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Sample records for patients phase iii

  1. Two-phase treatment of patients with crossbite and tendency toward skeletal Class III malocclusion*

    PubMed Central

    Bayerl, Maria de Lourdes Machado

    2014-01-01

    Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by an inadequate anteroposterior dental relationship which may or may not be accompanied by skeletal changes. In general, patients are distressed by a significantly compromised facial aspect which, when associated with a deficient middle third, encourages patients to seek treatment. This article reports a two-phase treatment carried out in a female patient aged six years and six months with a tendency towards a Class III skeletal pattern. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO). It is representative of the Discrepancy Index (DI) category, and fulfills part of the requirements for obtaining BBO Diploma. PMID:25279531

  2. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  3. Effect of phase III cardiac rehabilitation and relaxation on the quality of life in patients with cardiac syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Feizi, Aram; Ghaderi, Chiman; Dehghani, Mohammad R.; Khalkhali, Hamid R.; Sheikhi, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cardiac syndrome X is a relatively common disorder, and still not much is known about the causative factors or its pathophysiology, which makes it difficult to cure. Due to its chronic nature and debilitating symptoms, many patients have significantly reduced quality of life (QOL).The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and relaxation on the QOL of patients. Materials and Methods: This research is a randomized clinical trial study. Forty eligible and consenting women (age 30-65 years) were randomly assigned to four groups. In the first group (n = 11), progressive muscle relaxation (PMR); in the second group (n = 11), phase III CR; and in the third group (n = 11), PMR along with phase III CR were performed for 8 weeks at home. The fourth group (n = 7) was used as the control group. Short form of QOL questionnaire (SF-36) was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using χ2, Kruskal-Wallis, and rank sum difference tests. Results: After phase III CR, relaxation, and combination of CR and relaxation, patients demonstrated improved QOL (P < 0.001). The results of post-test multiple comparisons showed that there were statistically significant differences between control and all intervention groups (P < 0.05). There was also statistically significant difference between relaxation and combination of phase III CR and relaxation groups (P < 0.5). Conclusions: An 8-week phase III CR program together with relaxation improved QOL of patients with cardiac syndrome X. We suggest phase III CR program together with relaxation as an effective treatment in these patients. PMID:23922604

  4. Population pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia: results of a phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Schmidli, H; Peng, B; Riviere, G-J; Capdeville, R; Hensley, M; Gathmann, I; Bolton, A E; Racine-Poon, A

    2005-01-01

    Aims This study was designed to investigate the biochemical and physiological covariates or comedications that affect the pharmacokinetics of imatinib mesylate in patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukaemia (CP CML). Methods Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed in 371 patients receiving 400 mg imatinib once daily during a phase III trial of imatinib vs interferon-alfa plus cytarabine for the treatment of newly diagnosed CP CML. Covariates included age, weight, sex, ethnicity, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration, white blood cell (WBC) count, liver function, and creatinine concentration. Blood samples for imatinib analysis were taken on treatment days 1 and 29. Nonlinear mixed effects modelling was used for the population pharmacokinetic analysis. Results Population mean estimates (95% confidence interval) at day 1 for apparent clearance (CL) and apparent volume of distribution (V) of imatinib were 14 (13–15) l h−1 and 252 (237–267) l, respectively. Modelling suggested that CL decreased by 4 (3-5) l h−1 from day 1 to day 29, whereas V remained unchanged. Interindividual variability in CL and V was 32% and 31%, respectively. Weight, Hb, and WBC count demonstrated small effects on CL and V. Doubling body weight or Hb or halving the WBC count was associated with a 12%, 86% and 8% increase in CL, respectively, and a 32%, 60% and 5% increase in V, respectively. Comedications showed no clear effects on imatinib CL. Conclusions Population covariates and coadministered drugs minimally affected imatinib pharmacokinetics in newly diagnosed CP CML patients. PMID:15963092

  5. Twenty-Seven Years of Phase III Trials for Patients with Extensive Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Disappointing Results

    PubMed Central

    Oze, Isao; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Ochi, Nobuaki; Takigawa, Nagio; Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2009-01-01

    Background Few studies have formally assessed whether treatment outcomes have improved substantially over the years for patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer (ED-SCLC) enrolled in phase III trials. The objective of the current investigation was to determine the time trends in outcomes for the patients in those trials. Methods and Findings We searched for trials that were reported between January 1981 and August 2008. Phase III randomized controlled trials were eligible if they compared first-line, systemic chemotherapy for ED-SCLC. Data were evaluated by using a linear regression analysis. Results: In total, 52 trials were identified that had been initiated between 1980 and 2006; these studies involved 10,262 patients with 110 chemotherapy arms. The number of randomized patients and the proportion of patients with good performance status (PS) increased over time. Cisplatin-based regimens, especially cisplatin and etoposide (PE) regimen, have increasingly been studied, whereas cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine–based regimens have been less investigated. Multiple regression analysis showed no significant improvement in survival over the years. Additionally, the use of a PE regimen did not affect survival, whereas the proportion of patients with good PS and the trial design of assigning prophylactic cranial irradiation were significantly associated with favorable outcome. Conclusions and Significance The survival of patients with ED-SCLC enrolled in phase III trials did not improve significantly over the years, suggesting the need for further development of novel targets, newer agents, and comprehensive patient care. PMID:19915681

  6. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-07-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3-62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2-4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. PMID:25801797

  7. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3–62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2–4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. Am. J. Hematol. 90:584–591, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25801797

  8. A Phase I/II Trial of Topotecan and Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases in Patients With Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hedde, Jan-Peter; Neuhaus, Thomas . E-mail: t.neuhaus@jk-bonn.de; Schueller, Heinrich; Metzler, Ute; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G.H.; Kleinschmidt, Rolf; Losem, Christoph; Lange, Oliver; Grohe, Christian; Stier, Sebastian; Ko, Yon-Dschun

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Outcomes in patients with brain metastases undergoing whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) are hardly encouraging, and an improvement in results is therefore needed. One possible approach is the addition of chemotherapeutics. However the data presented thus far are also disappointing. A promising substance in this setting could become topotecan, which is known to cross the blood-brain barrier and additionally offers radiosensitizing effects. Therefore we performed a phase I/II trial to evaluate the feasibility of a concurrent radiochemotherapy regimen. Methods and Materials: From January 1999 to July 2001, a total of 75 patients (10 in phase I and 65 in phase II) were included. The WBRT was applied with a fraction size of 2 Gy/day for a total of 40 Gy. Topotecan was administered as a 30-min infusion with 0.2 to 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days over 4 weeks within 2 h to radiation therapy. Results: Because of the higher toxic rates seen in patients receiving 0.5 mg/m{sup 2}/day, the recommended dosage for phase II was 0.4 mg/m{sup 2}/day. In this group Grade 3/4 hematologic and nonhematologic side effects occurred in 19% and 21% of the patients, respectively. The overall response rate was 72% with an overall survival of 17 weeks and 30 weeks among the responders. Conclusions: Based on the moderate toxicity profile presented here we recommend to perform a phase III trial to confirm the promising phase I/II data.

  9. Phase I/II study of a short course of weekly cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Planting, A. S.; van der Burg, M. E.; de Boer-Dennert, M.; Stoter, G.; Verweij, J.

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with advanced solid tumours were entered in a phase I/II study of six, weekly cycles of cisplatin. Nineteen patients were chemonaive and six were previously treated. The starting dose was 50 mg m-2 week-1. This dose could be escalated without major toxicity to 70 mg m-2 week-1. At a dose of 80 mg m-2 myelosuppression grade 3 occurred as well as grade 1 nephro- and neurotoxicity. The maximum tolerated dose was 85 mg m-2 with dose limiting thrombocytopenia. Hypertonic saline was effective in preventing nephrotoxicity. Ondansetron was a very effective antiemetic in the first weeks of treatment but its efficacy waned later on. Responses were observed in head and neck cancer, melanoma and mesothelioma. At the dose level of 80 mg m-2 the optimal dose intensity was reached. This schedule will be tested further in phase II studies. PMID:8398709

  10. A Phase I/II Radiation Dose Escalation Study With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Stages I to III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Phase I Results of RTOG 0117

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Moughan, Jennifer; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: In preparation for a Phase III comparison of high-dose versus standard-dose radiation therapy, this Phase I/II study was initiated to establish the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included patients with histologically proven, unresectable Stages I to III non-small-cell lung cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin, AUC of 2, given weekly. The radiation dose was to be sequentially intensified by increasing the daily fraction size, starting from 75.25 Gy/35 fractions. Results: The Phase I portion of this study accrued 17 patients from 10 institutions and was closed in January 2004. After the initial 8 patients were accrued to cohort 1, the trial closed temporarily on September 26, 2002, due to reported toxicity. Two acute treatment-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported at the time: a case of grade 5 and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The protocol, therefore, was revised to de-escalate the radiation therapy dose (74 Gy/37 fractions). Patients in cohort 1 continued to develop toxicity, with 6/8 (75%) patients eventually developing grade >=3 events. Cohort 2 accrued 9 patients. There was one DLT, a grade 3 esophagitis, in cohort 2 in the first 5 patients (1/5 patients) and no DLTs for the next 2 patients (0/2 patients). Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 74 Gy/37 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction) using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy. This dose level in the Phase II portion has been well tolerated, with low rates of acute and late lung toxicities.

  11. Lack of patient-reported outcomes assessment in phase III breast cancer studies: a missed opportunity for informed decision making.

    PubMed

    Blinder, Victoria S

    2014-01-01

    A phase III study comparing capecitabine monotherapy to combination treatment with capecitabine and sunitinib in patients with metastatic breast cancer failed to demonstrate a benefit in terms of progression-free or overall survival. Both regimens were reasonably well tolerated with some differences noted in the specific toxicity profiles. However, the study failed to incorporate an assessment of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) such as self-reported pain, quality of life, or employment outcomes. This is a missed opportunity. If more clinical trials included such measures, they would provide valuable information to patients and clinicians choosing from a wide array of available and otherwise similarly effective systemic therapies for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:25841482

  12. Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Tremelimumab With Standard-of-Care Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Haanen, John B.; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L.; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D.; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4–blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). Results In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. Conclusion This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23295794

  13. Failures in Phase III: Causes and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Seruga, Bostjan; Ocana, Alberto; Amir, Eitan; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-15

    Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCT) in oncology fail to lead to registration of new therapies more often than RCTs in other medical disciplines. Most RCTs are sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry, which reflects industry's increasing responsibility in cancer drug development. Many preclinical models are unreliable for evaluation of new anticancer agents, and stronger evidence of biologic effect should be required before a new agent enters the clinical development pathway. Whenever possible, early-phase clinical trials should include pharmacodynamic studies to demonstrate that new agents inhibit their molecular targets and demonstrate substantial antitumor activity at tolerated doses in an enriched population of patients. Here, we review recent RCTs and found that these conditions were not met for most of the targeted anticancer agents, which failed in recent RCTs. Many recent phase III RCTs were initiated without sufficient evidence of activity from early-phase clinical trials. Because patients treated within such trials can be harmed, they should not be undertaken. The bar should also be raised when making decisions to proceed from phase II to III and from phase III to marketing approval. Many approved agents showed only better progression-free survival than standard treatment in phase III trials and were not shown to improve survival or its quality. Introduction of value-based pricing of new anticancer agents would dissuade the continued development of agents with borderline activity in early-phase clinical trials. When collaborating with industry, oncologists should be more critical and better advocates for cancer patients. PMID:26473191

  14. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, Greetta; Joensuu, Timo; Nokisalmi, Petri

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  15. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: a dose escalating phase I/II study

    PubMed Central

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-01-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3–6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85–90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P=0.006) and high-dose groups (P=0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  16. Telomerase peptide vaccination of patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer: A dose escalating phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, S L; Gjertsen, M K; Trachsel, S; Møller, M; Eriksen, J A; Meo, M; Buanes, T; Gaudernack, G

    2006-12-01

    Patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer have a dismal prognosis with a mean life expectancy of 3-6 months. New treatment modalities are thus urgently needed. Telomerase is expressed in 85-90% of pancreas cancer, and immunogenic telomerase peptides have been characterised. A phase I/II study was conducted to investigate the safety, tolerability, and immunogenecity of telomerase peptide vaccination. Survival of the patients was also recorded. Forty-eight patients with non-resectable pancreatic cancer received intradermal injections of the telomerase peptide GV1001 at three dose levels, in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The treatment period was 10 weeks. Monthly booster vaccinations were offered as follow-up treatment. Immune responses were measured as delayed-type hypersensitivity skin reaction and in vitro T-cell proliferation. GV1001 was well tolerated. Immune responses were observed in 24 of 38 evaluable patients, with the highest ratio (75%) in the intermediate dose group. Twenty-seven evaluable patients completed the study. Median survival for the intermediate dose-group was 8.6 months, significantly longer for the low- (P = 0.006) and high-dose groups (P = 0.05). One-year survival for the evaluable patients in the intermediate dose group was 25%. The results demonstrate that GV1001 is immunogenic and safe to use. The survival data indicate that induction of an immune response is correlated with prolonged survival, and the vaccine may offer a new treatment option for pancreatic cancer patients, encouraging further clinical studies. PMID:17060934

  17. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival. PMID:25867139

  18. Subcutaneous Progesterone Is Effective and Safe for Luteal Phase Support in IVF: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of the Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    Doblinger, Jakob; Cometti, Barbara; Trevisan, Silvia; Griesinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize efficacy and safety data on a new progesterone compound which is available for subcutaneous administration as compared to vaginally administered progesterone for luteal phase support in patients undergoing IVF treatment. Design Data from two randomized phase III trials (07EU/Prg06 and 07USA/Prg05) performed according to GCP standards with a total sample size of 1435 per-protocol patients were meta-analyzed on an individual patient data level. Setting University affiliated reproductive medicine unit. Patients Subcutaneous progesterone was administered to a total of 714 subjects and vaginal progesterone was administered to a total of 721 subjects who underwent fresh embryo transfer after ovarian stimulation followed by IVF or ICSI. The subjects were between 18 and 42 years old and had a BMI <30kg/m2. Interventions Subcutaneous progesterone 25 mg daily vs. either progesterone vaginal gel 90 mg daily (07EU/Prg06) or 100 mg intravaginal twice a day (07USA/Prg05) for luteal phase support in IVF patients. Main outcome measures Ongoing pregnancy rate beyond 10 gestational weeks, live birth rate and OHSS risk. Results The administration of subcutaneous progesterone versus intra-vaginal progesterone had no impact on ongoing pregnancy likelihood (OR = 0.865, 95% CI 0.694 to 1.077; P = n.s.), live birth likelihood (OR = 0.889, 95% CI 0.714 to 1.106; P = n.s.) or OHSS risk (OR = 0.995, 95% CI 0.565 to 1.754; P = n.s.) in regression analyses accounting for clustering of patients within trials, while adjusting for important confounders. Only female age and number of oocytes retrieved were significant predictors of live birth likelihood and OHSS risk. Conclusion No statistical significant or clinical significant differences exist between subcutaneous and vaginal progesterone for luteal phase support. PMID:26991890

  19. A phase III trial evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of nimesulide 1% spray in patients with soft-tissue injuries

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mazharuddin Ali; Rao, Madhusudhan; Reddy, Madan M.; Tamloorker, Datta; Gumdal, Vishesh; Latha, Moodahadu S.; Krishnankutty, Binny

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nimesulide 1% w/w spray in minor soft-tissue injuries in adult Indians through a multicentric, open-labeled, phase III trial. Materials and Methods: 125 eligible patients, who met the selection criteria and gave written informed consent, were screened, enrolled, and treated with nimesulide 1% spray for seven days. Patients were assessed at baseline, day 1, day 4, and day 8 for efficacy and safety. Primary efficacy variable pain intensity, was measured using a NRS 1-100 mm (numerical rating scale). Secondary efficacy variables were degree of inflammation and edema and degree of functional impairment; overall assessment of efficacy was done by patient (patient global assessment – PGA) and by investigator (investigator global assessment – IGA) on days 4 and 8. Result: There was a statistically significant reduction in the NRS score, degree of pain, edema (inflammation), and improvement in functional impairment on days 4 and 8 and in serum creatine kinase levels on day 8 in comparison with baseline. Global assessment of efficacy on day 8 was rated as “very good (21%),” “good (67.70%),” and “fair (11.30%)” by investigators and “very good (25%),” “good (58.90%),” and “fair (16.1%)” by patients. Two mild adverse events were reported in two patients, which resolved without any intervention. One (local irritation) was reported as not related, while the other (itching sensation) was probably related to the study drug. Conclusion: Nimesulide 1% spray was effective with a good safety profile and can be considered is a good alternative to oral analgesic therapy in minor soft-tissue injuries. PMID:23724380

  20. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  1. Patient-reported quality-of-life analysis of radium-223 dichloride from the phase III ALSYMPCA study

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, S.; Cislo, P.; Sartor, O.; Vogelzang, N. J.; Coleman, R. E.; O'Sullivan, J. M.; Reuning-Scherer, J.; Shan, M.; Zhan, L.; Parker, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223), a first-in-class α-emitting radiopharmaceutical, is recommended in both pre- and post-docetaxel settings in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and symptomatic bone metastases based on overall survival benefit demonstrated in the phase III ALSYMPCA study. ALSYMPCA included prospective measurements of health-related quality of life (QOL) using two validated instruments: the general EuroQoL 5D (EQ-5D) and the disease-specific Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P). Patients and methods Analyses were conducted to determine treatment effects of radium-223 plus standard of care (SOC) versus placebo plus SOC on QOL using FACT-P and EQ-5D. Outcomes assessed were percentage of patients experiencing improvement, percentage of patients experiencing worsening, and mean QOL scores during the study. Results Analyses were carried out on the intent-to-treat population of patients randomized to receive radium-223 (n = 614) or placebo (n = 307). The mean baseline EQ-5D utility and FACT-P total scores were similar between treatment groups. A significantly higher percentage of patients receiving radium-223 experienced meaningful improvement in EQ-5D utility score on treatment versus placebo {29.2% versus 18.5%, respectively; P = 0.004; odds ratio (OR) = 1.82 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21–2.74]}. Findings were similar for FACT-P total score [24.6% versus 16.1%, respectively; P = 0.020; OR = 1.70 (95% CI 1.08–2.65)]. A lower percentage of patients receiving radium-223 experienced meaningful worsening versus placebo measured by EQ-5D utility score and FACT-P total score. Prior docetaxel use and current bisphosphonate use did not affect these findings. Treatment was a significant predictor of EQ-5D utility score, with radium-223 associated with higher scores versus placebo (0.56 versus 0.50, respectively; P = 0.002). Findings were similar for FACT-P total score (99.08 versus 95

  2. Hypofractionated Helical Tomotherapy for Older Aged Patients With Prostate Cancer: Preliminary Results of a Phase I-II Trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Xia; Du, Lei; Yu, Wei; Cai, Bo-Ning; Xu, Shou-Ping; Xie, Chuan-Bin; Ma, Lin

    2016-08-01

    In our center, the feasibility and related acute toxicities of hypofractionated helical tomotherapy have been evaluated in older aged patients with prostate cancer . Between February 2009 and February 2014, 67 patients (older than 65 years) were enrolled in a prospective phase I-II study (registered number, ChiCTR-ONC-13004037). Patients in cohort 1 (n = 33) and cohort 2 (n = 34) received 76 Gy in 34 fractions (2.25 Gy/F) and 71.6 Gy in 28 fractions (2.65 Gy/F), respectively, to the prostate and seminal vesicles, while 25 patients in cohort 2 also received integrated elective lymph node irradiation (50.4 Gy). All patients were treated with helical tomotherapy, and daily image guidance was performed before each treatment. Acute toxicities were assessed with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. No significant difference was detected between the 2 cohorts in the incidence of acute toxicities. In cohort 1, the incidences of grade 1 and 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 45.5% and 45.4%, respectively, and without grade 3 and 4 toxicities. In cohort 2, the incidences of acute grade 1 and 2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 47.1% and 55.9%, respectively, and grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (hematuria) was noted only in 1 patient. No significant difference was detected in the incidence of acute toxicities between the patients receiving integrated elective lymph node irradiation and those receiving irradiation to prostate and seminal vesicle in cohort 2. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed with clinical parameters. Only the baseline weight was found negatively correlated with genitourinary toxicities at a weak level (relative risk = 0.946, 95% confidence interval 0.896-0.998], P = .043). This study shows that 2 hypofractionation regimens (76 Gy/34F and 71.6 Gy/28F) delivered with HT are well tolerated in older aged patients having prostate cancer

  3. Phase I/II Trial of Dose-Escalated Busulfan Delivered by Prolonged Continuous Infusion in Allogeneic Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas C; Walko, Christine; Chung, Yunro; Ivanova, Anastasia; Sheets, Julia; Rao, Kamakshi; Gabriel, Don; Comeau, Terry; Wood, William; Coghill, James; Armistead, Paul; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Serody, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Intensive chemotherapy or chemotherapy plus irradiation and allogeneic stem cell transplantation can be curative for patients with hematologic diseases. Reduced-intensity transplants can also achieve cure and result in less treatment-related mortality but higher relapse rates. Thus, optimizing the conditioning regimens used in allogeneic transplantation remains an important goal. We conducted a phase I/II trial to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of a continuous infusion of busulfan over 90 hours in conjunction with fludarabine followed by allogeneic related or unrelated donor transplant. Fifty-four patients with advanced hematologic malignancies were enrolled on this study. The MTD was identified as a 24-hour area under the curve (AUC) of approximately 7095 μM/min, which represents a 43% increase over the standard total daily AUC dose of 4800 μM/min given by intermittent schedules. DLTs at doses over 8000 μM/min were identified by a desquamative skin rash and mucositis. No dose-related increase in hepatic, pulmonary, or other organ toxicities were seen, whereas efficacy appeared to be improved at higher dose levels. Continuous-infusion busulfan with intermittent fludarabine provides an alternative treatment strategy that is generally well tolerated and permits an increase in total busulfan dose with encouraging efficacy. (NCI study no. NCT00448357.). PMID:26210442

  4. Confirmation of model-based dose selection for a Japanese phase III study of rivaroxaban in non-valvular atrial fibrillation patients.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masato; Tanigawa, Takahiko; Hashizume, Kensei; Kajikawa, Mariko; Tajiri, Masahiro; Mueck, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to confirm the appropriateness of the dose setting for a Japanese phase III study of rivaroxaban in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF), which had been based on model simulation employing phase II study data. The previously developed mixed-effects pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model, which consisted of an oral one-compartment model parameterized in terms of clearance, volume and a first-order absorption rate, was rebuilt and optimized using the data for 597 subjects from the Japanese phase III study, J-ROCKET AF. A mixed-effects modeling technique in NONMEM was used to quantify both unexplained inter-individual variability and inter-occasion variability, which are random effect parameters. The final PK and PK-PD models were evaluated to identify influential covariates. The empirical Bayes estimates of AUC and C(max) from the final PK model were consistent with the simulated results from the Japanese phase II study. There was no clear relationship between individual estimated exposures and safety-related events, and the estimated exposure levels were consistent with the global phase III data. Therefore, it was concluded that the dose selected for the phase III study with Japanese NVAF patients by means of model simulation employing phase II study data had been appropriate from the PK-PD perspective. PMID:23337693

  5. Blueberry Improves the Therapeutic Effect of Etanercept on Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Phase III Study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yingjie; Wang, Ye; Guo, Jun; Chu, Haifeng; Gao, Yong; Pang, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthritis in the adolescents under the age of 16. Etanercept, an inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor, is often used to treat JIA despite its significant side effects. Homeopathic remedies, such as blueberries, have anti-inflammatory properties with fewer unwanted effects and should be considered as a primary treatment. We aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept for JIA. Two hundred and one JIA patients were selected, and randomly and evenly assigned to three groups: ETA (50 mg of etanercept twice weekly), ETABJ (matched etanercept and 50 ml blueberry juice daily) and ETAPJ (matched etanercept and placebo juice). The severity of JIA was measured using American College of Rheumatology scales (ACR) 20, 50 and 70. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL1) alpha and IL1 beta, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RA) were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA. After a 6-month follow-up, the ACR20, ACR50 and ACR70 in an ETABJ group were higher than those in other two groups (P < 0.05), suggesting clinically meaningful improvement in JIA. Meanwhile, the symptoms and side effects were reduced significantly or absent in an ETABJ group, including mental diseases, retrobulbar optic neuritis, gaining weight, infection, cutaneous vasculitis, diarrhea, uveitis and pancytopenia. Blueberries reduced the levels of IL1 alpha and beta, and increased the level of IL1RA. Thus, a combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept can reduce the severity of JIA and should be developed as a new method for JIA therapy. PMID:26477692

  6. Effect of Certolizumab Pegol on Multiple Facets of Psoriatic Arthritis as Reported by Patients: 24-Week Patient-Reported Outcome Results of a Phase III, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Gladman, D; Fleischmann, R; Coteur, G; Woltering, F; Mease, P J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of certolizumab pegol (CZP) on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients with and without prior tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor exposure. Methods The ongoing phase III RAPID-PsA trial was double blind and placebo controlled to week 24. Patients were randomized 1:1:1 to placebo every 2 weeks or CZP 400 mg at weeks 0, 2, and 4, followed by either CZP 200 mg every 2 weeks or CZP 400 mg every 4 weeks. PRO measures evaluated were the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) disability index (DI), health status (measured by the Short Form 36 [SF-36] health survey), Psoriatic Arthritis Quality of Life (PsAQOL), Fatigue Assessment Scale, patient assessment of pain (visual analog scale), and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Post hoc analyses of PROs in patients with and without prior TNF inhibitor exposure were conducted. Change from baseline for all PROs was analyzed for the randomized population using analysis of covariance with last observation carried forward imputation. Results A total of 409 patients were randomized. Twenty percent had received a prior TNF inhibitor. Baseline demographics were similar between the treatment groups. At week 24, clinically meaningful differences in HAQ DI, SF-36, PsAQOL, fatigue, pain, and DLQI were observed in both CZP arms versus placebo (P < 0.001), irrespective of prior TNF inhibitor exposure. More CZP-treated patients reached SF-36 general population norms than placebo-treated patients. Conclusion Both CZP dosing schedules provided rapid improvements in PROs across multiple disease aspects in patients with PsA. The benefits of CZP treatment for health-related quality of life were seen across generic, PsA-specific, and dermatology-specific measures and were observed in patients regardless of prior TNF inhibitor exposure. PMID:24339179

  7. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  8. Phase I/II study of erlotinib and temsirolimus for patients with recurrent malignant gliomas: North American Brain Tumor Consortium trial 04-02

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Patrick Y.; Chang, Susan M.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Kuhn, John G.; Norden, Andrew D.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Robins, H. Ian; Lieberman, Frank S.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Mehta, Minesh P.; Drappatz, Jan; Groves, Morris D.; Santagata, Sandro; Ligon, Azra H.; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Wright, John J.; Dancey, Janet; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Prados, Michael D.; Ligon, Keith L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) may have synergistic antitumor effects in high-grade glioma patients. Methods We conducted a phase I/II study of the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib (150 mg/day) and the mTOR inhibitor temsirolimus. Patients initially received temsirolimus 50 mg weekly, and the dose adjusted based on toxicities. In the phase II component, the primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS6) among glioblastoma patients. Results Twenty-two patients enrolled in phase I, 47 in phase II. Twelve phase I patients treated at the maximum tolerated dosage were included in the phase II cohort for analysis. The maximum tolerated dosage was 15 mg temsirolimus weekly with erlotinib 150 mg daily. Dose-limiting toxicities were rash and mucositis. Among 42 evaluable glioblastoma patients, 12 (29%) achieved stable disease, but there were no responses, and PFS6 was 13%. Among 16 anaplastic glioma patients, 1 (6%) achieved complete response, 1 (6%) partial response, and 2 (12.5%) stable disease, with PFS6 of 8%. Tumor levels of both drugs were low, and posttreatment tissue in 3 patients showed no reduction in the mTOR target phosphorylated (phospho-)S6S235/236 but possible compensatory increase in phospho-AktS473. Presence of EGFR variant III, phospho-EGFR, and EGFR amplification did not correlate with survival, but patients with elevated phospho–extracellular signal-regulated kinase or reduced phosphatase and tensin homolog protein expression had decreased progression-free survival at 4 months. Conclusion Because of increased toxicity, the maximum tolerated dosage of temsirolimus in combination with erlotinib proved lower than expected. Insufficient tumor drug levels and redundant signaling pathways may partly explain the minimal antitumor activity noted. PMID:24470557

  9. Correct usage, ease of use, and preference of two dry powder inhalers in patients with COPD: analysis of five phase III, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Riley, John H; Tabberer, Maggie; Richard, Nathalie; Donald, Alison; Church, Alison; Harris, Stephanie S

    2016-01-01

    Background Handheld inhalers are used to deliver treatment for COPD. Incorrect usage leads to suboptimal disease control. Complex treatment regimens and use of multiple inhalers may reduce patient compliance. The Anoro Ellipta™ dry powder inhaler (DPI) simultaneously delivers umeclidinium bromide (UMEC) and vilanterol (VI) without coformulation being required. Aim To assess the correct usage and ease of use of the Ellipta™ DPI administering UMEC/VI and to compare patient preference for Ellipta™ with the HandiHaler® through exploratory analyses of patient and observer questionnaires in five Phase III studies. Methods Two Phase III, 3-month double-blind, placebo-controlled studies assessed the correct usage of the Ellipta™ DPI at Day 1 and after 6 weeks, and ease of use of the Ellipta™ DPI using a nonvalidated patient questionnaire after 6 weeks or early withdrawal. In three 6-month, blinded double-dummy, active comparator studies (two Phase IIIa and one Phase IIIb), patients completed a COPD device preference questionnaire between the Ellipta™ DPI and the Handi-Haler® at Day 168 (Week 24) or early withdrawal. Results In the 3-month placebo-controlled studies, ≥98% of patients used the Ellipta™ DPI correctly and 99% of patients found the inhaler easy/very easy-to-use and the dose counter easy/very easy to read. Across the two Phase IIIa active comparator studies, patients consistently stated a preference for the Ellipta™ DPI over HandiHaler® regarding the number of steps to use (59% vs 17%), time taken to use (62% vs 14%), and ease of use (63% vs 15%) regardless of which inhaler contained active drug. Results were consistent in the Phase IIIb active comparator study. Conclusion Delivery of UMEC/VI via the Ellipta™ DPI was considered easy-to-use, and patients with COPD demonstrated clear preference for this inhaler compared with HandiHaler®. PMID:27578968

  10. Phase III study of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine plus concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qian; Wang, Zhongtang; Huang, Wei; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Shuzeng; Zhou, Tao; Han, Dan; Wu, Zhenying; Gong, Heyi; Sun, Hongfu; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Yumei; Li, Hongsheng; Zhang, Zicheng; Lin, Haiqun; Li, Baosheng

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cisplatin with pemtrexed or vinorelbine and concurrent late course accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy (LCAHRT). Patients with unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were randomly assigned to two regimens. The experimental (PP) arm included cisplatin, pemtrexed and concurrent LCAHRT based on bilateral lung V20 = 33%. The control (NP) arm used cisplatin, vinorelbine with the same radiotherapy protocol. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Median survival times were 26.0 months (95% CI 23.2 to 28.7 months) and 28.5 months (95% CI 17.1 to 39.9 months) for the NP and PP arms, respectively (P = 0.26). Median progression-free survival was 12.5 months and 17.5 months in the NP and PP arms (P = 0.07). In both arms of the study, there were no differences in overall survival between patients with squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC. The incidences of grade 3 or 4 toxicity were higher in NP than PP arm. With concurrent LCAHRT, pemetrexed/cisplatin was equally as efficacious as vinorelbine/cisplatin, but showed a more favorable toxicity profile. PMID:26761213

  11. Phase I/II Trial of Imatinib and Bevacizumab in Patients With Advanced Melanoma and Other Advanced Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Betty K.; Rosen, Mark A.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Gallagher, Maryann; Chen, Helen; Sehgal, Chandra; O’Dwyer, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor signaling in the tumor microenvironment appear to cooperate in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Patients and Methods. We conducted a phase I trial combining bevacizumab (i.v. every 2 weeks) and imatinib (oral daily). Once a recommended phase II dose combination was established, a phase II trial was initiated in patients with metastatic melanoma. A Simon 2-stage design was used with 23 patients required in the first stage and 41 patients in total should the criteria to proceed be met. We required that 50% of the patients be progression-free at 16 weeks. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and power Doppler ultrasonography were performed in patients with metastatic tumors amenable to imaging with these methods at baseline and after 4 weeks. Results. A total of 17 patients were accrued to 4 dose and combination levels. Bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks could be safely combined with imatinib 800 mg daily. Common toxicities included fatigue, nausea, vomiting, edema, proteinuria, and anemia, but were not commonly severe. A total of 23 patients with metastatic melanoma (48% with American Joint Commission on Cancer stage M1c; median age, 63 years) were enrolled in the first stage of phase II. The 16-week progression-free survival rate was 35%, leading to termination of phase II after the first stage. In the small subset of patients who remained on study with lesions evaluable by DCE-MRI, significant decreases in tumor vascular permeability were noted, despite early disease progression using the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors. Conclusion. Bevacizumab and imatinib can be safely combined at the maximum doses used for each agent. We did not observe significant clinical activity with this regimen in melanoma patients. Implications for Practice: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted antiangiogenic therapy has proven clinical efficacy as a

  12. Randomized phase III trial of treatment duration for oral uracil and tegafur plus leucovorin as adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer: final results of JFMC33-0502

    PubMed Central

    Sadahiro, S.; Tsuchiya, T.; Sasaki, K.; Kondo, K.; Katsumata, K.; Nishimura, G.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Sato, S.; Koda, K.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Morita, T.; Matsuoka, J.; Usuki, H.; Hamada, C.; Kodaira, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background While adjuvant chemotherapy is preferable for high-risk colon cancer, treatment duration is controversial. Oral uracil and tegafur (UFT)/leucovorin (LV) is widely used as a standard adjuvant chemotherapy for colon cancer in Japan. We conducted a phase III trial to investigate the optimal duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Patients and methods Patients with curatively resected stage IIB/III colon cancer were eligible for enrollment in this trial. Patients were registered within 6 weeks after surgery and were randomly assigned to receive UFT/LV for 28 of 35 days for 6 months in the control group or for 5 consecutive days per week for 18 months in the study group. The primary end point was the disease-free survival (DFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival (OS) and safety. Result A total of 1071 patients were registered from 233 centers. A statistically significant difference in DFS was not observed between the study group and the control group; the 5-year DFS was 69% in the study group and 69% in the control group. The 5-year OS was 85% in the study group and 85% in the control group. Conclusion Eighteen-month treatment with UFT/LV did not improve DFS or OS compared with 6-month UFT/LV treatment in patients with stage IIB/III colon cancer. The important finding from this study is that not 18 months but 6 months of treatment is enough for postoperative UFT/LV for stage IIB/III colon cancer. Clinical trial number UMIN-CTR C000000245. PMID:26347106

  13. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  14. A Prospective Randomised Phase III Clinical Trial Testing the Role of Prophylactic Cranial Radiotherapy in Patients Treated with Trastuzumab for Metastatic Breast Cancer - Anglo Celtic VII.

    PubMed

    Canney, P; Murray, E; Dixon-Hughes, J; Lewsley, L-A; Paul, J

    2015-08-01

    A high incidence of central nervous system (CNS) metastases has been reported in patients with HER2-positive tumours receiving trastuzumab therapy for metastatic breast cancer. This study tested whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) could reduce the incidence of CNS metastases in this setting. This was a prospective, randomised phase III trial. Patients were randomised 1:1 to no PCI or PCI delivered at around 6 weeks after study entry. Cognitive function was assessed prospectively. In total, 51 patients were randomised over a 3 year period; 25 received PCI and 26 did not. The cumulative incidence of CNS metastases at 2 years was 32.4% (standard error = 9.8%) on the no PCI arm and 21.0% (standard error = 8.6%) on the PCI arm; the associated hazard ratio was 0.57 (95% confidence interval 0.18-1.74; P = 0.32). There was no evidence of cognitive dysfunction in PCI patients. PMID:25976296

  15. Phase I/II Study of the Antibody-Drug Conjugate Glembatumumab Vedotin in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Patrick A.; Hamid, Omid; Pavlick, Anna C.; Kluger, Harriet; Kim, Kevin B.; Boasberg, Peter D.; Simantov, Ronit; Crowley, Elizabeth; Green, Jennifer A.; Hawthorne, Thomas; Davis, Thomas A.; Sznol, Mario; Hwu, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The antibody-drug conjugate glembatumumab vedotin links a fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody against the melanoma-related glycoprotein NMB (gpNMB) to the potent cytotoxin monomethyl auristatin E. This study evaluated the safety and activity of glembatumumab vedotin in patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients received glembatumumab vedotin every 3 weeks (schedule 1) in a dose escalation and phase II expansion at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD). Dosing during 2 of 3 weeks (schedule 2) and weekly (schedule 3) was also assessed. The primary end points were safety and pharmacokinetics. The secondary end points included antitumor activity, gpNMB expression, and immunogenicity. Results One hundred seventeen patients were treated using schedule 1 (n = 79), schedule 2 (n = 15), or schedule 3 (n = 23). The MTDs were 1.88, 1.5, and 1.0 mg/kg for schedules 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Grade 3/4 treatment-related toxicities that occurred in two or more patients included rash, neutropenia, fatigue, neuropathy, arthralgia, myalgia, and diarrhea. Three treatment-related deaths (resulting from pneumococcal sepsis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and renal failure) occurred at doses exceeding the MTDs. In the schedule 1 phase II expansion cohort (n = 34), five patients (15%) had a partial response and eight patients (24%) had stable disease for ≥ 6 months. The objective response rate (ORR) was 2 of 6 (33%) for the schedule 2 MTD and 3 of 12 (25%) for the schedule 3 MTD. Rash was correlated with a greater ORR and improved progression-free survival. Conclusion Glembatumumab vedotin is active in advanced melanoma. The schedule 1 MTD (1.88 mg/kg once every 3 weeks) was associated with a promising ORR and was generally well tolerated. More frequent dosing was potentially associated with a greater ORR but increased toxicity. PMID:25267741

  16. Gefitinib in Combination With Irradiation With or Without Cisplatin in Patients With Inoperable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschild, Sacha; Bucher, Stephan E.; Bernier, Jacques; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Zouhair, Aberrahim; Ries, Gerhard; Lombrieser, Norbert; Lippuner, Thomas; Luetolf, Urs M.; Glanzmann, Christoph; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and tolerability of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) with radiation (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter Phase I study, 5 patients with unresectable NSCLC received 250 mg gefitinib daily starting 1 week before RT at a dose of 63 Gy (Step 1). After a first safety analysis, 9 patients were treated daily with 250 mg gefitinib plus CRT in the form of RT and weekly CDDP 35 mg/m{sup 2} (Step 2). Gefitinib was maintained for up to 2 years until disease progression or toxicity. Results: Fourteen patients were assessed in the two steps. In Step 1 (five patients were administered only gefitinib and RT), no lung toxicities were seen, and there was no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue reactions, limited to Grade 1-2. In Step 2, two of nine patients (22.2%) had DLT. One patient suffered from dyspnea and dehydration associated with neutropenic pneumonia, and another showed elevated liver enzymes. In both steps combined, 5 of 14 patients (35.7%) experienced one or more treatment interruptions. Conclusions: Gefitinib (250 mg daily) in combination with RT and CDDP in patients with Stage III NSCLC is feasible, but CDDP likely enhances toxicity. The impact of gefitinib on survival and disease control as a first-line treatment in combination with RT remains to be determined.

  17. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  18. Phase III Trial of Bevacizumab Plus Interferon Alfa Versus Interferon Alfa Monotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Final Results of CALGB 90206

    PubMed Central

    Rini, Brian I.; Halabi, Susan; Rosenberg, Jonathan E.; Stadler, Walter M.; Vaena, Daniel A.; Archer, Laura; Atkins, James N.; Picus, Joel; Czaykowski, Piotr; Dutcher, Janice; Small, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Bevacizumab is an antibody that binds vascular endothelial growth factor and has activity in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Interferon alfa (IFN-α) is the historic standard initial treatment for RCC. A prospective, randomized, phase III trial of bevacizumab plus IFN-α versus IFN-α monotherapy was conducted. Patients and Methods Patients with previously untreated, metastatic clear cell RCC were randomly assigned to receive either bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks) plus IFN-α (9 million units subcutaneously three times weekly) or the same dose and schedule of IFN-α monotherapy in a multicenter phase III trial. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate, and safety. Results Seven hundred thirty-two patients were enrolled. The median OS time was 18.3 months (95% CI, 16.5 to 22.5 months) for bevacizumab plus IFN-α and 17.4 months (95% CI, 14.4 to 20.0 months) for IFN-α monotherapy (unstratified log-rank P = .097). Adjusting on stratification factors, the hazard ratio was 0.86 (95% CI, 0.73 to 1.01; stratified log-rank P = .069) favoring bevacizumab plus IFN-α. There was significantly more grade 3 to 4 hypertension (HTN), anorexia, fatigue, and proteinuria for bevacizumab plus IFN-α. Patients who developed HTN on bevacizumab plus IFN-α had a significantly improved PFS and OS versus patients without HTN. Conclusion OS favored the bevacizumab plus IFN-α arm but did not meet the predefined criteria for significance. HTN may be a biomarker of outcome with bevacizumab plus IFN-α. PMID:20368558

  19. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  20. Traditional Chinese herbal medicine in the supportive management of patients with chronic cytopaenic marrow diseases -- a phase I/II clinical study.

