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Sample records for pattern generation involved

  1. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, Michiyuki

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Also, apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  2. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, N.M.I.

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base is described. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  3. Mask pattern generator employing EPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Masaki; Wakamiya, Wataru; Endo, Nobuhiro

    2003-08-01

    Mask cost is one of crucial issues in device fabrication, especially in SoC (System on a Chip) with small-volume production. The cost mainly depends on productivity of mask manufacturing tools such as mask writers and defect inspection tools. EPL (Electron Projection Lithography) has been developing as a high-throughput electron beam exposure technology that will succeed optical lithography. The application of EPL technology to mask writing will result in high productivity and contribute to decrease the mask cost. The concept of a mask pattern generator employing EPL technology is proposed in this paper. It is very similar to EPL technology used for pattern printing on a wafer. The mask patterns on the glass substrate are exposed by projecting the basic circuit patterns formed on the mother EPL mask. One example of the mother EPL mask is a stencil type made with 200-mm Si wafer. The basic circuit patterns are IP patterns and logical primitive patterns such as cell libraries (AND, OR, Inverter, Flip-Flop and etc.) to express the SoC device patterns. Since the SoC patterns are exposed with its collective units such as IP and logical primitive patterns by using this method, the high throughput will be expected comparing with conventional mask E-beam writers. In this paper, the mask pattern generator with the EPL technology is proposed. The concept, its advantages and issues to be solved are discussed.

  4. Optical Pattern Generator Using Excimer Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Bernhard F.

    1988-01-01

    Reticles (masks on enlarged scale) are needed for optical pattern transfer in the production of integrated semiconductor circuits. In order to meet present requirements for 5X reticles only a direct writing technique is feasible. This means direct exposing of photoresist either with light or an electron beam. Many of todays highly dense reticles require some 10 5 to 10 6 discrete exposures when generated with an optical pattern generator. Optical pattern generators normally use mercury arc lamps to expose positive photoresist, which in turn need 200 milliseconds for each of these discrete exposures, thus requiring to stop the table at every exposure position ("stop and go" mode). This results in running times of several days per reticle. Therefore most reticles are nowadays being manufactured with very expensive e-beam machines. In the early 80's we started the first experiments to expose photoresist with an excimer laser. In order to obtain the maximum gain in speed, the goal was to operate with only one excimer laser pulse per exposure, so that a fast "flash on the fly" operation with an optical pattern generator became true. Equipping a conventional optical pattern generator with an excimer laser as the light source, it has become possible to expose substrates coated with standard photoresist in the "flash on the fly" mode with only 13 nanoseconds per flash. So the thruput could be increased up to 25 times in comparison to a pattern generator equipped with a mercury lamp. A comparison of both operation modes will show that an immense increase of speed is possible, even when a ten years old M3600 pattern generator is used. This system is in function now with very high reliability since more than three years in our IC development line.

  5. Intersecting Circuits Generate Precisely Patterned Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Akrouh, Alejandro; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The developing retina generates spontaneous glutamatergic (stage III) waves of activity that sequentially recruit neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON and OFF RGCs). This activity pattern is thought to help establish parallel ON and OFF pathways in downstream visual areas. The circuits that produce stage III waves and desynchronize ON and OFF RGC firing remain obscure. Using dual patch clamp recordings, we find that ON and OFF RGCs receive sequential excitatory input from ON and OFF cone bipolar cells (CBCs), respectively. This input sequence is generated by crossover circuits, in which ON CBCs control glutamate release from OFF CBCs via diffusely stratified inhibitory amacrine cells. In addition, neighboring ON CBCs communicate directly and indirectly through lateral glutamatergic transmission and gap junctions, both of which are required for wave initiation and propagation. Thus, intersecting lateral excitatory and vertical inhibitory circuits give rise to precisely patterned stage III retinal waves. PMID:23830830

  6. Automatically generating extraction patterns from untagged text

    SciTech Connect

    Riloff, E.

    1996-12-31

    Many corpus-based natural language processing systems rely on text corpora that have been manually annotated with syntactic or semantic tags. In particular, all previous dictionary construction systems for information extraction have used an annotated training corpus or some form of annotated input. We have developed a system called AutoSlog-TS that creates dictionaries of extraction patterns using only untagged text. AutoSlog-TS is based on the AutoSlog system, which generated extraction patterns using annotated text and a set of heuristic rules. By adapting AutoSlog and combining it with statistical techniques, we eliminated its dependency on tagged text. In experiments with the MUC-4 terrorism domain, AutoSlog-TS created a dictionary of extraction patterns that performed comparably to a dictionary created by AutoSlog, using only preclassified texts as input.

  7. Patterning techniques for next generation IC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reduction of linear critical dimensions (CDs) beyond 45 nm would require significant increase of the complexity of pattern definition process. In this work, we discuss the key successor methodology to the current optical lithography, the Double Patterning Technique (DPT). We compare the complexity of CAD solutions, fab equipment, and wafer processing with its competitors, such as the nanoimprint (NIL) and the extreme UV (EUV) techniques. We also look ahead to the market availability for the product families enabled using the novel patterning solutions. DPT is often recognized as the most viable next generation lithography as it utilizes the existing equipment and processes and is considered a stop-gap solution before the advanced NIL or EUV equipment is developed. Using design for manufacturability (DfM) rules, DPT can drive the k1 factor down to 0.13. However, it faces a variety of challenges, from new mask overlay strategies, to layout pattern split, novel OPC, increased CD tolerances, new etch techniques, as well as long processing time, all of which compromise its return on investment (RoI). In contrast, it can be claimed e.g., that the RoI is the highest for the NIL but this technology bears significant risk. For all novel patterning techniques, the key questions remain: when and how should they be introduced, what is their long-term potential, when should they be replaced, and by what successor technology. We summarize the unpublished results of several panel discussions on DPT at the recent SPIE/BACUS conferences.

  8. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-02-15

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin-Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease. PMID:25433077

  9. Pattern formation during the CO-oxidation involving subsurface oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotermund, Harm Hinrich; Pollmann, Michael; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.

    2002-03-01

    This paper focuses on subsurface oxygen and its influence on pattern formation during CO-oxidation on platinum surfaces. For the observation of spatiotemporal pattern formation during catalytic reactions the photoelectron emission microscope (PEEM) has proven to be an excellent real-time imaging instrument, capable of tracking local work function changes. The existence of subsurface oxygen on platinumlike surfaces has been extensively discussed and for palladium its presence has been clearly established during rate oscillations. Subsurface oxygen is defined at this point as an atomic O species located directly underneath the uppermost metal crystal layer; its dipole moment therefore considerably lowers the work function of the surface. Here we review some of the investigations involving subsurface oxygen, focusing on the role subsurface oxygen might play in pattern formation during CO-oxidation on platinum. We will also present some new results, where this species clearly interacts with chemisorbed oxygen under restrictions by boundary conditions on the Pt(110) single crystal. These previously (through microlithography) constructed domain boundaries on the surface are made out of Rh or Pd, and they are acting as an additional source of CO molecules for the Pt surface.

  10. Generation 1.5 Written Error Patterns: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolan, Stephen M.; Miller, Donald

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to contribute to existing research on Generation 1.5 students, the current study uses quantitative and qualitative methods to compare error patterns in a corpus of Generation 1.5, L1, and L2 community college student writing. This error analysis provides one important way to determine if error patterns in Generation 1.5 student…

  11. Atypical patterns of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, J J; Elkholy, K; O'Brien, J; Kiernan, T

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our cardiology service with chest pain, exertional dyspnoea and palpitations on a background of known Fabry disease diagnosed with genetic testing in 1994. ECG showed sinus rhythm, shortened PR interval, widespread t wave inversion, q waves in the lateral leads and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Coronary angiogram showed only mild atheroma. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed anterolateral LVH and reduced left ventricular cavity size in keeping with Fabry cardiomyopathy. Cardiac MRI demonstrated asymmetric hypertrophy with evidence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in the maximally hypertrophied segments from base to apex with late gadolinium enhancement in the anterior and anteroseptal walls. This was quite an atypical appearance for Fabry cardiomyopathy. This case highlights the heterogeneity of patterns of cardiac involvement that may be associated with this rare X-linked lysosomal disorder. PMID:26989114

  12. Generating Spatiotemporal Joint Torque Patterns from Dynamical Synchronization of Distributed Pattern Generators

    PubMed Central

    Pitti, Alexandre; Lungarella, Max; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Pattern generators found in the spinal cord are no more seen as simple rhythmic oscillators for motion control. Indeed, they achieve flexible and dynamical coordination in interaction with the body and the environment dynamics giving to rise motor synergies. Discovering the mechanisms underlying the control of motor synergies constitutes an important research question not only for neuroscience but also for robotics: the motors coordination of high dimensional robotic systems is still a drawback and new control methods based on biological solutions may reduce their overall complexity. We propose to model the flexible combination of motor synergies in embodied systems via partial phase synchronization of distributed chaotic systems; for specific coupling strength, chaotic systems are able to phase synchronize their dynamics to the resonant frequencies of one external force. We take advantage of this property to explore and exploit the intrinsic dynamics of one specified embodied system. In two experiments with bipedal walkers, we show how motor synergies emerge when the controllers phase synchronize to the body's dynamics, entraining it to its intrinsic behavioral patterns. This stage is characterized by directed information flow from the sensors to the motors exhibiting the optimal situation when the body dynamics drive the controllers (mutual entrainment). Based on our results, we discuss the relevance of our findings for modeling the modular control of distributed pattern generators exhibited in the spinal cord, and for exploring the motor synergies in robots. PMID:20011216

  13. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, A. M.; Tarasov, N.; Churkin, D. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems.

  14. Pattern Generation by Dissipative Parametric Instability.

    PubMed

    Perego, A M; Tarasov, N; Churkin, D V; Turitsyn, S K; Staliunas, K

    2016-01-15

    Nonlinear instabilities are responsible for spontaneous pattern formation in a vast number of natural and engineered systems, ranging from biology to galaxy buildup. We propose a new instability mechanism leading to pattern formation in spatially extended nonlinear systems, which is based on a periodic antiphase modulation of spectrally dependent losses arranged in a zigzag way: an effective filtering is imposed at symmetrically located wave numbers k and -k in alternating order. The properties of the dissipative parametric instability differ from the features of both key classical concepts of modulation instabilities, i.e., the Benjamin-Feir instability and the Faraday instabiltyity. We demonstrate how the dissipative parametric instability can lead to the formation of stable patterns in one- and two-dimensional systems. The proposed instability mechanism is generic and can naturally occur or can be implemented in various physical systems. PMID:26824573

  15. Central Pattern Generator for Locomotion: Anatomical, Physiological, and Pathophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on major innovations over the past century in research on the spinal cord and, specifically, on specialized spinal circuits involved in the control of rhythmic locomotor pattern generation and modulation. Pioneers such as Charles Sherrington and Thomas Graham Brown have conducted experiments in the early twentieth century that changed our views of the neural control of locomotion. Their seminal work supported subsequently by several decades of evidence has led to the conclusion that walking, flying, and swimming are largely controlled by a network of spinal neurons generally referred to as the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion. It has been subsequently demonstrated across all vertebrate species examined, from lampreys to humans, that this CPG is capable, under some conditions, to self-produce, even in absence of descending or peripheral inputs, basic rhythmic, and coordinated locomotor movements. Recent evidence suggests, in turn, that plasticity changes of some CPG elements may contribute to the development of specific pathophysiological conditions associated with impaired locomotion or spontaneous locomotor-like movements. This article constitutes a comprehensive review summarizing key findings on the CPG as well as on its potential role in Restless Leg Syndrome, Periodic Leg Movement, and Alternating Leg Muscle Activation. Special attention will be paid to the role of the CPG in a recently identified, and uniquely different neurological disorder, called the Uner Tan Syndrome. PMID:23403923

  16. A central pattern generator producing alternative outputs: temporal pattern of premotor activity.

    PubMed

    Norris, Brian J; Weaver, Adam L; Morris, Lee G; Wenning, Angela; García, Paul A; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2006-07-01

    The central pattern generator for heartbeat in medicinal leeches constitutes seven identified pairs of segmental heart interneurons. Four identified pairs of heart interneurons make a staggered pattern of inhibitory synaptic connections with segmental heart motor neurons. Using extracellular recording from multiple interneurons in the network in 56 isolated nerve cords, we show that this pattern generator produces a side-to-side asymmetric pattern of intersegmental coordination among ipsilateral premotor interneurons. This pattern corresponds to a similarly asymmetric fictive motor pattern in heart motor neurons and asymmetric constriction pattern of the two tubular hearts, synchronous and peristaltic. We provide a quantitative description of the firing pattern of all the premotor interneurons, including phase, duty cycle, and intraburst frequency of this premotor activity pattern. This analysis identifies two stereotypical coordination modes corresponding to synchronous and peristaltic, which show phase constancy over a broad range of periods as do the fictive motor pattern and the heart constriction pattern. Coordination mode is controlled through one segmental pair of heart interneurons (switch interneurons). Side-to-side switches in coordination mode are a regular feature of this pattern generator and occur with changes in activity state of these switch interneurons. Associated with synchronous coordination of premotor interneurons, the ipsilateral switch interneuron is in an active state, during which it produces rhythmic bursts, whereas associated with peristaltic coordination, the ipsilateral switch interneuron is largely silent. We argue that timing and pattern elaboration are separate functions produced by overlapping subnetworks in the heartbeat central pattern generator. PMID:16611849

  17. Computer-Assisted Generation of Patterns and Virtual Reality Techniques for Fashion Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, Mickael; Richard, Paul; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2009-03-01

    We present a methodology for the design of aesthetic patterns and their visualization on virtual clothes. Generated patterns are directly mapped on the dress of a virtual mannequin. Furthermore, patterns sets may be interactively mapped on the virtual dress using a specific 3D interaction technique called Back-and-Forth. Pattern generation involves different mathematical approaches such as iterated function systems (IFS) and nonlinear trajectory models. Both model parameters and color space exploration is performed through a simple user interface. This work contributes to promote both computer assistance in the context of mass customization for fashion design.

  18. Parental Involvement in Adolescent Romantic Relationships: Patterns and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Marni L.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined dimensions of mothers' and fathers' involvement in adolescents' romantic relationships when offspring were age 17. Using cluster analysis, parents from 105 White, working and middle class families were classified as positively involved, negatively involved, or autonomy-oriented with respect to their adolescents' romantic…

  19. Automated branching pattern report generation for laparoscopic surgery assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Tetsuro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a method for generating branching pattern reports of abdominal blood vessels for laparoscopic gastrectomy. In gastrectomy, it is very important to understand branching structure of abdominal arteries and veins, which feed and drain specific abdominal organs including the stomach, the liver and the pancreas. In the real clinical stage, a surgeon creates a diagnostic report of the patient anatomy. This report summarizes the branching patterns of the blood vessels related to the stomach. The surgeon decides actual operative procedure. This paper shows an automated method to generate a branching pattern report for abdominal blood vessels based on automated anatomical labeling. The report contains 3D rendering showing important blood vessels and descriptions of branching patterns of each vessel. We have applied this method for fifty cases of 3D abdominal CT scans and confirmed the proposed method can automatically generate branching pattern reports of abdominal arteries.

  20. An optical pattern classification using computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiki, Yoshinori; Matsushita, Kenji; Shimizu, Eiji

    1990-07-01

    An optical pattern classification system is proposed which performs weighting and summation by the optical system using computer-generated holograms (CGHs). The system makes it possible to simplify the structure and to improve the processing speed. A trainable pattern classification system which performs weight modification by using a CGH matrix and a dot matrix liquid crystal display (LCD) as a shutter array is proposed. The trainable pattern classifier using a CGH matrix and LCD is described, and the experimental results are presented.

  1. Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory flume channel, equipped with an acoustic Doppler flow sensor and a bottom scanning laser, was used for detailed, non-intrusive flow measurements (at 2 cm s - 1 and 10 cm s - 1 ) around solitary biogenic structures, combined with high-resolution mapping of the structure shape and position. The structures were replicates of typical macrozoobenthic species commonly found in the Mecklenburg Bight and with a presumed influence on both, the near-bed current regime and sediment transport dynamics: a worm tube, a snail shell, a mussel, a sand mound, a pit, and a cross-stream track furrow. The flow was considerably altered locally by the different protruding structures (worm tube, snail, mussel and mound). They reduced the horizontal approach velocity by 72% to 79% in the wake zone at about 1-2 cm height, and the flow was deflected around the structures with vertical and lateral velocities of up to 10% and 20% of the free-stream velocity respectively in a region adjacent to the structures. The resulting flow separation (at flow Reynolds number of about 4000 and 20,000 respectively) divided an outer deflection region from an inner region with characteristic vortices and the wake region. All protruding structures showed this general pattern, but also produced individual characteristics. Conversely, the depressions (track and pit) only had a weak influence on the local boundary layer flow, combined with a considerable flow reduction within their cavities (between 29% and 53% of the free-stream velocity). A longitudinal vortex formed, below which a stagnant space was found. The average height affected by the structure-related mass flow rate deficit for the two velocities was 1.6 cm and 1.3 cm respectively (80% of height and 64%) for the protruding structures and 0.6 cm and 0.9 cm (90% and 127% of depth) for the depressions. Marine benthic soft-bottom macrozoobenthos species are expected to benefit from the flow modifications they induce, particularly in terms of

  2. Examining Associations between Race, Urbanicity, and Patterns of Bullying Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldweber, Asha; Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the role of race and urbanicity in bullying involvement has been limited. The present study examined bullying involvement subgroups that relate to race, urbanicity, and the perceived reason for the bullying. Self-report data were collected from 10,254 middle school youth (49.8% female; 62.4% Caucasian, 19.0% African American, and 5.6%…

  3. Examining associations between race, urbanicity, and patterns of bullying involvement.

    PubMed

    Goldweber, Asha; Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2013-02-01

    Research on the role of race and urbanicity in bullying involvement has been limited. The present study examined bullying involvement subgroups that relate to race, urbanicity, and the perceived reason for the bullying. Self-report data were collected from 10,254 middle school youth (49.8 % female; 62.4 % Caucasian, 19.0 % African American, and 5.6 % Hispanic) and latent class analyses were used to identify three subtypes of bullying involvement: low involvement (50 %), victim (31.3 %), and bully-victim (18.7 %). Irrespective of urbanicity (urban vs. non-urban), African American youth were more likely to be members of either the victim or bully-victim classes than the low involvement class. Further exploration of the community context suggested that urbanicity was associated with the increased likelihood of having been racially bullied. Urban bully-victims were also more likely to have been bullied about money than non-urban bully-victims. Findings underscore the importance of addressing both race and urbanicity for culturally sensitive prevention programming. PMID:23095907

  4. Identification of Regional Lymph Node Involvement of Colorectal Cancer by Serum SELDI Proteomic Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Nai-Jun; Gao, Chun-Fang; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2011-01-01

    Background. To explore the application of serum proteomic patterns for the preoperative detection of regional lymph node involvement of colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods. Serum samples were applied to immobilized metal affinity capture ProteinChip to generate mass spectra by Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Proteomic spectra of serum samples from 70 node-positive CRC patients and 75 age- and gender-matched node-negative CRC patients were employed as a training set, and a classification tree was generated by using Biomarker Pattern Software package. The validity of the classification tree was then challenged with a blind test set including another 65 CRC patients. Results. The software identified an average of 46 mass peaks/spectrum and 5 of the identified peaks at m/z 3,104, 3,781, 5,867, 7,970, and 9,290 were used to construct the classification tree. The classification tree separated effectively node-positive CRC patients from node-negative CRC patients, achieving a sensitivity of 94.29% and a specificity of 100.00%. The blind test challenged the model independently with a sensitivity of 91.43% a specificity of 96.67%. Conclusions. The results indicate that SELDI-TOF-MS can correctly distinguish node-positive CRC patients from node-negative ones and show great potential for preoperative screening for regional lymph node involvement of CRC. PMID:22253617

  5. Fringe patterns generated by micro-optical sensors for pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Tamee, Kreangsak; Chaiwong, Khomyuth; Yothapakdee, Kriengsak; Yupapin, Preecha P

    2015-01-01

    We present a new result of pattern recognition generation scheme using a small-scale optical muscle sensing system, which consisted of an optical add-drop filter incorporating two nonlinear optical side ring resonators. When light from laser source enters into the system, the device is stimulated by an external physical parameter that introduces a change in the phase of light propagation within the sensing device, which can be formed by the interference fringe patterns. Results obtained have shown that the fringe patterns can be used to form the relationship between signal patterns and fringe pattern recognitions. PMID:24450752

  6. Patterns of airway involvement in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ilias; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Papiris, Spyros A

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur commonly in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Pulmonary manifestations (PM) of IBD may be divided in airway disorders, interstitial lung disorders, serositis, pulmonary vasculitis, necrobiotic nodules, drug-induced lung disease, thromboembolic lung disease and enteropulmonary fistulas. Pulmonary involvement may often be asymptomatic and detected solely on the basis of abnormal screening tests. The common embryonic origin of the intestine and the lungs from the primitive foregut, the co-existence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue in both organs, autoimmunity, smoking and bacterial translocation from the colon to the lungs may all be involved in the pathogenesis of PM in IBD. PM are mainly detected by pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography. This review will focus on the involvement of the airways in the context of IBD, especially stenoses of the large airways, tracheobronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchitis, mucoid impaction, bronchial granulomas, bronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and the co-existence of IBD with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoidosis and a1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:25400999

  7. The generation of antiphase oscillations and synchrony by a rebound-based vertebrate central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Chang; Merrison-Hort, Robert; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Borisyuk, Roman

    2014-04-23

    Many neural circuits are capable of generating multiple stereotyped outputs after different sensory inputs or neuromodulation. We have previously identified the central pattern generator (CPG) for Xenopus tadpole swimming that involves antiphase oscillations of activity between the left and right sides. Here we analyze the cellular basis for spontaneous left-right motor synchrony characterized by simultaneous bursting on both sides at twice the swimming frequency. Spontaneous synchrony bouts are rare in most tadpoles, and they instantly emerge from and switch back to swimming, most frequently within the first second after skin stimulation. Analyses show that only neurons that are active during swimming fire action potentials in synchrony, suggesting both output patterns derive from the same neural circuit. The firing of excitatory descending interneurons (dINs) leads that of other types of neurons in synchrony as it does in swimming. During synchrony, the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition is 7.9 ± 1 ms, shorter than that in swimming (41 ± 2.3 ms). The occasional, extra midcycle firing of dINs during swimming may initiate synchrony, and mismatches of timing in the left and right activity can switch synchrony back to swimming. Computer modeling supports these findings by showing that the same neural network, in which reciprocal inhibition mediates rebound firing, can generate both swimming and synchrony without circuit reconfiguration. Modeling also shows that lengthening the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition by increasing dIN synaptic/conduction delay can improve the stability of synchrony. PMID:24760866

  8. Digitally based pattern generator for an electron-beam welder

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, L.G. III

    1981-02-19

    A digitally based deflection generator for an electron-beam welder is presented. Up to seven patterns of any shape are stored in programmable read-only memory (PROM). The pattern resolution is 39% at frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 kHz and can be x-t, y-t, or x-y formed. Frequency and pattern selections may be chosen by the welder computer or manually selected on the front panel. The ability to repeatedly synchronize two waveforms of any shape and frequency enables an unlimited variety of welds.

  9. Ring Counter Based ATPG for Low Transition Test Pattern Generation

    PubMed Central

    Begam, V. M. Thoulath; Baulkani, S.

    2015-01-01

    In test mode test patterns are applied in random fashion to the circuit under circuit. This increases switching transition between the consecutive test patterns and thereby increases dynamic power dissipation. The proposed ring counter based ATPG reduces vertical switching transitions by inserting test vectors only between the less correlative test patterns. This paper presents the RC-ATPG with an external circuit. The external circuit consists of XOR gates, full adders, and multiplexers. First the total number of transitions between the consecutive test patterns is determined. If it is more, then the external circuit generates and inserts test vectors in between the two test patterns. Test vector insertion increases the correlation between the test patterns and reduces dynamic power dissipation. The results prove that the test patterns generated by the proposed ATPG have fewer transitions than the conventional ATPG. Experimental results based on ISCAS'85 and ISCAS'89 benchmark circuits show 38.5% reduction in the average power and 50% reduction in the peak power attained during testing with a small size decoding logic. PMID:26075295

  10. Automatic generation of primary sequence patterns from sets of related protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Smith, R F; Smith, T F

    1990-01-01

    We have developed a computer algorithm that can extract the pattern of conserved primary sequence elements common to all members of a homologous protein family. The method involves clustering the pairwise similarity scores among a set of related sequences to generate a binary dendrogram (tree). The tree is then reduced in a stepwise manner by progressively replacing the node connecting the two most similar termini by one common pattern until only a single common "root" pattern remains. A pattern is generated at a node by (i) performing a local optimal alignment on the sequence/pattern pair connected by the node with the use of an extended dynamic programming algorithm and then (ii) constructing a single common pattern from this alignment with a nested hierarchy of amino acid classes to identify the minimal inclusive amino acid class covering each paired set of elements in the alignment. Gaps within an alignment are created and/or extended using a "pay once" gap penalty rule, and gapped positions are converted into gap characters that function as 0 or 1 amino acid of any type during subsequent alignment. This method has been used to generate a library of covering patterns for homologous families in the National Biomedical Research Foundation/Protein Identification Resource protein sequence data base. We show that a covering pattern can be more diagnostic for sequence family membership than any of the individual sequences used to construct the pattern. PMID:2296575

  11. A movement pattern generator model using artificial neural networks.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Gander, R E; Wood, H C

    1992-07-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANN's) allow a new approach to biological modeling. The main applications of ANN's have been geared towards the modeling of the association and learning mechanisms of the brain; only a few researchers have explored them for motor control. The fact that ANN's are based on biological systems indicates their potential application for a biological act such as locomotion. Towards this goal, we have developed a "movement pattern generator," using an ANN for generating periodic movement trajectories. This model is based on the concept of "central pattern generators." Jordan's sequential network, which is capable of learning sequences of patterns, was modified and used to generate several bipedal trajectories (or gaits), coded in task space, at different frequencies. The network model successfully learned all of the trajectories presented to it. The model has many attractive properties such as limit cycle behavior, generalization of trajectories and frequencies, phase maintenance, and fault tolerance. The movement pattern generator model is potentially applicable for improved understanding of animal locomotion and for use in legged robots and rehabilitation medicine. PMID:1516938

  12. Central respiratory pattern generation in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Milsom, W K; Reid, S G; Meier, J T; Kinkead, R

    1999-11-01

    There are two components to breathing pattern generation the production of the pattern of neural discharge associated with individual breaths, and the pattern in which breaths are produced to effect ventilation. Bullfrogs typically breathe with randomly distributed breaths. When respiratory drive is elevated, breathing becomes more regular and often episodic. Studies on in vitro brainstem-spinal cord preparations of the adult bullfrog and in situ preparations of decerebrate, paralyzed, unidirectionally ventilated animals suggest that output from the central rhythm generator in frogs is conditional on receiving some input and that a host of central inputs remain even in the most reduced preparations. There appear to be descending inputs from sites in the dorsal brainstem just caudal to the optic chiasma that cluster breaths into episodes, a strong excitatory input caudal to this site but rostral to the origin of the Vth cranial nerve and, possibly, segmental rhythm generators throughout the medulla that are normally entrained to produce the normal breathing pattern. The data also suggest that the shape of the discharge pattern (augmenting, decrementing) and timing of outputs (alternating vs synchronous) associated with motor outflow during each breath are also dependent on the interconnections between these various sites. PMID:10665378

  13. Central pattern generator for vocalization: Is there a vertebrate morphotype?

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Animals that generate acoustic signals for social communication are faced with two essential tasks: generate a temporally precise signal and inform the auditory system about the occurrence of one’s own sonic signal. Recent studies of sound producing fishes delineate a hindbrain network comprised of anatomically distinct compartments coding equally distinct neurophysiological properties that allow an organism to meet these behavioral demands. A set of neural characters comprising a vocal-sonic central pattern generator (CPG) morphotype is proposed for fishes and tetrapods that shares evolutionary developmental origins with pectoral appendage motor systems. PMID:25050813

  14. Generating Coherent Patterns of Activity from Chaotic Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Abbott, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural circuits display complex activity patterns both spontaneously and when responding to a stimulus or generating a motor output. How are these two forms of activity related? We develop a procedure called FORCE learning for modifying synaptic strengths either external to or within a model neural network to change chaotic spontaneous activity into a wide variety of desired activity patterns. FORCE learning works even though the networks we train are spontaneously chaotic and we leave feedback loops intact and unclamped during learning. Using this approach, we construct networks that produce a wide variety of complex output patterns, input-output transformations that require memory, multiple outputs that can be switched by control inputs, and motor patterns matching human motion capture data. Our results reproduce data on pre-movement activity in motor and premotor cortex, and suggest that synaptic plasticity may be a more rapid and powerful modulator of network activity than generally appreciated. PMID:19709635

  15. Modeling Scalable Pattern Generation in DNA Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Peter B.; Chen, Xi; Simpson, Zack B.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a theoretical framework for developing patterns in multiple dimensions using controllable diffusion and designed reactions implemented in DNA. This includes so-called strand displacement reactions in which one single-stranded DNA hybridizes to a hemi-duplex DNA and displaces another single-stranded DNA, reversibly or irreversibly. These reactions can be designed to proceed with designed rate and molecular specificity. By also controlling diffusion by partial complementarity to a stationary, cross-linked DNA, we can generate predictable patterns. We demonstrate this with several simulations showing deterministic, predictable shapes in space. PMID:25506295

  16. Order parameter for bursting polyrhythms in multifunctional central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2011-05-01

    We examine multistability of several coexisting bursting patterns in a central pattern generator network composed of three Hodgkin-Huxley type cells coupled reciprocally by inhibitory synapses. We establish that the control of switching between bursting polyrhythms and their bifurcations are determined by the temporal characteristics, such as the duty cycle, of networked interneurons and the coupling strength asymmetry. A computationally effective approach to the reduction of dynamics of the nine-dimensional network to two-dimensional Poincaré return mappings for phase lags between the interneurons is presented.

  17. Neural Sequence Generation Using Spatiotemporal Patterns of Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Jonathan; Kopell, Nancy; Gardner, Timothy; Markowitz, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    Stereotyped sequences of neural activity are thought to underlie reproducible behaviors and cognitive processes ranging from memory recall to arm movement. One of the most prominent theoretical models of neural sequence generation is the synfire chain, in which pulses of synchronized spiking activity propagate robustly along a chain of cells connected by highly redundant feedforward excitation. But recent experimental observations in the avian song production pathway during song generation have shown excitatory activity interacting strongly with the firing patterns of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a process of sequence generation more complex than feedforward excitation. Here we propose a model of sequence generation inspired by these observations in which a pulse travels along a spatially recurrent excitatory chain, passing repeatedly through zones of local feedback inhibition. In this model, synchrony and robust timing are maintained not through redundant excitatory connections, but rather through the interaction between the pulse and the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibition that it creates as it circulates the network. These results suggest that spatially and temporally structured inhibition may play a key role in sequence generation. PMID:26536029

  18. Neural Sequence Generation Using Spatiotemporal Patterns of Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jonathan; Kopell, Nancy; Gardner, Timothy; Markowitz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Stereotyped sequences of neural activity are thought to underlie reproducible behaviors and cognitive processes ranging from memory recall to arm movement. One of the most prominent theoretical models of neural sequence generation is the synfire chain, in which pulses of synchronized spiking activity propagate robustly along a chain of cells connected by highly redundant feedforward excitation. But recent experimental observations in the avian song production pathway during song generation have shown excitatory activity interacting strongly with the firing patterns of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a process of sequence generation more complex than feedforward excitation. Here we propose a model of sequence generation inspired by these observations in which a pulse travels along a spatially recurrent excitatory chain, passing repeatedly through zones of local feedback inhibition. In this model, synchrony and robust timing are maintained not through redundant excitatory connections, but rather through the interaction between the pulse and the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibition that it creates as it circulates the network. These results suggest that spatially and temporally structured inhibition may play a key role in sequence generation. PMID:26536029

  19. Generating patterns from fields of cells. Examples from Drosophila segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sanson, B

    2001-12-01

    In Drosophila, a cascade of maternal, gap, pair-rule and segment polarity genes subdivides the antero/posterior axis of the embryo into repeating segmental stripes. This review summarizes what happens next, i.e. how an intrasegmental pattern is generated and controls the differentiation of specific cell types in the epidermis. Within each segment, cells secreting the signalling molecules Wingless (the homologue of vertebrate Wnt-1) and Hedgehog are found in narrow stripes on both sides of the parasegmental boundary. The Wingless and Hedgehog organizing activities help to establish two more stripes per segment that localize ligands for the Epidermal Growth Factor and the Notch signalling pathways, respectively. These four signals then act at short range and in concert to control epidermal differentiation at the single cell level across the segment. This example from Drosophila provides a paradigm for how organizers generate precise patterns, and ultimately different cell types, in a naïve field of cells. PMID:11743020

  20. Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

  1. Continuities and changes in infant attachment patterns across two generations.

    PubMed

    Raby, K Lee; Steele, Ryan D; Carlson, Elizabeth A; Sroufe, L Alan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the intergenerational continuities and changes in infant attachment patterns within a higher-risk longitudinal sample of 55 female participants born into poverty. Infant attachment was assessed using the Strange Situation when participants were 12 and 18 months as well as several decades later with participants' children. Paralleling earlier findings from this sample on the stability of attachment patterns from infancy to young adulthood, results provided evidence for intergenerational continuities in attachment disorganization but not security. Children of adults with histories of infant attachment disorganization were at an increased risk of forming disorganized attachments. Although changes in infant attachment patterns across the two generations were not correlated with individuals' caregiving experiences or interpersonal stresses and supports during childhood and adolescence, higher quality social support during adulthood was associated with intergenerational changes from insecure to secure infant-caregiver attachment relationships. PMID:26213155

  2. Continuities and Changes in Infant Attachment Patterns Across Two Generations

    PubMed Central

    Raby, K. Lee; Steele, Ryan D.; Carlson, Elizabeth A.; Sroufe, L. Alan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the intergenerational continuities and changes in infant attachment patterns within a higher-risk longitudinal sample of 55 female participants born into poverty. Infant attachment was assessed using the Strange Situation when participants were 12 and 18 months as well as several decades later with participants’ children. Paralleling earlier findings from this sample on the stability of attachment patterns from infancy to young adulthood, results provided evidence for intergenerational continuities in attachment disorganization but not security. Children of adults with histories of infant attachment disorganization were at an increased risk of forming disorganized attachments. Although changes in infant attachment patterns across the two generations were not correlated with individuals’ caregiving experiences or interpersonal stresses and supports during childhood and adolescence, higher quality social support during adulthood was associated with intergenerational changes from insecure to secure infant-caregiver attachment relationships. PMID:26213155

  3. Electron beam pattern generator sensitivity to target potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Junru; Hartley, John

    2005-11-01

    Electrostatic chucking is the plan of record for mask clamping in Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. In order to minimize mask distortion it is recommended by the EUV lithography community that identical electrostatic chucks be used in the mask patterning and metrology tools. The high voltages used in electrostatic chucking have the potential to establish voltages on the mask surface, which may influence the electron optical characteristics of the pattern generator to the detrimental imaging of the pattern. To understand the relationship between image degradation and mask surface voltages, we are modeling the interaction between mask potential and electron beam columns. The first system modeled consists entirely of electrostatic elements, and the second one is a more traditional electron beam lithography system with electrostatic and magnetic components. All of the working parameters of the systems were fixed to establish optimal imaging on the grounded mask. We then altered the potential on the mask surface and determined the impact on focus and deflection errors. The simulation results establish the relationship between the mask potential, focus and deflection errors. Detailed data of focus deflection error versus mask potential will be presented for these electron beam column configurations. When combined with ITRS roadmap specifications, these results set boundaries on mask and chuck configurations as well as grounding schemes. The results are also applicable to charged particle maskless lithography schemes as well as issues of substrate charging in both pattern generators and metrology tools.

  4. Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2011-01-25

    In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

  5. Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2012-09-25

    In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

  6. Involvement of Working Memory in College Students' Sequential Pattern Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; De Los Reyes, Andres; Rowan, James D.; Lee, Bern; Delise, Justin; Molina, Sabrina; Cogdill, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    When learning highly organized sequential patterns of information, humans and nonhuman animals learn rules regarding the hierarchical structures of these sequences. In three experiments, we explored the role of working memory in college students' sequential pattern learning and performance in a computerized task involving a sequential…

  7. Patterns of Romantic Involvement among Emerging Adults: Psychosocial Correlates and Precursors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Shmuel; Scharf, Miri; Livne, Yaara; Barr, Tamuz

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined patterns of romantic involvement in 100 Israeli emerging adults (54 males) who were followed from age 22 to 29 years. Analyses of interviews at age 29 yielded four distinctive relational patterns that are associated with different levels of concurrent wellbeing: Intimately committed, Intimate, Non- intimately committed,…

  8. Use of design pattern layout for automatic metrology recipe generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabery, Cyrus; Page, Lorena

    2005-05-01

    As critical dimension control requirements become more challenging, due to complex designs, aggressive lithography, and the constant need to shrink,metrology recipe generation and design evaluation have also become very complex. Hundreds of unique sites must be measured and monitored to ensure good device performance and high yield. The use of the design and layout for automated metrology recipe generation will be critical to that challenge. The DesignGauge from Hitachi implements a system enabling arbitrary recipe generation and control of SEM observations performed on the wafer, based only on the design information. This concept for recipe generation can reduce the time to develop a technology node from RET and design rule selection, through OPC model calibration and verification, and all the way to high volume manufacturing. Conventional recipe creation for a large number of measurement targets requires a significant amount of engineering time. Often these recipes are used only once or twice during mask and process verification or OPC calibration data acquisition. This process of manual setup and analysis is also potentially error prone. CD-SEM recipe creation typically requires an actual wafer, so the recipe creation cannot occur until the scanner and reticle are in house. All of these problems with conventional CD SEM lead to increased development time and reduced final process quality. The new model of CD-SEM recipe generation and management utilizes design-to-SEM matching technology. This new technology extracts an idealized shape from the designed pattern, and utilizes the shape information for pattern matching. As a result, the designed pattern is used as basis for the template instead of the actual SEM image. Recipe creation can be achieved in a matter of seconds once the target site list is finalized. The sequence of steps for creating a recipe are: generate a target site list, pass the design polygons (GDS) and site list to the CD SEM, define references

  9. Mexican-Origin Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Adolescents' Peer Relationships: A Pattern-Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Perez-Brena, Norma J.; Baril, Megan E.; McHale, Susan M.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2012-01-01

    Using latent profile analysis, the authors examined patterns of mother-father involvement in adolescents' peer relationships along three dimensions--support, guidance, and restrictions--in 240 Mexican-origin families. Three profiles were identified: (a) High Mother Involvement (mothers higher than fathers on all three dimensions), (b) High…

  10. Patterns of Parental Involvement in Selected OECD Countries: Cross-National Analyses of PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartas, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), patterns of parental involvement were examined in selected OECD countries. The findings showed that, irrespective of educational qualifications, parents were frequently involved in their children's learning at the start of primary school and at age 15. Cross-national…

  11. Stochastic Generation of Wind Patterns over Lake Geneva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Barry, C. E.; Razmi, A. M.; Lemmin, U.; Le Dantec, N.

    2011-12-01

    stochastic generator of wind-pattern indices, i.e., the INAR(1) model produces a sequence of integers, each of which corresponds to a wind pattern. For a given index, the aforementioned binned COSMO wind fields were sampled randomly to produce the stochastic wind-field sequence.

  12. Pattern Recognition on Read Positioning in Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Boseon; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness and the utility of the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology are based on the assumption that the DNA or cDNA cleavage required to generate short sequence reads is random. Several previous reports suggest the existence of sequencing bias of NGS reads. To address this question in greater detail, we analyze NGS data from four organisms with different GC content, Plasmodium falciparum (19.39%), Arabidopsis thaliana (36.03%), Homo sapiens (40.91%) and Streptomyces coelicolor (72.00%). Using machine learning techniques, we recognize the pattern that the NGS read start is positioned in the local region where the nucleotide distribution is dissimilar from the global nucleotide distribution. We also demonstrate that the mono-nucleotide distribution underestimates sequencing bias, and the recognized pattern is explained largely by the distribution of multi-nucleotides (di-, tri-, and tetra- nucleotides) rather than mono-nucleotides. This implies that the correction of sequencing bias needs to be performed on the basis of the multi-nucleotide distribution. Providing companion software to quantify the effect of the recognized pattern on read positioning, we exemplify that the bias correction based on the mono-nucleotide distribution may not be sufficient to clean sequencing bias. PMID:27299343

  13. CT and MRI of diffuse lobar involvement pattern in liver pathology.

    PubMed

    Karçaaltincaba, Muşturay; Sirlin, Claude B

    2011-12-01

    Focal, segmental, and diffuse liver pathologies have been described in the literature. This article describes a pattern in which liver pathology is confined to a lobe. This lobar pattern has not been described previously to our knowledge. Herein, we illustrate computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of diffuse lobar involvement patterns in various liver conditions. Diffuse lobar involvement can be observed in benign (steatosis, hepatic iron overload, cholestasis, perfusion alterations, infarction, alveolar hydatid cysts, trauma, and hemangiomas) and primary malignant (hepatocellular carcinoma) pathologies. Diffuse lobar involvement in metastatic disease appears to be rare. Due in part to their potentially unusual appearances, the diagnosis of lobar pathologies using imaging can be challenging, and entities with lobar patterns can cause diagnostic confusion. Liver MRI can be used as a problem-solving tool for diffuse lobar pathologies detected on ultrasonography and CT. Inand out-of-phase MRI can help in the assessment of lobar fat accumulation. PMID:21053176

  14. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  15. Evolution of central pattern generators and rhythmic behaviours.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of rhythmic movements and the central pattern generators (CPGs) that control them uncover principles about the evolution of behaviour and neural circuits. Over the course of evolutionary history, gradual evolution of behaviours and their neural circuitry within any lineage of animals has been a predominant occurrence. Small changes in gene regulation can lead to divergence of circuit organization and corresponding changes in behaviour. However, some behavioural divergence has resulted from large-scale rewiring of the neural network. Divergence of CPG circuits has also occurred without a corresponding change in behaviour. When analogous rhythmic behaviours have evolved independently, it has generally been with different neural mechanisms. Repeated evolution of particular rhythmic behaviours has occurred within some lineages due to parallel evolution or latent CPGs. Particular motor pattern generating mechanisms have also evolved independently in separate lineages. The evolution of CPGs and rhythmic behaviours shows that although most behaviours and neural circuits are highly conserved, the nature of the behaviour does not dictate the neural mechanism and that the presence of homologous neural components does not determine the behaviour. This suggests that although behaviour is generated by neural circuits, natural selection can act separately on these two levels of biological organization. PMID:26598733

  16. Temperature-dependent regulation of vocal pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Gooler, David; Herrold, Amy; Patel, Shailja; Pong, Winnie W

    2008-12-01

    Vocalizations of Xenopus laevis are generated by central pattern generators (CPGs). The advertisement call of male X. laevis is a complex biphasic motor rhythm consisting of fast and slow trills (a train of clicks). We found that the trill rate of these advertisement calls is sensitive to temperature and that this rate modification of the vocal rhythms originates in the central pattern generators. In vivo the rates of fast and slow trills increased linearly with an increase in temperature. In vitro a similar linear relation between temperature and compound action potential frequency in the laryngeal nerve was found when fictive advertisement calls were evoked in the isolated brain. Temperature did not limit the contractile properties of laryngeal muscles within the frequency range of vocalizations. We next took advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the vocal CPG in vitro to localize the source of the vocal rhythms. We focused on the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), a brain stem nucleus that is essential for vocal production. We found that bilateral cooling of DTAM reduced both fast and slow trill rates. Thus we conclude that DTAM is a source of biphasic vocal rhythms. PMID:18829853

  17. The generation of vertebral segmental patterning in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Senthinathan, Biruntha; Sousa, Cátia; Tannahill, David; Keynes, Roger

    2012-01-01

    We have carried out a series of experimental manipulations in the chick embryo to assess whether the notochord, neural tube and spinal nerves influence segmental patterning of the vertebral column. Using Pax1 expression in the somite-derived sclerotomes as a marker for segmentation of the developing intervertebral disc, our results exclude such an influence. In contrast to certain teleost species, where the notochord has been shown to generate segmentation of the vertebral bodies (chordacentra), these experiments indicate that segmental patterning of the avian vertebral column arises autonomously in the somite mesoderm. We suggest that in amniotes, the subdivision of each sclerotome into non-miscible anterior and posterior halves plays a critical role in establishing vertebral segmentation, and in maintaining left/right alignment of the developing vertebral elements at the body midline. PMID:22458512

  18. MULTIOBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS INVOLVING CHEMICAL LOOPING COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Salazar; Urmila M. Diwekar; Stephen E. Zitney

    2009-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using coal gasification is an important approach for future energy options. This work focuses on understading the system operation and optimizing it in the presence of uncertain operating conditions using ASPEN Plus and CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic simulation and multiobjective optimization capabilities developed by Vishwamitra Research Institute. The feasible operating surface for the IGCC system is generated and deterministic multiobjective optimization is performed. Since the feasible operating space is highly non-convex, heuristics based techniques that do not require gradient information are used to generate the Pareto surface. Accurate CFD models are simultaneously developed for the gasifier and chemical looping combustion system to characterize and quantify the process uncertainty in the ASPEN model.

