMV has been significantly associated with an increased predisposition to allograft rejection, accelerated hepatitis C recurrence, and other opportunistic infections, as well as reduced overall patient and allograft survivals. We carried out a study on a Spanish adult liver transplant recipient who rapidly presented anemia and was diagnosed as having Coomb negative (nonimmune) hemolytic anemia, gastric ulcer, pneumonitis, and cholangitis associated with a CMV infection. PMID:25645792

  19. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  20. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  1. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  2. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  3. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  4. [Organ transplantation in Germany: Critical examination in times of scarce resources].

    PubMed

    Haverich, A; Haller, H

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation over the last 40 years has developed into a standardized successful procedure for the replacement of heart, kidney liver, lung, and pancreas. During this time, treatment strategies have greatly improved and novel procedures such as living related organ donation have been introduced. Despite these improvements, the number of organ transplants has stalled in recent years. In the face of increasing numbers of patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation, this situation is unacceptable and ways to improve the situation of organ transplantation have to be found.The reasons for the stagnant situation in organ transplantation are manifold and include lack of awareness in the general population, insufficient organ procurement in hospitals as well as problems in organ allocation. The criteria for organ allocation have been unfairly reported to EUROTRANSPLANT by some of the presently 44 centers in order of more rapidly receive an organ for their patients on the waiting list. The evolving discussions around this so-called transplantation scandal has further eroded support for organ transplantation in Germany. A critical assessment and a well-defined plan are necessary to improve the situation, increase the number of transplanted organs, and reduce the unacceptably long waiting time for patients in Germany. PMID:26678283

  5. Ethical criteria for procuring and distributing organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Childress, J F

    1989-01-01

    This article provides an ethical analysis and assessment of various actual and proposed policies of organ procurement and distribution in light of moral principles already embedded in U.S. institutions, laws, policies, and practices. Evaluating different methods of acquisition of human body parts--donation (express and presumed), sales, abandonment, and expropriation--the author argues for laws and policies, including required request, to maintain and facilitate express donation of organs by individuals and their families. Such laws and policies need adequate time for a determination of their effectiveness before society moves to other major alternatives, such as a market. In organ allocation and distribution, which have close moral connections with organ procurement, the author defends the judgment of the federal Task Force on Organ Transplantation that the community should have dispositional authority over donated organs, that professionals should be viewed as trustees and stewards of donated organs, and that the public should be heavily involved in the formation of policies of allocation and distribution. Concentrating on policies being developed in the United Network for Organ Sharing, the author examines the point system for cadaveric kidneys, the access of foreign nationals to organs donated in the U.S., and the multiple listings of patients seeking transplants. He concludes by identifying two major problems of equitable access to donated organs that will have to be addressed by social institutions other than UNOS: access to the waiting list for donated organs and the role of ability to pay in extrarenal transplants. PMID:2654283

  6. Infections in solid-organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R; Paya, C V

    1997-01-01

    Solid-organ transplantation is a therapeutic option for many human diseases. Infections are a major complication of solid-organ transplantation. All candidates should undergo a thorough infectious-disease screening prior to transplantation. There are three time frames, influenced by surgical factors, the level of immunosuppression, and environmental exposures, during which infections of specific types most frequently occur posttransplantation. Most infections during the first month are related to surgical complications. Opportunistic infections typically occur from the second to the sixth month. During the late posttransplant period (beyond 6 months), transplantation recipients suffer from the same infections seen in the general community. Opportunistic bacterial infections seen in transplant recipients include those caused by Legionella spp., Nocardia spp., Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of viral infections. Herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus and others are also significant pathogens. Fungal infections, caused by both yeasts and mycelial fungi, are associated with the highest mortality rates. Mycobacterial, pneumocystis, and parasitic diseases may also occur. PMID:8993860

  7. Pediatric liver transplant for urea cycle disorders and organic acidemias: United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data 2002–2012

    PubMed Central

    Perito, Emily R.; Rhee, Sue; Roberts, John Paul; Rosenthal, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Background Decision-making about liver transplant is unique in children with urea cycle disorders (UCD) and organic acidemias (OA) because of immediate high priority on the waiting list, not related to severity of disease. There is limited national outcomes data on which to base recommendations about liver transplant for UCD or OA. Methods Retrospective analysis of UNOS data on liver recipients <18 years, transplanted 2002–12. Repeat transplants excluded. Results 5.4% of pediatric liver transplants were liver-only for UCD/OA. UCD/OA increased from 4.3% of transplants in 2002–05 to 7.4% in 2010–12 (p<0.0001). 96% were deceased donor. Of these, 59% were transplanted at <2 years of age. Graft survival improved as age at transplant increased (p=0.04). By 5 years post-transplant, graft survival was 78% for children <2 years at transplant and 88% for those ≥2 years (p=0.06). Vascular thrombosis caused 45% of graft losses; 65% in children <2 years. Patient survival also improved as age at transplant increased; 5-year patient survival was 88% in UCD/OA children <2 years at transplant and 99% in those ≥2 years (p=0.006). At last-follow up (54 ± 34.4 months), children transplanted for UCD/OA were more likely to have cognitive and motor delay than those transplanted for other indications. Cognitive and motor delay in UCD/OA children were associated with metabolic disorder but not predicted by age or weight at transplant, gender, ethnicity, split vs. whole liver, or hospitalization at transplant in univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusion Most liver transplants for UCD/OA occur in early childhood. Further research is needed on the benefits of early transplant for UCD/OA, as younger age may increase post-transplant morbidity. PMID:24136671

  8. Gout in solid organ transplantation: a challenging clinical problem.

    PubMed

    Stamp, Lisa; Searle, Martin; O'Donnell, John; Chapman, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Hyperuricaemia occurs in 5-84% and gout in 1.7-28% of recipients of solid organ transplants. Gout may be severe and crippling, and may hinder the improved quality of life gained through organ transplantation. Risk factors for gout in the general population include hyperuricaemia, obesity, weight gain, hypertension and diuretic use. In transplant recipients, therapy with ciclosporin (cyclosporin) is an additional risk factor. Hyperuricaemia is recognised as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, whether anti-hyperuricaemic therapy reduces cardiovascular events remains to be determined. Dietary advice is important in the management of gout and patients should be educated to partake in a low-calorie diet with moderate carbohydrate restriction and increased proportional intake of protein and unsaturated fat. While gout is curable, its pharmacological management in transplant recipients is complicated by the risk of adverse effects and potentially severe interactions between immunosuppressive and hypouricaemic drugs. NSAIDs, colchicine and corticosteroids may be used to treat acute gouty attacks. NSAIDs have effects on renal haemodynamics, and must be used with caution and with close monitoring of renal function. Colchicine myotoxicty is of particular concern in transplant recipients with renal impairment or when used in combination with ciclosporin. Long-term urate-lowering therapy is required to promote dissolution of uric acid crystals, thereby preventing recurrent attacks of gout. Allopurinol should be used with caution because of its interaction with azathioprine, which results in bone marrow suppression. Substitution of mycophenylate mofetil for azathioprine avoids this interaction. Uricosuric agents, such as probenecid, are ineffective in patients with renal impairment. The exception is benzbromarone, which is effective in those with a creatinine clearance >25 mL/min. Benzbromarone is indicated in allopurinol-intolerant patients with

  9. [History of organ transplantation in the field of pediatric surgery in Japan].

    PubMed

    Inomata, Yukihiro

    2014-11-01

    In Japan, liver transplantation was first attempted 50 years ago, around the same time as the development of pediatric surgery. In 1989, clinical liver transplantation in Japan started with a living related-donor transplantation in a boy with biliary atresia. In the early years, the majority of recipients were children worldwide, which is why pediatric surgeons played a major role in the establishment of liver transplantation in Japan. From 1998, most of the indications for pediatric patients needing liver transplantation have been covered by governmental health insurance. Since that year, the annual number of pediatric liver transplantations, mainly living-donor transplantations, has remained stable at around 130. Biliary atresia is still the most common indication, but others like metabolic disease and hepatoblastoma have been increasing. Deceased-donor liver transplantation started in 1999 in Japan, but pediatric donors are very rare. Intestinal transplantation in Japan also started in a pediatric patient with short bowel syndrome in 1996. Deceased-donor intestinal transplantation is also performed, but the number of those on the waiting list for bowel transplantations in Japan has been very limited, probably due to financial constraints and relatively poor long-term results. With the change in the Organ Transplant Law in 2010, organ donations in Japan have increased slightly. Cadaveric split-liver transplantation has the potential to expand the benefit to pediatric recipients. A universal system for the long-term follow-up of pediatric recipients should be established to manage their transition to adulthood. PMID:25702514

  10. Cancer History May Affect Survival After Organ Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_158468.html Cancer History May Affect Survival After Organ Transplant Study also ... death compared to organ recipients with no cancer history, new research suggests. The findings indicate that transplant ...

  11. Cognitive Development and Learning in the Pediatric Organ Transplant Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Steven A.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating neurocognitive changes following organ transplantation in pediatric end-stage renal and liver disease. Findings suggest possible neurocognitive benefits associated with organ transplantation. Recommendations are made for methodological improvements in future research. (DB)

  12. Postoperative Care of the Transplanted Patient

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Gajarski, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The successful delivery of optimal peri-operative care to pediatric heart transplant recipients is a vital determinant of their overall outcomes. The practitioner caring for these patients must be familiar with and treat multiple simultaneous issues in a patient who may have been critically ill preoperatively. In addition to the complexities involved in treating any child following cardiac surgery, caretakers of newly transplanted patients encounter multiple transplant-specific issues. This chapter details peri-operative management strategies, frequently encountered early morbidities, initiation of immunosuppression including induction, and short-term outcomes. PMID:22548034

  13. The Changing Immunology of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    STARZL, THOMAS E.; DEMETRIS, ANTHONY J.; MURASE, NORIKO; TRUCCO, MASSIMO; THOMSON, ANGUS W.; RAO, ABDUL S.