    PubMed

    Linn, Yeh-Ching; Lu, Jiahui; Lim, Lay-Cheng; Sun, Huili; Sun, Jue; Zhou, Yongming

    2011-08-01

    We report on a phase I/II, single arm clinical trial studying the safety and efficacy of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) in patients with various chronic cytopaenic marrow diseases including myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), myelofibrosis (MF), aplastic anaemia (AA) and thalassemia intermedia, who either have failed, are unfit for or refused currently available Western medical treatment. Patients took oral herbal concoctions according to their TCM syndromes for 24 weeks while continuing with western medical management. The median age of this group of 31 patients was 61 (26--84) years old and median disease duration was 5 years (0.3--40 years). TCM herbs were well tolerated in these patients with multiple comorbidities and previous disease-related complications. Twenty-three patients completed the study with 5 (2 with MDS, 2 with MF and 1 with SAA) achieving some degree of haematological improvement. EORTC quality of life indicators improved in more than half of patients. This small study offers positive results and provides the basis for future larger studies which should randomize patients with MDS, MF and AA managed with standard Western medical treatment to without and with upfront combinations with TCM herbs. This will conclusively define the role of TCM in the supportive management of these diseases. This study was registered with Clinicaltrial.gov as NCT01224496. PMID:21742281

  1. Preliminary results of a phase I/II trial of paclitaxel in patients with relapsed or cisplatin-refractory testicular cancer.

    PubMed

    Bokemeyer, C; Schmoll, H J; Natt, F; Knoche, M; Beyer, J; Souchon, R

    1994-01-01

    Paclitaxel represents a novel antitumour agent with demonstrated activity in cisplatin-sensitive tumours, particularly ovarian cancer. In addition, responses to paclitaxel have been observed in patients with cisplatin-refractory ovarian cancer. The role of paclitaxel in the treatment of testicular cancer has not been explored so far. Despite the generally high cure rates in patients with metastatic testicular cancer, patients with relapsed disease not responding to platin-based salvage chemotherapy have an extremely poor prognosis. In a phase I/II trial 10 patients with relapsed, cisplatin-refractory malignant germ-cell tumours were treated with paclitaxel as 6-h infusions (8 patients) or 3-h infusions (2 patients) at doses from 135 mg/m2 to 310 mg/m2 at 3-week intervals. Three patients achieved a response to paclitaxel, but disease recurred shortly in two patients after two and four cycles of therapy, respectively. One patient has remained in marker-negative partial response for more than 5 months. The toxicity of paclitaxel was tolerable for a dose range from 135 mg/m2 to 225 mg/m2. Granulocytopenia, WHO grades 3 and 4, occurred in all patients but was of short duration (median 3 days; range: 2-7 days). Other toxicities such as mucositis (5 patients grade 1), neurotoxicity (1 patient grade 1, 2 patients grade 2), infection (1 patient grade 3) and diarrhoea (1 patient grade 2) were not dose-limiting. There were no hypersensitivity reactions, but 1 patient developed severe myalgias during therapy with paclitaxel. Six patients with documented cisplatin-refractory disease were retreated with cisplatin-based chemotherapy after paclitaxel treatment and, in 4 of these, tumour responses of 3, 4, 5 and more than 5 months duration were achieved. In order to explore the role of paclitaxel in relapsed and/or cisplatin-refractory testicular cancer a phase II study using a 3-h infusion of 225 mg/m2 paclitaxel every 3 weeks, conducted by the German Testicular Cancer Study Group

  2. Impact of Young Age on Treatment Efficacy and Safety in Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Patients From Nine First-Line Phase III Chemotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Charles D.; Bot, Brian M.; Thomas, David M.; Bleyer, Archie; Kohne, Claus-Henning; Seymour, Matthew T.; de Gramont, Aimery; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer predominantly occurs in the elderly, but approximately 5% of patients are 50 years old or younger. We sought to determine whether young age is prognostic, or whether it influences efficacy/toxicity of chemotherapy, in patients with advanced disease. Methods We analyzed individual data on 6,284 patients from nine phase III trials of advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC) that used fluorouracil-based single-agent and combination chemotherapy. End points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), and grade 3 or worse adverse events. Stratified Cox and adjusted logistic-regression models were used to test for age effects and age-treatment interactions. Results A total of 793 patients (13%) were younger than 50 years old; 188 of these patients (3% of total patients) were younger than 40 years old. Grade 3 or worse nausea (10% v 7%; P = .01) was more common, and severe diarrhea (11% v 14%; P = .001) and neutropenia (23% v 26%; P < .001) were less common in young (younger than 50 years) than in older (older than 50 years) patients. Age was prognostic for PFS, with poorer outcomes occurring in those younger than 50 years (median, 6.0 v 7.5 months; hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .02), but it did not affect RR or OS. In the subset of monotherapy versus combination chemotherapy trials, the relative benefits of multiagent chemotherapy were similar for young and older patients. Results were comparable when utilizing an age cut point of 40 years. Conclusion Young age is modestly associated with poorer PFS but not OS or RR in treated patients with aCRC, and young patients have more nausea but less diarrhea and neutropenia with chemotherapy in general. Young versus older patients derive the same benefits from combination chemotherapy. Absent results of a clinical trial, standard combination chemotherapy approaches are appropriate for young patients with aCRC. PMID:21646604

  3. A phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of misoprostol rectal suppositories to prevent acute radiation proctitis in patients with prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hille, Andrea . E-mail: ahille@med.uni-goettingen.de; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hermann, Robert M.; Christiansen, Hans; Saile, Bernhard; Pradier, Olivier; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis is the most relevant complication of pelvic radiation and is still mainly treated supportively. Considering the negative impact of acute proctitis symptoms on patients' daily activities and the potential relationship between the severity of acute radiation injury and late damage, misoprostol was tested in the prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 patients who underwent radiotherapy for prostate cancer were entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. Radiation-induced toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Toxicity Criteria. Results: Between the placebo and the misoprostol groups, no significant differences in proctitis symptoms occurred: 76% of patients in each group had Grade 1 toxicity, and 26% in the placebo group and 36% in the misoprostol group had Grade 2 toxicity. No differences were found in onset or symptom duration. Comparing the peak incidence of patients' toxicity symptoms, significantly more patients experienced rectal bleeding in the misoprostol group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Misoprostol given as a once-daily suppository did not decrease the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis and may increase the incidence of acute bleeding.

  4. A Phase III Study of Durvalumab (MEDI4736) With or Without Tremelimumab for Previously Treated Patients With Advanced NSCLC: Rationale and Protocol Design of the ARCTIC Study.

    PubMed

    Planchard, David; Yokoi, Takashi; McCleod, Michael J; Fischer, Jürgen R; Kim, Young-Chul; Ballas, Marc; Shi, Kelvin; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2016-05-01

    Anti-programmed cell death-1 and anti-programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1) monotherapies have shown promising clinical activity in advanced, refractory non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but antitumor activity appears to be greater in patients with PD-L1(+) tumors compared with patients harboring PD-L1(-) tumors. Combining the anti-PD-L1 antibody durvalumab and the anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 antibody tremelimumab offers the potential for antitumor activity in patients with advanced NSCLC, regardless of PD-L1 tumor status. ARCTIC (NCT02352948) is a global, phase III, randomized, open-label multicenter study in patients with advanced NSCLC assessing the safety and clinical activity of durvalumab versus standard of care (SoC; erlotinib, gemcitabine, or vinorelbine) in patients with PD-L1(+) tumors (≥25% of tumor cells with membrane staining using VENTANA PD-L1 [SP263] CDx Assay) (Sub-study A) and the combination of durvalumab + tremelimumab or either agent as monotherapy versus SoC in patients with PD-L1(-) tumors (Sub-study B). Eligible patients are those with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC (Stage IIIB/IV), without epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase activating mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements, who have received at least 2 prior systemic regimens, including 1 platinum-based chemotherapy regimen. Co-primary endpoints are progression-free survival and overall survival. Secondary endpoints include the proportion of patients alive at 12 months, objective response rate, duration of response, progression-free survival at 6 and 12 months, safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and quality of life. The exploratory endpoints will assess potential biomarkers of treatment response. Recruitment started in January 2015 and is ongoing. PMID:27265743

  5. Final overall survival results of phase III GCIG CALYPSO trial of pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and carboplatin vs paclitaxel and carboplatin in platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, U; Marth, C; Largillier, R; Kaern, J; Brown, C; Heywood, M; Bonaventura, T; Vergote, I; Piccirillo, M C; Fossati, R; Gebski, V; Lauraine, E P

    2012-01-01

    Background: The CALYPSO phase III trial compared CD (carboplatin-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD)) with CP (carboplatin-paclitaxel) in patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC). Overall survival (OS) data are now mature. Methods: Women with ROC relapsing >6 months after first- or second-line therapy were randomised to CD or CP for six cycles in this international, open-label, non-inferiority trial. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival. The OS analysis is presented here. Results: A total of 976 patients were randomised (467 to CD and 509 to CP). With a median follow-up of 49 months, no statistically significant difference was observed between arms in OS (hazard ratio=0.99 (95% confidence interval 0.85, 1.16); log-rank P=0.94). Median survival times were 30.7 months (CD) and 33.0 months (CP). No statistically significant difference in OS was observed between arms in predetermined subgroups according to age, body mass index, treatment-free interval, measurable disease, number of lines of prior chemotherapy, or performance status. Post-study cross-over was imbalanced between arms, with a greater proportion of patients randomised to CP receiving post-study PLD (68%) than patients randomised to CD receiving post-study paclitaxel (43% P<0.001). Conclusion: Carboplatin-PLD led to delayed progression and similar OS compared with carboplatin-paclitaxel in platinum-sensitive ROC. PMID:22836511

  6. A phase I/II study of biweekly capecitabine and irinotecan plus bevacizumab as second-line chemotherapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suenaga, Mitsukuni; Mizunuma, Nobuyuki; Matsusaka, Satoshi; Shinozaki, Eiji; Ozaka, Masato; Ogura, Mariko; Chin, Keisho; Yamaguchi, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background Triweekly capecitabine plus irinotecan (XELIRI) is not completely regarded as a valid substitute for fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI) in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) because of the potential for greater toxicity. We conducted a phase I/II study to assess the efficacy and safety of biweekly XELIRI plus bevacizumab (BV) as second-line chemotherapy for mCRC. Methods Patients with mCRC who had received prior chemotherapy including oxaliplatin and BV and had a UGT1A1 genotype of wild-type or heterozygous for UGT1A1*6 or *28 were eligible for this study. Treatment comprised capecitabine 1,000 mg/m2 twice daily from the evening of day 1 to the morning of day 8, intravenous irinotecan on day 1, and BV 5 mg/kg on day 1 every 2 weeks. The phase I study consisted of two steps (irinotecan 150 and 180 mg/m2), and dose-limiting toxicity was assessed during the first treatment cycle. The primary endpoint of the phase II study was progression-free survival (PFS). Results The recommended dose of irinotecan was determined to be 180 mg/m2 in the phase I study. Between November 2010 and August 2013, 44 patients were enrolled in phase II. The patients’ characteristics were as follows (N=44): median age, 60 years (range 32–80); male/female, 21/23; and UGT1A1 wild-type/heterozygous, 29/15. The median PFS was 6.8 months (95% confidence interval, 5.3–8.2 months), and the primary endpoint was met. Median overall survival was 18.3 months. The response rate was 22.7%. There was no significant difference in PFS or overall survival according to UGT1A1 status. Grade 3 or higher adverse events were mainly neutropenia in six patients and diarrhea in five patients. There were no other severe adverse events or treatment-related deaths. Conclusion In mCRC patients with wild-type or heterozygous UGT1A1*6 or *28 genotype, biweekly XELIRI + BV is effective and feasible as second-line chemotherapy. Biweekly XELIRI + BV is considered a valid substitute for FOLFIRI

  7. Treatment-Related Death in Patients with Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Phase III Trials over the Last Two Decades

    PubMed Central

    Ochi, Nobuaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Takigawa, Nagio; Oze, Isao; Fujiwara, Yoshiro; Ichihara, Eiki; Hisamoto, Akiko; Tabata, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Treatment-related death (TRD) remains a serious problem in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), despite recent improvements in supportive care. However, few studies have formally assessed time trends in the proportion of TRD over the past two decades. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and pattern of TRD over time. Methods We examined phase 3 trials conducted between 1990 and 2010 to address the role of systemic treatment for SCLC. The time trend was assessed using linear regression analysis. Results In total, 97 trials including nearly 25,000 enrolled patients were analyzed. The overall TRD proportion was 2.95%. Regarding the time trend, while it was not statistically significant, it tended to decrease, with a 0.138% decrease per year and 2.76% decrease per two decades. The most common cause of death was febrile neutropenia without any significant time trend in its incidence over the years examined (p = 0.139). However, deaths due to febrile neutropenia as well as all causes in patients treated with non-platinum chemotherapy increased significantly (p = 0.033). Conclusions The overall TRD rate has been low, but not negligible, in phase III trials for SCLC over the past two decades. PMID:22880112

  8. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Wahab, Sasa; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4-49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  9. S0502: A SWOG Phase III Randomized Study of Imatinib, With or Without Bevacizumab, in Patients With Untreated Metastatic or Unresectable Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Cathy; Corless, Christopher; Eary, Janet F.; Mulder, Karen; Okuno, Scott H.; George, Suzanne; Heinrich, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Lessons Learned Despite having significant rationale, S0502 failed to accrue for a number of reasons. Vetting a trial first, with scientific experts and funding agencies, does not guarantee success, especially when dealing with a rare tumor and/or one with an existing highly effective therapy. In the present case, adding an intravenous drug to an oral medication as part of a regimen expected to be continued for many years likely decreased patient (and physician) convenience and, thus, interest in the study. Background. Imatinib mesylate, a potent inhibitor of the KIT and PDGFR tyrosine kinases, is highly effective in the treatment of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). However, most imatinib-treated tumors eventually become resistant, accounting for a median progression-free survival of 19–23 months. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) correlates with poor prognosis in GIST; bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, is effective in a variety of solid tumors. We postulated combination therapy with imatinib plus bevacizumab would benefit patients with advanced GIST, particularly those reliant on VEGFA-dependent angiogenesis. Methods. Patients with metastatic or surgically unresectable GIST were eligible for this phase III open-label clinical trial, S0502. At registration, patients were randomly assigned to either imatinib 400 mg (standard) or 800 mg (patients with exon 9 KIT mutations), or imatinib plus bevacizumab, 7.5 mg/kg i.v. every 3 weeks. Patients were treated to progression, symptomatic deterioration, unacceptable toxicity, treatment delay greater than 4 weeks, or patient choice to withdraw from the study. The primary objective was to determine whether the addition of bevacizumab to imatinib would improve progression-free survival (PFS) in first-line treatment of incurable GIST. Results. S0502 opened on April 15, 2008. As of fall 2009, only 12 patients from at least 178 eligible SWOG centers plus those participating

  10. Allogeneic marrow transplantation following cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of hyperfractionated total body irradiation in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies: A phase I/II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Demirer, T.; Petersen, F.B.; Appelbaum, F.R.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of unshielded total body irradiation (TBI) delivered from dual {sup 60}C sources at an exposure rate of 0.08 Gy/min and given in thrice daily fractions of 1.2 Gy in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. Forty-four patients with a median age of 28 (range 6-48) years were entered into a Phase I/II study. All patients received cyclophosphamide (Cy), 120 mg/kg administered over 2 days before TBI. Marrow from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical siblings was infused following the last dose of TBI. An escalation-deescalation schema designed to not exceed an incidence of 25% of Grade 3-4 regimen-related toxicities (RRTs) was used. The first dose level tested was 13.2 Gy followed by 14.4 Gy. None of the four patients at the dose level of 13.2 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT. Two of the first eight patients receiving 14.4 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT, establishing this as the MTD. An additional 32 patients were evaluated at the 14.4 Gy level to confirm these initial observations. Of 40 patients receiving 14.4 Gy, 13 (32.5%) developed Grade 3-4 RRTs; 46% in adults and 12% in children. The primary dose limiting toxicity was Grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity, which occurred in 12.5% of patients. Noninfectious Grade 3-4 interstitial pneumonia syndrome occurred in 5% of patients. The actuarial probabilities of event-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 2 years were 0.10, 0.81, and 0.47, respectively, for patients who received 14.4 Gy of TBI. The outcome for patients receiving 14.4 Gy of TBI was not different from previous studies of other CY and TBI regimens in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. These data showed that the incidence of Grade 3-4 RRTs in adults was greater than the 25% maximum set as the goal of this study, suggesting that 13.2 Gy is a more appropriate dose of TBI for adults, while 14.4 Gy is an appropriate dose for children. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. FRAGMATIC: A randomised phase III clinical trial investigating the effect of fragmin® added to standard therapy in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs when blood clots in the leg, pelvic or other deep vein (deep vein thrombosis) with or without transport of the thrombus into the pulmonary arterial circulation (pulmonary embolus). VTE is common in patients with cancer and is increased by surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and disease progression. Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is routinely used to treat VTE and some evidence suggests that LMWH may also have an anticancer effect, by reduction in the incidence of metastases. The FRAGMATIC trial will assess the effect of adding dalteparin (FRAGMIN), a type of LMWH, to standard treatment for patients with lung cancer. Methods/Design The study design is a randomised multicentre phase III trial comparing standard treatment and standard treatment plus daily LMWH for 24 weeks in patients with lung cancer. Patients eligible for this study must have histopathological or cytological diagnosis of primary bronchial carcinoma (small cell or non-small cell) within 6 weeks of randomisation, be 18 or older, and must be willing and able to self-administer 5000 IU dalteparin by daily subcutaneous injection or have it administered to themselves or by a carer for 24 weeks. A total of 2200 patients will be recruited from all over the UK over a 3 year period and followed up for a minimum of 1 year after randomisation. Patients will be randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio, standard treatment or standard treatment plus dalteparin. The primary outcome measure of the trial is overall survival. The secondary outcome measures include venous thrombotic event (VTE) free survival, serious adverse events (SAEs), metastasis-free survival, toxicity, quality of life (QoL), levels of breathlessness, anxiety and depression, cost effectiveness and cost utility. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN80812769 PMID:19807917

  12. Phase III, randomized study of ofatumumab versus physicians' choice of therapy and standard versus extended-length ofatumumab in patients with bulky fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Österborg, Anders; Udvardy, Miklós; Zaritskey, Andrey; Andersson, Per-Ola; Grosicki, Sebastian; Mazur, Grzegorz; Kaplan, Polina; Steurer, Michael; Schuh, Anna; Montillo, Marco; Kryachok, Iryna; Middeke, Jan Moritz; Kulyaba, Yaroslav; Rekhtman, Grygoriy; Gorczyca, Michele; Daly, Siobhan; Chang, Chai-Ni; Lisby, Steen; Gupta, Ira

    2016-09-01

    We report results of a randomized, phase III study of ofatumumab versus physicians' choice treatment in patients with bulky fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia and explore extended versus standard-length ofatumumab treatment. Patients (79 ofatumumab, 43 physicians' choice) completed a median 6 (ofatumumab) or 3 (physicians' choice) months' therapy. Ofatumumab-treated patients with stable disease or better were randomized (2:1) to 6 months' extended ofatumumab treatment or observation. Although the study did not meet the primary endpoint of progression-free survival (PFS) by independent review committee (ofatumumab: 5.4 months, physicians' choice: 3.6 months; p = 0.27), median PFS by investigators was significantly longer for ofatumumab versus physicians' choice (7.0 versus 4.5 months; p = 0.003) as was time to next therapy (median 11.5 versus 6.5 months; p = 0.0004). PFS and time to next therapy were significantly longer with ofatumumab extended treatment than observation (p = 0.026 and p = 0.002, respectively; n = 37). The adverse-event profile of long-term ofatumumab administration showed no unexpected findings (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01313689). PMID:26784000

  13. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  14. A phase I/II study examining pentostatin, chlorambucil, and theophylline in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Willis, Carl R; Goodrich, Amy; Park, Kathy; Waselenko, Jamie K; Lucas, Margaret; Reese, Amy; Diehl, Louis F; Grever, Michael R; Byrd, John C; Flinn, Ian W

    2006-05-01

    In an attempt to exploit bcl-2 overexpression and aberrant p53 function, two frequently encountered aberrations that predict marked treatment resistance and worse prognosis in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), we combined theophylline, pentostatin, and chlorambucil at two dose levels (cohort I: 30 mg/m(2); cohort II: 20 mg/m(2)) on a 21-day cycle for up to six courses. We employed a phase I/II design to determine feasibility, define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and explore the impact of biologic modulation on response and time to progression (TTP) in 20 patients with relapsed or refractory CLL and NHL. Eight patients were enrolled in cohort I. They demonstrated a response rate (RR) of 28% and a 16.5-month TTP after receiving a median of two cycles. A 50% RR was observed in this cohort when patients with adverse histologies were excluded. Because of myelotoxicity, this dose level defined the MTD, and de-escalation occurred. All 12 patients in cohort II received 20 mg/m(2) chlorambucil. A 50% RR and an 18-month TTP were observed after a median of 5.5 cycles. An RR of 47% and a complete remission (CR) of 5% were observed for the entire group, although responses and TTP varied greatly by histology. Significant activity was observed in patients with B-cell CLL and follicular lymphoma (FL). RR and TTP for fludarabine-sensitive/naïve and fludarabine-refractory (FR) B-cell CLL patients were 66 vs 25% and 20 vs 8.5 months, respectively. Both FL patients responded (one with partial remission and one with CR), with a 22.5-monthly median TTP. For responding patients, median TTP and overall survival (OS) was 21 and 69 months, respectively, compared to a median TTP of 2 months and an OS of 13.5 months for nonresponders. The combination of pentostatin, chlorambucil, and theophylline is the active regimen in patients with FL and B-cell CLL. PMID:16518606

  15. Phase III Randomized Trial of Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With N2 or N3 Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Karrison, Theodore G.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Mueller, Jeffrey; Egan, Robyn; Huang, Chao H.; Brockstein, Bruce E.; Agulnik, Mark B.; Mittal, Bharat B.; Yunus, Furhan; Samant, Sandeep; Raez, Luis E.; Mehra, Ranee; Kumar, Priya; Ondrey, Frank; Marchand, Patrice; Braegas, Bettina; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Induction chemotherapy (IC) before radiotherapy lowers distant failure (DF) rates in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The goal of this phase III trial was to determine whether IC before chemoradiotherapy (CRT) further improves survival compared with CRT alone in patients with N2 or N3 disease. Patients and Methods Treatment-naive patients with nonmetastatic N2 or N3 SCCHN were randomly assigned to CRT alone (CRT arm; docetaxel, fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea plus radiotherapy 0.15 Gy twice per day every other week) versus two 21-day cycles of IC (docetaxel 75 mg/m2 on day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1, and fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 on days 1 to 5) followed by the same CRT regimen (IC + CRT arm). The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included DF-free survival, failure pattern, and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results A total of 285 patients were randomly assigned. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities during IC were febrile neutropenia (11%) and mucositis (9%); during CRT (both arms combined), they were mucositis (49%), dermatitis (21%), and leukopenia (18%). Serious adverse events were more common in the IC arm (47% v 28%; P = .002). With a minimum follow-up of 30 months, there were no statistically significant differences in OS (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.41), RFS, or DF-free survival. Conclusion IC did not translate into improved OS compared with CRT alone. However, the study was underpowered because it did not meet the planned accrual target, and OS was higher than predicted in both arms. IC cannot be recommended routinely in patients with N2 or N3 locally advanced SCCHN. PMID:25049329

  16. A phase I/II trial of a polysaccharide extract from Grifola frondosa (Maitake mushroom) in breast cancer patients: immunological effects

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hong; Seidman, Andrew; Fornier, Monica; D’Andrea, Gabriella; Wesa, Kathleen; Yeung, Simon; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Vickers, Andrew J.; Cassileth, Barrie

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer patients commonly use dietary supplements to “boost immune function”. A polysaccharide extract from Grifola frondosa (Maitake extract) showed immunomodulatory effects in preclinical studies and therefore the potential for clinical use. Whether oral administration in human produces measurable immunologic effects, however, is unknown. Methods In a phase I/II dose escalation trial, 34 postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free of disease after initial treatment, were enrolled sequentially in five cohorts. Maitake liquid extract was taken orally at 0.1, 0.5, 1.5, 3, or 5 mg/kg twice daily for 3 weeks. Peripheral blood was collected at days −7, 0 (prior to the first dosing), 7, 14, and 21 for ex vivo analyses. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability. Results No dose-limiting toxicity was encountered. Two patients withdrew prior to completion of the study due to grade I possibly related side effects: nausea and joint swelling in one patient; rash and pruritus in the second. There was a statistically significant association between Maitake and immunologic function (p < 0.0005). Increasing doses of Maitake increased some immunologic parameters and depressed others; the dose–response curves for many endpoints were non-monotonic with intermediate doses having either immune enhancing or immune suppressant effects compared with both high and low doses. Conclusions Oral administration of a polysaccharide extract from Maitake mushroom is associated with both immunologically stimulatory and inhibitory measurable effects in peripheral blood. Cancer patients should be made aware of the fact that botanical agents produce more complex effects than assumed, and may depress as well as enhance immune function. PMID:19253021

  17. Protocol for PIT: a phase III trial of prophylactic irradiation of tracts in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma following invasive chest wall intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bayman, N; Ardron, D; Ashcroft, L; Baldwin, D R; Booton, R; Darlison, L; Edwards, J G; Lang-Lazdunski, L; Lester, J F; Peake, M; Rintoul, R C; Snee, M; Taylor, P; Lunt, C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Histological diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma requires an invasive procedure such as CT-guided needle biopsy, thoracoscopy, video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATs) or thoracotomy. These invasive procedures encourage tumour cell seeding at the intervention site and patients can develop tumour nodules within the chest wall. In an effort to prevent nodules developing, it has been widespread practice across Europe to irradiate intervention sites postprocedure—a practice known as prophylactic irradiation of tracts (PIT). To date there has not been a suitably powered randomised trial to determine whether PIT is effective at reducing the risk of chest wall nodule development. Methods and analysis In this multicentre phase III randomised controlled superiority trial, 374 patients who can receive radiotherapy within 42 days of a chest wall intervention will be randomised to receive PIT or no PIT. Patients will be randomised on a 1:1 basis. Radiotherapy in the PIT arm will be 21 Gy in three fractions. Subsequent chemotherapy is given at the clinicians’ discretion. A reduction in the incidence of chest wall nodules from 15% to 5% in favour of radiotherapy 6 months after randomisation would be clinically significant. All patients will be followed up for up to 2 years with monthly telephone contact and at least four outpatient visits in the first year. Ethics and dissemination PIT was approved by NRES Committee North West—Greater Manchester West (REC reference 12/NW/0249) and recruitment is currently on-going, the last patient is expected to be randomised by the end of 2015. The analysis of the primary end point, incidence of chest wall nodules 6 months after randomisation, is expected to be published in 2016 in a peer reviewed journal and results will also be presented at scientific meetings and summary results published online. A follow-up analysis is expected to be published in 2018. Trial registration number ISRCTN04240319; NCT01604005; Pre

  18. Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Vuong, Te; Azoulay, Laurant; Marijnen, Corrie; Bujko, Kryzstof; Nasr, Elie; Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Cummings, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

  19. Assessment of flares in lupus patients enrolled in a phase II/III study of rituximab (EXPLORER).

    PubMed

    Merrill, Jt; Buyon, Jp; Furie, Ra; Latinis, Km; Gordon, C; Hsieh, H-J; Brunetta, P

    2011-06-01

    The EXPLORER study was designed to assess the response to rituximab versus placebo in patients with moderate to severe extrarenal systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) receiving background immunosuppression. The definition of response required reduced clinical activity without subsequent flares over 52 weeks, and the study did not meet its efficacy endpoint. The current exploratory analysis assessed flare rates in patients who achieved initial low disease activity response (British Isles Lupus Assessment Group [BILAG] C or better in all organs) during the study. Exploratory reanalysis of data from the EXPLORER trial was conducted, considering alternative definitions for flare. No difference was found between rituximab and placebo in preventing or delaying moderate to severe flares. However, when severe (BILAG A) flares alone were examined, rituximab reduced the risk of a subsequent first A flare (hazard ratio = 0.61; p = 0.052) and lowered mean ± SD annualized A flare rates (0.86 ± 1.47 vs. 1.41 ± 2.14; p = 0.038). Eighty-four (49.7%) rituximab-treated patients achieved low disease activity without subsequent A flares versus 31 (35.2%) placebo-treated patients (p = 0.027). Prednisone rescue for A flares was similar in rituximab- (24%) and placebo-treated (14%) patients (p = 0.204). This post hoc analysis evaluates the hypothesis that assessment of BILAG A flares may distinguish potential treatment effects with greater sensitivity than assessment of BILAG B flares. PMID:21478286

  20. Afatinib beyond progression in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer following chemotherapy, erlotinib/gefitinib and afatinib: phase III randomized LUX-Lung 5 trial

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, M.; Yang, J. C.-H.; Park, K.; Kim, J.-H.; Bennouna, J.; Chen, Y.-M.; Chouaid, C.; De Marinis, F.; Feng, J.-F.; Grossi, F.; Kim, D.-W.; Liu, X.; Lu, S.; Strausz, J.; Vinnyk, Y.; Wiewrodt, R.; Zhou, C.; Wang, B.; Chand, V. K.; Planchard, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Afatinib has demonstrated clinical benefit in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer progressing after treatment with erlotinib/gefitinib. This phase III trial prospectively assessed whether continued irreversible ErbB-family blockade with afatinib plus paclitaxel has superior outcomes versus switching to chemotherapy alone in patients acquiring resistance to erlotinib/gefitinib and afatinib monotherapy. Patients and methods Patients with relapsed/refractory disease following ≥1 line of chemotherapy, and whose tumors had progressed following initial disease control (≥12 weeks) with erlotinib/gefitinib and thereafter afatinib (50 mg/day), were randomized 2:1 to receive afatinib plus paclitaxel (40 mg/day; 80 mg/m2/week) or investigator's choice of single-agent chemotherapy. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Other end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), safety and patient-reported outcomes. Results Two hundred and two patients with progressive disease following clinical benefit from afatinib were randomized to afatinib plus paclitaxel (n = 134) or single-agent chemotherapy (n = 68). PFS (median 5.6 versus 2.8 months, hazard ratio 0.60, P = 0.003) and ORR (32.1% versus 13.2%, P = 0.005) significantly improved with afatinib plus paclitaxel. There was no difference in OS. Global health status/quality of life was maintained with afatinib plus paclitaxel over the entire treatment period. The median treatment duration was 133 and 51 days with afatinib plus paclitaxel and single-agent chemotherapy, respectively; 48.5% of patients receiving afatinib plus paclitaxel and 30.0% of patients receiving single-agent chemotherapy experienced drug-related grade 3/4 adverse events. Treatment-related adverse events were consistent with those previously reported with each agent. Conclusion Afatinib plus paclitaxel improved PFS and ORR compared with single-agent chemotherapy in patients who acquired resistance to

  1. A Prospective Phase III Randomized Trial of Hypofractionation Versus Conventional Fractionation in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Arcangeli, Stefano

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity and efficacy of hypofractionated (62 Gy/20 fractions/5 weeks, 4 fractions per week) vs. conventional fractionation radiotherapy (80 Gy/40 fractions/8 weeks) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: From January 2003 to December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated or conventional fractionated schedules of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients received a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation (TAD), and radiotherapy started 2 months thereafter. Results: The median (range) follow-up was 32 (8-66) and 35 (7-64) months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. No difference was found for late toxicity between the two treatment groups, with 3-year Grade 2 rates of 17% and 16% for gastrointestinal and 14% and 11% for genitourinary in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively. The 3-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rates were 87% and 79% in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively (p = 0.035). The 3-year FFBF rates in patients at a very high risk (i.e., pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) >20 ng/mL, Gleason score {>=}8, or T {>=}2c), were 88% and 76% (p = 0.014) in the former and latter arm, respectively. The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed fractionation, iPSA, and Gleason score as significant prognostic factors. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that late toxicity is equivalent between the two treatment groups and that the hypofractionated schedule used in this trial is superior to the conventional fractionation in terms of FFBF.

  2. Efficacy and Safety of Moxifloxacin in Hospitalized Patients with Secondary Peritonitis: Pooled Analysis of Four Randomized Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tellado, Jose M.; Weiss, Günter; Alder, Jeffrey; Kruesmann, Frank; Arvis, Pierre; Hussain, Tajamul; Solomkin, Joseph S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Secondary peritonitis is an advanced form of complicated intra-abdominal infection (cIAI) requiring hospitalization, surgical source control, and empiric antibiotic therapy against causative aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Methods: This pooled analysis of four prospective, active-controlled randomized clinical trials compared the efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin with that of comparator antibiotics in patients with confirmed secondary peritonitis. The primary efficacy endpoint was clinical success rate at test-of-cure (TOC) between day 10 and 45 post-therapy in the per-protocol (PP) population. Safety and clinical efficacy were assessed also in the intent-to-treat population (ITT). Bacteriological success was assessed at TOC in the microbiologically-valid population as a secondary efficacy endpoint. Results: Overall clinical success rates at TOC were 85.3% (431 of 505 patients) in the moxifloxacin and 88.4% (459 of 519 patients) in the comparator treatment groups (PP population, point estimate for the difference in success rates: −3.0%; 95% CI −7.06%, 1.05%), respectively. Similar clinical success rates between moxifloxacin and comparators were observed by anatomical site of infection, and ranged from 80.6% to 100% for moxifloxacin and from 71.4% to 96.6% for comparators, respectively. Bacteriologic success rates were similar with moxifloxacin (82.4%) and comparators (86.8%), respectively. The proportion of patients experiencing any treatment-emergent adverse events was slightly higher with moxifloxacin (67.3%) versus comparators (59.8%). Rates of drug-related adverse events (20.9% versus 20.0%) and deaths (4.3% versus 3.4%) were similar in moxifloxacin and comparator groups; none of the deaths were drug-related. Conclusions: The data suggests that once-daily IV (or IV/PO) moxifloxacin has a comparable efficacy and safety profile to antibiotic regimens approved previously in the subgroup of patients with secondary peritonitis of mild

  3. Revisiting dosing regimen using PK/PD modeling: the MODEL1 phase I/II trial of docetaxel plus epirubicin in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hénin, Emilie; Meille, Christophe; Barbolosi, Dominique; You, Benoit; Guitton, Jérôme; Iliadis, Athanassios; Freyer, Gilles

    2016-04-01

    The MODEL1 trial is the first model-driven phase I/II dose-escalation study of densified docetaxel plus epirubicin administration in metastatic breast cancer patients, a regimen previously known to induce unacceptable life-threatening toxicities. The primary objective was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of this densified regimen. Study of the efficacy was a secondary objective. Her2-negative, hormone-resistant metastatic breast cancer patients were treated with escalating doses of docetaxel plus epirubicin every 2 weeks for six cycles with granulocyte colony stimulating factor support. A total of 16 patients were treated with total doses ranging from 85 to 110 mg of docetaxel plus epirubicin per cycle. Dose escalation was controlled by a non-hematological toxicity model. Dose densification was guided by a model of neutrophil kinetics, able to optimize docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing with respect to pre-defined acceptable levels of hematological toxicity while ensuring maximal efficacy. The densified treatment was safe since hematological toxicity was much lower compared to previous findings, and other adverse events were consistent with those observed with this regimen. The maximal tolerated dose was 100 mg given every 2 weeks. The response rate was 45 %; median progression-free survival was 10.4 months, whereas 54.6 months of median overall survival was achieved. The optimized docetaxel plus epirubicin dosing regimen led to fewer toxicities associated with higher efficacy as compared with standard or empirical densified dosing. This study suggests that model-driven dosage adjustment can lead to improved efficacy-toxicity balance in patients with cancer when several anticancer drugs are combined. PMID:27002506

  4. A prospective phase I-II trial of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib in patients with carcinoma of the cervix with biomarker assessment of the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Fernanda G.; Chan, Philip; Doll, Corinne; Milosevic, Michael; Oza, Amit; Syed, Amy; Pintilie, Melania; Levin, Wilfred; Manchul, Lee; Fyles, Anthony . E-mail: Anthony.Fyles@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and effectiveness of celecoxib in combination with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients were accrued to a phase I-II trial of celecoxib 400 mg by mouth twice per day for 2 weeks before and during CRT. Tumor oxygenation (HP{sub 5}) and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) were measured before and 2 weeks after celecoxib administration alone. The median follow-up time was 2.7 years (range, 1.1-4.4 years). Results: The most common acute G3/4 toxicities were hematologic (4/31, 12.9%) and gastrointestinal (5/31, 16.1%) largely attributed to chemotherapy. Late G3/4 toxicity was seen in 4 of 31 patients (13.7% actuarial risk at 2 yr), including fistulas in 3 patients (9.7%). Within the first year of follow-up, 25 of 31 patients (81%) achieved complete response (CR), of whom 20 remained in CR at last follow-up. After 2 weeks of celecoxib administration before CRT, the median IFP decreased slightly (median absolute, -4.6 mm Hg; p = 0.09; relative, -21%; p = 0.07), whereas HP{sub 5} did not change significantly (absolute increase, 3.6%; p = 0.51; median relative increase, 11%; p = 0.27). No significant associations were seen between changes in HP{sub 5} or IFP and response to treatment (p = 0.2, relative HP{sub 5} change and p = 0.14, relative IFP change). Conclusions: Celecoxib in combination with definitive CRT is associated with acceptable acute toxicity, but higher than expected late complications. Celecoxib is associated with a modest reduction in the angiogenic biomarker IFP, but this does not correspond with tumor response.