  19. Vapor-Generator Wand Helps To Reveal Airflow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, David B.

    1993-01-01

    In vapor-generator wand, liquid propylene glycol flows into electrically heated stainless-steel tube. Liquid boils in heated tube, and emerging vapor forms dense, smoke-like fog used to make airflow patterns visible. Built in variety of sizes, suitable for uses ranging from tabletop demonstrations to research in wind tunnels. For best viewing, plume illuminated by bright, focused incandescent spotlight at right angle to viewing direction. Viewing further enhanced by coating walls of test chamber with flat, dark color to minimize reflections and increase contrast.

  20. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Horacio G.; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling.

  1. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Horacio G; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-14

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling. PMID:22979891

  2. Sequentially firing neurons confer flexible timing in neural pattern generators

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Alexander; Ermentrout, Bard

    2011-05-15

    Neuronal networks exhibit a variety of complex spatiotemporal patterns that include sequential activity, synchrony, and wavelike dynamics. Inhibition is the primary means through which such patterns are implemented. This behavior is dependent on both the intrinsic dynamics of the individual neurons as well as the connectivity patterns. Many neural circuits consist of networks of smaller subcircuits (motifs) that are coupled together to form the larger system. In this paper, we consider a particularly simple motif, comprising purely inhibitory interactions, which generates sequential periodic dynamics. We first describe the dynamics of the single motif both for general balanced coupling (all cells receive the same number and strength of inputs) and then for a specific class of balanced networks: circulant systems. We couple these motifs together to form larger networks. We use the theory of weak coupling to derive phase models which, themselves, have a certain structure and symmetry. We show that this structure endows the coupled system with the ability to produce arbitrary timing relationships between symmetrically coupled motifs and that the phase relationships are robust over a wide range of frequencies. The theory is applicable to many other systems in biology and physics.

  3. Drug-Abusing Fathers: Patterns of Pair-Bonding, Reproduction, and Paternal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Thomas J.; Winkel, Justin D.; Suchman, Nancy E.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2007-01-01

    Despite concern about compromise of fathering as a public policy issue, very little is known about the status of drug-abusing men as parents. In this pilot study, 50 men enrolled in methadone maintenance treatment completed a structured research interview designed to generate basic information about patterns of pair-bonding, reproduction, and paternal involvement. Descriptive analysis of these data highlighted a number of trends in the nature of fathering that, although at odds with popular stereotypes, were similar to trends noted in research being done with other populations of disenfranchised men. Consistent with a developmental-ecological perspective on parenting, the findings raise questions about ways historical and situational influences interact within this population to compromise socially responsible efforts to function as a father. The results also raise questions about the extent to which public policy initiatives designed to promote more responsible fathering are reaching this population, and they raise questions about ways the drug abuse treatment system might better support men interested in being a more effective parent. PMID:17399935

  4. Anatomical Pathways Involved in Generating and Sensing Rhythmic Whisker Movements

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Laurens W. J.; Houweling, Arthur R.; Owens, Cullen B.; Tanke, Nouk; Shevchouk, Olesya T.; Rahmati, Negah; Teunissen, Wouter H. T.; Ju, Chiheng; Gong, Wei; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K. E.; De Zeeuw, Chris I.

    2011-01-01

    The rodent whisker system is widely used as a model system for investigating sensorimotor integration, neural mechanisms of complex cognitive tasks, neural development, and robotics. The whisker pathways to the barrel cortex have received considerable attention. However, many subcortical structures are paramount to the whisker system. They contribute to important processes, like filtering out salient features, integration with other senses, and adaptation of the whisker system to the general behavioral state of the animal. We present here an overview of the brain regions and their connections involved in the whisker system. We do not only describe the anatomy and functional roles of the cerebral cortex, but also those of subcortical structures like the striatum, superior colliculus, cerebellum, pontomedullary reticular formation, zona incerta, and anterior pretectal nucleus as well as those of level setting systems like the cholinergic, histaminergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic pathways. We conclude by discussing how these brain regions may affect each other and how they together may control the precise timing of whisker movements and coordinate whisker perception. PMID:22065951

  5. Sexually differentiated central pattern generators in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Zornik, Erik; Yamaguchi, Ayako

    2008-06-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie the function of central pattern generators (CPGs) presents a formidable challenge requiring sophisticated tools and well-chosen model systems. In this article, we describe recent work on vocalizations of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis. These behaviors are driven by sexually differentiated CPGs and are exceptionally well suited to this objective. In particular, a simplified mechanism of vocal production (independent of respiratory musculature) allows straightforward interpretations of nerve activity with respect to behavior. Furthermore, the development of a fictively vocalizing isolated brain, together with the finding of rapid androgen-induced masculinization of female vocalizations, provides an invaluable tool for determining how new behaviors arise from existing circuits. PMID:18471902

  6. Analog electronic model of the lobster pyloric central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovskii, A.; Brugioni, S.; Levi, R.; Rabinovich, M.; Selverston, A.; Abarbane, H. D. I.

    2005-01-01

    An electronic circuit intended to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of a simplified 3-cell model of the pyloric central pattern generator in California spiny lobster stomato gastric ganglion is presented. The model employs the synaptic phase locked loop (SPLL) concept where the frequency of oscillations of a postsynaptic cell is mainly controlled by the synaptic current which depends on the phase shift between the oscillations. The theoretical study showed that the system has a stable steady state with correct phase shifts between the oscillations and that this regime is stable when the frequency of the pacemaker cell is varied over a wide range. The main bifurcations in the system were studied analytically, in computer simulations, and in experiments with the electronic circuit. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with the expectations of the theoretical model.

  7. Two-stage Turing model for generating pigment patterns on the leopard and the jaguar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. T.; Liaw, S. S.; Maini, P. K.

    2006-07-01

    Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, which showed that flecks are the primitive pattern of the felid family and all other patterns including rosettes and blotches develop from it, we construct a Turing reaction-diffusion model which generates spot patterns initially. Starting from this spotted pattern, we successfully generate patterns of adult leopards and jaguars by tuning parameters of the model in the subsequent phase of patterning.

  8. Generation of Earth's First-Order Biodiversity Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krug, Andrew Z.; Jablonski, David; Valentine, James W.; Roy, Kaustuv

    2009-02-01

    The first-order biodiversity pattern on Earth today and at least as far back as the Paleozoic is the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), a decrease in richness of species and higher taxa from the equator to the poles. LDGs are produced by geographic trends in origination, extinction, and dispersal over evolutionary timescales, so that analyses of static patterns will be insufficient to reveal underlying processes. The fossil record of marine bivalve genera, a model system for the analysis of biodiversity dynamics over large temporal and spatial scales, shows that an origination and range-expansion gradient plays a major role in generating the LDG. Peak origination rates and peak diversities fall within the tropics, with range expansion out of the tropics the predominant spatial dynamic thereafter. The origination-diversity link occurs even in a "contrarian" group whose diversity peaks at midlatitudes, an exception proving the rule that spatial variations in origination are key to latitudinal diversity patterns. Extinction rates are lower in polar latitudes (≥60°) than in temperate zones and thus cannot create the observed gradient alone. They may, however, help to explain why origination and immigration are evidently damped in higher latitudes. We suggest that species require more resources in higher latitudes, for the seasonality of primary productivity increases by more than an order of magnitude from equatorial to polar regions. Higher-latitude species are generalists that, unlike potential immigrants, are adapted to garner the large share of resources required for incumbency in those regions. When resources are opened up by extinctions, lineages spread chiefly poleward and chiefly through speciation.

  9. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults. PMID:26810575

  10. Positive Selection Linked with Generation of Novel Mammalian Dentition Patterns.

    PubMed

    Machado, João Paulo; Philip, Siby; Maldonado, Emanuel; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    A diverse group of genes are involved in the tooth development of mammals. Several studies, focused mainly on mice and rats, have provided a detailed depiction of the processes coordinating tooth formation and shape. Here we surveyed 236 tooth-associated genes in 39 mammalian genomes and tested for signatures of selection to assess patterns of molecular adaptation in genes regulating mammalian dentition. Of the 236 genes, 31 (∼13.1%) showed strong signatures of positive selection that may be responsible for the phenotypic diversity observed in mammalian dentition. Mammalian-specific tooth-associated genes had accelerated mutation rates compared with older genes found across all vertebrates. More recently evolved genes had fewer interactions (either genetic or physical), were associated with fewer Gene Ontology terms and had faster evolutionary rates compared with older genes. The introns of these positively selected genes also exhibited accelerated evolutionary rates, which may reflect additional adaptive pressure in the intronic regions that are associated with regulatory processes that influence tooth-gene networks. The positively selected genes were mainly involved in processes like mineralization and structural organization of tooth specific tissues such as enamel and dentin. Of the 236 analyzed genes, 12 mammalian-specific genes (younger genes) provided insights on diversification of mammalian teeth as they have higher evolutionary rates and exhibit different expression profiles compared with older genes. Our results suggest that the evolution and development of mammalian dentition occurred in part through positive selection acting on genes that previously had other functions. PMID:27613398

  11. Neural basis of singing in crickets: central pattern generation in abdominal ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2011-12-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying cricket singing behavior have been the focus of several studies, but the central pattern generator (CPG) for singing has not been localized conclusively. To test if the abdominal ganglia contribute to the singing motor pattern and to analyze if parts of the singing CPG are located in these ganglia, we systematically truncated the abdominal nerve cord of fictively singing crickets while recording the singing motor pattern from a front-wing nerve. Severing the connectives anywhere between terminal ganglion and abdominal ganglion A3 did not preclude singing, although the motor pattern became more variable and failure-prone as more ganglia were disconnected. Singing terminated immediately and permanently after transecting the connectives between the metathoracic ganglion complex and the first unfused abdominal ganglion A3. The contribution of abdominal ganglia for singing pattern generation was confirmed by intracellular interneuron recordings and current injections. During fictive singing, an ascending interneuron with its soma and dendrite in A3 depolarized rhythmically. It spiked 10 ms before the wing-opener activity and hyperpolarized in phase with the wing-closer activity. Depolarizing current injection elicited rhythmic membrane potential oscillations and spike bursts that elicited additional syllables and reliably reset the ongoing chirp rhythm. Our results disclose that the abdominal ganglion A3 is directly involved in generating the singing motor pattern, whereas the more posterior ganglia seem to provide only stabilizing feedback to the CPG circuit. Localizing the singing CPG in the anterior abdominal neuromeres now allows analyzing its circuitry at the level of identified interneurons in subsequent studies.

  12. Key Bifurcations of Bursting Polyrhythms in 3-Cell Central Pattern Generators

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Schwabedal, Justus; Clewley, Robert; Shilnikov, Andrey L.

    2014-01-01

    We identify and describe the key qualitative rhythmic states in various 3-cell network motifs of a multifunctional central pattern generator (CPG). Such CPGs are neural microcircuits of cells whose synergetic interactions produce multiple states with distinct phase-locked patterns of bursting activity. To study biologically plausible CPG models, we develop a suite of computational tools that reduce the problem of stability and existence of rhythmic patterns in networks to the bifurcation analysis of fixed points and invariant curves of a Poincaré return maps for phase lags between cells. We explore different functional possibilities for motifs involving symmetry breaking and heterogeneity. This is achieved by varying coupling properties of the synapses between the cells and studying the qualitative changes in the structure of the corresponding return maps. Our findings provide a systematic basis for understanding plausible biophysical mechanisms for the regulation of rhythmic patterns generated by various CPGs in the context of motor control such as gait-switching in locomotion. Our analysis does not require knowledge of the equations modeling the system and provides a powerful qualitative approach to studying detailed models of rhythmic behavior. Thus, our approach is applicable to a wide range of biological phenomena beyond motor control. PMID:24739943

  13. Removal of spike frequency adaptation via neuromodulation intrinsic to the Tritonia escape swim central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Katz, P S; Frost, W N

    1997-10-15

    For the mollusc Tritonia diomedea to generate its escape swim motor pattern, interneuron C2, a crucial member of the central pattern generator (CPG) for this rhythmic behavior, must fire repetitive bursts of action potentials. Yet, before swimming, repeated depolarizing current pulses injected into C2 at periods similar those in the swim motor program are incapable of mimicking the firing rate attained by C2 on each cycle of a swim motor program. This resting level of C2 inexcitability is attributable to its own inherent spike frequency adaptation (SFA). Clearly, this property must be altered for the swim behavior to occur. The pathway for initiation of the swimming behavior involves activation of the serotonergic dorsal swim interneurons (DSIs), which are also intrinsic members of the swim CPG. Physiologically appropriate DSI stimulation transiently decreases C2 SFA, allowing C2 to fire at higher rates even when repeatedly depolarized at short intervals. The increased C2 excitability caused by DSI stimulation is mimicked and occluded by serotonin application. Furthermore, the change in excitability is not caused by the depolarization associated with DSI stimulation or serotonin application but is correlated with a decrease in C2 spike afterhyperpolarization. This suggests that the DSIs use serotonin to evoke a neuromodulatory action on a conductance in C2 that regulates its firing rate. This modulatory action of one CPG neuron on another is likely to play a role in configuring the swim circuit into its rhythmic pattern-generating mode and maintaining it in that state. PMID:9315892

  14. Electronic Tongue Generating Continuous Recognition Patterns for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanxia; Genua, Maria; Garçon, Laurie-Amandine; Buhot, Arnaud; Calemczuk, Roberto; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Livache, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In current protocol, a combinatorial approach has been developed to simplify the design and production of sensing materials for the construction of electronic tongues (eT) for protein analysis. By mixing a small number of simple and easily accessible molecules with different physicochemical properties, used as building blocks (BBs), in varying and controlled proportions and allowing the mixtures to self-assemble on the gold surface of a prism, an array of combinatorial surfaces featuring appropriate properties for protein sensing was created. In this way, a great number of cross-reactive receptors can be rapidly and efficiently obtained. By combining such an array of combinatorial cross-reactive receptors (CoCRRs) with an optical detection system such as surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi), the obtained eT can monitor the binding events in real-time and generate continuous recognition patterns including 2D continuous evolution profile (CEP) and 3D continuous evolution landscape (CEL) for samples in liquid. Such an eT system is efficient for discrimination of common purified proteins. PMID:25286325

  15. Electronic tongue generating continuous recognition patterns for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanxia; Genua, Maria; Garçon, Laurie-Amandine; Buhot, Arnaud; Calemczuk, Roberto; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Livache, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In current protocol, a combinatorial approach has been developed to simplify the design and production of sensing materials for the construction of electronic tongues (eT) for protein analysis. By mixing a small number of simple and easily accessible molecules with different physicochemical properties, used as building blocks (BBs), in varying and controlled proportions and allowing the mixtures to self-assemble on the gold surface of a prism, an array of combinatorial surfaces featuring appropriate properties for protein sensing was created. In this way, a great number of cross-reactive receptors can be rapidly and efficiently obtained. By combining such an array of combinatorial cross-reactive receptors (CoCRRs) with an optical detection system such as surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi), the obtained eT can monitor the binding events in real-time and generate continuous recognition patterns including 2D continuous evolution profile (CEP) and 3D continuous evolution landscape (CEL) for samples in liquid. Such an eT system is efficient for discrimination of common purified proteins. PMID:25286325

  16. The Network Spinal Wave as a Central Pattern Generator

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Donald M.; Lemberger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This article explains the research on a unique spinal wave visibly observed in association with network spinal analysis care. Since 1997, the network wave has been studied using surface electromyography (sEMG), characterized mathematically, and determined to be a unique and repeatable phenomenon. Methods: The authors provide a narrative review of the research and a context for the network wave's development. Results: The sEMG research demonstrates that the movement of the musculature of the spine during the wave phenomenon is electromagnetic and mechanical. The changes running along the spine were characterized mathematically at three distinct levels of care. Additionally, the wave has the mathematical properties of a central pattern generator (CPG). Conclusions: The network wave may be the first CPG discovered in the spine unrelated to locomotion. The mathematical characterization of the signal also demonstrates coherence at a distance between the sacral to cervical spine. According to mathematical engineers, based on studies conducted a decade apart, the wave itself is a robust phenomenon and the detection methods for this coherence may represent a new measure for central nervous system health. This phenomenon has implications for recovery from spinal cord injury and for reorganizational healing development. PMID:27243963

  17. Mutual synchronization between structure and central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongu, Junichi; Iba, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    This paper shows an evaluating method of synchronization between a structure and Central Pattern Generators (CPGs), which are embedded in a controller designed for an active mass damper. A neural oscillator composing the CPGs has nonlinear and entrainment properties. Therefore, the proposed controller has possibility to exhibit the characteristic of robustness, when the structural parameters, i.e. stiffness or damping, are changed by earthquakes and the like. Our earlier studies have proposed the new controller and ascertained the efficacy of vibration suppression. However, there has been no study to evaluate the controller's above-mentioned properties. For tuning into practical application, the reliability and robustness along with the controller's vibration mitigation performance must be analyzed. In this paper, phase reduction theory is tried to appraise the synchronization between a structure and the CPGs. In this case, the synchronization between the target structure and a single neural oscillator constituting the CPGs is required to be investigated. Therefore, the single neural oscillator's the harmonization characteristic with sinusoidal input is firstly examined, and the synchronization region is expressed using phase response curves. In addition, the mutual synchronization between the structure and the single neural oscillator is studied under sinusoidal input using the result of the harmonization characteristic.

  18. Mexican-origin Mothers’ and Fathers’ Involvement in Adolescents’ Peer Relationships: A Pattern-Analytic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Perez-Brena, Norma J.; Baril, Megan E.; McHale, Susan M.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2013-01-01

    Using latent profile analysis, this study examined patterns of mother-father involvement in adolescents’ peer relationships along three dimensions, support, guidance, and restrictions, in 240 Mexican-origin families. Three profiles were identified: (a) High Mother Involvement (mothers higher than fathers on all three dimensions); (b) High Support/Congruent (mothers and fathers reported the highest levels of peer support and similar levels of guidance and restrictions); and (c) Differentiated (more guidance and restrictions by fathers than by mothers, similar levels of parent support). These profiles were linked to mothers’ and fathers’ familism values, traditional patriarchal gender role attitudes, and socioeconomic status, and to adolescents’ friendship intimacy and risky behaviors measured longitudinally from early to late adolescence. Adolescent gender moderated the linkages between parents’ involvement in adolescents’ peer relationships and youth adjustment. PMID:24092949

  19. Ethnic and Gender Variation in Religious Involvement: Patterns of Expression in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Janine M.; St. Peter, Josie R.; Fernandes, Sherira J.; Herrenkohl, Todd I.; Kosterman, Rick; Hawkins, J. David

    2012-01-01

    This study used latent class analysis to empirically derive profiles of religious involvement among a sample of 808 young adults and describe ethnic and gender differences within such religious involvement patterns. Items on the Duke Religion Index were included as part of a larger longitudinal survey of emotional, physical, and behavioral health. The scale measured the organizational, nonorganizational, and intrinsic dimensions of religiosity (Koenig et al. 2001) in a sample of young adults at two waves of the study—age 27 and age 30. At age 27, five religious profiles were distinguishable in the sample while at age 30 six profiles emerged. Ethnic differences were found for each of the religious profiles where religious involvement manifested in different ways. Religious profiles between ages 27 and 30 changed over time and were affected by gender and ethnicity. PMID:23002308

  20. Viewing Generativity and Social Capital as Underlying Factors of Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Sharon; Patel, Nimisha

    2015-01-01

    Parent involvement in education is a multifaceted support that has many well-documented benefits for students of all ages. Parent involvement is also a common expression of generativity as defined in Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development. The activities parents engage in during their children's educational pursuits, as well as their…

  1. Principal-Generated YouTube Video as a Method of Improving Parental Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Joey

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement level of parents and reveal whether principal-generated YouTube videos for regular communication would enhance levels of parental involvement at one North Texas Christian Middle School (pseudonym). The following questions guided this study: 1. What is the beginning level of parental…

  2. Evolution of oropharyngeal patterning mechanisms involving Dlx and endothelins in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Takio, Yoko; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Takechi, Masaki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2010-05-01

    In jawed vertebrates, the Dlx code, or nested expression patterns of Dlx genes, specify the dorsoventral polarity of pharyngeal arches, downstream of endothelin-1 (Edn-1) and its effectors, Bapx1 (Nkx3.2) and dHand (Hand2). To elucidate the evolution of the specification mechanism of the oropharyngeal skeletal system, lamprey homologs of Dlx, Edn, endothelin receptor (Ednr), Bapx1, and dHand were identified. Our analysis suggested that the Edn gene family emerged at the advent of vertebrates, and that gene duplications leading to the different Edn gnathostome subtypes (Edn1-3) occurred before the cyclostome-gnathostome split. This timing of gene duplications, giving rise to multiple subtypes, was also implied for Dlx, Ednr, Hand, and Bapx. In lamprey embryos, nested expressions of Dlx genes were not observed in pharyngeal arches, nor was any focal expression of Bapx1, known in gnathostomes to specify the jaw joint. The dHand homolog, however, was expressed more intensively ventrally, as in gnathostomes. Lamprey homologs of Edn-1 and EdnrA were also shown to be expressed as described in mice, indicating involvement of this signaling pathway in the craniofacial patterning early in vertebrate evolution. These results suggest that the last common ancestor of all the extant vertebrates would have possessed basic gene repertoires involved in oropharyngeal patterning in gnathostomes, but the elaborate genetic program leading to the Dlx code is likely to have been acquired uniquely in gnathostomes. PMID:20171204

  3. Expression of Genes Involved in Drosophila Wing Morphogenesis and Vein Patterning Are Altered by Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Imaginal wing discs of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) defined during embryogenesis ultimately result in mature wings of stereotyped (specific) venation patterning. Major regulators of wing disc development are the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF), Notch, Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wg), and Dpp signaling pathways. Highly stereotyped vascular patterning is also characteristic of tissues in other organisms flown in space such as the mouse retina and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic and other adaptations of vascular patterning to space environmental factors have not yet been systematically quantified, despite widespread recognition of their critical importance for terrestrial and microgravity applications. Here we report changes in gene expression with space flight related to Drosophila wing morphogenesis and vein patterning. In addition, genetically modified phenotypes of increasingly abnormal ectopic wing venation in the Drosophila wing1 were analyzed by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software2. Our goal is to further develop insightful vascular mappings associated with bioinformatic dimensions of genetic or other molecular phenotypes for correlation with genetic and other molecular profiling relevant to NASA's GeneLab and other Space Biology exploration initiatives.

  4. A Compartmental Lateral Inhibition System to Generate Contrasting Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Rufino Ferreira, Ana S.; Hsia, Justin; Arcak, Murat

    2015-01-01

    We propose a lateral inhibition system and analyze contrasting patterns of gene expression. The system consists of a set of compartments interconnected by channels. Each compartment contains a colony of cells that produce diffusible molecules to be detected by the neighboring colonies. Each cell is equipped with an inhibitory circuit that reduces its production when the detected signal is sufficiently strong. We characterize the parameter range in which steady-state patterns emerge. PMID:26665158

  5. Spin wave excitation patterns generated by spin torque oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macià, F.; Hoppensteadt, F. C.; Kent, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Spin torque nano-oscillators (STNO) are nanoscale devices that can convert a direct current into short wavelength spin wave excitations in a ferromagnetic layer. We show that arrays of STNO can be used to create directional spin wave radiation similarly to electromagnetic antennas. Combining STNO excitations with planar spin waves also creates interference patterns. We show that these interference patterns are static and have information on the wavelength and phase of the spin waves emitted from the STNO. We describe a means of actively controlling spin wave radiation patterns with the direct current flowing through STNO, which is useful in on-chip communication and information processing and could be a promising technique for studying short wavelength spin waves in different materials.

  6. Crashes involving motorised rickshaws in urban India: Characteristics and injury patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Uli; Dandona, Rakhi; Kumar, G. Anil; Dandona, Lalit

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Motorised three-wheeled vehicles (motorised rickshaw) are popular in Asian countries including India. This study aims to describe the crash characteristics and injury patterns for motorised rickshaw occupants and the road users hit-by-motorised rickshaw in urban India. Methods Consecutive cases of road traffic crashes involving motorised rickshaw, irrespective of injury severity, whether alive or dead, presenting to the emergency departments of two large government hospitals and three branches of a private hospital in Hyderabad city were recruited. Crash characteristics, details of injuries, injury severity parameters and outcome were documented in detailed interviews. Results A total of 139 (18%) of the 781 participants recruited were injured as a motorised rickshaw occupant (11%) or were hit by a motorised rickshaw (7%) in 114 crashes involving motorised rickshaw. Amongst motorised rickshaw occupants, single-vehicle collisions (54%) were more frequent than multi-vehicle collisions (46%), with overturning of motorised rickshaw in 73% of the single-vehicle collisions. Mortality (12%), the mean Injury Severity Score (5.8) and rate of multiple injured (60%) indicated a substantial trauma load. No significant differences in injury pattern were found between motorised rickshaw occupants and hit-by-motorised rickshaw subjects, with the pattern being similar to that of the pedestrians and two-wheeled vehicle users. With bivariate analysis for motorised rickshaw occupants, the risk of fatal outcome (odds ratio (OR) 2.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64–10.54), upper limb injury (OR 2.25, 95% CI: 0.94–5.37) and multiple injuries (OR 2.03, 95% CI 0.85–4.83) was high, although not statistically significant in multi-motorised-vehicle collisions as compared with the single-vehicle collisions or overturning. The risk of having multiple injuries (OR 4.55, 95% CI: 1.15–17.95) was significantly higher in motorised rickshaw occupants involved in front

  7. Perceptions of Father Involvement Patterns in Teenage-Mother Families: Predictors and Links to Mothers' Psychological Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Ariel; Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M.; Coley, Rebekah Levine

    2005-01-01

    Based on adolescent mothers' reports, longitudinal patterns of involvement of young, unmarried biological fathers (n=77) in teenage-mother families using cluster analytic techniques were examined. Approximately one third of fathers maintained high levels of involvement over time, another third demonstrated low involvement at both time points, and…

  8. Polychromatic Optical Vortex Generation from Patterned Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Generation of optical vortices is described in cholesteric liquid crystals with a singular point in the spatial distribution of a helix phase. The phenomenon uses the fact that a Bragg reflected light phase varies in proportion to the spatial phase of the helix, both at normal and oblique incidences. Our proposal enables high-efficiency, polychromatic generation of optical vortices without the need of a cumbersome fabrication process and fine-tuning.

  9. Polychromatic Optical Vortex Generation from Patterned Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-24

    Generation of optical vortices is described in cholesteric liquid crystals with a singular point in the spatial distribution of a helix phase. The phenomenon uses the fact that a Bragg reflected light phase varies in proportion to the spatial phase of the helix, both at normal and oblique incidences. Our proposal enables high-efficiency, polychromatic generation of optical vortices without the need of a cumbersome fabrication process and fine-tuning. PMID:27391724

  10. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniques with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.

  11. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniquesmore » with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.« less

  12. 32 nm imprint masks using variable shape beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Schmid, Gerard; Stacey, Nick; Perez, Joseph; Maltabes, John; Resnick, Douglas J.; Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL ®) is a unique method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay for creating multilevel devices. A photocurable low viscosity monomer is dispensed dropwise to meet the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling imprint patterning with a uniform residual layer across a field and across entire wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-100 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element, high quality projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of templates. For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x templates with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub 32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the template is discussed and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  13. Emergent Central Pattern Generator Behavior in Gap-Junction-Coupled Hodgkin-Huxley Style Neuron Model

    PubMed Central

    Memelli, Heraldo; Solomon, Irene C.

    2012-01-01

    Most models of central pattern generators (CPGs) involve two distinct nuclei mutually inhibiting one another via synapses. Here, we present a single-nucleus model of biologically realistic Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with random gap junction coupling. Despite no explicit division of neurons into two groups, we observe a spontaneous division of neurons into two distinct firing groups. In addition, we also demonstrate this phenomenon in a simplified version of the model, highlighting the importance of afterhyperpolarization currents (IAHP) to CPGs utilizing gap junction coupling. The properties of these CPGs also appear sensitive to gap junction conductance, probability of gap junction coupling between cells, topology of gap junction coupling, and, to a lesser extent, input current into our simulated nucleus. PMID:23365558

  14. A central pattern generator producing alternative outputs: pattern, strength, and dynamics of premotor synaptic input to leech heart motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Norris, Brian J; Weaver, Adam L; Wenning, Angela; García, Paul S; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2007-11-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) for heartbeat in medicinal leeches consists of seven identified pairs of segmental heart interneurons and one unidentified pair. Four of the identified pairs and the unidentified pair of interneurons make inhibitory synaptic connections with segmental heart motor neurons. The CPG produces a side-to-side asymmetric pattern of intersegmental coordination among ipsilateral premotor interneurons corresponding to a similarly asymmetric fictive motor pattern in heart motor neurons, and asymmetric constriction pattern of the two tubular hearts, synchronous and peristaltic. Using extracellular recordings from premotor interneurons and voltage-clamp recordings of ipsilateral segmental motor neurons in 69 isolated nerve cords, we assessed the strength and dynamics of premotor inhibitory synaptic output onto the entire ensemble of heart motor neurons and the associated conduction delays in both coordination modes. We conclude that premotor interneurons establish a stereotypical pattern of intersegmental synaptic connectivity, strengths, and dynamics that is invariant across coordination modes, despite wide variations among preparations. These data coupled with a previous description of the temporal pattern of premotor interneuron activity and relative phasing of motor neuron activity in the two coordination modes enable a direct assessment of how premotor interneurons through their temporal pattern of activity and their spatial pattern of synaptic connectivity, strengths, and dynamics coordinate segmental motor neurons into a functional pattern of activity. PMID:17804574

  15. A Single Input Change Test Pattern Generator for Sequential Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Feng; Lei, Shaochong; Shao, Zhibiao

    An optimized Built-In Self-Test technology is proposed in this paper. A simplified algebraic model is developed to represent the configurations of single input change circuits. A novel single input change sequence generation technique is designed. It consists of a modified scan shift register, a seed storage array and a series of XOR gates. This circuitry can automatically generate single input change sequences of more unique vectors. Experimental results based on the ISCAS-89 benchmark show that the proposed method can achieve high stuck-at fault coverage with low switching activity during test applications.

  16. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  17. Pattern generation with cesium atomic beams at nanometer scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, M.; Lison, F.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.; Nowak, S.; Pfau, T.; Mlynek, J.

    1996-12-01

    We have demonstrated that a cesium atomic beam can be used to pattern a gold surface using a self assembling monolayer (SAM) as a resist. A 12.5 μm period mesh was used as a proximity mask for the atomic beam. The cesium atoms locally change the wetability of the SAM, which allows a wet etching reagent to remove the underlying gold in the exposed regions. An edge resolution of better than 100 nm was obtained. The experiment suggests that this method can either be used as a sensitive position detector with nanometer resolution in atom optics, or for nanostructuring in a resist technique.

  18. Fatty acid transport and activation and the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid trafficking.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Angel; Fraisl, Peter; Arias-Barrau, Elsa; Dirusso, Concetta C; Singer, Diane; Sealls, Whitney; Black, Paul N

    2008-09-15

    These studies defined the expression patterns of genes involved in fatty acid transport, activation and trafficking using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and established the kinetic constants of fatty acid transport in an effort to define whether vectorial acylation represents a common mechanism in different cell types (3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes, Caco-2 and HepG2 cells and three endothelial cell lines (b-END3, HAEC, and HMEC)). As expected, fatty acid transport protein (FATP)1 and long-chain acyl CoA synthetase (Acsl)1 were the predominant isoforms expressed in adipocytes consistent with their roles in the transport and activation of exogenous fatty acids destined for storage in the form of triglycerides. In cells involved in fatty acid processing including Caco-2 (intestinal-like) and HepG2 (liver-like), FATP2 was the predominant isoform. The patterns of Acsl expression were distinct between these two cell types with Acsl3 and Acsl5 being predominant in Caco-2 cells and Acsl4 in HepG2 cells. In the endothelial lines, FATP1 and FATP4 were the most highly expressed isoforms; the expression patterns for the different Acsl isoforms were highly variable between the different endothelial cell lines. The transport of the fluorescent long-chain fatty acid C(1)-BODIPY-C(12) in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and 3T3-L1 adipocytes followed typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics; the apparent efficiency (k(cat)/K(T)) of this process increases over 2-fold (2.1 x 10(6)-4.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)) upon adipocyte differentiation. The V(max) values for fatty acid transport in Caco-2 and HepG2 cells were essentially the same, yet the efficiency was 55% higher in Caco-2 cells (2.3 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1) versus 1.5 x 10(6)s(-1)M(-1)). The kinetic parameters for fatty acid transport in three endothelial cell types demonstrated they were the least efficient cell types for this process giving V(max) values that were nearly 4-fold lower than those defined form 3T3-L1 adipocytes, Caco-2 cells and HepG2 cells. The

  19. Expression pattern of glycoside hydrolase genes in Lutzomyia longipalpis reveals key enzymes involved in larval digestion

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Caroline da Silva; Diaz-Albiter, Hector M.; Faria, Maiara do Valle; Sant'Anna, Maurício R. V.; Dillon, Rod J.; Genta, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the most important vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. Adults are phytophagous (males and females) or blood feeders (females only), and larvae feed on solid detritus. Digestion in sand fly larvae has scarcely been studied, but some glycosidase activities putatively involved in microorganism digestion were already described. Nevertheless, the molecular nature of these enzymes, as the corresponding genes and transcripts, were not explored yet. Catabolism of microbial carbohydrates in insects generally involves β-1,3-glucanases, chitinases, and digestive lysozymes. In this work, the transcripts of digestive β-1,3-glucanase and chitinases were identified in the L. longipalpis larvae throughout analysis of sequences and expression patterns of glycoside hydrolases families 16, 18, and 22. The activity of one i-type lysozyme was also registered. Interestingly, this lysozyme seems to play a role in immunity, rather than digestion. This is the first attempt to identify the molecular nature of sand fly larval digestive enzymes. PMID:25140153

  20. Patterns of rock fragment cover generated by tillage erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poesen, Jean; Wesemael, Bas van; Govers, Gerard; Martinez-Fernandez, José; Desmet, Philippe; Vandaele, Karel; Quine, Timothy; Degraer, Greet

    1997-03-01

    Intensively cultivated areas in the upper part of the Guadalentin catchment (southeast Spain) show a systematic spatial pattern of surface rock fragment cover ( Rc). The objective of this paper is to quantify and to explain this spatial rock fragment cover pattern. Therefore, a map of an intensively cultivated area of 5 km 2 was digitised, and for each pixel total topographic curvature was calculated. Next, rock fragment cover was determined photographically at 35 sites with a range of total slope curvatures. A linear relation between total curvature and rock fragment cover was found, except for narrow concavities. It was hypothesised that this pattern can be explained by a significant net downslope movement of rock fragments and fine earth by tillage. The displacement distances of rock fragments by tillage with a duckfoot chisel were measured by monitoring the displacement of tracers (painted rock fragments and aluminium cubes) on 5 sites having different slopes. The rare of tillage erosion for one tillage pass with a duckfoot chisel, expressed by the diffusion constant ( k), equals 282 kg/m for up and downslope tillage and only 139 kg/m for contour tillage. Nomograms indicate that mean denudation rates in almond groves due to tillage erosion (3 to 5 tillage passes per year) can easily amount to 1.5-2.6 mm/year for contour tillage and up to 3.6-5.9 mm/year for up- and downslope tillage for a field, 50 m long and having a slope of 20%. These figures are at least one order of magnitude larger than reported denudation rates caused by water erosion in similar environments. Hence tillage erosion contributes significantly to land degradation. The downslope soil flux induced by tillage not only causes considerable denudation on topographic convexities (hill tops and spurs) and upper field boundaries but also an important sediment accumulation in topographic concavities (hollows and valley bottoms) and at lower field boundaries. Kinetic sieving (i.e. the upward migration

  1. Comparison of the reliability of multifocal visual evoked cortical potentials generated by pattern reversal and pattern pulse stimulation.

    PubMed

    Souza, G S; Schakelford, H B; Moura, A L A; Gomes, B D; Ventura, D F; Fitzgerald, M E C; Silveira, L C L

    2012-10-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of the multifocal visual evoked cortical potentials (mfVEP) elicited by pattern pulse stimulation with that of pattern reversal in producing reliable responses (signal-to-noise ratio >1.359). Participants were 14 healthy subjects. Visual stimulation was obtained using a 60-sector dartboard display consisting of 6 concentric rings presented in either pulse or reversal mode. Each sector, consisting of 16 checks at 99% Michelson contrast and 80 cd/m² mean luminance, was controlled by a binary m-sequence in the time domain. The signal-to-noise ratio was generally larger in the pattern reversal than in the pattern pulse mode. The number of reliable responses was similar in the central sectors for the two stimulation modes. At the periphery, pattern reversal showed a larger number of reliable responses. Pattern pulse stimuli performed similarly to pattern reversal stimuli to generate reliable waveforms in R1 and R2. The advantage of using both protocols to study mfVEP responses is their complementarity: in some patients, reliable waveforms in specific sectors may be obtained with only one of the two methods. The joint analysis of pattern reversal and pattern pulse stimuli increased the rate of reliability for central sectors by 7.14% in R1, 5.35% in R2, 4.76% in R3, 3.57% in R4, 2.97% in R5, and 1.78% in R6. From R1 to R4 the reliability to generate mfVEPs was above 70% when using both protocols. Thus, for a very high reliability and thorough examination of visual performance, it is recommended to use both stimulation protocols. PMID:22782556

  2. Morphodynamics and anabranching patterns generated in the Madeira River, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.; Bonthius, C.; Abad, J. D.; Stevaux, J.; Filizola, N.; Frias, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Madeira River is the largest tributary in water discharge and sediment transport of the Amazon River. At present, this river is at the center of a controversial political discussion because the Brazilian government is building two hydroelectric plants on the Bolivia-Brazil border, flooding a long reach from near Cachuela Esperanza in the tributary Beni River, close to the Brazil-Bolivia border, up to Porto Velho. We present results from three field expeditions carried out in July-August 2011, December 2012 and March 2013. The main scope of this article is to disseminate the environmental threat suffered by the Madeira from regulation/disruption, and to present preliminary results on the geomorphologic characteristics of the Madeira channel and floodplain. Using historical radar and satellite imagery, the floodplain morpho-sedimentary units and morphology of the channel were assessed and quantified. Sediment bed and bank sampling, bathymetric surveys and velocity measurements were recorded using a single beam echo sounder and an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), respectively. Velocity data were analyzed using TRDI's WinRiverII and a MATLAB-based software package Velocity Mapping Tool. We consider that the Madeira River offers some ideal conditions to provide information on critical conditions and geomorphologic thresholds in mega-rivers. The Madeira River has been classified as a simple to moderate anabranching low-sinuosity river. The Madeira flows through a relatively simple pattern, alternating straight reaches with others that exhibit an incipient tendency to anabranch. Single beam and ADCP data yields insight into the bathymetry and flow characteristics in the channel through straight, pseudo-meandering, and anabranching stretches. We studied in detail three selected three reaches zones where three primary mechanisms for anabranching were identified: a) branches upstream and downstream in box shape pseudo-meanders; b) simple branch patterns

  3. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  4. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying.

    PubMed

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  5. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  6. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  7. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  8. Evaluating the Evidence Surrounding Pontine Cholinergic Involvement in REM Sleep Generation.

    PubMed

    Grace, Kevin P; Horner, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the "pontine REM sleep generator" by cholinergic inputs. Here, we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i) the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii) the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii) loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PTF is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv) cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail. PMID:26388832

  9. Pattern Generator for Bench Test of Digital Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Chu, Anhua J.

    2012-01-01

    All efforts to develop electronic equipment reach a stage where they need a board test station for each board. The SMAP digital system consists of three board types that interact with each other using interfaces with critical timing. Each board needs to be tested individually before combining into the integrated digital electronics system. Each board needs critical timing signals from the others to be able to operate. A bench test system was developed to support test of each board. The test system produces all the outputs of the control and timing unit, and is delivered much earlier than the timing unit. Timing signals are treated as data. A large file is generated containing the state of every timing signal at any instant. This file is streamed out to an IO card, which is wired directly to the device-under-test (DUT) input pins. This provides a flexible test environment that can be adapted to any of the boards required to test in a standalone configuration. The problem of generating the critical timing signals is then transferred from a hardware problem to a software problem where it is more easily dealt with.