    2010-01-01

    The engrafted organ becomes a chimera as the recipient’s leukocytes station themselves in the transplant. Remarkably, the recipient becomes chimeric as well, in a reverse migration involving immune cells from the graft. Interactions between donor and recipient cells are tolerogenic—a process with implications for the goal of graft acceptance with minimal immunosuppression. PMID:7593387

  14. Organ Transplantation — Then and Now

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, Thomas E.; Makowka, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    The last 25 years have seen amazing progress in transplantation —from the development of techniques for immunosuppression to methods for organ removal and preservation. Our distinguished authors focus on these developments and discuss how the momentum seen during the last quarter century can be accelerated. PMID:10283045

  15. Global initiatives to tackle organ trafficking and transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Alireza; Delmonico, Francis L

    2013-11-01

    The increasing gap between organ supply and demand has opened the door for illegal organ sale, trafficking of human organs, tissues and cells, as well as transplant tourism. Currently, underprivileged and vulnerable populations in resource-poor countries are a major source of organs for rich patient-tourists who can afford to purchase organs at home or abroad. This paper presents a summary of international initiatives, such as World Health Organization's Principle Guidelines, The Declaration of Istanbul, Asian Task Force Recommendations, as well as UNESCO's and the United Nation's initiatives against trafficking of human organs, tissues, cells, and transplant tourism. Beyond the summary, it calls for more practical measures to be taken to implement the existing guidelines and recommendations, in order to prevent exploitation of the poor as organ providers. The paper suggests that an international legally binding agreement in criminalizing organ trafficking would be a step forward to bring a change in the global picture of organ trafficking and transplant tourism. PMID:23749286

  16. TRANSPLANTATION EN MASSE DES ORGANES ABDOMINAUX

    PubMed Central

    STARZL, T.

    2010-01-01

    Les transplantations multi-organes, comprenant les blocs foie-duodénum-pancréas, foie-estomac-duodénum-pancréas, et foie-intestin sont réalisées avec un succés croissant Ces techniques et leurs combinaisons variées de transplantation monobloc ne sont pas de pratique courante. Les techniques de prélévement, de conservation et de soins post-opératoires sont décrites pour la transplantation multi-organes compléte ainsi que pour les variantes incomplétes. Le probléme particulier à ce type de transplantation est celui de la transplantation intestinale, c’est-à-dire la transplantation d’un organe à composante lymphoréticulaire complexe ce qui peut provoquer un syndrome greffon contre hôte. Par erreur de conception, et un peu par esprit de systéme, les efforts par le passé étaient dirigés sur la modification et la destruction des systémes lymphoréticulaires grâce au traitement préalable du donneur ou des organes transplantés, par médicaments, radiation ou autres moyens. Actuellement, I’idée directrice est de garder intacte les systémes lymphoréticulaires qui deviennent alors le site d’une circulation à double sens aprés transplantation. Avec la puissante immunodépression que fournit le FK 506, les cellules lymphoréticulaires du donneur peuvent circuler chez le receveur sans créer de syndrome du greffon contre hôte clinique et les cellules de la greffe s’assimilent à celles du receveur (chimérisme local) sans provoquer de rejet. Même si I’on évite le rejet ou le syndrome greffon contre hôte, il existe, à côté de ces entités, des relations métaboliques entre les organes greffés ainsi qu’entre les organes greffés et les viscéres du receveur laissés en place, qui peuvent influencer I’avenir soit des organes greffés, soit des organes laissés en place. Parmi les échanges métaboliques les mieux connus actuellement, il y a les facteurs splanchniques hépatotrophes endogénes, dont I’insuline est la mieux

  17. Presurgical Pulmonary Evaluation in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Sonu; Molmenti, Ernesto; Bhaskaran, Madhu C.; Ali, Nicole; Basu, Amit; Talwar, Arunabh

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) due to various mechanisms are prone to significant pulmonary comorbidities. With the improvements in renal replacement therapy (RRT), patients with CRF are now expected to live longer, and thus may develop complications in the lung from these processes. The preferred treatment of CRF is kidney transplantation and patients who are selected to undergo transplant must have a thorough preoperative pulmonary evaluation to assess pulmonary status and to determine risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. A MEDLINE®/PubMed® search was performed to identify all articles outlining the course of pre-surgical pulmonary evaluation with an emphasis on patients with CRF who have been selected for renal transplant. Literature review concluded that in addition to generic pre-surgical evaluation, renal transplant patients must also undergo a full cardiopulmonary and sleep evaluation to investigate possible existing pulmonary pathologies. Presence of any risk factor should then be aggressively managed or treated prior to surgery. PMID:25599047

  18. Neurocognitive functions in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gulleroglu, K; Baskin, E; Bayrakci, U S; Aydogan, M; Alehan, F; Kantar, A; Karakayali, F; Moray, G; Haberal, M

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is one of the major complications of chronic renal failure (CRF). Uremic state during CRF encompasses a wide spectrum of neurobehavioral and neurological disturbances. Recent studies showed that the pathophysiology of neurocognitive dysfunction in CRF is related to plasma levels of uremic solutes. Successful renal transplantation improves renal, metabolic, and endocrine functions and the quality of life. The aim of our study was to determine the state of neurocognitive function in pediatric renal transplant recipients. We prospectively performed a neurological examination and neuropsychological test battery (Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, and Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test) in 20 pediatric renal transplant recipients between 6 and 16 years of age. Twenty healthy children and 20 children with CRF were included in the study as the control groups. Mean age of the renal transplant recipients was 13.50 ± 3.40 years old. Mean evaluation time after transplantation was 2.0 ± 0.5 years. Bender-Gestalt Test result was abnormal in 40% of patients. The results of the Cancellation Test and the Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test showed significant decline in pediatric renal transplant patients when compared with the control. We found that neurocognitive dysfunction was frequent in pediatric renal transplantation patients. Awareness of this potential problem may be helpful for early recognition and treatment. Our findings suggest that periodic neurocognitive assessments may be indicated in transplant recipients. PMID:24314945

  19. Evolution of liver transplantation at the University of Heidelberg: interventions influencing patient referral.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Bruno Martin; Mehrabi, Arianeb; Schallert, Claudia; Schemmer, Peter; Sauer, Peter; Encke, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Friess, Helmut; Kraus, Thomas W; Büchler, Markus W; Schmidt, Jan

    2005-09-27

    In Heidelberg, liver transplantation was first performed in 1987. In this article, we report our experience with an interdisciplinary approach (intervention) to improve the internal and external acceptance of the liver transplantation program. Formation of a transplant team and interdisciplinary standard setting of pre-, peri-, and postoperative protocols significantly stimulated this process. Involvement of the referring doctors in patient's treatment by transferring competencies enhanced patients referral to our center and increased the numbers of patients on the waiting list, an indispensable factor for organ allocation by Eurotransplant and transplantation. Involvement of patient organizations increased patient acceptance in the program. PMID:16286894

  20. How is organ transplantation depicted in internal medicine and transplantation journals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In their book Spare Parts, published in 1992, Fox and Swazey criticized various aspects of organ transplantation, including the routinization of the procedure, ignorance regarding its inherent uncertainties, and the ethos of transplant professionals. Using this work as a frame of reference, we analyzed articles on organ transplantation published in internal medicine and transplantation journals between 1995 and 2008 to see whether Fox and Swazey’s critiques of organ transplantation were still relevant. Methods Using the PubMed database, we retrieved 1,120 articles from the top ten internal medicine journals and 4,644 articles from the two main transplantation journals (Transplantation and American Journal of Transplantation). Out of the internal medicine journal articles, we analyzed those in which organ transplantation was the main topic (349 articles). A total of 349 articles were randomly selected from the transplantation journals for content analysis. Results In our sample, organ transplantation was described in positive terms and was presented as a routine treatment. Few articles addressed ethical issues, patients’ experiences and uncertainties related to organ transplantation. The internal medicine journals reported on more ethical issues than the transplantation journals. The most important ethical issues discussed were related to the justice principle: organ allocation, differential access to transplantation, and the organ shortage. Conclusion Our study provides insight into representations of organ transplantation in the transplant and general medical communities, as reflected in medical journals. The various portrayals of organ transplantation in our sample of articles suggest that Fox and Swazey’s critiques of the procedure are still relevant. PMID:24219177

  1. Hematopoietic Cell and Renal Transplantation in Plasma Cell Dyscrasia Patients.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Olga; Grandinetti, Valeria; Donati, Gabriele; Comai, Giorgia; Battaglino, Giuseppe; Cuna, Vania; Capelli, Irene; Sala, Elisa; La Manna, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Gammopathies, multiple myeloma, and amyloidosis are plasma dyscrasias characterized by clonal proliferation and immunoglobulin overproduction. Renal impairment is the most common and serious complication with an incidence of 20-30% patients at the diagnosis. Kidney transplant has not been considered feasible in the presence of plasma dyscrasias because the immunosuppressive therapy may increase the risk of neoplasia progression, and paraproteins may affect the graft. However, recent advances in clinical management of multiple myeloma and other gammopathies allow considering kidney transplant as a possible alternative to dialysis. Numerous evidence indicates the direct relationship between hematological remission and renal function restoring. The combination of kidney and hematopoietic cell transplant has been reported as a promising approach to reestablish end-organ function and effectively treat the underlying disease. This review describes current protocols used to perform kidney transplantation in patients with plasma dyscrasias. PMID:26160700

  2. Platelets Influence Vascularized Organ Transplants from Start to Finish

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, A. D.; Morrell, C.N.; Baldwin, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    This review relates the basic functions of platelets to specific aspects of organ allograft rejection. Platelet activation can occur in the donor or recipient before transplantation as well as during antibody- and cell-mediated rejection. Biopsies taken during organ procurement from cadaver donors have documented that activated platelets are attached to vascular endothelial cells or leukocytes. In addition, many patients waiting for transplants have activated platelets due to the diseases that lead to organ failure or as a result of interventions used to support patients before and during transplantation. The contribution of platelets to hyperacute rejection of both allografts and xenografts is well recognized. Intravascular aggregates of platelets can also be prominent in experimental and clinical transplants that undergo acute antibody or cell-mediated rejection. In acute rejection, platelets can recruit mononuclear cells by secretion of chemokines. After contact, monocytes, macrophages and T cells interact with platelets through receptor/ligand pairs, including P-selectin/PSGL-1 and CD40/CD154. There is a potential for therapy to inhibit platelet mediated immune stimulation, but it is counterbalanced by the need to maintain coagulation in the perioperative period. PMID:19067663