  5. Sunitinib Plus Paclitaxel Versus Bevacizumab Plus Paclitaxel for First-Line Treatment of Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: A Phase III, Randomized, Open-Label Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Nicholas J.; Saleh, Mansoor N.; Paul, Devchand; Generali, Daniele; Gressot, Laurent; Copur, Mehmet S.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Minton, Susan E.; Giguere, Jeffrey K.; Smith, John W.; Richards, Paul D.; Gernhardt, Diana; Huang, Xin; Liau, Katherine F.; Kern, Kenneth A.; Davis, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A multicenter, open-label phase III study was conducted to test whether sunitinib plus paclitaxel prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) compared with bevacizumab plus paclitaxel as first-line treatment for patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer who were disease free for ≥ 12 months after adjuvant taxane treatment were randomized (1:1; planned enrollment 740 patients) to receive intravenous (I.V.) paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 every week for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles plus either sunitinib 25 to 37.5 mg every day or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg I.V. every 2 weeks. Results The trial was terminated early because of futility in reaching the primary endpoint as determined by the independent data monitoring committee during an interim futility analysis. At data cutoff, 242 patients had been randomized to sunitinib-paclitaxel and 243 patients to bevacizumab-paclitaxel. Median PFS was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (7.4 vs. 9.2 months; hazard ratio [HR] 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–2.25]; 1-sided P = .999). At a median follow-up of 8.1 months, with 79% of sunitinib-paclitaxel and 87% of bevacizumab-paclitaxel patients alive, overall survival analysis favored bevacizumab-paclitaxel (HR 1.82 [95% CI, 1.16–2.86]; 1-sided P = .996). The objective response rate was 32% in both arms, but median duration of response was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (6.3 vs. 14.8 months). Bevacizumab-paclitaxel was better tolerated than sunitinib-paclitaxel. This was primarily due to a high frequency of grade 3/4, treatment-related neutropenia with sunitinib-paclitaxel (52%) precluding delivery of the prescribed doses of both drugs. Conclusion The sunitinib-paclitaxel regimen evaluated in this study was clinically inferior to the bevacizumab-paclitaxel regimen and is not a recommended treatment option for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21569994

  6. Phase III Noninferiority Trial Comparing Irinotecan With Oxaliplatin, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin in Patients With Advanced Colorectal Carcinoma Previously Treated With Fluorouracil: N9841

    PubMed Central

    Kim, George P.; Sargent, Daniel J.; Mahoney, Michelle R.; Rowland, Kendrith M.; Philip, Philip A.; Mitchell, Edith; Mathews, Abraham P.; Fitch, Tom R.; Goldberg, Richard M.; Alberts, Steven R.; Pitot, Henry C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this multicenter phase III trial was to determine whether overall survival (OS) of fluorouracil (FU) -refractory patients was noninferior when treated with second-line infusional fluorouracil, leucovorin, and oxaliplatin (FOLFOX4; arm B) versus irinotecan (arm A). Cross-over to the other treatment on disease progression was mandated. Patients and Methods Patients who experienced treatment failure with one prior FU-based therapy and had not received prior irinotecan or oxaliplatin, either for metastatic disease or within 6 months of adjuvant FU therapy, were randomly assigned to arm A (irinotecan 350 or 300 mg/m2 every 3 weeks) or arm B (FOLFOX4). Results A total of 491 patients were randomly assigned (arm A, n = 245; arm B, n = 246); 288 (59%) had experienced treatment failure with FU for metastatic colorectal cancer. Two hundred twenty-seven patients (46%) received protocol-mandated third-line therapy (arm A, 43%; arm B, 57%). Median survival was 13.8 months (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.0 months) for initial treatment with FOLFOX4 and 14.3 months (95% CI, 12.0 to 15.9 months) for irinotecan (P = .38; hazard ratio = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.8 to 1.1). Response rates (RR; 28% v 15.5%; P = .0009) and time to progression (TTP; 6.2 v 4.4 months; P = .0009) were significantly superior with FOLFOX4. In the nonrandom subset of patients who crossed over, RR and TTP improvements with FOLFOX4 continued into third-line treatment. Irinotecan therapy was associated with more grade 3 nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and febrile neutropenia; FOLFOX4 was associated with more neutropenia and paresthesias. Conclusion In patients who experienced treatment failure with front-line FU therapy, OS does not significantly differ whether second-line therapy begins with irinotecan or FOLFOX4. FOLFOX4 produces higher RR and longer TTP. Both arms had notable OS in patients who experienced treatment failure with first-line FU therapy. PMID:19380443

  7. Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled phase III study of an E. coli extract plus 5-fluorouracil versus 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Unger, C; Häring, B; Kruse, A; Thumann, A; Schneider, B; Clemm, C; Weber, B; Clevert, H D; Hockertz, S; Kalousek, M B

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity (mucositis, diarrhea and leucopenia) of a therapy with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8; 5-FU) plus an E. coli extract (LC-Extract, Laves coli extract, Colibiogen inject, cell-free soluble fraction from lysed E. coli, Laves strain) in comparison with 5-FU plus placebo. Secondary endpoints included general toxicity, response rate according to WHO, survival time and quality of life. 164 patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled in this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter phase III study. The treatment consisted of 0.167 ml/kg/d LC-Extract or placebo followed by 500-750 mg/m2/d 5-FU on five consecutive days, repeated every three weeks for up to six treatment cycles. 158 (77 verum, 81 placebo) patients were evaluable for toxicity, 144 (72 verum, 72 placebo) evaluable for response. The therapy with LC-Extract was well tolerated. Adverse events that occurred during the study were mainly judged as 5-FU- or tumor-related. Toxicity from treatment with 600 mg/m2/d 5-FU in both treatment groups was very low. After treatment with 750 mg/m2/d 5-FU patients in the placebo-group experienced a higher CTC toxicity than in the LC-Extract groups. Remission rate and survival time showed a slight trend in favour of LC-Extract. These results suggest a positive benefit-risk ratio of the additional application of LC-Extract to 5-FU in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer especially for administration of high doses of 5-FU. PMID:11367875

  8. Dolutegravir in Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients With Raltegravir- and/or Elvitegravir-Resistant HIV-1: 24-Week Results of the Phase III VIKING-3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Penco, Giovanni; Wright, David; Mills, Anthony; Grossberg, Robert; Molina, Jean-Michel; Chas, Julie; Durant, Jacques; Moreno, Santiago; Doroana, Manuela; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Huang, Jenny; Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Vavro, Cindy; Nichols, Garrett; Yeo, Jane M.; Aberg, J.; Akil, B.; Arribas, J. R.; Baril, J.-G.; Blanco Arévalo, J. L.; Blanco Quintana, F.; Blick, G.; Boix Martínez, V.; Bouchaud, O.; Branco, T.; Bredeek, U. F.; Castro Iglesias, M.; Clumeck, N.; Conway, B.; DeJesus, E.; Delassus, J.-L.; De Truchis, P.; Di Perri, G.; Di Pietro, M.; Duggan, J.; Duvivier, C.; Elion, R.; Eron, J.; Fish, D.; Gathe, J.; Haubrich, R.; Henderson, H.; Hicks, C.; Hocqueloux, L.; Hodder, S.; Hsiao, C.-B.; Katlama, C.; Kozal, M.; Kumar, P.; Lalla-Reddy, S.; Lazzarin, A.; Leoncini, F.; Llibre, J. M.; Mansinho, K.; Morlat, P.; Mounzer, K.; Murphy, M.; Newman, C.; Nguyen, T.; Nseir, B.; Philibert, P.; Pialoux, G.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Ramgopal, M.; Richmond, G.; Salmon Ceron, D.; Sax, P.; Scarsella, A.; Sension, M.; Shalit, P.; Sighinolfi, L.; Sloan, L.; Small, C.; Stein, D.; Tashima, K.; Tebas, P.; Torti, C.; Tribble, M.; Troisvallets, D.; Tsoukas, C.; Viciana Fernández, P.; Ward, D.; Wheeler, D.; Wilkin, T.; Yeni, G.-P.; Louise Martin-Carpenter, J.; Uhlenbrauck, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Background. The pilot phase IIb VIKING study suggested that dolutegravir (DTG), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitor (INI), would be efficacious in INI-resistant patients at the 50 mg twice daily (BID) dose. Methods. VIKING-3 is a single-arm, open-label phase III study in which therapy-experienced adults with INI-resistant virus received DTG 50 mg BID while continuing their failing regimen (without raltegravir or elvitegravir) through day 7, after which the regimen was optimized with ≥1 fully active drug and DTG continued. The primary efficacy endpoints were the mean change from baseline in plasma HIV-1 RNA at day 8 and the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 24. Results. Mean change in HIV-1 RNA at day 8 was −1.43 log10 c/mL, and 69% of subjects achieved <50 c/mL at week 24. Multivariate analyses demonstrated a strong association between baseline DTG susceptibility and response. Response was most reduced in subjects with Q148 + ≥2 resistance-associated mutations. DTG 50 mg BID had a low (3%) discontinuation rate due to adverse events, similar to INI-naive subjects receiving DTG 50 mg once daily. Conclusions. DTG 50 mg BID–based therapy was effective in this highly treatment-experienced population with INI-resistant virus. Clinical Trials Registration. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01328041) and http://www.gsk-clinicalstudywww.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com (112574). PMID:24446523

  9. A Phase III, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Flexible-Dose Study of Levomilnacipran Extended-Release in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Anjana; Gommoll, Carl P.; Chen, Changzheng; Greenberg, William M.; Sheehan, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Levomilnacipran (1S, 2R-milnacipran) is a potent and selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor; an extended-release (ER) formulation allows for once-daily dosing. This phase III study (NCT01034462) evaluated the efficacy, the safety, and the tolerability of 40 to 120 mg/d of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo in the treatment of patients (18-80 y) with major depressive disorder. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, flexible-dose study comprised a 1-week single-blind, placebo run-in period; an 8-week double-blind treatment; and a 2-week double-blind down-taper period. The primary efficacy parameter was total score change from baseline to week 8 on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); the secondary efficacy was the Sheehan Disability Scale. Analysis was performed using the mixed-effects model for repeated measures on a modified intent-to-treat population. A total of 434 patients received at least 1 dose of double-blind treatment (safety population); 429 patients also had 1 or more postbaseline MADRS assessments (modified intent-to-treat population). The least squares mean differences and 95% confidence interval were statistically significant in favor of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo for the MADRS total score (−3.095 [−5.256, −0.935]; P = 0.0051) and the SDS total score (−2.632 [−4.193, −1.070]; P = 0.0010) change from baseline to week 8. Adverse events were reported in 61.8% of the placebo patients and in 81.6% of the levomilnacipran ER patients. Frequently reported adverse events (≥5% in levomilnacipran ER and twice the rate of placebo) were nausea, dizziness, constipation, tachycardia, urinary hesitation, hyperhidrosis, insomnia, vomiting, hypertension, and ejaculation disorder. In conclusion, there was a statistically significant difference in the score change from baseline to week 8 between levomilnacipran ER and placebo on several depression rating scales

  10. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase III study of pazopanib in patients with soft tissue sarcoma: results from the Japanese subgroup

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Akira; Araki, Nobuhito; Hiraga, Hiroaki; Sugiura, Hideshi; Matsumine, Akihiko; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Ueda, Takafumi; Ishii, Takeshi; Esaki, Taito; Machida, Michiko; Fukasawa, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective This analysis of the Japanese subpopulation of the PALETTE Phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled study investigated efficacy and safety of pazopanib in patients with metastatic soft tissue sarcoma after failure of standard chemotherapy. Methods Patients were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either pazopanib 800 mg once daily or placebo, with no subsequent cross-over. Primary endpoint was progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints included overall survival and overall response rate. Efficacy analysis was by intent-to-treat. Safety was also investigated. Results Forty-seven patients received either pazopanib (n = 31) or placebo (n = 16). Median progression-free survival was 7.0 weeks (95% confidence interval: 4.0–11.7) for placebo and 24.7 weeks (95% confidence interval: 8.6–28.1) for pazopanib (hazard ratio = 0.41 [95% confidence interval: 0.19–0.90]; P = 0.002). Median overall survival was 14.9 months (95% confidence interval: 6.8—not calculable) for placebo and 15.4 months (95% confidence interval: 7.9–28.8) for pazopanib (hazard ratio = 0.87 [95% confidence interval: 0.41–1.83]; P = 0.687). More patients receiving pazopanib experienced best response of stable disease versus placebo. Adverse events were similar to the global population; those leading to dose reduction were more common and mean daily dose was lower in the Japanese population versus the global population (45 vs. 32% and 624.4 vs. 700.4 mg, respectively). Conclusions The efficacy and safety of pazopanib observed in the Japanese subpopulation of PALETTE were similar to those in the global population. Pazopanib is a new treatment option for Japanese patients with metastatic non-adipocytic soft tissue sarcoma after chemotherapy. Clinical trial Registration number NCT00753688; GSK study ID: VEG110727; http://www.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com/study/VEG110727#ps. PMID:26864131

  11. A phase 2, multicenter, open-label study of sepantronium bromide (YM155) plus docetaxel in patients with stage III (unresectable) or stage IV melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Kudchadkar, Ragini; Ernst, Scott; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Redman, Bruce G; Steinberg, Joyce; Keating, Anne; Jie, Fei; Chen, Caroline; Gonzalez, Rene; Weber, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Survivin is a microtubule-associated protein believed to be involved in preserving cell viability and regulating tumor cell mitosis, and it is overexpressed in many primary tumor types, including melanoma. YM155 is a first-in-class survivin suppressant. The purpose of this Phase 2 study was to evaluate the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate in patients with unresectable Stage III or IV melanoma receiving a combination of YM155 plus docetaxel. The study had two parts: Part 1 established the dose of docetaxel that was tolerable in combination with YM155, and Part 2 evaluated the tolerable docetaxel dose (75 mg/m2) in combination with YM155 (5 mg/m2 per day continuous infusion over 168 h every 3 weeks). The primary endpoint was 6-month PFS rate. Secondary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR), 1-year overall survival (OS) rate, time from first response to progression, clinical benefit rate (CBR), and safety. Sixty-four patients with metastatic melanoma were treated with docetaxel and YM155. Eight patients received an initial docetaxel dose of 100 mg/m2 and 56 patients received 75 mg/m2 of docetaxel. Six-month PFS rate per Independent Review Committee (IRC) was 34.8% (n = 64; 95% CI, 21.3–48.6%), and per Investigator was 31.3% (n = 64; 95% CI, 19.5–43.9%). The best ORR (complete response [CR] + partial response [PR]) per IRC was 12.5% (8/64). The stable disease (SD) rate was 51.6% (33/64), leading to a CBR (CR + PR + SD) of 64.1% (41/64). Estimated probability of 1-year survival was 56.3%. YM155 is a novel agent showing modest activity when combined with docetaxel for treating patients with melanoma. YM155 was generally well tolerated, but the predetermined primary efficacy endpoint (i.e., 6-month PFS rate ≥20%) was not achieved. PMID:25533314

  12. A phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled, flexible-dose study of levomilnacipran extended-release in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Sambunaris, Angelo; Bose, Anjana; Gommoll, Carl P; Chen, Changzheng; Greenberg, William M; Sheehan, David V

    2014-02-01

    Levomilnacipran (1S, 2R-milnacipran) is a potent and selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor; an extended-release (ER) formulation allows for once-daily dosing. This phase III study (NCT01034462) evaluated the efficacy, the safety, and the tolerability of 40 to 120 mg/d of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo in the treatment of patients (18-80 y) with major depressive disorder. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, flexible-dose study comprised a 1-week single-blind, placebo run-in period; an 8-week double-blind treatment; and a 2-week double-blind down-taper period. The primary efficacy parameter was total score change from baseline to week 8 on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); the secondary efficacy was the Sheehan Disability Scale. Analysis was performed using the mixed-effects model for repeated measures on a modified intent-to-treat population. A total of 434 patients received at least 1 dose of double-blind treatment (safety population); 429 patients also had 1 or more postbaseline MADRS assessments (modified intent-to-treat population). The least squares mean differences and 95% confidence interval were statistically significant in favor of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo for the MADRS total score (-3.095 [-5.256, -0.935]; P = 0.0051) and the SDS total score (-2.632 [-4.193, -1.070]; P = 0.0010) change from baseline to week 8. Adverse events were reported in 61.8% of the placebo patients and in 81.6% of the levomilnacipran ER patients. Frequently reported adverse events (≥ 5% in levomilnacipran ER and twice the rate of placebo) were nausea, dizziness, constipation, tachycardia, urinary hesitation, hyperhidrosis, insomnia, vomiting, hypertension, and ejaculation disorder. In conclusion, there was a statistically significant difference in the score change from baseline to week 8 between levomilnacipran ER and placebo on several depression rating scales, reflecting symptomatic

  13. Eslicarbazepine acetate as adjunctive therapy in patients with uncontrolled partial-onset seizures: Results of a phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Michael R; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Harvey, Jay; Rogin, Joanne B; Biraben, Arnaud; Galimberti, Carlo A; Kowacs, Pedro A; Hong, Seung Bong; Cheng, Hailong; Blum, David; Nunes, Teresa; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures. Methods This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, phase III study was conducted at 173 centers in 19 countries, including the United States and Canada. Eligible patients were aged ≥16 years and had uncontrolled partial-onset seizures despite treatment with 1–2 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). After an 8-week baseline period, patients were randomized to once-daily placebo (n = 226), ESL 800 mg (n = 216), or ESL 1,200 mg (n = 211). Following a 2-week titration period, patients received ESL 800 or 1,200 mg once-daily for 12 weeks. Seizure data were captured and documented using event-entry or daily entry diaries. Results Standardized seizure frequency (SSF) during the maintenance period (primary end point) was reduced with ESL 1,200 mg (p = 0.004), and there was a trend toward improvement with ESL 800 mg (p = 0.06), compared with placebo. When data for titration and maintenance periods were combined, ESL 800 mg (p = 0.001) and 1,200 mg (p < 0.001) both reduced SSF. There were no statistically significant interactions between treatment response and geographical region (p = 0.38) or diary version (p = 0.76). Responder rate (≥50% reduction in SSF) was significantly higher with ESL 1,200 mg (42.6%, p < 0.001) but not ESL 800 mg (30.5%, p = 0.07) than placebo (23.1%). Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and TEAEs leading to discontinuation increased with ESL dose. The most common TEAEs were dizziness, somnolence, nausea, headache, and diplopia. Significance Adjunctive ESL 1,200 mg once-daily was more efficacious than placebo in adult patients with refractory partial-onset seizures. The once-daily 800 mg dose showed a marginal effect on SSF, but did not reach statistical significance. Both doses were well tolerated. Efficacy assessment was not affected by

  14. A phase 2, multicenter, open-label study of sepantronium bromide (YM155) plus docetaxel in patients with stage III (unresectable) or stage IV melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kudchadkar, Ragini; Ernst, Scott; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Redman, Bruce G; Steinberg, Joyce; Keating, Anne; Jie, Fei; Chen, Caroline; Gonzalez, Rene; Weber, Jeffrey

    2015-05-01

    Survivin is a microtubule-associated protein believed to be involved in preserving cell viability and regulating tumor cell mitosis, and it is overexpressed in many primary tumor types, including melanoma. YM155 is a first-in-class survivin suppressant. The purpose of this Phase 2 study was to evaluate the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate in patients with unresectable Stage III or IV melanoma receiving a combination of YM155 plus docetaxel. The study had two parts: Part 1 established the dose of docetaxel that was tolerable in combination with YM155, and Part 2 evaluated the tolerable docetaxel dose (75 mg/m(2) ) in combination with YM155 (5 mg/m(2) per day continuous infusion over 168 h every 3 weeks). The primary endpoint was 6-month PFS rate. Secondary endpoints were objective response rate (ORR), 1-year overall survival (OS) rate, time from first response to progression, clinical benefit rate (CBR), and safety. Sixty-four patients with metastatic melanoma were treated with docetaxel and YM155. Eight patients received an initial docetaxel dose of 100 mg/m(2) and 56 patients received 75 mg/m(2) of docetaxel. Six-month PFS rate per Independent Review Committee (IRC) was 34.8% (n = 64; 95% CI, 21.3-48.6%), and per Investigator was 31.3% (n = 64; 95% CI, 19.5-43.9%). The best ORR (complete response [CR] + partial response [PR]) per IRC was 12.5% (8/64). The stable disease (SD) rate was 51.6% (33/64), leading to a CBR (CR + PR + SD) of 64.1% (41/64). Estimated probability of 1-year survival was 56.3%. YM155 is a novel agent showing modest activity when combined with docetaxel for treating patients with melanoma. YM155 was generally well tolerated, but the predetermined primary efficacy endpoint (i.e., 6-month PFS rate ≥20%) was not achieved. PMID:25533314

  15. Dose modification and efficacy of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine vs. gemcitabine for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: phase III MPACT trial

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Moore, Malcolm; Macarulla, Teresa; Goldstein, David; Hammel, Pascal; Kunzmann, Volker; Liu, Helen; McGovern, Desmond; Romano, Alfredo; Von Hoff, Daniel D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dose modifications following adverse events (AEs) are an important part of the management of patients with pancreatic cancer treated with chemotherapy. While dose modifications are utilized to ensure patient safety, the subsequent influence of dose adjustments on treatment exposure and efficacy have not been reported in detail. This exploratory analysis examined the influence of dose modifications on treatment exposure and efficacy in the phase III MPACT trial, which demonstrated superior efficacy of nab-paclitaxel (nab-P) plus gemcitabine (Gem) to Gem alone for the treatment of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Methods Patients received either nab-P 125 mg/m2 + Gem 1,000 mg/m2 on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks or Gem 1,000 mg/m2 weekly for the first 7 of 8 weeks (cycle 1) and then days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks (cycle ≥2). The protocol allowed up to 2 dose reductions per agent. Dose delays were also used to manage toxicities. Results Toxicities that most commonly led to dose modifications were neutropenia, peripheral neuropathy, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue for nab-P and neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and fatigue for Gem alone. Baseline characteristics were similar in patients with dose modifications and the intent-to-treat (ITT) population. Among the 421 treated patients in the nab-P + Gem arm, all patients initiated treatment at the per-protocol nab-P starting dose of 125 mg/m2; 172 (41%) had a nab-P dose reduction, and 300 (71%) had a nab-P dose delay during the study. Most dose modifications occurred after the first 3 months (2 cycles) of treatment. The majority of patients (104/172, 60%) required only 1 nab-P dose reduction, and over half of patients (163/300) had either 1 or 2 dose delays. Patients who underwent dose modifications of nab-P had greater treatment exposure than those who did not in terms of treatment duration, number of cycles administered, and cumulative dose of nab-P delivered. Overall survival (OS) was shorter in the nab-P + Gem

  16. Phase III, multicenter, open-label, long-term study of the safety of abatacept in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to conventional or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, Tsukasa; Urata, Yukitomo; Suematsu, Eiichi; Ohta, Shuji; Honjo, Shigeru; Abe, Tohru; Yamamoto, Ami; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the long-term safety of intravenous (IV) abatacept treatment in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to methotrexate (MTX) or other conventional or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Methods This Phase III, open-label, long-term study (NCT00484289) comprised Japanese patients with RA who had completed abatacept Phase I or Phase II studies, and new patients intolerant to MTX. Patients from Phase I and Phase II studies received a weight-tiered dosing equivalent of 10 mg/kg abatacept, with MTX at doses up to 8 mg/week; newly enrolled patients received weight-tiered 10 mg/kg abatacept monotherapy. Safety and efficacy were assessed. Results A total of 217 patients (Phase I, n = 13; Phase II, n = 178; newly enrolled, n = 26) were treated with IV abatacept for a mean of 3 years. Serious adverse events occurred in 67/217 (30.9%) patients. Most adverse events were mild or moderate. For all cohorts combined, American College of Rheumatology 20% response rates ranged from 61.3 to 81.8% for as-observed and last observation carried forward analyses over 192 weeks. Following initial response, clinical and functional outcomes were maintained for up to 3 years. Conclusions In Japanese patients with RA, IV abatacept with and without background MTX showed tolerable safety and sustained efficacy over 3 years. PMID:24754273

  17. Phase I/II Trial of the Combination of Midostaurin (PKC412) and 5-Azacytidine for Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Paolo; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad; Nazha, Aziz; Borthakur, Gautam; Daver, Naval; Kadia, Tapan; Estrov, Zeev; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Konopleva, Marina; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Durand, Menda; Andreeff, Michael; Levis, Mark; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the combination of midostaurin and azacitidine (AZA) in patients with AML and high risk MDS. Patients received AZA 75 mg/m2 on days 1–7 and midostaurin 25 mg bid (in cohort 1 of phase I) or 50 mg bid (in cohort 2 of Phase I and in Phase II) orally on day 8–21 during the first cycle and continuously thereafter. Fourteen patients were enrolled in the phase I and 40 in the phase II. Overall response rate was 26%. The median remission duration (RD) was 20 weeks and was significantly longer in patients with FLT3 mutations not previously exposed to other FLT3 inhibitors (p=0.05) and in patients not previously transplanted (p=0.01). Thirty-two (59%) patients have died, all of complications related to disease progression. G3-4 non-hematological toxicity was reported in 38 (70%) patients, most frequently infections (56%), ejection fraction reduction (11%), and diarrhea or nausea/vomiting (9% each). The combination of midostaurin and AZA is an effective and safe regimen in patients with AML and high-risk MDS. Patients with FLT3 mutations but not previously exposed to other FLT3 inhibitors and patients not previously transplanted derived the greatest benefit. Further studies with this combination are warranted. PMID:25530214

  18. Phase I/II trial of the combination of midostaurin (PKC412) and 5-azacytidine for patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Strati, Paolo; Kantarjian, Hagop; Ravandi, Farhad; Nazha, Aziz; Borthakur, Gautam; Daver, Naval; Kadia, Tapan; Estrov, Zeev; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Konopleva, Marina; Rajkhowa, Trivikram; Durand, Menda; Andreeff, Michael; Levis, Mark; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the combination of midostaurin and azacitidine (AZA) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and high risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients received AZA 75 mg m(-2) on days 1-7 and midostaurin 25 mg bid (in cohort 1 of phase I) or 50 mg bid (in cohort 2 of Phase I and in Phase II) orally on day 8-21 during the first cycle and continuously thereafter. Fourteen patients were enrolled in the phase I and 40 in the phase II. Overall response rate was 26%. The median remission duration (RD) was 20 weeks and was significantly longer in patients with FLT3 mutations not previously exposed to other FLT3 inhibitors (P = 0.05) and in patients not previously transplanted (P = 0.01). Thirty-two (59%) patients have died, all of complications related to disease progression. G3-4 nonhematological toxicity was reported in 38 (70%) patients, most frequently infections (56%), ejection fraction reduction (11%), and diarrhea or nausea/vomiting (9% each). The combination of midostaurin and AZA is an effective and safe regimen in patients with AML and high-risk MDS. Patients with FLT3 mutations but not previously exposed to other FLT3 inhibitors and patients not previously transplanted derived the greatest benefit. Further studies with this combination are warranted. PMID:25530214

  19. Deep sequencing analysis of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase at baseline and time of failure in patients receiving rilpivirine in the phase III studies ECHO and THRIVE.

    PubMed

    Van Eygen, Veerle; Thys, Kim; Van Hove, Carl; Rimsky, Laurence T; De Meyer, Sandra; Aerssens, Jeroen; Picchio, Gaston; Vingerhoets, Johan

    2016-05-01

    Minority variants (1.0-25.0%) were evaluated by deep sequencing (DS) at baseline and virological failure (VF) in a selection of antiretroviral treatment-naïve, HIV-1-infected patients from the rilpivirine ECHO/THRIVE phase III studies. Linkage between frequently emerging resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) was determined. DS (llIumina®) and population sequencing (PS) results were available at baseline for 47 VFs and time of failure for 48 VFs; and at baseline for 49 responders matched for baseline characteristics. Minority mutations were accurately detected at frequencies down to 1.2% of the HIV-1 quasispecies. No baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs were detected in VFs; one responder carried 1.9% F227C. Baseline minority mutations associated with resistance to other non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) were detected in 8/47 VFs (17.0%) and 7/49 responders (14.3%). Baseline minority nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) RAMs M184V and L210W were each detected in one VF (none in responders). At failure, two patients without NNRTI RAMs by PS carried minority rilpivirine RAMs K101E and/or E138K; and five additional patients carried other minority NNRTI RAMs V90I, V106I, V179I, V189I, and Y188H. Overall at failure, minority NNRTI RAMs and NRTI RAMs were found in 29/48 (60.4%) and 16/48 VFs (33.3%), respectively. Linkage analysis showed that E138K and K101E were usually not observed on the same viral genome. In conclusion, baseline minority rilpivirine RAMs and other NNRTI/NRTI RAMs were uncommon in the rilpivirine arm of the ECHO and THRIVE studies. DS at failure showed emerging NNRTI resistant minority variants in seven rilpivirine VFs who had no detectable NNRTI RAMs by PS. J. Med. Virol. 88:798-806, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26412111

  20. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses - BH), and wet flue gas desulfurization systems (WFGD). Development work concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, with an emphasis on the control of mercury. The AECDP project is jointly funded by the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO), and Babcock and Wilcox, a McDermott company (B and W). This report discusses results of all three phases of the AECDP project with an emphasis on Phase III activities. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on characterization of the emissions of mercury and other air toxics and the control of these emissions for typical operating conditions of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP's and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals, (2) particulate control devices (ESPs and baghouses) effectively remove the particulate-phase mercury, but the particulate-phase mercury was only a small fraction of the total for the coals tested, (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however, for certain applications, system enhancements can be required to achieve high

  1. Phase III study of pasireotide long-acting release in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Edward M; Jarzab, Barbara; Eriksson, Barbro; Walter, Thomas; Toumpanakis, Christos; Morse, Michael A; Tomassetti, Paola; Weber, Matthias M; Fogelman, David R; Ramage, John; Poon, Donald; Gadbaw, Brian; Li, Jiang; Pasieka, Janice L; Mahamat, Abakar; Swahn, Fredrik; Newell-Price, John; Mansoor, Wasat; Öberg, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, we compared pasireotide long-acting release (pasireotide LAR) with octreotide long-acting repeatable (octreotide LAR) in managing carcinoid symptoms refractory to first-generation somatostatin analogues. Adults with carcinoid tumors of the digestive tract were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive pasireotide LAR (60 mg) or octreotide LAR (40 mg) every 28 days. Primary outcome was symptom control based on frequency of bowel movements and flushing episodes. Objective tumor response was a secondary outcome. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated in a post hoc analysis. Adverse events were recorded. At the time of a planned interim analysis, the data monitoring committee recommended halting the study because of a low predictive probability of showing superiority of pasireotide over octreotide for symptom control (n=43 pasireotide LAR, 20.9%; n=45 octreotide LAR, 26.7%; odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–1.97; P=0.53). Tumor control rate at month 6 was 62.7% with pasireotide and 46.2% with octreotide (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.89–4.32; P=0.09). Median (95% CI) PFS was 11.8 months (11.0 – not reached) with pasireotide versus 6.8 months (5.6 – not reached) with octreotide (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.20–0.98; P=0.045). The most frequent drug-related adverse events (pasireotide vs octreotide) included hyperglycemia (28.3% vs 5.3%), fatigue (11.3% vs 3.5%), and nausea (9.4% vs 0%). We conclude that, among patients with carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues, similar proportions of patients receiving pasireotide LAR or octreotide LAR achieved symptom control at month 6. Pasireotide LAR showed a trend toward higher tumor control rate at month 6, although it was statistically not significant, and was associated with a longer PFS than octreotide LAR. PMID:26366058

  2. Efficacy and safety of leuprorelin acetate 6-month depot in prostate cancer patients: a Phase III, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, comparative study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Namiki, Mikio; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Takabayashi, Nobuyoshi; Kudou, Kentarou; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective Leuprorelin acetate (TAP-144-SR) is commonly used worldwide in prostate cancer patients. This study was conducted to assess the non-inferiority of a 6-month depot formulation of TAP-144-SR (TAP-144-SR [6M]) 22.5 mg to a 3-month depot formulation of TAP-144-SR (TAP-144-SR [3M]) 11.25 mg in prostate cancer patients in Japan. Methods This was a 48-week Phase III, open-label, parallel-group comparative study. TAP-144-SR (6M) 22.5 mg (6M group) and TAP-144-SR (3M) 11.25 mg (3M group) were administered to 81 and 79 subjects, respectively. The primary endpoint was the rate of serum testosterone suppression to the castrate level (≤100 ng/dl). Results Serum testosterone of all subjects excluding one subject in the 3M group was suppressed to the castrate level throughout 48 weeks. The estimated between-group difference (6M group − 3M group) in suppression rate was 1.3% (95% confidence interval: −3.4, 6.8), and its lower confidence interval was more than −10% of the pre-determined allowable limit value to judge the non-inferiority. The prostate-specific antigen concentrations were stable throughout the study in both groups. Progressive disease in the best overall response based on the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors was 0.0% for the 6M group and 2.6% for the 3M group. Adverse events occurred in 92.6% in the 6M group and 89.9% in the 3M group. Adverse events leading to discontinuation were reported in 2.5% in the 6M group and 3.8% in the 3M group. Conclusions TAP-144-SR (6M) was not inferior to TAP-144-SR (3M) for the suppressive effect on serum testosterone level. TAP-144-SR (6M) was also as well tolerated as TAP-144-SR (3M). PMID:26486824

  3. Space Phase III - The commercial era dawns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allnutt, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    After the 'Phase I' of space activities, the period bounded by Sputnik and Apollo, 'Phase II', has been entered, a phase in which concerns over the use and the protection of space assets which support national security predominate. However, it is only when the commercial motive becomes prominent that human activity in new regions truly prospers and enters periods of exponential growth. It is believed that there are increasing signs that such a period, called 'Space Phase III', may be coming soon. A description is presented of developments and results upon which this conclusion is based. Since 1980, there have been three developments of great importance for the future of space activities. Six highly successful flights have demonstrated that the Space Shuttle concept works. A series of Soviet missions are related to the emergence of a capability to construct and service modular space stations. Successful tests of the European Ariane 1 indicate an end to U.S. monopoly with respect to the provision of launch services to the Western World.

  4. The clinical benefit of ruxolitinib across patient subgroups: analysis of a placebo-controlled, Phase III study in patients with myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Verstovsek, Srdan; Mesa, Ruben A.; Gotlib, Jason; Levy, Richard S.; Gupta, Vikas; DiPersio, John F.; Catalano, John V.; Deininger, Michael; Miller, Carole; Silver, Richard T.; Talpaz, Moshe; Winton, Elliott F.; Harvey, Jimmie H.; Arcasoy, Murat O.; Hexner, Elizabeth; Lyons, Roger M.; Paquette, Ronald; Raza, Azra; Vaddi, Kris; Erickson-Viitanen, Susan; Sun, William; Sandor, Victor; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Myelofibrosis (MF) patients can present with a wide spectrum of disease characteristics. We analysed the consistency of ruxolitinib efficacy across patient subgroups in the COntrolled MyeloFibrosis Study With ORal JAK Inhibitor Treatment (COMFORT-I,) a double-blind trial, where patients with intermediate-2 or high-risk MF were randomized to twice-daily oral ruxolitinib (n = 155) or placebo (n = 154). Subgroups analysed included MF subtype (primary, post-polycythaemia vera, post-essential thrombocythaemia), age (≤65, > 65 years), International Prognostic Scoring System risk group, baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0, 1, ≥2), JAK2 V617F mutation (positive, negative), baseline haemoglobin level (≥100, <100 g/l), baseline platelet count (100–200 × 109/l, >200 × 109/l), baseline palpable spleen size (≤10, >10 cm), and baseline quartile of spleen volume and Total Symptom Score (TSS; Q1 = lowest, Q4 = highest). Mean percentage change from baseline to week 24 in spleen volume and TSS were calculated for ruxolitinib and placebo in each subgroup. Overall survival was estimated by Kaplan–Meier method according to original randomization group. In ruxolitinib-treated patients, reductions in spleen volume and TSS and evidence of improved survival relative to placebo across subgroups were consistent with those seen in the COMFORT-I population, confirming that ruxolitinib is an effective therapy for the spectrum of MF patients studied in COMFORT-I. PMID:23480528

  5. Phase III Trial of Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Compared With Observation in Patients With Locally Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Neurocognitive and Quality-of-Life Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Alexander; Bae, Kyounghwa; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Wong, Stuart J.; Meyers, Christina A.; Bonner, James A.; Schild, Steven E.; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Bogart, Jeffery A.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Choy, Hak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose There are scant data regarding the effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on neurocognitive function (NCF) and quality of life (QOL). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0214 showed no overall survival (OS) benefit for PCI in stage III non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) at 1 year. However, there was a significant decrease in brain metastases (BM). This analysis focuses on the impact of PCI on NCF and QOL. Patients and Methods Patients with stage III NSCLC who completed definitive therapy without progression were randomly assigned to PCI or observation. NCF was assessed with Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADLS), and Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT). QOL was assessed with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core tool (QOL Questionnaire-QLQC30) and brain module (QLQBN20). Results There were no statistically significant differences at 1 year between the two arms in any component of the EORTC-QLQC30 or QLQBN20 (P > .05), although a trend for greater decline in patient-reported cognitive functioning with PCI was noted. There were no significant differences in MMSE (P = .60) or ADLS (P = .88). However, for HVLT, there was greater decline in immediate recall (P = .03) and delayed recall (P = .008) in the PCI arm at 1 year. Conclusion PCI in stage III NSCLC significantly decreases the risk of BM without improving 1-year OS. There were no significant differences in global cognitive function (MMSE) or QOL after PCI, but there was a significant decline in memory (HVLT) at 1 year. This study provides prospective data regarding the relative risks and benefits of PCI in this setting and the need to use sensitive cognitive assessments. PMID:21135267

  6. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Tatiana; Laville, Cedric; Dyrda, James; Mennerdahl, Dennis; Golovko, Yury; Raskach, Kirill; Tsiboulia, Anatoly; Lee, Gil Soo; Woo, Sweng-Woong; Bidaud, Adrien; Patel, Amrit; Bledsoe, Keith C; Rearden, Bradley T; Gulliford, J.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  7. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at >=6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed >=1 year, 11 (24%) >=2 years, and 7 (16%) >=3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At >=6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at >=6 months. Persistent seroma >=6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  8. Patient-reported outcome results in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with once-weekly dulaglutide: data from the AWARD phase III clinical trial programme.

    PubMed

    Yu, M; Van Brunt, K; Varnado, O J; Boye, K S

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures from the Assessment of Weekly AdministRation of LY2189265 (dulaglutide) in Diabetes (AWARD) clinical trial programme for dulaglutide (1.5 mg and 0.75 mg) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). The Impact of Weight on Self-Perception (IW-SP), Impact of Weight on Ability to Perform Physical Activities of Daily Living (APPADL), Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite, EQ-5D, Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ), Diabetes Symptom Checklist-Revised and Adult Low Blood Sugar Survey were administered and analysed for changes from baseline in one or more AWARD studies. Significant within-group changes from baseline to the primary time point were observed for several PRO measures across all studies. Compared with insulin glargine, significantly greater improvements in the IW-SP score were observed with dulaglutide 1.5 mg and with both dulaglutide doses in the APPADL score. Both dulaglutide doses resulted in significantly greater improvement in DTSQ scores (all subscales) compared with exenatide. Dulaglutide 1.5 mg also resulted in significantly greater improvement on the DTSQ hyperglycaemia subscale compared with metformin. Overall, these PRO results suggest that dulaglutide is beneficial in the treatment of T2D. PMID:26691396

  9. Evaluation of oral care to prevent oral mucositis in estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer patients treated with everolimus (Oral Care-BC): randomized controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Niikura, Naoki; Ota, Yoshihide; Hayashi, Naoki; Naito, Mariko; Kashiwabara, Kosuke; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Yamashita, Toshinari; Mukai, Hirofumi; Umeda, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    This is a randomized, multi-center, open-label, phase III study to evaluate the efficacy of professional oral care in preventing oral mucositis induced by everolimus in postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients will be randomized into professional oral care and control groups (1:1 ratio). All patients will receive everolimus with exemestane and will continue everolimus until disease progression. In the professional oral care group, patients will receive teeth surface cleaning, scaling and tongue cleaning before starting everolimus, and will continue to receive professional oral care weekly from oral surgeons throughout the 8 week treatment. In the control group, patients will brush their own teeth and gargle with 0.9% sodium chloride solution or water. The primary endpoint is the incidence of all grades of oral mucositis. Target accrual is 200 patients with a two-sided type I error rate of 5% and 80% power to detect 25% risk reduction. PMID:27365521

  10. Epigenetic Therapy Using Belinostat for Patients With Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Multicenter Phase I/II Study With Biomarker and Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Tumors From Patients in the Mayo Phase II Consortium and the Cancer Therapeutics Research Group

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Winnie; Chung, Hyun C.; Chan, Stephen L.; Wang, Ling Z.; Lim, Robert; Picus, Joel; Boyer, Michael; Mo, Frankie K.F.; Koh, Jane; Rha, Sun Y.; Hui, Edwin P.; Jeung, Hei C.; Roh, Jae K.; Yu, Simon C.H.; To, Ka F.; Tao, Qian; Ma, Brigette B.; Chan, Anthony W.H.; Tong, Joanna H.M.; Erlichman, Charles; Chan, Anthony T.C.; Goh, Boon C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Epigenetic aberrations have been reported in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study of patients with unresectable HCC and chronic liver disease, epigenetic therapy with the histone deacetylase inhibitor belinostat was assessed. The objectives were to determine dose-limiting toxicity and maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), to assess pharmacokinetics in phase I, and to assess activity of and explore potential biomarkers for response in phase II. Patients and Methods Major eligibility criteria included histologically confirmed unresectable HCC, European Cooperative Oncology Group performance score ≤ 2, and adequate organ function. Phase I consisted of 18 patients; belinostat was given intravenously once per day on days 1 to 5 every 3 weeks; dose levels were 600 mg/m2 per day (level 1), 900 mg/m2 per day (level 2), 1,200 mg/m2 per day (level 3), and 1,400 mg/m2 per day (level 4). Phase II consisted of 42 patients. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS), and the main secondary end points were response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and overall survival (OS). Exploratory analysis was conducted on pretreatment tumor tissues to determine whether HR23B expression is a potential biomarker for response. Results Belinostat pharmacokinetics were linear from 600 to 1,400 mg/m2 without significant accumulation. The MTD was not reached at the maximum dose administered. Dose level 4 was used in phase II. The median number of cycles was two (range, one to 12). The partial response (PR) and stable disease (SD) rates were 2.4% and 45.2%, respectively. The median PFS and OS were 2.64 and 6.60 months, respectively. Exploratory analysis revealed that disease stabilization rate (complete response plus PR plus SD) in tumors having high and low HR23B histoscores were 58% and 14%, respectively (P = .036). Conclusion Epigenetic therapy with belinostat demonstrates tumor stabilization and is generally well-tolerated. HR23B

  11. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR - PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley J. Miller; Ye Zhuang; Michael E. Collings; Michelle R. Olderbak

    2000-10-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration. The AHPC concept consists of a combination of fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emission with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. In Phase II, a 2.5-MW-scale AHPC was designed, constructed, installed, and tested at the Big Stone power station. For Phase III, further testing of an improved version of the 2.5-MW-scale AHPC at the Big Stone power station is being conducted to facilitate commercialization of the AHPC technology.

  12. Phase I-II Trial of Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aristu, Jose Javier Arbea, Leire; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Moreno, Marta M.D.; Azcona, Juan Diego; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus Miguel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To identify the maximal tolerated dose level of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and to evaluate the efficacy. Patients and Methods: Patients with rectal T3-T4 and/or N0-N+ rectal cancer received capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday through Friday and oxaliplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1, 8, and 15, concurrently with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was increased in 5.0-Gy steps in cohorts of 3 patients starting from 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions (dose level [DL] 1). DL2 and DL3 were designed to reach 42.5 Gy in 17 fractions and 47.5 Gy in 19 fractions, respectively. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed at DL1 or DL2. Of the 3 patients treated at DL3, 1 presented with Grade 3 diarrhea, which was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, and 3 additional patients were added. Of the 6 patients treated at DL3, no new dose-limiting toxicities were observed, and DL3 was identified as the recommended dose in this study. Eight additional patients were treated at 47.5 Gy. Grade 2 proctitis was the most frequent adverse event (40%); Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 2 patients (10%). All patients underwent surgery, and 17 patients (85%) underwent R0 resection. Four patients (20%) presented with a histologic response of Grade 4, 11 (55%) with Grade 3+, 2 (15%) with Grade 3, and 2 patients (10%) with Grade 2. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose in this study was 47.5 Gy. The high rates of pathologic response of Grade 3+ and 4 must be confirmed through the accrual of new patients in the Phase II study.

  13. Decitabine improves progression-free survival in older high-risk MDS patients with multiple autosomal monosomies: results of a subgroup analysis of the randomized phase III study 06011 of the EORTC Leukemia Cooperative Group and German MDS Study Group.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Michael; Suciu, Stefan; Hagemeijer, Anne; Rüter, Björn; Platzbecker, Uwe; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; Germing, Ulrich; Salih, Helmut R; Muus, Petra; Pflüger, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Hans-Eckart; Bogatyreva, Lioudmila; Aul, Carlo; de Witte, Theo; Ganser, Arnold; Becker, Heiko; Huls, Gerwin; van der Helm, Lieke; Vellenga, Edo; Baron, Frédéric; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Wijermans, Pierre W

    2016-01-01

    In a study of elderly AML patients treated with the hypomethylating agent decitabine (DAC), we noted a surprisingly favorable outcome in the (usually very unfavorable) subgroup with two or more autosomal monosomies (MK2+) within a complex karyotype (Lübbert et al., Haematologica 97:393-401, 2012). We now analyzed 206 myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients (88 % of 233 patients randomized in the EORTC/GMDSSG phase III trial 06011, 61 of them with RAEBt, i.e. AML by WHO) with cytogenetics informative for MK status.. Endpoints are the following: complete/partial (CR/PR) and overall response rate (ORR) and progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Cytogenetic subgroups are the following: 63 cytogenetically normal (CN) patients, 143 with cytogenetic abnormalities, 73 of them MK-negative (MK-), and 70 MK-positive (MK+). These MK+ patients could be divided into 17 with a single autosomal monosomy (MK1) and 53 with at least two monosomies (MK2+). ORR with DAC in CN patients: 36.1 %, in MK- patients: 16.7 %, in MK+ patients: 43.6 % (MK1: 44.4 %, MK2+ 43.3 %). PFS was prolonged by DAC compared to best supportive care (BSC) in the CN (hazard ratio (HR) 0.55, 99 % confidence interval (CI), 0.26; 1.15, p = 0.03) and MK2+ (HR 0.50; 99 % CI, 0.23; 1.06, p = 0.016) but not in the MK-, MK+, and MK1 subgroups. OS was not improved by DAC in any subgroup. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time in a randomized phase III trial that high-risk MDS patients with complex karyotypes harboring two or more autosomal monosomies attain encouraging responses and have improved PFS with DAC treatment compared to BSC. PMID:26596971

  14. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with

  15. 76 FR 33589 - Standards Improvement Project-Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...Phase III of the Standards Improvement Project (SIP-III) is the third in a series of rulemaking actions to improve and streamline OSHA standards. The Standards Improvement Project removes or revises individual requirements within rules that are confusing, outdated, duplicative, or inconsistent. OSHA identified several requirements for SIP-III (e.g., rigging, NIOSH records, and training......