  10. Fruit shape diversity in the Brassicaceae is generated by varying patterns of anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Tilly; Łangowski, Łukasz; Stacey, Nicola; Jantzen, Friederike; Moubayidin, Laila; Sicard, Adrien; Southam, Paul; Kennaway, Richard; Lenhard, Michael; Coen, Enrico S; Østergaard, Lars

    2016-09-15

    Fruits exhibit a vast array of different 3D shapes, from simple spheres and cylinders to more complex curved forms; however, the mechanism by which growth is oriented and coordinated to generate this diversity of forms is unclear. Here, we compare the growth patterns and orientations for two very different fruit shapes in the Brassicaceae: the heart-shaped Capsella rubella silicle and the near-cylindrical Arabidopsis thaliana silique. We show, through a combination of clonal and morphological analyses, that the different shapes involve different patterns of anisotropic growth during three phases. These experimental data can be accounted for by a tissue-level model in which specified growth rates vary in space and time and are oriented by a proximodistal polarity field. The resulting tissue conflicts lead to deformation of the tissue as it grows. The model allows us to identify tissue-specific and temporally specific activities required to obtain the individual shapes. One such activity may be provided by the valve-identity gene FRUITFULL, which we show through comparative mutant analysis to modulate fruit shape during post-fertilisation growth of both species. Simple modulations of the model presented here can also broadly account for the variety of shapes in other Brassicaceae species, thus providing a simplified framework for fruit development and shape diversity. PMID:27624834

  11. Evaluating the Evidence Surrounding Pontine Cholinergic Involvement in REM Sleep Generation

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Kevin P.; Horner, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep – characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity – is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the “pontine REM sleep generator” by cholinergic inputs. Here, we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i) the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii) the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii) loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PTF is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv) cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail. PMID:26388832

  12. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in Sugar Metabolism and Accumulation during Apple Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Lailiang

    2012-01-01

    Both sorbitol and sucrose are imported into apple fruit from leaves. The metabolism of sorbitol and sucrose fuels fruit growth and development, and accumulation of sugars in fruit is central to the edible quality of apple. However, our understanding of the mechanisms controlling sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple remains quite limited. We identified members of various gene families encoding key enzymes or transporters involved in sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple fruit using homology searches and comparison of their expression patterns in different tissues, and analyzed the relationship of their transcripts with enzyme activities and sugar accumulation during fruit development. At the early stage of fruit development, the transcript levels of sorbitol dehydrogenase, cell wall invertase, neutral invertase, sucrose synthase, fructokinase and hexokinase are high, and the resulting high enzyme activities are responsible for the rapid utilization of the imported sorbitol and sucrose for fruit growth, with low levels of sugar accumulation. As the fruit continues to grow due to cell expansion, the transcript levels and activities of these enzymes are down-regulated, with concomitant accumulation of fructose and elevated transcript levels of tonoplast monosaccharide transporters (TMTs), MdTMT1 and MdTMT2; the excess carbon is converted into starch. At the late stage of fruit development, sucrose accumulation is enhanced, consistent with the elevated expression of sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), MdSPS5 and MdSPS6, and an increase in its total activity. Our data indicate that sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple fruit is developmentally regulated. This represents a comprehensive analysis of the genes involved in sugar metabolism and accumulation in apple, which will serve as a platform for further studies on the functions of these genes and subsequent manipulation of sugar metabolism and fruit quality traits related to carbohydrates. PMID:22412983

  13. Beyond participation: the association between school extracurricular activities and involvement in violence across generations of immigration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D

    2012-03-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study explores how the relationship between extracurricular activities and youth violence varies by type of extracurricular activity profile (sports alone, non-sports alone, and a combination of sports and non-sports) and by generations of immigration (first, second, and third-plus). The sample is composed of 9.3% (n = 1,233) first-generation youth, 15.7% (n = 2,080) second generation, and 74.9% (n = 9,923) third-plus generation. The results reveal that adolescents from the third-plus generation (i.e., non-immigrant youth) who participate in non-sports alone or sports plus non-sports have lower odds of involvement in violence than adolescents from the same generation who do not participate in extracurricular activities. However, for first- and second-generation adolescents, participation in extracurricular activities is associated with higher rather than lower odds of violence compared to their non-participating counterparts. These findings challenge the viewpoint that participation in mainstream extracurricular activities as afforded by US schools is equally beneficial for all youth. They also call for additional research that explores why immigrant youth are less likely than non-immigrant youth to gain violence-reducing benefits when they participate in extracurricular activities. PMID:22167574

  14. Generation of nearly hemispherical and high gain azimuthally symmetric patterns with printed circuit antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung Yu; Alexopoulos, Nicolaos G.

    1987-08-01

    Patttern shaping techniques are discussed for printed circuit antennas such as microstrip dipoles and slot elements. Crossed printed circuit dipoles or a combination of a printed circuit dipole and a slot are employed. It is demonstrated that with the proper choice of substrate or substrate-superstrate parameters it is possible to generate: (1) nearly hemispherical patterns, (2) high-gain azimuthally symmetric patterns, and (3) nearly sec theta patterns.

  15. Generation of Customizable Micro-wavy Pattern through Grayscale Direct Image Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ran; Wang, Shunqiang; Andrews, Geoffrey; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2016-02-01

    With the increasing amount of research work in surface studies, a more effective method of producing patterned microstructures is highly desired due to the geometric limitations and complex fabricating process of current techniques. This paper presents an efficient and cost-effective method to generate customizable micro-wavy pattern using direct image lithography. This method utilizes a grayscale Gaussian distribution effect to model inaccuracies inherent in the polymerization process, which are normally regarded as trivial matters or errors. The measured surface profiles and the mathematical prediction show a good agreement, demonstrating the ability of this method to generate wavy patterns with precisely controlled features. An accurate pattern can be generated with customizable parameters (wavelength, amplitude, wave shape, pattern profile, and overall dimension). This mask-free photolithography approach provides a rapid fabrication method that is capable of generating complex and non-uniform 3D wavy patterns with the wavelength ranging from 12 μm to 2100 μm and an amplitude-to-wavelength ratio as large as 300%. Microfluidic devices with pure wavy and wavy-herringbone patterns suitable for capture of circulating tumor cells are made as a demonstrative application. A completely customized microfluidic device with wavy patterns can be created within a few hours without access to clean room or commercial photolithography equipment.

  16. Generation of Customizable Micro-wavy Pattern through Grayscale Direct Image Lithography

    PubMed Central

    He, Ran; Wang, Shunqiang; Andrews, Geoffrey; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of research work in surface studies, a more effective method of producing patterned microstructures is highly desired due to the geometric limitations and complex fabricating process of current techniques. This paper presents an efficient and cost-effective method to generate customizable micro-wavy pattern using direct image lithography. This method utilizes a grayscale Gaussian distribution effect to model inaccuracies inherent in the polymerization process, which are normally regarded as trivial matters or errors. The measured surface profiles and the mathematical prediction show a good agreement, demonstrating the ability of this method to generate wavy patterns with precisely controlled features. An accurate pattern can be generated with customizable parameters (wavelength, amplitude, wave shape, pattern profile, and overall dimension). This mask-free photolithography approach provides a rapid fabrication method that is capable of generating complex and non-uniform 3D wavy patterns with the wavelength ranging from 12 μm to 2100 μm and an amplitude-to-wavelength ratio as large as 300%. Microfluidic devices with pure wavy and wavy-herringbone patterns suitable for capture of circulating tumor cells are made as a demonstrative application. A completely customized microfluidic device with wavy patterns can be created within a few hours without access to clean room or commercial photolithography equipment. PMID:26902520

  17. Central Pattern Generation and the Motor Infrastructure for Suck, Respiration, and Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Steven M.; Estep, Meredith

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the current report is to review experimental findings on centrally patterned movements and sensory and descending modulation of central pattern generators (CPGs) in a variety of animal and human models. Special emphasis is directed toward speech production muscle systems, including the chest wall and orofacial complex during…

  18. From Central Pattern Generator to Sensory Template in the Evolution of Birdsong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konishi, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    Central nervous networks, be they a part of the human brain or a group of neurons in a snail, may be designed to produce distinct patterns of movement. Central pattern generators can account for the development and production of normal vocal signals without auditory feedback in non-songbirds. Songbirds need auditory feedback to develop and…

  19. Generation of rhythmic patterns of activity by ventral interneurones in rat organotypic spinal slice culture

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Laura; Galante, Micaela; Grandolfo, Micaela; Nistri, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    In the presence of certain excitatory substances the rat isolated spinal cord generates rhythmic oscillations believed to be an in-built locomotor programme (fictive locomotion). However, it is unknown whether a long-term culture of the same tissue can express rhythmic activity. Such a simplified model system would provide useful data on the minimal circuitry involved and the cellular mechanisms mediating this phenomenon. For this purpose we performed patch clamp recording (under whole-cell voltage or current clamp conditions) from visually identified ventral horn interneurones of an organotypic slice culture of the rat spinal cord. Ventral horn interneurones expressed rhythmic bursting when the extracellular [K+] was raised from 4 to 6-7 mM. Under voltage clamp this activity consisted of composite synaptic currents grouped into bursts lasting 0.9 ± 0.5 s (2.8 ± 1.5 s period) and was generated at network level as it was blocked by tetrodotoxin or low-Ca2+-high-Mg2+ solution and its periodicity was unchanged at different potential levels. In current clamp mode bursting was usually observed as episodes comprising early depolarizing potentials followed by hyperpolarizing events with tight temporal patterning. Bursting was fully suppressed by 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and reduced in amplitude and duration by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonism without change in periodicity. Extracellular field recording showed bursting activity over a wide area of the ventral horn. Regular, rhythmic activity similar to that induced by K+ also appeared spontaneously in Mg2+-free solution. The much slower rhythmic pattern induced by strychnine and bicuculline was also accelerated by high-K+ solution. The fast and regular rhythmic activity of interneurones in the spinal organotypic culture is a novel observation which suggests that the oversimplified circuit present in this culture is a useful model for investigating spinal rhythmic activity. PMID:10332095

  20. A Method for Generating Natural and User-Defined Sniffing Patterns in Anesthetized or Reduced Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Ryan M.; Wachowiak, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Sniffing has long been thought to play a critical role in shaping neural responses to odorants at multiple levels of the nervous system. However, it has been difficult to systematically examine how particular parameters of sniffing behavior shape odorant-evoked activity, in large part because of the complexity of sniffing behavior and the difficulty in reproducing this behavior in an anesthetized or reduced preparation. Here we present a method for generating naturalistic sniffing patterns in such preparations. The method involves a nasal ventilator whose movement is controlled by an analog command voltage. The command signal may consist of intranasal pressure transients recorded from awake rats and mice or user-defined waveforms. This “sniff playback” device generates intranasal pressure and airflow transients in anesthetized animals that approximate those recorded from the awake animal and are reproducible across trials and across preparations. The device accurately reproduces command waveforms over an amplitude range of approximately 1 log unit and up to frequencies of approximately 12 Hz. Further, odorant-evoked neural activity imaged during sniff playback appears similar to that seen in awake animals. This method should prove useful in investigating how the parameters of odorant sampling shape neural responses in a variety of experimental settings. PMID:18791186

  1. A test of a dual central pattern generator hypothesis for subcortical control of locomotion.

    PubMed

    Guadagnoli, M A; Etnyre, B; Rodrigue, M L

    2000-08-01

    This study was designed to examine the nature of neural circuits involved in subcortical inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation mechanisms of locomotion. These circuits, called central pattern generators (CPGs), are believed to receive tonic input and generate rhythmically alternating sets of commands. Although CPGs have been theorized to exist in humans, their potential dual role in inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation is unclear. In the present study, nine participants walked on a treadmill, timing their heel-strikes to a metronome which varied the phase lag from 0.5 to 1.0 pi radians (0.1 pi intervals). A stimulus was delivered to the sural nerve and reflexes were measured in the ipsilateral and contralateral lower extremities through electromyography. The similarity between phase lag conditions for both temporal coordination (i.e., relative timing aspects between muscles and/or limbs) and reflex intensities suggested that they may be controlled by the same subcortical circuitry. Two plausible explanations exist: (1) a single CPG coordinates muscular contractions and phasically alters proprioceptive reflex modulation, as well as cutaneous input, using feed-forward control; (2) two separate circuits are strongly entrained, producing synchronous outputs for inter-limb coordination and reflex modulation. The out-of-phase task used in this study was limited in discerning such a difference, if it exists. PMID:10969197

  2. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  3. Differences in Parental Involvement Typologies among Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y Parents: A Study of Select Bay Area Region of Houston Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloz, Elizabeth Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences existed among generations (Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y) regarding the levels of parental involvement within each of these generations. Also examined were additional factors such as the parents. socioeconomic status, educational level, marital status, and ethnicity. The…

  4. Interactions between zebrafish pigment cells responsible for the generation of Turing patterns.

    PubMed

    Nakamasu, Akiko; Takahashi, Go; Kanbe, Akio; Kondo, Shigeru

    2009-05-26

    The reaction-diffusion system is one of the most studied nonlinear mechanisms that generate spatially periodic structures autonomous. On the basis of many mathematical studies using computer simulations, it is assumed that animal skin patterns are the most typical examples of the Turing pattern (stationary periodic pattern produced by the reaction-diffusion system). However, the mechanism underlying pattern formation remains unknown because the molecular or cellular basis of the phenomenon has yet to be identified. In this study, we identified the interaction network between the pigment cells of zebrafish, and showed that this interaction network possesses the properties necessary to form the Turing pattern. When the pigment cells in a restricted region were killed with laser treatment, new pigment cells developed to regenerate the striped pattern. We also found that the development and survival of the cells were influenced by the positioning of the surrounding cells. When melanophores and xanthophores were located at adjacent positions, these cells excluded one another. However, melanophores required a mass of xanthophores distributed in a more distant region for both differentiation and survival. Interestingly, the local effect of these cells is opposite to that of their effects long range. This relationship satisfies the necessary conditions required for stable pattern formation in the reaction-diffusion model. Simulation calculations for the deduced network generated wild-type pigment patterns as well as other mutant patterns. Our findings here allow further investigation of Turing pattern formation within the context of cell biology. PMID:19433782

  5. Alcohol Consumption Patterns in Immigrant and Later Generation Mexican American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, M. Jean

    1987-01-01

    Immigrant Mexican women's drinking patterns were compared with those of Mexican women in Mexico, other United States Latinas, later-generation Mexican-American women, and male immigrants. Changes in the direction of greater permissiveness and rationalization of alcohol use among later-generation Mexican-American women are demonstrated. (JMM)

  6. Effects of Differences in Working Memory Capacity on Patterns of Word Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawamura, Mimpei; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Morioka, Shu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that WM (working memory) is concerned with word generation, but many points regarding the relationship between the individual differences of WM capacity and the patterns of word generation remain unclear. This study is to investigate these unclear points by using three types of word fluency task with different…

  7. Automatic test pattern generation for logic circuits using the Boolean tree

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong Taegwon.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop an algorithm that can generate test patterns for combinational circuits and sequential logic circuits automatically. The new proposed algorithm generates a test pattern by using a special tree called a modified Boolean tree. In this algorithm, the construction of a modified Boolean tree is the most time-consuming step. Following the construction of a modified Boolean tree, a test pattern can be found by simply assigning a logic value 1 for even primary inputs and a logic value 0 for odd primary inputs of the constructed modified Boolean tree. The algorithm is applied to several benchmark circuits. The results showed the following: (1) for combinational circuits, the algorithm can generate test patterns 10-15% faster than the FAN algorithm, which is known as one of the most efficient algorithms to-date; (2) for sequential circuits, the algorithm shows more fault coverage than the nine valued algorithm.

  8. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    PubMed Central

    Bullara, D.; De Decker, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction–diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction–diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns. PMID:25959141

  9. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullara, D.; de Decker, Y.

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction-diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction-diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns.

  10. Cortical regions involved in the generation of musical structures during improvisation in pianists.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Sara L; Csíkszentmihályi, Mihály; Ullén, Fredrik

    2007-05-01

    Studies on simple pseudorandom motor and cognitive tasks have shown that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and rostral premotor areas are involved in free response selection. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate whether these brain regions are also involved in free generation of responses in a more complex creative behavior: musical improvisation. Eleven professional pianists participated in the study. In one condition, Improvise, the pianist improvised on the basis of a visually displayed melody. In the control condition, Reproduce, the participant reproduced his previous improvisation from memory. Participants were able to reproduce their improvisations with a high level of accuracy, and the contrast Improvise versus Reproduce was thus essentially matched in terms of motor output and sensory feedback. However, the Improvise condition required storage in memory of the improvisation. We therefore also included a condition FreeImp, where the pianist improvised but was instructed not to memorize his performance. To locate brain regions involved in musical creation, we investigated the activations in the Improvise-Reproduce contrast that were also present in FreeImp contrasted with a baseline rest condition. Activated brain regions included the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the presupplementary motor area, the rostral portion of the dorsal premotor cortex, and the left posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus. We suggest that these regions are part of a network involved in musical creation, and discuss their possible functional roles. PMID:17488207

  11. K+ homeostasis and central pattern generation in the metathoracic ganglion of the locust.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Corinne I; Labrie, John D; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2009-07-01

    Stress-induced arrest of ventilatory motor pattern generation is tightly correlated with an abrupt increase in extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) within the metathoracic neuropil of the locust, Locusta migratoria. Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition with ouabain elicits repetitive surges of [K+]o that coincide with arrest and recovery of motor activity. Here we show that ouabain induces repetitive [K+]o events in a concentration-dependent manner. 10(-5)M, 10(-4)M, and 10(-3)M ouabain was bath-applied in semi-intact locust preparations. 10(-4)M and 10(-3)M ouabain reliably induced repetitive [K+]o events whereas 10(-5)M ouabain had no significant effect. In comparison to 10(-4)M ouabain, 10(-3)M ouabain increased the number and hastened the time to onset of repetitive [K+]o waves, prolonged [K+]o event duration, increased resting [K+]o, and diminished the absolute value of [K+]o waves. Recovery of motor patterning following [K+]o events was less likely in 10(-3)M ouabain. In addition, we show that K+ channel inhibition using TEA suppressed the onset and decreased the amplitude of ouabain-induced repetitive [K+]o waves. Our results demonstrate that ventilatory circuit function in the locust CNS is dependent on the balance between mechanisms of [K+] accumulation and [K+] clearance. We suggest that with an imbalance in favour of accumulation the system tends towards a bistable state with transitions mediated by positive feedback involving voltage-dependent K+ channels. PMID:19482133

  12. Inspiring the Next Generation of Explorers: Scientist Involvement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists, science experts, graduate and even undergraduate student researchers have a unique ability to inspire the next generation of explorers. These science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts can serve as role models for students and can help inspire them to consider future STEM-related careers. They have an exceptional ability to instill a sense of curiosity and fascination in the minds of students as they bring science to life in the classroom. Students and teachers are hungry for opportunities to interact with scientists. They feel honored when these experts take time out of their busy day to share their science, their expertise, and their stories. The key for teachers is to be cognizant of opportunities to connect their students with scientists. For scientists, the key is to know how to get involved, to have options for participation that involve different levels of commitment, and to work with educational specialists who can help facilitate their involvement. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students by getting them actively involved with NASA exploration, discovery, and the process of science. One of the main goals of the program is to facilitate student research in the classroom. The program uses astronaut photographs, provided through the ARES Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload on the International Space Station (ISS) as the hook to help students gain an interest in a research topic. Student investigations can focus on Earth or involve comparative planetology. Student teams are encouraged to use additional imagery and data from Earth or planetary orbital spacecraft, or ground-based data collection tools, to augment the astronaut photography dataset. A second goal of the program is to provide

  13. Inspiring the Next Generation of Explorers: Scientist Involvement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Paige; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Scientists, science experts, graduate and even undergraduate student researchers have a unique ability to inspire the next generation of explorers. These science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts can serve as role models for students and can help inspire them to consider future STEM-related careers. They have an exceptional ability to instill a sense of curiosity and fascination in the minds of students as they bring science to life in the classroom. Students and teachers are hungry for opportunities to interact with scientists. They feel honored when these experts take time out of their busy day to share their science, their expertise, and their stories. The key for teachers is to be cognizant of opportunities to connect their students with scientists. For scientists, the key is to know how to get involved, to have options for participation that involve different levels of commitment, and to work with educational specialists who can help facilitate their involvement. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students by getting them actively involved with NASA exploration, discovery, and the process of science. One of the main goals of the program is to facilitate student research in the classroom. The program uses astronaut photographs, provided through the ARES Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload on the International Space Station (ISS) as the hook to help students gain an interest in a research topic. Student investigations can focus on Earth or involve comparative planetology. Student teams are encouraged to use additional imagery and data from Earth or planetary orbital spacecraft, or ground-based data collection tools, to augment the astronaut photography dataset. A second goal of the program is to provide

  14. Localization of Motor Neurons and Central Pattern Generators for Motor Patterns Underlying Feeding Behavior in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schoofs, Andreas; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Pankratz, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper, we identify distinct clusters of motor neurons that execute head tilting, mouth hook movements, and pharyngeal pumping during larval feeding. This basic anatomical scaffold enabled the use of calcium-imaging to monitor the neural activity of motor neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) that drive food intake. Simultaneous nerve- and muscle-recordings demonstrate that the motor neurons innervate the cibarial dilator musculature (CDM) ipsi- and contra-laterally. By classical lesion experiments we localize a set of CPGs generating the neuronal pattern underlying feeding movements to the subesophageal zone (SEZ). Lesioning of higher brain centers decelerated all feeding-related motor patterns, whereas lesioning of ventral nerve cord (VNC) only affected the motor rhythm underlying pharyngeal pumping. These findings provide a basis for progressing upstream of the motor neurons to identify higher regulatory components of the feeding motor system. PMID:26252658

  15. Localization of Motor Neurons and Central Pattern Generators for Motor Patterns Underlying Feeding Behavior in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schoofs, Andreas; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Pankratz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper, we identify distinct clusters of motor neurons that execute head tilting, mouth hook movements, and pharyngeal pumping during larval feeding. This basic anatomical scaffold enabled the use of calcium-imaging to monitor the neural activity of motor neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) that drive food intake. Simultaneous nerve- and muscle-recordings demonstrate that the motor neurons innervate the cibarial dilator musculature (CDM) ipsi- and contra-laterally. By classical lesion experiments we localize a set of CPGs generating the neuronal pattern underlying feeding movements to the subesophageal zone (SEZ). Lesioning of higher brain centers decelerated all feeding-related motor patterns, whereas lesioning of ventral nerve cord (VNC) only affected the motor rhythm underlying pharyngeal pumping. These findings provide a basis for progressing upstream of the motor neurons to identify higher regulatory components of the feeding motor system. PMID:26252658

  16. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2004-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions ( de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically colocalize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  17. Note: A novel dielectric barrier discharge system for generating stable patterns in wide range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weibo; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Yuyang; Dong, Lifang

    2016-05-01

    We develop a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system with a meshed water electrode to generate stable square superlattice patterns (MSSP) in Ar/air mixture in a wide range of experimental environments. Discharge scenarios with the applied voltage increasing in the meshed DBD and ordinary DBD are presented respectively under the same experimental conditions. It is found that a square pattern and MSSP can be obtained stably and easily in meshed DBD, while no pattern emerges in ordinary DBD. MSSP can be formed when the Ar content is from 0% to 70%, and the corresponding applied voltage decreases with Ar content increasing. Results based on optical methods show that MSSP is generated by artificially designed electrodes together with nonlinear characteristics of DBD, which may account for why patterns in meshed DBD exist in a wide range.

  18. Note: A novel dielectric barrier discharge system for generating stable patterns in wide range.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weibo; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Yuyang; Dong, Lifang

    2016-05-01

    We develop a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system with a meshed water electrode to generate stable square superlattice patterns (MSSP) in Ar/air mixture in a wide range of experimental environments. Discharge scenarios with the applied voltage increasing in the meshed DBD and ordinary DBD are presented respectively under the same experimental conditions. It is found that a square pattern and MSSP can be obtained stably and easily in meshed DBD, while no pattern emerges in ordinary DBD. MSSP can be formed when the Ar content is from 0% to 70%, and the corresponding applied voltage decreases with Ar content increasing. Results based on optical methods show that MSSP is generated by artificially designed electrodes together with nonlinear characteristics of DBD, which may account for why patterns in meshed DBD exist in a wide range. PMID:27250476

  19. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Noh, JungHyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns. PMID:27230944

  20. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yong; Noh, JungHyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P F

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns. PMID:27230944

  1. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yong; Noh, Junghyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns.

  2. When does colonisation of a semi-arid hillslope generate vegetation patterns?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    Patterned vegetation occurs in many semi-arid regions of the world. Most previous studies have assumed that patterns form from a starting point of uniform vegetation, for example as a response to a decrease in mean annual rainfall. However an alternative possibility is that patterns are generated when bare ground is colonised. This paper investigates the conditions under which colonisation leads to patterning on sloping ground. The slope gradient plays an important role because of the downhill flow of rainwater. One long-established consequence of this is that patterns are organised into stripes running parallel to the contours; such patterns are known as banded vegetation or tiger bush. This paper shows that the slope also has an important effect on colonisation, since the uphill and downhill edges of an isolated vegetation patch have different dynamics. For the much-used Klausmeier model for semi-arid vegetation, the author shows that without a term representing water diffusion, colonisation always generates uniform vegetation rather than a pattern. However the combination of a sufficiently large water diffusion term and a sufficiently low slope gradient does lead to colonisation-induced patterning. The author goes on to consider colonisation in the Rietkerk model, which is also in widespread use: the same conclusions apply for this model provided that a small threshold is imposed on vegetation biomass, below which plant growth is set to zero. Since the two models are quite different mathematically, this suggests that the predictions are a consequence of the basic underlying assumption of water redistribution as the pattern generation mechanism. PMID:26547308

  3. Rapid Generation of Multiplexed Cell Cocultures Using Acoustic Droplet Ejection Followed by Aqueous Two-Phase Exclusion Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yu; Frampton, John P.; Raghavan, Shreya; Sabahi-Kaviani, Rahman; Luker, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The development of tools for patterning cocultures of cells is a fundamental interest among cell biologists and tissue engineers. Although a variety of systems exist for micropatterning cells, the methods used to generate cell micropatterns are often cumbersome and difficult to adapt for tissue engineering purposes. This study combines acoustic droplet ejection and aqueous two-phase system exclusion patterning to introduce a method for patterning cocultures of cells in multiplexed arrays. This new method uses focused acoustic radiation pressure to eject discrete droplets of uniform size from the surface of a dextran solution containing cells. The size of droplets is controlled by adjusting ultrasound parameters, such as pulse, duration, and amplitude. The ejected dextran droplets are captured on a cell culture substrate that is manipulated by a computer-controlled 3D positioning system according to predesigned patterns. Polyethylene glycol solution containing an additional cell type is then added to the culture dish to produce a two-phase system capable of depositing different types of cells around the initial pattern of cells. We demonstrate that our method can produce patterns of islands or lines with two or more cell types. Further, we demonstrate that patterns can be multiplexed for studies involving combinations of multiple cell types. This method offers a tool to transfer cell-containing samples in a contact-free, nozzle-less manner, avoiding sample cross-contamination. It can be used to pattern cell cocultures without complicated fabrication of culture substrates. These capabilities were used to examine the response of cancer cells to the presence of a ligand (CXCL12) secreted from surrounding cocultured cells. PMID:22356298

  4. Parental Involvement in Infant Sleep Routines Predicts Differential Sleep Patterns in Children With and Without Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Jennifer; Palmer, Cara A; Hussain, Hira; Alfano, Candice A

    2016-08-01

    This study compared parents' retrospective reports of their involvement in infant settling strategies and their relation to current sleep patterns among children (N = 84, ages 7-11) with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and healthy controls. Parents of children with GAD were significantly more likely to report rocking their infants to sleep and putting infants down when they were already asleep than parents of healthy controls, even when accounting for infant health-related factors and parental anxiety. Greater involvement in infant sleep routines also predicted sleep patterns (measured via actigraphy) during childhood, though opposite relationships were observed in the two groups. Early involvement was related to poorer sleep in control children but better sleep for children with GAD even after controlling for current parenting practices. Findings suggest differential effects of early sleep-related parenting for children with and without later anxiety disorders with possible implications for early intervention. PMID:26493392

  5. Calculation of second-harmonic wave pattern generated by focused cylindrical vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsu, A.; Kozawa, Y.; Sato, S.

    2010-03-01

    We calculated the second-harmonic wave pattern induced by focused cylindrically symmetric, polarized vector beams. The second-order nonlinear polarization was expressed for fundamental electric field components passed through a dielectric interface based on vector diffraction theory. Furthermore, the second-harmonic wave pattern was represented on the basis of the far-field approximate expression derived from the formulation of higher-order harmonic generation including a Green's function. For a (110) zinc selenide crystal, the calculated forward emission patterns of the second-harmonic wave were eight-figure shaped as observed in experiment.

  6. Oscillatory Pattern Generation of the Olfactory Center Using Pulse-Type Hardware Chaotic Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ken; Hatano, Hirokazu; Saito, Minoru; Sekine, Yoshifumi

    Oscillatory patterns of electrical activity are a ubiquitous feature in nervous systems. Oscillatory patterns play an important role in the processing of sensory information pattern recognition. For example, earlier reports describe that the oscillatory patterns in the olfactory center of the land slug are changed by odor stimuli to the tentacles. Olfactory processing has also been studied in relation to rabbits and land slugs through the construction and use of mathematical neural network models. However, a large-scale model is necessary for the study of a model which has sensory information recognition by the oscillatory pattern. Therefore, the construction of a hardware model that can generate oscillatory patterns is desired because nonlinear operations can be processed at higher speeds than the mathematical model. We are studying about the neural network using hardware neuron models to construct the olfactory center model of the living organisms. In the present study, we discuss about the oscillatory pattern generation of the olfactory center using pulse-type hardware chaotic neuron models. Our model shows periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic oscillations such as the olfactory center of living organisms by changing the synaptic connection weights.

  7. Structural vibration control by tuned mass damper using central pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Hongu, Junichi

    2011-04-01

    This paper proposes a new control method for active mass dampers using a Central Pattern Generator in vibration mitigation. The active mass dampers (or active dynamic absorbers) have been applied to structural vibration control of high-rise buildings, bridges and so on. In this case, the mass of the active mass damper must oscillate in an appropriate phase in relation to the control object, and generally, the damper has been designed by linear control theory as pole placement method, optimal control method or H infinity control method, and all the rest. On the other hand, on walking of animate beings like mammals or insects, both side feet have appropriate phase relations; moreover, it is possible to keep moving on irregular ground. That is, algorithms for the walking would be embedded into the animate beings to control the complicated and redundant bodies with ease and robustness. In biological study, the Central Pattern Generators in bodies playing a significant role in the walking have been learned over the last few decades, and some studies said that some animate beings are able to control their feet by using the generators without their brains in the walking. Moreover, mathematical models of the pattern generators have been proposed, and some researchers have been studying to realize walking of biped-robots using the pattern generators embedded in a computer. In this study, the algorithm is installed into a controller for the active mass damper; furthermore, validation of the controller is performed by numerical simulation.

  8. Generation of optical crystals and quasicrystal beams: Kaleidoscopic patterns and phase singularity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y. F.; Liang, H. C.; Lin, Y. C.; Tzeng, Y. S.; Su, K. W.; Huang, K. F.

    2011-05-15

    We explore the feasibility of the generation of pseudonondiffracting optical beams related to crystal and quasicrystal structures. It is experimentally confirmed that optical crystal and quasicrystal beams can be remarkably generated with a collimated light to illuminate a high-precision mask with multiple apertures regularly distributed on a ring. We also found that exotic kaleidoscopic patterns can be exhibited with the high-order quasicrystal beams. More importantly, the structures of phase singularities in optical quasicrystal beams are manifested.

  9. Influence of next-generation sequencing and storage conditions on miRNA patterns generated from PAXgene blood.

    PubMed

    Backes, Christina; Leidinger, Petra; Altmann, Gabriela; Wuerstle, Maximilian; Meder, Benjamin; Galata, Valentina; Mueller, Sabine C; Sickert, Daniel; Stähler, Cord; Meese, Eckart; Keller, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    Whole blood derived miRNA signatures determined by Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) offer themselves as future minimally invasive biomarkers for various human diseases. The PAXgene system is a commonly used blood storage system for miRNA analysis. Central to all miRNA analyses that aim to identify disease specific miRNA signatures, is the question of stability and variability of the miRNA profiles that are generated by NGS. We characterized the influence of five different conditions on the genome wide miRNA expression pattern of human blood isolated in PAXgene RNA tubes. In detail, we analyzed 15 miRNomes from three individuals. The blood was subjected to different numbers of freeze/thaw cycles and analyzed for the influence of storage at -80 or 8 °C. We also determined the influence of blood collection and NGS preparations on the miRNA pattern isolated from a single individual, which has been sequenced 10 times. Here, five PAXGene tubes were consecutively collected that have been split in two replicates, representing two experimental batches. All samples were analyzed by Illumina NGS. For each sample, approximately 20 million NGS reads have been generated. Hierarchical clustering and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed an influence of the different conditions on the miRNA patterns. The effects of the different conditions on miRNA abundance are, however, smaller than the differences that are due to interindividual variability. We also found evidence for an influence of the NGS measurement on the miRNA pattern. Specifically, hsa-miR-1271-5p and hsa-miR-182-5p showed coefficients of variation above 100% indicating a strong influence of the NGS protocol on the abundance of these miRNAs. PMID:26207298

  10. Central pattern generators for a common semiology in fronto-limbic seizures and in parasomnias. A neuroethologic approach.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, C A; Rubboli, G; Gardella, E; Cantalupo, G; Calandra-Buonaura, G; Vedovello, M; Alessandria, M; Gandini, G; Cinotti, S; Zamponi, N; Meletti, S

    2005-12-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are genetically determined neuronal aggregates in the mesencephalon, pons and spinal cord subserving innate motor behaviours essential for survival (feeding, locomotion, reproduction etc.). In higher primates CPGs are largely under neocortical control. We describe how certain motor events observed in parasomnias and epileptic seizures could have similar features and resemble motor behaviours, which can be the expression of the same CPG. Both epilepsy and sleep can lead to a temporary loss of control of neomammalian cortex that facilitates through a common platform (arousal) the emergences of stereotyped inborn fixed action patterns. Therefore we suggest that, independently from the nature of the trigger, be it a seizure or a parasomnia, the same CPGs can be involved, "caught up", leading to a common motor semiology (the "Carillon theory"). PMID:16331401

  11. Spiral pattern in a radial displacement involving a reaction-producing gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Ban, Mitsumasa; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2008-08-01

    We have shown experimentally that the pattern created by the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous one in a radial Hele-Shaw cell develops not radially but spirally when a more viscous sodium polyacrylate solution is displaced by a less viscous trivalent iron ion (Fe3+) solution with a sufficiently high concentration of Fe3+ . Another experiment revealed that an instantaneous chemical reaction takes place between the two fluids, and at high Fe3+ concentrations it produces a film of the gel at the contact plane. The gel film is proposed to be responsible for the spiral pattern.

  12. Spiral pattern in a radial displacement involving a reaction-producing gel.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Yuichiro; Hayashi, Atsushi; Ban, Mitsumasa; Kato, Yoshihito; Tada, Yutaka

    2008-08-01

    We have shown experimentally that the pattern created by the displacement of a more viscous fluid by a less viscous one in a radial Hele-Shaw cell develops not radially but spirally when a more viscous sodium polyacrylate solution is displaced by a less viscous trivalent iron ion (Fe3+) solution with a sufficiently high concentration of Fe3+ . Another experiment revealed that an instantaneous chemical reaction takes place between the two fluids, and at high Fe3+ concentrations it produces a film of the gel at the contact plane. The gel film is proposed to be responsible for the spiral pattern. PMID:18850936

  13. Improved photomask accuracy with a high-productivity DUV laser pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öström, Thomas; Måhlén, Jonas; Karawajczyk, Andrzej; Rosling, Mats; Carlqvist, Per; Askebjer, Per; Karlin, Tord; Sallander, Jesper; Österberg, Anders

    2006-10-01

    A strategy for sub-100 nm technology nodes is to maximize the use of high-speed deep-UV laser pattern generators, reserving e-beam tools for the most critical photomask layers. With a 248 nm excimer laser and 0.82 NA projection optics, the Sigma7500 increases the application space of laser pattern generators. A programmable spatial light modulator (SLM) is imaged with partially coherent optics to compose the photomask pattern. Image profiles are enhanced with phase shifting in the pattern generator, and features below 200 nm are reliably printed. The Sigma7500 extends the SLM-based architecture with improvements to CD uniformity and placement accuracy, resulting from an error budget-based methodology. Among these improvements is a stiffer focus stage design with digital servos, resulting in improved focus stability. Tighter climate controls and improved dose control reduce drift during mask patterning. As a result, global composite CD uniformity below 5 nm (3σ) has been demonstrated, with placement accuracy below 10 nm (3σ) across the mask. Self-calibration methods are used to optimize and monitor system performance, reducing the need to print test plates. The SLM calibration camera views programmed test patterns, making it possible to evaluate image metrics such as CD uniformity and line edge roughness. The camera is also used to characterize image placement over the optical field. A feature called ProcessEqualizer TM has been developed to correct long-range CD errors arising from process effects on production photomasks. Mask data is sized in real time to compensate for pattern-dependent errors related to local pattern density, as well as for systematic pattern-independent errors such as radial CD signatures. Corrections are made in the pixel domain in the advanced adjustments processor, which also performs global biasing, stamp distortion compensation, and corner enhancement. In the Sigma7500, the mask pattern is imaged with full edge addressability in each

  14. Inferior olivary nucleus involvement in pediatric neurodegenerative disorders: does it play a role in neuroimaging pattern-recognition approach?

    PubMed

    Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Morana, Giovanni; Bruno, Claudio; Di Rocco, Maja; Striano, Pasaquale; De Grandis, Eusa; Veneselli, Edvige; Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta

    2015-04-01

    The diagnostic work up of neurometabolic/degenerative disorders is complex. In such context, identification of neuroradiological features suggestive of specific diagnoses is useful to prompt further diagnostic tests. Involvement of the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has been reported in several pathologic conditions, either as a primary manifestation of disease or secondary to hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD). In this study, we analyzed a cohort of 95 children with different neurometabolic/degenerative diseases involving the brainstem and cerebellum, with the aim to evaluate whether ION involvement plays a role in a neuroimaging-based pattern-recognition approach. A total of 13 patients (13.7%) showed bilateral high-signal intensity and enlargement of the ION on T2-weighted images, while 16 (16.8%) had ION T2-hyperintensity without olivary nucleus enlargement. Our study demonstrates that ION involvement is not rare in children with neurometabolic/degenerative disorders. Two main neuroradiological patterns, that is, "T2-hyperintense signal" and "T2-hyperintense signal with enlargement" are found. These patterns can be related to different etiologies, and do not suggest specific diagnoses. Primary ION lesion can be characterized by olivary swelling, and the differentiation from typical secondary HOD may be difficult. PMID:25686202

  15. Variation in motor output and motor performance in a centrally generated motor pattern

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Brian J.; Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) produce motor patterns that ultimately drive motor outputs. We studied how functional motor performance is achieved, specifically, whether the variation seen in motor patterns is reflected in motor performance and whether fictive motor patterns differ from those in vivo. We used the leech heartbeat system in which a bilaterally symmetrical CPG coordinates segmental heart motor neurons and two segmented heart tubes into two mutually exclusive coordination modes: rear-to-front peristaltic on one side and nearly synchronous on the other, with regular side-to-side switches. We assessed individual variability of the motor pattern and the beat pattern in vivo. To quantify the beat pattern we imaged intact adults. To quantify the phase relations between motor neurons and heart constrictions we recorded extracellularly from two heart motor neurons and movement from the corresponding heart segments in minimally dissected leeches. Variation in the motor pattern was reflected in motor performance only in the peristaltic mode, where larger intersegmental phase differences in the motor neurons resulted in larger phase differences between heart constrictions. Fictive motor patterns differed from those in vivo only in the synchronous mode, where intersegmental phase differences in vivo had a larger front-to-rear bias and were more constrained. Additionally, load-influenced constriction timing might explain the amplification of the phase differences between heart segments in the peristaltic mode and the higher variability in motor output due to body shape assumed in this soft-bodied animal. The motor pattern determines the beat pattern, peristaltic or synchronous, but heart mechanics influence the phase relations achieved. PMID:24717348

  16. Lay Referral Patterns Involved in Cardiac Treatment Decision Making among Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Amey, Cheryl H.; Stoller, Eleanor Palo; Muldoon, Susan B.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined age and contextually related factors that are influential in lay referral patterns during cardiac treatment decision making. Design and Methods: A complementary design was used. The Myocardial Infarction (MI) Onset Study identified demographic correlates of who sought medical care for 1,388 MI (heart attack) survivors.…

  17. The Development of Group Interaction Patterns: How Groups become Adaptive, Generative, and Transformative Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Manuel; Sessa, Valerie I.

    2007-01-01

    This article integrates the literature on group interaction process analysis and group learning, providing a framework for understanding how patterns of interaction develop. The model proposes how adaptive, generative, and transformative learning processes evolve and vary in their functionality. Environmental triggers for learning, the group's…

  18. Student-Generated Content in College Teaching: Content Quality, Behavioural Pattern and Learning Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, X.; Guo, X.; Yu, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of course content, behavioural patterns of students and learning performance in teaching of student-generated content (SGC). A total of 49 third-year university students in educational technology participated in this study. By combining the methods of questionnaire, lag sequence analysis and interview, the study…

  19. Pattern-generating travelling waves in a discrete multicellular system with lateral inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plahte, Erik; Øyehaug, Leiv

    2007-02-01

    On a one-dimensional string of cells, the juxtacrine signalling model for Delta-Notch lateral inhibition by Collier et al. [J.R. Collier, N.A.M. Monk, P.K. Maini, J.H. Lewis, Pattern formation by lateral inhibition with feedback: A mathematical model of Delta-Notch intercellular interaction, J. Theoret. Biol. 183 (1996) 429-446] exhibits a predominant alternating pattern of cells expressing either Delta or Notch, as well as many aperiodic patterns. Despite this multistationarity, in the idealised situation of no noise, travelling waves invading the unstable, homogeneous state only generate the predominant alternating pattern in their wake all over the lattice. However, this robustness is totally lost in the presence of stochastic noise because the invaded, initial state is unstable. Using linear approximations around the initial, homogeneous state and around the final, patterned state, we are able to derive analytically all essential properties of the wave: the shape of the wave front, the unique, alternating pattern generated by the wave, and the asymptotic speed of the wave front. We show that the asymptotic wave speed equals the theoretical minimum wave speed. The latter agrees extremely well with the value estimated from numerical simulations. Thus, in this system travelling waves are pulled by the leading edge of the front.