  3. Systematic review of melanoma incidence and prognosis in solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma carries the potential for substantial morbidity and mortality in the solid organ transplant population. We systematically reviewed the literature published from January 1995 to January 2012 to determine the overall relative risk and prognosis of melanoma in transplant recipients. Our search identified 7,512 citations. Twelve unique non-overlapping studies reported the population-based incidence of melanoma in an inception cohort of solid organ transplant recipients. Compared to the general population, there is a 2.4-fold (95% confidence interval, 2.0 to 2.9) increased incidence of melanoma after transplantation. No population-based outcome data were identified for melanoma arising post-transplant. Data from non-population based cohort studies suggest a worse prognosis for late-stage melanoma developing after transplantation compared with the general population. For patients with a history of pre-transplant melanoma, one population-based study reported a local recurrence rate of 11% (2/19) after transplantation, although staging and survival information was lacking. There is a need for population-based data on the prognosis of melanoma arising pre- and post-transplantation. Increased incidence and potentially worse melanoma outcomes in this high-risk population have implications for clinical care in terms of prevention, screening and reduction of immunosuppression after melanoma development post-transplant, as well as transplantation decisions in patients with a history of pre-transplant melanoma. PMID:24834346

  4. Race and invasive fungal infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Amelia K; McGwin, Gerald; Andes, David R; Lyon, G Marshall; Chiller, Tom; Pappas, Peter G; Baddley, John W

    2014-01-01

    Health disparities in access to solid organ transplantation (SOT) and graft survival are well recognized, but there are limited data on the relationship of race to risk of invasive fungal infection (IFI) among SOT recipients. We conducted a case-control study using data from the Transplant-Associated Infection Surveillance Network (TRANSNET) to investigate race and IFI. Cases (n = 1,214) and controls (n = 16,550) were compared on demographic variables using chi-square, and the relationship between race and IFI was assesses with unconditional logistic regression. Compared to White transplant patients, Blacks had similar odds of developing IFI (OR = .97, 95% Cl 0.82-1.15, P = .7125), while participants who identified as other ethnicity were less likely to develop IFI (OR = .56, 95% Cl .41-.75, P < .001). Blacks, when compared to White patients, were at increased odds of developing cryptococcal infection (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.35-3.54, P = .002). Despite pharmacogenetic differences, Black transplant recipients were not more likely overall to develop IFI compared to White transplant recipients. PMID:25065083

  5. Organ transplantation and tissue donation: a theological look.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, O R

    1993-01-01

    The author's position is that the work of organ donation and transplantation and tissue donation over the past forty-five years is in need of theological reflection. Some profound events and processes are involved in transplantation as the human family engages in a quest for wholeness. Different religious traditions-Jewish, Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Protestant-view the use of organs for transplantation differently. General attribution theory is adapted as a perspective on organ transplantation. PMID:10129259

  6. Colchicine myoneuropathy in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Peter; Hunt, Ian; Goldberg, Lawrence; Warrens, Anthony

    2002-07-01

    Colchicine is widely employed for the treatment of gout in renal transplant patients where NSAIDs are contra-indicated and allopurinol prophylaxis is often avoided due to concomitant azathioprine immunosuppression. We report here a case of colchicine-induced myoneuropathy in a renal transplant recipient. Our patient had myalgia, muscle weakness, elevated creatine kinase levels, myopathic changes on electromyography and peripheral neuropathy. Withdrawal of colchicine resulted in recovery within 4 weeks. Renal transplant recipients are likely to be at greater risk of colchicine-induced myoneuropathy due to the unique concurrence of risk factors predisposing to toxicity in such patients. These risk factors include the high incidence of gout in this population, widespread use of colchicine as first-line therapy, impaired renal function and concomitant cyclosporin treatment. The diagnosis should be considered in any renal transplant recipient receiving the drug who develops myopathy. Prompt withdrawal of colchicine therapy should result in rapid clinical and biochemical improvement. PMID:12122515

  7. Effect of Hepatitis C Positivity on Survival in Adult Patients Undergoing Heart Transplantation (from the United Network for Organ Sharing Database).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sachin; Deo, Salil V; Altarabsheh, Salah E; Dunlay, Shannon M; Sarabu, Nagaraju; Sareyyupoglu, Basar; Elgudin, Yakov; Medalion, Benjamin; ElAmm, Chantal; Ginwalla, Mahazarin; Zacharias, Michael; Benatti, Rodolpho; Oliveira, Guilherme H; Kilic, Ahmet; Fonarow, Gregg C; Park, Soon J

    2016-07-01

    Concerns exist regarding orthotropic heart transplantation in hepatitis C virus (HCV) seropositive recipients. Thus, a national registry was accessed to evaluate early and late outcome in HCV seropositive recipients undergoing heart transplant. Retrospective analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing registry (1991 to 2014) was performed to evaluate recipient profile and clinical outcome of patients with HCV seropositive (HCV +ve) and seronegative (HCV -ve). Adjusted results of early mortality and late survival were compared between cohorts. From 23,507 patients (mean age 52 years; 75% men), 481 (2%) were HCV +ve (mean age 52 years; 77% men). Annual proportion of HCV +ve recipients was comparable over the study period (range 1.3% to 2.7%; p = 0.2). The HCV +ve cohort had more African-American (22% vs 17%; p = 0.01), previous left ventricular assist device utilization (21% vs 14%; p <0.01) and more hepatitis B core Ag+ve recipients (17% vs 5%; p <0.01). However, both cohorts were comparable in terms of extracorporeal membrane oxygenator usage (p = 0.7), inotropic support (p = 0.2), intraaortic balloon pump (p = 0.7) support, serum creatinine (p = 0.7), and serum bilirubin (p = 0.7). Proportion of status 1A patients was similar (24% HCV + vs 21% HCV -); however, wait time for HCV +ve recipients were longer (mean 23 vs 19 days; p <0.01). Among donor variables, age (p = 0.8), hepatitis B status (p = 0.4), and Center for Diseases Control high-risk status (p = 0.9) were comparable in both cohorts. At a median follow-up of 4 years, 67% patients were alive, 28% died, and 1.1% were retransplanted (3.4% missing). Overall survival was worse in the HCV+ cohort (64.3% vs 72.9% and 43.2% vs 55% at 5 and 10 years; p <0.01), respectively. Late renal (odds ratio [OR] 1.2 [1 to 1.6]; p = 0.02) and liver dysfunction (odds ratio 4.5 [1.2 to 15.7]; p = 0.01) occurs more frequently in HCV +ve recipients. On adjusted analysis, HCV seropositivity is

  8. Kidney transplantation in older patients: benefits and risks.

    PubMed

    Rao, Venkateswara K

    2002-01-01

    The proportion of older patients accepted for dialysis is increasing every year both in the US and abroad. Of the two treatment modalities for end-stage renal disease, i.e. dialysis and transplantation, the latter offers more freedom and is associated with better clinical outcome. Most elderly patients seem to have excellent functional rehabilitation after a kidney transplant. However, in view of the wide gap between the availability of cadaver organs and the people in need, giving the precious organ to the elderly who have a shorter expected lifespan may present an ethical problem. Therefore, it has become increasingly important to offer the kidney to only those who have no significant comorbid conditions or other high risk factors, so as to improve the odds of success after renal transplantation. PMID:11950375

  9. Organ transplantation in Malaysia: a social-legal study.

    PubMed

    Ngah, Anisah Che

    2005-09-01

    Kidney and corneal transplants have been undertaken since the seventies although other forms of organ transplantation were lesser known. To date more than 1000 kidney transplants, the majority from living related donors have been performed. Nevertheless heart, lung and liver transplant only had an impact in the nineties. The main reason being, the lack of cadaveric donors, which has hampered the development of organ transplantation in Malaysia. It is instructive to note that the Malaysian society has been rather conservative when it comes to organ transplantation. This is compounded by the Asean culture and value system, which are directly derived from our historical background and religious convictions. However attempts had been made by various organisations such as The Malaysian Society of Transplantation, which was set up in 1994 to create greater awareness on organ donation & transplantation amongst both the healthcare professionals and the public. PMID:16538765

  10. Doctors Report Groundbreaking HIV-To-HIV Organ Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158039.html Doctors Report Groundbreaking HIV-to-HIV Organ Transplants One donor supplied a kidney to ... News) -- Trailblazing liver and kidney transplants from an HIV-positive donor to HIV-positive recipients were announced ...

  11. Clinical research in pediatric organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Azeka, Estela; Saavedra, Laura Castillo; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has greatly improved survival in children with end-stage disease, becoming one of the main treatment options in this population. Nonetheless, there are significant challenges associated with validating and optimizing the effects of these interventions in clinical trials. Therefore, we reviewed the main issues related to conducting clinical transplantation research in children. We divided these challenges into three different categories: (i) challenges related to surgical techniques and anesthetic procedures, (ii) challenges related to post-transplant care and (iii) challenges specific to a particular population group and disease type. Some of the observed burdens for clinical research in this field are related to the limitations of conducting studies with a placebo or sham procedure, determining the standard of care for a control group, low prevalence of cases, ethical concerns related to use of a placebo control group and lack of generalizability from animal studies and clinical trials conducted in adult populations. To overcome some of these barriers, it is necessary to utilize alternative clinical trial designs, such as observational studies or non-inferiority trials, and to develop multicenter collaborations to increase the recruitment rate. In conclusion, the lack of robust data related to pediatric transplantation remains problematic, and further clinical trials are needed to develop more efficacious and safer treatments. PMID:24860862

  12. Role of patient-support groups in the Thailand transplant program.

    PubMed

    Luvira, U; Supaporn, T

    2004-09-01

    Thailand started kidney transplantation in 1972 when vascular and nonvascular transplant programs were first established. Presently, we have 27 kidney, 6 liver, and 6 intrathoracic private or governmental transplantation centers, all approved and members of the Organ Donation Centres Thai Red Cross Society (ODC). They also provide organ procurement teams to the ODC. The Thai Medical Council has issued and supervised the criterion of brain death and ethical rules of transplantation to all practicing physicians since 1989. All recipients must register at these selected transplantation centers and at the ODC. When the potential donor arrives from any hospital in Thailand, the donor hospital notifies the ODC and organ procurement teams are sent out to harvest organs and transfer them to the recipient transplantation centers. The ODC computerizes and shares organs according to ABO, HLA typing, and crossmatching results. After transplantation all patients register with the Thai Transplantation Society (TTS) and the ODC. The TTS, the Thai Transplant Coordinator Society, and the ODC are responsible for the education of surgeons, physicians, nurses, patients, the public, and mass media to improve our transplant program. Bone marrow transplantation has separate regulations. Pooled, nonrelated bone marrow donors are registered at the blood-bank of the Thai Red Cross Society to provide donors for bone marrow transplantation. Financially, government support recipients only if they are state enterprise workers or civil servants. Public fund support through the ODC for organ procurement and the Kidney Foundation of Thailand is available for kidney transplantation. The ODC and the transplantation centers are the main patient-support groups for transplant programs in Thailand. PMID:15518725

  13. Renal scans in pregnant transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1988-08-01

    This study demonstrates the normal technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ((/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA) renal scan in pregnant patients with transplanted kidneys. Five pregnant renal transplant patients had seven (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA renal studies to assess allograft perfusion and function. All scans showed the uteroplacental complex. The bladder was always compressed and distorted. The transplanted kidney was frequently rotated to a more vertical position. In all patients allograft flow and function were maintained. There was calyceal retention on all studies and ureteral retention activity in three of five patients. Using the MIRD formalism, the total radiation absorbed dose to the fetus was calculated to be 271 mrad. This radiation exposure is well within NRCP limits for the fetus of radiation workers and an acceptable low risk in the management of these high risk obstetric patients.