  16. Patient Background Factors Affecting the Therapeutic Outcomes in Response to Eszopiclone in Adult Patients with Chronic Insomnia: A Post Hoc Analysis of a Double-Blind Phase III Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yuichi; Kamijo, Atsushi; Nagai, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: To identify whether baseline demographic factors or subjective sleep variables are associated with the outcomes following treatment with eszopiclone using data from a recent randomized controlled trial of 78 Japanese subjects with insomnia who were treated with 2 mg eszopiclone per day. Methods: We performed a post hoc analysis of factors including sleep latency (SL), wake time after sleep onset (WASO) (both assessed via sleep diaries), and several demographic variables. Subjects with a SL or WASO > 30 min at baseline and with evaluable SL/WASO data at Week 4 were included in SL and WASO remitter analyses, respectively; those with a SL or WASO ≤ 30 min at Week 4 were defined as SL or WASO remitters, respectively. Threshold baseline SL and WASO values for identification of remitters were determined. Results: No relationships between subjectively assessed therapeutic outcomes and demographic factors were identified. Patients with shorter SL and lower WASO values at baseline showed better outcomes following treatment with eszopiclone in terms of SL and WASO changes, respectively. Baseline SL of 75 min and baseline WASO of 80 min were selected as arbitrary cutoff values for determination of SL and WASO remitters/non-remitters, respectively. Conclusions: These findings may help clinicians to predict their patients' outcomes in response to standard doses of eszopiclone in clinical practice. Citation: Inoue Y, Kamijo A, Nagai R. Patient background factors affecting the therapeutic outcomes in response to eszopiclone in adult patients with chronic insomnia: a post hoc analysis of a double-blind phase III study in Japan. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1171–1178. PMID:26094929

  17. A Phase I/II Clinical Trial of Belinostat (PXD101) in Combination with Doxorubicin in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robin L.; Rossen, Philip Blach; Lind-Hansen, Maja; Knoblauch, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Belinostat is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor. Primary Objectives. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) of belinostat (Bel) in combination with doxorubicin (Dox) in solid tumours (phase I) and response rate (RR) in soft tissue sarcomas (phase II). Methods. Bel was administered as a 30-minute IV infusion on days 1–5 and on day 5 with Dox. The dose escalation schedule was as follows: cohort 1: Bel 600 mg/m2 and 50 mg/m2 Dox, cohort 2: Bel 600 mg/m2 and 75 mg/m2 Dox, cohort 3: Bel 800 mg/m2 and 75 mg/m2 Dox, and cohort 4: Bel 1000 mg/m2 and 75 mg/m2 Dox. Results. 41 patients were included (25 in phase I, 16 in phase II). Adverse events were fatigue (95%), nausea (76%), and alopecia (63%). There was one DLT, grade 3 rash/hand and foot syndrome. MTD was Bel 1000 mg/m2/d and Dox 75 mg/m2. Four responses were seen: 2 PR in phase I, RR of 8%; in phase II, 1 PR/1 CR, RR of 13%, and 9 patients (56%) with SD. Conclusion. The combination was well tolerated. Response rate was moderate but median time to progression was 6.0 months (95% CI, 1.6–9.7 months) which is superior to some reports of single-agent Dox. PMID:27403082

  18. Randomized Phase III Study Comparing Paclitaxel/Cisplatin/ Gemcitabine and Gemcitabine/Cisplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer Without Prior Systemic Therapy: EORTC Intergroup Study 30987

    PubMed Central

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M.; Skoneczna, Iwona; De Santis, Maria; Daugaard, Gedske; Boehle, Andreas; Chevreau, Christine; Paz-Ares, Luis; Laufman, Leslie R.; Winquist, Eric; Raghavan, Derek; Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Sandra; Sylvester, Richard; de Wit, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival. Patients and Methods We conducted a randomized phase III study to compare paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine (PCG) with GC in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and toxicity. Results From 2001 to 2004, 626 patients were randomly assigned; 312 patients were assigned to PCG, and 314 patients were assigned to GC. After a median follow-up of 4.6 years, the median OS was 15.8 months on PCG versus 12.7 months on GC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; P = .075). OS in the subgroup of all eligible patients was significantly longer on PCG (3.2 months; HR, 0.82; P = .03), as was the case in patients with bladder primary tumors. PFS was not significantly longer on PCG (HR, 0.87; P = .11). Overall response rate was 55.5% on PCG and 43.6% on GC (P = .0031). Both treatments were well tolerated, with more thrombocytopenia and bleeding on GC than PCG (11.4% v 6.8%, respectively; P = .05) and more febrile neutropenia on PCG than GC (13.2% v 4.3%, respectively; P < .001). Conclusion The addition of paclitaxel to GC provides a higher response rate and a 3.1-month survival benefit that did not reach statistical significance. Novel approaches will be required to obtain major improvements in survival of incurable urothelial cancer. PMID:22370319

  19. A phase I/II trial of irinotecan-cisplatin combined with an anti-late-diarrhoeal programme to evaluate the safety and antitumour response of this combination therapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Y; Tsuduki, E; Izumi, S; Hojo, M; Kamimura, M; Naka, G; Kobayashi, K; Kudo, K

    2005-12-12

    We conducted a phase I/II study in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to increase the therapeutic index of the cisplatin-irinotecan combination by institution of an anti-late-diarrhoeal program (ADP). A total of 77 chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled. The cisplatin dose was fixed at 60 mg m(-2) (Day 1). Irinotecan was escalated in 5 mg m(-2) increments, starting from 60 mg m(-2) (Days 1 and 8). ADP consisted of oral sodium bicarbonate, magnesium oxide, basic water, and ursodeoxycholic acid, and was administered orally for 4 days with each dose of irinotecan. In the phase I portion, irinotecan pharmacokinetics was also examined. After the recommended dose of irinotecan with ADP was determined, a phase II study was conducted to evaluate the response. Maximum tolerated dose was reached at an irinotecan dose of 80 mg m(-2) (Grade 4 diarrhoea and neutropenia). Pharmacokinetic studies show that the maximum concentration and the area under the curve of both irinotecan and SN38 (active metabolite of irinotecan) tend to increase in the dose-dependent manner of irinotecan. The phase II portion of the study included 48 patients, who were treated with 75 mg m(-2) of irinotecan. Grade 3/4 toxicities included neutropenia in 65%, leucopenia in 33%, and late diarrhoea in 6% of the patients. During this treatment, PS did not change in 65% of patients. At the end of the chemotherapy, PS did not decline in 90% of patients. In the phase II portion, a response occurred in 63% (95% confidential interval (CI), 47-76%) of patients. Median time to progression was 19 weeks (95% CI, 15-22 weeks), and median survival was 52 weeks (95% CI, 39-64 weeks). This regimen of irinotecan and cisplatin with ADP resulted in promising efficacy with acceptable toxicity for patients with advanced NSCLC. This regimen is a candidate for the experimental arm towards future phase III studies. PMID:16288302

  20. Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Label, Phase III Trial of Decitabine Versus Patient Choice, With Physician Advice, of Either Supportive Care or Low-Dose Cytarabine for the Treatment of Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Thomas, Xavier G.; Dmoszynska, Anna; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka; Mazur, Grzegorz; Mayer, Jiri; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Chou, Wen-Chien; Buckstein, Rena; Cermak, Jaroslav; Kuo, Ching-Yuan; Oriol, Albert; Ravandi, Farhad; Faderl, Stefan; Delaunay, Jacques; Lysák, Daniel; Minden, Mark; Arthur, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase III trial compared the efficacy and safety of decitabine with treatment choice (TC) in older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and poor- or intermediate-risk cytogenetics. Patients and Methods Patients (N = 485) age ≥ 65 years were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive decitabine 20 mg/m2 per day as a 1-hour intravenous infusion for five consecutive days every 4 weeks or TC (supportive care or cytarabine 20 mg/m2 per day as a subcutaneous injection for 10 consecutive days every 4 weeks). The primary end point was overall survival (OS); the secondary end point was the complete remission (CR) rate plus the CR rate without platelet recovery (CRp). Adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Results The primary analysis with 396 deaths (81.6%) showed a nonsignificant increase in median OS with decitabine (7.7 months; 95% CI, 6.2 to 9.2) versus TC (5.0 months; 95% CI, 4.3 to 6.3; P = .108; hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.04). An unplanned analysis with 446 deaths (92%) indicated the same median OS (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.99; nominal P = .037). The CR rate plus CRp was 17.8% with decitabine versus 7.8% with TC (odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.8; P = .001). AEs were similar for decitabine and cytarabine, although patients received a median of four cycles of decitabine versus two cycles of TC. The most common drug-related AEs with decitabine were thrombocytopenia (27%) and neutropenia (24%). Conclusion In older patients with AML, decitabine improved response rates compared with standard therapies without major differences in safety. An unplanned survival analysis showed a benefit for decitabine, which was not observed at the time of the primary analysis. PMID:22689805

  1. Separation studies of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) by reversed-phase paper chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, B.; Shinde, V.M.

    1987-07-01

    Reversed-phase paper chromatographic separations of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) have been carried out on Whatman No 1 filter paper impregnated with triphenylphosphine oxide as stationary phase and using organic complexing agents such as sodium acetate, sodium succinate and sodium malonate solutions as active mobile phases. Results for the separation of binary and ternary mixtures are reported and the method has been successfully applied to the separation and detection of these elements present in real samples and at ppm level concentration.

  2. CA19-9 decrease at 8 weeks as a predictor of overall survival in a randomized phase III trial (MPACT) of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, E. G.; Von Hoff, D. D.; Reni, M.; Arena, F. P.; Infante, J. R.; Bathini, V. G.; Wood, T. E.; Mainwaring, P. N.; Muldoon, R. T.; Clingan, P. R.; Kunzmann, V.; Ramanathan, R. K.; Tabernero, J.; Goldstein, D.; McGovern, D.; Lu, B.; Ko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background A phase I/II study and subsequent phase III study (MPACT) reported significant correlations between CA19-9 decreases and prolonged overall survival (OS) with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P + Gem) treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). CA19-9 changes at week 8 and potential associations with efficacy were investigated as part of an exploratory analysis in the MPACT trial. Patients and methods Untreated patients with MPC (N = 861) received nab-P + Gem or Gem alone. CA19-9 was evaluated at baseline and every 8 weeks. Results Patients with baseline and week-8 CA19-9 measurements were analyzed (nab-P + Gem: 252; Gem: 202). In an analysis pooling the treatments, patients with any CA19-9 decline (80%) versus those without (20%) had improved OS (median 11.1 versus 8.0 months; P = 0.005). In the nab-P + Gem arm, patients with (n = 206) versus without (n = 46) any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed overall response rate (ORR) of 40% versus 13%, and a median OS of 13.2 versus 8.3 months (P = 0.001), respectively. In the Gem-alone arm, patients with (n = 159) versus without (n = 43) CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed ORR of 15% versus 5%, and a median OS of 9.4 versus 7.1 months (P = 0.404), respectively. In the nab-P + Gem and Gem-alone arms, by week 8, 16% (40/252) and 6% (13/202) of patients, respectively, had an unconfirmed radiologic response (median OS 13.7 and 14.7 months, respectively), and 79% and 84% of patients, respectively, had stable disease (SD) (median OS 11.1 and 9 months, respectively). Patients with SD and any CA19-9 decrease (158/199 and 133/170) had a median OS of 13.2 and 9.4 months, respectively. Conclusion This analysis demonstrated that, in patients with MPC, any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 can be an early marker for chemotherapy efficacy, including in those patients with SD. CA19-9 decrease identified more patients with survival benefit than radiologic response by week 8. PMID:26802160

  3. Citalopram versus fluoxetine: a double-blind, controlled, multicentre, phase III trial in patients with unipolar major depression treated in general practice.

    PubMed

    Patris, M; Bouchard, J M; Bougerol, T; Charbonnier, J F; Chevalier, J F; Clerc, G; Cyran, C; Van Amerongen, P; Lemming, O; Høpfner Petersen, H E

    1996-06-01

    Two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), citalopram and fluoxetine, both at a daily dose of 20 mg, were compared in patients with unipolar major depression treated in general practice. This was a multicentre, double-blind, randomized trial carried out in France. The duration of treatment was 8 weeks. Patients were assessed by means of the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), the 17 items Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and the investigator's Clinical Global Impressions (CGI), Observed and spontaneously reported adverse events were also recorded. A total of 357 patients of both sexes, aged between 21 and 73 years, entered the double-blind phase of the trial. A clear reduction of both the MADRS and the HAMD mean total scores was observed in both treatment groups with no statistically significant differences between treatments. Apart from back pain recorded more frequently in the citalopram group, no significant difference was found between the two treatment groups with regard to adverse events, and both citalopram and fluoxetine were considered to be well tolerated. It was concluded that citalopram was as effective as fluoxetine in the treatment of unipolar major depression. Citalopram showed an earlier onset of recovery than fluoxetine. PMID:8803650

  4. A Phase II Study of Synchronous Three-Dimensional Conformal Boost to the Gross Tumor Volume for Patients With Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 0301 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kwan Ho Ahn, Sung Ja; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Young-Chul; Moon, Sung Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Kim, Heung Tae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jin Soo

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of synchronous three-dimensional (3D) conformal boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV) in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included unresectable Stage III NSCLC with no pleural effusion, no supraclavicular nodal metastases, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 0-1. Forty-nine patients with pathologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Eighteen patients had Stage IIIA and 31 had Stage IIIB. By using 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT) techniques, a dose of 1.8 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume with a synchronous boost of 0.6 Gy to the GTV, with a total dose of 60 Gy to the GTV and 45 Gy to the planning target volume in 25 fractions during 5 weeks. All patients received weekly chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 36.8 months (range, 29.0-45.5 months) for surviving patients, median survival was 28.1 months. One-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 77%, 56.4%, and 43.8%, respectively. Corresponding local progression-free survival rates were 71.2%, 53.7%, and 53.7%. Compliance was 90% for RT and 88% for chemotherapy. Acute esophagitis of Grade 2 or higher occurred in 29 patients. Two patients with T4 lesions died of massive bleeding and hemoptysis during treatment (Grade 5). Overall late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusions: Based on the favorable outcome with acceptable toxicity, the acceleration scheme using 3D conformal GTV boost in this trial is warranted to compare with conventional fractionation in a Phase III trial.

  5. [Phase I-II study of recombinant interferon gamma].

    PubMed

    Adachi, K; Ogawa, M; Usui, N; Inagaki, J; Horikoshi, N; Inoue, K; Nakada, H; Tada, A; Yamazaki, H; Mukaiyama, T

    1985-06-01

    A phase I-II study of human recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma) was conducted in patients with various advanced cancer refractory to standard chemotherapies. In the phase I study, seven patients received 14 courses of escalating doses ranging from 2 X 10(6)U/m2 to 64 X 10(6)U/m2 by 1-hour intravenous infusion for 5 consecutive days. The toxicities were high fever with chills, anorexia, occasional nausea and vomiting, elevation of serum GOT, and dose-related leukopenia and neurotoxic symptoms such as heavy fatigue with somnolence or lethargy, both of which were reversible. The pharmacokinetics showed that the peak levels of serum rIFN-gamma activity were dose-related but decreased rapidly to below measurable levels within 6 hours after infusion in patients receiving less than 12 X 10(6)U/m2. Considering these data, the dosage of rIFN-gamma 6 X 10(6) U/m2 by daily intramuscular injection for more than 4 weeks was selected for the early phase II study. There was no partial response out of 11 evaluable patients but a stable condition was observed in 2 cases of renal cell carcinoma and one case each of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. All toxicities seen were similar to those observed in the phase I study, but no tachyphylaxis developed with continued dosage. The antitumor effect of rIFN-gamma remains to be evaluated in a further study employing higher doses. PMID:2988459

  6. Phase I/II Trial of Sequential Chemoradiotherapy Using a Novel Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer, Doranidazole (PR-350), in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (WJTOG-0002)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Yasumasa Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Koji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Negoro, Shunichi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hida, Toyoaki; Kawahara, Masaaki; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Hirokawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Ariyoshi, Yutaka

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: This Phase I/II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of PR-350, a novel hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, when administered with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) after induction chemotherapy (CT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Two cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2}) and paclitaxel (180 mg/m{sup 2}), or carboplatin (AUC = 6) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}) were given before RT of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. In the Phase I portion, the starting dosage of PR-350 was 10 daily administrations (2000 mg/m{sup 2}) in combination with RT, and this number was increased in increments of 10 for successive groups to 30 doses. Results: In total, 37 patients were enrolled. In Phase I (n = 20), PR-350 could be administered 30 times with concurrent thoracic RT. Thus, in Phase II (n = 17), PR-350 was administered 30 times. The major toxicity was radiation pneumonitis, with Grade 3 or more pneumonitis noted in 6 patients (16%) including 2 with treatment-related deaths. However, no Grade 3 or more esophageal toxicity was noted, and only Grade 1 peripheral neuropathy was noted in 9 patients (24%). For all 37 patients, the median survival time (MST) and the 2-year survival rate were 15.9 months and 24%, respectively. For 18 patients receiving 21 to 30 doses of PR-350, the MST and 2-year survival rate were 20.9 months and 33%, respectively. Conclusions: Thoracic RT combined with 30 daily administrations of PR-350 after induction CT was well tolerated and promising for locally advanced NSCLC.

  7. A phase I/II study of oral clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine in previously treated acute myeloid leukaemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients at least 60 years of age.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Mawad, Raya; Gooley, Ted A; Becker, Pamela S; Sandhu, Vicky; Hendrie, Paul; Scott, Bart L; Wood, Brent L; Walter, Roland B; Smith, Kelly; Dean, Carol; Estey, Elihu H; Pagel, John M

    2015-08-01

    Outcomes for older adults with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are generally poor, and new effective therapies are needed. We investigated oral clofarabine combined with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients aged 60 years and above with relapsed or refractory AML or high-risk MDS in a phase I/II trial. A 3 + 3 dose escalation of oral clofarabine was followed by a phase II expansion with the aim of obtaining a complete response (CR) rate ≥30%. We identified 20 mg/d for 5 d as the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oral clofarabine. A total of 35 patients, with a median age of 72 years, were treated. Of 26 patients enrolled at the MTD, 4 had treatment-related grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicities, but none died within 28 d. The observed CR rate and median survival were 34% [95% confidence interval (CI), 18-50%] and 6.8 months overall and 38% [95% CI, 19-57%] and 7.2 months at the MTD. The median disease-free survival was 7.4 months. Fifty-two percent (23/44) of cycles administered at the MTD were done without hospital admission. This combination of oral clofarabine and LDAC demonstrated efficacy with a CR rate of >30% and acceptable toxicity in older patients. PMID:25854284

  8. PLCO Ovarian Phase III Validation Study — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Our preliminary data indicate that the performance of CA 125 as a screening test for ovarian cancer can be improved upon by additional biomarkers. With completion of one additional validation step, we will be ready to test the performance of a consensus marker panel in a phase III validation study. Given the original aims of the PLCO trial, we believe that the PLCO represents an ideal longitudinal cohort offering specimens for phase III validation of ovarian cancer biomarkers.

  9. Randomized Phase III Trial Comparing ABVD Plus Radiotherapy With the Stanford V Regimen in Patients With Stages I or II Locally Extensive, Bulky Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Subset Analysis of the North American Intergroup E2496 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Ranjana H.; Hong, Fangxin; Fisher, Richard I.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Robinson, K. Sue; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Wagner, Henry; Stiff, Patrick J.; Cheson, Bruce D.; Stewart, Douglas A.; Gordon, Leo I.; Kahl, Brad S.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Blum, Kristie A.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Tuscano, Joseph M.; Hoppe, Richard T.; Horning, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The phase III North American Intergroup E2496 Trial (Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma) compared doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) with mechlorethamine, doxorubicin, vincristine, bleomycin, vinblastine, etoposide, and prednisone (Stanford V). We report results of a planned subgroup analysis in patients with stage I or II bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to six to eight cycles of ABVD every 28 days or Stanford V once per week for 12 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after completion of chemotherapy, all patients received 36 Gy of modified involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to the mediastinum, hila, and supraclavicular regions. Patients on the Stanford V arm received IFRT to additional sites ≥ 5 cm at diagnosis. Primary end points were failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Of 794 eligible patients, 264 had stage I or II bulky disease, 135 received ABVD, and 129 received Stanford V. Patient characteristics were matched. The overall response rate was 83% with ABVD and 88% with Stanford V. At a median follow-up of 6.5 years, the study excluded a difference of more than 21% in 5-year FFS and more than 16% in 5-year OS between ABVD and Stanford V (5-year FFS: 85% v 79%; HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.37 to 1.25; P = .22; 5-year OS: 96% v 92%; HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.16 to 1.47; P = .19). In-field relapses occurred in < 10% of the patients in each arm. Conclusion For patients with stage I or II bulky mediastinal HL, no substantial statistically significant differences were detected between the two regimens, although power was limited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first prospective trial reporting outcomes specific to this subgroup, and it sets a benchmark for comparison of ongoing and future studies. PMID:25897153

  10. Treatment of older patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel: subgroup analyses from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial (CLEOPATRA).

    PubMed

    Miles, David; Baselga, José; Amadori, Dino; Sunpaweravong, Patrapim; Semiglazov, Vladimir; Knott, Adam; Clark, Emma; Ross, Graham; Swain, Sandra M

    2013-11-01

    Although the incidence of cancer increases with age, older patients are under-represented in cancer treatment trials, resulting in limited data availability in this patient population. Here we present results from pre-defined subgroup analyses conducted by age group (<65 vs ≥ 65 years) from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients who had not received previous chemotherapy or biological therapy for HER2-positive locally recurrent, unresectable or metastatic breast cancer were randomly assigned to treatment with placebo, trastuzumab, and docetaxel or with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel. Primary endpoint was independently assessed progression-free survival. We performed pre-specified subgroup analyses of progression-free survival according to age. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00567190. 808 patients were enrolled. Of those, 127 patients were 65 years of age or older (placebo arm: 67, pertuzumab arm: 60). Patients in both age groups experienced progression-free survival benefit with treatment in the pertuzumab arm (<65 years: HR: 0.65; 95 % CI 0.53-0.80; ≥65 years: HR: 0.52; 95 % CI 0.31-0.86). Diarrhoea, fatigue, asthenia, decreased appetite, vomiting, and dysgeusia were reported more frequently in patients 65 years of age or older compared with younger patients. Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were reported less frequently in the older age group. The efficacy and safety data reported in CLEOPATRA suggest that the combined use of pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel should not be limited by patient age. PMID:24129974

  11. A phase I study of concurrent chemotherapy (paclitaxel and carboplatin) and thoracic radiotherapy with swallowed manganese superoxide dismutase plasmid liposome protection in patients with locally advanced stage III non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tarhini, Ahmad A; Belani, Chandra P; Luketich, James D; Argiris, Athanassios; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Gooding, William; Pennathur, Arjun; Petro, Daniel; Kane, Kevin; Liggitt, Denny; Championsmith, Tony; Zhang, Xichen; Epperly, Michael W; Greenberger, Joel S

    2011-03-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is a genetically engineered therapeutic DNA/liposome containing the human MnSOD transgene. Preclinical studies in mouse models have demonstrated that the expression of the human MnSOD transgene confers protection of normal tissues from ionizing irradiation damage. This is a phase I study of MnSOD plasmid liposome (PL) in combination with standard chemoradiation in surgically unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel) was given weekly (for 7 weeks), concurrently with radiation. MnSOD PL was swallowed twice a week (total 14 doses), at three dose levels: 0.3, 3, and 30 mg. Dose escalation followed a standard phase I design. Esophagoscopy was done at baseline, day 4, and 6 weeks after radiation with biopsies of the squamous lining cells. DNA was extracted and analyzed by PCR for the detection of the MnSOD transgene DNA. Ten patients with AJCC stage IIIA (three) and IIIB (seven) completed the course of therapy. Five had squamous histology, two adenocarcinoma, one large cell, and two not specified. Patients were treated in three cohorts at three dose levels of MnSOD PL: 0.3 (three patients), 3 (three patients), and 30 mg (four patients). The median dose of radiation was 77.7 Gy (range 63-79.10 Gy). Overall response rate for the standard chemoradiation regimen was 70% (n = 10). There were no dose-limiting toxicities reported in all three dosing tiers. It is concluded that the oral administration of MnSOD PL is feasible and safe. The phase II recommended dose is 30 mg. PMID:20873987

  12. Dose Escalation of Gemcitabine Is Possible With Concurrent Chest Three-Dimensional Rather Than Two-Dimensional Radiotherapy: A Phase I Trial in Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zinner, Ralph G. Cox, James D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Pisters, Katherine M.W.; Herbst, Roy S.; Kies, Merril; Hong, Waun K.; Fossella, Frank V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase I study the maximum tolerated dose of weekly gemcitabine concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as the relationship between the volume of the esophagus irradiated and severe esophagitis. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage III NSCLC received gemcitabine initially at 150 mg/m{sup 2}/wk over 7 weeks concurrently with chest radiotherapy to 63 Gy in 34 fractions. The first 9 patients underwent treatment with two-dimensional (2D) radiotherapy; the remaining 12 patients, with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and target volume reduced to clinically apparent disease. Consolidation was 4 cycles of gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m{sup 2}/wk and cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: In the 2D group, the dose-limiting toxicity, Grade 3 esophagitis, occurred in 3 of 6 patients in the 150-mg/m{sup 2}/wk cohort and 2 of 3 patients in the 125-mg/m{sup 2}/wk cohort. No cases of Grade 3 esophagitis occurred at these doses in the 3D group. At gemcitabine 190 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, 2 of 6 patients in the 3D cohort had Grade 3 esophagitis. The mean percentages of esophagus irradiated to 60 Gy were 68% in the 2D cohort and 18% in the 3D cohort. Conclusions: We could not escalate the dose of gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy when using 2D planning because of severe acute esophagitis. However, we could escalate the dose of gemcitabine to 190 mg/m{sup 2}/wk when using 3D planning. The Phase II dose is 150 mg/m{sup 2}/wk. Three-dimensional CRT permitted the use of higher doses of gemcitabine.

  13. Results of a phase I/II open-label, safety and efficacy trial of coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein in haemophilia B patients

    PubMed Central

    Martinowitz, U; Lissitchkov, T; Lubetsky, A; Jotov, G; Barazani-Brutman, T; Voigt, C; Jacobs, I; Wuerfel, T; Santagostino, E

    2015-01-01

    Introduction rIX-FP is a coagulation factor IX (recombinant), albumin fusion protein with more than fivefold half-life prolongation over other standard factor IX (FIX) products available on the market. Aim This prospective phase II, open-label study evaluated the safety and efficacy of rIX-FP for the prevention of bleeding episodes during weekly prophylaxis and assessed the haemostatic efficacy for on-demand treatment of bleeding episodes in previously treated patients with haemophilia B. Methods The study consisted of a 10–14 day evaluation of rIX-FP pharmacokinetics (PK), and an 11 month safety and efficacy evaluation period with subjects receiving weekly prophylaxis treatment. Safety was evaluated by the occurrence of related adverse events, and immunogenic events, including development of inhibitors. Efficacy was evaluated by annualized spontaneous bleeding rate (AsBR), and the number of injections to achieve haemostasis. Results Seventeen subjects participated in the study, 13 received weekly prophylaxis and 4 received episodic treatment only. No inhibitors were detected in any subject. The mean and median AsBR were 1.25, and 1.13 respectively in the weekly prophylaxis arm. All bleeding episodes were treated with 1 or 2 injections of rIX-FP. Three prophylaxis subjects who were treated on demand prior to study entry had >85% reduction in AsBR compared to the bleeding rate prior to study entry. Conclusion This study demonstrated the efficacy for weekly routine prophylaxis of rIX-FP to prevent spontaneous bleeding episodes and for the treatment of bleeding episodes. In addition no safety issues were detected during the study and an improved PK profile was demonstrated. PMID:25990590

  14. Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Minesh P. Shapiro, William R.; Phan, See C.; Gervais, Radj; Carrie, Christian; Chabot, Pierre; Patchell, Roy A.; Glantz, Michael J.; Recht, Lawrence; Langer, Corey; Sur, Ranjan K.; Roa, Wilson H.; Mahe, Marc A.; Fortin, Andre; Nieder, Carsten; Meyers, Christina A.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

  15. Induction therapy with cetuximab plus docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (ETPF) in patients with resectable nonmetastatic stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. A GERCOR phase II ECHO-07 study

    PubMed Central

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Lacave, Roger; Lefevre, Marine; Soussan, Patrick; Antoine, Martine; Périé, Sophie; Belloc, Jean-Baptiste; Banal, Alain; Albert, Sébastien; Chabolle, Frédéric; Céruse, Philippe; Baril, Philippe; Gatineau, Michel; Housset, Martin; Moukoko, Rachel; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; de Gramont, Aimery; Bonnetain, Franck; Lacau St Guily, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Induction TPF regimen is a standard treatment option for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx. The efficacy and safety of adding cetuximab to induction TPF (ETPF) therapy was evaluated. Patients with nonmetastatic resectable stage III/IV SCC of the oropharynx were treated with weekly cetuximab followed the same day by docetaxel and cisplatin and by a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil on days 1-5 (every 3 weeks, 3 cycles). The primary endpoint was clinical and radiological complete response (crCR) of primary tumor at 3 months. Secondary endpoints were crCR rates, overall response, pathological CR, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. Forty-two patients were enrolled, and 41 received ETPF. The all nine planned cetuximab doses and the full three doses of planned chemotherapy were completed in 31 (76%) and 36 (88%) patients, respectively. Twelve (29%) patients required dose reduction. The crCR of primary tumor at the completion of therapy was observed in nine (22%) patients. ETPF was associated with a tumor objective response rate (ORR) of 58%. The most frequent grade 3–4 toxicities were as follows: nonfebrile neutropenia (39%), febrile neutropenia (19%), diarrhea (10%), and stomatitis (12%). Eighteen (44%) patients experienced acne-like skin reactions of any grade. One toxic death occurred secondary to chemotherapy-induced colitis with colonic perforation. This phase II study reports an interesting response rate for ETPF in patients with moderately advanced SCC of the oropharynx. The schedule of ETPF evaluated in this study cannot be recommended at this dosage. PMID:25684313

  16. Induction therapy with cetuximab plus docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (ETPF) in patients with resectable nonmetastatic stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. A GERCOR phase II ECHO-07 study.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Lacave, Roger; Lefevre, Marine; Soussan, Patrick; Antoine, Martine; Périé, Sophie; Belloc, Jean-Baptiste; Banal, Alain; Albert, Sébastien; Chabolle, Frédéric; Céruse, Philippe; Baril, Philippe; Gatineau, Michel; Housset, Martin; Moukoko, Rachel; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; de Gramont, Aimery; Bonnetain, Franck; Lacau St Guily, Jean

    2015-05-01

    Induction TPF regimen is a standard treatment option for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx. The efficacy and safety of adding cetuximab to induction TPF (ETPF) therapy was evaluated. Patients with nonmetastatic resectable stage III/IV SCC of the oropharynx were treated with weekly cetuximab followed the same day by docetaxel and cisplatin and by a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil on days 1-5 (every 3 weeks, 3 cycles). The primary endpoint was clinical and radiological complete response (crCR) of primary tumor at 3 onths. Secondary endpoints were crCR rates, overall response, pathological CR, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. Forty-two patients were enrolled, and 41 received ETPF. The all nine planned cetuximab doses and the full three doses of planned chemotherapy were completed in 31 (76%) and 36 (88%) patients, respectively. Twelve (29%) patients required dose reduction. The crCR of primary tumor at the completion of therapy was observed in nine (22%) patients. ETPF was associated with a tumor objective response rate (ORR) of 58%. The most frequent grade 3-4 toxicities were as follows: nonfebrile neutropenia (39%), febrile neutropenia (19%), diarrhea (10%), and stomatitis (12%). Eighteen (44%) patients experienced acne-like skin reactions of any grade. One toxic death occurred secondary to chemotherapy-induced colitis with colonic perforation. This phase II study reports an interesting response rate for ETPF in patients with moderately advanced SCC of the oropharynx. The schedule of ETPF evaluated in this study cannot be recommended at this dosage. PMID:25684313

  17. Radiation-related quality of life parameters after targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy in patients with breast cancer: results from the randomized phase III trial TARGIT-A

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) is a new treatment approach for early stage breast cancer. This study reports on the effects of IORT on radiation-related quality of life (QoL) parameters. Methods Two hundred and thirty women with stage I-III breast cancer (age, 31 to 84 years) were entered into the study. A single-center subgroup of 87 women from the two arms of the randomized phase III trial TARGIT-A (TARGeted Intra-operative radioTherapy versus whole breast radiotherapy for breast cancer) was analyzed. Furthermore, results were compared to non-randomized control groups: n = 90 receiving IORT as a tumor bed boost followed by external beam whole breast radiotherapy (EBRT) outside of TARGIT-A (IORT-boost), and n = 53 treated with EBRT followed by an external-beam boost (EBRT-boost). QoL was collected using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaires C30 (QLQ-C30) and BR23 (QLQ-BR23). The mean follow-up period in the TARGIT-A groups was 32 versus 39 months in the non-randomized control groups. Results Patients receiving IORT alone reported less general pain (21.3 points), breast (7.0 points) and arm (15.1 points) symptoms, and better role functioning (78.7 points) as patients receiving EBRT (40.9; 19.0; 32.8; and 60.5 points, respectively, P < 0.01). Patients receiving IORT alone also had fewer breast symptoms than TARGIT-A patients receiving IORT followed by EBRT for high risk features on final pathology (IORT-EBRT; 7.0 versus 29.7 points, P < 0.01). There were no significant differences between TARGIT-A patients receiving IORT-EBRT compared to non-randomized IORT-boost or EBRT-boost patients and patients receiving EBRT without a boost. Conclusions In the randomized setting, important radiation-related QoL parameters after IORT were superior to EBRT. Non-randomized comparisons showed equivalent parameters in the IORT-EBRT group and the control groups. PMID:23294485

  18. Efficacy and safety of liraglutide, a once-daily human glucagon-like peptide-1 analogue, in Latino/Hispanic patients with type 2 diabetes: post hoc analysis of data from four phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, J A; Ørsted, D D; Campos, C

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist liraglutide in Latino/Hispanic individuals with type 2 diabetes, in addition to comparing its treatment effects with those observed in non-Latino/Hispanic individuals. Analyses were performed on patient-level data from a subset of individuals self-defined as Latino/Hispanic from four phase III studies, the LEAD-3, LEAD-4, LEAD-6 and 1860-LIRA-DPP-4 trials. Endpoints included change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and body weight from baseline. In Latino/Hispanic patients (n = 505; 323 treated with liraglutide) after 26 weeks, mean HbA1c reductions were significantly greater with both liraglutide 1.2 and 1.8 mg versus comparator or placebo in the LEAD-3 and LEAD-4 studies, and with 1.8 mg liraglutide in the 1860-LIRA-DPP-4 trial. In LEAD-3 both doses led to significant differences in body weight change among Latino/Hispanic patients versus the comparator. With 1.8 mg liraglutide, difference in weight change was significant only in the 1860-LIRA-DPP-4 trial versus sitagliptin. For both endpoints Latino/Hispanic and non-Latino/Hispanic patients responded to liraglutide similarly. In summary, liraglutide is efficacious for treatment of type 2 diabetes in Latino/Hispanic patients, with a similar efficacy to that seen in non-Latino/Hispanic patients. PMID:26936426

  19. Cardiac Tolerability of Pertuzumab Plus Trastuzumab Plus Docetaxel in Patients With HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer in CLEOPATRA: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Phase III Study

    PubMed Central

    Ewer, Michael S.; Cortés, Javier; Amadori, Dino; Miles, David; Knott, Adam; Clark, Emma; Benyunes, Mark C.; Ross, Graham; Baselga, José

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. We report cardiac tolerability of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab plus docetaxel versus placebo plus trastuzumab plus docetaxel observed in the phase III study CLEOPATRA in patients with HER2-positive first-line metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Patients and Methods. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥50% and ECOG performance status of 0 or 1 were required for study entry. During the study, LVEF assessments took place every 9 weeks. Pertuzumab/placebo was given at 840 mg, then 420 mg q3w; trastuzumab was administered at 8 mg/kg, then 6 mg/kg q3w, and docetaxel was initiated at 75 mg/m2 q3w. Results. The incidence of cardiac adverse events (all grades) was 16.4% in the placebo arm and 14.5% in the pertuzumab arm, with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD, all grades) being the most frequently reported event (8.3% versus 4.4% in the placebo and pertuzumab arm). Declines in LVEF by ≥10% points from baseline and to <50% were reported in 6.6% and 3.8% of patients in the placebo and pertuzumab arm, respectively. Seventy-two percent (placebo arm) and 86.7% (pertuzumab arm) of those patients recovered to a value ≥50%. The incidence of symptomatic LVSD was low, occurring in 1.8% (n = 7) versus 1.0% (n = 4) of patients in the placebo and pertuzumab arm. In 8/11 patients, the symptomatic LVSD had resolved at data cutoff. Conclusion. The combination of pertuzumab plus trastuzumab plus docetaxel did not increase the incidence of cardiac adverse events, including LVSD, compared with the control arm in HER2-positive MBC. The majority of cardiac adverse events were reversible. PMID:23475636

  20. Failure to Adhere to Protocol Specified Radiation Therapy Guidelines Was Associated With Decreased Survival in RTOG 9704-A Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Patients With Resected Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Ross A.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Regine, William F.; Safran, Howard; Hoffman, John P.; Lustig, Robert; Konski, Andre A.; Benson, Al B.; Macdonald, John S.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: In Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704, as previously published, patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma received continuous infusion 5-FU and concurrent radiotherapy (5FU-RT). 5FU-RT treatment was preceded and followed by randomly assigned chemotherapy, either 5-FU or gemcitabine. This analysis explored whether failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines influenced survival and/or toxicity. Methods and Materials: RT requirements were protocol specified. Adherence was scored as per protocol (PP) or less than per protocol (patient treatment outcomes. Scoring was done for all tumor locations and for the subset of pancreatic head location. Results: RT was scored for 416 patients: 216 PP and 200 patients with pancreatic head tumors, both PP score and gemcitabine treatment correlated with improved MS (p = 0.016, p = 0.043, respectively). For all tumor locations, PP score was associated with decreased risk of failure (p = 0.016) and, for gemcitabine patients, a trend toward reduced Grade 4/5 nonhematologic toxicity (p = 0.065). Conclusions: This is the first Phase III, multicenter, adjuvant protocol for pancreatic adenocarcinoma to evaluate the impact of adherence to specified RT protocol guidelines on protocol outcomes. Failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines was associated with reduced survival and, for patients receiving gemcitabine, trend toward increased nonhematologic toxicity.

  1. Comparison of Provider-Assessed and Patient-Reported Outcome Measures of Acute Skin Toxicity During a Phase III Trial of Mometasone Cream Versus Placebo During Breast Radiotherapy: The North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N06C4)

    SciTech Connect

    Neben-Wittich, Michelle A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Burger, Kelli N.; Martenson, James A.; Miller, Robert C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Considerable interobserver variability exists among providers and between providers and patients when measuring subjective symptoms. In the recently published Phase III N06C4 trial of mometasone cream vs. placebo to prevent radiation dermatitis, the primary provider-assessed (PA) endpoint, using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), was negative. However, prospectively planned secondary analyses of patient-reported outcomes (PROs), using the Skindex-16 and Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool (STAT), were positive. This study assesses the relationship between PA outcomes and PROs. Methods and Materials: Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the three tools. Statistical correlations were defined as follows: <0.5, mild; 0.5-0.7, moderate; and >0.7, strong. Results: CTCAE dermatitis moderately correlated with STAT erythema, and CTCAE pruritus strongly correlated with STAT itching. CTCAE pruritus had a moderate correlation with Skindex-16 itching. Comparing the 2 PRO tools, Skindex-16 itching correlated moderately with STAT itching. Skindex-16 burning, hurting, irritation, and persistence all showed the strongest correlation with STAT burning; they showed moderate correlations with STAT itching and tenderness. Conclusions: The PRO Skindex-16 correlated well with the PRO portions of STAT, but neither tool correlated well with CTCAE. PROs delineated a wider spectrum of toxicity than PA measures and provided more information on rash, redness, pruritus, and annoyance measures compared with CTCAE findings of rash and pruritus. PROs may provide a more complete measure of patient experience than single-symptom, PA endpoints in clinical trials assessing radiation skin toxicity.