  20. Synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates the mosaic cellular pattern of the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Sayaka; Honda, Hisao; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Miyata, Takaki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), olfactory cells (OCs) and supporting cells (SCs), which express different cadherins, are arranged in a characteristic mosaic pattern in which OCs are enclosed by SCs. However, the mechanism underlying this cellular patterning is unclear. Here, we show that the cellular pattern of the OE is established by cellular rearrangements during development. In the OE, OCs express nectin-2 and N-cadherin, and SCs express nectin-2, nectin-3, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin. Heterophilic trans-interaction between nectin-2 on OCs and nectin-3 on SCs preferentially recruits cadherin via α-catenin to heterotypic junctions, and the differential distributions of cadherins between junctions promote cellular intercalations, resulting in the formation of the mosaic pattern. These observations are confirmed by model cell systems, and various cellular patterns are generated by the combinatorial expression of nectins and cadherins. Collectively, the synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates mosaic pattern, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism. PMID:26929452

  1. Directivity patterns of laser-generated sound in solids: Effects of optical and thermal parameters.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, directivity patterns of laser-generated sound in solids are investigated theoretically. Two main approaches to the calculation of directivity patterns of laser-generated sound are discussed for the most important case of thermo-optical regime of generation. The first approach, which is widely used in practice, is based on the simple modelling of the equivalent thermo-optical source as a mechanical dipole comprising two horizontal forces applied to the surface in opposite directions. The second approach is based on the rigorous theory that takes into account all acoustical, optical and thermal parameters of a solid material and all geometrical and physical parameters of a laser beam. Directivity patterns of laser-generated bulk longitudinal and shear elastic waves, as well as the amplitudes of generated Rayleigh surface waves, are calculated for different values of physical and geometrical parameters and compared with the directivity patterns calculated in case of dipole-source representation. It is demonstrated that the simple approach using a dipole-source representation of laser-generated sound is rather limited, especially for description of generated longitudinal acoustic waves. A practical criterion is established to define the conditions under which the dipole-source representation gives predictions with acceptable errors. It is shown that, for radiation in the normal direction to the surface, the amplitudes of longitudinal waves are especially sensitive to the values of thermal parameters and of the acoustic reflection coefficient from a free solid surface. A discussion is given on the possibility of using such a high sensitivity to the values of the reflection coefficient for investigation of surface properties of real solids. PMID:26851995

  2. Wide-field depth-sectioning fluorescence microscopy using projector-generated patterned illumination.

    PubMed

    Delica, Serafin; Blanca, Carlo Mar

    2007-10-10

    We present a simple and cost-effective wide-field, depth-sectioning, fluorescence microscope utilizing a commercial multimedia projector to generate excitation patterns on the sample. Highly resolved optical sections of fluorescent pollen grains at 1.9 microm axial resolution are constructed using the structured illumination technique. This requires grid excitation patterns to be scanned across the sample, which is straightforwardly implemented by creating slideshows of gratings at different phases, projecting them onto the sample, and synchronizing camera acquisition with slide transition. In addition to rapid dynamic pattern generation, the projector provides high illumination power and spectral excitation selectivity. We exploit these properties by imaging mouse neural cells in cultures multistained with Alexa 488 and Cy3. The spectral and structural neural information is effectively resolved in three dimensions. The flexibility and commercial availability of this light source is envisioned to open multidimensional imaging to a broader user base. PMID:17932535

  3. Generation of mask patterns for diffractive optical elements using Mathematica{sup T}{sup M}

    SciTech Connect

    OShea, D.C.

    1996-07-01

    The generation of binary and grayscale masks used in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements is usually performed using a proprietary piece of software or a computer-aided drafting package. Once the pattern is computed or designed, it must be output to a plotting or imaging system that will produce a reticle plate. This article describes a number of short Mathematica modules that can be used to generate binary and grayscale patterns in a PostScript-compatible format. Approaches to ensure that the patterns are directly related to the function of the element and the design wavelength are discussed. A procedure to preserve the scale of the graphic output when it is transferred to another application is given. Examples of surfaces for a 100 mm effective focal length lens and an Alvarez surface are given. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites.

    PubMed

    González Pericot, N; Villoria Sáez, P; Del Río Merino, M; Liébana Carrasco, O

    2014-11-01

    The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites. PMID:25081852

  5. An approach toward an analysis of the pattern recognition involved in the stellar orientation of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallraff, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    A conditioning method was used to investigate the orientational responses of ducks as affected by manipulations of the stellar patterns in a planetarium. Under simulated natural skies it was possible to train a bird to a particular direction successively under all positions of the rotating sphere at a constant latitude. The responses were independent of the phase relationships between local time, season, and appearance of the sky provided the bird had been trained under the particular sector of the sphere some time before.

  6. Officer-involved shooting: reaction patterns, response protocols, and psychological intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Psychologists who work with law enforcement agencies may be called upon to respond to an officer-involved shooting (OIS). These need not be the most traumatic critical incidents in policing, but when they are, the reasons usually involve a mix of incident characteristics, officer response styles, and departmental handling. This article describes some of the psychological reactions experienced by officers during and following an OIS and provides a model of administrative, legal, mental health, and peer support services for officers in need. Finally, the article discusses several key roles that the police psychologist can play in the process of managing an OIS. PMID:17131770

  7. Generational Patterns in Mexican Americans' Academic Performance in an Unwelcoming Political Context

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Danyel A. V.; Roosa, Mark W.; Knight, George P.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that immigrant students often do better academically than their U.S.-born peers from the same ethnic group but it is unclear whether this pattern holds for Mexican Americans. We examined the academic performance of four generations of Mexican American students from fifth to 10th grade looking for generation differences and explanations for them. Using data from 749 families, we tested a model with fifth grade variables that differed by generation as potential mediators linking student generation to 10th grade academic performance. Results showed that immigrants were academically behind at fifth grade but caught up by seventh. Only economic hardship mediated the long term relationship between student generation and 10th grade academic performance; maternal educational expectations and child language hassles, English usage, discrimination, and mainstream values helped explained the early academic deficit of immigrant children. The results identified potential targets for interventions to improve Mexican American students' academic performance. PMID:24578588

  8. Changing Patterns of Parent-Teacher Communication and Parent Involvement from Preschool to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Elizabeth; McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Harrison, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    PreschoolThis study investigated the nature of parent involvement and parent-educator communication in prior-to-school early childhood settings and school, to explore relations to social capital variables and consistencies and changes in practices over time. Parent interview and teacher questionnaire data from two waves of the Longitudinal Study…

  9. Mexican-Origin Parents' Involvement in Adolescent Peer Relationships: A Pattern Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Killoren, Sarah E.; Thayer, Shawna M.

    2007-01-01

    The cultural backgrounds and experiences of Mexican-origin mothers and fathers (including their Anglo and Mexican cultural orientations and their familism values) and their socioeconomic background (parental education, family income, neighborhood poverty rate) are linked to the nature of their involvement in adolescent peer relationships.

  10. Volunteers in Amateur Sport Organizations: Biographic and Demographic Characteristics and Patterns of Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slack, Trevor

    This paper presents findings on the biographic and demographic characteristics of volunteer sport administrators and their involvement in sport organizations. The sample for the study consisted of volunteer sport administrators in 60 province-level sport organizations in Alberta, Canada. This study was done because of the dearth of research in…

  11. Patterns of Rural Community Involvement: A Comparison of Residents and Recent Immigrants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rank, Mark R.; Voss, Paul R.

    1982-01-01

    Data collected in 1977 from 992 households in 37 fast-growing nonmetropolitan counties in the Upper Great Lakes Region show that newcomers over time tend to become as involved in their new communities as the oldtimers and socioeconomic status positively affects levels of formal community participation for both migrants and residents. (LC)

  12. "Simply the Best for My Children": Patterns of Parental Involvement in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ule, Mirjana; Živoder, Andreja; du Bois-Reymond, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    This article explores parental involvement in the educational trajectories of children in Europe. The analysis is embedded in the framework of the three dominant contemporary social processes that have been acknowledged as crucial factors for the educational and life trajectories of young people today, i.e. familialization, institutionalization,…

  13. The large contour data generation from divided image of photomask pattern of 32 nm and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakawa, Tsutomu; Ogiso, Yoshiaki; Iwai, Toshimichi; Matsumoto, Jun; Nakamura, Takayuki

    2010-05-01

    The application of Mask CD-SEM for process management of photomask using two dimensional measurements as photomask patterns become smaller and more complex, [1]. Also, WPI technology application using an optical Mask inspection tool simulates wafer plane images using photomask images [2]. In order to simulate the MEEF influence for aggressive OPC and High-end photomask patterns in 32nm node and beyond, a requirement exists for wide Field of View (FOV) GDS data and tone information generated from high precision SEM images. In light of these requirements, we developed a GDS data extraction algorithm with sub-nanometer accuracy using wide FOV images, for example, greater than 10um square. As a result, we over come the difficulty of generating large contour data without the distortion that is normally associated with acquired SEM images. Also, it will be shown that the evaluation result can be effective for 32 nm applications and beyond using Mask CD-SEM E3620 manufactured by Advantest. On the other hand, we investigate the application example of the wide FOV GDS data. In order to easily compare the acquired GDS data with design data, we explain the separate algorithm with three layer structures for Tri-tone (Ternary) photomask pattern, consisting of an outer pattern and another pattern.

  14. Cellular basis for singing motor pattern generation in the field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer)

    PubMed Central

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2012-01-01

    The singing behavior of male crickets allows analyzing a central pattern generator (CPG) that was shaped by sexual selection for reliable production of species-specific communication signals. After localizing the essential ganglia for singing in Gryllus bimaculatus, we now studied the calling song CPG at the cellular level. Fictive singing was initiated by pharmacological brain stimulation. The motor pattern underlying syllables and chirps was recorded as alternating spike bursts of wing-opener and wing-closer motoneurons in a truncated wing nerve; it precisely reflected the natural calling song. During fictive singing, we intracellularly recorded and stained interneurons in thoracic and abdominal ganglia and tested their impact on the song pattern by intracellular current injections. We identified three interneurons of the metathoracic and first unfused abdominal ganglion that rhythmically de- and hyperpolarized in phase with the syllable pattern and spiked strictly before the wing-opener motoneurons. Depolarizing current injection in two of these opener interneurons caused additional rhythmic singing activity, which reliably reset the ongoing chirp rhythm. The closely intermeshing arborizations of the singing interneurons revealed the dorsal midline neuropiles of the metathoracic and three most anterior abdominal neuromeres as the anatomical location of singing pattern generation. In the same neuropiles, we also recorded several closer interneurons that rhythmically hyper- and depolarized in the syllable rhythm and spiked strictly before the wing-closer motoneurons. Some of them received pronounced inhibition at the beginning of each chirp. Hyperpolarizing current injection in the dendrite revealed postinhibitory rebound depolarization as one functional mechanism of central pattern generation in singing crickets. PMID:23170234

  15. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites

    SciTech Connect

    González Pericot, N.; Villoria Sáez, P.; Del Río Merino, M.; Liébana Carrasco, O.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • On-site segregation level: 1.80%; training and motivation strategies were not effective. • 70% Cardboard waste: from switches and sockets during the building services stage. • 40% Plastic waste: generated during structures and partition works due to palletizing. • >50% Wood packaging waste, basically pallets, generated during the envelope works. - Abstract: The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites.

  16. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  17. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  18. Vesicular glutamate transporter 2 is required for central respiratory rhythm generation but not for locomotor central pattern generation.

    PubMed

    Wallén-Mackenzie, Asa; Gezelius, Henrik; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Nygård, Anna; Enjin, Anders; Fujiyama, Fumino; Fortin, Gilles; Kullander, Klas

    2006-11-22

    Glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission is dependent on glutamate release from presynaptic vesicles loaded by three members of the solute carrier family, Slc17a6-8, which function as vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs). Here, we show that VGLUT2 (Slc17a6) is required for life ex utero. Vglut2 null mutant mice die immediately after birth because of the absence of respiratory behavior. Investigations at embryonic stages revealed that neural circuits in the location of the pre-Bötzinger (PBC) inspiratory rhythm generator failed to become active. However, neurons with bursting pacemaker properties and anatomical integrity of the PBC area were preserved. Vesicles at asymmetric synapses were fewer and malformed in the Vglut2 null mutant hindbrain, probably causing the complete disruption of AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated synaptic activity in mutant PBC cells. The functional deficit results from an inability of PBC neurons to achieve synchronous activation. In contrast to respiratory rhythm generation, the locomotor central pattern generator of Vglut2 null mutant mice displayed normal rhythmic and coordinated activity, suggesting differences in their operating principles. Hence, the present study identifies VGLUT2-mediated signaling as an obligatory component of the developing respiratory rhythm generator. PMID:17122055

  19. Drosophila TIEG Is a Modulator of Different Signalling Pathways Involved in Wing Patterning and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Acquisition of a final shape and size during organ development requires a regulated program of growth and patterning controlled by a complex genetic network of signalling molecules that must be coordinated to provide positional information to each cell within the corresponding organ or tissue. The mechanism by which all these signals are coordinated to yield a final response is not well understood. Here, I have characterized the Drosophila ortholog of the human TGF-β Inducible Early Gene 1 (dTIEG). TIEG are zinc-finger proteins that belong to the Krüppel-like factor (KLF) family and were initially identified in human osteoblasts and pancreatic tumor cells for the ability to enhance TGF-β response. Using the developing wing of Drosophila as “in vivo” model, the dTIEG function has been studied in the control of cell proliferation and patterning. These results show that dTIEG can modulate Dpp signalling. Furthermore, dTIEG also regulates the activity of JAK/STAT pathway suggesting a conserved role of TIEG proteins as positive regulators of TGF-β signalling and as mediators of the crosstalk between signalling pathways acting in a same cellular context. PMID:21494610

  20. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-01

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration. PMID:26322369

  1. Viral RNA patterns and high viral load reliably define oropharynx carcinomas with active HPV16 involvement.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dana; Schmitt, Markus; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Benner, Axel; Pawlita, Michael; Bosch, Franz X

    2012-10-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC) that are associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection carry a more favorable prognosis than those that are HPV-negative. However, it remains unclear which biomarker(s) can reliably determine which OPSCC specimens are truly driven by HPV infection. In this study, we analyzed 199 fresh-frozen OPSCC specimens for HPV DNA, viral load, RNA expression patterns typical for cervical carcinomas (CxCaRNA(+)), and the HPV-targeted tumor suppressor protein p16(INK4a) as markers for HPV infection. In this set of specimens, there was a 49% prevalence of DNA for the cancer-associated HPV type 16 (HPV(+)). However, there was only a 16% prevalence of high viral load and only a 20% prevalence of CxCaRNA(+), a marker of HPV16 carcinogenic activity. Among the CxCaRNA(+) tumors, 78% of the specimens exhibited overexpression of p16(INK4a), which also occurred in 14% of the HPV-negative tumors. Using a multivariate survival analysis with HPV negativity as the reference group, CxCaRNA(+) as a single marker conferred the lowest risk of death [HR = 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.13-0.61] from oropharyngeal cancer, closely followed by high viral load (HR = 0.32, 95% CI, 0.14-0.73). In contrast, a weaker inverse association was found for OPSCC that were HPV(+) and p16(INK4a) high (HR = 0.55, 95% CI, 0.29-1.08). In summary, our findings argued that viral load or RNA pattern analysis is better suited than p16(INK4a) expression to identify HPV16-driven tumors in OPSCC patient populations. PMID:22991302

  2. SOM-based Pattern Generator: Pattern Generation Based on the Backward Projection in a Self-Organizing Map and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakuya, Hiroshi; Ishiguma, Takahiro

    A major feature of the self-organizing map (SOM) is a topology-preserving projection from the input layer to the competitive layer, and it has been used mainly as an analytical tool for discovering underlying rules in the given data set. Even though recent splendid progress in this area, there are few novel ideas to break such a conventional style. On the contrary, based on its distinctive nature, a new method for generating patterns through backward projection from the competitive layer to the input layer is proposed recently. Moreover, a promising technology for producing animation as a series of backward-projected patterns along with any pathways on the competitive layer is presented. Then, in order to carry out further considerations, some computer simulations with a variety of posed stick figures are tried in this paper. After training, four kinds of pathways, which correspond to different movements such as dancing, exercising and walking, are prepared. Though some of them does not contain any training samples, all of them worked well as we have intended in advance. As a result, it is found that the proposed method shows good performance and it is also confirmed its effectiveness.

  3. Simultaneously Uncovering the Patterns of Brain Regions Involved in Different Story Reading Subprocesses

    PubMed Central

    Wehbe, Leila; Murphy, Brian; Talukdar, Partha; Fyshe, Alona; Ramdas, Aaditya; Mitchell, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Story understanding involves many perceptual and cognitive subprocesses, from perceiving individual words, to parsing sentences, to understanding the relationships among the story characters. We present an integrated computational model of reading that incorporates these and additional subprocesses, simultaneously discovering their fMRI signatures. Our model predicts the fMRI activity associated with reading arbitrary text passages, well enough to distinguish which of two story segments is being read with 74% accuracy. This approach is the first to simultaneously track diverse reading subprocesses during complex story processing and predict the detailed neural representation of diverse story features, ranging from visual word properties to the mention of different story characters and different actions they perform. We construct brain representation maps that replicate many results from a wide range of classical studies that focus each on one aspect of language processing and offer new insights on which type of information is processed by different areas involved in language processing. Additionally, this approach is promising for studying individual differences: it can be used to create single subject maps that may potentially be used to measure reading comprehension and diagnose reading disorders. PMID:25426840

  4. Biological pattern generation: the cellular and computational logic of networks in motion.

    PubMed

    Grillner, Sten

    2006-12-01

    In 1900, Ramón y Cajal advanced the neuron doctrine, defining the neuron as the fundamental signaling unit of the nervous system. Over a century later, neurobiologists address the circuit doctrine: the logic of the core units of neuronal circuitry that control animal behavior. These are circuits that can be called into action for perceptual, conceptual, and motor tasks, and we now need to understand whether there are coherent and overriding principles that govern the design and function of these modules. The discovery of central motor programs has provided crucial insight into the logic of one prototypic set of neural circuits: those that generate motor patterns. In this review, I discuss the mode of operation of these pattern generator networks and consider the neural mechanisms through which they are selected and activated. In addition, I will outline the utility of computational models in analysis of the dynamic actions of these motor networks. PMID:17145498

  5. Two-phase Flow Patterns in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller / Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kanuma, Hitoshi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko; Takeishi, Masayuki

    There is a lack of information about vapor-liquid two-phase flow patterns determined using void signals in high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. Sensing void fraction has been hampered because lithium bromide aqueous solution of strong alkalinity is employed as working fluid at high temperature and high level of vacuum. New void sensor applicable to such difficult conditions was developed. The void Fractions at 48 locations in a high temperature generator were measured simultaneously in both cooling and heating operations. Analysis of void signals detected reveals that the most violent boiling occurs at the upper part of rear plate of combustion chamber and the first line of vertical tubes located in the flue. The flow patterns are strongly affected by the system pressure difference between the cooling and heating operations: there appear bubbly, slug and froth flows in the cooling operation, but only bubbly flow in the heating operation.

  6. A rule-based expert system for automatic control rod pattern generation for boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.S.; Lin, C. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on an expert system for generating control rod patterns that has been developed. The knowledge is transformed into IF-THEN rules. The inference engine uses the Rete pattern matching algorithm to match facts, and rule premises and conflict resolution strategies to make the system function intelligently. A forward-chaining mechanism is adopted in the inference engine. The system is implemented in the Common Lisp programming language. The three-dimensional core simulation model performs the core status and burnup calculations. The system is successfully demonstrated by generating control rod programming for the 2894-MW (thermal) Kuosheng nuclear power plant in Taiwan. The computing time is tremendously reduced compared to programs using mathematical methods.

  7. Experimental observation of multistability and dynamic attractors in silicon central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Le; Nogaret, Alain

    2015-11-01

    We report on the multistability of chaotic networks of silicon neurons and demonstrate how spatiotemporal sequences of voltage oscillations are selected with timed current stimuli. A three neuron central pattern generator was built by interconnecting Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with mutually inhibitory links mimicking gap junctions. By systematically varying the timing of current stimuli applied to individual neurons, we generate the phase lag maps of neuronal oscillators and study their dependence on the network connectivity. We identify up to six attractors consisting of triphasic sequences of unevenly spaced pulses propagating clockwise and anticlockwise. While confirming theoretical predictions, our experiments reveal more complex oscillatory patterns shaped by the ratio of the pulse width to the oscillation period. Our work contributes to validating the command neuron hypothesis.

  8. Photorefractive holographic moiré-like patterns for secure numerical code generation.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, G N; Oliveira, M E; dos Santos, P A M

    2013-03-15

    In this Letter, low-frequency photorefractive holographic moiré fringe patterns are proposed as secure numerical code generators that could be useful for storage or data transmission. These dynamic moiré patterns are holographically obtained by the superposition of two or more sinusoidal gratings with slightly different pitches. The Bi(12)TiO(20) photorefractive crystal sample is used as holographic medium. An optical numerical base was defined with patterns representing the 0, 1 and -1 digits as bits. Then, the complete set of these optical bits is combined to form bytes, where a numerical sequence is represented. The results show that the proposed numerical code is simple, robust and extremely secure, then could be used efficiently as standard numerical identification in robotic vision or eventually in storage or transmission of secure numerical data. PMID:23503288

  9. Phase relationships between segmentally organized oscillators in the leech heartbeat pattern generating network.

    PubMed

    Masino, Mark A; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2002-03-01

    Motor pattern generating networks that produce segmentally distributed motor outflow are often portrayed as a series of coupled segmental oscillators that produce a regular progression (constant phase differences) in their rhythmic activity. The leech heartbeat central pattern generator is paced by a core timing network, which consists of two coupled segmental oscillators in segmental ganglia 3 and 4. The segmental oscillators comprise paired mutually inhibitory oscillator interneurons and the processes of intersegmental coordinating interneurons. As a first step in understanding the coordination of segmental motor outflow by this pattern generator, we describe the functional synaptic interactions, and activity and phase relationships of the heart interneurons of the timing network, in isolated nerve cord preparations. In the timing network, most (approximately 75%) of the coordinating interneuron action potentials were generated at a primary spike initiation site located in ganglion 4 (G4). A secondary spike initiation site in ganglion 3 (G3) became active in the absence of activity at the primary site. Generally, the secondary site was characterized by a reluctance to burst and a lower spike frequency, when compared with the primary site. Oscillator interneurons in G3 inhibited spike activity at both initiation sites, whereas oscillator interneurons in G4 inhibited spike activity only at the primary initiation site. This asymmetry in the control of spike activity in the coordinating interneurons may account for the observation that the phase of the coordinating interneurons is more tightly linked to the G3 than G4 oscillator interneurons. The cycle period of the timing network and the phase difference between the ipsilateral G3 and G4 oscillator interneurons were regular within individual preparations, but varied among preparations. This variation in phase differences observed across preparations implies that modulated intrinsic membrane and synaptic properties

  10. Towards pattern generation and chaotic series prediction with photonic reservoir computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonik, Piotr; Hermans, Michiel; Duport, François; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-03-01

    Reservoir Computing is a bio-inspired computing paradigm for processing time dependent signals that is particularly well suited for analog implementations. Our team has demonstrated several photonic reservoir computers with performance comparable to digital algorithms on a series of benchmark tasks such as channel equalisation and speech recognition. Recently, we showed that our opto-electronic reservoir computer could be trained online with a simple gradient descent algorithm programmed on an FPGA chip. This setup makes it in principle possible to feed the output signal back into the reservoir, and thus highly enrich the dynamics of the system. This will allow to tackle complex prediction tasks in hardware, such as pattern generation and chaotic and financial series prediction, which have so far only been studied in digital implementations. Here we report simulation results of our opto-electronic setup with an FPGA chip and output feedback applied to pattern generation and Mackey-Glass chaotic series prediction. The simulations take into account the major aspects of our experimental setup. We find that pattern generation can be easily implemented on the current setup with very good results. The Mackey-Glass series prediction task is more complex and requires a large reservoir and more elaborate training algorithm. With these adjustments promising result are obtained, and we now know what improvements are needed to match previously reported numerical results. These simulation results will serve as basis of comparison for experiments we will carry out in the coming months.

  11. From spinal central pattern generators to cortical network: integrated BCI for walking rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Duvinage, M; De Saedeleer, C; Castermans, T; Bengoetxea, A; Petieau, M; Seetharaman, K; Hoellinger, T; Dan, B; Dutoit, T; Sylos Labini, F; Lacquaniti, F; Ivanenko, Y

    2012-01-01

    Success in locomotor rehabilitation programs can be improved with the use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Although a wealth of research has demonstrated that locomotion is largely controlled by spinal mechanisms, the brain is of utmost importance in monitoring locomotor patterns and therefore contains information regarding central pattern generation functioning. In addition, there is also a tight coordination between the upper and lower limbs, which can also be useful in controlling locomotion. The current paper critically investigates different approaches that are applicable to this field: the use of electroencephalogram (EEG), upper limb electromyogram (EMG), or a hybrid of the two neurophysiological signals to control assistive exoskeletons used in locomotion based on programmable central pattern generators (PCPGs) or dynamic recurrent neural networks (DRNNs). Plantar surface tactile stimulation devices combined with virtual reality may provide the sensation of walking while in a supine position for use of training brain signals generated during locomotion. These methods may exploit mechanisms of brain plasticity and assist in the neurorehabilitation of gait in a variety of clinical conditions, including stroke, spinal trauma, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy. PMID:22272380

  12. Staphylococcus aureus genomic pattern and atopic dermatitis: may factors other than superantigens be involved?

    PubMed

    Rojo, A; Aguinaga, A; Monecke, S; Yuste, J R; Gastaminza, G; España, A

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the genotypic profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from atopic dermatitis (AD) patients and from control subjects, and to study the relationship between clinical severity, immune response, and genomic pattern of S. aureus isolated from AD patients. We selected 32 patients with AD and S. aureus skin colonization and 31 atopic controls with no history of AD who where asymptomatic carriers of S. aureus. Microarray-based genotyping was performed on S. aureus isolates. In AD patients, clinical severity was assessed using the Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index and total IgE levels and staphylococcal superantigen-specific IgE levels (SEA, SEB, SEC, TSST1) were determined. The genes lukE, lukD, splA, splB, ssl8, and sasG were more frequent in isolates from AD patients. CC30 was more common in isolates from atopic controls than in AD patients. There was a correlation between total IgE and clinical severity, but an association between clinical severity, immune response, and the presence of S. aureus superantigen genes, including enterotoxin genes, could not be demonstrated. Finally, a correlation was found between AD severity and other S. aureus genes, such as sasG and scn. S. aureus factors besides superantigens could be related to the worsening and onset of AD. PMID:24162256

  13. Structural insights into HetR−PatS interaction involved in cyanobacterial pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Xi; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhao, Meng-Xi; Cai, Kun; Liu, Sanling; Wen, Bin; Lv, Pei; Zhang, Yonghui; Peng, Junhui; Zhong, Hui; Yu, Hong-Mei; Ren, Yan-Min; Zhang, Zhiyong; Tian, Changlin; Wu, Qingfa; Oliveberg, Mikael; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The one-dimensional pattern of heterocyst in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is coordinated by the transcription factor HetR and PatS peptide. Here we report the complex structures of HetR binding to DNA, and its hood domain (HetRHood) binding to a PatS-derived hexapeptide (PatS6) at 2.80 and 2.10 Å, respectively. The intertwined HetR dimer possesses a couple of novel HTH motifs, each of which consists of two canonical α-helices in the DNA-binding domain and an auxiliary α-helix from the flap domain of the neighboring subunit. Two PatS6 peptides bind to the lateral clefts of HetRHood, and trigger significant conformational changes of the flap domain, resulting in dissociation of the auxiliary α-helix and eventually release of HetR from the DNA major grove. These findings provide the structural insights into a prokaryotic example of Turing model. PMID:26576507

  14. NeuroPG: open source software for optical pattern generation and data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Benjamin W.; Murphy, Daniel B.; Dapello, Joel A.; Robinson, Jacob T.

    2015-01-01

    Patterned illumination using a digital micromirror device (DMD) is a powerful tool for optogenetics. Compared to a scanning laser, DMDs are inexpensive and can easily create complex illumination patterns. Combining these complex spatiotemporal illumination patterns with optogenetics allows DMD-equipped microscopes to probe neural circuits by selectively manipulating the activity of many individual cells or many subcellular regions at the same time. To use DMDs to study neural activity, scientists must develop specialized software to coordinate optical stimulation patterns with the acquisition of electrophysiological and fluorescence data. To meet this growing need we have developed an open source optical pattern generation software for neuroscience—NeuroPG—that combines, DMD control, sample visualization, and data acquisition in one application. Built on a MATLAB platform, NeuroPG can also process, analyze, and visualize data. The software is designed specifically for the Mightex Polygon400; however, as an open source package, NeuroPG can be modified to incorporate any data acquisition, imaging, or illumination equipment that is compatible with MATLAB’s Data Acquisition and Image Acquisition toolboxes. PMID:25784873

  15. Health Care Waste generation rates and patterns: The case of Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Maamari, Olivia; Brandam, Cedric; Lteif, Roger; Salameh, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze Infectious Health Care Waste generation rates and patterns in Lebanon. Therefore, the quantities generated during five years by 57 hospitals from a total of 163 in the country have been analyzed. The seasonal evolution of Infectious Health Care Waste production and the evolution of the evaluation of the trends over years have been studied. Besides, the generation per capita have been estimated and compared to other countries. The variance between categories and the correlation between number of beds and Infectious Health Care Waste generation have been analyzed. The obtained results showed that the large private hospitals (over 200 beds) are characterized by their high generation rate: an average of 2.45kg per occupied bed(-1)day(-1), whereas the average generation rate for other categories is 0.94kg per occupied bed(-1)day(-1). The weighted mean is 1.14 per occupied kgbed(-1)day(-1). Small public hospitals (i.e. less than 100 beds) have the smallest standard deviation: 0.13, whereas large private hospitals (i.e. over than 200 beds) have the highest standard deviation: 0.40. Infectious Health Care Waste generation has been estimated to 1.42kg/capita/year. The correlation between the numbers of hospitals beds in hospitals and the generation rate per bed is weak. The correlation between Infectious Health Care Waste generation per day and beds number is stronger. The total quantity produced by hospitals has increased over the five past years. These results suggest that the quantities of medical waste are not well controlled, and that hospitals have a defective monitoring management system of their waste. Annual peaks are observed in June, July, and December. Thus, this study, for the first time in Lebanon, has provided information on the infectious waste generation, allowing benchmarking between hospitals and between countries. PMID:26049204

  16. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-02-01

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. PMID:26861392

  17. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. PMID:26861392

  18. Patterns and rates of riverbank erosion involving ice-rich permafrost (yedoma) in northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevskiy, Mikhail; Shur, Yuri; Strauss, Jens; Jorgenson, Torre; Fortier, Daniel; Stephani, Eva; Vasiliev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Yedoma, a suite of syngenetically frozen silty ice- and organic-rich deposits with large ice wedges that accumulated during the late Pleistocene, is vulnerable to thermal degradation and erosion because of the extremely high ice contents. This degradation can result in significant surface subsidence and retreat of coastal bluffs and riverbanks with large consequences to landscape evolution, infrastructure damage, and water quality. We used remote sensing and field observations to assess patterns and rates of riverbank erosion at a 35-m-high active yedoma bluff along the Itkillik River in northern Alaska. The total volumetric ground-ice content-including wedge, segregated, and pore ice-was estimated to be ~ 86%. The process of riverbank erosion and stabilization include three main stages typical of the areas with ice-rich permafrost: (1) thermal erosion combined with thermal denudation, (2) thermal denudation, and (3) slope stabilization. Active riverbank erosion at the main study site started in July 1995, when the Itkillik River changed its channel. The total retreat of the riverbank during 1995-2010 within different segments of the bluff varied from 180 to 280 m; the average retreat rate for the most actively eroded part of the riverbank was almost 19 m/y. From August 2007 to August 2011, the total retreat varied from 10 to almost 100 m. The average retreat rate for the whole 680-m-long bluff was 11 m/y. For the most actively eroded central part of the bluff (150 m long) it was 20 m/y, ranging from 16 to 24 m/y. More than 180,000 m3 of ground ice and organic-rich frozen soil, or almost 70,000 metric tons (t) of soil solids including 880 t of organic carbon, were transported to the river from the retreating bank annually. This study reports the highest long-term rates of riverbank erosion ever observed in permafrost regions of Eurasia and North America.

  19. Are Hox Genes Ancestrally Involved in Axial Patterning? Evidence from the Hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica (Cnidaria)

    PubMed Central

    Chiori, Roxane; Jager, Muriel; Denker, Elsa; Wincker, Patrick; Da Silva, Corinne; Le Guyader, Hervé; Manuel, Michaël; Quéinnec, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Background The early evolution and diversification of Hox-related genes in eumetazoans has been the subject of conflicting hypotheses concerning the evolutionary conservation of their role in axial patterning and the pre-bilaterian origin of the Hox and ParaHox clusters. The diversification of Hox/ParaHox genes clearly predates the origin of bilaterians. However, the existence of a “Hox code” predating the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor and supporting the deep homology of axes is more controversial. This assumption was mainly based on the interpretation of Hox expression data from the sea anemone, but growing evidence from other cnidarian taxa puts into question this hypothesis. Methodology/Principal Findings Hox, ParaHox and Hox-related genes have been investigated here by phylogenetic analysis and in situ hybridisation in Clytia hemisphaerica, an hydrozoan species with medusa and polyp stages alternating in the life cycle. Our phylogenetic analyses do not support an origin of ParaHox and Hox genes by duplication of an ancestral ProtoHox cluster, and reveal a diversification of the cnidarian HOX9-14 genes into three groups called A, B, C. Among the 7 examined genes, only those belonging to the HOX9-14 and the CDX groups exhibit a restricted expression along the oral-aboral axis during development and in the planula larva, while the others are expressed in very specialised areas at the medusa stage. Conclusions/Significance Cross species comparison reveals a strong variability of gene expression along the oral-aboral axis and during the life cycle among cnidarian lineages. The most parsimonious interpretation is that the Hox code, collinearity and conservative role along the antero-posterior axis are bilaterian innovations. PMID:19156208

  20. Preclinical evidence supporting the clinical development of central pattern generator-modulating therapies for chronic spinal cord-injured patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ambulation or walking is one of the main gaits of locomotion. In terrestrial animals, it may be defined as a series of rhythmic and bilaterally coordinated movement of the limbs which creates a forward movement of the body. This applies regardless of the number of limbs—from arthropods with six or more limbs to bipedal primates. These fundamental similarities among species may explain why comparable neural systems and cellular properties have been found, thus far, to control in similar ways locomotor rhythm generation in most animal models. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the known structural and functional features associated with central nervous system (CNS) networks that are involved in the control of ambulation and other stereotyped motor patterns—specifically Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) that produce basic rhythmic patterned outputs for locomotion, micturition, ejaculation, and defecation. Although there is compelling evidence of their existence in humans, CPGs have been most studied in reduced models including in vitro isolated preparations, genetically-engineered mice and spinal cord-transected animals. Compared with other structures of the CNS, the spinal cord is generally considered as being well-preserved phylogenetically. As such, most animal models of spinal cord-injured (SCI) should be considered as valuable tools for the development of novel pharmacological strategies aimed at modulating spinal activity and restoring corresponding functions in chronic SCI patients. PMID:24910602

  1. KCNQ1 and KCNE1 K+ Channel Components are Involved in Early Left-Right Patterning in Xenopus laevis Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Morokuma, Junji; Blackiston, Douglas; Levin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Several ion transporters have been implicated in left-right (LR) patterning. Here, we characterize a new component of the early bioelectrical circuit: the potassium channel KCNQ1 and its accessory subunit KCNE1. Having cloned the native Xenopus versions of both genes, we show that both are asymmetrically localized as maternal proteins during the first few cleavages of frog embryo development in a process dependent on microtubule and actin organization. Molecular loss-of-function using dominant negative constructs demonstrates that both gene products are required for normal LR asymmetry. We propose a model whereby these channels provide an exit path for K+ ions brought in by the H+,K+-ATPase. This physiological module thus allows the obligate but electroneutral H+,K+-ATPase to generate an asymmetric voltage gradient on the left and right sides. Our data reveal a new, bioelectrical component of the mechanisms patterning a large-scale axis in vertebrate embryogenesis. PMID:18453744

  2. Antigenic Variation in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Involves a Highly Structured Switching Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Recker, Mario; Buckee, Caroline O.; Serazin, Andrew; Kyes, Sue; Pinches, Robert; Christodoulou, Zóe; Springer, Amy L.; Gupta, Sunetra; Newbold, Chris I.

    2011-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria, fungi, and protozoa achieve chronic infection through an immune evasion strategy known as antigenic variation. In the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, this involves transcriptional switching among members of the var gene family, causing parasites with different antigenic and phenotypic characteristics to appear at different times within a population. Here we use a genome-wide approach to explore this process in vitro within a set of cloned parasite populations. Our analyses reveal a non-random, highly structured switch pathway where an initially dominant transcript switches via a set of switch-intermediates either to a new dominant transcript, or back to the original. We show that this specific pathway can arise through an evolutionary conflict in which the pathogen has to optimise between safeguarding its limited antigenic repertoire and remaining capable of establishing infections in non-naïve individuals. Our results thus demonstrate a crucial role for structured switching during the early phases of infections and provide a unifying theory of antigenic variation in P. falciparum malaria as a balanced process of parasite-intrinsic switching and immune-mediated selection. PMID:21408201

  3. Two-Generation Strategies and Involving Immigrant Parents in Children's Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosnoe, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Intervening in the parent generation can improve current and future prospects in the child generation. Such two-generation strategies target either parents' life circumstances or parenting behaviors. Because many immigrants do not have the English capabilities, inside knowledge about schools, or social standing, engaging them more fully in the…

  4. Generation, Language, Body Mass Index, and Activity Patterns in Hispanic Children

    PubMed Central

    Taverno, Sharon E.; Rollins, Brandi Y.; Francis, Lori A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The acculturation hypothesis proposes an overall disadvantage in health outcomes for Hispanic immigrants with more time spent living in the U.S., but little is known about how generational status and language may influence Hispanic children’s relative weight and activity patterns. Purpose The association between generation and language was investigated with relative weight (BMI z-scores), physical activity, screen time, and participation in extracurricular activities (e.g., sports, clubs) in a U.S.-based, nationally representative sample of Hispanic children. Methods Participants included 2,012 Hispanic children aged 6–11 years from the cross-sectional, 2003 National Survey of Children’s Health. Children were grouped according to generational status (1st, 2nd or 3rd), and the primary language spoken in the home (English vs non-English). Primary analyses included adjusted logistic and multinomial logistic regression to examine the relationships among variables; all analyses were conducted between 2008 and 2009. Results Compared to 3rd generation, English speakers, 1st and 2nd generation, non-English speakers were over two times more likely to be obese. Moreover, 1st generation, non-English speakers were half as likely to engage in regular physical activity and sports. Both 1st and 2nd generation, non-English speakers were less likely to participate in clubs compared to 2nd and 3rd generation, English speakers. Overall, all non–English speaking groups reported less screen time compared to 3rd generation, English speakers. Conclusions The hypothesis that Hispanics lose their health protection with more time spent in the U.S. was not supported in this sample of Hispanic children. PMID:20117570

  5. Generation of spatially periodic patterns by a mechanical instability: a mechanical alternative to the Turing model.

    PubMed

    Harris, A K; Stopak, D; Warner, P

    1984-04-01

    We have studied the generation of spatial patterns created by mechanical (rather than chemical) instabilities. When dissociated fibroblasts are suspended in a gel of reprecipitated collagen, and the contraction of the gel as a whole is physically restrained by attachment of its margin to a glass fibre meshwork, then the effect of the fibroblasts' traction is to break up the cell-matrix mixture into a series of clumps or aggregations of cells and compressed matrix. These aggregations are interconnected by linear tracts of collagen fibres aligned under the tensile stress exerted by fibroblast traction. The patterns generated by this mechanical instability vary depending upon cell population density and other factors. Over a certain range of cell concentrations, this mechanical instability yields geometric patterns which resemble but are usually much less regular than the patterns which develop normally in the dermis of developing bird skin. We propose that an equivalent mechanical instability, occurring during the embryonic development of this skin, could be the cause not only of the clumping of dermal fibroblasts to form the feather papillae, but also of the alignment of collagen fibres into the characteristic polygonal network of fibre bundles - which interconnect these papillae and which presage the subsequent pattern of the dermal muscles serving to control feather movements. More generally, we suggest that this type of mechanical instability can serve the morphogenetic functions for which Turing's chemical instability and other reaction-diffusion systems have been proposed. Mechanical instabilities can create physical structures directly, in one step, in contrast to the two or more steps which would be required if positional information first had to be specified by chemical gradients and then only secondarily implemented in physical form. In addition, physical forces can act more quickly and at much longer range than can diffusing chemicals and can generate a

  6. Gas generation and migration studies involving recently generated /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste for the TRU Waste Sampling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, A.; Warren, J.L.

    1986-07-01

    This study is part of the multicontractor TRU Waste Sampling Program. Radiolytically generated gases were vented through a filtering device to determine its effectiveness in maintaining hydrogen concentrations within acceptably safe levels. In the second part of the study measurements were made to determine the ability of these gases, particularly hydrogen, to migrate through a sealed rigid polyethylene drum liner. Void volumes in these drums were found to be generally in excess of 90%. The carbon composite filter was found to satisfactorily vent hydrogen up to moderately high levels of alpha activity in the waste substrate. The sealed 90-mil liner was found to inhibit, but not prevent, the migration of hydrogen and other radiolytically generated gases.

  7. Toward robust phase-locking in Melibe swim central pattern generator models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil, Sajiya; Allen, Dane; Youker, Joseph; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2013-12-01

    Small groups of interneurons, abbreviated by CPG for central pattern generators, are arranged into neural networks to generate a variety of core bursting rhythms with specific phase-locked states, on distinct time scales, which govern vital motor behaviors in invertebrates such as chewing and swimming. These movements in lower level animals mimic motions of organs in higher animals due to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. Hence, various neurological diseases can be linked to abnormal movement of body parts that are regulated by a malfunctioning CPG. In this paper, we, being inspired by recent experimental studies of neuronal activity patterns recorded from a swimming motion CPG of the sea slug Melibe leonina, examine a mathematical model of a 4-cell network that can plausibly and stably underlie the observed bursting rhythm. We develop a dynamical systems framework for explaining the existence and robustness of phase-locked states in activity patterns produced by the modeled CPGs. The proposed tools can be used for identifying core components for other CPG networks with reliable bursting outcomes and specific phase relationships between the interneurons. Our findings can be employed for identifying or implementing the conditions for normal and pathological functioning of basic CPGs of animals and artificially intelligent prosthetics that can regulate various movements.

  8. Coupled chaotic oscillators and their relation to a central pattern generator for artificial quadrupeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellini, Horacio; Yudiarsah, Efta; Romanelli, Lilia; Cerdeira, Hilda A.