  14. Care of the liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mamatha; Al-Busafi, Said A; Deschênes, Marc; Ghali, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an approach to the care of liver transplant (LT) patients, a growing patient population with unique needs. METHODS: A literature search of PubMed for guidelines and review articles using the keywords “liver transplantation”, “long term complications” and “medical management” was conducted, resulting in 77 articles. RESULTS: As a result of being on immunosuppression, LT recipients are at increased risk of infections and must be screened regularly for metabolic complications and malignancies. DISCUSSION: Although immunosuppression is key to maintaining allograft health after transplantation, it comes with its own set of medical issues to follow. Physicians following LT recipients must be aware of the greater risk for hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, renal failure, metabolic bone disease and malignancies in these patients, all of whom require regular monitoring and screening. Vaccination, quality of life, sexual function and pregnancy must be specifically addressed in transplant patients. PMID:24729996

  15. Study of dermatoses in kidney transplant patients*

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Alexandre Moretti; da Rocha, Sheila Pereira; Reis Filho, Eugênio Galdino de Mendonça; Eid, Danglades Resende Macedo; Reis, Carmelia Matos Santiago

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing in the number of kidney transplant recipients has favored, more frequently than before, the emergence of dermatoses and warranted their study through subsequent publications. OBJECTIVES to evaluate the frequency of dermatoses in kidney transplant recipients. METHODS kidney transplant recipients with suspected dermatoses between March 1st 2009 and June 30th 2010. RESULTS 53 patients (28 males and 25 females), aged between 22 and 69 (mean age = 45 years) were evaluated. Most of them came from the cities of Ceilândia, Samambaia and São Sebastião/DF, and had already been transplanted for 5 to 10 years before (37.7%); 62.3% were recipients of living donors and 83% were prednisone-treated. The most prevalent dermatoses were of fungal (45.3%) and viral (39.6%) etiologies. Among the non-melanoma malignant neoplasms, the basal cell carcinoma prevailed (six cases), in spite of the low incidence. Concerning fungal dermatoses, 12 cases of onychomycosis, five of pityriasis versicolor and four of pityrosporum folliculitis were reported. For diagnosis, in most cases (64.2%), laboratory examinations (mycological and histopathological) were performed. CONCLUSION cutaneous manifestations in kidney transplant recipients are generally secondary to immunosuppression. The infectious dermatoses, especially those of fungal origin, are frequently found in kidney transplant recipients and their occurrence increases progressively according to the time elapsed from the transplantation, which makes follow-up important. PMID:23793196

  16. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Refractory Clostridium difficile Colitis in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Friedman-Moraco, R. J.; Mehta, A. K.; Lyon, G. M.; Kraft, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been shown to be safe and efficacious in individuals with refractory Clostridium difficile . It has not been widely studied in individuals with immunosuppression due to concerns about infectious complications. We describe two solid organ transplant recipients, one lung and one renal, in this case report that both had resolution of their diarrhea caused by C. difficile after FMT. Both recipients required two FMTs to achieve resolution of their symptoms and neither had infectious complications. Immunosuppressed individuals are at high risk for acquisition of C. difficile and close monitoring for infectious complications after FMT is necessary, but should not preclude its use in patients with refractory disease due to C. difficile . Sequential FMT may be used to achieve cure in these patients with damaged microbiota from antibiotic use and immunosuppression. PMID:24433460

  17. [Brain death, bioethics and organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Carlos; Pérez, Manuel; Thambo, Sergio; Valdivieso, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    The concept of death has evolved medically, legally and culturally since the introduction of life support technologies in the middle of the 20th century. The traditional cardiopulmonary and the new neurologically based brain death criterions of death are examined. We conclude that brain death, defined as total and irreversible loss of function of the whole brain, fulfills better "the permanent cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole" definition of death. Brain death diagnosis, based on standard neurologic clinical examination performed accurately, is unequivocal. Transplantation medicine, mostly based on organ donation of brain dead people, has become a routine and universally accepted therapeutic intervention nowadays, which benefits many people. Ethics foundations of organ transplantation are reviewed. Even though brain death and organ donation are widely accepted in medical, legal, religious and public opinion today, the whole society and medical community need to be further educated about these matters, so that unavoidable changes of traditional concepts might be better understood. Permanent education should be the best way to dissipate social fears and distrust towards organ donation and brain death. PMID:15379061

  18. Obama's 3-Pronged Effort to Speed Organ Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... include making it easier for Americans to become organ donors and increasing the number of organ transplants. Also, ... organ donation, but just 50 percent are registered organ donors. Experts hope to narrow that gap. Online partners ...

  19. PTX3 Polymorphisms and Invasive Mold Infections After Solid Organ Transplant.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Lecompte, T Doco; Bibert, Stephanie; Manuel, Oriol; Rüeger, Sina; Berger, Christoph; Boggian, Katia; Cusini, Alexia; Garzoni, Christian; Hirsch, Hans; Khanna, Nina; Mueller, Nicolas J; Meylan, Pascal R; Pascual, Manuel; van Delden, Christian; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2015-08-15

    Donor PTX3 polymorphisms were shown to influence the risk of invasive aspergillosis among hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Here, we show that PTX3 polymorphisms are independent risk factors for invasive mold infections among 1101 solid organ transplant recipients, thereby strengthening their role in mold infection pathogenesis and patients' risk stratification. PMID:25977268

  20. Contraceptive use in female recipients of a solid-organ transplant

    PubMed Central

    Rafie, Sally; Lai, Sophia; Garcia, Juanita E.; Mody, Sheila K.

    2016-01-01

    Context Women of reproductive age account for more than one-third of all solid-organ transplant recipients and are advised against becoming pregnant for 1 to 2 years after their surgeries. The risks posed to the woman, the transplanted organ, and the fetus underscore the importance of systems to ensure that patients receive counseling on family planning, including return to fertility, contraceptive use, and when pregnancy can be safely considered, and highly effective methods of contraception. Objective To investigate use of contraceptives among women after solid-organ transplant and to identify opportunities to improve care. Design A cross-sectional survey study. Setting An urban academic medical center. Patients Women 18 to 50 years old who have received a kidney, pancreas, and/or liver transplant within the past 1 to 24 months. Intervention Participants completed self-administered questionnaires regarding their menstrual pattern, pregnancy history, contraceptive use before and after transplant, and counseling on family planning issues. Main Outcome Measures Contraceptive use. Results The most common contraceptive method used in both the year preceding transplant and the year after transplant was condoms. Participants desired more counseling on highly effective contraceptive methods, such as intrauterine devices. Participants would like to receive contraceptive counseling from an obstetrician/gynecologist or transplant care team provider. Conclusion Female recipients of solid-organ transplants want more counseling on highly effective methods of contraception. PMID:25488557

  1. [Cryptosporidium parvum Gastroenteritis in a Patient with Renal Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Çetinkaya, Ülfet; Dursun, İsmail; Kuk, Salih; Şahin, İzzet; Yazar, Süleyman

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a case who starting abundant watery diarrhea on the 14th day of renal transplantation is presented. Stool sample was analyzed for Cryptosporidium spp. by carbol fuchsin staining method, copro-ELISA and nested polimeraze chain reaction (PCR). From sample found positive by Carbol-fuchsin staining method and Copro-ELISA, DNA sequence analysis was performed, gel-purified from amplicon obtained by nested PCR. As a result of DNA sequence analysis was determined to be Cryptosporidium parvum. Although C. parvum is a rare causative agent of gastroenteritis it can be cause serious clinical diarrhea solid organ transplantation patient. As a result, also C.parvum must be considered as a causative agent of diarrhea occurring after organ transplantation. PMID:26470932

  2. The development of squamous cell carcinoma in a patient after kidney transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Szychta, Paweł; Sporny, Stanisław; Rykała, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In patients with organ transplantation as compared to the general population the risk of cancer is significantly increased. The most common changes are malignant tumors of the skin, constituting 30-65% of malignant tumors found in recipients. Potential risk factors for skin cancer after a transplant operation are: solar radiation, immunosuppressive therapy, genetic factors, infection with HPV and skin cancer transmission before transplantation. In contrast to the immunocompetent population, skin cancers in transplant recipients are dominated by squamous cell carcinoma, followed by basal cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma in patients after transplantation is characterized by a strong tendency to give local recurrences and distant metastases. Due to the high risk of developing skin cancer in transplant recipients, preventive oncology plays an important role in the long-term care of patients after transplantation. This includes: sun protection, education, and early treatment of patients with precancerous lesions. It is also stressed that systematic dermatologic studies need to be carried out in patients after transplantation surgery. The paper contains basic information about skin cancers in organ transplant recipients: epidemiology, potential risk factors, treatment and prognosis. The paper presents also a case of patient who developed squamous cell carcinoma of the skin 3 years after renal transplantation. PMID:24278050

  3. Younger dialytic patients are really at risk to be not transplanted. The Tuscany experience.

    PubMed

    Bertoni, E; Rosati, A; Zanazzi, M; Di Maria, L; Becherelli, P; Gallo, M; Salvadori, M