  2. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and vinorelbine followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin in patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Cho, Kwan Ho; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Hyae Young; Yoon, Sung Jin B.S.; Lee, Jin Soo . E-mail: jslee@ncc.re.kr

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: For locoregionally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become a standard therapy. We conducted a Phase II trial to examine the efficacy and toxicity of adding gemcitabine and vinorelbine induction chemotherapy to concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included inoperable clinical Stage III NSCLC without pleural effusion, ECOG performance status 0-1, and weight loss {<=}5%. Induction chemotherapy consisted of three cycles of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} and vinorelbine 30 mg/m{sup 2}, each given i.v. on Days 1 and 8, every 3 weeks. During once-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, total 63 Gy), two cycles of oral etoposide (100 mg on Days 1-5 and 8-12) plus cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8) were given concurrently 4 weeks apart. Results: Between April 2002 and November 2003, 42 patients were enrolled and 40 were included in response and toxicity evaluation. The median age was 59 years and 13 patients had IIIA and 27 had IIIB; 24 had squamous ca, 12 had adenocarcinoma, and 4 had others. Objective tumor responses were obtained in 29 patients (72.5%), including 18 (45.0%) after induction chemotherapy. After a median follow-up of 23.8 months, the median survival time and progression-free survival was 23.2 months and 10.9 months, respectively, with 2-year survival rate of 43.9%. For the patients with supraclavicular nodal involvement, the median survival time was 11.8 months with 2-year survival rate of 16.7%, whereas the corresponding figures were 27.8 months and 52.0%, respectively, for those without supraclavicular nodal involvement. Toxicity of induction chemotherapy was mild and well tolerated. However, concurrent chemoradiotherapy was associated with G3/4 hematologic toxicity in 75.7%, G3 esophagitis in 24.2%, and two treatment-related deaths. There were nonlife-threatening late toxicities in additional 6 patients. Conclusions

  3. Adalimumab improves health-related quality of life in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis compared with the United States general population norms: Results from a randomized, controlled Phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Revicki, Dennis A; Menter, Alan; Feldman, Steven; Kimel, Miriam; Harnam, Neesha; Willian, Mary K

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of adalimumab on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) for patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Background Psoriasis is a chronic, inflammatory, immune-mediated disease that has a significant impact on patients' HRQOL. Adalimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that blocks tumor necrosis factor, a pro-inflammatory cytokine, and is effective and well-tolerated for patients with moderate to severe psoriasis. Methods Data were obtained for a secondary analysis of patients in a randomized, controlled Phase III trial evaluating the effect of adalimumab in patients with psoriasis (N = 1,205). Patients with moderate to severe psoriasis were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to adalimumab 80 mg (two 40 mg injections administered subcutaneously at baseline followed by one 40 mg injection every other week from Week 1 to Week 15) or placebo. Short Form-36 (SF-36) Health Survey scores of psoriasis patients were used to assess HRQOL and were compared with United States (US) population norms at baseline and Week 16. Results Baseline Physical Component Summary (PCS) scores for the placebo and adalimumab groups were similar to the general US population. Baseline mean Mental Component Summary (MCS) scores were significantly lower for the adalimumab and placebo groups compared with the general population (47.4, 47.7, and 50.8 points, respectively; p < 0.0001). PCS scores at Week 16 for patients receiving adalimumab had improved and were significantly greater than scores for the general US population (52.7 vs 48.9; p < 0.001). Compared with the general US population, MCS scores at Week 16 were similar for patients receiving adalimumab (51.2 vs 50.8; p = 1.000) and lower for patients receiving placebo (50.8 vs 48.7; p < 0.0001). Conclusion Psoriasis has a broad impact on patient functioning and well-being. Improvement in skin lesions and joint symptoms associated with adalimumab treatment was accompanied by improvements in HRQOL to levels

  4. Preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial using in situ photoimmunotherapy combined with imiquimod for metastatic melanoma patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaosong; Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Howard, C. Anthony; Murray, Cynthia; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    In Situ Photoimmunotherapy (ISPI), a newly developed modality for cancer therapy, has been shown to be able to modulate the body's own immune response. This clinical trial was designed to evaluate the safety and therapeutic effect of ISPI, using imiquimod as its immunoadjuvant for metastatic melanoma patients. ISPI consisted of three main components applied directly to the cutaneous metastases: 1) local application of topical imiquimod; 2) injection of indocyanine green; and 3) an 805 nm laser for local irradiation. All patients completed at least one cycle of treatment. All the patients completed at least one cycle of treatments; one patient received 6 cycles. The most common adverse effects were rash, pruritus, pain, fatigue and anorexia. Fever, chills, vomiting and cellulitis were relative rare. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. Complete Response (CR) was observed in 6 patients. Median overall survival of the 11 evaluated patients was 12.2 months. Six of the eleven patients were still alive at the time of this report. Treatment of ISPI using imiquimod is safe and well tolerant. Our preliminary clinical results suggest that this new method can be a promising modality for metastatic melanoma.

  5. Intravenous anidulafungin followed optionally by oral voriconazole for the treatment of candidemia in Asian patients: results from an open-label Phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Candidemia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients, particularly in Asia. Anidulafungin has been reported to be an effective treatment for candidemia in Western populations, but little is known about its efficacy in Asian patients, where the clinical presentation and epidemiology may be different. Methods An open-label study of anidulafungin for the treatment of candidemia was recently conducted in several Asian countries. Treatment was initiated with intravenous anidulafungin, given for at least 5 days, with the option to complete treatment with oral voriconazole. The primary endpoint was global (clinical and microbiological) response, and the primary analysis was the proportion of patients in the modified intent-to-treat population with successful global response at the end of therapy. Secondary analyses included proportion with successful global response in clinically relevant patient subgroups. The safety and tolerability profile of anidulafungin and voriconazole in this population was also investigated. Results Forty-three patients were studied, including 42 in the modified intent-to-treat population. Eighteen patients were > 65 years, the largest age subgroup, and 21 had central venous catheters. The most common Candida species causing infection were C. tropicalis (n = 18) and C. albicans (n = 10). In the primary analysis, 73.8% had a successful global response at end of therapy. Success rates in subgroups were: 72.2% for C. tropicalis and 71.4% for C. albicans infection, 58.8% for patients > 65 years, and 81.0% for patients with central venous catheters. Safety and tolerability were comparable with the known profiles for anidulafungin (and voriconazole). Conclusions Although the epidemiology of Candida infections was different in this open-label study, the efficacy of anidulafungin in Asian patients with documented candidemia was consistent with previous studies in Western populations. No new

  6. Patient-Reported Outcome Results From the Open-Label Phase III AURELIA Trial Evaluating Bevacizumab-Containing Therapy for Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stockler, Martin R.; Hilpert, Felix; Friedlander, Michael; King, Madeleine T.; Wenzel, Lari; Lee, Chee Khoon; Joly, Florence; de Gregorio, Nikolaus; Arranz, José Angel; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sorio, Roberto; Freudensprung, Ulrich; Sneller, Vesna; Hales, Gill; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of bevacizumab on patient-reported outcomes (PROs; secondary end point) in the AURELIA trial. Patients and Methods Patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer were randomly assigned to chemotherapy alone (CT) or with bevacizumab (BEV-CT). PROs were assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire–Ovarian Cancer Module 28 (EORTC QLQ-OV28) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Ovarian Cancer symptom index (FOSI) at baseline and every two or three cycles (8/9 weeks) until disease progression. The primary PRO hypothesis was that more patients receiving BEV-CT than CT would achieve at least a 15% (≥ 15-point) absolute improvement on the QLQ-OV28 abdominal/GI symptom subscale (items 31-36) at week 8/9. Patients with missing week 8/9 questionnaires were included as unimproved. Questionnaires from all assessments until disease progression were analyzed using mixed-model repeated-measures (MMRM) analysis. Sensitivity analyses were used to determine the effects of differing assumptions and methods for missing data. Results Baseline questionnaires were available from 89% of 361 randomly assigned patients. More BEV-CT than CT patients achieved a ≥ 15% improvement in abdominal/GI symptoms at week 8/9 (primary PRO end point, 21.9% v 9.3%; difference, 12.7%; 95% CI, 4.4 to 20.9; P = .002). MMRM analysis covering all time points also favored BEV-CT (difference, 6.4 points; 95% CI, 1.3 to 11.6; P = .015). More BEV-CT than CT patients achieved ≥ 15% improvement in FOSI at week 8/9 (12.2% v 3.1%; difference, 9.0%; 95% CI, 2.9% to 15.2%; P = .003). Sensitivity analyses gave similar results and conclusions. Conclusion Bevacizumab increased the proportion of patients achieving a 15% improvement in patient-reported abdominal/GI symptoms during chemotherapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24687829

  7. Autophagy Inhibition to Augment mTOR Inhibition: A Phase I/II Trial of RAD001 and Hydroxychloroquine in Patients With Previously Treated Renal Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-07

    Histological Evidence of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; That Has Been Previously Treated With 1-3 Prior Regimens. Phase 1 Only, Any Number of Prior Regimens; With Evidence of Progressive Disease on or Within 6 Months; of Discontinuing Sunitinib, Sorafenib or Pazopanib. Previous; Therapy With Bevacizumab, IL2, or Interferon Are Permitted.

  8. Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, in patients with psoriatic arthritis and current skin involvement: a phase III, randomised, controlled trial (PALACE 3)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher J; Blanco, Francisco J; Crowley, Jeffrey; Birbara, Charles A; Jaworski, Janusz; Aelion, Jacob; Stevens, Randall M; Vessey, Adele; Zhan, Xiaojiang; Bird, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate apremilast treatment in patients with active psoriatic arthritis, including current skin involvement, despite prior therapy with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or biologic agents. Methods Patients (N=505) were randomised (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg twice daily, or apremilast 30 mg twice daily. Rescue therapy with apremilast was designated at week 16 for placebo patients not achieving 20% improvement in swollen and tender joint counts. At week 24, the remaining placebo patients were then randomised to apremilast 20 mg twice daily or 30 mg twice daily. The efficacy and safety of apremilast were assessed over 52 weeks. Results At week 16, significantly more patients receiving apremilast 20 mg twice daily (28%) and 30 mg twice daily (41%) achieved 20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology response criteria versus placebo (18%; p=0.0295 and p<0.0001, respectively), and mean decrease in the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index score was significantly greater with apremilast 30 mg twice daily (−0.20) versus placebo (−0.07; p=0.0073). In patients with baseline psoriasis body surface area involvement ≥3%, significantly more apremilast 30 mg twice daily patients achieved 50% reduction from baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (41%) versus placebo (24%; p=0.0098) at week 16. At week 52, observed improvements in these measures demonstrated sustained response with continued apremilast treatment. Most adverse events were mild to moderate in severity; the most common were diarrhoea, nausea, headache and upper respiratory tract infection. Conclusions Apremilast demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements in psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis at week 16; sustained improvements were seen with continued treatment through 52 weeks. Apremilast was generally well tolerated and demonstrated an acceptable safety profile. Trial registration number NCT01212770. PMID:26792812

  9. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Braendengen, Morten; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Bruheim, Kjersti; Cvancarova, Milada; Berglund, Ake; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  10. Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Gabapentin for the Prevention of Delayed Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy, NCCTG N08C3 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Debra L.; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Sloan, Jeff A.; Diekmann, Brent; Fuloria, Jyotsna; Kottschade, Lisa A.; Lyss, Alan P.; Jaslowski, Anthony J.; Mazurczak, Miroslaw A.; Blair, Scott C.; Terstriep, Shelby; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite targeted antiemetics, data support an unmet need related to the management of delayed nausea and vomiting (NV). Promising pilot data informed this phase III trial evaluating gabapentin for delayed NV from highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). METHODS Participants were randomized to receive prophylactic treatment with 20 mg of dexamethasone and a 5HT3 receptor antagonist (RA) on the day of chemotherapy, followed by gabapentin 300 mg twice a day and dexamethasone (dex) or placebo and dex after HEC. Gabapentin/placebo was started the day of chemotherapy and continued through day 5 for the first chemotherapy cycle, whereas dex was titrated down on days 2–4. The primary end point was complete response (CR), defined as no emesis and no use of rescue medications on days 2–6, using an NV diary. The percentages of those in each group with a CR were compared by Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS Four hundred thirty patients were enrolled in this study. Forty-seven percent of patients in the gabapentin arm and 41% in the placebo arm had a CR (P = .23). Mean number of emesis episodes was <0.5 daily, and mean nausea severity was <2 (mild). In both arms, patient satisfaction with NV control was greater than 8 (with 10 being perfectly satisfied). There were no significant differences in unwanted side effects. CONCLUSIONS In this study, gabapentin did not significantly improve delayed NV. Patients were satisfied with the control of their nausea and vomiting irrespective of arm. The use of a 5HT3 RA and dexamethasone provided good control of nausea and vomiting for most patients. PMID:25043153

  11. Randomized, Phase III Trial of First-Line Figitumumab in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Versus Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Alone in Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Corey J.; Novello, Silvia; Park, Keunchil; Krzakowski, Maciej; Karp, Daniel D.; Mok, Tony; Benner, Rebecca J.; Scranton, Judith R.; Olszanski, Anthony J.; Jassem, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Figitumumab (CP-751,871), a fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody, inhibits the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R). Our multicenter, randomized, phase III study compared figitumumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as first-line treatment in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Patients with stage IIIB/IV or recurrent NSCLC disease with nonadenocarcinoma histology received open-label figitumumab (20 mg/kg) plus paclitaxel (200 mg/m2) and carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve, 6 mg · min/mL) or paclitaxel and carboplatin alone once every 3 weeks for up to six cycles. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results Of 681 randomly assigned patients, 671 received treatment. The study was closed early by an independent Data Safety Monitoring Committee because of futility and an increased incidence of serious adverse events (SAEs) and treatment-related deaths with figitumumab. Median OS was 8.6 months for figitumumab plus chemotherapy and 9.8 months for chemotherapy alone (hazard ratio [HR], 1.18; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.40; P = .06); median progression-free survival was 4.7 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 5.4) and 4.6 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 5.4), respectively (HR, 1.10; P = .27); the objective response rates were 33% and 35%, respectively. The respective rates of all-causality SAEs were 66% and 51%; P < .01). Treatment-related grade 5 adverse events were also more common with figitumumab (5% v 1%; P < .01). Conclusion Adding figitumumab to standard chemotherapy failed to increase OS in patients with advanced nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC. Further clinical development of figitumumab is not being pursued. PMID:24888810

  12. A Phase III, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial of d-Threo-Methylphenidate HCl in Brain Tumor Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Jerome M. Case, L. Douglas; Atkins, James; Frizzell, Bart; Sanders, George; Griffin, Patricia; Lesser, Glenn; McMullen, Kevin; McQuellon, Richard; Naughton, Michelle; Rapp, Stephen; Stieber, Volker; Shaw, Edward G.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: The quality of life (QOL) and neurocognitive function of patients with brain tumors are negatively affected by the symptoms of their disease and brain radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the effect of prophylactic d-threo-methylphenidate HCl (d-MPH), a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant on QOL and cognitive function in patients undergoing RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty-eight patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors were randomly assigned to receive d-MPH or placebo. The starting dose of d-MPH was 5 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) and was escalated by 5 mg b.i.d. to a maximum of 15 mg b.i.d. The placebo was administered as one pill b.i.d. escalating three pills b.i.d. The primary outcome was fatigue. Patients were assessed at baseline, the end of radiation therapy, and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after brain RT using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy with brain and fatigue (FACIT-F) subscales, as well as the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Scale and Mini-Mental Status Exam. Results: The Mean Fatigue Subscale Score at baseline was 34.7 for the d-MPH arm and 33.3 for the placebo arm (p = 0.61). At 8 weeks after the completion of brain RT, there was no difference in fatigue between patient groups. The adjusted least squares estimate of the Mean Fatigue Subscale Score was 33.7 for the d-MPH and 35.6 for the placebo arm (p = 0.64). Secondary outcomes were not different between the two treatment arms. Conclusions: Prophylactic use of d-MPH in brain tumor patients undergoing RT did not result in an improvement in QOL.

  13. Gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, levofolinate, 5-fluorouracil, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and interleukin-2 (GOLFIG) versus FOLFOX chemotherapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patients: the GOLFIG-2 multicentric open-label randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Correale, Pierpaolo; Botta, Cirino; Rotundo, Maria S; Guglielmo, Annamaria; Conca, Raffaele; Licchetta, Antonella; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Bestoso, Elena; Ciliberto, Domenico; Cusi, Maria G; Fioravanti, Antonella; Guidelli, Giacomo M; Bianco, Maria T; Misso, Gabriella; Martino, Elodia; Caraglia, Michele; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Mini, Enrico; Mantovani, Giovanni; Ridolfi, Ruggero; Pirtoli, Luigi; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2014-01-01

    The GOLFIG-2 phase III trial was designed to compare the immunobiological activity and antitumor efficacy of GOLFIG chemoimmunotherapy regimen with standard FOLFOX-4 chemotherapy in frontline treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. This trial was conceived on the basis of previous evidence of antitumor and immunomodulating activity of the GOLFIG regimen in mCRC. GOLFIG-2 is a multicentric open/label phase III trial (EUDRACT: 2005-003458-81). Chemo-naive mCRC patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive biweekly standard FOLFOX-4 or GOLFIG [gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2), day 1); oxaliplatin (85 mg/m(2), day 2); levofolinate (100 mg/m(2), days 1-2), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (400 mg/m(2) in bolus followed by 24 h infusion at 800 mg/m(2),days 1-2), sc. GM-CSF (100 μg, days 3-7); sc. aldesleukin (0·5 MIU bi-daily, days 8-14 and 17-30)] treatments. The study underwent early termination because of poor recruitment in the control arm. After a median follow-up of 43.83 months, GOLFIG regimen showed superiority over FOLFOX in terms of progression-free survival [median 9·23 (95% confidence interval (CI), 6·9-11.5) vs. median 5.70 (95% CI, 3.38-8.02) months; hazard ratio (HR): 0.52 (95% CI, 0.35-0.77), P=0·002] and response rate [66.1% (95% CI, 0.41-0.73) vs. 37·0% (95% CI, 0.28-0.59), P=0.002], with a trend to longer survival [median 21.63 (95% CI, 18.09-25.18) vs. 14.57 mo (95% CI, 9.07-20.07); HR: 0·79 (95% CI, 0.52-1.21); P=0.28]. Patients in the experimental arm showed higher incidence of non-neutropenic fever (18.5%), autoimmunity signs (18.5%), an increase in the number of monocytes, eosinophils, CD4(+) T lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and a decrease in immunoregulatory (CD3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+)) T cells. Taken together, these findings provide proof-of-principle that GOLFIG chemoimmunotherapy may represent a novel reliable option for first-line treatment of mCRC. PMID:24316553

  14. Phase III, Randomized, Open-Label Study of Daily Imatinib Mesylate 400 mg Versus 800 mg in Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase Using Molecular End Points: Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Optimization and Selectivity Study

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Jorge E.; Baccarani, Michele; Guilhot, François; Druker, Brian J.; Branford, Susan; Kim, Dong-Wook; Pane, Fabrizio; Pasquini, Ricardo; Goldberg, Stuart L.; Kalaycio, Matt; Moiraghi, Beatriz; Rowe, Jacob M.; Tothova, Elena; De Souza, Carmino; Rudoltz, Marc; Yu, Richard; Krahnke, Tillmann; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Radich, Jerald P.; Hughes, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the safety and efficacy of initial treatment with imatinib mesylate 800 mg/d (400 mg twice daily) versus 400 mg/d in patients with newly diagnosed chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase. Patients and Methods A total of 476 patients were randomly assigned 2:1 to imatinib 800 mg (n = 319) or 400 mg (n = 157) daily. The primary end point was the major molecular response (MMR) rate at 12 months. Results At 12 months, differences in MMR and complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) rates were not statistically significant (MMR, 46% v 40%; P = .2035; CCyR, 70% v 66%; P = .3470). However, MMR occurred faster among patients randomly assigned to imatinib 800 mg/d, who had higher rates of MMR at 3 and 6 months compared with those in the imatinib 400-mg/d arm (P = .0035 by log-rank test). CCyR also occurred faster in the 800-mg/d arm (CCyR at 6 months, 57% v 45%; P = .0146). The most common adverse events were edema, gastrointestinal problems, and rash, and all were more common in patients in the 800-mg/d arm. Grades 3 to 4 hematologic toxicity also occurred more frequently in patients receiving imatinib 800 mg/d. Conclusion MMR rates at 1 year were similar with imatinib 800 mg/d and 400 mg/d, but MMR and CCyR occurred earlier in patients treated with 800 mg/d. Continued follow-up is needed to determine the clinical significance of earlier responses on high-dose imatinib. PMID:20008622

  15. A phase I/II study of leucovorin, carboplatin and 5-fluorouracil (LCF) in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site or advanced oesophagogastric/pancreatic adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Rigg, A.; Cunningham, D.; Gore, M.; Hill, M.; O'Brien, M.; Nicolson, M.; Chang, J.; Watson, M.; Norman, A.; Hill, A.; Oates, J.; Moore, H.; Ross, P.

    1997-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUPS) accounts for 5-10% of all malignancies. Forty patients with metastatic CUPS or advanced oesophagogastric/pancreatic adenocarcinomas were recruited. Eligibility included ECOG performance status 0-2, minimum life expectancy of 3 months and measurable disease. The regimen consisted of bolus intravenous 5 fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin (20 mg m-2) days 1-5 and carboplatin (AUC5) on day 3. The leucovorin/carboplatin/5-FU (LCF) was repeated every 4 weeks. The starting dose of 5-FU was 350 mg m-2 day-1 with escalation to 370 and then 400 mg m-2 day -1 after the toxicity at the previous level had been assessed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was defined as the dosage of 5-FU that achieved 60% grade 3/4 toxicity. In addition, objective and symptomatic responses, quality of life and survival were assessed. The MTD of 5-FU in the LCF regimen was 370 mg m-2. The predominant toxicity was asymptomatic marrow toxicity. The 350 mg m-2 level was then expanded. There were two toxic deaths due to neutropenic sepsis, one at 370 mg m-2 after one course and one at 350 mg m-2 after four courses. The objective response rate was 25% with one complete response (CR) and nine partial responses (PRs). The median duration of response was 3.4 months (range 1-10). The CR and eight of the nine PRs were in CUPS patients. Twelve patients developed progressive disease on LCF. Median survival for all 40 patients was 7.8 months (10 months median survival for those treated at 350 mg m-2). The majority of patients described a symptomatic improvement with LCF chemotherapy. The recommended dose of 5-FU for future studies is 350 mg m-2 combined with leucovorin 20 mg m-2 and carboplatin (AUC5). PMID:9000605

  16. Efficacy and Safety of 1-Hour Infusion of Recombinant Human Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Patients With Acute Decompensated Heart Failure: A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guogan; Wang, Pengbo; Li, Yishi; Liu, Wenxian; Bai, Shugong; Zhen, Yang; Li, Dongye; Yang, Ping; Chen, Yu; Hong, Lang; Sun, Jianhui; Chen, Junzhu; Wang, Xian; Zhu, Jihong; Hu, Dayi; Li, Huimin; Wu, Tongguo; Huang, Jie; Tan, Huiqiong; Zhang, Jian; Liao, Zhongkai; Yu, Litian; Mao, Yi; Ye, Shaodong; Feng, Lei; Hua, Yihong; Ni, Xinhai; Zhang, Yuhui; Wang, Yang; Li, Wei; Luan, Xiaojun; Sun, Xiaolu; Wang, Sijia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 1-h infusion of recombinant human atrial natriuretic peptide (rhANP) in combination with standard therapy in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF).This was a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Eligible patients with ADHF were randomized to receive a 1-h infusion of either rhANP or placebo at a ratio of 3:1 in combination with standard therapy. The primary endpoint was dyspnea improvement (a decrease of at least 2 grades of dyspnea severity at 12 h from baseline). Reduction in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) 1 h after infusion was the co-primary endpoint for catheterized patients. Overall, 477 patients were randomized: 358 (93 catheterized) patients received rhANP and 118 (28 catheterized) received placebo. The percentage of patients with dyspnea improvement at 12 h was higher, although not statistically significant, in the rhANP group than in the placebo group (32.0% vs 25.4%, odds ratio=1.382, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.863-2.212, P = 0.17). Reduction in PCWP at 1 h was significantly greater in patients treated with rhANP than in patients treated with placebo (-7.74 ± 5.95 vs -1.82 ± 4.47 mm Hg, P < 0.001). The frequencies of adverse events and renal impairment within 3 days of treatment were similar between the 2 groups. Mortality at 1 month was 3.1% in the rhANP group vs 2.5% in the placebo group (hazard ratio = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.34-4.26; P > 0.99).1-h rhANP infusion appears to result in prompt, transient hemodynamic improvement with a small, nonsignificant, effect on dyspnea in ADHF patients receiving standard therapy. The safety of 1-h infusion of rhANP seems to be acceptable. (WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform [ICTRP] number, ChiCTR-IPR-14005719.). PMID:26945407

  17. Dose-dense sequential adjuvant chemotherapy followed, as indicated, by trastuzumab for one year in patients with early breast cancer: first report at 5-year median follow-up of a Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group randomized phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Dose-dense sequential chemotherapy including anthracyclines and taxanes has been established in the adjuvant setting of high-risk operable breast cancer. However, the preferable taxane and optimal schedule of administration in a dose-dense regimen have not been defined yet. Methods From July 2005 to November 2008, 1001 patients (990 eligible) were randomized to receive, every 2 weeks, 3 cycles of epirubicin 110 mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of paclitaxel 200 mg/m2 followed by 3 cycles of intensified CMF (Arm A; 333 patients), or 3 cycles of epirubicin followed by 3 cycles of CMF, as in Arm A, followed 3 weeks later by 9 weekly cycles of docetaxel 35 mg/m2 (Arm B; 331), or 9 weekly cycles of paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 (Arm C; 326). Trastuzumab was administered for one year to HER2-positive patients post-radiation. Results At a median follow-up of 60.5 months, the 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 86%, 90% and 88%, for Arms A, B and C, respectively, while the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 96% in all arms. No differences were found in DFS or OS between the combined B and C Arms versus Arm A (DFS: HR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.59-1.11, P = 0.20; OS: HR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.55-1.30, P = 0.43). Among the 255 patients who received trastuzumab, 189 patients (74%) completed 1 year of treatment uneventfully. In all arms, the most frequently reported severe adverse events were neutropenia (30% vs. 27% vs. 26%) and leucopenia (12% vs. 13% vs. 12%), while febrile neutropenia occurred in fifty-one patients (6% vs. 4% vs. 5%). Patients in Arm A experienced more often severe pain (P = 0.002), neurological complications (P = 0.004) and allergic reactions (P = 0.004), while patients in Arm B suffered more often from severe skin reactions (P = 0.020). Conclusions No significant differences in survival between the regimens were found in the present phase III trial. Taxane scheduling influenced the type of severe toxicities. HER2

  18. EGFR biomarkers predict benefit from vandetanib in combination with docetaxel in a randomized phase III study of second-line treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heymach, J. V.; Lockwood, S. J.; Herbst, R. S.; Johnson, B. E.; Ryan, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background ZODIAC was a randomized phase III study of second-line treatment in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that evaluated the addition of vandetanib to docetaxel. The study showed a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival and objective response rate, but not in overall survival for unselected patients. This study evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutation, copy number gain, and protein expression, and KRAS gene mutation, in pretreatment tumor samples as potential biomarkers predicting benefit from vandetanib as second-line treatment of NSCLC. Patients and methods After progression following first-line chemotherapy, 1391 patients with locally advanced or metastatic (stage IIIB/IV) NSCLC were randomized 1 : 1 to receive vandetanib (100 mg/day) plus docetaxel (75 mg/m2 every 21 days) or placebo plus docetaxel in the ZODIAC study. Archival tumor samples (n = 570) were collected from consenting patients (n = 958) for predefined, prospective biomarker analyses. Results Of evaluable samples, 14% were EGFR mutation positive, 35% were EGFR FISH positive, 88% were EGFR protein expression positive, and 13% were KRAS mutation positive. Compared with the overall study population, in which progression-free survival (PFS) [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.79] but not OS (HR = 0.91) were significantly improved with vandetanib, there was greater relative clinical benefit for patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors [PFS HR 0.51, confidence interval (CI) 0.25–1.06 and OS HR 0.46, CI 0.14–1.57] and EGFR FISH-positive tumors (PFS HR 0.61, CI 0.39–0.94 and OS HR 0.48, CI 0.28–0.84). Similarly, patients with EGFR mutation or FISH-positive tumor samples who received vandetanib had an increased chance of objective tumor response (odds ratios 3.34, CI 0.8–13.89, and 3.90, CI 1.02–14.82, respectively). There did not appear to be benefit for vandetanib in patients with KRAS mutation-positive tumors. Conclusions

  19. The pharmacodynamic impact of apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, on circulating levels of inflammatory biomarkers in patients with psoriatic arthritis: substudy results from a phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (PALACE 1).

    PubMed

    Schafer, Peter H; Chen, Peng; Fang, Lorraine; Wang, Andrew; Chopra, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, demonstrated effectiveness (versus placebo) for treatment of active psoriatic arthritis in the psoriatic arthritis long-term assessment of clinical efficacy (PALACE) phase III clinical trial program. Pharmacodynamic effects of apremilast on plasma biomarkers associated with inflammation were evaluated in a PALACE 1 substudy. Of 504 patients randomized in PALACE 1, 150 (placebo: n = 51; apremilast 20 mg BID: n = 51; apremilast 30 mg BID: n = 48) provided peripheral blood plasma samples for analysis in a multiplexed cytometric bead array assay measuring 47 proteins associated with systemic inflammatory immune responses. Association between biomarker levels and achievement of 20% improvement from baseline in modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR20) response criteria was assessed by logistic regression. At Week 24, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and ferritin were significantly reduced from baseline with apremilast 20 mg BID or 30 mg BID versus placebo. ACR20 response correlated with change in TNF-α level with both apremilast doses. At Week 40, IL-17, IL-23, IL-6, and ferritin were significantly decreased and IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonists significantly increased with apremilast 30 mg BID versus placebo. In patients with active psoriatic arthritis, apremilast reduced circulating levels of Th1 and Th17 proinflammatory mediators and increased anti-inflammatory mediators. PMID:25973439

  20. The Pharmacodynamic Impact of Apremilast, an Oral Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, on Circulating Levels of Inflammatory Biomarkers in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Substudy Results from a Phase III, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial (PALACE 1)

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Peter H.; Chen, Peng; Fang, Lorraine; Wang, Andrew; Chopra, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, demonstrated effectiveness (versus placebo) for treatment of active psoriatic arthritis in the psoriatic arthritis long-term assessment of clinical efficacy (PALACE) phase III clinical trial program. Pharmacodynamic effects of apremilast on plasma biomarkers associated with inflammation were evaluated in a PALACE 1 substudy. Of 504 patients randomized in PALACE 1, 150 (placebo: n = 51; apremilast 20 mg BID: n = 51; apremilast 30 mg BID: n = 48) provided peripheral blood plasma samples for analysis in a multiplexed cytometric bead array assay measuring 47 proteins associated with systemic inflammatory immune responses. Association between biomarker levels and achievement of 20% improvement from baseline in modified American College of Rheumatology (ACR20) response criteria was assessed by logistic regression. At Week 24, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-6, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and ferritin were significantly reduced from baseline with apremilast 20 mg BID or 30 mg BID versus placebo. ACR20 response correlated with change in TNF-α level with both apremilast doses. At Week 40, IL-17, IL-23, IL-6, and ferritin were significantly decreased and IL-10 and IL-1 receptor antagonists significantly increased with apremilast 30 mg BID versus placebo. In patients with active psoriatic arthritis, apremilast reduced circulating levels of Th1 and Th17 proinflammatory mediators and increased anti-inflammatory mediators. PMID:25973439

  1. Randomized Phase III Trial of Ixabepilone Plus Capecitabine Versus Capecitabine in Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer Previously Treated With an Anthracycline and a Taxane

    PubMed Central

    Sparano, Joseph A.; Vrdoljak, Eduard; Rixe, Oliver; Xu, Binghe; Manikhas, Alexey; Medina, Carlos; Ventilari Da Costa, Susanne Crocamo; Ro, Jungsil; Rubio, Gonzalo; Rondinon, Monica; Perez Manga, Gumersindo; Peck, Ronald; Poulart, Valerie; Conte, Pierfranco

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We sought to determine whether the combination of ixabepilone plus capecitabine improved overall survival (OS) compared with capecitabine alone in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes. Patients and Methods A total of 1,221 patients with MBC previously treated with anthracycline and taxanes were randomly assigned to ixabepilone (40 mg/m2 intravenously on day 1) plus capecitabine (2,000 mg/m2 orally on days 1 through 14) or capecitabine alone (2,500 mg/m2 on the same schedule) given every 21 days. The trial was powered to detect a 20% reduction in the hazard ratio (HR) for death. Results There was no significant difference in OS between the combination and capecitabine monotherapy arm, the primary end point (median, 16.4 v 15.6 months; HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 078 to 1.03; P = .1162). The arms were well balanced with the exception of a higher prevalence of impaired performance status (Karnofsky performance status 70% to 80%) in the combination arm (32% v 25%). In a secondary Cox regression analysis adjusted for performance status and other prognostic factors, OS was improved for the combination (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75 to 0.98; P = .0231). In 79% of patients with measurable disease, the combination significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS; median, 6.2 v 4.2 months; HR = 0.79; P = .0005) and response rate (43% v 29%; P < .0001). Grade 3 to 4 neuropathy occurred in 24% treated with the combination, but was reversible. Conclusion This study confirmed a previous trial demonstrating improved PFS and response for the ixabepilone-capecitabine combination compared with capecitabine alone, although this did not result in improved survival. PMID:20530276

  2. Genetic variants in VEGF pathway genes in neoadjuvant breast cancer patients receiving bevacizumab: Results from the randomized phase III GeparQuinto study.

    PubMed

    Hein, Alexander; Lambrechts, Diether; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Häberle, Lothar; Eidtmann, Holger; Tesch, Hans; Untch, Michael; Hilfrich, Jörn; Schem, Christian; Rezai, Mahdi; Gerber, Bernd; Dan Costa, Serban; Blohmer, Jens-Uwe; Schwedler, Kathrin; Kittel, Kornelia; Fehm, Tanja; Kunz, Georg; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hanusch, Claus; Huober, Jens; Liedtke, Cornelia; Mau, Christine; Moisse, Matthieu; Müller, Volkmar; Nekljudova, Valentina; Peuteman, Gilian; Rack, Brigitte; Rübner, Matthias; Van Brussel, Thomas; Wang, Liewei; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Loibl, Sibylle; Fasching, Peter A

    2015-12-15

    Studies assessing the effect of bevacizumab (BEV) on breast cancer (BC) outcome have shown different effects on progression-free and overall survival, suggesting that a subgroup of patients may benefit from this treatment. Unfortunately, no biomarkers exist to identify these patients. Here, we investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VEGF pathway genes correlate with pathological complete response (pCR) in the neoadjuvant GeparQuinto trial. HER2-negative patients were randomized into treatment arms receiving either BEV combined with standard chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone. In a pre-planned biomarker study, DNA was collected from 729 and 724 patients, respectively from both treatment arms, and genotyped for 125 SNPs. Logistic regression assessed interaction between individual SNPs and both treatment arms to predict pCR. Five SNPs may be associated with a better response to BEV, but none of them remained significant after correction for multiple testing. The two SNPs most strongly associated, rs833058 and rs699947, were located upstream of the VEGF-A promoter. Odds ratios for the homozygous common, heterozygous and homozygous rare rs833058 genotypes were 2.36 (95% CI, 1.49-3.75), 1.20 (95% CI, 0.88-1.64) and 0.61 (95% CI, 0.34-1.12). Notably, some SNPs in VEGF-A exhibited a more pronounced effect in the triple-negative subgroup. Several SNPs in VEGF-A may be associated with improved pCR when receiving BEV in the neoadjuvant setting. Although none of the observed effects survived correction for multiple testing, our observations are consistent with previous studies on BEV efficacy in BC. Further research is warranted to clarify the predictive value of these markers. PMID:26100253

  3. A phase III trial comparing an anionic phospholipid-based cream and aloe vera-based gel in the prevention of radiation dermatitis in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Thomas E; Bosley, Christina; Smith, Julie; Baratti, Pam; Pritchard, David; Davis, Tina; Li, Chenghong; Xiong, Xiaoping

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Radiation dermatitis is a common side effect of radiation therapy (RT). In severe cases, RT must be interrupted until the skin heals, which can compromise treatment. The purpose of the study was to compare an anionic polar phospholipid (APP)-based cream and an aloe vera-based gel to determine their effectiveness in preventing and treating radiation dermatitis. Patients and methods Forty-five pediatric patients (median age, 11 years) with various diagnoses who received at least 23.4 Gy participated. APP cream and aloe vera gel were symmetrically applied within the irradiated field after each treatment. Three measures were collected before, during and after completion of treatment: subject's skin comfort, dermatologic assessment, and common toxicity criteria (CTC). Results Significant differences in specific variables favoring APP cream use were noted in some patients including skin comfort variables, dry (p = 0.002), soft (p = 0.057), feels good (p = 0.002), rough (p = 0.065), smooth (p = 0.012) and dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.013), erythema (p = 0.002) and peely (p = 0.008). Grouped CTC scores were supportive of APP cream (p = 0.004). In comparing the first and last assessments, two dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.035) and peely (p = 0.016), favored APP cream. Conclusion APP cream is more effective than aloe vera-based gel for prevention and treatment of radiation dermatitis. PMID:18093332

  4. Effect of Kangfuxin Solution on Chemo/Radiotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Multicenter, Prospective Randomized Phase III Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yangkun; Feng, Mei; Fan, Zixuan; Zhu, Xiaodong; Jin, Feng; Li, Rongqing; Wu, Jingbo; Yang, Xia; Jiang, Qinghua; Bai, Hongfang; Huang, Yecai; Lang, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Kangfuxin Solution, a pure Chinese herbal medicine, on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. Methods. A randomized, parallel-group, multicenter clinical study was performed. A total of 240 patients were randomized to receive either Kangfuxin Solution (test group) or compound borax gargle (control group) during chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis, upper gastrointestinal mucositis, and oral pain were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0 and the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS). Results. Of 240 patients enrolled, 215 were eligible for efficacy analysis. Compared with the control group, the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in the test group were significantly reduced (P = 0.01). The time to different grade of oral mucositis occurrence (grade 1, 2, or 3) was longer in test group (P < 0.01), and the accumulated radiation dose was also higher in test group comparing to the control group (P < 0.05). The test group showed lower incidence of oral pain and gastrointestinal mucositis than the control group (P < 0.01). No significant adverse events were observed. Conclusion. Kangfuxin Solution demonstrated its superiority to compound borax gargle on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy. Its safety is acceptable for clinical application. PMID:27375766

  5. Effect of Kangfuxin Solution on Chemo/Radiotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Multicenter, Prospective Randomized Phase III Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yangkun; Feng, Mei; Fan, Zixuan; Zhu, Xiaodong; Jin, Feng; Li, Rongqing; Wu, Jingbo; Yang, Xia; Jiang, Qinghua; Bai, Hongfang; Huang, Yecai; Lang, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Kangfuxin Solution, a pure Chinese herbal medicine, on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. Methods. A randomized, parallel-group, multicenter clinical study was performed. A total of 240 patients were randomized to receive either Kangfuxin Solution (test group) or compound borax gargle (control group) during chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis, upper gastrointestinal mucositis, and oral pain were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0 and the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS). Results. Of 240 patients enrolled, 215 were eligible for efficacy analysis. Compared with the control group, the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in the test group were significantly reduced (P = 0.01). The time to different grade of oral mucositis occurrence (grade 1, 2, or 3) was longer in test group (P < 0.01), and the accumulated radiation dose was also higher in test group comparing to the control group (P < 0.05). The test group showed lower incidence of oral pain and gastrointestinal mucositis than the control group (P < 0.01). No significant adverse events were observed. Conclusion. Kangfuxin Solution demonstrated its superiority to compound borax gargle on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy. Its safety is acceptable for clinical application. PMID:27375766

  6. Phase III Study of Radiation Therapy With or Without Cis-Platinum in Patients With Unresectable Squamous or Undifferentiated Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: An Intergroup Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (E2382)

    SciTech Connect

    Quon, Harry; Leong, Traci; Haselow, Robert; Leipzig, Bruce; Cooper, Jay; Forastiere, Arlene

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The Head and Neck Intergroup conducted a Phase III randomized trial to determine whether the addition weekly cisplatin to daily radiation therapy (RT) would improve survival in patients with unresectable squamous cell head-and-neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were randomized to RT (70 Gy at 1.8-2 Gy/day) or to the identical RT with weekly cisplatin dosed at 20 mg/m{sup 2}. Failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log rank test. Results: Between 1982 and 1987, 371 patients were accrued, and 308 patients were found eligible for analysis. Median follow-up was 62 months. The median FFS was 6.5 and 7.2 months for the RT and RT + cisplatin groups, respectively (p = 0.30). The p value for the treatment difference was p = 0.096 in multivariate modeling of FFS (compared to a p = 0.30 in univariate analysis). Expected acute toxicities were significantly increased with the addition of cisplatin except for in-field RT toxicities. Late toxicities were not significantly different except for significantly more esophageal (9% vs. 3%, p = 0.03) and laryngeal (11% vs. 4%, p = 0.05) late toxicities in the RT + cisplatin group. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent weekly cisplatin at 20 mg/m{sup 2} to daily radiation did not improve survival, although there was evidence of activity. Low-dose weekly cisplatin seems to have modest tumor radiosensitization but can increase the risk of late swallowing complications.

  7. 75 FR 14575 - Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III AGENCY: National... Development Committee Resolution 05-05, Human Performance-Based Standards and Usability Testing. NIST...