    2005-04-01

    Animal locomotion employs different periodic patterns known as animal gaits. In 1993, Collins and Stewart recognized that gaits possessed certain symmetries and characterized the gaits of quadrupeds and bipeds using permutation symmetry groups, which impose constraints on the locomotion center called the central pattern generator (CPG) in the animal brain. They modeled the CPG by coupling four nonlinear oscillators and found that it was possible to reproduce all symmetries of the gaits by changing the coupling strength. Here we propose to extend this idea using coupled chaotic oscillators synchronized using the Pyragas method in order to characterize the CPG symmetries. We also evaluate the time series behavior when the foot is in contact with the ground: this has potential robotic applications.

  9. Family Involvement: Impacts on Postsecondary Educational Success for First-Generation Appalachian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Elizabeth; Simmons, Leigh Ann

    2009-01-01

    First-generation college students face a number of barriers to academic success and completion of their degrees. Using Bronfenbrenner's (1989) ecological theory as a framework, qualitative research was used to examine the experiences of 10 first-generation Appalachian Kentucky university students (mean age = 21 years) and factors they attributed…

  10. Communication Challenges for Management Faculty Involving Younger "Generation X" Students in Their Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Stephen L.; Holmes, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    A majority (60%) of 19 management faculty identified challenges dealing with "Generation X" students, including communication differences; changes in teaching and assessment practices were noted. Managers (n=16) noted similar challenges with younger employees. Analysis showed these challenges were not unique to this generation, demonstrating how…

  11. Precise colocalization of interacting structural and pigmentary elements generates extensive color pattern variation in Phelsuma lizards

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Color traits in animals play crucial roles in thermoregulation, photoprotection, camouflage, and visual communication, and are amenable to objective quantification and modeling. However, the extensive variation in non-melanic pigments and structural colors in squamate reptiles has been largely disregarded. Here, we used an integrated approach to investigate the morphological basis and physical mechanisms generating variation in color traits in tropical day geckos of the genus Phelsuma. Results Combining histology, optics, mass spectrometry, and UV and Raman spectroscopy, we found that the extensive variation in color patterns within and among Phelsuma species is generated by complex interactions between, on the one hand, chromatophores containing yellow/red pteridine pigments and, on the other hand, iridophores producing structural color by constructive interference of light with guanine nanocrystals. More specifically, we show that 1) the hue of the vivid dorsolateral skin is modulated both by variation in geometry of structural, highly ordered narrowband reflectors, and by the presence of yellow pigments, and 2) that the reflectivity of the white belly and of dorsolateral pigmentary red marks, is increased by underlying structural disorganized broadband reflectors. Most importantly, these interactions require precise colocalization of yellow and red chromatophores with different types of iridophores, characterized by ordered and disordered nanocrystals, respectively. We validated these results through numerical simulations combining pigmentary components with a multilayer interferential optical model. Finally, we show that melanophores form dark lateral patterns but do not significantly contribute to variation in blue/green or red coloration, and that changes in the pH or redox state of pigments provide yet another source of color variation in squamates. Conclusions Precisely colocalized interacting pigmentary and structural elements generate extensive

  12. Coherence of light and generation of speckle patterns in photobiology and photomedicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Belkin, Michael

    2012-03-01

    The use of diodes instead of lasers was recently suggested for phototherapeutic applications. This trend is due to economical and practical reasons and is based on the argument that lasers have no preference over diodes as light sources as the former lose their coherency upon penetrating biological tissues. This module supports this claim while providing a brief explanation to non professionals on the meaning of coherence of light as well as the physics behind the generation of speckle patterns, and the relation of these physical entities to photomedicine.

  13. Multiplexed recording with uncorrelated computer-generated reference patterns in coaxial holographic data storage.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Wani, Yotaro; Nomura, Takanori

    2015-05-15

    A computer-generated reference pattern (CGRP) allows improvement in light efficiency and the quality of reconstructed data in coaxial holographic data storage. In this Letter, a multiplexed recording method with uncorrelated CGRPs is proposed. With this method, crosstalk from adjacent holograms is suppressed without shifting a medium. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed method experimentally, shift selectivity is investigated, and then multiplexed recording is performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method enables high-density recording compared with conventional shift multiplexing. In addition, a theoretical analysis implies that at least 100 uncorrelated CGRPs can be designed and used for multiplexed recording. PMID:26393689

  14. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns. PMID:27502578

  15. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns. PMID:27502578

  16. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns.

  17. Importance of the inherent and the relative surface energies in generating patterned layer in a solution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do-Kyung; Kwon, Hyeok Bin; Park, Hongsik; Choe, Eunji; Bae, Jin-Hyuk; Park, Jaehoon; Song, Seong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    We report the importance of the inherent and the relative surface energies in generating a patterned organic semiconductor layer through a solution process. The inherent and the relative surface energies of the substrate can be effectively controlled using polydimethylsiloxane in combination with an UV/ozone treatment. The controlled inherent surface energy in each region, as well as the high-order difference of relative surface energy, plays a significant role in generating the patterned layer. In addition, the patterned metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structure shows a lower lateral current than the non-patterned MSM structure because the current path is limited.

  18. Bio-inspired Optimal Locomotion Reconfigurability of Quadruped Rovers using Central Pattern Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohra, Murtaza

    Legged rovers are often considered as viable solutions for traversing unknown terrain. This work addresses the optimal locomotion reconfigurability of quadruped rovers, which consists of obtaining optimal locomotion modes, and transitioning between them. A 2D sagittal plane rover model is considered based on a domestic cat. Using a Genetic Algorithm, the gait, pose and control variables that minimize torque or maximize speed are found separately. The optimization approach takes into account the elimination of leg impact, while considering the entire variable spectrum. The optimal solutions are consistent with other works on gait optimization, and are similar to gaits found in quadruped animals as well. An online model-free gait planning framework is also implemented, that is based on Central Pattern Generators is implemented. It is used to generate joint and control trajectories for any arbitrarily varying speed profile, and shown to regulate locomotion transition and speed modulation, both endogenously and continuously.

  19. The internal flow pattern analysis of a tidal power turbine operating on bidirectional generation-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Luo, Y.; Xiao, Y. X.; Wang, Z. W.

    2013-12-01

    Using tidal energy can reduce environment pollution, save conventional energy and improve energy structure, hence it presents great advantage and is developing potential. Influenced by flood tide and low tide, a fully functional tidal power station needs to experience six operating modes, including bidirectional generation, pumping and sluice; the internal unsteady flow pattern and dynamic characters are very complicated. Based on a bidirectional tidal generator unit, three-dimensional unsteady flows in the flow path were calculated for four typical operating conditions with the pressure pulsation characteristics analyzed. According to the numerical results, the internal flow characteristics in the flow path were discussed. The influence of gravity to the hydraulic performance and flow characteristics were analysed. The results provide a theoretical analysis method of the hydraulic optimization design of the same type unit as well as a direction for stable operation and optimal scheduling of existing tidal power unit.

  20. A mesh generation and machine learning framework for Drosophila gene expression pattern image analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multicellular organisms consist of cells of many different types that are established during development. Each type of cell is characterized by the unique combination of expressed gene products as a result of spatiotemporal gene regulation. Currently, a fundamental challenge in regulatory biology is to elucidate the gene expression controls that generate the complex body plans during development. Recent advances in high-throughput biotechnologies have generated spatiotemporal expression patterns for thousands of genes in the model organism fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Existing qualitative methods enhanced by a quantitative analysis based on computational tools we present in this paper would provide promising ways for addressing key scientific questions. Results We develop a set of computational methods and open source tools for identifying co-expressed embryonic domains and the associated genes simultaneously. To map the expression patterns of many genes into the same coordinate space and account for the embryonic shape variations, we develop a mesh generation method to deform a meshed generic ellipse to each individual embryo. We then develop a co-clustering formulation to cluster the genes and the mesh elements, thereby identifying co-expressed embryonic domains and the associated genes simultaneously. Experimental results indicate that the gene and mesh co-clusters can be correlated to key developmental events during the stages of embryogenesis we study. The open source software tool has been made available at http://compbio.cs.odu.edu/fly/. Conclusions Our mesh generation and machine learning methods and tools improve upon the flexibility, ease-of-use and accuracy of existing methods. PMID:24373308

  1. TermGenie – a web-application for pattern-based ontology class generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, Heiko; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Foulger, Rebecca E.; Hill, David P.; Lomax, Jane; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Roncaglia, Paola; Mungall, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Biological ontologies are continually growing and improving from requests for new classes (terms) by biocurators. These ontology requests can frequently create bottlenecks in the biocuration process, as ontology developers struggle to keep up, while manually processing these requests and create classes. TermGenie allows biocurators to generate new classes based on formally specified design patterns or templates. The system is web-based and can be accessed by any authorized curator through a web browser. Automated rules and reasoning engines are used to ensure validity, uniqueness and relationship to pre-existing classes. In the last 4 years the Gene Ontology TermGenie generated 4715 new classes, about 51.4% of all new classes created. The immediate generation of permanent identifiers proved not to be an issue with only 70 (1.4%) obsoleted classes. Lastly, TermGenie is a web-based class-generation system that complements traditional ontology development tools. All classes added through pre-defined templates are guaranteed to have OWL equivalence axioms that are used for automatic classification and in some cases inter-ontology linkage. At the same time, the system is simple and intuitive and can be used by most biocurators without extensive training.

  2. TermGenie – a web-application for pattern-based ontology class generation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dietze, Heiko; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Foulger, Rebecca E.; Hill, David P.; Lomax, Jane; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Roncaglia, Paola; Mungall, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Biological ontologies are continually growing and improving from requests for new classes (terms) by biocurators. These ontology requests can frequently create bottlenecks in the biocuration process, as ontology developers struggle to keep up, while manually processing these requests and create classes. TermGenie allows biocurators to generate new classes based on formally specified design patterns or templates. The system is web-based and can be accessed by any authorized curator through a web browser. Automated rules and reasoning engines are used to ensure validity, uniqueness and relationship to pre-existing classes. In the last 4 years the Gene Ontology TermGenie generated 4715 newmore » classes, about 51.4% of all new classes created. The immediate generation of permanent identifiers proved not to be an issue with only 70 (1.4%) obsoleted classes. Lastly, TermGenie is a web-based class-generation system that complements traditional ontology development tools. All classes added through pre-defined templates are guaranteed to have OWL equivalence axioms that are used for automatic classification and in some cases inter-ontology linkage. At the same time, the system is simple and intuitive and can be used by most biocurators without extensive training.« less

  3. Low frequency variability of European weather patterns and its impact on power generation in northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masato, Giacomo; Slavov, Georgi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that Europe is becoming increasingly reliant on the power generation from the solar and wind sources. Germany is a leader in such a trend - it is then interesting to study to what extent the low-frequency variability of the European weather patterns impacts the power production in this country. Rather than identifying such patterns starting from the weather angle, four weather regimes are identified that maximize and minimize the production of solar and wind power. The analysis of their past occurrence and trends allows us to estimate the potential amount of energy produced for any given year (assuming a constant installed capacity). It is found that the sole change in such weather regimes over the recent years is able to drive up to a 20% annual difference in power generation. This also throws an interesting challenge at the scientific community, whereby the future projection of these regimes can heavily influence both the short- and long-term Eurozone plans in terms of European renewable energy targets.

  4. Scalable and enhanced triboelectric output power generation by surface functionalized nanoimprint patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeog Kwon, Yang; Shin, Sung-Ho; Jung, Joo-Yun; Nah, Junghyo

    2016-05-01

    We report nanoimprint lithographic submicron surface patterning for scalable output power generation and performance enhancement in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). Specifically, one contact surface of a TENG is nanoimprinted with polyurethane acrylate (PUA) lines in different pitches and the counter contact surface is coated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The results show that a TENG with 200 nm pitch PUA lines exhibits voltage and current up to ∼430 V and ∼55 μA cm‑2, generating about a sixfold higher output power than that with a flat PUA surface at an applied force of 0.3 MPa. In addition, scalable output power was obtained by adjusting line pitches. Further enhancement in output power was also demonstrated by chemically functionalizing the PUA line patterns with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). The PDDA functionalization boosted voltage and current up to ∼500 V and ∼100 μA cm‑2, respectively, which corresponds to ∼50% power density enhancement. The approach introduced here is a simple, effective, scalable and reproducible way to fabricate TENGs.

  5. Helical Striation Pattern Generation and Axial Field Compression in Aluminum Liner Experiments at 1 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, Levon; Byvank, Tom; Greenly, John; Kusse, Bruce; Pikuz, Sergei; Potter, William; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David

    2015-11-01

    Awe et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 235005, 2014] found on the 20 MA Z machine that applying an externally generated axial magnetic field to an imploding liner produces a helical plasma pattern near the surface of the liner. Here we show that this phenomenon is also observed using 10 mm long cylindrical metal liners having 16 mm diameter and 3 to 6 μm wall thickness on the 1 MA, 100-200 ns COBRA pulsed power generator [T. A. Shelkovenko et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10F521, 2006]. The magnetic field in these experiments is created using a 150 μs rise time Helmholtz coil, and the pattern is observed using extreme ultraviolet imaging. Moreover, using B-dot probes we show that there is a 4-8% axial magnetic field compression relative to the initially applied Bz. Using a visible light framing camera, we show that this compression begins before the outside surface of the liner has become a visible light emitting plasma. This research was sponsored by the NNSA SSAP under DOE Coop Agreement DE-NA0001836 and DOE grant DE-NA0001847 as well as by NSF grant PHY-1102471.

  6. Control of traveling-wave oscillations and bifurcation behavior in central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Alexandra S.; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Understanding synchronous and traveling-wave oscillations, particularly as they relate to transitions between different types of behavior, is a central problem in modeling biological systems. Here, we address this problem in the context of central pattern generators (CPGs). We use contraction theory to establish the global stability of a traveling-wave or synchronous oscillation, determined by the type of coupling. This opens the door to better design of coupling architectures to create the desired type of stable oscillations. We then use coupling that is both amplitude and phase dependent to create either globally stable synchronous or traveling-wave solutions. Using the CPG motor neuron network of a leech as an example, we show that while both traveling and synchronous oscillations can be achieved by several types of coupling, the transition between different types of behavior is dictated by a specific coupling architecture. In particular, it is only the “repulsive” but not the commonly used phase or rotational coupling that can explain the transition to high-frequency synchronous oscillations that have been observed in the heartbeat pattern generator of a leech. This shows that the overall dynamics of a CPG can be highly sensitive to the type of coupling used, even for coupling architectures that are widely believed to produce the same qualitative behavior.

  7. Control of traveling-wave oscillations and bifurcation behavior in central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Landsman, Alexandra S; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Understanding synchronous and traveling-wave oscillations, particularly as they relate to transitions between different types of behavior, is a central problem in modeling biological systems. Here, we address this problem in the context of central pattern generators (CPGs). We use contraction theory to establish the global stability of a traveling-wave or synchronous oscillation, determined by the type of coupling. This opens the door to better design of coupling architectures to create the desired type of stable oscillations. We then use coupling that is both amplitude and phase dependent to create either globally stable synchronous or traveling-wave solutions. Using the CPG motor neuron network of a leech as an example, we show that while both traveling and synchronous oscillations can be achieved by several types of coupling, the transition between different types of behavior is dictated by a specific coupling architecture. In particular, it is only the "repulsive" but not the commonly used phase or rotational coupling that can explain the transition to high-frequency synchronous oscillations that have been observed in the heartbeat pattern generator of a leech. This shows that the overall dynamics of a CPG can be highly sensitive to the type of coupling used, even for coupling architectures that are widely believed to produce the same qualitative behavior. PMID:23214622

  8. Scalable and enhanced triboelectric output power generation by surface functionalized nanoimprint patterns.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yang Hyeog; Shin, Sung-Ho; Jung, Joo-Yun; Nah, Junghyo

    2016-05-20

    We report nanoimprint lithographic submicron surface patterning for scalable output power generation and performance enhancement in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). Specifically, one contact surface of a TENG is nanoimprinted with polyurethane acrylate (PUA) lines in different pitches and the counter contact surface is coated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The results show that a TENG with 200 nm pitch PUA lines exhibits voltage and current up to ∼430 V and ∼55 μA cm(-2), generating about a sixfold higher output power than that with a flat PUA surface at an applied force of 0.3 MPa. In addition, scalable output power was obtained by adjusting line pitches. Further enhancement in output power was also demonstrated by chemically functionalizing the PUA line patterns with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). The PDDA functionalization boosted voltage and current up to ∼500 V and ∼100 μA cm(-2), respectively, which corresponds to ∼50% power density enhancement. The approach introduced here is a simple, effective, scalable and reproducible way to fabricate TENGs. PMID:27053597

  9. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Fracture Patterns Generated by Underground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H.; Mihaly, J. M.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    A dynamic micro-mechanical damage mechanics model, developed by Bhat, Rosakis and Sammis, J. Appl. Mech., 2012, is used to simulate two-dimensional explosions in a brittle material. The theoretical patterns of circumferential and radial fractures are quantitatively compared with those produced by point explosions in very brittle "candy glass" plates. In these experiments the evolution of the fracture pattern is monitored using high-speed digital photography, which also images the resultant elastic waves (P and S). Theoretical estimates of the spatial extent of circumferential and radial cracking as well as the propagation speed of the comminution front and the growth-rate of individual radial cracks all compare well with the experimental observations. The wave-forms of the P and S waves, specifically the local particle velocities, are also recorded at selected points using laser vibrometers. Asymmetric fracture patterns caused by a non isotropic pre-stress, the preferred orientation of initial flaws (a rift plane), or a lithostatic gradient lead to the generation of strong S-waves from the otherwise spherically symmetric point source.

  10. Atomic layer deposition on phase-shift lithography generated photoresist patterns for 1D nanochannel fabrication.

    PubMed

    Güder, Firat; Yang, Yang; Krüger, Michael; Stevens, Gregory B; Zacharias, Margit

    2010-12-01

    A versatile, low-cost, and flexible approach is presented for the fabrication of millimeter-long, sub-100 nm wide 1D nanochannels with tunable wall properties (wall thickness and material) over wafer-scale areas on glass, alumina, and silicon surfaces. This approach includes three fabrication steps. First, sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns were generated by near-field contact phase-shift lithography (NFC-PSL) using an inexpensive homemade borosilicate mask (NFC-PSM). Second, various metal oxides were directly coated on the resist patterns with low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD). Finally, the remaining photoresist was removed via an acetone dip, and then planar nanochannel arrays were formed on the substrate. In contrast to all the previous fabrication routes, the sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns produced by NFC-PSL are directly employed as a sacrificial layer for the creation of nanochannels. Because both the NFC-PSL and the ALD deposition are highly reproducible processes, the strategy proposed here can be regarded as a general route for nanochannel fabrication in a simplified and reliable manner. In addition, the fabricated nanochannels were used as templates to synthesize various organic and inorganic 1D nanostructures on the substrate surface. PMID:21047101

  11. Distinct Mammalian Precursors Are Committed to Generate Neurons with Defined Dendritic Projection Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kelsch, Wolfgang; Mosley, Colleen P; Lin, Chia-Wei; Lois, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate how dendrites target different neurons to establish connections with specific cell types remain largely unknown. In particular, the formation of cell-type–specific connectivity during postnatal neurogenesis could be either determined by the local environment of the mature neuronal circuit or by cell-autonomous properties of the immature neurons, already determined by their precursors. Using retroviral fate mapping, we studied the lamina-specific dendritic targeting of one neuronal type as defined by its morphology and intrinsic somatic electrical properties in neonatal and adult neurogenesis. Fate mapping revealed the existence of two separate populations of neuronal precursors that gave rise to the same neuronal type with two distinct patterns of dendritic targeting—innervating either a deep or superficial lamina, where they connect to different types of principal neurons. Furthermore, heterochronic and heterotopic transplantation demonstrated that these precursors were largely restricted to generate neurons with a predetermined pattern of dendritic targeting that was independent of the host environment. Our results demonstrate that, at least in the neonatal and adult mammalian brain, the pattern of dendritic targeting of a given neuron is a cell-autonomous property of their precursors. PMID:18001150

  12. Central pattern generators for social vocalization: Androgen-dependent neurophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2008-01-01

    Historically, most studies of vertebrate central pattern generators (CPGs) have focused on mechanisms for locomotion and respiration. Here, we highlight new results for ectothermic vertebrates, namely teleost fish and amphibians, showing how androgenic steroids can influence the temporal patterning of CPGs for social vocalization. Investigations of vocalizing teleosts show how androgens can rapidly (within minutes) modulate the neurophysiological output of the vocal CPG (fictive vocalizations that mimic the temporal properties of natural vocalizations) inclusive of their divergent actions between species, as well as intraspecific differences between male reproductive morphs. Studies of anuran amphibians (frogs) demonstrate that long-term steroid treatments (wks) can masculinize the fictive vocalizations of females, inclusive of its sensitivity to rapid modulation by serotonin. Given the conserved organization of vocal control systems across vertebrate groups, the vocal CPGs of fish and amphibians provide tractable models for identifying androgen-dependent events that are fundamental to the mechanisms of vocal motor patterning. These basic mechanisms can also inform our understanding of the more complex CPGs for vocalization, and social behaviors in general, that have evolved among birds and mammals. PMID:18262186

  13. Mechanisms of Left-Right Coordination in Mammalian Locomotor Pattern Generation Circuits: A Mathematical Modeling View

    PubMed Central

    Talpalar, Adolfo E.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2015-01-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized “hopping” pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left–right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  14. Mechanisms of left-right coordination in mammalian locomotor pattern generation circuits: a mathematical modeling view.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Bacak, Bartholomew J; Talpalar, Adolfo E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2015-05-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized "hopping" pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left-right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  15. Molecules and mechanisms involved in the generation and migration of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Miranda, Luis R; Parnavelas, John G; Chiara, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-containing interneurons of the neocortex are largely derived from the ganglionic eminences in the subpallium. Numerous studies have previously defined the migratory paths travelled by these neurons from their origins to their destinations in the cortex. We review here results of studies that have identified many of the genes expressed in the subpallium that are involved in the specification of the subtypes of cortical interneurons, and the numerous transcription factors, motogenic factors and guidance molecules that are involved in their migration. PMID:20360946

  16. Resolution improvement and pattern generator development for the maskless micro-ion-beam reduction lithography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ximan

    have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3delta CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

  17. Tigroid pattern of cerebral white matter involvement in chromosome 6p25 deletion syndrome with concomitant 5p15 duplication

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Meena; Smith, Kath; Williams, Steve; Griffiths, Paul D.; Parker, Michael J.; Mordekar, Santosh R.

    2012-01-01

    Sub-telomeric deletions of the short arm of chromosome 6 are a well-described clinical entity characterized by developmental impairment, hypotonia, eye abnormalities and defects in the heart and kidneys. Chromosome 5p terminal duplication is a rarer entity, associated with developmental impairment and facial dysmorphism. We report a 3-year-old patient with a chromosome 6p25.1pter deletion and chromosome 5p15.1pter duplication who had global developmental impairment and unusual cerebral white matter changes, with hypoplastic corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis on magnetic resonance imaging -brain scan. We discuss the differential diagnosis to consider in patients with this appearance on magnetic resonance imaging -brain scan and reiterate the need for chromosome analysis in patients with this pattern of developmental anomaly. Tigroid pattern of cerebral white matter involvement has not been reported in chromosomal deletion/duplication syndromes. With the increasing use of molecular karyotyping for patients with multiple congenital anomalies and developmental delay, it is important to consider the exact size and nature of chromosomal deletion/duplication, in order to provide families with prognostic information and recurrence risk. This in turn, will help provide valuable information regarding the natural history of rare chromosomal imbalances.

  18. Beyond Participation: The Association between School Extracurricular Activities and Involvement in Violence across Generations of Immigration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study…

  19. The New Workforce Generation: Understanding the Problems Facing Parental Involvement in Jordanian Kindergartens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi; Khasawneh, Samer; Mahfouz, Safi; Khawaldeh, Moustafa

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the problems facing parental involvement in Jordanian kindergartens from the parents' perspectives. A 36-item questionnaire that addressed five domains was designed by the researchers and distributed among the study participants. The study sample consisted of 297 parents of kindergarten children from various…

  20. Spike timing-dependent serotonergic neuromodulation of synaptic strength intrinsic to a central pattern generator circuit.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akira; Katz, Paul S

    2003-11-26

    Neuromodulation is often thought to have a static, gain-setting function in neural circuits. Here we report a counter example: the neuromodulatory effect of a serotonergic neuron is dependent on the interval between its spikes and those of the neuron being modulated. The serotonergic dorsal swim interneurons (DSIs) are members of the escape swim central pattern generator (CPG) in the mollusk Tritonia diomedea. DSI spike trains heterosynaptically enhanced synaptic potentials evoked by another CPG neuron, ventral swim interneuron B (VSI-B), when VSI-B action potentials occurred within 10 sec of a DSI spike train; however, if VSI-B was stimulated 20-120 sec after DSI, then the amplitude of VSI-B synaptic potentials decreased. Consistent with this, VSI-B-evoked synaptic currents exhibited a temporally biphasic and bidirectional change in amplitude after DSI stimulation. Both the DSI-evoked enhancement and decrement were occluded by serotonin and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist methysergide, suggesting that both phases are mediated by serotonin. In most preparations, however, bath-applied serotonin caused only a sustained enhancement of VSI-B synaptic strength. The heterosynaptic modulation interacted with short-term homosynaptic plasticity: DSI-evoked depression was offset by VSI-B homosynaptic facilitation. This caused a complicated temporal pattern of neuromodulation when DSI and VSI-B were stimulated to fire in alternating bursts to mimic the natural motor pattern: DSI strongly enhanced summated VSI-B synaptic potentials and suppressed single synaptic potentials after the cessation of the artificial motor pattern. Thus, spike timing-dependent serotonergic neuromodulatory actions can impart temporal information that may be relevant to the operation of the CPG. PMID:14645466

  1. Investigation of Vortex Clouds and Droplet Sizes in Heated Water Spray Patterns Generated by Axisymmetric Full Cone Nozzles

    PubMed Central

    Naz, M. Y.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ariwahjoedi, B.; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit. PMID:24307881

  2. Investigation of vortex clouds and droplet sizes in heated water spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Sulaiman, S A; Ariwahjoedi, B; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit. PMID:24307881

  3. Flow patterns generated by oblate medusan jellyfish: field measurements and laboratory analyses.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-04-01

    Flow patterns generated by medusan swimmers such as jellyfish are known to differ according the morphology of the various animal species. Oblate medusae have been previously observed to generate vortex ring structures during the propulsive cycle. Owing to the inherent physical coupling between locomotor and feeding structures in these animals, the dynamics of vortex ring formation must be robustly tuned to facilitate effective functioning of both systems. To understand how this is achieved, we employed dye visualization techniques on scyphomedusae (Aurelia aurita) observed swimming in their natural marine habitat. The flow created during each propulsive cycle consists of a toroidal starting vortex formed during the power swimming stroke, followed by a stopping vortex of opposite rotational sense generated during the recovery stroke. These two vortices merge in a laterally oriented vortex superstructure that induces flow both toward the subumbrellar feeding surfaces and downstream. The lateral vortex motif discovered here appears to be critical to the dual function of the medusa bell as a flow source for feeding and propulsion. Furthermore, vortices in the animal wake have a greater volume and closer spacing than predicted by prevailing models of medusan swimming. These effects are shown to be advantageous for feeding and swimming performance, and are an important consequence of vortex interactions that have been previously neglected. PMID:15781886

  4. Involvement of retinol dehydrogenase 10 in embryonic patterning and rescue of its loss of function by maternal retinaldehyde treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rhinn, Muriel; Schuhbaur, Brigitte; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal

    2011-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active vitamin A metabolite, is a key signaling molecule in vertebrate embryos. Morphogenetic RA gradients are thought to be set up by tissue-specific actions of retinaldehyde dehydrogenases (RALDHs) and catabolizing enzymes. According to the species, two enzymatic pathways (β-carotene cleavage and retinol oxidation) generate retinaldehyde, the substrate of RALDHs. Placental species depend on maternal retinol transferred to the embryo. The retinol-to-retinaldehyde conversion was thought to be achieved by several redundant enzymes; however, a random mutagenesis screen identified retinol dehydrogenase 10 [Rdh10Trex allele; Sandell LL, et al. (2007) Genes Dev 21:1113–1124] as responsible for a homozygous lethal phenotype with features of RA deficiency. We report here the production and characterization of unique murine Rdh10 loss-of-function alleles generated by gene targeting. We show that although Rdh10−/− mutants die at an earlier stage than Rdh10Trex mutants, their molecular patterning defects do not reflect a complete state of RA deficiency. Furthermore, we were able to correct most developmental abnormalities by administering retinaldehyde to pregnant mothers, thereby obtaining viable Rdh10−/− mutants. This demonstrates the rescue of an embryonic lethal phenotype by simple maternal administration of the missing retinoid compound. These results underscore the importance of maternal retinoids in preventing congenital birth defects, and lead to a revised model of the importance of RDH10 and RALDHs in controlling embryonic RA distribution. PMID:21930923

  5. Parenting across Racial and Class Lines: Assortative Mating Patterns of New Parents Who Are Married, Cohabiting, Dating or No Longer Romantically Involved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Joshua R.; Harknett, Kristen

    2006-01-01

    We examine the assortative mating patterns of new parents who are married, cohabiting, romantically involved and no longer romantically involved. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study, we find that relationship status at the time of a birth depends mainly on father's race rather than on whether mother and father's…

  6. A model of a flexible anguilliform swimmer driven by a central pattern generator with proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, Christina; Tytell, Eric; Hoffman, Kathleen; Fauci, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The swimming of a simple vertebrate, the lamprey, can shed light on how a flexible body can couple with a fluid environment to swim rapidly and efficiently. Animals use proprioceptive sensory information to sense how their bodies are bending, and then adjust the neural signals to their muscles to improve performance. We will present recent progress in the development of a computational model of a lamprey swimming in a Navier-Stokes fluid where a simple central pattern generator model, based on phase oscillators, is coupled to the evolving body dynamics of the swimmer through curvature and curvature derivative feedback. Such feedback can be positive (frequency decreasing), negative (frequency increasing), or mixed (positive to one side of the body and negative to the other, or vice versa). We will examine how the emergent swimming behavior and cost of transport depends upon these functional forms of proprioceptive feedback chosen in the model.

  7. Pattern Formation and Force Generation by Cell Ensembles in a Filamentous Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, R.; Schwarz, U. S.

    Adhesion-dependent soft tissue cells both create and sense tension in the extracellular matrix. Therefore cells can actively interact through the mechanics of the surrounding matrix. An intracellular positive feedback loop upregulates cellular contractility in stiff or tensed environments. Here we theoretically address the resulting pattern formation and force generation for the case of a filamentous matrix, which we model as a two-dimensional cable network. Cells are modeled as anisotropic contraction dipoles which move in favor of tensed directions in the matrix. Our Monte Carlo simulations suggest that at small densities, cells align in strings, while at high densities, they form interconnected meshworks. Cellular activation both by biochemical factors and by tension leads to a hyperbolic increase in tissue tension. We also discuss the effect of cell density on tissue tension and shape.

  8. A new Pulse-Pattern Generator based on LabVIEW FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, F.; Beck, D.; Brand, H.; Hahn, H.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.

    2012-07-01

    For the control of experimental sequences composed of triggers, gates and delays a Pulse-Pattern Generator (PPG) has been developed based on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) addressed in a LabVIEW environment. It allows a highly reproducible timing of measurement procedures by up to 64 individual channels with pulse and delay periods from the nanoseconds to the minutes range. The PPG has been implemented in the context of the development of a new control system for the ClusterTrap setup, an ion storage device for atomic-cluster research, in close contact with the SHIPTRAP and ISOLTRAP collaborations at GSI and CERN, respectively. As the new PPG is not ion-trap specific it can be employed in any experiment based on sequences of triggers, pulses and delays.

  9. Development of a morphing structure with the incorporation of central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Thomas K.; Bart-Smith, Hilary; Iwasaki, Tetsuya

    2006-03-01

    The Manta Ray, Manta birostris, is an amazing creature, propelling itself through the water with the elegant and complex flapping of its wings. Achieving outstanding efficiencies, engineers are looking for ways to mimic its flight through the water and harness its propulsive techniques. This study combines two biologically inspired aspects to achieve this goal: morphing structures actuated with a biomimetic neural network control system. It is believed that this combination will prove capable of producing the oscillatory motions necessary for locomotion. In this paper, a four-truss structure with three actuators is chosen and its performance capabilities are analyzed. A synthetic central pattern generator, which provides the fundamental control mechanisms for rhythmic motion in animals, is designed to realize an oscillatory control of the three actuators. The control system is simulated using Matlab, then combined with LabVIEW to control the four-truss structure. The system's performance is analyzed, with specific attention to both transient and steady-state behavior.

  10. A new pillared-layer 3D coordination polymer involving in situ generated formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yu-Pei; Li, Yun-Wu; Li, Da-Cheng; Du, Yu-Chang; Yao, Qing-Xia; Dou, Jian-Min

    2015-02-01

    A new Cd-based coordination polymer, [Cd(cpt)(HCOO)]n (1), has been synthesized from 1-(4-carboxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazole) ligand (Hcpt). The structure was characterized through X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis, and IR spectrum. Compound 1 presents a three-dimensional (3D) pillared-layer structure constructed by metal-formate layers and cpt- ligands. Moreover, the unusual formate anions are generated in situ from the decomposition of DMF precursors. The fluorescence property of 1 in solid state was also researched.

  11. A muscarinic cholinergic mechanism underlies activation of the central pattern generator for locust flight.

    PubMed

    Buhl, Edgar; Schildberger, Klaus; Stevenson, Paul A

    2008-07-01

    A central question in behavioural control is how central pattern generators (CPGs) for locomotion are activated. This paper disputes the key role generally accredited to octopamine in activating the CPG for insect flight. In deafferented locusts, fictive flight was initiated by bath application of the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine, the acetylcholine analogue carbachol, and the acetylcholinesterase blocker eserine, but not by nicotine. Furthermore, in addition to octopamine, various other amines including dopamine, tyramine and histamine all induced fictive flight, but not serotonin or the amine-precursor amino acid tyrosine. However, flight initiation was not reversibly blocked by aminergic antagonists, and was still readily elicited by both natural stimulation (wind) and pilocarpine in reserpinized, amine-depleted locusts. By contrast, the muscarinic antagonists atropine and scopolamine reversibly blocked flight initiated by wind, cholinergic agonists, octopamine, and by selective stimulation of a flight-initiating interneurone (TCG). The short delay from TCG stimulation to flight onset suggests that TCG acts directly on the flight CPG, and accordingly that TCG, or its follower cell within the flight generating circuit, is cholinergic. We conclude that acetylcholine acting via muscarinic receptors is the key neurotransmitter in the mechanism underlying the natural activation of the locust flight CPG. Amines are not essential for this, but must be considered as potential neuromodulators for facilitating flight release and tuning the motor pattern. We speculate that muscarinic activation coupled to aminergic facilitation may be a general feature of behavioural control in insects for ensuring conditional recruitment of individual motor programs in accordance with momentary adaptive requirements. PMID:18587129

  12. A Modeling Approach on Why Simple Central Pattern Generators Are Built of Irregular Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Marcelo Bussotti; Carelli, Pedro Valadão; Sartorelli, José Carlos; Pinto, Reynaldo Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The crustacean pyloric Central Pattern Generator (CPG) is a nervous circuit that endogenously provides periodic motor patterns. Even after about 40 years of intensive studies, the rhythm genesis is still not rigorously understood in this CPG, mainly because it is made of neurons with irregular intrinsic activity. Using mathematical models we addressed the question of using a network of irregularly behaving elements to generate periodic oscillations, and we show some advantages of using non-periodic neurons with intrinsic behavior in the transition from bursting to tonic spiking (as found in biological pyloric CPGs) as building components. We studied two- and three-neuron model CPGs built either with Hindmarsh-Rose or with conductance-based Hodgkin-Huxley-like model neurons. By changing a model’s parameter we could span the neuron’s intrinsic dynamical behavior from slow periodic bursting to fast tonic spiking, passing through a transition where irregular bursting was observed. Two-neuron CPG, half center oscillator (HCO), was obtained for each intrinsic behavior of the neurons by coupling them with mutual symmetric synaptic inhibition. Most of these HCOs presented regular antiphasic bursting activity and the changes of the bursting frequencies was studied as a function of the inhibitory synaptic strength. Among all HCOs, those made of intrinsic irregular neurons presented a wider burst frequency range while keeping a reliable regular oscillatory (bursting) behavior. HCOs of periodic neurons tended to be either hard to change their behavior with synaptic strength variations (slow periodic burster neurons) or unable to perform a physiologically meaningful rhythm (fast tonic spiking neurons). Moreover, 3-neuron CPGs with connectivity and output similar to those of the pyloric CPG presented the same results. PMID:25799556

  13. Correlation of hierarchal Upper Silurian stacking patterns generated by Milankovitch orbital forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Mauriello, D.J.; Ketterer, M.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Upper Silurian Wills Creek Formation in Pennsylvania and Maryland is entirely divisible into meter-scale allocycles. Stacking patterns of these allocycles reveal a hierarchy consistent with predictions based on the Milankovitch model of orbital forcing. Asymmetrical Sixth-Order cycles (PACs), bounded by surfaces produced by precessional sea-level rises, are divisible into a lower highstand portion and an upper lowstand portion separated by a sharp sea-level fall surface produced by a rapid sea-level drop within the precessional cycle. Sixth-Order cycles may be genetically grouped into Fifth-Order (100 ky.) and subsequently, Fourth-Order (400 ky.) cycles, each of which exhibits a distinct internal symmetry. Fifth-Order cycles, on average three to four meters in thickness, are composed of a basal transgressive portion consisting of two PACs followed by two or three successively regressive PACs. Four Fifth-Order cycles constitute a complete Fourth-Order cycle, in which the second Fifth-Order cycle contains facies representing the deepest or least restricted paleoenvironments. In each case, the fundamental Sixth-Order cycles were generated by the precessional signal modulated by orbital eccentricity variations. Over distances in excess of 100 km, Wills Creek facies change laterally from nearshore marine to fluvial coastal plain. Stacking patterns in these distinct facies are identical, and thus correlative, indicating the basin-wide extent of the stratigraphic events which produced these patterns. These correlations demonstrate that Milankovitch-driven eustatic sea-level fluctuations were occurring during the Late Silurian.

  14. Diversity of wing patterns and abdomen-generated substrate sounds in 3 European scorpionfly species

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Gepp, Johannes; Hinteregger, Karin; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In the genus Panorpa (Insecta: Mecoptera), also known as scorpionflies, premating behavior includes repeated sequences of slow wing movements (waving, fanning, flagging) which are accompanied by rapid abdomen vibrations that generate substantial substrate-borne sound. It is still unknown whether wing patterns or vibratory signals contain information about species identity, sex and/or the quality of potential mating partners. Besides species-specific pheromones, these multimodal signals may be of particular importance for the maintenance of reproductive isolation in sympatrically occurring scorpionfly species. Here, we analyzed phyologenetic relationships among, and the pattern of forewings as well as substrate-borne sound in 3 different sympatric Central-European scorpionfly species (P. communis, P. germanica, and P. alpina). Divergence time estimates, based on 879 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene, indicate longstanding separate evolutionary histories for the studied Panorpa species. Morphological analysis revealed that wing length as an indicator of body size increased in the following order: P. alpina < P. germanica < P. communis. Individuals can be assigned to the correct species and sex with high accuracy just by evaluation of the number of dark spots and the proportion of wing pigmentation. Despite high variability of interpulse period at an individual level, across species analysis revealed a positive correlation of average interpulse period as well as mean signal amplitude with forewing length. These results suggest wing patterns, but less likely vibratory signals, to contain information about species identity. Furthermore, receivers may be able to estimate the body size of a signaler solely on the basis of substrate-borne sound. PMID:24818592

  15. Diversity of wing patterns and abdomen-generated substrate sounds in 3 European scorpionfly species.

    PubMed

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Gepp, Johannes; Hinteregger, Karin; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In the genus Panorpa (Insecta: Mecoptera), also known as scorpionflies, premating behavior includes repeated sequences of slow wing movements (waving, fanning, flagging) which are accompanied by rapid abdomen vibrations that generate substantial substrate-borne sound. It is still unknown whether wing patterns or vibratory signals contain information about species identity, sex and/or the quality of potential mating partners. Besides species-specific pheromones, these multimodal signals may be of particular importance for the maintenance of reproductive isolation in sympatrically occurring scorpionfly species. Here, we analyzed phyologenetic relationships among, and the pattern of forewings as well as substrate-borne sound in 3 different sympatric Central-European scorpionfly species (P. communis, P. germanica, and P. alpina). Divergence time estimates, based on 879 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene, indicate longstanding separate evolutionary histories for the studied Panorpa species. Morphological analysis revealed that wing length as an indicator of body size increased in the following order: P. alpina < P. germanica < P. communis. Individuals can be assigned to the correct species and sex with high accuracy just by evaluation of the number of dark spots and the proportion of wing pigmentation. Despite high variability of interpulse period at an individual level, across species analysis revealed a positive correlation of average interpulse period as well as mean signal amplitude with forewing length. These results suggest wing patterns, but less likely vibratory signals, to contain information about species identity. Furthermore, receivers may be able to estimate the body size of a signaler solely on the basis of substrate-borne sound. PMID:24818592

  16. Wave patterns generated by an axisymmetric obstacle in a two-layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacaze, L.; Paci, A.; Cid, E.; Cazin, S.; Eiff, O.; Esler, J. G.; Johnson, E. R.

    2013-12-01

    Gravity waves generated by a moving obstacle in a two-layer stratified fluid are investigated. The experimental configuration is three-dimensional with an axisymmetric obstacle which is towed in one of the two layers. The experimental method used in the present study is based on a stereoscopic technique allowing the 3D reconstruction of the interface between the two layers. Investigation into the wave pattern as a function of the Froude number, Fr, based on the relative density of the fluid layers and the velocity of the towed obstacle is presented. Specific attention is paid to the transcritical regime for which Fr is close to one. Potential energy trapped in the wave field patterns is also extracted from the experimental results and is analyzed as a function of both the Froude number, Fr, and the transcritical similarity parameter . In particular, a remarkable increase in the potential energy around Fr = 1 is observed and a scaling allowing to assemble data resulting from different experimental parameters is proposed.