    2004-01-01

    The huge increase in organ donation (27.2 pmp in 2002), that characterized our regional transplant program was mainly due to the increase of marginal (older) donors. As allocating organs coupling donor and recipient age is mandatory, aim of this study was to verify the consequences of such retrieval policy over the renal transplant activity. According our longitudinal data younger uremic patients in Tuscany waiting list for transplantation, have the lowest chance to receive kidney transplantation, mainly with respect to older patients that are easily removed from the waiting list. This unfair condition need to be corrected either by promoting living donation, either increasing cadaveric donation from younger donors. PMID:15478911

  4. Transition from Hospital to Home Following Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant: Qualitative Findings of Parent Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lerret, Stacee M.; Weiss, Marianne E; Stendahl, Gail; Chapman, Shelley; Neighbors, Katie; Amsden, Katie; Lokar, Joan; Voit, Ashley; Menendez, Jerome; Alonso, Estella M

    2014-01-01

    Transplant providers are challenged to determine appropriate interventions for patients and families due to limited published research regarding the context of the post-discharge experience from the perspective of parents of transplanted children. The purpose of this study is to describe the parent perspective of the transition from hospital to home following their child’s solid organ transplant. Within a mixed-methods design, 37 parents of pediatric heart, kidney and liver transplant recipients from three pediatric hospitals responded to qualitative interview questions on the day of hospital discharge and three weeks following hospital discharge. Insight to the discharge preparation process revealed necessary education components. Post-discharge themes were identified for coping, knowledge and adherence. The parents’ responses provide awareness as to specific stressors and concerns parents are faced with when their child is discharged from the hospital after solid organ transplant and opportunities for ways the transplant team can provide support. PMID:24814154

  5. Solid-organ transplantation in older adults: current status and future research.

    PubMed

    Abecassis, M; Bridges, N D; Clancy, C J; Dew, M A; Eldadah, B; Englesbe, M J; Flessner, M F; Frank, J C; Friedewald, J; Gill, J; Gries, C; Halter, J B; Hartmann, E L; Hazzard, W R; Horne, F M; Hosenpud, J; Jacobson, P; Kasiske, B L; Lake, J; Loomba, R; Malani, P N; Moore, T M; Murray, A; Nguyen, M-H; Powe, N R; Reese, P P; Reynolds, H; Samaniego, M D; Schmader, K E; Segev, D L; Shah, A S; Singer, L G; Sosa, J A; Stewart, Z A; Tan, J C; Williams, W W; Zaas, D W; High, K P

    2012-10-01

    An increasing number of patients older than 65 years are referred for and have access to organ transplantation, and an increasing number of older adults are donating organs. Although short-term outcomes are similar in older versus younger transplant recipients, older donor or recipient age is associated with inferior long-term outcomes. However, age is often a proxy for other factors that might predict poor outcomes more strongly and better identify patients at risk for adverse events. Approaches to transplantation in older adults vary across programs, but despite recent gains in access and the increased use of marginal organs, older patients remain less likely than other groups to receive a transplant, and those who do are highly selected. Moreover, few studies have addressed geriatric issues in transplant patient selection or management, or the implications on health span and disability when patients age to late life with a transplanted organ. This paper summarizes a recent trans-disciplinary workshop held by ASP, in collaboration with NHLBI, NIA, NIAID, NIDDK and AGS, to address issues related to kidney, liver, lung, or heart transplantation in older adults and to propose a research agenda in these areas. PMID:22958872

  6. 76 FR 78216 - Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995. The provisions of this rule will not affect the... change to the definition of human organs covered by section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act of... of the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, as amended (hereinafter section 301 of NOTA)....

  7. Invasive Mold Infections in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Crabol, Yoann; Lortholary, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mold infections represent an increasing source of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients. Whereas there is a large literature regarding invasive molds infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplants, data in solid organ transplants are scarcer. In this comprehensive review, we focused on invasive mold infection in the specific population of solid organ transplant. We highlighted epidemiology and specific risk factors for these infections and we assessed the main clinical and imaging findings by fungi and by type of solid organ transplant. Finally, we attempted to summarize the diagnostic strategy for detection of these fungi and tried to give an overview of the current prophylaxis treatments and outcomes of these infections in solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:25525551

  8. Universal noninvasive detection of solid organ transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Thomas M.; Khush, Kiran K.; Valantine, Hannah A.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    It is challenging to monitor the health of transplanted organs, particularly with respect to rejection by the host immune system. Because transplanted organs have genomes that are distinct from the recipient's genome, we used high throughput shotgun sequencing to develop a universal noninvasive approach to monitoring organ health. We analyzed cell-free DNA circulating in the blood of heart transplant recipients and observed significantly increased levels of cell-free DNA from the donor genome at times when an endomyocardial biopsy independently established the presence of acute cellular rejection in these heart transplant recipients. Our results demonstrate that cell-free DNA can be used to detect an organ-specific signature that correlates with rejection, and this measurement can be made on any combination of donor and recipient. This noninvasive test holds promise for replacing the endomyocardial biopsy in heart transplant recipients and may be applicable to other solid organ transplants. PMID:21444804

  9. Latest development of legal regulations of organ transplant in China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chunyan

    2008-12-01

    Organ transplant practice has developed greatly in last two decades in China. In response to the practical need, the State Council released the Regulations on Human Organ Transplant 2007, replacing the previous Interim Provisions on Administration of Clinical Application of Human Organ Transplant Technology 2006. This article first examines the latest development of legal regulations of organ transplant by comparing the differences between the two pieces of legislation. It then analyzes the impact of the new rules set forth in the 2007 Regulations upon three problems existing in the current organ transplant practice, that is, organ procurement from executed prisoners, organ trade, and organ tourism. The article finally discusses the deficiencies of the 2007 Regulations, which are supposed to be remedied in the next legal reform. PMID:19492722

  10. Potential benefits of melatonin in organ transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Esteban-Zubero, Eduardo; García-Gil, Francisco Agustín; López-Pingarrón, Laura; Alatorre-Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; Iñigo-Gil, Pablo; Tan, Dun-Xian; García, José Joaquín; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-06-01

    Organ transplantation is a useful therapeutic tool for patients with end-stage organ failure; however, graft rejection is a major obstacle in terms of a successful treatment. Rejection is usually a consequence of a complex immunological and nonimmunological antigen-independent cascade of events, including free radical-mediated ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). To reduce the frequency of this outcome, continuing improvements in the efficacy of antirejection drugs are a top priority to enhance the long-term survival of transplant recipients. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a powerful antioxidant and ant-inflammatory agent synthesized from the essential amino acid l-tryptophan; it is produced by the pineal gland as well as by many other organs including ovary, testes, bone marrow, gut, placenta, and liver. Melatonin has proven to be a potentially useful therapeutic tool in the reduction of graft rejection. Its benefits are based on its direct actions as a free radical scavenger as well as its indirect antioxidative actions in the stimulation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Moreover, it has significant anti-inflammatory activity. Melatonin has been found to improve the beneficial effects of preservation fluids when they are enriched with the indoleamine. This article reviews the experimental evidence that melatonin is useful in reducing graft failure, especially in cardiac, bone, otolaryngology, ovarian, testicular, lung, pancreas, kidney, and liver transplantation. PMID:27068700

  11. Applications of regenerative medicine in organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Aditya; Bansal, Ramta

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide shortage of organs for clinical implantation establishes the need to bring forward and test new technologies that will help in solving the problem. The concepts of regenerative medicine hold the potential for augmenting organ function or repairing damaged organ or allowing regeneration of deteriorated organs and tissue. Researchers are exploring possible regenerative medicine applications in organ transplantation so that coming together of the two fields can benefit each other. The present review discusses the strategies that are being implemented to regenerate or bio-engineer human organs for clinical purposes. It also highlights the limitations of the regenerative medicine that needs to be addressed to explore full potential of the field. A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using keywords “regenerative medicine,” “tissue-engineering,” “bio-engineered organs,” “decellularized scaffold” and “three-dimensional printing.” This review screened about 170 articles to get the desired knowledge update. PMID:26229352

  12. Perioperative Care of the Liver Transplant Patient.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Mark T; Kramer, David J

    2016-07-01

    With the evolution of surgical and anesthetic techniques, liver transplantation has become "routine," allowing for modifications of practice to decrease perioperative complications and costs. There is debate over the necessity for intensive care unit admission for patients with satisfactory preoperative status and a smooth intraoperative course. Postoperative care is made easier when the liver graft performs optimally. Assessment of graft function, vigilance for complications after the major surgical insult, and optimization of multiple systems affected by liver disease are essential aspects of postoperative care. The intensivist plays a vital role in an integrated multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:27339683

  13. Current Antioxidant Treatments in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shaojun; Xue, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the key mechanisms affecting the outcome throughout the course of organ transplantation. It is widely believed that the redox balance is dysregulated during ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and causes subsequent oxidative injury, resulting from the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, in order to alleviate organ shortage, increasing number of grafts is retrieved from fatty, older, and even non-heart-beating donors that are particularly vulnerable to the accumulation of ROS. To improve the viability of grafts and reduce the risk of posttransplant dysfunction, a large number of studies have been done focusing on the antioxidant treatments for the purpose of maintaining the redox balance and thereby protecting the grafts. This review provides an overview of these emerging antioxidant treatments, targeting donor, graft preservation, and recipient as well. PMID:27403232

  14. Abdominal aortic aneurysmectomy in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lacombe, M

    1986-01-01

    Five patients who had undergone renal transplantation 3 months to 23 years ago were operated on successfully for an abdominal aortic aneurysm. In the first case, dating from 1973, the kidney was protected by general hypothermia. In the remaining patients, no measure was used to protect the kidney. Only one patient showed a moderate increase of blood creatinine in the postoperative period; renal function returned to normal in 15 days. All five patients have normal renal function 6 months to 11 years after aortic repair. Results obtained in this series show that protection of the transplant during aortic surgery is not necessary, provided adequate surgical technique is used. Such a technique is described in detail. Its use simplifies surgical treatment of such lesions and avoids the complex procedures employed in the seven previously published cases. Images FIGS. 1A and B. FIGS. 2A and B. FIGS. 3A and B. FIGS. 4A and B. FIGS. 5A and B. PMID:3510592