  8. Efficacy and safety of rilpivirine in treatment-naive, HIV-1-infected patients with hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus coinfection enrolled in the Phase III randomized, double-blind ECHO and THRIVE trials

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Mark; Amaya, Gerardo; Clumeck, Nathan; Arns da Cunha, Clovis; Jayaweera, Dushyantha; Junod, Patrice; Li, Taisheng; Tebas, Pablo; Stevens, Marita; Buelens, Annemie; Vanveggel, Simon; Boven, Katia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The efficacy and hepatic safety of the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors rilpivirine (TMC278) and efavirenz were compared in treatment-naive, HIV-infected adults with concurrent hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the pooled week 48 analysis of the Phase III, double-blind, randomized ECHO (NCT00540449) and THRIVE (NCT00543725) trials. Methods Patients received 25 mg of rilpivirine once daily or 600 mg of efavirenz once daily, plus two nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors. At screening, patients had alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase levels ≤5× the upper limit of normal. HBV and HCV status was determined at baseline by HBV surface antigen, HCV antibody and HCV RNA testing. Results HBV/HCV coinfection status was known for 670 patients in the rilpivirine group and 665 in the efavirenz group. At baseline, 49 rilpivirine and 63 efavirenz patients [112/1335 (8.4%)] were coinfected with either HBV [55/1357 (4.1%)] or HCV [57/1333 (4.3%)]. The safety analysis included all available data, including beyond week 48. Eight patients seroconverted during the study (rilpivirine: five; efavirenz: three). A higher proportion of patients achieved viral load <50 copies/mL (intent to treat, time to loss of virological response) in the subgroup without HBV/HCV coinfection (rilpivirine: 85.0%; efavirenz: 82.6%) than in the coinfected subgroup (rilpivirine: 73.5%; efavirenz: 79.4%) (rilpivirine, P = 0.04 and efavirenz, P = 0.49, Fisher's exact test). The incidence of hepatic adverse events (AEs) was low in both groups in the overall population (rilpivirine: 5.5% versus efavirenz: 6.6%) and was higher in HBV/HCV-coinfected patients than in those not coinfected (26.7% versus 4.1%, respectively). Conclusions Hepatic AEs were more common and response rates lower in HBV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with rilpivirine or efavirenz than in those who were not coinfected. PMID:22532465

  9. Efficacy, patient-reported outcomes and safety profile of ATX-101 (deoxycholic acid), an injectable drug for the reduction of unwanted submental fat: results from a phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Ascher, B; Hoffmann, K; Walker, P; Lippert, S; Wollina, U; Havlickova, B

    2014-01-01

    Background Unwanted submental fat (SMF) may result in an unattractive chin profile and dissatisfaction with appearance. An approved and rigorously tested non-surgical method for SMF reduction is lacking. Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ATX-101 for the pharmacological reduction of unwanted SMF in a phase III randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Methods Patients (n = 360) with moderate or severe SMF were randomized to receive ATX-101 1 or 2 mg/cm2 or placebo injected into their SMF for up to four treatments ∼28 days apart, with a 12-week follow-up. Coprimary efficacy endpoints were the proportions of treatment responders, defined as a ≥1-point reduction in SMF on the Clinician-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (CR-SMFRS), and those satisfied with their appearance in association with their face and chin after treatment on the Subject Self-Rating Scale (SSRS score ≥4). Secondary efficacy endpoints included a ≥1-point improvement in SMF on the Patient-Reported Submental Fat Rating Scale (PR-SMFRS) and changes in the Patient-Reported Submental Fat Impact Scale (PR-SMFIS). Additional patient-reported outcomes and changes in the Skin Laxity Rating Scale were recorded. Adverse events (AEs) and laboratory test results were monitored. Results Compared with placebo, a greater proportion of patients treated with ATX-101 1 and 2 mg/cm2 showed a ≥1-point improvement in CR-SMFRS (58.3% and 62.3%, respectively, vs. 34.5% with placebo; P < 0.001) and patient satisfaction (SSRS score ≥4) with the appearance of their face and chin (68.3% and 64.8%, respectively, vs. 29.3%; P < 0.001). Patient-reported secondary efficacy endpoints showed significant improvements in SMF severity (PR-SMFRS; P = 0.009 for ATX-101 1 mg/cm2, P < 0.001 for ATX-101 2 mg/cm2 vs. placebo) and emotions and perceived self-image (PR-SMFIS; P < 0.001). No overall worsening of skin laxity was observed. AEs were mostly transient, mild to moderate in

  10. Immunomonitoring results of a phase II/III study of malignant ascites patients treated with the trifunctional antibody catumaxomab (anti-EpCAM x anti-CD3).

    PubMed

    Jäger, Michael; Schoberth, Alexandra; Ruf, Peter; Hess, Juergen; Hennig, Michael; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Wimberger, Pauline; Ströhlein, Michael; Theissen, Bettina; Heiss, Markus M; Lindhofer, Horst

    2012-01-01

    Patients with malignant ascites secondary to primary carcinomas benefit from intraperitoneal therapy with the trifunctional antibody catumaxomab (anti-EpCAM × anti-CD3). Here, we report the analysis of peritoneal fluid samples from 258 patients with malignant ascites randomized to catumaxomab or control groups to investigate the molecular effects of catumaxomab treatment. In the catumaxomab group, tumor cell numbers and peritoneal levels of VEGF decreased, whereas the activation status of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell populations increased more than two-fold after treatment. Notably, CD133(+)/EpCAM(+) cancer stem cells vanished from the catumaxomab samples but not from the control samples. In vitro investigations indicated that catumaxomab eliminated tumor cells in a manner associated with release of proinflammatory Th1 cytokines. Together, our findings show that catumaxomab therapy activates peritoneal T cells and eliminates EpCAM(+) tumor cells, establishing a molecular and cellular basis to understand in vivo efficacy within the immunosuppressed malignant ascites tissue microenvironment. PMID:22044753

  11. Analysis of opioid-mediated analgesia in Phase III studies of methylnaltrexone for opioid-induced constipation in patients with chronic noncancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Lynn R; Brenner, Darren M; Barrett, Andrew C; Paterson, Craig; Bortey, Enoch; Forbes, William P

    2015-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous methylnaltrexone is efficacious and well tolerated for opioid-induced constipation (OIC) but may theoretically disrupt opioid-mediated analgesia. Methods Opioid use, pain intensity, and opioid withdrawal (Objective Opioid Withdrawal Scale [OOWS] and Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale [SOWS] scores) were reported in a randomized, double-blind trial with an open-label extension (RCT) and an open-label trial (OLT) evaluating safety in adults with chronic noncancer pain. In the RCT, patients taking ≥50 mg of oral morphine equivalents daily with <3 rescue-free bowel movements weekly received methyl naltrexone 12 mg once daily (n=150), every other day (n=148), or placebo (n=162) for 4 weeks, followed by open-label methylnaltrexone 12 mg (as needed [prn]; n=364) for 8 weeks. In the OLT, patients (n=1,034) on stable opioid doses with OIC received methylnaltrexone 12 mg prn for up to 48 weeks. Results Minimal fluctuations of median morphine equivalent dose from baseline (BL) were observed in the RCT double-blind period (BL, 154.8–161.0 mg/d; range, 137.1–168.0 mg/d), RCT open-label period (BL, 156.3–174.6; range, 144.0–180.0) and OLT (BL, 120 mg/d; range, 117.3–121.1 mg/d). No significant change from BL in pain intensity score occurred in any group at weeks 2 or 4 (both P≥0.1) of the RCT double-blind period, and scores remained stable during the open-label period and in the OLT (mean change, −0.2 to 0.1). Changes from BL in OOWS and SOWS scores during the double-blind period were not significantly impacted by methylnaltrexone exposure at weeks 2 or 4 (P>0.05 for all). Conclusion Methylnaltrexone did not affect opioid-mediated analgesia in patients with chronic noncancer pain and OIC. PMID:26586963

  12. A DOUBLE-BLIND, RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, FIXED-DOSE PHASE III STUDY OF VILAZODONE IN PATIENTS WITH GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Gommoll, Carl; Durgam, Suresh; Mathews, Maju; Forero, Giovanna; Nunez, Rene; Tang, Xiongwen; Thase, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Background Vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist, is approved for treating major depressive disorder in adults. This study (NCT01629966 ClinicalTrials.gov) evaluated the efficacy and safety of vilazodone in adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods A multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose study in patients with GAD randomized (1:1:1) to placebo (n = 223), or vilazodone 20 mg/day (n = 230) or 40 mg/day (n = 227). Primary and secondary efficacy parameters were total score change from baseline to week 8 on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAMA) and Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), respectively, analyzed using a predefined mixed-effect model for repeated measures (MMRM). Safety outcomes were presented by descriptive statistics. Results The least squares mean difference (95% confidence interval) in HAMA total score change from baseline (MMRM) was statistically significant for vilazodone 40 mg/day versus placebo (–1.80 [–3.26, –0.34]; P = .0312 [adjusted for multiple comparisons]), but not for vilazodone 20 mg/day versus placebo. Mean change from baseline in SDS total score was not significantly different for either dose of vilazodone versus placebo when adjusted for multiplicity; significant improvement versus placebo was noted for vilazodone 40 mg/day without adjustment for multiplicity (P = .0349). The incidence of adverse events was similar for vilazodone 20 and 40 mg/day (∼71%) and slightly lower for placebo (62%). Nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, vomiting, and fatigue were reported in ≥5% of patients in either vilazodone group and at least twice the rate of placebo. Conclusions Vilazodone was effective in treating anxiety symptoms of GAD. No new safety concerns were identified. PMID:25891440

  13. Quality-of-life and performance status results from the phase III RAINBOW study of ramucirumab plus paclitaxel versus placebo plus paclitaxel in patients with previously treated gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma†

    PubMed Central

    Al-Batran, S.-E.; Van Cutsem, E.; Oh, S. C.; Bodoky, G.; Shimada, Y.; Hironaka, S.; Sugimoto, N.; Lipatov, O. N.; Kim, T.-Y.; Cunningham, D.; Rougier, P.; Muro, K.; Liepa, A. M.; Chandrawansa, K.; Emig, M.; Ohtsu, A.; Wilke, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The phase III RAINBOW trial demonstrated that the addition of ramucirumab to paclitaxel improved overall survival, progression-free survival, and tumor response rate in fluoropyrimidine–platinum previously treated patients with advanced gastric/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma. Here, we present results from quality-of-life (QoL) and performance status (PS) analyses. Patients and methods Patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS of 0/1 were randomized to receive ramucirumab (8 mg/kg i.v.) or placebo on days 1 and 15 of a 4-week cycle, with both arms receiving paclitaxel (80 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed with the QoL/health status questionnaires EORTC QLQ-C30 and EQ-5D at baseline and 6-week intervals. PS was assessed at baseline and day 1 of every cycle. Time to deterioration (TtD) in each QLQ-C30 scale was defined as randomization to first worsening of ≥10 points (on 100-point scale) and TtD in PS was defined as first worsening to ≥2. Hazard ratios (HRs) for treatment effect were estimated using stratified Cox proportional hazards models. Results Of the 665 patients randomized, 650 (98%) provided baseline QLQ-C30 and EQ-5D data, and 560 (84%) also provided data from ≥1 postbaseline time point. Baseline scores for both instruments were similar between arms. Of the 15 QLQ-C30 scales, 14 had HR < 1, indicating similar or longer TtD in QoL for ramucirumab + paclitaxel. Treatment with ramucirumab + paclitaxel was also associated with a delay in TtD in PS to ≥2 (HR = 0.798, P = 0.0941). Alternate definitions of PS deterioration yielded similar results: PS ≥ 3 (HR = 0.656, P = 0.0508), deterioration by ≥1 PS level (HR = 0.802, P = 0.0444), and deterioration by ≥2 PS levels (HR = 0.608, P = 0.0063). EQ-5D scores were comparable between treatment arms, stable during treatment, and worsened at discontinuation. Conclusion In patients with previously treated advanced gastric

  14. Phase I-II study of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients: a report of feasibility and early toxicity results in the first 50 treatments

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To report results in terms of feasibility and early toxicity of hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) approach with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) as adjuvant treatment after breast-conserving surgery. Methods Between September 2010 and May 2011, 50 consecutive patients presenting early-stage breast cancer were submitted to adjuvant radiotherapy with SIB-VMAT approach using RapidArc in our Institution (Istituto Clinico Humanitas ICH). Three out of 50 patients were irradiated bilaterally (53 tumours in 50 patients). All patients were enrolled in a phase I-II trial approved by the ICH ethical committee. All 50 patients enrolled in the study underwent VMAT-SIB technique to irradiate the whole breast with concomitant boost irradiation of the tumor bed. Doses to whole breast and surgical bed were 40.5 Gy and 48 Gy respectively, delivered in 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Skin toxicities were recorded during and after treatment according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria with a median follow-up of 12 months (range 8–16). Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as excellent/good or fair/poor. Results The median age of the population was 68 years (range 36–88). According to AJCC staging system, 38 breast lesions were classified as pT1, and 15 as pT2; 49 cases were assessed as N0 and 4 as N1. The maximum acute skin toxicity by the end of treatment was Grade 0 in 20/50 patients, Grade 1 in 32/50, Grade 2 in 0 and Grade 3 in 1/50 (one of the 3 cases of bilateral breast irradiation). No Grade 4 toxicities were observed. All Grade 1 toxicities had resolved within 3 weeks. No significant differences in cosmetic scores on baseline assessment vs. 3 months and 6 months after the treatment were observed: all patients were scored as excellent/good (50/50) compared with baseline; no fair/poor judgment was recorded. No other toxicities or local failures were recorded during follow-up. Conclusions The 3-week course of

  15. COMPARISON OF PROVIDER-ASSESSED AND PATIENT-REPORTED OUTCOME MEASURES OF ACUTE SKIN TOXICITY DURING A PHASE III TRIAL OF MOMETASONE CREAM VERSUS PLACEBO DURING BREAST RADIOTHERAPY: THE NORTH CENTRAL CANCER TREATMENT GROUP (N06C4)

    PubMed Central

    Neben-Wittich, Michelle A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Burger, Kelli N.; Martenson, James A.; Miller, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Considerable interobserver variability exists among providers and between providers and patients when measuring subjective symptoms. In the recently published Phase III N06C4 trial of mometasone cream vs. placebo to prevent radiation dermatitis, the primary provider–assessed (PA) endpoint, using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), was negative. However, prospectively planned secondary analyses of patient-reported outcomes (PROs), using the Skindex-16 and Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool (STAT), were positive. This study assesses the relationship between PA outcomes and PROs. Methods and Materials Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the three tools. Statistical correlations were defined as follows: <0.5, mild; 0.5–0.7, moderate; and >0.7, strong. Results CTCAE dermatitis moderately correlated with STATerythema, and CTCAE pruritus strongly correlated with STAT itching. CTCAE pruritus had a moderate correlation with Skindex-16 itching. Comparing the 2 PRO tools, Skindex-16 itching correlated moderately with STAT itching. Skindex-16 burning, hurting, irritation, and persistence all showed the strongest correlation with STAT burning; they showed moderate correlations with STAT itching and tenderness. Conclusions The PRO Skindex-16 correlated well with the PRO portions of STAT, but neither tool correlated well with CTCAE. PROs delineated a wider spectrum of toxicity than PA measures and provided more information on rash, redness, pruritus, and annoyance measures compared with CTCAE findings of rash and pruritus. PROs may provide a more complete measure of patient experience than single-symptom, PA endpoints in clinical trials assessing radiation skin toxicity. PMID:20888137

  16. Comparison of EP2006, a filgrastim biosimilar, to the reference: a phase III, randomized, double-blind clinical study in the prevention of severe neutropenia in patients with breast cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, K.; Semiglazov, V.; Krasnozhon, D.; Davidenko, I.; Nelyubina, L.; Nakov, R.; Stiegler, G.; Singh, P.; Schwebig, A.; Kramer, S.; Harbeck, N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biosimilars of filgrastim are in widespread clinical use in Europe. This phase III study compares biosimilar filgrastim (EP2006), with the US-licensed reference product, Neupogen®, in breast cancer patients receiving (neo)adjuvant myelosuppressive chemotherapy (TAC). Patients and methods A total of 218 patients receiving 5 µg/kg/day filgrastim over six chemotherapy cycles were randomized 1:1:1:1 into four arms. Two arms received only one product (nonalternating), biosimilar or reference, and two arms (alternating) received alternating treatments during each cycle (biosimilar then reference or vice versa). The primary end point was duration of severe neutropenia (DSN) during cycle 1. Results The baseline characteristics were balanced between the four treatment arms. Noninferiority of biosimilar versus the reference was demonstrated: DSN (days) in cycle 1 was 1.17 ± 1.11 (biosimilar, N = 101) and 1.20 ± 1.02 (reference, N = 103), 97.5% confidence interval lower boundary for the difference was −0.26 days (above the predefined limit of −1 day). No clinically meaningful differences were observed regarding any other efficacy parameter: incidence of febrile neutropenia (FN); hospitalization due to FN; incidence of infections; depth and time of absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir and time to ANC recovery during cycle 1 and across all cycles. The pattern and frequency of adverse events were similar across all treatments. Conclusion This study demonstrates that biosimilar and the reference filgrastim are similar with no clinically meaningful differences regarding efficacy and safety in prevention of severe neutropenia. Biosimilar filgrastim could represent an important alternative to the reference product, potentially benefiting public health by increasing access to filgrastim treatment. Study number NCT01519700. PMID:26122726

  17. Postoperative dose-dense sequential versus concomitant administration of epirubicin and paclitaxel in patients with node-positive breast cancer: 5-year results of the Hellenic Cooperative Oncology Group HE 10/00 phase III Trial.

    PubMed

    Gogas, Helen; Dafni, Urania; Karina, Maria; Papadimitriou, Christos; Batistatou, Anna; Bobos, Mattheos; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Eleftheraki, Anastasia G; Timotheadou, Eleni; Bafaloukos, Dimitrios; Christodoulou, Christos; Markopoulos, Christos; Briasoulis, Evangelos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Samantas, Epaminontas; Kosmidis, Paris; Stathopoulos, George P; Karanikiotis, Charisios; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Fountzilas, George

    2012-04-01

    To explore the impact of dose intensity (DI) in the adjuvant setting of breast cancer, a randomized phase III trial was conducted comparing postoperative dose-dense sequential chemotherapy with epirubicin, paclitaxel, and cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF)in high-risk breast cancer patients. From Oct 2000 to June 2005, 1,121 node-positive patients were randomized to dose-dense sequential epirubicin 110 mg/m(2) and paclitaxel (Taxol, Bristol Myers-Squibb, Princeton, NJ) 250 mg/m(2) (group A), or concurrent epirubicin 83 mg/m(2) and paclitaxel 187 mg/m(2) (group B), both followed by three cycles of "intensified" combination chemotherapy with CMF. By protocol design total cumulative dose and duration of treatment were identical in both groups. Dose intensity of epirubicin and paclitaxel was double in the dose-dense arm. Prophylactic treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor was given with the dose-dense treatments. Disease-free survival (DFS) was the primary endpoint. At a median follow-up of 76 months, 253 patients (23%) had documented disease relapse (123 vs. 130 in groups A and B, respectively) and 208 deaths (101, group A and 107, group B) had been observed. The 5-year DFS rate of 74 and 74% and OS rate of 86 and 85% were observed for group A and group B, respectively. No differences were found in DFS or OS between the two treatment groups (P = 0.78 and P = 0.45 for DFS and OS, respectively). Safety analysis results showing that both regimens were well tolerated and safe have been previously published (Fountzilas et al. Ann Oncol 2008). No DFS or OS benefit from the dose-dense sequential epirubicin and paclitaxel was detected when compared to the concurrent administration of the same drugs. No additional safety issues were raised with long-term follow-up. PMID:22187126

  18. Acquired antithrombin III deficiency in patients with glomerular proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Thaler, E; Balzar, E; Kopsa, H; Pinggera, W F

    1978-01-01

    Antithrombin III (AT II/III) was determined immunologically and by means of a heparin cofactor assay in plasma samples and 24-hour urine of 15 patients with various degrees of proteinuria, being predominantly of glomerular origin. In urine the AT II/III concentrations were significantly correlated to the concentrations of albumin, plasminogen and IgG. One third of the patients had AT II/III plasma levels below the normal range. The plasma levels showed a significant inverse correlation to the AT II/III and albumin clearance rates. Similarily, the plasminogen concentrations in plasma were decreased in two thirds of the patients, being inversely correlated to the renal plasminogen clearance values. It is proposed that AT II/III deficiency in the nephrotic syndrome is an important pathogenetic factor in venous thrombosis. PMID:689489

  19. Phase III clinical study of maxacalcitol ointment in patients with palmoplantar pustulosis: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Tamaki, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) often shows resistance to treatment. Vitamin D3 analog (VitD3 ) has been widely used for the treatment of psoriasis, however, the efficacy and safety of topical VitD3 treatment of PPP are not fully confirmed. Maxacalcitol topical ointment (22-oxacalcitriol [OCT]) was applied twice daily for 8 weeks. Evaluation of efficacy was based on scored skin findings for three main symptoms (erythema, pustules/vesicles and keratinization/scales). The primary and secondary end-points were the total and symptom-specific scores of skin findings, respectively. A total of 188 patients with moderate or severe PPP were enrolled in the study and were randomized into either the OCT group (n = 95) or placebo group (n = 93). The total scores (mean ± standard error) of skin findings at the last observation adjusting for those on day 1 were 5.0 ± 0.20 in the OCT group and 6.9 ± 0.20 in the placebo group. There was a significant decrease in the total score of skin findings in the OCT group compared with the placebo group (P < 0.0001). In particular, the score of pustules/vesicles drastically decreased in the OCT group. In terms of safety, the incidence of adverse reactions in the OCT and placebo groups were 11.6% and 9.7%, respectively. These results indicate that OCT is effective and highly safe in the management of PPP. Topical OCT treatment was found to show a potent action on pustules/vesicles thereby contributing to the cure of PPP. PMID:26282062

  20. Long-term safety and efficacy of fasiglifam (TAK-875), a G-protein-coupled receptor 40 agonist, as monotherapy and combination therapy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: a 52-week open-label phase III study.

    PubMed

    Kaku, K; Enya, K; Nakaya, R; Ohira, T; Matsuno, R

    2016-09-01

    This multicentre, open-label, phase III study investigated the safety and efficacy of the G-protein-coupled receptor 40 agonist fasiglifam. Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes and inadequate glycaemic control despite diet and/or exercise (n = 282), or despite diet and/or exercise plus one oral antidiabetic agent [sulphonylurea (n = 262), rapid-acting insulin secretagogue (n = 124), α-glucosidase inhibitor (n = 141), biguanide (n = 136), thiazolidinedione (n = 139) or dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor (n = 138)] were randomized to treatment with fasiglifam 25 or 50 mg once daily for 52 weeks. The primary endpoints were safety variables. The overall incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) was 75.4-85.1% in the 25 mg group and 78.9-89.9% in the 50 mg group; most TEAEs were mild. Hypoglycaemia was negligible with fasiglifam monotherapy and most common with sulphonylurea combination therapy (12.4 and 9.1% for 25 and 50 mg groups, respectively). Abnormal liver-related laboratory values were uncommon. Glycated haemoglobin levels decreased from week 2 in all groups and were maintained to week 52. Although fasiglifam as monotherapy or in combination regimens was well tolerated during long-term treatment, global concerns about liver safety led to termination of its development after study completion. PMID:27178047

  1. Study protocol for a phase III multicentre, randomised, open-label, blinded-end point trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of immunoglobulin plus cyclosporin A in patients with severe Kawasaki disease (KAICA Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Reiko; Hamada, Hiromichi; Sato, Yasunori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ebata, Ryota; Terauchi, Moe; Terai, Masaru; Hanaoka, Hideki; Hata, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown aetiology that predominantly affects infants and young children. We hypothesise that cyclosporin A (CsA) may be effective in treating KD by regulating the Ca2+/NFAT signalling pathway. This trial compares the current standard therapy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and the combined IVIG+CsA therapy in paediatric patients with severe KD. Methods and analysis This trial is a phase III, multicentre, randomised, open-label, blinded-end point trial that evaluates the efficacy and safety of IVIG+CsA therapy. Patients with severe KD who satisfy the eligibility criteria are randomised (1:1) to receive either CsA (5 mg/kg/day for 5 days; Neoral) plus high-dose IVIG (2 g/kg for 24 h and aspirin 30 mg/kg/day), or high-dose IVIG alone (2 g/kg for 24 h and aspirin 30 mg/kg/day). The primary end point is the frequency of occurrence of coronary artery abnormalities during the trial period. An independent end point review committee will be in charge of the trial assessment. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of each institution. The trial was notified and registered at the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, in Japan. The trial is currently on-going and is scheduled to finish in April 2017. The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number JMA-IIA00174; Pre-results. PMID:26628527

  2. A Phase I-II Study of Postoperative Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Crosby, Tom D.L.; Dubbelman, Ria; Bartelink, Harry; Verheij, Marcel

    2007-12-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 randomized study showed that postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. We hypothesized that these results could be improved further by using a more effective, intensified, and convenient chemotherapy schedule. Therefore, this Phase I-II dose-escalation study was performed to determine the maximal tolerated dose and toxicity profile of postoperative radiotherapy combined with concurrent capecitabine. Patients and Methods: After recovery from surgery for adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction or stomach, all patients were treated with capecitabine monotherapy, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily for 2 weeks. After a 1-week treatment-free interval, patients received capecitabine (650-1,000 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily 5 days/week) in a dose-escalation schedule combined with radiotherapy on weekdays for 5 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the gastric bed, anastomoses, and regional lymph nodes. Results: Sixty-six patients were treated accordingly. Two patients went off study before or shortly after the start of chemoradiotherapy because of progressive disease. Therefore, 64 patients completed treatment as planned. During the chemoradiotherapy phase, 4 patients developed four items of Grade III dose-limiting toxicity (3 patients in Dose Level II and 1 patient in Dose Level IV). The predefined highest dose of capecitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily orally, was tolerated well and, therefore, considered safe for further clinical evaluation. Conclusions: This Phase I-II study shows that intensified chemoradiotherapy with daily capecitabine is feasible in postoperative patients with gastroesophageal junction and gastric cancer.

  3. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are a powerful prognostic marker in patients with triple-negative breast cancer enrolled in the IBCSG phase III randomized clinical trial 22-00.

    PubMed

    Pruneri, Giancarlo; Gray, Kathryn P; Vingiani, Andrea; Viale, Giuseppe; Curigliano, Giuseppe; Criscitiello, Carmen; Láng, István; Ruhstaller, Thomas; Gianni, Lorenzo; Goldhirsch, Aron; Kammler, Roswitha; Price, Karen N; Cancello, Giuseppe; Munzone, Elisabetta; Gelber, Richard D; Regan, Meredith M; Colleoni, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic and predictive value of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cohort of the phase III IBCSG trial 22-00, comparing low-dose oral 'metronomic' cyclophosphamide-methotrexate maintenance chemotherapy (CM-maintenance) to no-CM-maintenance in early breast cancer. TILs were evaluated in full-face hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained sections of tumor samples confirmed centrally as TNBC (< 1 % of ER and PgR immunoreactivity and absence of HER2 overexpression or amplification). Mononuclear cells were evaluated in the stromal area within the borders of the invasive tumor. The primary endpoint was breast cancer-free interval (BCFI). Cox proportional hazards regression model assessed the association of BCFI and secondary endpoints with TILs score. In the 647 tumor samples, the median percentage of TILs was 18 % (IQR = 8-40 %), with 18 % having TILs ≥ 50 % (lymphocyte-predominant breast cancer, LPBC). At a median follow-up of 6.9 years, TILs were associated with better prognosis. For every 10 % increase of TILs, BCFI risk reduction was 13 % (HR 0.87, 95 % CI 0.79-0.95,P = 0.003). DFS, DRFI, and OS risk reductions were 11 % (P = 0.005), 16 % (P = 0.003), and 17 % (P < 0.001), respectively. Multivariable analysis confirmed the independent prognostic value of TILs. No significant TILs-by-treatment interaction was observed (P = 0.39) for associations of TILs with BCFI, although patients with LPBC receiving CM-maintenance had a greater breast cancer risk reduction (HR 0.64,95 % CI 0.23-1.78) than those with non-LPBC (TILs < 50 %) (HR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.67-1.40). TILs score is a potent prognostic factor in patients with TNBC. Low-dose chemotherapy confers a greater (not statistically significant) clinical benefit in patients with LPBC. PMID:27372069

  4. Impact of concomitant low-dose aspirin on the safety and tolerability of naproxen and esomeprazole magnesium delayed-release tablets in patients requiring chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy: an analysis from 5 Phase III studies.

    PubMed

    Angiolillo, Dominick J; Datto, Catherine; Raines, Shane; Yeomans, Neville D

    2014-07-01

    Patients receiving chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and concomitant low-dose aspirin (LDA) are at increased risk of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. A fixed-dose combination of enteric-coated (EC) naproxen and immediate-release esomeprazole magnesium (NAP/ESO) has been designed to deliver a proton-pump inhibitor followed by an NSAID in a single tablet. To examine safety data from 5 Phase III studies of NAP/ESO in LDA users (≤ 325 mg daily, administered at any time during the study), and LDA non-users, data were analyzed from 6-month studies assessing NAP/ESO versus EC naproxen in patients with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis (n = 2), 3-month studies assessing NAP/ESO vs celecoxib or placebo in patients with knee osteoarthritis (n = 2), and a 12-month, open-label, safety study of NAP/ESO (n = 1). In an analysis of two studies, incidences of endoscopically confirmed gastric ulcers (GUs) and duodenal ulcers (DUs) were summarized by LDA subgroups. In the pooled analysis from all five studies, incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) (including prespecified NSAID-associated upper GI AEs and cardiovascular AEs), serious AEs, and AE-related discontinuations were stratified by LDA subgroups. Overall, 2,317 patients received treatment; 1,157 patients received NAP/ESO and, of these, 298 received LDA. The cumulative incidence of GUs and DUs in the two studies with 6-month follow-up was lower for NAP/ESO vs EC naproxen in both LDA subgroups [GUs: 3.0 vs 27.9%, respectively, for LDA users, 6.4 vs 22.4%, respectively, for LDA non-users (both P < 0.001); DUs: 1.0 vs 5.8% for LDA users, 0.6 vs 5.3% for LDA non-users]. The incidence of erosive gastritis was lower in NAP/ESO- vs EC naproxen-treated patients for both LDA users [18.2 vs 36.5%, respectively (P = 0.004)] and LDA non-users [19.8 vs 38.5%, respectively (P < 0.001)]. Among LDA users, incidences of NSAID-associated upper GI AEs were: NAP/ESO, 16.1%; EC

  5. Trimebutine-induced phase III-like activity in infants with intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Boige, N; Cargill, G; Mashako, L; Cezard, J P; Navarro, J

    1987-01-01

    Duodenal manometric recordings were performed in five male children (mean age 11.7 +/- 6.8 months) suffering from severe digestive pathology with clinical findings of dysmotility; they required total parenteral nutrition: one case of enteropathy following intestinal resection for congenital small bowel atresia, and four cases of intestinal pseudoobstruction. The basal 3-h fasting recordings showed complete disorganization of interdigestive activity characterized by an absence of migrating motor complexes and a marked basal hypomotility with motor indices lower than in control subjects. Intravenous trimebutine (3 mg/kg) produced a phase III-like activity 88 +/- 121 s after administration in four cases. The activity lasted 236 +/- 105 s and had a mean frequency of 11.75 +/- 0.86 waves/min. It was propagated aborally in the two patients having two duodenal recording sites. Trimebutine-induced phase III activity was followed by signs of peristalsis in two patients. PMID:3430262

  6. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient’s biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker’s clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible. Methods and Findings We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design. Conclusions Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs. PMID:26910238

  7. Parenchymal mechanics, gas mixing, and the slope of phase III.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Theodore A

    2013-07-01

    A model of parenchymal mechanics is revisited with the objective of investigating the differences in parenchymal microstructure that underlie the differences in regional compliance that are inferred from gas-mixing studies. The stiffness of the elastic line elements that lie along the free edges of alveoli and form the boundary of the lumen of the alveolar duct is the dominant determinant of parenchymal compliance. Differences in alveolar size cause parallel shifts of the pressure-volume curve, but have little effect on compliance. However, alveolar size also affects the relation between surface tension and pressure during the breathing cycle. Thus regional differences in alveolar size generate regional differences in surface tension, and these drive Marangoni surface flows that equilibrate surface tension between neighboring acini. Surface tension relaxation introduces phase differences in regional volume oscillations and a dependence of expired gas concentration on expired volume. A particular example of different parenchymal properties in two neighboring acini is described, and gas exchange in this model is calculated. The efficiency of mixing and slope of phase III for the model agree well with published data. This model constitutes a new hypothesis concerning the origin of phase III. PMID:23599394

  8. Caring for class III obese patients.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Lea Anne

    2013-11-01

    The Pennsylvania Patient Safety Reporting System is a confidential, statewide Internet reporting system to which all Pennsylvania hospitals, outpatient-surgery facilities, and birthing centers, as well as some abortion facilities, must file information on medical errors.Safety Monitor is a column from Pennsylvania's Patient Safety Authority, the authority that informs nurses on issues that can affect patient safety and presents strategies they can easily integrate into practice. For more information on the authority, visit www.patientsafetyauthority.org. For the original article discussed in this column or for other articles on patient safety, click on "Patient Safety Advisories" and then "Advisory Library" in the left-hand navigation menu. PMID:24149276

  9. A randomized controlled Phase III trial comparing 2-weekly docetaxel combined with cisplatin plus fluorouracil (2-weekly DCF) with cisplatin plus fluorouracil (CF) in patients with metastatic or recurrent esophageal cancer: rationale, design and methods of Japan Clinical Oncology Group study JCOG1314 (MIRACLE study).

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Kozo; Tsushima, Takahiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Hironaka, Shuichi; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Kii, Takayuki; Shibuya, Yuichi; Chin, Keisho; Katayama, Hiroshi; Kato, Ken; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-05-01

    Chemotherapy with cisplatin plus fluorouracil is the current standard treatment for metastatic or recurrent esophageal cancer. We have developed a 2-weekly docetaxel combined with CF regimen and conducted a Phase I/II trial for metastatic or recurrent esophageal cancer (JCOG0807). Promising efficacy and safety were shown in JCOG0807, and we have commenced a Phase III trial in September 2014 to confirm the superiority of 2-weekly DCF to CF for patients with metastatic or recurrent esophageal cancer. A total of 240 patients will be accrued from 41 Japanese institutions over a period of 4 years. The primary end point is overall survival. The secondary end points are progression-free survival, response rate and proportion of adverse events. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000015107 (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm). PMID:25646357

  10. Rationale and design of the allogeneiC human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) in patients with aging fRAilTy via intravenoUS delivery (CRATUS) study: A phase I/II, randomized, blinded and placebo controlled trial to evaluate the safety and potential efficacy of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cell infusion in patients with aging frailty

    PubMed Central

    Golpanian, Samuel; DiFede, Darcy L.; Pujol, Marietsy V.; Lowery, Maureen H.; Levis-Dusseau, Silvina; Goldstein, Bradley J.; Schulman, Ivonne H.; Longsomboon, Bangon; Wolf, Ariel; Khan, Aisha; Heldman, Alan W.; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    Frailty is a syndrome associated with reduced physiological reserves that increases an individual's vulnerability for developing increased morbidity and/or mortality. While most clinical trials have focused on exercise, nutrition, pharmacologic agents, or a multifactorial approach for the prevention and attenuation of frailty, none have studied the use of cell-based therapies. We hypothesize that the application of allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (allo-hMSCs) as a therapeutic agent for individuals with frailty is safe and efficacious. The CRATUS trial comprises an initial non-blinded phase I study, followed by a blinded, randomized phase I/II study (with an optional follow-up phase) that will address the safety and pre-specified beneficial effects in patients with the aging frailty syndrome. In the initial phase I protocol, allo-hMSCs will be administered in escalating doses via peripheral intravenous infusion (n=15) to patients allocated to three treatment groups: Group 1 (n=5, 20 million allo-hMSCs), Group 2 (n=5, 100 million allo-hMSCs), and Group 3 (n=5, 200 million allo-hMSCs). Subsequently, in the randomized phase, allo-hMSCs or matched placebo will be administered to patients (n=30) randomly allocated in a 1:1:1 ratio to one of two doses of MSCs versus placebo: Group A (n=10, 100 million allo-hMSCs), Group B (n=10, 200 million allo-hMSCs), and Group C (n=10, placebo). Primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCs administered in frail older individuals. This study will determine the safety of intravenous infusion of stem cells and compare phenotypic outcomes in patients with aging frailty. PMID:26933813

  11. Novel approaches to incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies into phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fillit, H; Cummings, J; Neumann, P; McLaughlin, T; Salavtore, P; Leibman, C

    2010-10-01

    The societal and individual costs of Alzheimer's disease are significant, worldwide. As the world ages, these costs are increasing rapidly, while health systems face finite budgets. As a result, many regulators and payers will require or at least consider phase III cost-effectiveness data (in addition to safety and efficacy data) for drug approval and reimbursement, increasing the risks and costs of drug development. Incorporating pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease presents a number of challenges. We propose several specific suggestions to improve the design of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials. We propose that acute episodes of care are key outcome measures for pharmacoeconomic studies. To improve the possibility of detecting a pharmacoeconomic impact in phase III, we suggest several strategies including; study designs for enrichment of pharmacoeconomic outcomes that include co-morbidity of patients; reducing variability of care that can affect pharmacoeconomic outcomes through standardized care management; employing administrative claims data to better capture meaningful pharmacoeconomic data; and extending clinical trials in open label follow-up periods in which pharmacoeconomic data are captured electronically by administrative claims. Specific aspects of power analysis for pharmacoeconomic studies are presented. The particular pharmacoeconomic challenges caused by the use of biomarkers in clinical trials, the increasing use of multinational studies, and the pharmacoeconomic challenges presented by biologicals in development for Alzheimer's disease are discussed. In summary, since we are entering an era in which pharmacoeconomic studies will be essential in drug development for supporting regulatory approval, payor reimbursement and integration of new therapies into clinical care, we must consider the design and incorporation of pharmacoeconomic studies in phase III clinical trials more seriously

  12. High pressure phase transition in group III nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Verma, S.; Kaurav, Netram; Choudhary, K. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP), the pressure induced structural phase transformation from ZnS-type (B3) to NaCl-type (B1) structure in group III Post-Transition Metal Nitrides [TMN; TM=Ga and Tl] were investigated. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  13. Shock and Recovery of Polytetrafluoroethylene Above and Below the Phase II to Phase III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Gray, George T.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2006-07-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is a semi-crystalline polymer exhibiting complicated pressure and temperature dependent phases. High strain rate applications in aerospace, defense, and automotive industries have lead to interest in the shock response of PTFE and resulting changes in the polymer structure. Experimental studies on pressure-induced phase transitions using shock-loading techniques and the resulting changes in crystalline structure are presented. Gas launcher experiments were performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C momentum trapped assemblies with impact pressures from 0.4 to 0.85 GPa to investigate the material response above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. [LAUR-05-5945

  14. Water ice phases II, III, and V - Plastic deformation and phase relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, W. B.; Boro, C. O.; Kirby, S. H.; Stern, L. A.; Heard, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The ordinary water phase I was transformed to the ice phases that are known to exist in the interiors of large ice moons, such as Ganymede and Callisto for the purpose of investigating plastic deformation behavior of these ices. Ices II, III, and V were prepared using an apparatus and techniques similar to those described by Durham et al. (1983) and subsequently deformed in a gas deformation apparatus, and their deformation data were obtained. It was found that ice II was the strongest of the high-pressure phases, with a strength that was comparable to that of ice I; ice III was very weak, with the flow rate 100 to 1000 times higher than that of ice II at the same levels of stress. It was also found that ices III and V can exist metastably within the ice II field and that they may be deformed plastically within much of the metastable region without reverting to ice II. It is suggested that the weakness of the ice III phase may have profoundly influenced the evolution and the present-day behavior of the icy moons.

  15. Impact of efalizumab on patient-reported outcomes in high-need psoriasis patients: results of the international, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III Clinical Experience Acquired with Raptiva (CLEAR) trial [NCT00256139

    PubMed Central

    Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Shear, Neil; Shumack, Stephen; Henninger, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic psoriasis can negatively affect patients' lives. Assessing the impact of treatment on different aspects of a patient's health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is therefore important and relevant in trials of anti-psoriasis agents. The recombinant humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody efalizumab targets multiple T-cell-dependent steps in the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. Efalizumab has demonstrated safety and efficacy in several clinical trials, and improves patients' quality of life. Objective: To evaluate the impact of efalizumab on HRQOL and other patient-reported outcomes in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, including a large cohort of High-Need patients for whom at least 2 other systemic therapies were unsuitable because of lack of efficacy, intolerance, or contraindication. Methods A total of 793 patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive efalizumab 1 mg/kg/wk (n = 529) or placebo (n = 264) for 12 weeks. The study population included 526 High-Need patients (342 efalizumab, 184 placebo). The treatment was evaluated by patients using the HRQOL assessment tools Short Form-36 (SF-36) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Other patient-reported assessments included the Psoriasis Symptom Assessment (PSA), a visual analog scale (VAS) for itching, and the Patient's Global Psoriasis Assessment (PGPA). Results Efalizumab was associated with improvements at Week 12 from baseline in patient-reported outcomes, both in the total study population and in the High-Need cohort. Among all efalizumab-treated patients, the DLQI improved by 5.7 points from baseline to Week 12, relative to an improvement of 2.3 points for placebo patients (P < .001). Corresponding improvements in DLQI in the High-Need cohort were 5.4 points for efalizumab compared to 2.3 for placebo (P < .001). Improvements from baseline on the SF-36, PSA, PGPA, and itching VAS at Week 12 were also significantly greater in efalizumab-treated patients than for placebo

  16. Effect of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy for Sacral Chordoma: Results of Phase I-II and Phase II Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Reiko; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Shinji; Serizawa, Itsuko; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Tatezaki, Shin-ichiro

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To summarize the results of treatment for sacral chordoma in Phase I-II and Phase II carbon ion radiotherapy trials for bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. Patients and Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of 38 patients with medically unresectable sacral chordomas treated with the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan between 1996 and 2003. Of the 38 patients, 30 had not received previous treatment and 8 had locally recurrent tumor after previous resection. The applied carbon ion dose was 52.8-73.6 Gray equivalents (median, 70.4) in a total of 16 fixed fractions within 4 weeks. Results: The median patient age was 66 years. The cranial tumor extension was S2 or greater in 31 patients. The median clinical target volume was 523 cm{sup 3}. The median follow-up period was 80 months. The 5-year overall survival rate was 86%, and the 5-year local control rate was 89%. After treatment, 27 of 30 patients with primary tumor remained ambulatory with or without supportive devices. Two patients experienced severe skin or soft-tissue complications requiring skin grafts. Conclusion: Carbon ion radiotherapy appears effective and safe in the treatment of patients with sacral chordoma and offers a promising alternative to surgery.