  17. Homologues of serotonergic central pattern generator neurons in related nudibranch molluscs with divergent behaviors.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, James M; Katz, Paul S

    2007-04-01

    Homologues of a neuron that contributes to a species-specific behavior were identified and characterized in species lacking that behavior. The nudibranch Tritonia diomedea swims by flexing its body dorsally and ventrally. The dorsal swim interneurons (DSIs) are components of the central pattern generator (CPG) underlying this rhythmic motor pattern and also activate crawling. Homologues of the DSIs were identified in six nudibranchs that do not exhibit dorsal-ventral swimming: Tochuina tetraquetra, Melibe leonina, Dendronotus iris, D. frondosus, Armina californica, and Triopha catalinae. Homology was based upon shared features that distinguish the DSIs from all other neurons: (1) serotonin immunoreactivity, (2) location in the Cerebral serotonergic posterior (CeSP) cluster, and (3) axon projection to the contralateral pedal ganglion. The DSI homologues, named CeSP-A neurons, share additional features with the DSIs: irregular basal firing, synchronous inputs, electrical coupling, and reciprocal inhibition. Unlike the DSIs, the CeSP-A neurons were not rhythmically active in response to nerve stimulation. The CeSP-A neurons in Tochuina and Triopha also excited homologues of the Tritonia Pd5 neuron, a crawling efferent. Thus, the CeSP-A neurons and the DSIs may be part of a conserved network related to crawling that may have been co-opted into a rhythmic swim CPG in Tritonia. PMID:17180703

  18. Multi-Generational Perspectives: How They Interact and Impact Service to Students and Their Families in an Age of Highly-Involved Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzusin, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Although there have always been differences in how generations navigate decision-making in higher education, highly involved parents have led to conflicting inter-generational educational expectations. This research study investigated the phenomenon of parental involvement and how meanings on educational expectations vary depending on generation.…

  19. The Graphic Pattern Generation Test in Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Psychometric Properties and Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Sunderaraman, Preeti; Sokolov, Elisaveta; Cines, Sarah; Sullo, Elizabeth; Orly, Aidan; Lerer, Bianca; Karlawish, Jason; Huey, Edward; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Design fluency tests, commonly used in both clinical and research contexts to evaluate nonverbal concept generation, have the potential to offer useful information in the differentiation of healthy versus pathological aging. While normative data for older adults are available for multiple timed versions of this test, similar data have been unavailable for a previously published untimed task, the Graphic Pattern Generation Task (GPG). Time constraints common to almost all of the available design fluency tests may cloud interpretation of higher level executive abilities, for example in individuals with slow processing speed. The current study examined the psychometric properties of the GPG and presents normative data in a sample of 167 healthy older adults (OAs) and 110 individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results suggest that a brief version of the GPG can be administered reliably, and that this short form has high test-retest and inter-rater reliability. Number of perseverations was higher in individuals with AD as compared to OAs. A cut-off score of 4 or more perseverations showed a moderate degree of sensitivity (76%) and specificity (37%) in distinguishing individuals with AD and OAs. Finally, perseverations were associated with nonmemory indices, underscoring the nonverbal nature of this error in OAs and individuals with AD. PMID:25679880

  20. Different patterns of language activation in post-stroke aphasia are detected by overt and covert versions of the verb generation fMRI task

    PubMed Central

    Allendorfer, Jane B.; Kissela, Brett M.; Holland, Scott K.; Szaflarski, Jerzy P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Post-stroke language functions depend on the relative contributions of the dominant and non-dominant hemispheres. Thus, we aimed to identify the neural correlates of overt and covert verb generation in adult post-stroke aphasia. Material/Methods Sixteen aphasic LMCA stroke patients (SPs) and 32 healthy controls (HCs) underwent language testing followed by fMRI while performing an overt event-related verb generation task (ER-VGT) isolating activations related to noun-verb semantic processing or to articulation and auditory processing, and a covert block design verb generation task (BD-VGT). Results BD-VGT activation patterns were consistent with previous studies, while ER-VGT showed different patterns in SPs relative to HCs including less left-hemispheric involvement during semantic processing and predominantly right-sided activation related to articulation and auditory processing. ER-VGT intra-scanner performance was positively associated with activation during semantic associations in the left middle temporal gyrus for HCs (p=0.031) and left middle frontal gyrus for SPs (p=0.042). Increased activation in superior frontal/cingulate gyri was associated with better intra-scanner performance (p=0.020). Lesion size negatively impacted verbal fluency tested with Controlled Oral Word Association Test (p=0.0092) and the Semantic Fluency Test (p=0.033) and trended towards a negative association with verb generation performance on the event-related verb generation task (p=0.081). Conclusions Greater retention of pre-stroke language skills is associated with greater involvement of the left hemisphere with different cortical recruitment patterns observed in SPs versus HCs. Post-stroke verbal fluency may depend more upon the structural and functional integrity of the dominant left hemisphere language network rather than the shift to contralateral homologues. PMID:22367124

  1. Nanophotonic reservoir computing with photonic crystal cavities to generate periodic patterns.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Martin Andre Agnes; Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Wyffels, Francis; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) is a technique in machine learning inspired by neural systems. RC has been used successfully to solve complex problems such as signal classification and signal generation. These systems are mainly implemented in software, and thereby they are limited in speed and power efficiency. Several optical and optoelectronic implementations have been demonstrated, in which the system has signals with an amplitude and phase. It is proven that these enrich the dynamics of the system, which is beneficial for the performance. In this paper, we introduce a novel optical architecture based on nanophotonic crystal cavities. This allows us to integrate many neurons on one chip, which, compared with other photonic solutions, closest resembles a classical neural network. Furthermore, the components are passive, which simplifies the design and reduces the power consumption. To assess the performance of this network, we train a photonic network to generate periodic patterns, using an alternative online learning rule called first-order reduced and corrected error. For this, we first train a classical hyperbolic tangent reservoir, but then we vary some of the properties to incorporate typical aspects of a photonics reservoir, such as the use of continuous-time versus discrete-time signals and the use of complex-valued versus real-valued signals. Then, the nanophotonic reservoir is simulated and we explore the role of relevant parameters such as the topology, the phases between the resonators, the number of nodes that are biased and the delay between the resonators. It is important that these parameters are chosen such that no strong self-oscillations occur. Finally, our results show that for a signal generation task a complex-valued, continuous-time nanophotonic reservoir outperforms a classical (i.e., discrete-time, real-valued) leaky hyperbolic tangent reservoir (normalized root-mean-square errors=0.030 versus NRMSE=0.127). PMID:24807033

  2. Utility of next-generation RNA-sequencing in identifying chimeric transcription involving human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Jessen, Karen Margrethe; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human endogenous retroviruses and endogenous retrovirus-like repeats (here collectively HERVs) impose direct regulation on human genes through enhancer and promoter motifs present in their long terminal repeats (LTRs). Although chimeric transcription in which novel gene isoforms containing retroviral and human sequence are transcribed from viral promoters are commonly associated with disease, regulation by HERVs is beneficial in other settings; for example, in human testis chimeric isoforms of TP63 induced by an ERV9 LTR protect the male germ line upon DNA damage by inducing apoptosis, whereas in the human globin locus the γ- and β-globin switch during normal hematopoiesis is mediated by complex interactions of an ERV9 LTR and surrounding human sequence. The advent of deep sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way researchers solve important scientific questions and develop novel hypotheses in relation to human genome regulation. We recently applied next-generation paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) to examine ERV9 chimeric transcription in human reference cell lines from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This led to the discovery of advanced regulation mechanisms by ERV9s and other HERVs across numerous human loci including transcription of large gene-unannotated genomic regions, as well as cooperative regulation by multiple HERVs and non-LTR repeats such as Alu elements. In this article, well-established examples of human gene regulation by HERVs are reviewed followed by a description of paired-end RNA-seq, and its application in identifying chimeric transcription genome-widely. Based on integrative analyses of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, data we then present novel examples of regulation by ERV9s of tumor suppressor genes CADM2 and SEMA3A, as well as transcription of an unannotated region. Taken together, this article highlights

  3. Liquid chromatography with amperometric reaction detection involving electrogenerated reagents: applications with in-situ generated bromine.

    PubMed

    King, W P; Kissinger, P T

    1980-09-01

    We describe the use of electrogenerated reactants for continuous on-line reaction detection with thin-layer hydrodynamic amperometry. The reagent is introduced into the liquid-chromatographic column effluent at a constant rate by using controlled-current electrochemistry. After the effluent passes through a short reaction coil, the reagent concentration is monitored at the detector. Reaction of eluted compounds with bromine is signalled by changes in the current detected. The direct electrochemical control of the reagent concentration allows changes to be made, even during the course of obtaining a chromatogram. Depending on the specific reagent or reaction, the reagent is supplied either by addition of a second stream or by direct generation in the mobile phase. The latter configuration provides sufficient baseline stability to permit detection of the uptake of as little as 10 pmol of reagent bromine. The technique has been used to detect nanograms of underivatized fatty acids, prostaglandins, and phenols after separation by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. PMID:7408178

  4. Arecoline Induces Neurotoxicity to PC12 Cells: Involvement in ER Stress and Disturbance of Endogenous H2S Generation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Mei; Wang, Li; Gu, Hong-Feng; Wu, Keng; Xiao, Fan; Chen, Ying; Guo, Run-Min; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Arecoline is a major alkaloid of areca nut and has been effect on central nervous system. Although arecoline-induced neurotoxicity has been reported, the possible underlying neurotoxic mechanisms have not yet been elucidated. Increasing evidences have shown that both excessive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and disturbance of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. Here, the purpose of present study was to verify whether ER stress and the disturbance of endogenous H2S generation are also involved in arecoline-caused neurotoxicity. We found that treatment of PC12 cells with arecoline induced the down-regulation of cells viability and up-regulation of apoptosis and the activity of caspase-3, indicating the neurotoxic role of arecoline to PC12 cells. In addition, arecoline also increased the expression of Bax (pro-apoptotic protein) and attenuated the expression of Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic protein) in PC12 cells. Simultaneously, arecoline caused excessive ER stress in PC12 cells, as evidenced by the up-regulations of Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein (CHOP), and Cleaved caspase-12 expressions. Notably, the level of H2S in the culture supernatant and the expressions of cystathionine β-synthase and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (two major enzymes for endogenous H2S generation in PC12 cells) were also reduced by arecoline treatment. These results indicate that arecoline-caused neurotoxicity to PC12 cells is involved in ER stress and disturbance of endogenous H2S generation and suggest that the modulation of ER stress and endogenous H2S generation may be potential therapeutic approach in treatment of arecoline-caused neurotoxicity. PMID:27255601

  5. Auxin-induced hydrogen sulfide generation is involved in lateral root formation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Cao, Zeyu; Li, Jiale; Shen, Wenbiao; Huang, Liqin

    2014-03-01

    Similar to auxin, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), mainly produced by l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES; EC 4.4.1.1) in plants, could induce lateral root formation. The objective of this study was to test whether H2S is also involved in auxin-induced lateral root development in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings. We observed that auxin depletion-induced down-regulation of transcripts of SlDES1, decreased DES activity and endogenous H2S contents, and the inhibition of lateral root formation were rescued by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor). However, No additive effects were observed when naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was co-treated with NaHS (lower than 10 mM) in the induction of lateral root formation. Subsequent work revealed that a treatment with NAA or NaHS could simultaneously induce transcripts of SlDES1, DES activity and endogenous H2S contents, and thereafter the stimulation of lateral root formation. It was further confirmed that H2S or HS(-), not the other sulfur-containing components derived from NaHS, was attributed to the stimulative action. The inhibition of lateral root formation and decreased of H2S metabolism caused by an H2S scavenger hypotaurine (HT) were reversed by NaHS, but not NAA. Molecular evidence revealed that both NaHS- or NAA-induced modulation of some cell cycle regulatory genes, including the up-regulation of SlCDKA;1, SlCYCA2;1, together with simultaneous down-regulation of SlKRP2, were differentially reversed by HT pretreatment. To summarize, above results clearly suggested that H2S might, at least partially, act as a downstream component of auxin signaling to trigger lateral root formation. PMID:24463534

  6. A central pattern generator producing alternative outputs: phase relations of leech heart motor neurons with respect to premotor synaptic input.

    PubMed

    Norris, Brian J; Weaver, Adam L; Wenning, Angela; García, Paul S; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2007-11-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) for heartbeat in leeches consists of seven identified pairs of segmental heart interneurons and one unidentified pair. Four of the identified pairs and the unidentified pair of interneurons make inhibitory synaptic connections with segmental heart motor neurons. The CPG produces a side-to-side asymmetric pattern of intersegmental coordination among ipsilateral premotor interneurons corresponding to a similarly asymmetric fictive motor pattern in heart motor neurons, and asymmetric constriction pattern of the two tubular hearts: synchronous and peristaltic. Using extracellular techniques, we recorded, in 61 isolated nerve cords, the activity of motor neurons in conjunction with the phase reference premotor heart interneuron, HN(4), and another premotor interneuron that allowed us to assess the coordination mode. These data were then coupled with a previous description of the temporal pattern of premotor interneuron activity in the two coordination modes to synthesize a global phase diagram for the known elements of the CPG and the entire motor neuron ensemble. These average data reveal the stereotypical side-to-side asymmetric patterns of intersegmental coordination among the motor neurons and show how this pattern meshes with the activity pattern of premotor interneurons. Analysis of animal-to-animal variability in this coordination indicates that the intersegmental phase progression of motor neuron activity in the midbody in the peristaltic coordination mode is the most stereotypical feature of the fictive motor pattern. Bilateral recordings from motor neurons corroborate the main features of the asymmetric motor pattern. PMID:17728387

  7. Next Generation Sequencing Analysis Reveals Segmental Patterns of microRNA Expression in Mouse Epididymal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Brett; Stanger, Simone J.; Mihalas, Bettina P.; Reilly, Jackson N.; Anderson, Amanda L.; Dun, Matthew D.; Tyagi, Sonika; Holt, Janet E.; McLaughlin, Eileen A.

    2015-01-01

    The functional maturation of mammalian spermatozoa is accomplished as the cells descend through the highly specialized microenvironment of the epididymis. This dynamic environment is, in turn, created by the combined secretory and absorptive activity of the surrounding epithelium and displays an extraordinary level of regionalization. Although the regulatory network responsible for spatial coordination of epididymal function remains unclear, recent evidence has highlighted a novel role for the RNA interference pathway. Indeed, as noncanonical regulators of gene expression, small noncoding RNAs have emerged as key elements of the circuitry involved in regulating epididymal function and hence sperm maturation. Herein we have employed next generation sequencing technology to profile the genome-wide miRNA signatures of mouse epididymal cells and characterize segmental patterns of expression. An impressive profile of some 370 miRNAs were detected in the mouse epididymis, with a subset of these specifically identified within the epithelial cells that line the tubule (218). A majority of the latter miRNAs (75%) were detected at equivalent levels along the entire length of the mouse epididymis. We did however identify a small cohort of miRNAs that displayed highly regionalized patterns of expression, including miR-204-5p and miR-196b-5p, which were down- and up-regulated by approximately 39- and 45-fold between the caput/caudal regions, respectively. In addition we identified 79 miRNAs (representing ~ 21% of all miRNAs) as displaying conserved expression within all regions of the mouse, rat and human epididymal tissue. These included 8/14 members of let-7 family of miRNAs that have been widely implicated in the control of androgen signaling and the repression of cell proliferation and oncogenic pathways. Overall these data provide novel insights into the sophistication of the miRNA network that regulates the function of the male reproductive tract. PMID:26270822

  8. Neuromodulator-evoked synaptic metaplasticity within a central pattern generator network.

    PubMed

    Kvarta, Mark D; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M; Johnson, Bruce R

    2012-11-01

    Synapses show short-term activity-dependent dynamics that alter the strength of neuronal interactions. This synaptic plasticity can be tuned by neuromodulation as a form of metaplasticity. We examined neuromodulator-induced metaplasticity at a graded chemical synapse in a model central pattern generator (CPG), the pyloric network of the spiny lobster stomatogastric ganglion. Dopamine, serotonin, and octopamine each produce a unique motor pattern from the pyloric network, partially through their modulation of synaptic strength in the network. We characterized synaptic depression and its amine modulation at the graded synapse from the pyloric dilator neuron to the lateral pyloric neuron (PD→LP synapse), driving the PD neuron with both long square pulses and trains of realistic waveforms over a range of presynaptic voltages. We found that the three amines can differentially affect the amplitude of graded synaptic transmission independently of the synaptic dynamics. Low concentrations of dopamine had weak and variable effects on the strength of the graded inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (gIPSPs) but reliably accelerated the onset of synaptic depression and recovery from depression independently of gIPSP amplitude. Octopamine enhanced gIPSP amplitude but decreased the amount of synaptic depression; it slowed the onset of depression and accelerated its recovery during square pulse stimulation. Serotonin reduced gIPSP amplitude but increased the amount of synaptic depression and accelerated the onset of depression. These results suggest that amine-induced metaplasticity at graded chemical synapses can alter the parameters of synaptic dynamics in multiple and independent ways. PMID:22933725

  9. Integration of Scale Invariant Generator Technique and S-A Technique for Characterizing 2-D Patterns for Information Retrieve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, L.; Cheng, Q.

    2004-12-01

    The scale invariant generator technique (SIG) and spectrum-area analysis technique (S-A) were developed independently relevant to the concept of the generalized scale invariance (GSI). The former was developed for characterizing the parameters involved in the GSI for characterizing and simulating multifractal measures whereas the latter was for identifying scaling breaks for decomposition of superimposed multifractal measures caused by multiple geophysical processes. A natural integration of these two techniques may yield a new technique to serve two purposes, on the one hand, that can enrich the power of S-A by increasing the interpretability of decomposed patterns in some applications of S-A and, on the other hand, that can provide a mean to test the uniqueness of multifractality of measures which is essential for application of SIG technique in more complicated environment. The implementation of the proposed technique has been done as a Dynamic Link Library (DLL) in Visual C++. The program can be friendly used for method validation and application in different fields.

  10. Coexpression patterns indicate that GPI-anchored non-specific lipid transfer proteins are involved in accumulation of cuticular wax, suberin and sporopollenin.

    PubMed

    Edstam, Monika M; Blomqvist, Kristina; Eklöf, Anna; Wennergren, Uno; Edqvist, Johan

    2013-12-01

    The non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTP) are unique to land plants. The nsLTPs are characterized by a compact structure with a central hydrophobic cavity and can be classified to different types based on sequence similarity, intron position or spacing between the cysteine residues. The type G nsLTPs (LTPGs) have a GPI-anchor in the C-terminal region which attaches the protein to the exterior side of the plasma membrane. The function of these proteins, which are encoded by large gene families, has not been systematically investigated so far. In this study we have explored microarray data to investigate the expression pattern of the LTPGs in Arabidopsis and rice. We identified that the LTPG genes in each plant can be arranged in three expression modules with significant coexpression within the modules. According to expression patterns and module sizes, the Arabidopsis module AtI is functionally equivalent to the rice module OsI, AtII corresponds to OsII and AtIII is functionally comparable to OsIII. Starting from modules AtI, AtII and AtIII we generated extended networks with Arabidopsis genes coexpressed with the modules. Gene ontology analyses of the obtained networks suggest roles for LTPGs in the synthesis or deposition of cuticular waxes, suberin and sporopollenin. The AtI-module is primarily involved with cuticular wax, the AtII-module with suberin and the AtIII-module with sporopollenin. Further transcript analysis revealed that several transcript forms exist for several of the LTPG genes in both Arabidopsis and rice. The data suggests that the GPI-anchor attachment and localization of LTPGs may be controlled to some extent by alternative splicing. PMID:23893219

  11. Concept and analytical basis for revistas - A fast, flexible computer/graphic system for generating periodic satellite coverage patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of satellite coverage patterns is facilitated by three basic strategies: use of a simplified physical model, permitting rapid closed-form calculation; separation of earth rotation and nodal precession from initial geometric analyses; and use of symmetries to construct traces of indefinite length by repetitive transposition of basic one-quadrant elements. The complete coverage patterns generated consist of a basic nadir trace plus a number of associated off-nadir traces, one for each sensor swath edge to be delineated. Each trace is generated by transposing one or two of the basic quadrant elements into a circle on a nonrotating earth model sphere, after which the circle is expanded into the actual 'helical' pattern by adding rotational displacements to the longitude coordinates. The procedure adapts to the important periodic coverage cases by direct insertion of the characteristic integers N and R (days and orbital revolutions, respectively, per coverage period).

  12. Regulation of ventral surface chemoreceptors by the central respiratory pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Guyenet, Patrice G; Mulkey, Daniel K; Stornetta, Ruth L; Bayliss, Douglas A

    2005-09-28

    The rat retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) contains neurons described as central chemoreceptors in the adult and respiratory rhythm-generating pacemakers in neonates [parafacial respiratory group (pfRG)]. Here we test the hypothesis that both RTN and pfRG neurons are intrinsically chemosensitive and tonically firing neurons whose respiratory rhythmicity is caused by a synaptic feedback from the central respiratory pattern generator (CPG). In halothane-anesthetized adults, RTN neurons were silent below 4.5% end-expiratory (e-exp) CO2. Their activity increased linearly (3.2 Hz/1% CO2) up to 6.5% (CPG threshold) and then more slowly to peak approximately 10 Hz at 10% CO2. Respiratory modulation of RTN neurons was absent below CPG threshold, gradually stronger beyond, and, like pfRG neurons, typically (42%) characterized by twin periods of reduced activity near phrenic inspiration. After CPG inactivation with kynurenate (KYN), RTN neurons discharged linearly as a function of e-exp CO2 (slope, +1.7 Hz/1% CO2) and arterial pH (threshold, 7.48; slope, 39 Hz/pH unit). In coronal brain slices (postnatal days 7-12), RTN chemosensitive neurons were silent at pH 7.55. Their activity increased linearly with acidification up to pH 7.2 (17 Hz/pH unit at 35 degrees C) and was always tonic. In conclusion, consistent with their postulated central chemoreceptor role, RTN/pfRG neurons encode pH linearly and discharge tonically when disconnected from the rest of the respiratory centers in vivo (KYN treatment) and in vitro. In vivo, RTN neurons receive respiratory synchronous inhibitory inputs that may serve as feedback and impart these neurons with their characteristic respiratory modulation. PMID:16192384

  13. CfLGBP, a pattern recognition receptor in Chlamys farreri involved in the immune response against various bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialong; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Wei, Xiumei; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Lin; Song, Linsheng

    2010-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide and beta-1, 3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) is a kind of pattern recognition receptor, which can recognize and bind LPS and beta-1, 3-glucan, and plays curial roles in the innate immune defense against Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. In this study, the functions of LGBP from Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri performed in innate immunity were analyzed. Firstly, the mRNA expression of CfLGBP in hemocytes toward three typical PAMPS stimulation was examined by realtime PCR. It was up-regulated extremely (P < 0.01) post stimulation of LPS and beta-glucan, and also exhibited a moderate up-regulation (P < 0.01) after PGN injection. Further PAMPs binding assay with the polyclonal antibody specific for CfLGBP proved that the recombinant CfLGBP (designated as rCfLGBP) could bind not only LPS and beta-glucan, but also PGN in vitro. More importantly, rCfLGBP exhibited obvious agglutination activity towards Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and fungi Pichia pastoris. Taking the results of immunofluorescence assay into account, which displayed CfLGBP was expressed specifically in the immune cells (hemocytes) and vulnerable organ (gill and mantle), we believed that LGBP in C. farreri, serving as a multi-functional PRR, not only involved in the immune response against Gram-negative and fungi as LGBP in other invertebrates, but also played significant role in the event of anti-Gram-positive bacteria infection. As the first functional research of LGBP in mollusks, our study provided new implication into the innate immune defense mechanisms of C. farreri and mollusks. PMID:20659562

  14. Control Theoretic Modeling and Generated Flow Patterns of a Fish-Tail Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Brian; Morgansen, Kristi; Dabiri, Dana

    2003-11-01

    Many real-world engineering problems involve understanding and manipulating fluid flows. One of the challenges to further progress in the area of active flow control is the lack of appropriate models that are amenable to control-theoretic studies and algorithm design and also incorporate reasonably realistic fluid dynamic effects. We focus here on modeling and model-verification of bio-inspired actuators (fish-fin type structures) used to control fluid dynamic artifacts that will affect speed, agility, and stealth of Underwater Autonomous Vehicles (UAVs). Vehicles using fish-tail type systems are more maneuverable, can turn in much shorter and more constrained spaces, have lower drag, are quieter and potentially more efficient than those using propellers. We will present control-theoretic models for a simple prototype coupled fluid and mechanical actuator where fluid effects are crudely modeled by assuming only lift, drag, and added mass, while neglecting boundary effects. These models will be tested with different control input parameters on an experimental fish-tail robot with the resulting flow captured with DPIV. Relations between the model, the control function choices, the obtained thrust and drag, and the corresponding flow patterns will be presented and discussed.

  15. Stereotypic Laryngeal and Respiratory Motor Patterns Generate Different Call Types in Rat Ultrasound Vocalization

    PubMed Central

    RIEDE, TOBIAS

    2014-01-01

    Rodents produce highly variable ultrasound whistles as communication signals unlike many other mammals, who employ flow-induced vocal fold oscillations to produce sound. The role of larynx muscles in controlling sound features across different call types in ultrasound vocalization (USV) was investigated using laryngeal muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity, subglottal pressure measurements and vocal sound output in awake and spontaneously behaving Sprague–Dawley rats. Results support the hypothesis that glottal shape determines fundamental frequency. EMG activities of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles were aligned with call duration. EMG intensity increased with fundamental frequency. Phasic activities of both muscles were aligned with fast changing fundamental frequency contours, for example in trills. Activities of the sternothyroid and sternohyoid muscles, two muscles involved in vocal production in other mammals, are not critical for the production of rat USV. To test how stereotypic laryngeal and respiratory activity are across call types and individuals, sets of ten EMG and subglottal pressure parameters were measured in six different call types from six rats. Using discriminant function analysis, on average 80% of parameter sets were correctly assigned to their respective call type. This was significantly higher than the chance level. Since fundamental frequency features of USV are tightly associated with stereotypic activity of intrinsic laryngeal muscles and muscles contributing to build-up of subglottal pressure, USV provide insight into the neurophysiological control of peripheral vocal motor patterns. PMID:23423862

  16. Multislit interference patterns in high-order harmonic generation in C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Becker, A.; Jaroń-Becker, A.

    2007-12-01

    We study high-order harmonic generation in C60 molecules interacting with a linearly polarized intense short laser pulse at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, using an extension of the so-called three-step or Lewenstein model to the molecular case. The results exhibit modulations in the plateaus of the spectra at the longer wavelengths, which are present for ensembles of aligned as well as randomly oriented fullerenes. The analysis of the results show that the minima can be explained by a multislit interference effect arising from the contributions of the 60 atomic centers to the dipole moment. Good agreement between the positions of the minima in the spectra obtained in the length gauge are found with those of the recombination matrix element, but not for those in the velocity gauge calculations. We further use a simple spherical model to analyze how geometrical information, such as the radius of the fullerene cage, can be obtained from the interference pattern in the harmonic spectra.

  17. The contribution of a central pattern generator in a reflex-based neuromuscular model

    PubMed Central

    Dzeladini, Florin; van den Kieboom, Jesse; Ijspeert, Auke

    2014-01-01

    Although the concept of central pattern generators (CPGs) controlling locomotion in vertebrates is widely accepted, the presence of specialized CPGs in human locomotion is still a matter of debate. An interesting numerical model developed in the 90s’ demonstrated the important role CPGs could play in human locomotion, both in terms of stability against perturbations, and in terms of speed control. Recently, a reflex-based neuro-musculo-skeletal model has been proposed, showing a level of stability to perturbations similar to the previous model, without any CPG components. Although exhibiting striking similarities with human gaits, the lack of CPG makes the control of speed/step length in the model difficult. In this paper, we hypothesize that a CPG component will offer a meaningful way of controlling the locomotion speed. After introducing the CPG component in the reflex model, and taking advantage of the resulting properties, a simple model for gait modulation is presented. The results highlight the advantages of a CPG as feedforward component in terms of gait modulation. PMID:25018712

  18. Hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase is involved in high blue-light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng; Xing, Da; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-08-01

    One of the most important functions of blue light is to induce chloroplast movements by reducing the damage to photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by various environmental stimuli, can act as a signaling molecule that regulates a number of developmental processes and environmental responses. To investigate whether H2O2 is involved in high blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we use luminescence spectrometer to observe H2O2 generation with the assistance of the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (H2DCF-DA). After treatment with high blue light, a large quantity of H2O2 indicated by the fluorescence intensity of DCF is produced in a dose-dependent manner in leaf strip of Arabidopsis. Enzymatic assay shows that the activity of NADPH oxidase, which is a major site for H2O2 generation, also rapidly increases in treated strips. Exogenously applied H2O2 can promote the high blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Moreover, high blue light-induced H2O2 generation can be abolished completely by addition of exogenous catalase (CAT), and partly by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (DCMU), which are an NADPH oxidase inhibitor and a blocker of electron transport chain. And subsequent chloroplast movements can be abolished by CAT and DPI, but not by DCMU. These results presented here suggested that high blue light can induce oxidative burst, and NADPH oxidase as a major producer for H2O2 is involved in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements.

  19. Formaldehyde impairs learning and memory involving the disturbance of hydrogen sulfide generation in the hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Qing; Zhuang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ping; Fang, Heng-Rong; Zhou, Cheng-Fang; Gu, Hong-Feng; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Chun-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Formaldehyde (FA), a well-known indoor and outdoor pollutant, has been implicated as the responsible agent in the development of neurocognitive disorders. Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), the third gasotransimitter, is an endogenous neuromodulator, which facilitates the induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation, involving the functions of learning and memory. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of FA on the formation of learning and memory and the generation of endogenous H(2)S in the hippocampus of rats. We found that the intracerebroventricular injection of FA in rats impairs the function of learning and memory in the Morris water maze and novel object recognition test and increases the formation of apoptosis and lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. We also showed that FA exposure inhibits the expression of cystathionine β-synthase, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous H(2)S generation in hippocampus and decreases the production of endogenous H(2)S in hippocampus in rats. These results suggested that FA-disturbed generation of endogenous H(2)S in hippocampus leads to the oxidative stress-mediated neuron damage, ultimately impairing the function of learning and memory. Our findings imply that the disturbance of endogenous H(2)S generation in hippocampus is a potential contributing mechanism underling FA-caused learning and memory impairment. PMID:23108488

  20. Versatile pattern generation of periodic, high aspect ratio Si nanostructure arrays with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report on a method of fabricating variable patterns of periodic, high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale. The approach marries step-and-repeat nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE), enabling near perfectly ordered Si nanostructure arrays of user-defined patterns to be controllably and rapidly generated on a wafer scale. Periodic features possessing circular, hexagonal, and rectangular cross-sections with lateral dimensions down to sub-50 nm, in hexagonal or square array configurations and high array packing densities up to 5.13 × 107 structures/mm2 not achievable by conventional UV photolithography are fabricated using this top-down approach. By suitably tuning the duration of catalytic etching, variable aspect ratio Si nanostructures can be formed. As the etched Si pattern depends largely on the NIL mould which is patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), the technique can be used to form patterns not possible with self-assembly methods, nanosphere, and interference lithography for replication on a wafer scale. Good chemical resistance of the nanoimprinted mask and adhesion to the Si substrate facilitate good pattern transfer and preserve the smooth top surface morphology of the Si nanostructures as shown in TEM. This approach is suitable for generating Si nanostructures of controlled dimensions and patterns, with high aspect ratio on a wafer level suitable for semiconductor device production. PMID:24289275

  1. Versatile pattern generation of periodic, high aspect ratio Si nanostructure arrays with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Jian-Wei; Wee, Qixun; Dumond, Jarrett; Tay, Andrew; Chua, Soo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    We report on a method of fabricating variable patterns of periodic, high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale. The approach marries step-and-repeat nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE), enabling near perfectly ordered Si nanostructure arrays of user-defined patterns to be controllably and rapidly generated on a wafer scale. Periodic features possessing circular, hexagonal, and rectangular cross-sections with lateral dimensions down to sub-50 nm, in hexagonal or square array configurations and high array packing densities up to 5.13 × 107 structures/mm2 not achievable by conventional UV photolithography are fabricated using this top-down approach. By suitably tuning the duration of catalytic etching, variable aspect ratio Si nanostructures can be formed. As the etched Si pattern depends largely on the NIL mould which is patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), the technique can be used to form patterns not possible with self-assembly methods, nanosphere, and interference lithography for replication on a wafer scale. Good chemical resistance of the nanoimprinted mask and adhesion to the Si substrate facilitate good pattern transfer and preserve the smooth top surface morphology of the Si nanostructures as shown in TEM. This approach is suitable for generating Si nanostructures of controlled dimensions and patterns, with high aspect ratio on a wafer level suitable for semiconductor device production.

  2. Transcriptome Profiling of Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) Root and Identification of Genes Involved in Response to Lead (Pb) Stress with Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yinglong; Shen, Hong; Gong, Yiqin; Limera, Cecilia; Liu, Liwang

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb), one of the most toxic heavy metals, can be absorbed and accumulated by plant roots and then enter the food chain resulting in potential health risks for human beings. The radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an important root vegetable crop with fleshy taproots as the edible parts. Little is known about the mechanism by which radishes respond to Pb stress at the molecular level. In this study, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)–based RNA-seq technology was employed to characterize the de novo transcriptome of radish roots and identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) during Pb stress. A total of 68,940 assembled unique transcripts including 33,337 unigenes were obtained from radish root cDNA samples. Based on the assembled de novo transcriptome, 4,614 DEGs were detected between the two libraries of untreated (CK) and Pb-treated (Pb1000) roots. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis revealed that upregulated DEGs under Pb stress are predominately involved in defense responses in cell walls and glutathione metabolism-related processes, while downregulated DEGs were mainly involved in carbohydrate metabolism-related pathways. The expression patterns of 22 selected genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR, and the results were highly accordant with the Solexa analysis. Furthermore, many candidate genes, which were involved in defense and detoxification mechanisms including signaling protein kinases, transcription factors, metal transporters and chelate compound biosynthesis related enzymes, were successfully identified in response to heavy metal Pb. Identification of potential DEGs involved in responses to Pb stress significantly reflected alterations in major biological processes and metabolic pathways. The molecular basis of the response to Pb stress in radishes was comprehensively characterized. Useful information and new insights were provided for investigating the molecular regulation mechanism of heavy metal Pb accumulation and

  3. Caudatin induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in human glioma cells with involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liang-Zhen; Hou, Ya-Jun; Zhao, Ming; Yang, Ming-Feng; Fu, Xiao-Ting; Sun, Jing-Yi; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Shao, Lu-Rong; Zhang, Hui-Fang; Fan, Cun-Dong; Gao, Hong-Li; Sun, Bao-Liang

    2016-08-01

    Caudatin as one species of C-21 steroidal from Cynanchum bungei decne displays potential anticancer activity. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In the present study, the growth suppressive effect and mechanism of caudatin on human glioma U251 and U87 cells were evaluated in vitro. The results indicated that caudatin significantly inhibited U251 and U87 cell growth in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that caudatin-induced cell growth inhibition was achieved by induction of cell apoptosis, as convinced by the increase of Sub-G1 peak, PARP cleavage and activation of caspase-3, caspase-7 and caspase-9. Caudatin treatment also resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction which correlated with an imbalance of Bcl-2 family members. Further investigation revealed that caudatin triggered U251 cell apoptosis by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation through disturbing the redox homeostasis. Moreover, pretreatment of caspase inhibitors apparently weakens caudatin-induced cell killing, PARP cleavage and caspase activation and eventually reverses caudatin-mediated apoptosis. Importantly, caudatin significantly inhibited U251 tumour xenografts in vivo through induction of cell apoptosis involving the inhibition of cell proliferation and angiogenesis, which further validate its value in combating human glioma in vivo. Taken together, the results described above all suggest that caudatin inhibited human glioma cell growth by induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis with involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS generation. PMID:27184666

  4. Involvement of Bradykinin Generation in Intravascular Dissemination of Vibrio vulnificus and Prevention of Invasion by a Bradykinin Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Maruo, Keishi; Akaike, Takaaki; Ono, Tomomichi; Maeda, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Involvement of bradykinin generation in bacterial invasion was examined by using a gram-negative bacillus, Vibrio vulnificus, which is known to invade the blood circulatory system and cause septicemia. V. vulnificus was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) into mice with or without bradykinin or a bradykinin (B2 receptor) antagonist. Dissemination of V. vulnificus from peritoneal septic foci to the circulating blood was assessed by counting of viable bacteria in venous blood by use of the colony-forming assay. Intravascular dissemination of V. vulnificus in mice was significantly potentiated by simultaneous injection with bradykinin but was markedly reduced by coadministration with the B2 antagonist d-Arg,[Hyp3, Thi5,8, d-Phe7]-bradykinin. Furthermore, V. vulnificus lethality was significantly increased when bradykinin was administered simultaneously with the bacillus, whereas it was definitely suppressed by treatment with d-Arg,[Hyp3, Thi5,8, d-Phe7]-bradykinin. Similarly, ovomacroglobulin, a potent inhibitor of the V. vulnificus protease, showed a strong suppressive effect on the V. vulnificus septicemia. We also confirmed appreciable bradykinin production in the primary septic foci in the mouse peritoneal cavity after i.p. inoculation with V. vulnificus. It is thus concluded that bradykinin generation in infectious foci is critically involved in facilitation of intravascular dissemination of V. vulnificus. PMID:9453658

  5. Decomposing risk: landscape structure and wolf behavior generate different predation patterns in two sympatric ungulates.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Vincenzo; Sand, Hakan; Zimmermann, Barbara; Mattisson, Jenny; Wabakken, Petter; Linnell, John D C

    2013-10-01

    Recolonizing carnivores can have a large impact on the status of wild ungulates, which have often modified their behavior in the absence of predation. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of reestablished predator-prey systems is crucial to predict their potential ecosystem effects. We decomposed the spatial structure of predation by recolonizing wolves (Canis lupus) on two sympatric ungulates, moose (Alces alces) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), in Scandinavia during a 10-year study. We monitored 18 wolves with GPS collars, distributed over 12 territories, and collected records from predation events. By using conditional logistic regression, we assessed the contributions of three main factors, the utilization patterns of each wolf territory, the spatial distribution of both prey species, and fine-scale landscape structure, in determining the spatial structure of moose and roe deer predation risk. The reestablished predator-prey system showed a remarkable spatial variation in kill occurrence at the intra-territorial level, with kill probabilities varying by several orders of magnitude inside the same territory. Variation in predation risk was evident also when a spatially homogeneous probability for a wolf to encounter a prey was simulated. Even inside the same territory, with the same landscape structure, and when exposed to predation by the same wolves, the two prey species experienced an opposite spatial distribution of predation risk. In particular, increased predation risk for moose was associated with open areas, especially clearcuts and young forest stands, whereas risk was lowered for roe deer in the same habitat types. Thus, fine-scale landscape structure can generate contrasting predation risk patterns in sympatric ungulates, so that they can experience large differences in the spatial distribution of risk and refuge areas when exposed to predation by a recolonizing predator. Territories with an earlier recolonization were not associated with a lower

  6. Physiological and pathophysiological interactions between the respiratory central pattern generator and the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Baekey, David M; Abdala, Ana P L; Machado, Benedito H; Dick, Thomas E; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory modulation seen in the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) implies that the respiratory and sympathetic networks interact. During hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the SNA displays an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting strengthened interactions between the networks. In this chapter, we review a series of experimental and modeling studies that help elucidate possible mechanisms of sympatho-respiratory coupling. We conclude that this coupling significantly contributes to both the sympathetic baroreflex and the augmented sympathetic activity after exposure to CIH. This conclusion is based on the following findings. (1) Baroreceptor activation results in perturbation of the respiratory pattern via transient activation of postinspiratory neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC). The same BötC neurons are involved in the respiratory modulation of SNA, and hence provide an additional pathway for the sympathetic baroreflex. (2) Under hypercapnia, phasic activation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) is accompanied by synchronous discharges in SNA due to the common source of this rhythmic activity in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). CIH conditioning increases the CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors in the RTN which results in the emergence of AbN and SNA discharges under normocapnic conditions similar to those observed during hypercapnia in naïve animals. Thus, respiratory-sympathetic interactions play an important role in defining sympathetic output and significantly contribute to the sympathetic activity and hypertension under certain physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and the theoretical framework presented may be instrumental in understanding of malfunctioning control of sympathetic activity in a variety of disease states. PMID:25194190

  7. Massive alterations of the methylation patterns around DNA transposons in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid.