  15. Belatacept for the prophylaxis of organ rejection in kidney transplant patients: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hardinger, Karen L; Sunderland, Daniel; Wiederrich, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Background Belatacept is a novel immunosuppressive therapy designed to improve clinical outcomes associated with kidney transplant recipients while minimizing use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). Methods We searched for clinical trials related to administration of belatacept to kidney transplant patients compared to various immunosuppression regimens, as well as for studies that utilized data from belatacept trials to validate new surrogate measures. The purpose of this review is to consolidate the published evidence of belatacept’s effectiveness and safety in renal transplant recipients to better elucidate its place in clinical practice. Results Analysis of the results from the Belatacept Evaluation of Nephroprotection and Effi-cacy as First-Line Immunosuppressive Trial (BENEFIT) study, a de novo trial that compared cyclosporine (CsA)-based therapy to belatacept-based therapy in standard criteria donors, found a significant difference in mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 13–15 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 23–27 mL/min/1.73 m2 at 1 year and 7 years, respectively. The BENEFIT-EXT study was similarly designed with the exception that it included extended criteria donors. Renal function improved significantly for the more intensive belatacept group in all years of the BENEFIT-EXT study; however, it was not significant in the less intensive group until 5 years after transplant. Belatacept regimens resulted in lower blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and incidence of new-onset diabetes after transplant compared to CsA-based regimens. Results from conversion of CNIs to belatacept therapy, dual therapy of belatacept with sirolimus, and belatacept with corticosteroid avoidance therapy are also included in this article. Conclusion The evidence reviewed in this article suggests that belatacept is an effective alternative in kidney transplant recipients. Compared to CNI-based therapy, belatacept-based therapy results in superior renal function and similar rates

  16. Post-bone marrow transplant patient management.

    PubMed Central

    Poliquin, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Increasingly, bone marrow transplant (BMT) is the treatment of choice for certain hematologic diseases. BMT is, however, a risky procedure with many potentially serious complications. Some complications are the result of the conditioning regimen, a stage of transplantation that includes large doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. Conditioning-induced neutropenia and thrombocytopenia often result in infection, bleeding, and mucositis. Veno-occlusive disease (VOD), a chemotherapy-induced hepatotoxicity, can cause a mild to severe form of liver disease. Other complications are directly attributable to the engrafted new marrow. Graft-versus-host disease, a rejection process initiated by immunocompetent donor T lymphocytes, is a complication frequently observed in allogeneic BMT. Approximately 14-28 days after the day of transplant, signs of engraftment begin to appear. When specific discharge criteria are met, the BMT patient is discharged from the hospital. Specific follow-up medical care is ongoing for about one year after BMT. PMID:2293508

  17. Prospects of using organs and cells from pigs for transplantation into humans.

    PubMed

    Groth, Carl G

    2007-02-01

    Once pig organs can be transplanted into humans, transplantation will move into a new era. There will be unlimited access to undamaged organs, and cells for transplantation and, eventually, donation from deceased or live human beings will become obsolete. Furthermore, it will be possible to alleviate graft rejection, at least in part, by genetic modification of the source animal. Currently, there are three major obstacles to performing transplantations from pig to man: a powerful immune barrier, a potential risk of transmitting microorganisms, particularly endogenous retrovirus, and ethical issues related to the future recipients and to society at large. This article will first discuss the ongoing work with regards to overcoming the current obstacles. Also, the many potential advantages of using pig organs will be discussed in some detail. Furthermore, lessons learned from attempts at transplanting porcine cells to patients will be reviewed. PMID:17344582

  18. Serologic Vaccination Response after Solid Organ Transplantation: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Eckerle, Isabella; Rosenberger, Kerstin Daniela; Zwahlen, Marcel; Junghanss, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are one of the major complications in transplantation medicine. Vaccination-based prevention is desirable, but data on the response to active vaccination after SOT are conflicting. Methods In this systematic review, we identify the serologic response rate of SOT recipients to post-transplantation vaccination against tetanus, diphtheria, polio, hepatitis A and B, influenza, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, tick-borne encephalitis, rabies, varicella, mumps, measles, and rubella. Results Of the 2478 papers initially identified, 72 were included in the final review. The most important findings are that (1) most clinical trials conducted and published over more than 30 years have all been small and highly heterogeneous regarding trial design, patient cohorts selected, patient inclusion criteria, dosing and vaccination schemes, follow up periods and outcomes assessed, (2) the individual vaccines investigated have been studied predominately only in one group of SOT recipients, i.e. tetanus, diphtheria and polio in RTX recipients, hepatitis A exclusively in adult LTX recipients and mumps, measles and rubella in paediatric LTX recipients, (3) SOT recipients mount an immune response which is for most vaccines lower than in healthy controls. The degree to which this response is impaired varies with the type of vaccine, age and organ transplanted and (4) for some vaccines antibodies decline rapidly. Conclusion Vaccine-based prevention of infectious diseases is far from satisfactory in SOT recipients. Despite the large number of vaccination studies preformed over the past decades, knowledge on vaccination response is still limited. Even though the protection, which can be achieved in SOT recipients through vaccination, appears encouraging on the basis of available data, current vaccination guidelines and recommendations for post-SOT recipients remain poorly supported

  19. INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is often the only alternative form of treatment for patients dependent on total parenteral nutrition for survival. Although a limited number of intestinal transplantations have been performed, results with FK 506 immunosuppression are comparable to those for other organ transplants. The impact of successful intestinal transplantation on gastroenterology will likely be similar to the impact of kidney and liver transplantation on nephrology and hepatology. PMID:7515221

  20. Gender issues in solid organ donation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Fangmin; Huang, Tao; Yuan, Shunzong; Zhou, Yeqing; Gong, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    Gender as a critical, intrinsic, non-immunologic factor plays a pivotal role in the field of transplantation. The gender of donors and recipients is involved in the entire process, including organ donation and transplant surgery. This review article aims to summarize the literature related to the role of gender in solid organ donation and transplantation and to unveil the underlying mechanism by which gender mismatch between donor and recipient impacts transplant rejection. A systematic search was conducted through PubMed by using the following key words: "gender", or "sex", and "transplant", "organ donation" for published articles. The prima facie evidence demonstrated that females are more likely to donate their organs and are less willing than males to accept transplant surgery; however, their donated liver organs will have a higher risk of graft failure compared with males. With respect to kidney, heart, and lung transplantations, the role of gender remains controversial. Results of animal studies support the negative impact of gender mismatch on allograft function. In conclusion, our present study advances the knowledge of gender issues in the field of solid organ donation and transplantation. In general, gender mismatch is not advantageous to transplant outcome, as evidenced by many aspects of biological investigations on immunogenicity of H-Y antigen to females. Therefore, gender issues should be highlighted and an a priori intervention is needed to improve graft survival in clinical practice. PMID:24064859

  1. Invasive Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a liver transplant patient: case report and review of infection in transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Popiel, K Y; Wong, P; Lee, M J; Langelier, M; Sheppard, D C; Vinh, D C

    2015-06-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae, an ascosporogenous yeast commonly used in the production of food, is an emerging infection in immunocompromised patients. We report the case of a 60-year-old man whose orthotopic liver transplant was complicated by S. cerevisiae fungemia and peritoneal abscess, successfully treated with caspofungin and drainage. We also review the literature of invasive saccharomycoses in recipients of hematologic and solid organ transplants. PMID:25827213

  2. [Ethics in organ transplantation: continous search for defining what is acceptable].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Acevedo, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    In the past 50 years, Transplant Medicine has been adopted worldwide as a growing option for treatment of many organic diseases. Ethical Issues in organ replacement therapy have emerged since the beginning. Significant advancements in the care of critically ill patients, as well as the increasing need of cadaveric organs for transplantation, definitively influenced a complex discussion about new criteria for definition of death, one of the most complex ethic debates in last century. Criteria for organ assignment are also cause of profound debate, especially when the number of patients waiting for an organ is extremely high compared with organ availability. Living donor represents a very complex figure in modern medicine, security issues as well as the need to offer them absolute respect to their capacity to decide must be considered in every patient. Ethics in transplantation represent a continuous search for defining what is acceptable. PMID:16524057

  3. Ethical perspectives on living donor organ transplantation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Concejero, Allan M; Chen, Chao-Long

    2009-12-01

    Live donors are a continuing source of organ grafts for solid organ transplantation in Asia. Ethical issues surrounding the development of living donor organ transplantation in Eastern countries are different from those in Western countries. Donor safety is still the paramount concern in any donor operation. Issues on organ trafficking remain societal concerns in low-income nations. Religion, cultural background, economic prerogatives, and timely legislation contribute to the social acceptance and maturation of organ donation. PMID:19938130

  4. Hepatitis C in non-hepatic solid organ transplant candidates and recipients: A new horizon

    PubMed Central

    Belga, Sara; Doucette, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is estimated to affect 130-150 million people globally which corresponds to 2%-3% of the total world population. It remains the leading indication for liver transplant worldwide and has been demonstrated to negatively impact both patient and graft survival following non-hepatic organ transplantation. In the era of interferon-based therapy, although treatment and cure of HCV prior to non-hepatic transplant improved survival, tolerability and low cure rates substantially limited therapy. Interferon (IFN)-based therapy following non-hepatic solid organ transplant, due to the risk of allograft rejection, is generally contraindicated. Rapid advances in IFN-free therapy with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) in the last few years have completely changed the paradigm of hepatitis C therapy. Compared to IFN-based regimens, DAAs have less frequent and less severe adverse effects, shorter durations of therapy, and higher cure rates that are minimally impacted by historically negative predictors of response such as cirrhosis, ethnicity, and post-transplant state. Recent studies have shown that liver transplant (LT) recipients can be safely and effectively treated with DAA combination therapies; although data are limited, many of the principles of therapy in LT may be extrapolated to non-hepatic solid organ transplant recipients. Here we review the data on DAA combination therapies in transplantation, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of pre- vs post-transplant HCV therapy and future directions. PMID:26819530

  5. Pediatric Abdominal Organ Transplantation: Current Indications, Techniques, and Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, A Luana; Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Chang, Patricia T; Lee, Edward Y; Phillips, Grace S

    2016-03-01

    The anatomy, normal postoperative radiological appearance, and imaging features of common postoperative complications of pediatric abdominal transplants are reviewed, including renal, liver, and intestinal transplants. Doppler ultrasound is the mainstay of imaging after transplantation. Computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography, MR imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, MR cholangiopancreatography, conventional angiography, and nuclear medicine imaging may be used for problem-solving in pediatric transplant patients. Accurate and timely radiological diagnosis of transplant complications facilitates appropriate treatment and minimizes morbidity and mortality. PMID:26896225