  17. Reactor physics studies in the GCFR Phase III critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Morman, J A

    1980-03-01

    The third phase of the gas cooled fast reactor (GCFR) program, ZPR-9 Assembly 30, is based on a multi-zoned core of PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ with radial and axial blankets of UO/sub 2/. Studies performed in this assembly will be compared to the previous phases of the GCFR program and will help to define parameters in this power-flattened demonstration plant-type core. Measurements in the Phase III program included small sample reactivity worths of various materials, central reaction rates and reaction rate distributions, absorption-to-fission ratios and the central point conversion ratio and the worth of steam entry into a small central zone. The reactivity change associated with the construction of a central pin zone in the core and axial blanket was measured. Reaction rate and steam entry measurements were repeated in the pin environment. Standard analysis methods using ENDF/B-IV data are described and the results are compared to measurements performed during the program.

  18. FAIRY: a randomized controlled patient-blind phase III study to compare the efficacy and safety of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject®) to placebo in patients with acute isovolemic anemia after gastrectomy - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Isovolemic anemia (decrease in hemoglobin concentration with normal or even increased blood volume) after gastric cancer surgery may negatively influence short- and long-term outcomes. Therefore correction of isovolemic postoperative anemia is supposed to be beneficial. This prospective randomized placebo-controlled multicenter trial is designed to evaluate the efficacy of ferric carboxymaltose administration with the primary end point of successful hemoglobin level increase by 2 g/dl at 12 weeks after randomization. Methods and design Gastric cancer patients after oncologic resection and postoperative hemoglobin level ≥ 7 g/dl to <10 g/dl at postoperative days 5 to 7 will be eligible for trial inclusion. After randomization, 450 patients (225 per group) are going to be subjected either to administration of ferric carboxymaltose (treatment group) or normal (0.9%) saline (placebo group). Patients will be blinded to the intervention. Patients will undergo evaluation for hemoglobin level, hematology and quality of life assessment 3 and 12 weeks after randomization. Discussion Correction of isovolemic postoperative anemia in gastric cancer patients after oncologic resection is considered to be beneficial. Administration of ferric carboxymaltose is considered to be superior to placebo for anemia correction without the possible risks of red blood cell transfusion. Further, improved quality of life for patients with quick recovery of hemoglobin levels is expected. Trial registration NCT01725789 (international: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov) and NCCCTS-12-644 (NCC, Korea). PMID:24708660

  19. Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies: Phase III--Center-Taxiway Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Phase III of the Los Angeles International Airport Runway Incursion Studies was conducted, under an agreement with HNTB Corporation, at the NASA Ames FutureFlight Central (FFC) facility in June 2003. The objective of the study was the evaluation of a new center-taxiway concept at LAX. This study is an extension of the Phase I and Phase II studies previously conducted at FFC. This report presents results from Phase III of the study, in which a center-taxiway concept between runways 25L and 25R was simulated and evaluated. Phase III data were compared objectively against the Baseline data. Subjective evaluations by participating LAX controllers were obtained with regard to workload, efficiency, and safety criteria. To facilitate a valid comparison between Baseline and Phase III data, the same scenarios were used for Phase III that were tested during Phases I and II. This required briefing participating controllers on differences in airport and airline operations between 2001 and today.

  20. Clofarabine in combination with a standard remission induction regimen (cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin) in patients with previously untreated intermediate and bad-risk acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (HR-MDS): phase I results of an ongoing phase I/II study of the leukemia groups of EORTC and GIMEMA (EORTC GIMEMA 06061/AML-14A trial).

    PubMed

    Willemze, R; Suciu, S; Muus, P; Halkes, C J M; Meloni, G; Meert, L; Karrasch, M; Rapion, J; Vignetti, M; Amadori, S; de Witte, T; Marie, J P

    2014-06-01

    This study aims to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of clofarabine combined with the EORTC-GIMEMA 3 + 10 induction regimen (idarubicin + cytosine arabinoside) in adults with untreated acute myelogenous leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. In this phase I trial, 25 patients (median age 56 years) received 5 days of clofarabine as 1-h infusion (arm A) or push injection (arm B) at the dose level of 5 × 10 or 5 × 15 mg/m(2)/day in an algorithmic dose escalation 3 + 3 design. A consolidation course (intermediate dose cytosine arabinoside, idarubicin) was planned for patients in complete remission (CR). Primary endpoint was safety and tolerance as measured by dose limiting toxicity (DLT); secondary endpoints were response rate, other grade III/IV toxicities, and hematological recovery after induction and consolidation. Five DLTs were observed (in arm A: one DLT at 10 mg/m(2)/day, three at 15 mg/m(2)/day; in arm B: one DLT at 15 mg/m(2)/day). Three patients receiving 15 mg/m(2)/day were withdrawn due to adverse events not classified as DLT. Prolonged hypoplasia was observed in five patients. CR + complete remission with incomplete recovery were achieved in 21 patients (11/12 (92 %) receiving clofarabine 10 mg/m(2)/day; 10/13 (77 %) receiving clofarabine 15 mg/m(2)/day). Clofarabine, 5 × 10 mg/m(2)/day, resulted in one DLT and no early treatment withdrawals. MTD of clofarabine combined with cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin is 5 × 10 mg/m(2)/day. PMID:24682421

  1. Novel Agents for Multiple Myeloma to Overcome Resistance in Phase III Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Orlowski, Robert Z.

    2013-01-01

    The incorporation of novel agents such as bortezomib and lenalidomide into initial therapy for multiple myeloma has improved the response rate of induction regimens. Also, these drugs are being increasingly used in the peri-transplant setting for transplant-eligible patients, and as part of consolidation and/or maintenance after front-line treatment, including in transplant-ineligible patients. Together, these and other strategies have contributed to a prolongation of progression-free and overall survival in myeloma patients, and an increasing proportion are able to sustain a remission for many years. Despite these improvements, however, the vast majority of patients continue to suffer relapses, which suggests a prominent role for either primary, innate drug resistance, or secondary, acquired drug resistance. As a result, there remains a strong need to develop new proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory agents, as well as new drug classes, which would be effective in the relapsed and/or refractory setting, and overcome drug resistance. This review will focus on novel drugs that have reached phase III trials, including carfilzomib and pomalidomide, which have recently garnered regulatory approvals. In addition, agents that are in phase II or III, potentially registration-enabling trials will be described as well, to provide an overview of the possible landscape in the relapsed and/or refractory arena over the next five years. PMID:24135408

  2. A Phase I/II Study of Cyclophosphamide and Topotecan in Patients with High-Risk Malignancies Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The St. Jude Long-term Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kasow, Kimberly A.; Stewart, Clinton F.; Barfield, Raymond C.; Wright, Nancy L.; Li, Chenghong; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Leung, Wing; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Bowman, Laura C.; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hale, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Fifty-eight consecutive children with high-risk malignancies were treated with cyclophosphamide and targeted topotecan followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) in a phase I/II IRB-approved study. Twelve participants enrolled in phase I; 5 received dose level 1 of topotecan 3mg/m2/day with subsequent doses targeted to total systemic exposure of 100 ± 20 ng°hr/ml and cyclophosphamide 750mg/m2/day. Seven participants received dose level 2. Cyclophosphamide dose escalation to 1g/m2/day was considered excessively toxic; 1 died from irreversible veno-occlusive disease and 2 experienced reversible hepatotoxicity. These adverse events halted further dose escalation. Forty-six participants were enrolled in phase II; results are on the 51 participants who received therapy at dose level 1, the maximum tolerated dose. Diagnoses included neuroblastoma (26), sarcoma (9), lymphoma (8), brain tumors (5), Wilms (2) and retinoblastoma (1). Twenty participants (39.3%) were in ≥ CR1 at enrollment; median age was 5.1 years. Most common non-hematologic grade 3/4 toxicity was gastrointestinal (n=37). Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred at a median of 15 and 24 days, respectively. Twenty-six (51%) remain alive at a median of 6.4 years after AHCT. Cyclophosphamide 3.75g/m2 and targeted topotecan followed by AHCT is feasible and produces acceptable toxicity in children with high-risk malignancies. PMID:22426752

  3. Phase III ResonantSonic{reg_sign} report

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, D.R.; Last, G.V.; Friley, J.R.; Strope, L.A.; Johnston, B.V.

    1996-09-01

    The ResonantSonic drilling system was tested at the hanford Site in the fiscal year 1991-1992 under the auspices of the Drilling Technology Development Program and the Environmental Restoration Program. The purpose of that program was to develop, test, and demonstrate drilling methods that are environmentally acceptable, safe, efficient, and cost effective when drilling and sampling in hazardous and radioactive waste sites. The cable-tool method has historically been the primary drilling method employed for characterization and remediation projects at the Hanford site. The cable-tool method can be used reliably in a wide variety of geologic conditions and yields continuous, relatively intact core samples. however, the disadvantages of this method are that the penetration rates are slow relative to most other drilling techniques. This report represents the completion of the ResonantSonic drilling program test activities. A brief description of the ResonantSonic drilling program is given. Phases I and II activities are also presented. Phase III activities are outlined. The conclusions drawn from the results and recommendations for further work to improve the drilling technology are discussed.

  4. Alloy Phase Diagrams for III-P Semiconductor Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennett, Adam

    Bulk crystals of III-V ternary and quaternary semiconductors with tunable band gaps and lattice constants are attractive for numerous electronic and optoelectronic applications. In particular, the ternary GaxIn 1-xP has a band gap range of 1.351 - 2.261 eV, which corresponds to wavelengths in the near infrared to green range of the electromagnetic spectrum, and lattice constant ranging of 5.4512 - 5.8688 A. This makes it attractive for applications such as a high energy junction in multi-junction photovoltaics, terahetrtz emission, and as a substrate for yellow, amber, orange, and red AlGaInP LEDs. However, bulk growth of GaxIn1-xP ternary III-V semiconductor crystals using elemental Ga-In-P melts or pseudo-binary GaP-InP melts is significantly challenging due to the high vapor pressure of phosphorus at the typical growth temperatures, the large variation in the lattice constant of the constituent binaries, and the slow growth rates necessary in order to avoid the formation of cracks, dislocations, and multiphase inhomogeneities. Lowering the growth temperature is desirable such that the vapor pressure of phosphorus can be more easily managed. Low growth temperatures can be achieved by using gallium or indium rich solutions, as is currently used for liquid phase epitaxy. However, this approach is less attractive for growing bulk crystals due to numerous experimental difficulties such as high segregation of gallium in indium as well as sticking of the growth solution to the crucible wall and to the grown crystal, making crystal extraction without causing damage challenging. The objective of this research is to establish the conditions required for the growth of uniform composition bulk crystals of GaxIn 1-xP at any desired composition from a stoichiometric GaxIn 1-xPySb1-y quaternary melt, as well as conditions for compositional grading from a binary III-V material seed. Due to large number of conditions of melt composition and temperature that are possible, trial

  5. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  6. Lipolytic and metabolic response to glucagon in fasting king penguins: phase II vs. phase III.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Servane F; Thil, Marie-Anne; Groscolas, Rene

    2003-02-01

    This study aims to determine how glucagon intervenes in the regulation of fuel metabolism, especially lipolysis, at two stages of a spontaneous long-term fast characterized by marked differences in lipid and protein availability and/or utilization (phases II and III). Changes in the plasma concentration of various metabolites and hormones, and in lipolytic fluxes as determined by continuous infusion of [2-3H]glycerol and [1-14C]palmitate, were examined in vivo in a subantarctic bird (king penguin) before, during, and after a 2-h glucagon infusion. In the two fasting phases, glucagon infusion at a rate of 0.025 microg. kg(-1). min(-1) induced a three- to fourfold increase in the plasma concentration and in the rate of appearance (Ra) of glycerol and nonesterified fatty acids, the percentage of primary reesterification remaining unchanged. Infusion of glucagon also resulted in a progressive elevation of the plasma concentration of glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate and in a twofold higher insulinemia. These changes were not significantly different between the two phases. The plasma concentrations of triacylglycerols and uric acid were unaffected by glucagon infusion, except for a 40% increase in plasma uric acid in phase II birds. Altogether, these results indicate that glucagon in a long-term fasting bird is highly lipolytic, hyperglycemic, ketogenic, and insulinogenic, these effects, however, being similar in phases II and III. The maintenance of the sensitivity of adipose tissue lipolysis to glucagon could suggest that the major role of the increase in basal glucagonemia observed in phase III is to stimulate gluconeogenesis rather than fatty acid delivery. PMID:12388477

  7. Doxepin Rinse Versus Placebo in the Treatment of Acute Oral Mucositis Pain in Patients Receiving Head and Neck Radiotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy: A Phase III, Randomized, Double-Blind Trial (NCCTG-N09C6 [Alliance])

    PubMed Central

    Leenstra, James L.; Miller, Robert C.; Qin, Rui; Martenson, James A.; Dornfeld, Kenneth J.; Bearden, James D.; Puri, Dev R.; Stella, Philip J.; Mazurczak, Miroslaw A.; Klish, Marie D.; Novotny, Paul J.; Foote, Robert L.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Painful oral mucositis (OM) is a significant toxicity during radiotherapy for head and neck cancers. The aim of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was to test the efficacy of doxepin hydrochloride in the reduction of radiotherapy-induced OM pain. Patients and Methods In all, 155 patients were randomly allocated to a doxepin oral rinse or a placebo for the treatment of radiotherapy-related OM pain. Patients received a single dose of doxepin or placebo on day 1 and then crossed over to receive the opposite agent on a subsequent day. Pain questionnaires were administered at baseline and at 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 minutes. Patients were then given the option to continue doxepin. The primary end point was pain reduction as measured by the area under the curve (AUC) of the pain scale using data from day 1. Results Primary end point analysis revealed that the AUC for mouth and throat pain reduction was greater for doxepin (−9.1) than for placebo (−4.7; P < .001). Crossover analysis of patients completing both phases confirmed that patients experienced greater mouth and throat pain reduction with doxepin (intrapatient changes of 4.1 for doxepin-placebo arm and −2.8 for placebo-doxepin arm; P < .001). Doxepin was associated with more stinging or burning, unpleasant taste, and greater drowsiness than the placebo rinse. More patients receiving doxepin expressed a desire to continue treatment than did patients with placebo after completion of each of the randomized phases of the study. Conclusion A doxepin rinse diminishes OM pain. Further studies are warranted to determine its role in the management of OM. PMID:24733799

  8. Shock and Recovery of Polytetrafluoroethylene Above and Below the Phase II To Phase III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2005-07-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is semi-crystalline in nature with its linear chains forming complicated temperature and pressure dependent phases. Due to its desirable mechanical properties applications of PTFE include structures designed for dynamic largescale plasticity excursions. Experimental studies on pressure-induced phase transitions using shock-loading techniques and the resulting changes in crystalline structure are presented. Disks of pedigreed PTFE 7C have been shock loaded in momentum trapped assemblies using a 80 mm gas launcher. Challenges in momentum trapping and soft recovery arising from the low yield stress of PTFE (9 MPa at room temperature) are discussed. Experiments were performed with impact pressures from 0.4 to 0.85 GPa to investigate the material response above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Changes in crystalline structure of the recovered materials were quantified using dynamic scanning calorimetry (DSC) and density.

  9. Simulations using a drug-disease modeling framework and phase II data predict phase III survival outcome in first-line non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Claret, L; Lu, J-F; Bruno, R; Hsu, C-P; Hei, Y-J; Sun, Y-N

    2012-11-01

    Simulations were performed for carboplatin/paclitaxel (C/P) plus motesanib or bevacizumab vs. C/P as first-line treatment for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a published drug-disease model. With 700 patients in each arm, simulated hazard ratios for motesanib (0.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71-1.1) and bevacizumab (0.89; 95% CI, 0.73-1.1) agreed with results from the respective phase III studies but did not discriminate between failed and successful studies. The current model may require further enhancement to improve its utility for predicting phase III outcomes. PMID:22910440

  10. GLASS COMPOSITIONS FOR THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-06-29

    A series of 29 test glass compositions were selected for Phase III of the nepheline study using a combination of two approaches. The first approach was based on evaluating the glass composition region allowable by all of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models with the exception of the current nepheline discriminator. This approach was taken to determine whether there are glass compositions that, while predicted to crystallize nepheline upon slow cooling, would otherwise be acceptable for processing in the DWPF. The second approach was based on quasicrystalline theory of glass structure, which helped predict compositional regions where nepheline should form. A detailed description of this methodology is forthcoming. The selection strategy outlined here will provide an opportunity to determine experimentally whether the glasses that fail the current nepheline discriminator but pass the newly proposed nepheline discriminator are indeed free of nepheline after slow cooling. If this is the case, these data will serve as a significant step toward reducing conservatism in the current nepheline discriminator. The 29 glass compositions selected for testing address both the PCCS model and quasicrystalline theory approaches in evaluating both a reduction in conservatism for the current nepheline discriminator and possible implementation of the newly proposed discriminator based on glass structural theory. These glasses will be fabricated and characterized in the laboratory, with the results and conclusions described in a technical report.

  11. Evaluate fundamental approaches to longwall dust control. Phase III report

    SciTech Connect

    Babbitt, C.; Bartlett, P.; Kelly, J.; Ludlow, J.; Mangolds, A.; Rajan, S.; Ruggieri, S.; Varga, E.

    1984-03-31

    The overall objective of the contract is to evaluate the effectiveness of available dust control technology for double-drum shearer longwall sections in a coordinated, systematic program at a few longwall test sections and to make the results available to the entire coal mining industry. This program is investigating nine different dust control techniques. These nine subprograms encompass a broad range of dust control measures ranging from administrative controls to new hardware. They span not only presently employed methods but also those recently adopted in the United States and those proposed for the future. This report documents the Phase III effort on each of the subprograms. For clarity, the report is divided in sections by subprogram as follows: Section 2, Subprogram A - passive barriers/spray air movers for dust control; Section 3, Subprogram B - practical aspects of deep cutting; Section 4, Subprogram C - stage loader dust control; Section 5, Subprogram D - longwall automation technology; Section 6, Subprogram E - longwall application of ventilation curtains; Section 7, Subprogram F - reversed drum rotation; Section 8, Subprogram G - reduction of shield generated dust; Section 9, Subprogram H - air canopies for longwalls; and Section 10, Subprogram I - mining practices. 43 figures, 11 tables.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-11-09

    This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in

  13. 77 FR 40936 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III ACTION: Notice of request for public comments. SUMMARY: The Department of State is seeking Office of Management and Budget...: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request: Reinstatement of...

  14. Dynamic observation of phase transformation behaviors in indium(III) selenide nanowire based phase change memory.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Chun-Wei; Chen, Jui-Yuan; Ting, Yi-Hsin; Lu, Kuo-Chang; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Wen-Wei

    2014-09-23

    Phase change random access memory (PCRAM) has been extensively investigated for its potential applications in next-generation nonvolatile memory. In this study, indium(III) selenide (In2Se3) was selected due to its high resistivity ratio and lower programming current. Au/In2Se3-nanowire/Au phase change memory devices were fabricated and measured systematically in an in situ transmission electron microscope to perform a RESET/SET process under pulsed and dc voltage swept mode, respectively. During the switching, we observed the dynamic evolution of the phase transformation process. The switching behavior resulted from crystalline/amorphous change and revealed that a long pulse width would induce the amorphous or polycrystalline state by different pulse amplitudes, supporting the improvement of the writing speed, retention, and endurance of PCRAM. PMID:25133955

  15. Hepatocellular carcinoma: reasons for phase III failure and novel perspectives on trial design.

    PubMed

    Llovet, Josep M; Hernandez-Gea, Virginia

    2014-04-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major health problem. Most patients with HCC experience a recurrence after resection/ablation or are diagnosed at advanced stages. Sorafenib remains the only approved systemic drug for these patients. Molecular therapies targeting signaling cascades involved in hepatocarcinogenesis have been explored in phase III clinical trials. However, none of the drugs tested have shown positive results in the first-line (brivanib, sunitinib, erlotinib, and linifanib) or second-line (brivanib, everolimus) setting after sorafenib progression. Reasons for failure are heterogeneous and include lack of understanding of critical drivers of tumor progression/dissemination, liver toxicity, flaws in trial design, or marginal antitumoral potency. These trials are also challenging time to progression as a surrogate endpoint of survival. Trials ongoing testing drugs head-to-head versus sorafenib in "all comers" might have difficulties in achieving superior results in the first line. Novel trials are also designed testing drugs in biomarker-based subpopulations of patients with HCC. Most common mutations, however, are undruggable, such as p53 and CTNNB1. Two types of studies are proposed: (i) phase II pivotal proof-of-concept studies testing drugs blocking potential oncogenic addiction loops, such as the one testing MEK inhibitors in RAS(+) patients or amplification of FGF19 as a target; and (ii) phase II to III studies using biomarker-based trial enrichment for defining HCC subpopulations, such as the case of enriching for MET-positive tumors. These strategies have been deemed successful in breast, melanoma, and lung cancers, and are expected to change the landscape of trial design of HCC. PMID:24589894

  16. Embracing failure: What the Phase III progesterone studies can teach about TBI clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite positive preclinical studies and two positive Phase II clinical trials, two large Phase III clinical trials of progesterone treatment of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) recently ended with negative results, so a 100% failure rate continues to plague the field of TBI trials. Methods: This paper reviews and analyses the trial structures and outcomes and discusses the implications of these failures for future drug and clinical trial development. Persistently negative trial outcomes have led to disinvestment in new drug research by companies and policy-makers and disappointment for patients and their families, failures which represent a major public health concern. The problem is not limited to TBI. Failure rates are high for trials in stroke, sepsis, cardiology, cancer and orthopaedics, among others. Results: This paper discusses some of the reasons why the Phase III trials have failed. These reasons may include faulty extrapolation from pre-clinical data in designing clinical trials and the use of subjective outcome measures that accurately reflect neither the nature of the deficits nor long-term quantitative recovery. Conclusions: Better definitions of injury and healing and better outcome measures are essential to change the embrace of failure that has dominated the field for over 30 years. This review offers suggestions to improve the situation. PMID:26274493

  17. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  18. Phase I/II trial of 2-weekly docetaxel combined with cisplatin plus fluorouracil in metastatic esophageal cancer (JCOG0807).

    PubMed

    Hironaka, Shuichi; Tsubosa, Yasuhiro; Mizusawa, Junki; Kii, Takayuki; Kato, Ken; Tsushima, Takahiro; Chin, Keisho; Tomori, Akihisa; Okuno, Tatsuya; Taniki, Toshikatsu; Ura, Takashi; Matsushita, Hisayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Doki, Yuichiro; Kusaba, Hitoshi; Fujitani, Kazumasa; Taira, Koichi; Seki, Shiko; Nakamura, Tsutomu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-09-01

    We carried out a phase I/II trial of adding 2-weekly docetaxel to cisplatin plus fluorouracil (CF) therapy (2-weekly DCF regimen) in esophageal cancer patients to investigate its safety and antimetastatic activity. Patients received 2-weekly docetaxel (30 mg/m(2) [dose level (DL)1] or 40 mg/m(2) [DL2] with a 3 + 3 design in phase I, on days 1 and 15) in combination with fixed-dose CF (80 mg/m(2) cisplatin, day 1; 800 mg/m(2) fluorouracil, days 1-5) repeated every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint was dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) in phase I and central peer review-based response rate in phase II. At least 22 responders among 50 patients were required to satisfy the primary endpoint with a threshold of 35%. Sixty-two patients were enrolled in phase I and II. In phase I, 10 patients were enrolled with DLT of 0/3 at DL1 and 2/7 in DL2. Considering DLT and treatment compliance, the recommended phase II dose was determined as DL1. In phase II, the response rate was 62% (P < 0.0001; 95% confidence interval, 48-75%); median overall survival and progression-free survival were 11.1 and 5.8 months, respectively. Common grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (25%), anemia (36%), hyponatremia (29%), anorexia (24%), and nausea (11%). No febrile neutropenia was observed. Pneumonitis caused treatment-related death in one patient. The 2-weekly DCF regimen showed promising antimetastatic activity and tolerability. A phase III study comparing this regimen with CF therapy is planned by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group. This study was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000001737. PMID:25041052

  19. Preliminary results of a phase I/II study of sodium pentosanpolysulfate in the treatment of chronic radiation-induced proctitis

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Pilepich, M.V.; Parsons, C.L. )

    1990-02-01

    This is a report of a phase I/II study of 13 patients treated with sodium pentosanpolysulfate (PPS) for chronic radiation-induced proctitis. A complete response was obtained in 82%, a partial response occurred in 9%, and 9% failed to respond to therapy. No significant toxicity was observed. It is concluded that PPS is an effective treatment for chronic radiation-induced proctitis and a phase III randomized, double-blind study of PPS versus placebo is planned.

  20. A randomized phase III trial comparing S-1 versus UFT as adjuvant chemotherapy for stage II/III rectal cancer (JFMC35-C1: ACTS-RC)

    PubMed Central

    Oki, E.; Murata, A.; Yoshida, K.; Maeda, K.; Ikejiri, K.; Munemoto, Y.; Sasaki, K.; Matsuda, C.; Kotake, M.; Suenaga, T.; Matsuda, H.; Emi, Y.; Kakeji, Y.; Baba, H.; Hamada, C.; Saji, S.; Maehara, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds Preventing distant recurrence and achieving local control are important challenges in rectal cancer treatment, and use of adjuvant chemotherapy has been studied. However, no phase III study comparing adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for rectal cancer has demonstrated superiority of a specific regimen. We therefore conducted a phase III study to evaluate the superiority of S-1 to tegafur–uracil (UFT), a standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for curatively resected stage II/III rectal cancer in Japan, in the adjuvant setting for rectal cancer. Patients and methods The ACTS-RC trial was an open-label, randomized, phase III superiority trial conducted at 222 sites in Japan. Patients aged 20–80 with stage II/III rectal cancer undergoing curative surgery without preoperative therapy were randomly assigned to receive UFT (500–600 mg/day on days 1–5, followed by 2 days rest) or S-1 (80–120 mg/day on days 1–28, followed by 14 days rest) for 1 year. The primary end point was relapse-free survival (RFS), and the secondary end points were overall survival and adverse events. Results In total, 961 patients were enrolled from April 2006 to March 2009. The primary analysis was conducted in 480 assigned to receive UFT and 479 assigned to receive S-1. Five-year RFS was 61.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 57.1% to 65.9%] for UFT and 66.4% (95% CI 61.9% to 70.5%) for S-1 [P = 0.0165, hazard ratio (HR): 0.77, 95% CI 0.63–0.96]. Five-year survival was 80.2% (95% CI 76.3% to 83.5%) for UFT and 82.0% (95% CI 78.3% to 85.2%) for S-1. The main grade 3 or higher adverse events were increased alanine aminotransferase and diarrhea (each 2.3%) in the UFT arm and anorexia, diarrhea (each 2.6%), and fatigue (2.1%) in the S-1 arm. Conclusion One-year S-1 treatment is superior to UFT with respect to RFS and has therefore become a standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimen for stage II/III rectal cancer following curative resection. PMID:27056996

  1. A Phase III Trial Comparing Two Dose-dense, Dose-intensified Approaches (ETC and PM(Cb)) for Neoadjuvant Treatment of Patients With High-risk Early Breast Cancer (GeparOcto)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-14

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; HER2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  2. Rationale and design of the Percutaneous Stem Cell Injection Delivery Effects on Neomyogenesis in Dilated Cardiomyopathy (the POSEIDON-DCM study): a phase I/II, randomized pilot study of the comparative safety and efficacy of transendocardial injection of autologous mesenchymal stem cell vs. allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in patients with non-ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Muzammil; DiFede, Darcy L; Golpanian, Samuel; Khan, Aisha; Gomes, Samirah A; Mendizabal, Adam; Heldman, Alan W; Hare, Joshua M

    2014-12-01

    While accumulating clinical trials have focused on the impact of cell therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic cardiomyopathy, there are fewer efforts to examine cell-based therapy in patients with non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM). We hypothesized that cell therapy could have a similar impact in NICM. The POSEIDON-DCM trial is a phase I/II trial designed to address autologous vs. allogeneic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in patients with NICM. In this study, cells will be administered transendocardially with the NOGA injection-catheter system to patients (n = 36) randomly allocated to two treatment groups: group 1 (n = 18 auto-human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC)) and group 2 (n = 18 allo-hMSCs). The primary and secondary objectives are, respectively, to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of allo-hMSCS vs. auto-hMSCs in patients with NICM. This study will establish safety of transendocardial injection of stem cells (TESI), compare phenotypic outcomes, and offer promising advances in the field of cell-based therapy in patients with NICM. PMID:25354998

  3. Seeking the Profile of an Elementary Educator: Phase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arth, Alfred A.; And Others

    This paper presents the third phase of a student-faculty investigation seeking the profile of the elementary school teacher. Phase I discovered an indication of different personality traits in elementary and secondary teachers. Phase II redesigned the original questionnaire and supported the findings with additional research. This third phase…

  4. National Geoscience Data Repository System -- Phase III: Implementation and Operation of the Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, Christopher M.

    2002-05-28

    The National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III was an operational project focused on coordinating and facilitating transfers of at-risk geoscience data from the private sector to the public domain.

  5. Phase I/II dose-escalation study of PI3K inhibitors pilaralisib or voxtalisib in combination with letrozole in patients with hormone-receptor-positive and HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer refractory to a non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Kimberly; Burris, Howard; Gomez, Patricia; Lynn Henry, N; Isakoff, Steven; Campana, Frank; Gao, Lei; Jiang, Jason; Macé, Sandrine; Tolaney, Sara M

    2015-11-01

    This phase I/II dose-escalation study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics of pilaralisib (SAR245408), a pan-class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, or voxtalisib (SAR245409), a PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, in combination with letrozole in hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative, non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor-refractory, recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. Maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) were determined using a 3 + 3 design in phase I. Efficacy was evaluated at the MTDs in phase II. Twenty-one patients were enrolled in phase I; MTDs were determined to be pilaralisib tablets 400 mg once daily (QD) or voxtalisib capsules 50 mg twice daily in combination with letrozole tablets 2.5 mg QD. Fifty-one patients were enrolled in phase II; one patient had a partial response in the pilaralisib arm. Rates of progression-free survival at 6 months were 17 and 8 % in the pilaralisib and voxtalisib arms, respectively. The most frequently reported treatment-related grade ≥ 3 adverse events were aspartate aminotransferase increased (5 %) and rash (5 %) in the pilaralisib arm, and alanine aminotransferase increased (11 %) and rash (9 %) in the voxtalisib arm. Pilaralisib and voxtalisib did not interact pharmacokinetically with letrozole. Pilaralisib had a greater pharmacodynamic impact than voxtalisib, as demonstrated by its impact on glucose homeostasis. There was no association between molecular alterations in the PI3K pathway and efficacy. In summary, pilaralisib or voxtalisib, in combination with letrozole, was associated with an acceptable safety profile and limited efficacy in endocrine therapy-resistant HR+ , HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26497877

  6. Predictors of treatment outcome in headache patients with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III (MCMI-III).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jacob Sander; Bendtsen, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor

    2007-02-01

    The objective was to discover possible psychological factors influencing treatment outcome for headache patients referred to psychological treatment in a tertiary headache centre by initial assessment using the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III (MCMI-III). The MCMI-III was administered to 136 referred patients. Patients with valid protocols who had completed their treatment by October 2003 were included. Multidisciplinary treatment was offered including psychological treatment, mainly pain and stress management, pharmacological treatment and physiotherapy. Medians of MCMI-III scales for patients with and without reduction in headache frequency were compared. All of the eligible 58 patients were included in the study. Patients with reduction in headache frequency after treatment had lower scores on the MCMI-III Somatoform, Major depression and Avoidant personality pattern scales and higher scores on the Alcohol Dependence, Self-Defeating personality pattern, Depressive personality pattern, Drug Dependence, Aggressive personality pattern and Bipolar: Manic scales before treatment compared to patients without effect. Patients with a positive treatment effect reported less symptoms of depression and seemed less inclined to somatisation than non-responders. Responders also appeared more likely to experience increased social or occupational distress and report difficulties with handling emotions and an enduring tendency to focus on negative aspects of the self-image. The results can give valuable information regarding treatment planning and development. PMID:17221338

  7. Phase III Simplified Integrated Test (SIT) results - Space Station ECLSS testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Dubiel, Melissa Y.; Ogle, Kathryn Y.; Perry, Jay L.; Whitley, Ken M.

    1990-01-01

    During 1989, phase III testing of Space Station Freedom Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) began at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with the Simplified Integrated Test. This test, conducted at the MSFC Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), was the first time the four baseline air revitalization subsystems were integrated together. This paper details the results and lessons learned from the phase III SIT. Future plans for testing at the MSFC CMIF are also discussed.

  8. Effects of gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention in the treatment of phase III bedsore

    PubMed Central

    LI, YANLING; YAO, MEIYING; WANG, XIA; ZHAO, YANQING

    2016-01-01

    Pressure sore pertains to tissue damage or necrosis that occurs due to lack of adequate nutrition following long-term exposure to pressure and decreased blood circulation. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention in the treatment of phase III bedsore. In total, 50 patients with phase III bedsore were included in the present study. The patients were randomly divided into the control (n=25) and observation (n=25) groups. Patients in the control group received conventional nursing, while those in the observation group received gelatin sponge combined with moist wound healing nursing. The effects of the two nursing methods were compared and analyzed. The results showed that the improvement rate of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). The Branden score and area of pressure sore of the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.05). The frequency and time of dressing change and the average cost of hospitalization of the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group (P<0.001). In conclusion, gelatin sponge combined with moist wound-healing nursing intervention may significantly improve the treatment of phase III bedsore. PMID:27313666

  9. 75 FR 38645 - Standards Improvement Project-Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ...The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is continuing its efforts to remove or revise outdated, duplicative, unnecessary, and inconsistent requirements in its safety and health standards. This effort builds on the success of Standards Improvement Project (SIP)--Phase I published on June 18, 1998, and SIP--Phase II published on January 5, 2005. The Agency believes that the......

  10. The coupling of thermochemistry and phase diagrams for group III-V semiconductor systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, T.J.

    1998-07-21

    The project was directed at linking the thermochemical properties of III-V compound semiconductors systems with the reported phase diagrams. The solid-liquid phase equilibrium problem was formulated and three approaches to calculating the reduced standard state chemical potential were identified and values were calculated. In addition, thermochemical values for critical properties were measured using solid state electrochemical techniques. These values, along with the standard state chemical potentials and other available thermochemical and phase diagram data, were combined with a critical assessment of selected III-V systems. This work was culminated with a comprehensive assessment of all the III-V binary systems. A novel aspect of the experimental part of this project was the demonstration of the use of a liquid encapsulate to measure component activities by a solid state emf technique in liquid III-V systems that exhibit high vapor pressures at the measurement temperature.

  11. Phase I-II Study of Hypofractionated Simultaneous Integrated Boost With Tomotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Di Muzio, Nadia Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Alongi, Filippo; Broggi, Sara; Mangili, Paola; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Valdagni, Riccardo; Calandrino, Riccardo; Fazio, Ferruccio

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To report planning and acute toxicity data of the first 60 patients treated within a Phase I-II study with moderate hypofractionation by image-guided helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Various clinical target volumes (CTVs) were defined: CTV1-pelvic nodes; CTV2-upper portion of seminal vesicles; CTV3-lower portion of SV; CTV4-prostate; overlap between planning target volume (PTV) 4 and rectum. Different doses to each PTV were simultaneously delivered in 28 fractions. For 31 low-risk patients: 56.0, 61.6, and 71.4 Gy for PTV2-4, respectively; for 20 intermediate-risk patients: 51.8, 61.6, 65.5, and 74.2 Gy for PTV1-4, respectively; for 9 high-risk patients: 51.8 and 65.5 Gy for PTV1-2 and 74.2 Gy for PTV3-4. For all patients, the dose to overlap was 65.5 Gy. Results: The mean fraction of rectum receiving more than 65 Gy (V65) and rectal Dmax were 10% and 70.8 Gy respectively. In cases of pelvic node irradiation, the intestinal cavity (outside PTV) receiving > 45 and 50 Gy was 86 and 12 cc, respectively. A homogeneous dose distribution within each PTV was guaranteed. Acute genitourinary toxicity according to RTOG scoring system was as follows: 21/60 (35%) Grade 1, 12/60 (20%) Grade 2, 2/60 (3%) Grade 3. Acute rectal toxicities were: 18/60 (30%) Grade 1. Twelve (20%) patients showed Grade 1 upper intestinal toxicity (uGI). No patients experienced {>=} Grade 2 acute rectal or uGI side effects. Conclusions: This study shows excellent results with regard to acute toxicity. Further research is necessary to assess definitive late toxicity and tumor control outcome.

  12. Phase transitions in new BEDT-TTF κ-phase salts with hexacyanometalate anions [M(CN) 63- M=Co(III) and Fe(III)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre Le Maguerè; Ouahab, Lahcène; Corian, Nathalie; Gómez-García, Carlos J.; Delhaès, Pierre; Even, Jacky; Bertault, Marcel

    1996-01-01

    The preparation, crystal structure determination and physical properties of the compounds formulated as κ-(BEDT-TTF) 4((C 2H 5) 4N)M(CN) 6.3H 2O (M= Co III and Fe III) are presented. Organic ET layers with packing of orthogonalized dimers containing charge carriers and inorganic octahedral hexacyanometalate anions with diamagnetic or paramagnetic transition metals coexist in the title compounds. Two phase transitions occuring respectively at 150 K and in the 230-260 K range have been evidenced by magnetic (SQUID and ESR), DSC measurements. However, preliminary X-Ray studies revealed a structural change around 240 K only.