    PubMed

    Yaakov, Beery; Kashkush, Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and reproducible genomic changes can be induced during the early stages of the life of nascent allopolyploid species. In a previous study, it was shown that following allopolyploidization, cytosine methylation changes can affect up to 11% of the wheat genome. However, the methylation patterns around transposable elements (TEs) were never studied in detail. We used transposon methylation display (TMD) to assess the methylation patterns of CCGG sites flanking three TE families (Balduin, Apollo, and Thalos) in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid. In addition, transposon display (TD), using a methylation-insensitive restriction enzyme, was applied to search for genomic rearrangements at the TE insertion sites. We observed that up to 54% of CCGG sites flanking the three TE families showed changes in methylation patterns in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid, where hypermethylation was predominant. Over 70% of the changes in TMD patterns occurred in the first two generations of the newly formed allohexaploid. Furthermore, analysis of 555 TE insertion sites by TD and 18 cases by site-specific PCR revealed a full additive pattern in the allohexaploid, an indication for lack of massive rearrangements. These data indicate that following allopolyplodization, DNA-TE insertion sites can undergo a significantly high level of methylation changes compared with methylation changes of other genomic sequences. PMID:21217805

  8. Designing responsive pattern generators: stable heteroclinic channel cycles for modeling and control.

    PubMed

    Horchler, Andrew D; Daltorio, Kathryn A; Chiel, Hillel J; Quinn, Roger D

    2015-04-01

    A striking feature of biological pattern generators is their ability to respond immediately to multisensory perturbations by modulating the dwell time at a particular phase of oscillation, which can vary force output, range of motion, or other characteristics of a physical system. Stable heteroclinic channels (SHCs) are a dynamical architecture that can provide such responsiveness to artificial devices such as robots. SHCs are composed of sequences of saddle equilibrium points, which yields exquisite sensitivity. The strength of the vector fields in the neighborhood of these equilibria determines the responsiveness to perturbations and how long trajectories dwell in the vicinity of a saddle. For SHC cycles, the addition of stochastic noise results in oscillation with a regular mean period. In this paper, we parameterize noise-driven Lotka-Volterra SHC cycles such that each saddle can be independently designed to have a desired mean sub-period. The first step in the design process is an analytic approximation, which results in mean sub-periods that are within 2% of the specified sub-period for a typical parameter set. Further, after measuring the resultant sub-periods over sufficient numbers of cycles, the magnitude of the noise can be adjusted to control the mean period with accuracy close to that of the integration step size. With these relationships, SHCs can be more easily employed in engineering and modeling applications. For applications that require smooth state transitions, this parameterization permits each state's distribution of periods to be independently specified. Moreover, for modeling context-dependent behaviors, continuously varying inputs in each state dimension can rapidly precipitate transitions to alter frequency and phase. PMID:25712192

  9. Real-time biomimetic Central Pattern Generators in an FPGA for hybrid experiments

    PubMed Central

    Ambroise, Matthieu; Levi, Timothée; Joucla, Sébastien; Yvert, Blaise; Saïghi, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    This investigation of the leech heartbeat neural network system led to the development of a low resources, real-time, biomimetic digital hardware for use in hybrid experiments. The leech heartbeat neural network is one of the simplest central pattern generators (CPG). In biology, CPG provide the rhythmic bursts of spikes that form the basis for all muscle contraction orders (heartbeat) and locomotion (walking, running, etc.). The leech neural network system was previously investigated and this CPG formalized in the Hodgkin–Huxley neural model (HH), the most complex devised to date. However, the resources required for a neural model are proportional to its complexity. In response to this issue, this article describes a biomimetic implementation of a network of 240 CPGs in an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), using a simple model (Izhikevich) and proposes a new synapse model: activity-dependent depression synapse. The network implementation architecture operates on a single computation core. This digital system works in real-time, requires few resources, and has the same bursting activity behavior as the complex model. The implementation of this CPG was initially validated by comparing it with a simulation of the complex model. Its activity was then matched with pharmacological data from the rat spinal cord activity. This digital system opens the way for future hybrid experiments and represents an important step toward hybridization of biological tissue and artificial neural networks. This CPG network is also likely to be useful for mimicking the locomotion activity of various animals and developing hybrid experiments for neuroprosthesis development. PMID:24319408

  10. Pigment Pattern Formation in the Guppy, Poecilia reticulata, Involves the Kita and Csf1ra Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kottler, Verena A.; Fadeev, Andrey; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Males of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) vary tremendously in their ornamental patterns, which are thought to have evolved in response to a complex interplay between natural and sexual selection. Although the selection pressures acting on the color patterns of the guppy have been extensively studied, little is known about the genes that control their ontogeny. Over 50 years ago, two autosomal color loci, blue and golden, were described, both of which play a decisive role in the formation of the guppy color pattern. Orange pigmentation is absent in the skin of guppies with a lesion in blue, suggesting a defect in xanthophore development. In golden mutants, the development of the melanophore pattern during embryogenesis and after birth is affected. Here, we show that blue and golden correspond to guppy orthologs of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor a (csf1ra; previously called fms) and kita. Most excitingly, we found that both genes are required for the development of the black ornaments of guppy males, which in the case of csf1ra might be mediated by xanthophore–melanophore interactions. Furthermore, we provide evidence that two temporally and genetically distinct melanophore populations contribute to the adult camouflage pattern expressed in both sexes: one early appearing and kita-dependent and the other late-developing and kita-independent. The identification of csf1ra and kita mutants provides the first molecular insights into pigment pattern formation in this important model species for ecological and evolutionary genetics. PMID:23666934

  11. From social behavior to neural circuitry: steroid hormones rapidly modulate advertisement calling via a vocal pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Remage-Healey, Luke; Bass, Andrew H

    2006-09-01

    Across vertebrates, androgens are rapidly elevated within minutes in response to aggressive or reproductive stimuli, yet it is unclear what the causal relationship is between fast androgen elevation and the ongoing (minute-by-minute) expression of behavior. This study tested the hypothesis that rapid increases in plasma steroid levels induce similarly rapid increases in both vocal behavior and the neurophysiological output of a central pattern generator that governs vocal behavior. In Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta), males call to attract females to their nesting sites, and both males and females vocalize in aggressive interactions. Previous field experiments with males showed that simulated territorial challenges produce rapid and concurrent elevations in ongoing calling behavior and circulating levels of the teleost-specific androgen 11-ketotestosterone (11kT), but not the glucocorticoid cortisol. The current field experiments showed that non-invasive (food) delivery of 11kT, but not cortisol, induced an elevation within 10 min in the ongoing calling behavior of males. Electrophysiological experiments revealed that intramuscular injections of either 11kT or cortisol, but neither testosterone nor 17-beta-estradiol, induced increases within 5 min in the output of the vocal pattern generator in males, whereas only cortisol had similarly fast effects in females. The field behavioral results support predictions generated by the challenge hypothesis and also parallel the 11kT-dependent modulation of the vocal pattern generator in males. The cortisol effect on the vocal pattern generator in both sexes predicts that glucocorticoids regulate vocalizations in non-advertisement contexts. Together, these experiments provide strong support for the hypothesis that surges in circulating steroid levels play a causal role in shaping rapid changes in social behavior (vocalizations) through non-genomic-like actions on neural (vocal motor) circuits that directly encode behavioral

  12. Extreme ultraviolet lithography patterned mask defect detection performance evaluation toward 16- to 11-nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Shoji; Terao, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    High-sensitivity and low-noise extreme ultraviolet (EUV) mask pattern defect detection is one of the major issues remaining to be addressed in device fabrication using extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). We have designed a projection electron microscopy (PEM) system, which has proven to be quite promising for half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node to hp 11-nm node mask inspection. The PEM system was integrated into a pattern inspection system for defect detection sensitivity evaluation. To improve the performance of hp 16-nm patterned mask defect detection toward hp 11-nm EUVL patterned mask, defect detection signal characteristics, which depend on hp 64-nm pattern image intensity deviation on EUVL mask, were studied. Image adjustment effect of the captured images for die-to-die defect detection was evaluated before the start of the defect detection image-processing sequence. Image correction of intrafield intensity unevenness and L/S pattern image contrast deviation suppresses the generation of false defects. Captured images of extrusion and intrusion defects in hp 64-nm L/S patterns were used for detection. Applying the image correction for defect detection, 12-nm sized intrusion defect, which was smaller than our target size for hp 16-nm defect detection requirements, was identified without false defects.

  13. Aging and Generational Patterns of Alcohol Consumption among Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans and Mainland Puerto Ricans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Sandra A.; Markides, Kyriakos S.

    1994-01-01

    Used data from Hispanic Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to describe life-course patterns of alcohol consumption among Mexican Americans, Cuban Americans, and Puerto Ricans residing in mainland United States. Found age differences in patterns of consumption among Mexican American and Puerto Rican males that reflect aging effects. Found…

  14. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  15. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  16. Modular organization of the multipartite central pattern generator for turtle rostral scratch: knee-related interneurons during deletions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul S G; Daniels-McQueen, Susan; Lai, Jessica; Liu, Z; Corman, Tanya S

    2016-06-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are neuronal networks in the spinal cord that generate rhythmic patterns of motor activity in the absence of movement-related sensory feedback. For many vertebrate rhythmic behaviors, CPGs generate normal patterns of motor neuron activities as well as variations of the normal patterns, termed deletions, in which bursts in one or more motor nerves are absent from one or more cycles of the rhythm. Prior work with hip-extensor deletions during turtle rostral scratch supports hypotheses of hip-extensor interneurons in a hip-extensor module and of hip-flexor interneurons in a hip-flexor module. We present here single-unit interneuronal recording data that support hypotheses of knee-extensor interneurons in a knee-extensor module and of knee-flexor interneurons in a knee-flexor module. Members of knee-related modules are not members of hip-related modules and vice versa. These results in turtle provide experimental support at the single-unit interneuronal level for the organizational concept that the rostral-scratch CPG for the turtle hindlimb is multipartite, that is, composed of more than two modules. This work, when combined with experimental and computational work in other vertebrates, does not support the classical view that the vertebrate limb CPG is bipartite with only two modules, one controlling all the flexors of the limb and the other controlling all the extensors of the limb. Instead, these results support the general principle that spinal CPGs are multipartite. PMID:27030737

  17. Direct imaging of periodic subwavelength patterns generated by optical phase masks

    SciTech Connect

    Tonyushkin, Alexei; Sleator, Tycho

    2006-11-15

    We have demonstrated direct imaging of interference fringes of total atomic density with periods {lambda}/4 and {lambda}/2 for optical wavelength {lambda} that have been produced in a de Broglie wave atom interferometer. The imaging was done by means of an 'optical mask' technique, which allowed us to observe subwavelength periodic patterns with a resolution of up to {lambda}/16. In addition, the dependence of the fringe pattern on the recoil phase and pulse area reveals quantum dynamics in the atomic center-of-mass motion. The behavior of the fringe patterns near the interference times distinguishes the effects of phase gratings from those of amplitude gratings.

  18. Patterned mask inspection technology with Projection Electron Microscope (PEM) technique for 11 nm half-pitch (hp) generation EUV masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Shoji; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    High-sensitivity EUV mask pattern defect detection is one of the major issues in order to realize the device fabrication by using the EUV lithography. We have already designed a novel Projection Electron Microscope (PEM) optics that has been integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code), and which seems to be quite promising for 16 nm hp generation EUVL Patterned mask Inspection (PI). Defect inspection sensitivity was evaluated by capturing an electron image generated at the mask by focusing onto an image sensor. The progress of the novel PEM optics performance is not only about making an image sensor with higher resolution but also about doing a better image processing to enhance the defect signal. In this paper, we describe the experimental results of EUV patterned mask inspection using the above-mentioned system. The performance of the system is measured in terms of defect detectability for 11 nm hp generation EUV mask. To improve the inspection throughput for 11 nm hp generation defect detection, it would require a data processing rate of greater than 1.5 Giga- Pixel-Per-Second (GPPS) that would realize less than eight hours of inspection time including the step-and-scan motion associated with the process. The aims of the development program are to attain a higher throughput, and enhance the defect detection sensitivity by using an adequate pixel size with sophisticated image processing resulting in a higher processing rate.

  19. Risk factors and patterns of lymph node involvement in primary gastric large B-cell lymphoma: implications for target definition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ximei; Wang, Peiguo; Zhao, Lujun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify the appropriate radiation volume for primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PG-DLBCL). Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and pathological findings of 68 patients treated with total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Results There were 23, 14, and 29 patients with stage I, stage II, and stage IIE disease, respectively, and 30 patients had lymph node involvement. Primary tumor location, as well as the depth of invasion, was significantly associated with lymph node involvement. When the tumor was limited to the muscularis, the involved lymph nodes were found to be perigastric nodes. For tumors invading beyond the muscularis, regional lymph nodes were involved. Conclusion The optimal radiation volume for patients with PG-DLBCL is largely dependent on the primary location and depth of invasion. Larger series and longer follow-up are needed to further delineate the radiation volumes for PG-DLBCL. PMID:27536138

  20. Control strategies of 3-cell Central Pattern Generator via global stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Álvaro; Rodríguez, Marcos; Barrio, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The study of the synchronization patterns of small neuron networks that control several biological processes has become an interesting growing discipline. Some of these synchronization patterns of individual neurons are related to some undesirable neurological diseases, and they are believed to play a crucial role in the emergence of pathological rhythmic brain activity in different diseases, like Parkinson’s disease. We show how, with a suitable combination of short and weak global inhibitory and excitatory stimuli over the whole network, we can switch between different stable bursting patterns in small neuron networks (in our case a 3-neuron network). We develop a systematic study showing and explaining the effects of applying the pulses at different moments. Moreover, we compare the technique on a completely symmetric network and on a slightly perturbed one (a much more realistic situation). The present approach of using global stimuli may allow to avoid undesirable synchronization patterns with nonaggressive stimuli. PMID:27021970

  1. Control strategies of 3-cell Central Pattern Generator via global stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Álvaro; Rodríguez, Marcos; Barrio, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The study of the synchronization patterns of small neuron networks that control several biological processes has become an interesting growing discipline. Some of these synchronization patterns of individual neurons are related to some undesirable neurological diseases, and they are believed to play a crucial role in the emergence of pathological rhythmic brain activity in different diseases, like Parkinson’s disease. We show how, with a suitable combination of short and weak global inhibitory and excitatory stimuli over the whole network, we can switch between different stable bursting patterns in small neuron networks (in our case a 3-neuron network). We develop a systematic study showing and explaining the effects of applying the pulses at different moments. Moreover, we compare the technique on a completely symmetric network and on a slightly perturbed one (a much more realistic situation). The present approach of using global stimuli may allow to avoid undesirable synchronization patterns with nonaggressive stimuli.

  2. Patterns of Reasoning Exhibited by Children and Adolescents in Response to Moral Dilemmas Involving Plants, Animals and Ecosystems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevers, Patricia; Gebhard, Ulrich; Billmann-Mahecha, Elfriede

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the attitudes and values that children and adolescents hold with respect to nature and the patterns of reasoning with which they are expressed. Outlines current positions in environmental ethics, discusses difficulties in applying contemporary theories of moral development to the problem, and summarizes preliminary results of the…

  3. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  4. Feedback of Erosional-Depositional Processes Generating Anabranching Patterns in a Mega-River the Case of the PARANÁ River, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.; Pereira, M.; Ramonell, C. G.; Szupiany, R. N.

    2011-12-01

    A new category of "very large" rivers was recently proposed and defined as mega-rivers, which are those rivers with a Qmean of more than ~17,000m3/s. This category includes the nine largest rivers on Earth and the Parana River is one of the selected members of that peculiar group. The planform adjustment of mega-rivers is a variety of anabranching patterns characterized by the existence of alluvial islands. The processes and mechanisms involved in the generation of the different anabranching styles, however, are not well understood. The Paraná channel pattern has been classified as a low to moderate anabranching, low sinuosity with tendency to braided and having a meandering thalweg. We analyzed a reach of the middle Paraná in Argentina applying a combined multitemporal, hydraulic, sedimentologic and geomorphologic approach. Multitemporal geomorphologic maps, sedimentary descriptions of bars, islands and banks, volumetric calculations using multitemporal bathymetric charts, measurements with ADCP and bathymetric surveys with echosound, sediment transport estimations and the hydrological analysis of available data from gauge stations were some of the tools used in our research. The evolution of the reach was studied from 1908 to present. The reach is subdivided in two sub-reaches (named Chapeton and Curtiembre) which are comprised between nodal points. Chapeton has been in a more mature quasi-equilibrium state through the XX Century but the main channel in Curtiembre evolved from a single pattern to anabranching pattern since 1950s. We conclude that the generation of the anabranching pattern in the studied reach depends of a combination of factors such as the architecture of the floodplain and islands, the main role played by the morphodynamics and shifting of the thalweg, the availability and path of sandy sediments bedforms architecture and the temporal variability of the effective discharge among other secondary factors. A feedback system coupling erosional

  5. Direct magnetic patterning due to the generation of ferromagnetism by selective ion irradiation of paramagnetic FeAl alloys.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Enric; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Fassbender, Jürgen; Gemming, Thomas; Weber, Anja; Heyderman, Laura J; Rao, K V; Deevi, Seetharama C; Suriñach, Santiago; Baró, Maria Dolors; Sort, Jordi; Nogués, Josep

    2009-02-01

    Sub-100-nm magnetic dots embedded in a non-magnetic matrix are controllably generated by selective ion irradiation of paramagnetic Fe(60)Al(40) (atomic %) alloys, taking advantage of the disorder-induced magnetism in this material. The process is demonstrated by sequential focused ion beam irradiation and by in-parallel broad-beam ion irradiation through lithographed masks. Due to the low fluences used, this method results in practically no alteration of the surface roughness. The dots exhibit a range of magnetic properties depending on the size and shape of the structures, with the smallest dots (<100 nm) having square hysteresis loops with coercivities in excess of micro(0)H(C) = 50 mT. Importantly, the patterning can be fully removed by annealing. The combination of properties induced by the direct magnetic patterning is appealing for a wide range of applications, such as patterned media, magnetic separators, or sensors. PMID:19089839

  6. Belly dancer's myoclonus and chronic abdominal pain: pain-related dysinhibition of a spinal cord central pattern generator?

    PubMed

    Tamburin, Stefano; Idone, Domenico; Zanette, Giampietro

    2007-07-01

    We report on a patient with segmental rhythmic myoclonus resembling belly dance. This patient developed the myoclonus in temporal and anatomical association with chronic abdominal pain. No structural or metabolic abnormalities were found. EMG recordings suggested the presence of a spinal cord central pattern generator (CPG). We hypothesize that pain-related spinal plasticity might have contributed to the hyperactivity of a spinal CPG, thus leading to the myoclonic jerks in our patient. PMID:17049297

  7. The Identification of Discriminating Patterns from 16S rRNA Gene to Generate Signature for Bacillus Genus.

    PubMed

    More, Ravi P; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-08-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene has been widely used for the taxonomic classification of bacteria. A molecular signature is a set of nucleotide patterns, which constitute a regular expression that is specific to each particular taxon. Our main goal was to identify discriminating nucleotide patterns in 16S rRNA gene and then to generate signatures for taxonomic classification. To demonstrate our approach, we used the phylum Firmicutes as a model using representative taxa Bacilli (class), Bacillales (order), Bacillaceae (family), and Bacillus (genus), according to their dominance at each hierarchical taxonomic level. We applied combined composite vector and multiple sequence alignment approaches to generate gene-specific signatures. Further, we mapped all the patterns into the different hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene and confirmed the most appropriate distinguishing region as V3-V4 for targeted taxa. We also examined the evolution in discriminating patterns of signatures across taxonomic levels. We assessed the comparative classification accuracy of signatures with other methods (i.e., RDP Classifier, KNN, and SINA). Results revealed that the signatures for taxa Bacilli, Bacillales, Bacillaceae, and Bacillus could correctly classify isolate sequences with sensitivity of 0.99, 0.97, 0.94, and 0.89, respectively, and specificity close to 0.99. We developed signature-based software DNA Barcode Identification (DNA BarID) for taxonomic classification that is available at website http://www.neeri.res.in/DNA_BarID.htm . This pattern-based study provides a deeper understanding of taxon-specific discriminating patterns in 16S rRNA gene with respect to taxonomic classification. PMID:27104769

  8. High-harmonic generation from a coherent superposition of electronic states: Controlling interference patterns via short and long quantum orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bredtmann, Timm; Bandrauk, André D.

    2013-09-01

    Laser pump-probe schemes are explored numerically from a molecular time-dependent Schrödinger equation for monitoring attosecond electron motion by high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) from a coherent superposition of electronic states. Varying the time delay between the probe and pump pulse on an attosecond time scale alters the HHG signal, leading to universal interference patterns. By using an extended three-step recollision model, we show that various regular interference patterns in the HHG spectra, including continuous harmonic frequency redshifts as a function of pump-probe delay, are related to interference between specific pairs of short or long quantum orbits. For small excited-state population (regime A), interferences are controlled by electron-tunneling times, whereas for equal populations (regime B), recollision time control dominates thus allowing for control of the HHG process by the pump-probe delay time and by electron-state populations. We show that each specific pattern is closely related to the interference between pairs of specific (short or long) quantum orbits originating from a specific electron bound state. One can generate a specific pattern by varying the populations in the coherent superposition, the laser intensity, wavelength, and ionization potential of the electronic states.

  9. Mixed Methods Case Study of Generational Patterns in Responses to Shame and Guilt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Moral socialization and moral learning are antecedents of moral motivation. As many as 4 generations interact in workplace and education settings; hence, a deeper understanding of the moral motivation of members of those generations is needed. The purpose of this convergent mixed methods case study was to understand the moral motivation of 5…

  10. Hydrogel thin film with swelling-induced wrinkling patterns for high-throughput generation of multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ziqi; Gu, Jianjun; Zhao, Yening; Guan, Ying; Zhu, X X; Zhang, Yongjun

    2014-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) multicellular spheroids (MCSs) mimic the structure and function of real tissue much better than the conventional 2D cell monolayers, however, their application was severely hindered by difficulties in their generation. An ideal method for MCS fabrication should produce spheroids with narrow size distribution and allow for control over their size. The method should also be simple, cheap, and scalable. Here, we use patterned nonadhesive poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) hydrogel films to guide the self-assembly of cells. The films were fabricated directly in the wells of cell culture plates. They were patterned spontaneously by swelling in water, without the use of any template or specialized facilities. When cell suspension is added, the cells settle down by gravity to the bottom. Because of the presence of the wrinkling pattern composed of uniformed microcaves, the cells accumulate to the center of the microcaves and gradually self-assemble into MCSs. Using this method, monodisperse MCSs were generated. The size of the spheroids can be facilely controlled by the number of cells seeded. The method is compatible with the conventional monolayer cell culture method. Thousands of spheroids can be generated in a single well. We expect this method will pave the way for the application of MCSs in various biomedical areas. PMID:25072634

  11. Design of Spiking Central Pattern Generators for Multiple Locomotion Gaits in Hexapod Robots by Christiansen Grammar Evolution.

    PubMed

    Espinal, Andres; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Carpio, Martin; Guerra-Hernandez, Erick I; Ornelas-Rodriguez, Manuel; Sotelo-Figueroa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to design Spiking Central Pattern Generators (SCPGs) to achieve locomotion at different frequencies on legged robots. It is validated through embedding its designs into a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and implemented on a real hexapod robot. The SCPGs are automatically designed by means of a Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE)-based methodology. The CGE performs a solution for the configuration (synaptic weights and connections) for each neuron in the SCPG. This is carried out through the indirect representation of candidate solutions that evolve to replicate a specific spike train according to a locomotion pattern (gait) by measuring the similarity between the spike trains and the SPIKE distance to lead the search to a correct configuration. By using this evolutionary approach, several SCPG design specifications can be explicitly added into the SPIKE distance-based fitness function, such as looking for Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) with minimal connectivity or a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) able to generate different locomotion gaits only by changing the initial input stimuli. The SCPG designs have been successfully implemented on a Spartan 6 FPGA board and a real time validation on a 12 Degrees Of Freedom (DOFs) hexapod robot is presented. PMID:27516737

  12. Design of Spiking Central Pattern Generators for Multiple Locomotion Gaits in Hexapod Robots by Christiansen Grammar Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Espinal, Andres; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Carpio, Martin; Guerra-Hernandez, Erick I.; Ornelas-Rodriguez, Manuel; Sotelo-Figueroa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to design Spiking Central Pattern Generators (SCPGs) to achieve locomotion at different frequencies on legged robots. It is validated through embedding its designs into a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and implemented on a real hexapod robot. The SCPGs are automatically designed by means of a Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE)-based methodology. The CGE performs a solution for the configuration (synaptic weights and connections) for each neuron in the SCPG. This is carried out through the indirect representation of candidate solutions that evolve to replicate a specific spike train according to a locomotion pattern (gait) by measuring the similarity between the spike trains and the SPIKE distance to lead the search to a correct configuration. By using this evolutionary approach, several SCPG design specifications can be explicitly added into the SPIKE distance-based fitness function, such as looking for Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) with minimal connectivity or a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) able to generate different locomotion gaits only by changing the initial input stimuli. The SCPG designs have been successfully implemented on a Spartan 6 FPGA board and a real time validation on a 12 Degrees Of Freedom (DOFs) hexapod robot is presented. PMID:27516737

  13. Generation of a reference radiation pattern of string instruments using automatic excitation and acoustic centering.

    PubMed

    Shabtai, Noam R; Behler, Gottfried; Vorländer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Radiation patterns of musical instruments are important for the understanding of music perception in concert halls, and may be used to improve the plausibility of virtual acoustic systems. Many attempts have been performed to measure the spatial response of musical instruments using surrounding spherical microphone arrays with a limited number of microphones. This work presents a high-resolution spatial sampling of the radiation pattern of an electrically excited violin, and addresses technical problems that arise due to mechanical reasons of the excitation apparatus using acoustic centering. PMID:26627818

  14. A simple model for polar cap convection patterns and generation of theta auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    An addition of the uniform interplanetary magnetic field and the earth's dipole magnetic field is used to evaluate electric field convection patterns over the polar caps that result from solar wind flow across open geomagnetic field lines. The model also accounts for field-aligned patterns within, and auroral arcs across, the polar cap. The qualitative predictions derived from the model express the electric field magnitudes, aurora intensity, sunward and antisunward flow, and the dusk-side reversal of the convection field in terms of the x and y components of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  15. Demography as Destiny: The Role of Parental Involvement and Mathematics Course Taking Patterns among 9th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degner, Kate M.

    2013-01-01

    This study uses data from the National Center of Education Statistics (NCES) High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HLS:09). Parent responses to the Parent Involvement survey, given as part of the NCES study were considered, along with their child's socio-economic status (SES) and self-reported level of mathematics course enrollment during…

  16. Intergenerational Relationship Quality, Gender, and Grandparent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Melissa A.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Ontai, Lenna; Conger, Rand D.

    2010-01-01

    This prospective, intergenerational study (N = 181) considered how parent (G1, Generation 1) and child (G2, Generation 2) relationship quality during adolescence and adulthood is associated with G1's level of involvement with their 3- to 4-year-old grandchildren (G3, Generation 3). Path model analyses indicated different patterns of results for…

  17. Fast gamma oscillations are generated intrinsically in CA1 without the involvement of fast-spiking basket cells.

    PubMed

    Craig, Michael T; McBain, Chris J

    2015-02-25

    Information processing in neuronal networks relies on the precise synchronization of ensembles of neurons, coordinated by the diverse family of inhibitory interneurons. Cortical interneurons can be usefully parsed by embryonic origin, with the vast majority arising from either the caudal or medial ganglionic eminences (CGE and MGE). Here, we examine the activity of hippocampal interneurons during gamma oscillations in mouse CA1, using an in vitro model where brief epochs of rhythmic activity were evoked by local application of kainate. We found that this CA1 KA-evoked gamma oscillation was faster than that in CA3 and, crucially, did not appear to require the involvement of fast-spiking basket cells. In contrast to CA3, we also found that optogenetic inhibition of pyramidal cells in CA1 did not significantly affect the power of the oscillation, suggesting that excitation may not be essential for gamma genesis in this region. We found that MGE-derived interneurons were generally more active than CGE interneurons during CA1 gamma, although a group of CGE-derived interneurons, putative trilaminar cells, were strongly phase-locked with gamma oscillations and, together with MGE-derived axo-axonic and bistratified cells, provide attractive candidates for being the driver of this locally generated, predominantly interneuron-driven model of gamma oscillations. PMID:25716860

  18. Fast Gamma Oscillations Are Generated Intrinsically in CA1 without the Involvement of Fast-Spiking Basket Cells

    PubMed Central

    Craig, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Information processing in neuronal networks relies on the precise synchronization of ensembles of neurons, coordinated by the diverse family of inhibitory interneurons. Cortical interneurons can be usefully parsed by embryonic origin, with the vast majority arising from either the caudal or medial ganglionic eminences (CGE and MGE). Here, we examine the activity of hippocampal interneurons during gamma oscillations in mouse CA1, using an in vitro model where brief epochs of rhythmic activity were evoked by local application of kainate. We found that this CA1 KA-evoked gamma oscillation was faster than that in CA3 and, crucially, did not appear to require the involvement of fast-spiking basket cells. In contrast to CA3, we also found that optogenetic inhibition of pyramidal cells in CA1 did not significantly affect the power of the oscillation, suggesting that excitation may not be essential for gamma genesis in this region. We found that MGE-derived interneurons were generally more active than CGE interneurons during CA1 gamma, although a group of CGE-derived interneurons, putative trilaminar cells, were strongly phase-locked with gamma oscillations and, together with MGE-derived axo-axonic and bistratified cells, provide attractive candidates for being the driver of this locally generated, predominantly interneuron-driven model of gamma oscillations. PMID:25716860

  19. Myoepithelial differentiation in cribriform, tubular and solid pattern of adenoid cystic carcinoma: A potential involvement in histological grading and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Fei; Zhou, Chuan-Xiang; Gao, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) is known as a biphasic tumor composed of ductal and myoepithelial cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the amount and distribution of the myoepithelial cells in cribriform, tubular and solid subtypes of AdCC and analyze their relationship with histological grading and prognosis. A panel of myoepithelial markers including CK5/6, p63, p40, D2-40, calponin, α-SMA, S-100, and vimentin, together with a luminal cell marker CK7, and Ki-67 were used for immunohistochemical study in 109 AdCCs that included 38 cribriform, 36 tubular and 35 solid subtypes. The myoepithelial cells were labeled and found lined cystic-like paces, located at the periphery of the cribriform arrangements, and presented at the nonluminal cells of the two-layered tubular structures, while absent or dispersed in the solid pattern. Meantime, the solid subtype presented a higher proliferation rate assessed by mitotic count and Ki-67 labeling index, followed by poorer overall survival and recurrent-free survival. Furthermore, CK7 expression was found higher in solid pattern than in cribriform-tubular subtype, which showed negative correlation with the myoepithelial markers including D2-40, Calponin, α-SMA, p63, p40 and vimentin. The solid pattern of AdCC showed gland differentiation but loss of myoepithelial differentiation with a higher proliferation and more aggressiveness as well as poorer prognosis compared with the cribriform-tubular subtypes, which implies that loss of MEC differentiation might contribute to the poor prognosis of the solid subtype of AdCC. However, further studies are required to clarify its exact role in AdCC progression. PMID:27180054

  20. Generation and use of observational data patterns in the evaluation of data quality for AmeriFlux and FLUXNET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, G.; Agarwal, D.; Poindexter, C.; Papale, D.; Trotta, C.; Ribeca, A.; Canfora, E.; Faybishenko, B.; Gunter, D.; Chu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The fluxes-measuring sites that are part of AmeriFlux are operated and maintained in a fairly independent fashion, both in terms of scientific goals and operational practices. This is also the case for most sites from other networks in FLUXNET. This independence leads to a degree of heterogeneity in the data sets collected at the sites, which is also reflected in data quality levels. The generation of derived data products and data synthesis efforts, two of the main goals of these networks, are directly affected by the heterogeneity in data quality. In a collaborative effort between AmeriFlux and ICOS, a series of quality checks are being conducted for the data sets before any network-level data processing and product generation take place. From these checks, a set of common data issues were identified, and are being cataloged and classified into data quality patterns. These patterns are now being used as a basis for implementing automation for certain data quality checks, speeding up the process of applying the checks and evaluating the data. Currently, most data checks are performed individually in each data set, requiring visual inspection and inputs from a data curator. This manual process makes it difficult to scale the quality checks, creating a bottleneck for the data processing. One goal of the automated checks is to free up time of data curators so they can focus on new or less common issues. As new issues are identified, they can also be cataloged and classified, extending the coverage of existing patterns or potentially generating new patterns, helping both improve existing automated checks and create new ones. This approach is helping make data quality evaluation faster, more systematic, and reproducible. Furthermore, these patterns are also helping with documenting common causes and solutions for data problems. This can help tower teams with diagnosing problems in data collection and processing, and also in correcting historical data sets. In this

  1. Pattern generation in the lobster (Panulirus) stomatogastric ganglion. II. Pyloric network simulation.

    PubMed

    Hartline, D K

    1979-08-01

    1. Results from the companion paper were incorporated into a physiologically realistic computer model of the three principal cell types (PD/AB, LP, PY) of the pyloric network in the stomatogastric ganglion. Parameters for the model were mostly calculated (sometimes estimated) from experimental data rather than fitting the model to observed output patterns. 2. The initial run was successful in predicting several features of the pyloric pattern: the observed gap between PD and LP bursts, the appropriate sequence of the activity periods (PD, LP, PY), and a substantial PY burst not properly simulated by an earlier model. 3. The major discrepancy between model and observed patterns was the too-early occurrence of the PY burst, which resulted in a much shortened LP burst. Motivated by this discrepancy, additional investigations were made of PY properties. A hyperpolarization-enabled depolarization-activated hyperpolarizing conductance change was discovered which may make an important contribution to the late phase of PY activity in the normal burst cycle. Addition of this effect to the model brought its predictions more in line with observed patterns. 4. Other discrepancies between model and observation were instructive and are discussed. The findings force a substantial revision in previously held ideas on pattern production in the pyloric system. More weight must be given to functional properties of individual neurons and less to properties arising purely from network interactions. This shift in emphasis may be necessary in more complicated systems as well. 5. An example has been provided of the value quantitative modeling can be to network physiology. Only through rigorous quantitative testing can qualitative theories of how the nervous system operates be substantiated. PMID:227480

  2. Next-generation re-sequencing of genes involved in increased platelet reactivity in diabetic patients on acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Postula, Marek; Janicki, Piotr K; Eyileten, Ceren; Rosiak, Marek; Kaplon-Cieslicka, Agnieszka; Sugino, Shigekazu; Wilimski, Radosław; Kosior, Dariusz A; Opolski, Grzegorz; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rare missense genetic variants in several genes related to platelet functions and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) response are associated with the platelet reactivity in patients with diabetes type 2 (T2D) on ASA therapy. Fifty eight exons and corresponding introns of eight selected genes, including PTGS1, PTGS2, TXBAS1, PTGIS, ADRA2A, ADRA2B, TXBA2R, and P2RY1 were re-sequenced in 230 DNA samples from T2D patients by using a pooled PCR amplification and next-generation sequencing by Illumina HiSeq2000. The observed non-synonymous variants were confirmed by individual genotyping of 384 DNA samples comprising of the individuals from the original discovery pools and additional verification cohort of 154 ASA-treated T2DM patients. The association between investigated phenotypes (ASA induced changes in platelets reactivity by PFA-100, VerifyNow and serum thromboxane B2 level [sTxB2]), and accumulation of rare missense variants (genetic burden) in investigated genes was tested using statistical collapsing tests. We identified a total of 35 exonic variants, including 3 common missense variants, 15 rare missense variants, and 17 synonymous variants in 8 investigated genes. The rare missense variants exhibited statistically significant difference in the accumulation pattern between a group of patients with increased and normal platelet reactivity based on PFA-100 assay. Our study suggests that genetic burden of the rare functional variants in eight genes may contribute to differences in the platelet reactivity measured with the PFA-100 assay in the T2DM patients treated with ASA. PMID:26599574

  3. Changes in muscle activation and force generation patterns during cycling movements because of low-intensity squat training with slow movement and tonic force generation.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Michiya; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Ishii, Naokata

    2009-11-01

    Our previous studies showed that relatively low-load (approximately 50-60% 1 repetition maximum [1RM]) resistance training with slow movement and tonic force generation (LST) significantly increased muscle size and strength. However, LST is a very specific movement that differs from natural movements associated with sport activities and activities of daily life, and therefore, it might have some unfavorable effects on dynamic sport movement. We investigated the effects of LST on muscle activity and force generation patterns during cycling movement as a representative dynamic sports movement. Twenty-four healthy young men who were not in the habit of bicycle riding and did not have a history of regular resistance training were randomly assigned to the LST (approximately 60% 1RM load, 3-second lifting, and 3-second lowering movement without a relaxing phase: n = 8), a high-intensity exercise at normal speed (HM) group (85% 1RM load, 1-second lifting, 1-second lowering, and 1-second relaxed movement: n = 8), or sedentary control (CON, n = 8) group. Subjects in the training groups performed vertical squats by the assigned method. Exercise sessions consisted of 3 sets and were performed twice a week for 13 weeks. Pre- and posttraining muscle activation and force generation patterns during the cycling movements were evaluated by the coefficient of variation (CV) of the rectified electromyographic (EMG) wave from the vastus lateralis and CV of pedaling force. Both the CV of the rectified EMG and of pedaling force decreased significantly in the LST group (-21 and -18%, p < 0.05, respectively), whereas there were no significant changes in either the HN or the CON group. This decrease in CV in the LST group could mean that muscle activity and force generation during cycling movement have become more tonic. This result following LST may have an unfavorable effect on cycling movement and other dynamic sports movements. PMID:19826286

  4. The Next Generation of Users: Prevalence and Longitudinal Patterns of Tobacco Use Among US Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Valerie; Rath, Jessica; Villanti, Andrea C.; Vallone, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We monitored the prevalence and patterns of use of the array of tobacco products available to young adults, who are at risk for initiation and progression to established tobacco use. Methods. We used data from waves 1 to 3 of GfK’s KnowledgePanel (2011–2012), a nationally representative cohort of young adults aged 18 to 34 years (n = 2144). We examined prevalence and patterns of tobacco product use over time, associated demographics, and state-level tobacco policy. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine predictors of initiation of cigarettes as well as noncombustible and other combustible products. Results. The prevalence of ever tobacco use rose from 57.28% at wave 1 to 67.43% at wave 3. Use of multiple products was the most common pattern (66.39% of tobacco users by wave 3). Predictors of initiation differed by product type and included age, race/ethnicity, policy, and use of other tobacco products. Conclusions. Tobacco use is high among young adults and many are using multiple products. Efforts to implement policy and educate young adults about the risks associated with new and emerging products are critical to prevent increased initiation of tobacco use. PMID:24922152

  5. Backswitch poling in lithium niobate for high-fidelity domain patterning and efficient blue light generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchko, Robert G.; Shur, Vladimir Y.; Fejer, Martin M.; Byer, Robert L.

    1999-09-01

    In nonlinear optics applications employing quasiphase matching, short-pitch domain gratings are generally required for the efficient generation of visible and ultraviolet light. Here we introduce an improved electric-field poling technique, which incorporates spontaneous backswitching and leads to uniform short-pitch domain structures. The total volume of backswitched material, and hence the duty cycle of the backswitched domain grating, can be accurately controlled. First-order single-pass continuous-wave second harmonic generation of 60 mW at 460 nm is achieved at 6.1%/W efficiency in 0.5-mm-thick 4-μm-period backswitch-poled lithium niobate.

  6. Expression Patterns of Genes Involved in the Defense and Stress Response of Spiroplasma citri Infected Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Vadamalai, Ganesan; Dickinson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar periwinkle is an ornamental and a medicinal plant, and is also an indicator plant that is highly susceptible to phytoplasma and spiroplasma infections from different crops. Periwinkle lethal yellows, caused by Spiroplasma citri, is one of the most devastating diseases of periwinkle. The response of plants to S. citri infection is very little known at the transcriptome level. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the expression levels of four selected genes involved in defense and stress responses in naturally and experimentally Spiroplasma citri infected periwinkles. Strictosidine β-glucosidase involved in terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) biosynthesis pathway showed significant upregulation in experimentally and naturally infected periwinkles. The transcript level of extensin increased in leaves of periwinkles experimentally infected by S. citri in comparison to healthy ones. A similar level of heat shock protein 90 and metallothionein expression was observed in healthy, naturally and experimentally spiroplasma-diseased periwinkles. Overexpression of Strictosidine β-glucosidase demonstrates the potential utility of this gene as a host biomarker to increase the fidelity of S. citri detection and can also be used in breeding programs to develop stable disease-resistance varieties. PMID:22408455

  7. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gregory R; Li, Jieyue; Shariff, Aabid; Rohde, Gustavo K; Murphy, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins) and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers). Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply "vesicular". We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors. PMID:26624011

  8. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Li, Jieyue; Shariff, Aabid; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins) and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers). Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply “vesicular”. We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors. PMID:26624011

  9. Involvement of the sonic hedgehog, patched 1 and bmp2 genes in patterning of the zebrafish dermal fin rays.

    PubMed

    Laforest, L; Brown, C W; Poleo, G; Géraudie, J; Tada, M; Ekker, M; Akimenko, M A

    1998-11-01

    The signaling molecule encoded by Sonic hedgehog (shh) participates in the patterning of several embryonic structures including limbs. During early fin development in zebrafish, a subset of cells in the posterior margin of pectoral fin buds express shh. We have shown that regulation of shh in pectoral fin buds is consistent with a role in mediating the activity of a structure analogous to the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) (Akimenko and Ekker (1995) Dev. Biol. 170, 243-247). During growth of the bony rays of both paired and unpaired fins, and during fin regeneration, there does not seem to be a region equivalent to the ZPA and one would predict that shh would play a different role, if any, during these processes specific to fish fins. We have examined the expression of shh in the developing fins of 4-week old larvae and in regenerating fins of adults. A subset of cells in the basal layer of the epidermis in close proximity to the newly formed dermal bone structures of the fin rays, the lepidotrichia, express shh, and ptc1 which is thought to encode the receptor of the SHH signal. The expression domain of ptc1 is broader than that of shh and adjacent blastemal cells releasing the dermal bone matrix also express ptc1. Further observations indicate that the bmp2 gene, in addition to being expressed in the same cells of the basal layer of the epidermis as shh, is also expressed in a subset of the ptc1-expressing cells of the blastema. Amputations of caudal fins immediately after the first branching point of the lepidotrichia, and global administration of all-trans-retinoic acid, two procedures known to cause fusion of adjacent rays, result in a transient decrease in the expression of shh, ptc1 and bmp2. The effects of retinoic acid on shh expression occur within minutes after the onset of treatment suggesting direct regulation of shh by retinoic acid. These observations suggest a role for shh, ptc1 and bmp2 in patterning of the dermoskeleton of developing and

  10. Expression pattern in retinal photoreceptors of POMGnT1, a protein involved in muscle-eye-brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mary Luz; Haro, Carmen; Campello, Laura; Cruces, Jesús; Martín-Nieto, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The POMGNT1 gene, encoding protein O-linked-mannose β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, is associated with muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) and other dystroglycanopathies. This gene’s lack of function or expression causes hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) in the muscle and the central nervous system, including the brain and the retina. The ocular symptoms of patients with MEB include retinal degeneration and detachment, glaucoma, and abnormal electroretinogram. Nevertheless, the POMGnT1 expression pattern in the healthy mammalian retina has not yet been investigated. In this work, we address the expression of the POMGNT1 gene in the healthy retina of a variety of mammals and characterize the distribution pattern of this gene in the adult mouse retina and the 661W photoreceptor cell line. Methods Using reverse transcription (RT)–PCR and immunoblotting, we studied POMGNT1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in various mammalian species, from rodents to humans. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses were performed to characterize the distribution profile of its protein product in mouse retinal sections and in 661W cultured cells. The intranuclear distribution of POMT1 and POMT2, the two enzymes preceding POMGnT1 in the α-DG O-mannosyl glycosylation pathway, was also analyzed. Results POMGNT1 mRNA and its encoded protein were expressed in the neural retina of all mammals studied. POMGnT1 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction in the mouse retina and concentrated in the myoid portion of the photoreceptor inner segments, where the protein colocalized with GM130, a Golgi complex marker. The presence of POMGnT1 in the Golgi complex was also evident in 661W cells. However, and in contrast to retinal tissue, POMGnT1 additionally accumulated in the nucleus of the 661W photoreceptors. Colocalization was found within this organelle between POMGnT1 and POMT1/2, the latter associated with euchromatic regions of the nucleus. Conclusions

  11. Optical generation of a circular harmonic filter for rotation and translation invariant optical pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yeou-Yen

    1987-01-01

    A new method to generate a circular harmonic filter with both rotation and translation invariance is described, which is based on a phase-shifted double-exposure (PSDE) technique. An expression for the peak correlation intensity at the origin for the correlation plane as a function of target orientation for the PSDE filter is derived. Experimental results confirming the theoretical predictions are provided.

  12. Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in México.

    PubMed

    Otoniel, Buenrostro Delgado; Liliana, Márquez-Benavides; Francelia, Pinette Gaona

    2008-01-01

    Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of HHW. Results from the solid waste generation analysis indicated that approximately 1.6% of the waste stream consists of HHW. Correspondingly, it was estimated that in Morelia, a total amount of 442ton/day of domestic waste are produced, including 7.1ton of HHW per day. Furthermore, the overall amount of HHW is not directly related to income level, although particular byproducts do correlate. However, an important difference was observed, as the brands and the presentation sizes of goods and products used in each socioeconomic stratum varied. PMID:18573653

  13. Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado Otoniel, Buenrostro

    2008-07-01

    Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of HHW. Results from the solid waste generation analysis indicated that approximately 1.6% of the waste stream consists of HHW. Correspondingly, it was estimated that in Morelia, a total amount of 442 ton/day of domestic waste are produced, including 7.1 ton of HHW per day. Furthermore, the overall amount of HHW is not directly related to income level, although particular byproducts do correlate. However, an important difference was observed, as the brands and the presentation sizes of goods and products used in each socioeconomic stratum varied.