  6. [Chronic rejection: Differences and similarities in various solid organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Suhling, H; Gottlieb, J; Bara, C; Taubert, R; Jäckel, E; Schiffer, M; Bräsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, chronic rejections after transplantation of the lungs, heart, liver, and kidney are described. Chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) plays an important role in all of these transplantations and has a significant influence on patient survival. The pathophysiological reasons for CAD varies greatly in the various organs.Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is the most important determinant of survival and quality of life after lung transplantation. Diagnosis is based on lung function, especially forced expiratory flow in 1 s (FEV1) decline. Prevention, early detection, and rapid treatment are extremely important. Azithromycin and extracorporeal photopheresis are commonly used for treatment because they usually positively influence the progression of lung remodeling.The expression for chronic rejection of the heart is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Immunological and nonimmunological factors are important for its development. Due to limited therapeutic options, prevention is of utmost importance (administration of mTOR inhibitors and minimizing cardiovascular risk factors).The mid- and long-term survival rates after liver transplantation have hardly changed in recent decades, which is an indication of the difficulty in diagnosing chronic graft dysfunction. Chronic ductopenic rejection accounts for a small proportion of late graft dysfunction. Idiopathic posttransplant hepatitis and de novo autoimmune hepatitis are important in addition to recurrence of the underlying disease that led to transplantation.Chronic allograft nephropathy is the result of severe rejection which cumulates in increasing fibrosis with remodeling. The earliest possible diagnosis and therapy is currently the only option. Diagnosis is based on evidence of donor-specific antibodies and histological findings. PMID:26782281

  7. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:26202137

  8. Current obstacles to organ transplant in Middle Eastern countries.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Faissal A M; Souqiyyeh, Muhammad Ziad

    2015-04-01

    The Middle Eastern map includes all the Arab countries, Iran, Turkey, Pakistan, and countries of Central Asia. There are common features of organ transplant in these countries such as inadequate preventive medicine, uneven health infrastructure, poor awareness of the medical community and public about the importance of organ donation and transplant, high level of ethnicity, poor government support of organ transplant, and political unrest. In addition, there is inadequate team spirit among transplant physicians, lack of planning for organ procurement and transplant centers, and lack of effective health insurance. Living-donor organ transplant is the most widely practiced type of transplant in the Middle East. Deceased-donor organ donation is not used properly because of continued debate in the medical community about the concept of death according to neurologic criteria (brain death) and inadequate awareness of the public about the importance of organ donation and transplant in many countries in this region. Continuous work is needed to provide solutions to overcome the current obstacles. PMID:25894118

  9. Organ donation and transplantation-the Chennai experience in India.

    PubMed

    Shroff, S; Rao, S; Kurian, G; Suresh, S

    2007-04-01

    Tamil Nadu has been at the forefront of medical care in the country. It was the first state in the country that started a living kidney transplant program. It is also the first state to successfully start the cadaver programme after the passing of the "Transplantation of Human Organ Act" of 1994 and in the last 5 years has formed a network between hospitals for organ sharing. From the year 2000 to 2006 an organ sharing network was started in Tamil Nadu and the facilitator of this programme has been a non-government organization called MOHAN (acronym for Multi Organ Harvesting Aid Network) Foundation. The organs shared during the period number over 460 organs in two regions (both Tamil Nadu and Hyderabad). In Tamil Nadu the shared organs have included 166 Kidneys, 24 livers, 6 hearts, and 180 eyes. In 2003 sharing network was initiated by MOHAN in Hyderabad and to some extent the Tamil Nadu model was duplicated. with some success and 96 cadaver organs have been transplanted in the last 3 years. There are many advantages of organ sharing including the cost economics. At present there is a large pool of brain dead patients who could become potential organ donors in the major cities in India. Their organs are not being utilized for various support logistics. A multi-pronged strategy is required for the long term success of this program. These years in Tamil Nadu have been the years of learning, un-learning and relearning and the program today has matured slowly into what can perhaps be evolved as an Indian model. In all these years there have been various difficulties in its implementation and some of the key elements for the success of the program is the need to educate our own medical fraternity and seek their cooperation. The program requires trained counselors to be able to work in the intensive cares. The government's support is pivotal if this program to provide benefit to the common man. MOHAN Foundation has accumulated considerable experience to be able to

  10. Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159395.html Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: ... for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these ...

  11. Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159395.html Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: Study ... for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these cases. ...

  12. Diet and Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sign up for our FREE magazine, Kidney Living Organ Donation & Transplantation Be an Organ Donor Living Donation Donor ... Giving Primary menu Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate Search Search Header ...

  13. The kindness of strangers: organ transplantation in a capitalist age.

    PubMed

    Shannon, T A

    2001-09-01

    The topic of organ transplantation is examined from the perspective of three authors: Robert Bellah, Jeremy Rifkin, and Margaret Jane Radin. Introduced by reflections on the development of the justification of organ transplantation within the Roman Catholic community and the various themes raised by the historical study in Richard Titmuss's The Gift Relationship, the paper examines how and in what ways the possible commodification of organs will affect our society and the impacts this may have on the supply of organs. PMID:11700684

  14. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with miss-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  15. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Strong, D Michael; Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with mis-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  16. Should we allow organ donation euthanasia? Alternatives for maximizing the number and quality of organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dominic; Savulescu, Julian

    2012-01-01

    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste. In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways to improve the number and quality of organs available from this group of patients. Changes to consent arrangements (for example conscription of organs after death) or changes to organ donation practice could dramatically increase the numbers of organs available, though they would conflict with currently accepted norms governing transplantation. We argue that one alternative, Organ Donation Euthanasia, would be a rational improvement over current practice regarding withdrawal of life support. It would give individuals the greatest chance of being able to help others with their organs after death. It would increase patient autonomy. It would reduce the chance of suffering during the dying process. We argue that patients should be given the choice of whether and how they would like to donate their organs in the event of withdrawal of life support in intensive care. Continuing current transplantation practice comes at the cost of death and prolonged organ failure. We should seriously consider all of the alternatives. PMID:20459428

  17. Malignancy after Solid Organ Transplantation: Comprehensive Imaging Review.

    PubMed

    Katabathina, Venkata S; Menias, Christine O; Tammisetti, Varaha S; Lubner, Meghan G; Kielar, Ania; Shaaban, Akram; Mansour, Joseph; Surabhi, Venkateshwar R; Hara, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    Life expectancies for solid organ recipients as well as graft survival rates for these patients have improved over the years because of advanced immunosuppressive therapies; however, with chronic use of these drugs, posttransplant malignancy has become one of the leading causes of morbidity for them. The risk of carcinogenesis in transplant recipients is significantly higher than for the general population and cancers tend to manifest at an advanced stage. Posttransplant malignancies are thought to develop by three mechanisms: de novo development, donor-related transmission, and recurrence of a recipient's pretransplant malignancy. Although nonmelanoma skin cancer, Kaposi sarcoma, posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder, anogenital cancer, and lung cancer are malignancies that are thought to arise de novo, malignant melanoma and cancers that arise in the renal allograft are frequently donor related. Hepatocellular carcinomas and cholangiocarcinomas have a greater tendency to recur in liver transplant recipients. An altered or deranged immune system caused by chronic immunosuppression is considered to be one of the major contributing factors to carcinogenesis. The proposed pathogenic mechanisms for oncogenesis include impaired immunosurveillance of neoplastic cells, weakened immune activity against oncogenic viruses, and direct carcinogenic effects of immunosuppressive agents. Imaging plays an important role in screening, follow-up, and long-term surveillance in patients with malignancies because key imaging features can guide in their timely diagnosis. However, some benign entities such as transplant-related renal fibrosis, biliary necrosis, and infectious nodules in the lungs mimic malignancies and require pathologic confirmation. Management strategies that can improve malignancy-related morbidity and mortality in transplant recipients include prevention of risk factors, appropriate modulation of immunosuppressive agents, prophylaxis against infection

  18. Negative impact of trading in human organs on the development of transplantation in the Middle East.

    PubMed

    Abouna, G M

    1993-06-01

    With recent advances in transplanting human organs, increasing numbers of people in need of replacement organs are opting for transplantation. These medical advances and the subsequent public demand have, however, led to a supply-demand problem in which more patients request replacement organs than the number which are readily available. A flourishing international trade in human organs has developed in response to the comparatively high demand for organs. Organs in demand are bought from the poor for transplantation to wealthy clientele. For their contacts and services, brokers, private hospitals, and physicians earn enormous profits. It is estimated that more than 2000 kidneys since 1990 have been sold annually in India to wealthy recipients from the Middle East, the Far East, and Europe. The phenomenon has alarmed the medical profession, the public, and many governments and has been condemned by all major religions and most transplant societies. The author also condemns the sale of human organs as being damaging to the cause of transplantation as well as many other moral, religious, and ethical values and beliefs of society. The sale of organs negatively affects their altruistic donation by the public as well as the development of local cadaver procurement programs by national governments. All forms of paid organ donation should therefore be made illegal in all countries of the world. Sections consider the donor, the recipient, local transplant programs, the medical profession, and the impact upon society. PMID:8516911

  19. Diagnostic Yields in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Admitted With Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio A.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Stosor, Valentina; Ison, Michael G.; Angarone, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although diarrhea is a frequent complaint among solid organ transplant recipients, the contribution of infectious etiologies remains incompletely defined. We sought to define the etiologies of diarrhea and the yields of testing at our institution. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis over an 18-month period of hospitalized solid organ transplant recipients. We stratified diarrhea by community onset vs hospital onset of diarrhea. Results. We identified 422 admissions (representing 314 unique patients) with community-onset diarrhea, and 112 admissions (representing 102 unique patients) with hospital-onset diarrhea. The majority of community- and hospital-onset diarrheal episodes had no identified etiology (60.9% and 75.9%, respectively; P = .03), yet were also self-limited (91% and 91%, respectively; P = .894). Thereafter, the most frequently encountered infectious etiologies were Clostridium difficile infection (13.3% and 11.8%, respectively), norovirus enteritis (8.2% and 3%), cytomegalovirus disease or colitis (6.3% and 2.7%), and bacterial enterocolitis (0.9% and 0%) (P = .03). In aggregate, these entities represented 93.7% and 90.5% of the identified infectious etiologies, respectively. Protozoan causes were rarely seen. Coinfection, or the simultaneous detection of ≥2 pathogens, occurred in 8 (1.9%) and 2 (1.8%) community- and hospital-onset diarrheal admissions, respectively (P = .99). Conclusions. In solid organ transplant recipients who presented at our institution with diarrhea, approximately one-third had infectious etiologies identified, consisting predominantly of C. difficile, norovirus, cytomegalovirus, and bacterial enterocolitis. Other infectious etiologies were rare. PMID:25371488