  13. Erythropoietin Neuroprotection in Neonatal Cardiac Surgery: A Phase I/II Safety and Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Andropoulos, Dean B.; Brady, Ken; Easley, R. Blaine; Dickerson, Heather A.; Voigt, Robert G.; Shekerdemian, Lara S.; Meador, Marcie R.; Eisenman, Carol A.; Hunter, Jill V.; Turcich, Marie; Rivera, Carlos; McKenzie, E. Dean; Heinle, Jeffrey S.; Fraser, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Neonates undergoing complex congenital heart surgery have a significant incidence of neurological problems. Erythropoietin has anti-apoptotic, anti-excitatory, and anti-inflammatory properties to prevent neuronal cell death in animal models, and improves neurodevelopmental outcomes in full term neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. We designed a prospective phase I/II trial of erythropoietin neuroprotection in neonatal cardiac surgery to assess safety, and indicate efficacy. Methods Neonates undergoing surgery for D-transposition of the great vessels, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, or aortic arch reconstruction were randomized to 3 perioperative doses of erythropoietin, or placebo. Neurodevelopmental testing with Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development III was performed at age 12 months. Results 59 patients received study drug. Safety profile, including MRI brain injury, clinical events, and death, was not different between groups. 3 patients in each group died. 42 patients (22 erythropoietin, 20 placebo, 79% of survivors) returned for 12-month follow-up. The mean Cognitive Scores were erythropoietin, 101.1 ± 13.6, placebo, 106.3 ± 10.8 (p=0.19); Language Scores were erythropoietin 88.5 ± 12.8, placebo 92.4 ± 12.4 (p=0.33); and Motor Scores were erythropoietin 89.9 ± 12.3, placebo 92.6 ± 14.1, (p=0.51). Conclusions Safety profile for erythropoietin administration was not different than placebo. Neurodevelopmental outcomes were not different between groups, however this pilot study was not powered to definitively address this outcome. Lessons learned from the current study suggest optimized study design features for a larger prospective trial to definitively address the utility of erythropoietin for neuroprotection in this population. PMID:23102686

  14. Phase III Trial of Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Sorafenib in Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Flaherty, Keith T.; Lee, Sandra J.; Zhao, Fengmin; Schuchter, Lynn M.; Flaherty, Lawrence; Kefford, Richard; Atkins, Michael B.; Leming, Philip; Kirkwood, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The primary objective of this study was to determine whether carboplatin, paclitaxel, and sorafenib (CPS) improve overall survival (OS) compared with carboplatin and paclitaxel (CP) in chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic melanoma. Patients and Methods In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled phase III study, all patients received carboplatin at area under the [concentration-time] curve 6 and paclitaxel 225 mg/m2 intravenously once every 21 days with random assignment to sorafenib 400 mg orally twice per day on days 2 through 19 every 21 days or placebo. The primary end point was OS, and secondary end points included progression-free survival, objective tumor response, and toxicity. Results In all, 823 patients were enrolled over 34 months. At final analysis, the median OS was 11.3 months (95% CI, 9.8 to 12.2 months) for CP and 11.1 months (95% CI, 10.3 to 12.3 months) for CPS; the difference in the OS distribution was not statistically significant by the stratified log-rank test, stratified on American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, and prior therapy (P = .878). Median progression-free survival was 4.9 months for CPS and 4.2 months for CP (P = .092, stratified log-rank test). Response rate was 20% for CPS and 18% for CP (P = .427). More patients on the CPS arm had grade 3 or higher toxicities (84% v 78%; P = .027), with increased rash, hand-foot syndrome, and thrombocytopenia accounting for most of the difference. Conclusion Sorafenib does not improve OS when given in combination with CP for chemotherapy-naive patients with metastatic melanoma. This study establishes benchmark end points for the CP regimen in first-line therapy of metastatic melanoma. PMID:23248256

  15. Design and analysis of phase III trials with ordered outcome scales: the concept of the sliding dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Murray, Gordon D; Barer, David; Choi, Sung; Fernandes, Helen; Gregson, Barbara; Lees, Kennedy R; Maas, Andrew I R; Marmarou, Anthony; Mendelow, A David; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Taylor, Gillian S; Teasdale, Graham M; Weir, Christopher J

    2005-05-01

    The conventional approach to the analysis of a Phase III trial in head injury or stroke takes an ordered scale measuring functional outcome and collapses the scale to a binary outcome of favorable versus unfavorable. This discards potentially relevant information which limits statistical power and moreover is not in accord with clinical practice. We propose an alternative approach where a favorable outcome is defined as better than would be expected, taking account of each individual patient's baseline prognosis. This is illustrated through a worked example based on data from a Phase III trial in head injury. The approach is also compared with the proportional odds model, which is another statistical approach that can exploit an ordered outcome scale. The approach raises issues of clinical, statistical, and regulatory importance, and we initiate what we believe needs to become a widespread debate amongst the community involved in clinical research in head injury and stroke. PMID:15892597

  16. Considerations in the rational design and conduct of phase I/II pediatric clinical trials: avoiding the problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, S M; Reed, M D; Wells, T G; Kearns, G L

    2007-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a heightened awareness of the need to include children in the drug development process. With this awareness has come an expansion of the infrastructure for conducting studies in children and an increase in the sponsorship of pediatric clinical trials. However, the growth in pediatric research has, in many cases, not been accompanied by an increase in the involvement of trained pediatric investigators when it comes to trial design and/or interpretation. Pediatric phase I/II protocols continue to span a spectrum from those that are carefully constructed to those that are poorly designed. This paper highlights the basic elements of phase I/II protocols that merit unique consideration when the clinical trial involves children. Illustrations are provided from our experience, which highlight problems that may arise when trials are not designed with the pediatric patient in mind. PMID:17329988

  17. Promising short-term clinical results of the cementless Oxford phase III medial unicondylar knee prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    van Dorp, Karin B; Breugem, Stefan JM; Bruijn, Daniël J; Driessen, Marcel JM

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the short-term clinical results of the Oxford phase III cementless medial unicondylar knee prosthesis (UKP) compared to the cemented medial UKP. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a tertairy orthopedic centre between the period of May 2010 and September 2012. We included 99 medial UKP in 97 patients and of these UKP, 53 were cemented and 46 were cementless. Clinical outcome was measured using a questionnaire, containing a visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, Oxford Knee score, Kujala score and SF-12 score. Knee function was tested using the American Knee Society score. Complications, reoperations and revisions were recorded. Statistical significance was defined as a P value < 0.05. RESULTS: In a mean follow-up time of 19.5 mo, three cemented medial UKP were revised to a total knee prosthesis. Reasons for revision were malrotation of the tibial component, aseptic loosening of the tibial component and progression of osteoarthritis in the lateral- and patellofemoral compartment. In five patients a successful reoperation was performed, because of impingement or (sub)luxation of the polyethylene bearing. Patients with a reoperation were significant younger than patients in the primary group (56.7 vs 64.0, P = 0.01) and were more likely to be male (85.7% vs 38.8%, P = 0.015). Overall the cementless medial UKP seems to perform better, but the differences in clinical outcome are not significant; a VAS pain score of 7.4 vs 11.7 (P = 0.22), an Oxford Knee score of 43.3 vs 41.7 (P = 0.27) and a Kujala score of 79.6 vs 78.0 (P = 0.63). The American Knee Society scores were slightly better in the cementless group with 94.5 vs 90.2 (P = 0.055) for the objective score and 91.2 vs 87.8 (P = 0.25) for the subjective score. CONCLUSION: The cementless Oxford phase III medial UKP shows good short-term clinical results, when used in a specialist clinic by an experienced surgeon. PMID:27114932

  18. Local Area Network Implementation: Moving toward Phase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoehl, Susan B.

    1989-01-01

    Describes a LAN (local area network)-based automation project which has neared completion of the first phase of implementation at the Health Sciences Library of Allegheny General Hospital (Pittsburgh, PA). Changes in the library and its objectives with increased technological experience are examined. Diagrams of the current LAN configuration and…

  19. Individualized Inservice Teacher Education (Project In-Step). Evaluation Report. Phase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurber, John C.

    This is a report on the third phase of Project IN-STEP, which was intended to develop a viable model for individualized, multi-media in-service teacher education programs. (Phase I and II are reported in ED 033 905, and ED 042 709). The rationale for Phase III was to see if the model could be successfully transferred to an area other than teaching…

  20. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Donna

    2013-12-01

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 – 5, Phase II tasks 6 – 8, and Phase III tasks 9 – 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  1. Pros: concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains the ideal treatment in fit patients with large volume unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rabatic, Bryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The debate of treating stage III, large volume non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with definitive chemo-radiotherapy continues to be waged. A physically fit patient, having large volume and unresectable disease is the ideal candidate for this treatment approach. The ability of this patient population to successfully complete, and thereby benefit from an aggressive, combined treatment to improve local control and survival, drives the recommendation of treating oncologists for this approach. Until a phase III trial proves otherwise, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy will remain the ideal treatment for fit patients having large volume unresectable stage III NSCLC. PMID:27186513

  2. A decision-theoretic phase I-II design for ordinal outcomes in two cycles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juhee; Thall, Peter F; Ji, Yuan; Müller, Peter

    2016-04-01

    This paper is motivated by a phase I-II clinical trial of a targeted agent for advanced solid tumors. We study a stylized version of this trial with the goal to determine optimal actions in each of two cycles of therapy. A design is presented that generalizes the decision-theoretic two-cycle design of Lee and others (2015. Bayesian dose-finding in two treatment cycles based on the joint utility of efficacy and toxicity. Journal of the American Statistical Association, to appear) to accommodate ordinal outcomes. Backward induction is used to jointly optimize the actions taken for each patient in each of the two cycles, with the second action accounting for the patient's cycle 1 dose and outcomes. A simulation study shows that simpler designs obtained by dichotomizing the ordinal outcomes either perform very similarly to the proposed design, or have much worse performance in some scenarios. We also compare the proposed design with the simpler approaches of optimizing the doses in each cycle separately, or ignoring the distinction between cycles 1 and 2. PMID:26553915

  3. Paclitaxel/carboplatin with or without sorafenib in the first-line treatment of patients with stage III/IV epithelial ovarian cancer: a randomized phase II study of the Sarah Cannon Research Institute

    PubMed Central

    Hainsworth, John D; Thompson, Dana S; Bismayer, John A; Gian, Victor G; Merritt, William M; Whorf, Robert C; Finney, Lindsey H; Dudley, B Stephens

    2015-01-01

    This trial compared the efficacy and toxicity of standard first-line treatment with paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/carboplatin plus sorafenib in patients with advanced ovarian carcinoma. Patients with stage 3 or 4 epithelial ovarian cancer with residual measurable disease or elevated CA-125 levels after maximal surgical cytoreduction were randomized (1:1) to receive treatment with paclitaxel (175 mg/m2, 3 h infusion, day 1) and carboplatin (AUC 6.0, IV, day 1) with or without sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily (PO BID). Patients were reevaluated for response after completing 6 weeks of treatment (two cycles); responding or stable patients received six cycles of paclitaxel/carboplatin. Patients receiving the sorafenib-containing regimen continued sorafenib (400 PO BID) for a total of 52 weeks. Eighty-five patients were randomized and received treatment.Efficacy was similar for patients receiving paclitaxel/carboplatin/sorafenib versus paclitaxel/carboplatin: overall response rates 69% versus 74%; median progression-free survival 15.4 versus 16.3 months; 2 year survival 76% versus 81%. The addition of sorafenib added substantially to the toxicity of the regimen; rash, hand–foot syndrome, mucositis, and hypertension were significantly more common in patients treated with sorafenib. The addition of sorafenib to standard paclitaxel/carboplatin did not improve efficacy and substantially increased toxicity in the first-line treatment of advanced epithelial ovarian cancer. Based on evidence from this study and other completed trials, sorafenib is unlikely to have a role in the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25556916

  4. Effect of Pulse Duration on Polytetrafluoroethylene Shocked above the Crystalline Phase II-Iii Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. N.; Gray, G. T.; Rae, P. J.; Trujillo, C. P.; Bourne, N. K.

    2007-12-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II-III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  5. Shock Pulse Effects in PTFE Shocked Through the Crystalline Phase II--III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Gray, George T., III; Rae, Philip J.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2008-03-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II--III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  6. Effect of Pulse Duration on Polytetrafluoroethylene Shocked Above the Crystalline Phase II--III Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Eric N.; Gray, George T., III; Rae, Philip J.; Trujillo, Carl P.; Bourne, Neil K.

    2007-06-01

    We present an experimental study of crystalline structure evolution of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) due to pressure-induced phase transitions in a semi-crystalline polymer using soft-recovery, shock-loading techniques coupled with mechanical and chemical post-shock analysis. Gas-launched, plate impact experiments have been performed on pedigreed PTFE 7C, mounted in momentum-trapped, shock assemblies, with impact pressures above and below the phase II to phase III crystalline transition. Below the phase transition only subtle changes were observed in the crystallinity, microstructure, and mechanical response of PTFE. Shock loading of PTFE 7C above the phase II--III transition was seen to cause both an increase in crystallinity from 38% to ˜53% (by Differential Scanning Calorimetry, DSC) and a finer crystalline microstructure, and changed the yield and flow stress behavior. We particularly focus on the effect of pulse duration on the microstructure evolution.

  7. The impact of concurrent granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor on radiation-induced mucositis in head and neck cancer patients: A double-blind placebo-controlled prospective Phase III study by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9901

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Janice K. . E-mail: janice.ryu@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu; Swann, Suzanne; LeVeque, Francis; Johnson, Darlene J.; Chen, Allan; Fortin, Andre; Kim, Harold; Ang, Kian K.

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: Based on early clinical evidence of potential mucosal protection by granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the efficacy and safety of GM-CSF in reducing the severity and duration of mucosal injury and pain (mucositis) associated with curative radiotherapy (RT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients included those with head-and-neck cancer with radiation ports encompassing >50% of oral cavity and/or oropharynx. Standard RT ports were used to cover the primary tumor and regional lymphatics at risk in standard fractionation to 60-70 Gy. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was allowed. Patients were randomized to receive subcutaneous injection of GM-CSF 250 {mu}g/m{sup 2} or placebo 3 times a week. Mucosal reaction was assessed during the course of RT using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and the protocol-specific scoring system. Results: Between October 2000 and September 2002, 130 patients from 36 institutions were accrued. Nine patients (7%) were excluded from the analysis, 3 as a result of drug unavailability. More than 80% of the patients participated in the quality-of-life endpoint of this study. The GM-CSF did not cause any increase in toxicity compared with placebo. There was no statistically significant difference in the average mean mucositis score in the GM-CSF and placebo arms by a t test (p = 0.4006). Conclusion: This placebo-controlled, randomized study demonstrated no significant effect of GM-CSF given concurrently compared with placebo in reducing the severity or duration of RT-induced mucositis in patients undergoing definitive RT for head-and-neck cancer.

  8. Mometasone Furoate Effect on Acute Skin Toxicity in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Phase III Double-Blind, Randomized Trial From the North Central Cancer Treatment Group N06C4

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Robert C.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Stoffel, Thomas J.; Haselow, Robert E.; Schaefer, Paul L.; Bearden, James D.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Martenson, James A.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: A two-arm, double-blind, randomized trial was performed to evaluate the effect of 0.1% mometasone furoate (MMF) on acute skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing breast or chest wall radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Patients with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast carcinoma who were undergoing external beam radiotherapy to the breast or chest wall were randomly assigned to apply 0.1% MMF or placebo cream daily. The primary study endpoint was the provider-assessed maximal grade of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, radiation dermatitis. The secondary endpoints included provider-assessed Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Grade 3 or greater radiation dermatitis and adverse event monitoring. The patient-reported outcome measures included the Skindex-16, the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, a Symptom Experience Diary, and a quality-of-life self-assessment. An assessment was performed at baseline, weekly during radiotherapy, and for 2 weeks after radiotherapy. Results: A total of 176 patients were enrolled between September 21, 2007, and December 7, 2007. The provider-assessed primary endpoint showed no difference in the mean maximum grade of radiation dermatitis by treatment arm (1.2 for MMF vs. 1.3 for placebo; p = .18). Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity was greater in the placebo group (p = .04), primarily from pruritus. For the patient-reported outcome measures, the maximum Skindex-16 score for the MMF group showed less itching (p = .008), less irritation (p = .01), less symptom persistence or recurrence (p = .02), and less annoyance with skin problems (p = .04). The group's maximal Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool score showed less burning sensation (p = .02) and less itching (p = .002). Conclusion: Patients receiving daily MMF during radiotherapy might experience reduced acute skin toxicity compared with patients receiving placebo.

  9. Randomised Phase I/II trial assessing the safety and efficacy of radiolabelled anti-carcinoembryonic antigen I131 KAb201 antibodies given intra-arterially or intravenously in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Advanced pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis, and the current standard of care (gemcitabine based chemotherapy) provides a small survival advantage. However the drawback is the accompanying systemic toxicity, which targeted treatments may overcome. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of KAb201, an anti-carcinoembryonic antigen monoclonal antibody, labelled with I131 in pancreatic cancer (ISRCTN 16857581). Methods Patients with histological/cytological proven inoperable adenocarcinoma of the head of pancreas were randomised to receive KAb 201 via either the intra-arterial or intravenous delivery route. The dose limiting toxicities within each group were determined. Patients were assessed for safety and efficacy and followed up until death. Results Between February 2003 and July 2005, 25 patients were enrolled. Nineteen patients were randomised, 9 to the intravenous and 10 to the intra-arterial arms. In the intra-arterial arm, dose limiting toxicity was seen in 2/6 (33%) patients at 50 mCi whereas in the intravenous arm, dose limiting toxicity was noted in 1/6 patients at 50 mCi, but did not occur at 75 mCi (0/3). The overall response rate was 6% (1/18). Median overall survival was 5.2 months (95% confidence interval = 3.3 to 9 months), with no significant difference between the intravenous and intra-arterial arms (log rank test p = 0.79). One patient was still alive at the time of this analysis. Conclusion Dose limiting toxicity for KAb201 with I131 by the intra-arterial route was 50 mCi, while dose limiting toxicity was not reached in the intravenous arm. PMID:19243606

  10. Decitabine versus best supportive care in older patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt) - results of a subgroup analysis of the randomized phase III study 06011 of the EORTC Leukemia Cooperative Group and German MDS Study Group (GMDSSG).

    PubMed

    Becker, Heiko; Suciu, Stefan; Rüter, Björn Hans; Platzbecker, Uwe; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; Germing, Ulrich; Salih, Helmut R; Muus, Petra; Pflüger, Karl-Heinz; Hagemeijer, Anne; Schaefer, Hans-Eckart; Fiaccadori, Valeria; Baron, Frédéric; Ganser, Arnold; Aul, Carlo; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre W; Lübbert, Michael

    2015-12-01

    In the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)/GMDSSG phase III trial 06011, we compared decitabine (15 mg/m(2) every 8 h for 3 days) with best supportive care (BSC) in patients ≥60 years with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) by French-American-British (FAB) criteria. Here, we reinvestigate trial 06011 for the activity and efficacy specifically in patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts in transformation (RAEBt). Response rates in the decitabine arm (N = 40) were as follows: complete or partial remission, 15 %; hematologic improvement, 15 %; resistant disease, 30 %. RAEBt patients in the decitabine arm had longer progression-free survival (PFS; hazard ratio (HR) 0.30, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.18-0.51; median, 6.2 vs 2.8 months) and overall survival (OS; HR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.42-1.11; median, 8.0 vs 6.0 months) than in the BSC arm (N = 35). Censoring at allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the OS difference between the treatment groups increased, particularly among patients aged 60-74 years (HR 0.48, 95 % CI 0.26-0.89). After regrouping the study cohort according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria, patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (i.e., ≥20 % blasts) in the decitabine arm (N = 27) also had longer PFS than in the BSC arm (N = 23) (HR 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.83; median, 6.2 vs 2.8 months). In conclusion, 3-day decitabine displays clinical activity and efficacy in MDS and/or AML with 5-30 % blood or 20-30 % marrow blasts. PMID:26400023

  11. [Procollagen-III-peptide in the serum of patients with Crohn disease].

    PubMed

    Loeschke, K; Kaltenthaler, P

    1989-03-01

    Serum procollagen-III-peptide (PP III) concentrations were measured in 54 patients with Crohn's disease and compared with data obtained from healthy controls and patients with liver fibrosis or ulcerative colitis. Whereas in alcoholic liver cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis PP III was increased up to 18-fold as described by others, only 3 patients with Crohn's disease had slightly elevated PP III concentrations. In 2 of them, increased PP III could be explained by adolescence. In 5 other patients, PP III levels were at the upper limit of normal. Subgroup analysis showed that high clinical disease activity, recurrence after intestinal resection, presence of strictures and long disease duration did not elevate PP III levels. We therefore conclude that determination of serum PP III is of no value in the follow-up patients with Crohn's disease. In ulcerative colitis, PP III levels were uniformly normal. An additional result was a decreased PP III during corticosteroid therapy, suggesting a direct effect on collagen metabolism. PMID:2718533

  12. Brazing of the Tore Supra actively cooled Phase III Limiter

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.E.; Walker, C.A.; Lutz, T.J.; Hosking, F.M.; McGrath, R.T.

    1993-12-31

    The head of the water-cooled Tore Supra Phase 3 Limiter is a bank of 14 round OFHC copper tubes, curved to fit the plasma radius, onto which several hundred pyrolytic graphite (PG) tiles and a lesser number of carbon fiber composite tiles are brazed. The small allowable tolerances for fitting the tiles to the tubes and mating of compound curvatures made the brazing and fabrication extremely challenging. The paper describes the fabrication process with emphasis on the procedure for brazing. In the fixturing for vacuum furnace brazing, the tiles were each independently clamped to the tube with an elaborate set of window frame clamps. Braze quality was evaluated with transient heating tests. Some rebrazing was necessary.

  13. Final results of the EORTC 18871/DKG 80-1 randomised phase III trial. rIFN-alpha2b versus rIFN-gamma versus ISCADOR M versus observation after surgery in melanoma patients with either high-risk primary (thickness >3 mm) or regional lymph node metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kleeberg, U R; Suciu, S; Bröcker, E B; Ruiter, D J; Chartier, C; Liénard, D; Marsden, J; Schadendorf, D; Eggermont, A M M

    2004-02-01

    Between 1988 and 1996, the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Melanoma Group (EORTC-MG) performed a prospective, randomised phase III adjuvant trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of low dose recombinant interferon-alpha 2 b (rIFN-alpha2b) (1 MU) or recombinant interferon gamma (rIFN-gamma), (0.2 mg) both given subcutaneously (s.c.), every other day (qod), for 12 months in comparison with an untreated control group. The German Cancer Society (DKG) added a fourth arm with Iscador M, a popular mistletoe extract. High-risk stage II patients (thickness >3 mm) and stage III patients (positive lymph nodes) without distant metastasis were randomised and followed until their first progression or death. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed. From 1988 to 1996, a total of 830 patients were randomised: 423 in the three-arm EORTC 18871 trial and 407 patients in the four-arm DKG 80-1 trial. The median follow-up was 8.2 years and a total of 537 relapses and 475 deaths were reported. At 8 years, the disease-free interval (DFI) rate was 32.4% and the overall survival (OS) rate was 40.0%. In terms of the DFI, the hazard ratio estimates (95% Confidence Intervals (CI)) were: 1.04 (0.84, 1.30) for the comparison of rIFN-alpha2b versus control, 0.96 (0.77, 1.20) for rIFN-gamma versus control, and 1.32 (0.93, 1.87) for Iscador M versus control. In terms of OS, the corresponding estimates (95% CI) for the 3 treatment comparisons were: for IFN-alpha2b 0.96 (0.76, 1.21), for rIFN-gamma 0.87 (0.69, 1.10) and for Iscador M 1.21 (0.84, 1.75), respectively. The results show no clinical benefit for adjuvant treatment with low dose rIFN-alpha2b or rIFN-gamma or with Iscador M in high-risk melanoma patients. PMID:14746858

  14. Does Zinc Sulfate Prevent Therapy-Induced Taste Alterations in Head and Neck Cancer Patients? Results of Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial from the North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N01C4)

    SciTech Connect

    Halyard, Michele Y.; Jatoi, Aminah . E-mail: Jatoi.aminah@mayo.edu; Sloan, Jeff A.; Bearden, James D.; Vora, Sujay A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Perez, Edith A.; Soori, Gammi; Zalduendo, Anthony C.; Zhu, Angela; Stella, Philip J.; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Taste alterations (dysgeusia) are well described in head and neck cancer patients who undergo radiotherapy (RT). Anecdotal observations and pilot studies have suggested zinc may mitigate these symptoms. This multi-institutional, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to provide definitive evidence of this mineral's palliative efficacy. Methods and Materials: A total of 169 evaluable patients were randomly assigned to zinc sulfate 45 mg orally three times daily vs. placebo. Treatment was to be given throughout RT and for 1 month after. All patients were scheduled to receive {>=}2,000 cGy of external beam RT to {>=}30% of the oral cavity, were able to take oral medication, and had no oral thrush at study entry. Changes in taste were assessed using the previously validated Wickham questionnaire. Results: At baseline, the groups were comparable in age, gender, and planned radiation dose (<6,000 vs. {>=}6,000 cGy). Overall, 61 zinc-treated (73%) and 71 placebo-exposed (84%) patients described taste alterations during the first 2 months (p = 0.16). The median interval to taste alterations was 2.3 vs. 1.6 weeks in the zinc-treated and placebo-exposed patients, respectively (p = 0.09). The reported taste alterations included the absence of any taste (16%), bitter taste (8%), salty taste (5%), sour taste (4%), sweet taste (5%), and the presence of a metallic taste (10%), as well as other descriptions provided by a write in response (81%). Zinc sulfate did not favorably affect the interval to taste recovery. Conclusion: Zinc sulfate, as prescribed in this trial, did not prevent taste alterations in cancer patients who were undergoing RT to the oral pharynx.

  15. Phase I/II study of 131I-MIBG with vincristine and 5 days of irinotecan for advanced neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    DuBois, S G; Allen, S; Bent, M; Hilton, J F; Hollinger, F; Hawkins, R; Courtier, J; Mosse, Y P; Matthay, K K

    2015-01-01

    Background: 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) is an active radiopharmaceutical in neuroblastoma. A previous study demonstrated that MIBG could be combined with vincristine and prolonged irinotecan, although 25% of first courses had grade 3 diarrhoea. The current phase I/II study evaluated MIBG with vincristine and 5 days of higher-dose irinotecan. Methods: Patients 1–30 years old with advanced neuroblastoma were eligible. Patients received cefixime on days −1 to +6, irinotecan (50 mg m−2 per dose IV) on days 0–4, vincristine (2 mg m−2) on day 0, MIBG (555 or 666 MBq kg−1) on day 1, and peripheral blood stem cells on day 13. UGT1A1 genotyping was performed in consenting patients. Results: Thirty-two patients (12 phase I ; 20 phase II) received 42 courses. No dose-limiting toxicities were seen during dose escalation and the recommended administered activity was 666 MBq kg−1. Myelosuppression and diarrhoea were the most common toxicities, with grade 3 diarrhoea in 6% of first courses. Patients homozygous for UGT1A1*28 had more grade 4 thrombocytopenia (80% vs 37% P=0.14). Responses (five complete and four partial) occurred in 9 out of 32 (28%) patients. Conclusions: MIBG (666 MBq kg−1) with vincristine and this irinotecan schedule is tolerable and active, with less severe diarrhoea compared with a regimen using more protracted irinotecan. PMID:25602966

  16. An open-label Phase I/II clinical trial of pyrimethamine for the treatment of patients affected with chronic GM2 gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs or Sandhoff variants).

    PubMed

    Clarke, Joe T R; Mahuran, Don J; Sathe, Swati; Kolodny, Edwin H; Rigat, Brigitte A; Raiman, Julian A; Tropak, Michael B

    2011-01-01

    Late-onset GM2 gangliosidosis is an autosomal recessive, neurodegenerative, lysosomal storage disease, caused by deficiency of ß-hexosaminidase A (Hex A), resulting from mutations in the HEXA (Tay-Sachs variant) or the HEXB (Sandhoff variant) genes. The enzyme deficiency in many patients with juvenile or adult onset forms of the disease results from the production of an unstable protein, which becomes targeted for premature degradation by the quality control system of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and is not transported to lysosomes. In vitro studies have shown that many mutations in either the α or β subunit of Hex A can be partially rescued, i.e. enhanced levels of both enzyme protein and activity in lysosomes, following the growth of patient cells in the presence of the drug, pyrimethamine. The objectives of the present clinical trial were to establish the tolerability and efficacy of the treatment of late-onset GM2 gangliosidosis patients with escalating doses of pyrimethamine, to a maximum of 100 mg per day, administered orally in a single daily dose, over a 16-week period . The primary objective, tolerability, was assessed by regular clinical examinations, along with a panel of hematologic and biochemical studies. Although clinical efficacy could not be assessed in this short trial, treatment efficacy was evaluated by repeated measurements of leukocyte Hex A activity, expressed relative to the activity of lysosomal ß-glucuronidase. A total of 11 patients were enrolled, 8 males and 3 females, aged 23 to 50 years. One subject failed the initial screen, another was omitted from analysis because of the large number of protocol violations, and a third was withdrawn very early as a result of adverse events which were not drug-related. For the remaining 8 subjects, up to a 4-fold enhancement of Hex A activity at doses of 50 mg per day or less was observed. Additionally marked individual variations in the pharmacokinetics of the drug among the patients were

  17. Age Strengthening of Gray Cast Iron Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Von L. Richards; Wayne Nicola

    2003-06-26

    The primary objective of this research is to identify the age strengthening mechanism in gray and ductile cast iron, and to quantify the parameters that control it. It is also to contribute to a new predictive model for gray and ductile iron strength and hardness. This work shows that age strengthening occurs on a sigmoidal-logarithmic scale in gray and ductile cast irons, to a statistically significant extent. This is similar to Avrami-Johnson-Mehl kinetics for phase transformations in metals. It occurs in both cupola-melted iron and induction melted iron. However, it does not happen in all compositions. We have developed some understanding of the process. Data suggests that nitrogen and nitride-forming trace elements have a significant role in the process, but that is yet not fully characterized. Also, the time dependence of the bulk hardness and strength increase, the nano-scale precipitation evidence from neutron scattering, differential scanning calorimetry results and matrix micro-hardness increase in ferrite all indicate that age strengthening occurs by a precipitation or pre-precipitate cluster formation mechanism.

  18. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to add composite soundings to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This allows National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to compare the current atmospheric state with climatology. In a previous phase, the AMU created composite soundings for four rawinsonde observation stations in Florida, for each of eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the NWS Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the NSHARP software program. NWS MLB requested that the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in AWIPS. The AMU first created a procedure to customize AWIPS so composite soundings could be displayed. A unique four-character identifier was created for each of the 32 composite soundings. The AMU wrote a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (TcVTk) software program to convert the composite soundings from NSHARP to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format. The NetCDF files were then displayable by AWIPS.

  19. Impact of switching from mycophenolate mofetil to enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium on gastrointestinal side effects in patients with autoimmune disease: a Phase III, open-label, single-arm, multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Manger, Bernhard; Hiepe, Falk; Schneider, Matthias; Worm, Margitta; Wimmer, Peter; Paulus, Eva-Maria; Schwarting, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to assess changes in gastrointestinal symptom severity in patients with autoimmune disease who were switched from mycophenolate mofetil to enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS). Methods In this national, explorative, single-arm study, 111 patients were enrolled and switched to equimolar EC-MPS at baseline. The primary endpoint was change in the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) total score after 6–8 weeks of treatment (Visit 2). The optional follow-up visit was 6–12 weeks after completion of the study (Visit 2). Secondary endpoints were changes in GSRS subscale score; changes in gastrointestinal-related quality of life measured by the Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI); and general health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measured by Psychological General Well-Being Index and assessment of overall treatment effect (OTE). Change was evaluated by paired t-tests. Results At Visit 2, the mean ± standard deviation GSRS total score improved from 2.28±1.13 to 2.02±0.93 points. The change (−0.28±0.92 points, P=0.002) was statistically significant. The change at the follow-up visit (−0.36±0.94 points, P=0.001) was statistically significant and more than the minimal clinical important difference. GSRS subscores showed statistically significant and clinically relevant improvement for abdominal pain (−0.51±1.2 points, P<0.001) and indigestion (−0.42±1.33 points, P=0.002). Overall GIQLI score showed significant improvement from baseline to Visit 2 (−5.8±18.6 points, P=0.002). Per OTE, improvement was reported in 44.1% and 34.2% patients as rated by physicians and patients, respectively. The majority of patients (55%) reported OTE-HRQoL as unchanged. Diarrhea and nausea were the commonly reported adverse events. Conclusion Patients switched to EC-MPS experienced less gastrointestinal symptom burden and showed improvement in HRQoL. PMID:26229499

  20. A randomized phase III trial of oral S-1 plus cisplatin versus docetaxel plus cisplatin in Japanese patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: TCOG0701 CATS trial

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, K.; Sakai, H.; Katakami, N.; Nishio, M.; Inoue, A.; Okamoto, H.; Isobe, H.; Kunitoh, H.; Takiguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Ohmatsu, H.; Sugawara, S.; Minato, K.; Fukuda, M.; Yokoyama, A.; Takeuchi, M.; Michimae, H.; Gemma, A.; Kudoh, S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Platinum-based two-drug combination chemotherapy has been standard of care for patients with advanced nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The primary aim was to compare overall survival (OS) of patients with advanced NSCLC between the two chemotherapy regimens. Secondary end points included progression-free survival (PFS), response, safety, and quality of life (QoL). Patients and methods Patients with previously untreated stage IIIB or IV NSCLC, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0–1 and adequate organ function were randomized to receive either oral S-1 80 mg/m2/day on days 1–21 plus cisplatin 60 mg/m2 on day 8 every 4–5 weeks, or docetaxel 60 mg/m2 on day 1 plus cisplatin 80 mg/m2 on day 1 every 3–4 weeks, both up to six cycles. Results A total of 608 patients from 66 sites in Japan were randomized to S-1 plus cisplatin (n = 303) or docetaxel plus cisplatin (n = 305). OS for oral S-1 plus cisplatin was noninferior to docetaxel plus cisplatin [median survival, 16.1 versus 17.1 months, respectively; hazard ratio = 1.013; 96.4% confidence interval (CI) 0.837–1.227]. Significantly higher febrile neutropenia (7.4% versus 1.0%), grade 3/4 neutropenia (73.4% versus 22.9%), grade 3/4 infection (14.5% versus 5.3%), and grade 1/2 alopecia (59.3% versus 12.3%) were observed in the docetaxel plus cisplatin than in the S-1 plus cisplatin. There were no differences found in PFS or response between the two arms. QoL data investigated by EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC-13 favored the S-1 plus cisplatin. Conclusion Oral S-1 plus cisplatin is not inferior to docetaxel plus cisplatin and is better tolerated in Japanese patients with advanced NSCLC. Clinical trial number UMIN000000608. PMID:25908605

  1. Treatment of primary glioblastoma multiforme with cetuximab, radiotherapy and temozolomide (GERT) – phase I/II trial: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Stephanie E; Heeger, Steffen; Haselmann, Renate; Edler, Lutz; Debus, Jürgen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Background The implementation of combined radiochemotherapy (RCHT) with temozolomide (TMZ) has lead to a significant increase in overall survival times in patients with Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), however, outcome still remains unsatisfactory. The majority of GBMs show an overexpression and/or amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Therefore, addition of EGFR-inhibition with cetuximab to the current standard treatment approach with radiotherapy and TMZ seems promising. Methods/design GERT is a one-armed single-center phase I/II trial. In a first step, dose-escalation of TMZ from 50 mg/m2 to 75 mg/m2 together with radiotherapy and cetuximab will be performed. Should safety be proven, the phase II trial will be initiated with the standard dose of 75 mg/m2 of TMZ. Cetuximab will be applied in the standard application dose of 400 mg/m2 in week 1, thereafter at a dose of 250 mg/m2 weekly. A total of 46 patients will be included into this phase I/II trial. Primary endpoints are feasibility and toxicity, secondary endpoints are overall and progression-free survival. An interim analysis will be performed after inclusion of 15 patients into the main study. Patients' enrolment will be performed over a period of 2 years. The observation time will end 2 years after inclusion of the last patient. Discussion The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of combined RCHT-immunotherapy with TMZ and cetuximab as first-line treatment for patients with primary GBM. PMID:16709245

  2. Phase mixed rotation magnetoconvection and Taylor's condition III. Wave trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Susan A.; Soward, Andrew M.

    Nonlinear amplitude equations governing the radial modulation of quasi-geostrophic convective rolls, which occur in a rapidly rotating self-gravitating sphere permeated by a weak azimuthal magnetic field (small Elsasser number), were derived in Part I. Stationary and travelling pulse solutions were obtained in Part II. That analysis is extended here; wave train solutions are sought and their stability tested. Special features of the equations include: nonlinear diffusion and dispersion; also phase mixing, which leads to a lack of translational invariance of the system. In spite of the latter, the underlying structure of the wave trains sought is spatially periodic on a length L, but modulated by a time dependent Floquet exponent. Consequently, a Fourier representation is employed and the time evolution of the Fourier coefficients is determined numerically. It is shown that pulses confined to lengths l(< L) can be superimposed non-interactively to form wave trains. The numerical demonstration relies on establishing that the pseudo-energy based on the time averaged wave train amplitude coincides with the corresponding pulse energy E calculated in Part II. When l and L are comparable some pulse interaction can be inferred. Available numerical evidence suggests that wave trains, and by implication pulses, are unstable. The geophysical implications are discussed. All finite amplitude solutions pertain to the Ekman regime in which the modified Taylor's condition is satisfied by small magnetic field perturbations. Only in the infinite amplitude limit do the solutions determine true Taylor states. It is anticipated that following instability in the Ekman regime convection equilibrates in some large amplitude Taylor state, which is determined when additional ageostrophic effects are taken into account. Analysis of that state lies outside the range of validity of our amplitude equations.

  3. Remedial Action Report for Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04, Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Wells

    2007-08-15

    This Phase III remedial action report addresses the remediation of lead-contaminated soils found at the Security Training Facility STF-02 Gun Range at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Phase I, consisting of developing and implementing institutional controls at Operble Unit 10-04 sites and developing and implementing Idaho National Laboratory Site-wide plans for both institutional controls and ecological monitoring, was addressed in a previous report. Phase II will remediate sites contaminated with trinitrotoluene and Royal Demolition Explosive. Phase IV will remediate hazards from unexploded ordnance.

  4. Cisplatin plus oral etoposide (EoP) combination is more effective than paclitaxel in patients with advanced breast cancer pretreated with anthracyclines: a randomised phase III trial of Turkish Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Icli, F; Akbulut, H; Uner, A; Yalcin, B; Baltali, E; Altinbas, M; Coşkun, Ş; Komurcu, S; Erkisi, M; Demirkazik, A; Senler, F C; Sencan, O; Büyükcelik, A; Boruban, C; Onur, H; Zengin, N; Sak, S D

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to determine whether oral etoposide and cisplatin combination (EoP) is superior to paclitaxel in the treatment of advanced breast cancer (ABC) patients pretreated with anthracyclines. From December 1997 to August 2003, 201 patients were randomised, 100 to EoP and 101 to paclitaxel arms. Four patients in each arm were ineligible. The doses of etoposide and cisplatin were 50 mg p.o. twice a day for 7 days and 70 mg m−2 intravenously (i.v.) on day 1, respectively, and it was 175 mg m−2 on day 1 for paclitaxel. Both treatments were repeated every 3 weeks. A median of four cycles of study treatment was given in both arms. The response rate obtained in the EoP arm was significantly higher (36.3 vs 22.2%; P=0.038). Median response duration was longer for the EoP arm (7 vs 4 months) (P=0.132). Also, time to progression was significantly in favour of the EoP arm (5.5 vs 3.9 months; P=0.003). Median overall survival was again significantly longer in the EoP arm (14 vs 9.5 months; P=0.039). Toxicity profile of both groups was similar. Two patients in each arm were lost due to febrile neutropenia. The observed activity and acceptable toxicity of EoP endorses the employment of this combination in the treatment of ABC following anthracyclines. PMID:15726120

  5. Phase I/II study of trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin and radiation for locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Safran, Howard . E-mail: hsafran@lifespan.org; Di Petrillo, Thomas; Akerman, Paul; Ng, Thomas; Evans, Devon; Steinhoff, Margaret; Benton, David; Purviance, John; Goldstein, Lisa; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Kennedy, Teresa R.N.

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the overall survival for patients with locally advanced, HER2 overexpressing, esophageal adenocarcinoma receiving trastuzumab, paclitaxel, cisplatin, and radiation on a Phase I-II study. Methods and Materials: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus without distant organ metastases and 2+/3+ HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were eligible. All patients received cisplatin 25 mg/m{sup 2} and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2} weekly for 6 weeks with radiation therapy (RT) 50.4 Gy. Patients received trastuzumab at dose levels of 1, 1.5, or 2 mg/kg weekly for 5 weeks after an initial bolus of 2, 3, or 4 mg/kg. Results: Nineteen patients were entered: 7 (37%) had celiac adenopathy, and 7 (37%) had retroperitoneal, portal adenopathy, or scalene adenopathy. Fourteen of 19 patients (74%) had either 3+ HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry, or an increase in HER2 gene copy number by HER2 gene amplification or high polysomy by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The median survival of all patients was 24 months and the 2-year survival was 50%. Conclusions: Assessment of the effect of trastuzumab in the treatment of patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma overexpressing HER2 is limited by the small number of patients in this study. Overall survival, however, was similar to prior studies without an increase in toxicity. Evaluation of HER2 status should be performed in future trials for patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus that investigate therapies targeting the HER family.

  6. Efficacy and safety profile of combination of tramadol-diclofenac versus tramadol-paracetamol in patients with acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain, and acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: a Phase III, 5-day open-label study

    PubMed Central

    Chandanwale, Ajay S; Sundar, Subramanian; Latchoumibady, Kaliaperumal; Biswas, Swati; Gabhane, Mukesh; Naik, Manoj; Patel, Kamlesh

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a fixed-dose combination (FDC) of tramadol and diclofenac versus a standard approved FDC of tramadol and paracetamol, in patients with acute moderate to severe pain. Methods A total of 204 patients with moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions (n=52), acute flare of osteoarthritis (n=52), acute flare of rheumatoid arthritis (n=50), or postoperative pain (n=50) were enrolled in the study at baseline. Each disease category was then randomized to receive either of two treatments for 5 days: group A received an FDC of immediate-release tramadol hydrochloride (50 mg) and sustained-release diclofenac sodium (75 mg) (one tablet, twice daily), and group B received an FDC of tramadol hydrochloride (37.5 mg) and paracetamol (325 mg) (two tablets every 4–6 hours, up to a maximum of eight tablets daily). The primary efficacy end points were reductions in pain intensity from baseline at day 3 and day 5 as assessed by a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score. Results Group A showed a significant reduction in the VAS score for overall pain from baseline on day 3 (P=0.001) and day 5 (P<0.0001) as compared with group B. The combination of tramadol-diclofenac resulted in few mild to moderate adverse events (nausea, vomiting, epigastric pain, and gastritis), which required minimal management, without any treatment discontinuation. The number of adverse events in group A was nine (8.82%) compared with 22 (21.78%) in group B, after 5 days of treatment. Conclusion An FDC of tramadol-diclofenac showed a significantly greater reduction in pain intensity and was well tolerated compared with tramadol-paracetamol, resulting in better analgesia in patients suffering from moderate to severe pain due to acute musculoskeletal conditions, postoperative pain following orthopedic surgery, or acute flare of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25152629

  7. Effects of PECS Phase III Application Training on Independent Mands in Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Jessica June

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of PECS phase III application training on independent mands in young children with autism. Participants were five children with autism ranging from ages 2 to 4 years old. A multiple baseline across participants was used to evaluate acquisition of independent correct mands across baseline and…

  8. What Works in Oklahoma Schools: A Comprehensive Needs Assessment of Oklahoma Schools. Phase III Action Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzano Research Laboratory, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This document contains the Phase III report from the "What Works in Oklahoma Schools" study. As opposed to describing the findings from the study that was conducted, it provides a tool-kit that can be used by Oklahoma principals and teachers to determine the best courses of action for their schools and classrooms. The tools provided in this report…

  9. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Job Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Conway, T. J.; Tobey, D. H.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Dalton, Angela C.; Pusey, Portia K.

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Job Profiles. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.

  10. SPSP Phase III Recruiting, Selecting, and Developing Secure Power Systems Professionals. Individual and Team Performance Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Conway, T. J.; Tobey, D. H.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Dalton, Angela C.; Pusey, Portia K.

    2015-03-01

    The Secure Power Systems Professional Phase III final report was released last year which an appendix of Individual and Team Performance Guidelines. This new report is that appendix broken out as a standalone document to assist utilities in recruiting and developing Secure Power Systems Professionals at their site.