  20. Donation after cardiac death in abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reich, David J; Guy, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the field of donation after cardiac death, focusing on the history, ethicolegal issues, clinical outcomes, best practices, operative techniques, and emerging strategies to optimize utilization of this resource. Donation after cardiac death is one effective way to decrease the organ shortage and has contributed the largest recent increase in abdominal organ allografts. Currently, donation after cardiac death organs confer an increased risk of ischemic cholangiopathy after liver transplant and of delayed graft function after kidney transplant. As this field matures, risk factors for donation after cardiac death organ transplant will be further identified and clinical outcomes will improve as a result of protocol standardization and ongoing research. PMID:22678860

  1. Kidney transplant in diabetic patients: modalities, indications and results

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Érika B; de Sá, João R; Melaragno, Cláudio S; Gonzalez, Adriano M; Linhares, Marcelo M; Salzedas, Alcides; Medina-Pestana, José O

    2009-01-01

    Background Diabetes is a disease of increasing worldwide prevalence and is the main cause of chronic renal failure. Type 1 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure have the following therapy options: kidney transplant from a living donor, pancreas after kidney transplant, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant, or awaiting a deceased donor kidney transplant. For type 2 diabetic patients, only kidney transplant from deceased or living donors are recommended. Patient survival after kidney transplant has been improving for all age ranges in comparison to the dialysis therapy. The main causes of mortality after transplant are cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, infections and neoplasias. Five-year patient survival for type 2 diabetic patients is lower than the non-diabetics' because they are older and have higher body mass index on the occasion of the transplant and both pre- and posttransplant cardiovascular diseases prevalences. The increased postransplant cardiovascular mortality in these patients is attributed to the presence of well-known risk factors, such as insulin resistance, higher triglycerides values, lower HDL-cholesterol values, abnormalities in fibrinolysis and coagulation and endothelial dysfunction. In type 1 diabetic patients, simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant is associated with lower prevalence of vascular diseases, including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and amputation in comparison to isolated kidney transplant and dialysis therapy. Conclusion Type 1 and 2 diabetic patients present higher survival rates after transplant in comparison to the dialysis therapy, although the prevalence of cardiovascular events and infectious complications remain higher than in the general population. PMID:19825194

  2. Management of proteinuria in the transplanted patient.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Tomáš

    2015-06-01

    Proteinuria is a relatively frequent complication in children after renal transplantation (40-80 %). It is usually mild and non-nephrotic in nature and predominantly tubular in origin. The major causes of post-transplant proteinuria are recurrence of primary glomerulonephritis [mostly focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS)], rejection (acute and chronic), mTOR inhibitors or hypertension. Proteinuria is a risk factor for graft loss and patient death in adults, and even a mild proteinuria (0.1-0.2 g/day) is associated with impaired graft and patient survival. In children, proteinuria seems to be associated with graft but not patient survival. Proteinuria (protein/creatinine ratio) should be assessed regularly in all children. In children with prior chronic kidney disease due to idiopathic FSGS, proteinuria should be assessed daily during the first month after transplantation to enable early diagnosis of recurrence. The cause of proteinuria should be identified, and graft biopsy should be considered in children with unexplained proteinuria, especially with new onset proteinuria or deterioration of previously mild proteinuria. Treatment must be primarily targeted at the cause of proteinuria, and in normotensive children symptomatic antiproteinuric therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin II receptor antagonists should also be initiated. Other antihypertensive drugs should be used to achieve target blood pressure of <75th percentile. Target proteinuria should be <20 mg/mmol creatinine. PMID:25159718

  3. Comparison of the ICF Core Set for Cardiopulmonary Conditions in the Acute Hospital Setting among Different Types of Transplant Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Xinhua

    2010-01-01

    To compare the functioning profiles of patients receiving different types of organ transplants using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The patients (n=102) were enrolled between days 5 and 10 after discharge following receipt of an organ transplant, and assessed for sociodemographic variables, the Functional…

  4. Challenges of valve surgeries in post-renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tanveer; Kishore, Kolkebaile Sadanand; Maheshwarappa, Nandakumar Neralakere; Pasarad, Ashwini Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Renal transplantation remains a mainstay of therapy for the end-stage renal disease. Cardiac disease has a high prevalence in this patient population. Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death among kidney transplantation patients. The cardiac disease accounts for 43% of all-cause mortality among dialysis patients and for ≈38% of all-cause mortality after transplantation. In this article, we review the factors and outcomes associated with valve surgeries in renal transplant recipients and evaluate the strategy for open heart surgery after renal transplantation performed. PMID:26440255

  5. [The transplant coordinator nurse, the harvesting of organs and tissues].

    PubMed

    Maroudy, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Development of the transplantation of organs and tissues are not linked solely to the feats of surgery and biology. Without quality of the organization for the donation and the organ removal, nothing would be possible. Figurehead of this organization: the coordinator nurse for donation and the organ procurement. PMID:27338689

  6. Rhodococcus empyema in a heart transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Richard; Nord, John; Lanspa, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a rare cause of pneumonia and empyema almost exclusively occurring in immunocompromised patients. Most people who become infected have direct exposure to livestock. We present a case where the exposure was presumed to be through a family member in close contact with horses. Our case describes an infection in a heart transplant patient that was initially identified as a probable intra-abdominal infection and later reidentified as Rhodococcus equi empyema, and was treated with surgery and prolonged antibiotics. PMID:25473561

  7. Social world of organ transplantation, trafficking, and policies.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Farhan Navid; Purkayastha, Bandana

    2016-05-01

    Although success of organ transplants reflects advances in medical procedures, the success has generated debates about the ethical standards and policies that govern transplants, especially the acquisition of organs for transplants. We focus on laws, policies, and organ trafficking to highlight the interdisciplinary perspectives that can shape our understanding of transplantation as a social phenomenon. We discuss international policies and country-specific legislation from Pakistan to point to gaps and their implications for protecting vulnerable people who are exploited for organ removal. International collaboration and the legal framework need to be strengthened to fight the menace globally and to deal with the cases of organ trafficking within the legal ambit of human trafficking so that the rights of victims are upheld by states, justice systems, and ultimately medical establishments and practitioners. PMID:26841906

  8. Donor-Derived Coccidioides immitis Endocarditis and Disseminated Infection in the Setting of Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Joanna K; Giraldeau, Genevieve; Montoya, Jose G; Deresinski, Stan; Ho, Dora Y; Pham, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Background.  Endocarditis is a rare manifestation of infection with Coccidioides. This is the first reported case of donor-derived Coccidioides endocarditis obtained from a heart transplant. Methods.  We present a unique case of donor-derived Coccidioides immitis endocarditis and disseminated infection in a heart transplant patient. We also conducted a review of the literature to identify other cases of donor-derived coccidioidomycosis in solid organ transplant recipients and reviewed their clinical characteristics. Results.  Fifteen prior cases of donor-derived coccidioidomycosis were identified. A majority of these cases were diagnosed by positive culture (83%). Mortality was high at 58%. Conclusions.  Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for disseminated coccidioidomycosis in patients who received transplants with organs from donors with a history of residing in endemic regions. PMID:27413765

  9. Donor-Derived Coccidioides immitis Endocarditis and Disseminated Infection in the Setting of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Joanna K.; Giraldeau, Genevieve; Montoya, Jose G.; Deresinski, Stan; Ho, Dora Y.; Pham, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endocarditis is a rare manifestation of infection with Coccidioides. This is the first reported case of donor-derived Coccidioides endocarditis obtained from a heart transplant. Methods. We present a unique case of donor-derived Coccidioides immitis endocarditis and disseminated infection in a heart transplant patient. We also conducted a review of the literature to identify other cases of donor-derived coccidioidomycosis in solid organ transplant recipients and reviewed their clinical characteristics. Results. Fifteen prior cases of donor-derived coccidioidomycosis were identified. A majority of these cases were diagnosed by positive culture (83%). Mortality was high at 58%. Conclusions. Clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for disseminated coccidioidomycosis in patients who received transplants with organs from donors with a history of residing in endemic regions. PMID:27413765

  10. Skin Cancer in the Crosshairs: Highlights from the Biennial Scientific Retreat of International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative and Skin Care in Organ Transplant Recipients Europe.

    PubMed

    Sinnya, Sudipta; Zwald, Fiona O; Colegio, Oscar R

    2015-08-01

    The International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative (ITSCC) is an organization comprising of physicians; transplant surgeons and basic science research scientists dedicated in providing optimal care and ongoing research advancements in solid organ transplant recipients to improve patient outcome and quality of life. As medical advances occur, it is anticipated that the sheer number of solid organ transplantations occurring worldwide will continue to increase. The long-term medication associated immunosuppression improves graft survival, but as a consequence, these individuals become increasingly susceptible to various cutaneous malignancies, lymphoproliferative disorders and infections. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most frequently encountered skin cancer and increases 65- to 250-fold [Jensen et al., Skin cancer in kidney and heart transplant recipients and different long-term immunosuppressive therapy regimens. J Am Acad Dermatol. 1999;40:177-186; Lindelöf et al., Incidence of skin cancer in 5356 patients following organ transplantation. Br J Dermatol. 2000; 143:513-519]. However, the rates of basal cell carcinoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma also increase in organ transplant recipients leading to significant morbidity as well as mortality [Berg and Otley. Skin cancer in organ transplant recipients: epidemiology, pathogenesis, and management. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2002; 47:1-20]. In October 2014, the International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative and its equivalent European counterpart, Skin Care in Organ Transplant Recipients Europe held its 10th biennial meeting in Essex, MA to discuss the clinical conundrums and the evolving research pertinent to the field. This meeting report provides a synthesis of all the clinical and research data presented at the 4-day meeting. PMID:27500228