  14. Rapid communicationPattern generation with cesium atomic beams at nanometer scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreis, M.; Lison, F.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.; Nowak, S.; Pfau, T.; Mlynek, J.

    1996-12-01

    We have demonstrated that a cesium atomic beam can be used to pattern a gold surface using a self assembling monolayer (SAM) as a resist. A 12.5 μm period mesh was used as a proximity mask for the atomic beam. The cesium atoms locally change the wetability of the SAM, which allows a wet etching reagent to remove the underlying gold in the exposed regions. An edge resolution of better than 100 nm was obtained. The experiment suggests that this method can either be used as a sensitive position detector with nanometer resolution in atom optics, or for nanostructuring in a resist technique.

  15. BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF THE STRESSES GENERATED BY DIFFERENT DISOCCLUSION PATTERNS IN AN IMPLANT-SUPPORTED MANDIBULAR COMPLETE DENTURE

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Gustavo Diniz; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Landre, Janis; Seraidarian, Paulo Isaías

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated by three-dimensional finite element analysis the tensions generated by different disocclusion patterns (canine guide and bilateral balanced occlusion) in an implant-supported mandibular complete denture. Material and Methods: A three-dimensional model of implant-supported mandibular complete denture was fabricated according to the Brånemark protocol. A 5-element 3.75 x 13-mm screw-shape dental implant system was modeled for this study. The implants were located in the intermental foramen region with 3-mm-high prosthetic components joined by a nickel-chromium framework with 12-mm bilateral cantilever covered by acrylic resin and 12 acrylic denture teeth. SolidWorks® software was used before and after processing the simulations. The mechanical properties of the components were inserted in the model and a 15 N load was established in fixed points, in each one of the simulations. Data were collected in the entire nickel-chromium framework. The results were displayed three-dimensionally as color graphic scales. Results: The canine guide generated greater tensions in the region of the first implant, while the bilateral balanced occlusion generated great tensions in the entire metallic framework. The maximum tension found in the simulation of the bilateral balanced occlusion was 3.22 fold higher than the one found in the simulation of the disocclusion in canine guide. Conclusion: The pattern of disocclusion in canine guide is the ideal for implant-supported mandibular complete denture. PMID:19936535

  16. Amer2 protein is a novel negative regulator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling involved in neuroectodermal patterning.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Astrid S; Tanneberger, Kristina; Schambony, Alexandra; Behrens, Jürgen

    2012-01-13

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling is negatively controlled by the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor, which induces proteasomal degradation of β-catenin as part of the β-catenin destruction complex. Amer2 (APC membrane recruitment 2; FAM123A) is a direct interaction partner of APC, related to the tumor suppressor Amer1/WTX, but its function in Wnt signaling is not known. Here, we show that Amer2 recruits APC to the plasma membrane by binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate lipids via lysine-rich motifs and that APC links β-catenin and the destruction complex components axin and conductin to Amer2. Knockdown of Amer2 increased Wnt target gene expression and reporter activity in cell lines, and overexpression reduced reporter activity, which required membrane association of Amer2. In Xenopus embryos, Amer2 is expressed mainly in the dorsal neuroectoderm and neural tissues. Down-regulation of Amer2 by specific morpholino oligonucleotides altered neuroectodermal patterning, which could be rescued by expression of a dominant-negative mutant of Lef1 that interferes with β-catenin-dependent transcription. Our data characterize Amer2 for the first time as a negative regulator of Wnt signaling both in cell lines and in vivo and define Amer proteins as a novel family of Wnt pathway regulators. PMID:22128170

  17. The Drosophila Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 6 Family Member Has Two Isoforms and Is Potentially Involved in Embryonic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Rodney; Oosthuysen, Brent; Cajee, Umar-Faruq; Mokgohloa, Lehlogonolo; Nweke, Ekene; Antunes, Ricardo Jorge; Coetzer, Theresa H. T.; Ntwasa, Monde

    2015-01-01

    The human retinoblastoma binding protein 6 (RBBP6) is implicated in esophageal, lung, hepatocellular and colon cancers. Furthermore, RBBP6 was identified as a strong marker for colon cancer prognosis and as a predisposing factor in familial myeloproliferative neoplasms. Functionally, the mammalian protein interacts with p53 and enhances the activity of Mdm2, the prototypical negative regulator of p53. However, since RBBP6 (known as PACT in mice) exists in multiple isoforms and pact−/− mice exhibit a more severe phenotype than mdm2−/− mutants, it must possess some Mdm2-independent functions. The function of the invertebrate homologue is poorly understood. This is complicated by the absence of the Mdm2 gene in both Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We have experimentally identified the promoter region of Snama, the Drosophila homologue, analyzed potential transcription factor binding sites and confirmed the existence of an additional isoform. Using band shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays combined with mass spectrometry, we found evidence that this gene may be regulated by, amongst others, DREF, which regulates hundreds of genes related to cell proliferation. The potential transcription factors for Snama fall into distinct functional groups, including anteroposterior embryonic patterning and nucleic acid metabolism. Significantly, previous work in mice shows that pact−/− induces an anteroposterior phenotype in embryos when rescued by simultaneous deletion of p53. Taken together, these observations indicate the significance of RBBP6 proteins in carcinogenesis and in developmental defects. PMID:25955646

  18. The generation of biomolecular patterns in highly porous collagen-GAG scaffolds using direct photolithography

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Teresa A.; Caliari, Steven R.; Williford, Paul D.; Harley, Brendan A.; Bailey, Ryan C.

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex organization of structural proteins found within tissues and organs. Heterogeneous tissues with spatially and temporally modulated properties play an important role in organism physiology. Here we present a benzophenone (BP) based direct, photolithographic approach to spatially pattern solution phase biomolecules within collagen-GAG (CG) scaffolds and demonstrate creation of a wide range of patterns composed of multiple biomolecular species in a manner independent from scaffold fabrication steps. We demonstrate the ability to immobilize biomolecules at surface densities of up to 1000 ligands per square micron on the scaffold strut surface and to depths limited by the penetration depth of the excitation source into the scaffold structure. Importantly, while BP photopatterning does further crosslink the CG scaffold, evidenced by increased mechanical properties and collagen crystallinity, it does not affect scaffold microstructural or compositional properties or negatively influence cell adhesion, viability, or proliferation. We show that covalently photoimmobilized fibronectin within a CG scaffold significantly increases the speed of MC3T3-E1 cell attachment relative to the bare CG scaffold or non-specifically adsorbed fibronectin, suggesting that this approach can be used to improve scaffold bioactivity. Our findings, on the whole, establish the use of direct, BP photolithography as a methodology for covalently incorporating activity-improving biochemical cues within 3D collagen biomaterial scaffolds with spatial control over biomolecular deposition. PMID:21397322

  19. Brainstem Involvement as a Cause of Central Sleep Apnea: Pattern of Microstructural Cerebral Damage in Patients with Cerebral Microangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Duning, Thomas; Deppe, Michael; Brand, Eva; Stypmann, Jörg; Becht, Charlotte; Heidbreder, Anna; Young, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background The exact underlying pathomechanism of central sleep apnea with Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSA-CSR) is still unclear. Recent studies have demonstrated an association between cerebral white matter changes and CSA. A dysfunction of central respiratory control centers in the brainstem was suggested by some authors. Novel MR-imaging analysis tools now allow far more subtle assessment of microstructural cerebral changes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and what severity of subtle structural cerebral changes could lead to CSA-CSR, and whether there is a specific pattern of neurodegenerative changes that cause CSR. Therefore, we examined patients with Fabry disease (FD), an inherited, lysosomal storage disease. White matter lesions are early and frequent findings in FD. Thus, FD can serve as a "model disease" of cerebral microangiopathy to study in more detail the impact of cerebral lesions on central sleep apnea. Patients and Methods Genetically proven FD patients (n = 23) and age-matched healthy controls (n = 44) underwent a cardio-respiratory polysomnography and brain MRI at 3.0 Tesla. We applied different MR-imaging techniques, ranging from semiquantitative measurement of white matter lesion (WML) volumes and automated calculation of brain tissue volumes to VBM of gray matter and voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) analysis. Results In 5 of 23 Fabry patients (22%) CSA-CSR was detected. Voxel-based DTI analysis revealed widespread structural changes in FD patients when compared to the healthy controls. When calculated as a separate group, DTI changes of CSA-CSR patients were most prominent in the brainstem. Voxel-based regression analysis revealed a significant association between CSR severity and microstructural DTI changes within the brainstem. Conclusion Subtle microstructural changes in the brainstem might be a neuroanatomical correlate of CSA-CSR in patients at risk of WML. DTI is more sensitive and specific than

  20. Gravitational Wave (GW) Radiation Pattern at the Focus of a High-Frequency GW (HFGW) Generator and Aerospace Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Davis, Eric W.; Woods, R. C.

    2005-02-01

    The Gravitational Wave (GW) radiation pattern is derived that results from a rod rotating about a pivot, a dumbbell rotating about its central axis, a pair of stars rotating about their orbital focus, or a stationary circular asymmetrical-array of tangentially jerking elements. The three-dimensional shape of the GW radiation pattern is like a dumbbell cross-section having its long axis perpendicular to the plane of motion or along the central axis of the stationary ring of sequentially jerking elements. The center of the radiation pattern is situated at the pivot, orbital-focus, or center of the stationary array. Knowledge of the GW radiation pattern allows for optimum placement of a detector. In the case of High-Frequency Gravitational Waves (HFGWs), in which the diffraction of the GW radiation is less than the dimensions of the ring of jerking elements, the radiation pattern is situated at the center of the ring and represents a focus or concentration point of the HFGWs, The concentration point extends over a diffraction-limited spot having a radius of λGW/π, where λGW is the wavelength of the HFGW. In the case of a superconductor, prior research, although speculative has shown that the GW wavelength is foreshortened by a factor of about 300. Thus there could be a much more concentrated diffraction-limited flux of HFGW at the focus. It is shown that the efficiency of a HFGW communications link could be approximately proportional to the sixth power of the HFGW frequency. Applications to space technology, involving aerospace communications, and Astronomy are discussed.

  1. Laser-array generators produced by patterned ion irradiation of acrylic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoover, Brian G.; McMichael, Chase K.; Wood, Lowell T.; Zhang, Zuhua; Liu, Jia-Rui; Chu, Wei-Kan

    2005-09-01

    Ion irradiation of polymer films is a promising process technology for photonics applications that require flexible, lightweight devices resistant to selected environmental variables. Crossed phase gratings that may serve as laser-beam array generators are fabricated using the dry process of irradiation of acrylic (PMMA) films with various doses of high-energy alpha particles through a stencil mask. The gratings are examined with the aid of AFM and SEM images, and Raman-Nath diffraction analysis is applied to estimate the generated refractive-index modulation as a function of the dose. SEM images of a stained grating cross-section suggest a mechanism of unsaturated bond formation and accompanying contraction of the irradiated polymer. Post-irradiation baking is shown to increase the contraction or generated surface relief by around an order of magnitude. Since the index modulation and surface relief due to irradiation tend to cancel, the overall diffraction effciencies of unbaked gratings do not surpass 67%, although baked gratings can provide higher diffraction effciencies.

  2. PLAP efficiently generates mature antigenic peptides in vitro but in patterns distinct from ERAP11

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadou, Dimitra; Hearn, Arron; Evnouchidou, Irini; Chroni, Angeliki; Leondiadis, Leondios; York, Ian A.; Rock, Kenneth L.; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2010-01-01

    All three members of the oxytocinase sub-family of M1 aminopeptidases, ERAP1 (ERAAP), ERAP2 and PLAP (IRAP), have been implicated in the generation of MHC class I-presented peptides. ERAP1 and 2 trim peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum for direct presentation whereas PLAP has been recently implicated in cross presentation. The best characterized member of the family, ERAP1, has unique enzymatic properties that fit well with its role in antigen processing. ERAP1 can trim a large variety of long peptide sequences and efficiently accumulate mature antigenic epitopes of 8–9 amino acids long. In this study we evaluate the ability of PLAP to process antigenic peptide precursors in vitro and compare it to ERAP1. We find that, similarly to ERAP1, PLAP can trim a variety of long peptide sequences efficiently and, in most cases, accumulates appreciable amounts of correct length mature antigenic epitope. Again, similarly to ERAP1, PLAP continued trimming some of the epitopes tested and accumulated smaller products effectively destroying the epitope. However, the intermediate accumulation properties of ERAP1 and PLAP are distinct and epitope dependent, suggesting that these two enzymes may impose different selective pressures on epitope generation. Overall, although PLAP has the necessary enzymatic properties to participate in generating or destroying MHC class I presented peptides, its trimming behavior is distinct from that of ERAP1, something that supports a separate role for these two enzymes in antigen processing. PMID:20592285

  3. The fictively breathing tadpole brainstem preparation as a model for the development of respiratory pattern generation and central chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Gdovin, M J; Torgerson, C S; Remmers, J E

    1999-11-01

    Spontaneous high-frequency, low-amplitude and low-frequency, high-amplitude efferent bursting patterns of cranial and spinal motor nerve activity in the in vitro brainstem preparation of the bullfrog tadpole Rana catesbeiana have been characterized as fictive gill and lung ventilation, respectively (Gdovin MJ, Torgerson CS, Remmers JE). Characterization of gill and lung ventilatory activity in cranial nerves in the spontaneously breathing tadpole Rana catesbeiana, FASEB J 1996;10(3):A642; Gdovin MJ, Torgerson CS, Remmers JE. Neurorespiratory pattern of gill and lung ventilation in the decerebrate spontaneously breathing tadpole, Respir Physiol 1998;113:135 146; Pack AI, Galante RJ, Walker RE, Kubin LK, Fishman AP. Comparative approach to neural control of respiration, In: Speck DF, Dekin MS, Revelette WR, Frazier DT, editors. Respiratory Control Central and Peripheral Mechanisms. Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1993:52-57). In addition, the ontogenetic dependence of central respiratory chemoreceptor stimulation on fictive gill and lung ventilation has been previously described (Torgerson CS, Gdovin MJ, Remmers JE. Fictive gill and lung ventilation in the pre- and post-metamorphic tadpole brainstem, J Neurophysiol 1998, in press). To investigate the neural substrates responsible for central respiratory rhythm generation of gill and lung ventilation in the developing tadpole, we recorded efferent activities of cranial nerve (CN) V, VII, and X and spinal nerve (SN) II during changes in superfusate PCO2 before and after multiple transection of the in vitro brainstem. The brainstem was transected between CN VIII and IX and the response to changes in PCO2 was recorded. A second transection was then made between the caudal margin of CN X and rostral to SN II. Preliminary data reveal that robust gill ventilation was recorded consistently only if the segment of brainstem included CN X, whereas the loci capable of eliciting fictive lung bursting patterns appeared to

  4. The Physiological Characterization of Connexin41.8 and Connexin39.4, Which Are Involved in the Striped Pattern Formation of Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masakatsu; Sawada, Risa; Aramaki, Toshihiro; Skerrett, I Martha; Kondo, Shigeru

    2016-01-15

    The zebrafish has a striped skin pattern on its body, and Connexin41.8 (Cx41.8) and Cx39.4 are involved in striped pattern formation. Mutations in these connexins change the striped pattern to a spot or labyrinth pattern. In this study, we characterized Cx41.8 and Cx39.4 after expression in Xenopus oocytes. In addition, we analyzed Cx41.8 mutants Cx41.8I203F and Cx41.8M7, which caused spot or labyrinth skin patterns, respectively, in transgenic zebrafish. In the electrophysiological analysis, the gap junctions formed by Cx41.8 and Cx39.4 showed distinct sensitivity to transjunctional voltage. Analysis of non-junctional (hemichannel) currents revealed a large voltage-dependent current in Cx39.4-expressing oocytes that was absent in cells expressing Cx41.8. Junctional currents induced by both Cx41.8 and Cx39.4 were reduced by co-expression of Cx41.8I203F and abolished by co-expression of Cx41.8M7. In the transgenic experiment, Cx41.8I203F partially rescued the Cx41.8 null mutant phenotype, whereas Cx41.8M7 failed to rescue the null mutant, and it elicited a more severe phenotype than the Cx41.8 null mutant, as evidenced by a smaller spot pattern. Our results provide evidence that gap junctions formed by Cx41.8 play an important role in stripe/spot patterning and suggest that mutations in Cx41.8 can effect patterning by way of reduced function (I203F) and dominant negative effects (M7). Our results suggest that functional differences in Cx41.8 and Cx39.4 relate to spot or labyrinth mutant phenotypes and also provide evidence that these two connexins interact in vivo and in vitro. PMID:26598520

  5. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Fracture Patterns and Particle Motion Generated by Underground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, J. M.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.; Bhat, H.

    2013-12-01

    Fracture patterns and local particle velocities produced by point explosions in very brittle 'candy glass' plates are compared to those numerically predicted using a dynamic micro-mechanical damage mechanics model, developed by Bhat, Rosakis and Sammis, J. Appl. Mech., 2012. Empirically measured material properties for candy glass facilitate direct comparison between the numerical simulation and experimental results. The evolution of fracture damage produced in experiments is observed using high-speed digital photography, which also images resultant wave fronts (for both P and S). Local particle velocities are also recorded at up to three points using laser vibrometers. Numerical results for the spatial extent of circumferential and radial cracking, in addition to the growth-rate of individual radial cracks, are representative of experimental observations. Wave reflections from the plate edges are observed in both experiment and numerical simulation to affect the expansion of radial cracks. Numerically predicted wave-forms and arrivals compare well with experimental results observed at select points.

  6. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  7. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  8. The ERESE Project: Involving Teachers in the Online Generation and QA/QC of Enduring Teaching Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.; Keller, M.; Russell, J.; Helly, J.; Helly, M.; Miller, S.; Massell Symons, C.

    2005-12-01

    The ERESE project has as its main goal to create, archive and make available "Enduring Resources in Earth Science Education" through a collaboration between teachers, scientists, librarians and information technology (IT) professionals. Over the last two years of this National Science Digital Library (NSDL) project, we have developed such ERESE resources for middle and high school teachers for use in lesson plans with "plate tectonics" and "magnetics" as their main theme. An IT environment has been developed under http://earthref.org/ERESE where researchers, teachers and students can search for and download these resources from the EarthRef.org Digital Archive (ERDA) that now contains more than 600 objects. They do this by searching for researchable questions or by browsing a "Resource Matrix" where the objects (i.e. data files) are displayed based on content (image, data or text) and expert level (1 to 9). Good examples out of the 52 predefined resource matrices are the ones on "Seafloor Spreading", "The Earth's Magnetic Field" and "Hotspots and Absolute Plate Motion". Researchers, teachers and students are encouraged to upload their own contributions in the ERDA online archive, allowing them to share research and teaching materials with their peers and beyond. These uploads can be linked with one or more resource matrices and assigned an expert level. To streamline this uploading process, we have formed a core group of resource developers (students and teachers) that generate new ERESE objects which are subject to an extensive QA/QC (Quality Assessment and Quality Control) protocol by their peers (students and teachers) and by a team of researchers. The peer-to-peer reviews ensure equality and quality amongst the various ERESE resources, whereas the science reviews screen for content correctness and scientific scholarship. The overall goal of this protocol is to ensure digital longevity and scientific validity, while the involvement of teachers and students is

  9. Observing and predicting the spatial-temporal pattern of runoff generation processes from the watershed to the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, M.

    2012-12-01

    Runoff generation processes are the key to understand and predict watershed dynamics and behaviour under current as well as under changing conditions. A variety of approaches have been developed to observe these processes at the plot scale (e.g. infiltration and sprinkling experiments), the hillslope scale (soil moisture and piezometer networks and trenching) and the watershed scale (hydrograph separation with stable isotopes and natural tracers). However, predicting the four major runoff generation mechanisms (infiltration excess, saturation excess, subsurface flow and deep percolation) without detailed observation in ungauged watershed is still a challenge, but a prerequisite to track water flow pathways and to make adequate prediction for hydrological extremes. Methods have been developed to map dominant runoff generation processes in the field and with digital maps, however, these methods are often static and do not consider the temporal dynamics of runoff generation processes frequently observed with the various experimental approaches. The recently developed parsimonious rainfall-runoff model DROGen can bridge the gap between across spatial scales in ungauged watersheds since parameters are not calibrated. The model incorporates high-resolution GIS data (1m resolution DEM, land-use, impervious surfaces), hydro-geological and pedological data as well as information about the effect of macropores and preferential flow pathways on runoff generation processes with a comprehensive knowledge base from various field observations and experiments. The model was applied to over 6500 meso-scale watershed in the State of Baden-Württemberg in Germany and 15 gauged watersheds were selected for detailed model evaluation. The evaluation was done with field-mapping of runoff generation processes for direct comparison with the simulated pattern of runoff processes for different types of precipitation (high intensity and short duration / low intensity and long duration) and

  10. Direct patterning of vortex generators on a fiber tip using a focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Vayalamkuzhi, Pramitha; Bhattacharya, Shanti; Eigenthaler, Ulrike; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Samlan, C T; Hirscher, Michael; Spatz, Joachim P; Viswanathan, Nirmal K

    2016-05-15

    The realization of spiral phase optical elements on the cleaved end of an optical fiber by focused ion beam milling is presented. A focused Ga+ ion beam with an acceleration voltage of 30 keV is used to etch continuous spiral phase plates and fork gratings directly on the tip of the fiber. The phase characteristics of the output beam generated by the fabricated structures measured via an interference experiment confirmed the presence of phase singularity in the output beam. The devices are expected to be promising candidates for all-fiber beam shaping and optical trapping applications. PMID:27176945

  11. Experiments evaluating subsidence generated within a subaqueous deformable substrate due to varying differential sediment loading patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, B.; Chatmas, E. S.; Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    The intraslope areas of many passive margins display a complex bathymetry of topographic depressions and crests that form series of minibasins. These minibasins are linked to the deformation of subsurface salt layers and act as localized sediment traps. Many mechanisms have been proposed for the initiation of minibasins, including tectonic forces (both extensional and contractional), regional gravitational sliding, density inversion between salt layers and overburden, and differential sediment loading. Regardless of initiation mechanism, it is widely recognized that synkinematic deposition plays a active role in determining subsidence patterns and sediment routing within and among the minibasins. We undertook a series of simplified 1-D and 2-D experiments 1) to evaluate the feasibility of developing a series of well-defined minibasins created exclusively by differential sediment loading and 2) to quantitatively determine the effects of substrate thickness, density contrast, and sedimentation rate on the resultant subsidence pattern. We also present an initial non-dimensionalized formulation of the problem that relates density contrasts, clinoform thickness, substrate thickness, progradation rate, and viscosity of the deformable substrate. Two sets of experiments were performed. The first set (1-D) vertically loaded a subaqueous corn syrup substrate (capturing the rheology of subsurface salt as a Newtonian fluid) with walnut sand. The second set (2-D) of experiments prograded a walnut sediment clinoform across a corn syrup substrate. We systematically varied sedimentation rate, substrate thickness, and, in the case of the prograding clinoform, base level. In no cases did we successfully reproduce a series of minibasins similar to those observed in natural settings. Instead the substrate was simply displaced laterally as sediment was deposited, forming a single depression. High sedimentation rates tended to produce wider zones of subsidence, however, if given

  12. Practical performance and enabling technologies in immersion scanners for the double patterning generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kohno, Hirotaka; Sato, Shinji; Kosugi, Junichi; Shibazaki, Yuichi

    2011-04-01

    At SPIE2010, excellent performance of the cutting edge immersion lithography scanner, the NSR-S620D, which is based on the new "Streamlign" platform was demonstrated. Last year's work focused mainly on machine evaluation data[1]. Now, many S620Ds are employed at customers' sites and being used in device manufacturing. In this paper, the authors will introduce the latest factory data, as well as various techniques that enable superior yield and enhance productivity in IC manufacturing. It is well understood, that in order to achieve further device shrinks without using traditional techniques such as NA expansion or wavelength reduction, several practical issues must be overcome. Extremely tight overlay performance will be required for pitch splitting double patterning, for example. In addition, it is also necessary to control the image plane and the aberration of the optics much more carefully. Of course these improvements must also be achieved with sufficient productivity (throughput). In order to satisfy all of the requirements for mass production at customer factories, many variable factors must be dealt with. One of these variable factors is the characteristics of the processed wafers that include on-flatness, grid distortion, steep topology around the edge, or topography of the previous layers' patterns. These factors typically impact overlay and/or auto focus accuracy. Another variable is the difference in exposure conditions between layers, which include illumination conditions, dose, reticle transmittance, and the alignment marks. Exposure induced heating in particular is the key issue for today's enhanced throughput capabilities, with regards to achieving both optimal accuracy and productivity. In some IC production facilities, and often foundries, many different kinds of products are manufactured in parallel. However, in order to enhance performance and accuracy, it is sometimes necessary to optimize machine parameters for each product. Cleary this

  13. Interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 plasma wave data - oblique electrostatic waves generated by the electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei; Gurnett, D.A.; Cairns, I.H. )

    1992-11-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) explored the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms of plasma waves were obtained from the PDP at frequencies of 0-30 kHz and at distances up to 400 m from the shuttle. Strong low-frequency (below 10 kHz) electric field noise was observed in the wideband data during two periods in which an electron beam was ejected from the shuttle. This noise shows clear evidence of interference patterns caused by the finite (3.89 m) antenna length. The low-frequency noise was the most dominant type of noise produced by the ejected electron beam. Analysis of antenna interference patterns generated by these waves permits a determination of the wavelength, the direction of propagation, and the location of the source region. The observed waves have a linear dispersion relation very similar to that of ion acoustic waves. The waves are believed to be oblique ion acoustic or high-order ion cyclotron waves generated by a current of ambient electrons returning to the shuttle in response to the ejected electron beam. 31 refs.

  14. Separation of spatial-temporal patterns ('climatic modes') by combined analysis of really measured and generated numerically vector time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, A. M.; Mukhin, D.; Volodin, E. M.; Gavrilov, A.; Loskutov, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    The new method of decomposition of the Earth's climate system into well separated spatial-temporal patterns ('climatic modes') is discussed. The method is based on: (i) generalization of the MSSA (Multichannel Singular Spectral Analysis) [1] for expanding vector (space-distributed) time series in basis of spatial-temporal empirical orthogonal functions (STEOF), which makes allowance delayed correlations of the processes recorded in spatially separated points; (ii) expanding both real SST data, and longer by several times SST data generated numerically, in STEOF basis; (iii) use of the numerically produced STEOF basis for exclusion of 'too slow' (and thus not represented correctly) processes from real data. The application of the method allows by means of vector time series generated numerically by the INM RAS Coupled Climate Model [2] to separate from real SST anomalies data [3] two climatic modes possessing by noticeably different time scales: 3-5 and 9-11 years. Relations of separated modes to ENSO and PDO are investigated. Possible applications of spatial-temporal climatic patterns concept to prognosis of climate system evolution is discussed. 1. Ghil, M., R. M. Allen, M. D. Dettinger, K. Ide, D. Kondrashov, et al. (2002) "Advanced spectral methods for climatic time series", Rev. Geophys. 40(1), 3.1-3.41. 2. http://83.149.207.89/GCM_DATA_PLOTTING/GCM_INM_DATA_XY_en.htm 3. http://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/SOURCES/.KAPLAN/.EXTENDED/.v2/.ssta/

  15. Large-scale Generation of Patterned Bubble Arrays on Printed Bi-functional Boiling Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Chang-Ho; David, Michele; Gao, Zhongwei; Chang, Alvin; Allen, Marshall; Wang, Hailei; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2016-04-01

    Bubble nucleation control, growth and departure dynamics is important in understanding boiling phenomena and enhancing nucleate boiling heat transfer performance. We report a novel bi-functional heterogeneous surface structure that is capable of tuning bubble nucleation, growth and departure dynamics. For the fabrication of the surface, hydrophobic polymer dot arrays are first printed on a substrate, followed by hydrophilic ZnO nanostructure deposition via microreactor-assisted nanomaterial deposition (MAND) processing. Wettability contrast between the hydrophobic polymer dot arrays and aqueous ZnO solution allows for the fabrication of heterogeneous surfaces with distinct wettability regions. Heterogeneous surfaces with various configurations were fabricated and their bubble dynamics were examined at elevated heat flux, revealing various nucleate boiling phenomena. In particular, aligned and patterned bubbles with a tunable departure frequency and diameter were demonstrated in a boiling experiment for the first time. Taking advantage of our fabrication method, a 6 inch wafer size heterogeneous surface was prepared. Pool boiling experiments were also performed to demonstrate a heat flux enhancement up to 3X at the same surface superheat using bi-functional surfaces, compared to a bare stainless steel surface.

  16. Large-scale Generation of Patterned Bubble Arrays on Printed Bi-functional Boiling Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Ho; David, Michele; Gao, Zhongwei; Chang, Alvin; Allen, Marshall; Wang, Hailei; Chang, Chih-hung

    2016-01-01

    Bubble nucleation control, growth and departure dynamics is important in understanding boiling phenomena and enhancing nucleate boiling heat transfer performance. We report a novel bi-functional heterogeneous surface structure that is capable of tuning bubble nucleation, growth and departure dynamics. For the fabrication of the surface, hydrophobic polymer dot arrays are first printed on a substrate, followed by hydrophilic ZnO nanostructure deposition via microreactor-assisted nanomaterial deposition (MAND) processing. Wettability contrast between the hydrophobic polymer dot arrays and aqueous ZnO solution allows for the fabrication of heterogeneous surfaces with distinct wettability regions. Heterogeneous surfaces with various configurations were fabricated and their bubble dynamics were examined at elevated heat flux, revealing various nucleate boiling phenomena. In particular, aligned and patterned bubbles with a tunable departure frequency and diameter were demonstrated in a boiling experiment for the first time. Taking advantage of our fabrication method, a 6 inch wafer size heterogeneous surface was prepared. Pool boiling experiments were also performed to demonstrate a heat flux enhancement up to 3X at the same surface superheat using bi-functional surfaces, compared to a bare stainless steel surface. PMID:27034255

  17. Large-scale Generation of Patterned Bubble Arrays on Printed Bi-functional Boiling Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-Ho; David, Michele; Gao, Zhongwei; Chang, Alvin; Allen, Marshall; Wang, Hailei; Chang, Chih-hung

    2016-01-01

    Bubble nucleation control, growth and departure dynamics is important in understanding boiling phenomena and enhancing nucleate boiling heat transfer performance. We report a novel bi-functional heterogeneous surface structure that is capable of tuning bubble nucleation, growth and departure dynamics. For the fabrication of the surface, hydrophobic polymer dot arrays are first printed on a substrate, followed by hydrophilic ZnO nanostructure deposition via microreactor-assisted nanomaterial deposition (MAND) processing. Wettability contrast between the hydrophobic polymer dot arrays and aqueous ZnO solution allows for the fabrication of heterogeneous surfaces with distinct wettability regions. Heterogeneous surfaces with various configurations were fabricated and their bubble dynamics were examined at elevated heat flux, revealing various nucleate boiling phenomena. In particular, aligned and patterned bubbles with a tunable departure frequency and diameter were demonstrated in a boiling experiment for the first time. Taking advantage of our fabrication method, a 6 inch wafer size heterogeneous surface was prepared. Pool boiling experiments were also performed to demonstrate a heat flux enhancement up to 3X at the same surface superheat using bi-functional surfaces, compared to a bare stainless steel surface. PMID:27034255

  18. Evolution of Courtship Songs in Xenopus : Vocal Pattern Generation and Sound Production.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Elizabeth C; Kelley, Darcy B

    2015-01-01

    The extant species of African clawed frogs (Xenopus and Silurana) provide an opportunity to link the evolution of vocal characters to changes in the responsible cellular and molecular mechanisms. In this review, we integrate several robust lines of research: evolutionary trajectories of Xenopus vocalizations, cellular and circuit-level mechanisms of vocalization in selected Xenopus model species, and Xenopus evolutionary history and speciation mechanisms. Integrating recent findings allows us to generate and test specific hypotheses about the evolution of Xenopus vocal circuits. We propose that reduced vocal sex differences in some Xenopus species result from species-specific losses of sexually differentiated neural and neuromuscular features. Modification of sex-hormone-regulated developmental mechanisms is a strong candidate mechanism for reduced vocal sex differences. PMID:26138673

  19. A Sodium Leak Current Regulates Pacemaker Activity of Adult Central Pattern Generator Neurons in Lymnaea Stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tom Z.; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The resting membrane potential of the pacemaker neurons is one of the essential mechanisms underlying rhythm generation. In this study, we described the biophysical properties of an uncharacterized channel (U-type channel) and investigated the role of the channel in the rhythmic activity of a respiratory pacemaker neuron and the respiratory behaviour in adult freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Our results show that the channel conducts an inward leak current carried by Na+ (ILeak-Na). The ILeak-Na contributed to the resting membrane potential and was required for maintaining rhythmic action potential bursting activity of the identified pacemaker RPeD1 neurons. Partial knockdown of the U-type channel suppressed the aerial respiratory behaviour of the adult snail in vivo. These findings identified the Na+ leak conductance via the U-type channel, likely a NALCN-like channel, as one of the fundamental mechanisms regulating rhythm activity of pacemaker neurons and respiratory behaviour in adult animals. PMID:21526173

  20. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-05-18

    have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3{delta} CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

  1. Development of a diurnal rainfall pattern generator and assessment of climate change impact on flood risk in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakawa, H.; Masumoto, T.

    2011-12-01

    An increase in flood risk, especially in low-lying areas, is predicted as a consequence of global climate change. Immediate measures are needed to minimize the damage caused by more-frequent flooding. The capacities of drainage systems in paddy areas are planned on the basis of design rainfall. For example, design rainfall may be represented by a 3-day rainfall event with a 10-year return period. However, design rainfall parameters used in Japan have not been reviewed for a few decades, and changes in rainfall patterns associated with recent climate change are not reflected in current drainage planning. The aim of this study was to develop a diurnal rainfall pattern generator and to use it to evaluate the effects of changing patterns of heavy rainfall due to climate change on flood risk in low-lying areas. Our study area was in the Kaga three-lagoon basin in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. There are two lagoons in the study area, and the low-lying paddy areas extend over about 4,000 ha in the lower reaches of the basin. First, we developed a drainage analysis model that incorporates kinematic and diffusive runoff models for upland and inundated areas, respectively. The model was adjusted in accordance with observed discharges and water levels for heavy rainfall events. Next, the rainfall data predicted by MIROC (a Global Climate Model developed by the Center for Climate Systems Research) were analyzed to determine the future trends of changes of heavy rainfall. Our analysis showed that probabilistic 3-day rainfall would increase in the future. In particular, 3-day rainfall events with a 10-year return period were calculated to increase from about 220 mm/3d at present to about 270 mm/3d in the future. These amounts of rainfall were used to represent the future trend of increases of heavy rainfall. Simultaneously, we developed a diurnal rainfall pattern generator based on a Monte Carlo simulation method. For this generator, the beta distribution was used to disaggregate

  2. Specific residues of the GDP/GTP exchange factor Bud5p are involved in establishment of the cell type-specific budding pattern in yeast.

    PubMed

    Kang, Pil Jung; Lee, Bongyong; Park, Hay-Oak

    2004-07-01

    Cells of the budding yeast undergo oriented cell division by choosing a specific site for growth depending on their cell type. Haploid a and alpha cells bud in an axial pattern whereas diploid a/alpha cells bud in a bipolar pattern. The Ras-like GTPase Rsr1p/Bud1p, its GDP-GTP exchange factor Bud5p, and its GTPase-activating protein Bud2p are essential for selecting the proper site for polarized growth in all cell types. Here we showed that specific residues at the N terminus and the C terminus of Bud5p were important for bipolar budding, while some residues were involved in both axial and bipolar budding. These bipolar-specific mutations of BUD5 disrupted proper localization of Bud5p in diploid a/alpha cells without affecting Bud5p localization in haploid alpha cells. In contrast, Bud5p expressed in the bud5 mutants defective in both budding patterns failed to localize in all cell types. Thus, these results identify specific residues of Bud5p that are likely to be involved in direct interaction with spatial landmarks, which recruit Bud5p to the proper bud site. Finally, we found a new start codon of BUD5, which extends the open reading frame to 210 bp upstream of the previously estimated start site, thus encoding a polypeptide of 608 amino acid residues. Bud5p with these additional N-terminal residues interacted with Bud8p, a potential bipolar landmark, suggesting that the N-terminal region is necessary for recognition of the spatial cues. PMID:15136576

  3. On the processes generating latitudinal richness gradients: identifying diagnostic patterns and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Hurlbert, Allen H.; Stegen, James C.

    2014-01-01

    We use a simulation model to examine four of the most common hypotheses for the latitudinal richness gradient and identify patterns that might be diagnostic of those four hypotheses. The hypotheses examined include (1) tropical niche conservatism, or the idea that the tropics are more diverse because a tropical clade origin has allowed more time for diversification in the tropics and has resulted in few species adapted to extra-tropical climates. (2) The ecological limits hypothesis suggests that species richness is limited by the amount of biologically available energy in a region. (3) The speciation rates hypothesis suggests that the latitudinal gradient arises from a gradient in speciation rates. (4) Finally, the tropical stability hypothesis argues that climatic fluctuations and glacial cycles in extratropical regions have led to greater extinction rates and less opportunity for specialization relative to the tropics. We found that tropical niche conservatism can be distinguished from the other three scenarios by phylogenies which are more balanced than expected, no relationship between mean root distance (MRD) and richness across regions, and a homogeneous rate of speciation across clades and through time. The energy gradient, speciation gradient, and disturbance gradient scenarios all produced phylogenies which were more imbalanced than expected, showed a negative relationship between MRD and richness, and diversity-dependence of speciation rate estimates through time. We found that the relationship between speciation rates and latitude could distinguish among these three scenarios, with no relation expected under the ecological limits hypothesis, a negative relationship expected under the speciation rates hypothesis, and a positive relationship expected under the tropical stability hypothesis. We emphasize the importance of considering multiple hypotheses and focusing on diagnostic predictions instead of predictions that are consistent with multiple

  4. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A

  5. On the processes generating latitudinal richness gradients: identifying diagnostic patterns and predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Hurlbert, Allen H.; Stegen, James C.

    2014-12-02

    Many processes have been put forward to explain the latitudinal gradient in species richness. Here, we use a simulation model to examine four of the most common hypotheses and identify patterns that might be diagnostic of those four hypotheses. The hypotheses examined include (1) tropical niche conservatism, or the idea that the tropics are more diverse because a tropical clade origin has allowed more time for diversification in the tropics and has resulted in few species adapted to extra-tropical climates. (2) The productivity, or energetic constraints, hypothesis suggests that species richness is limited by the amount of biologically available energy in a region. (3) The tropical stability hypothesis argues that major climatic fluctuations and glacial cycles in extratropical regions have led to greater extinction rates and less opportunity for specialization relative to the tropics. (4) Finally, the speciation rates hypothesis suggests that the latitudinal richness gradient arises from a parallel gradient in rates of speciation. We found that tropical niche conservatism can be distinguished from the other three scenarios by phylogenies which are more balanced than expected, no relationship between mean root distance and richness across regions, and a homogeneous rate of speciation across clades and through time. The energy gradient, speciation gradient, and disturbance gradient scenarios all exhibited phylogenies which were more imbalanced than expected, showed a negative relationship between mean root distance and richness, and diversity-dependence of speciation rate estimates through time. Using Bayesian Analysis of Macroevolutionary Mixtures on the simulated phylogenies, we found that the relationship between speciation rates and latitude could distinguish among these three scenarios. We emphasize the importance of considering multiple hypotheses and focusing on diagnostic predictions instead of predictions that are consistent with more than one hypothesis.

  6. DCC mediated axon guidance of spinal interneurons is essential for normal locomotor central pattern generator function.

    PubMed

    Rabe Bernhardt, Nadine; Memic, Fatima; Gezelius, Henrik; Thiebes, Anja-Lena; Vallstedt, Anna; Kullander, Klas

    2012-06-15

    Coordinated limb rhythmic movements take place through organized signaling in local spinal cord neuronal networks. The establishment of these circuitries during development is dependent on the correct guidance of axons to their targets. It has previously been shown that the well-known axon guidance molecule netrin-1 is required for configuring the circuitry that provides left-right alternating coordination in fictive locomotion. The attraction of commissural axons to the midline in response to netrin-1 has been shown to involve the netrin-1 receptor DCC (deleted in Colorectal Cancer). However, the role of DCC for the establishment of CPG coordination has not yet been resolved. We show that mice carrying a null mutation of DCC displayed an uncoordinated left-right activity during fictive locomotion accompanied by a loss of interneuronal subpopulations originating from commissural progenitors. Thus, DCC plays a crucial role in the formation of spinal neuronal circuitry coordinating left-right activities. Together with the previously published results from netrin-1 deficient mice, the data presented in this study suggest a role for the most ventral originating V3 interneurons in synchronous activities over the midline. Further, it provides evidence that axon crossing in the spinal cord is more intricately controlled than in previously suggested models of DCC-netrin-1 interaction. PMID:22521513

  7. Characterization of a non-chemically amplified resist for photomask fabrication using a 257-nm optical pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsack, Benjamen M.; Tabery, Cyrus E.; Stachowiak, Timothy B.; Dallas, Tim E.; Xu, Cheng-Bai; Pochkowski, Mike; Willson, C. Grant

    1999-12-01

    I-line optical pattern generators using non-chemically amplified resists have become the workhorses for high throughput mask fabrication. The demand for smaller and more uniform features on photomasks has driven the development of a 257 nm optical pattern generator. A non-chemically amplified resist is being developed to maximize the performance of this new 257 nm mask tool. Resist characterization and lithography simulation are being used to formulate a non-chemically amplified resist for 257 nm optical pattern generators. Non- chemically amplified resists are advantageous for us in mask fabrication due to their storage and post-exposure stability. Chemically amplified resists may provide higher performance but they also require environmental mini-environments and a post-exposure bake equipment not commonly present in mask houses. Diazonaphthoquinone (DNQ)/novolak resists have not been used for DUV Integrated Circuit (IC) applications mainly due to the low sensitivity and the strong absorbance of the DNQ photoactive compound (PAC) at 248 nm. However, a 2,1,4 DNQ based resist has been characterized that bleaches at 257 nm and inhibits novolak. The photoproduct of the 2,1,4 DNQ PAC is much more transparent at 257 nm than 248 nm. Novolak resin is too strongly absorbing for use in formulating efficient 248 nm resists, but novolak has an absorbance minimum at 257 nm that provides transparency similar to poly (hydroxystyrene). Lithography simulation is being used to develop a non- chemically amplified resist to minimize the expensive iteration of manufacturing trials. An exposure system using a 257 nm frequency double Ar laser system has been constructed to study the resist photokinetics. Dill exposure parameters (A, B and C) have been extracted for a 2,1,4 DNQ/novolak based resist. Dissolution rate measurements have been made with a DRM developed at the University of Texas at Austin. Simulation is used to determine the optimal resist absorption, bleaching, dose and

  8. Integrating Information: An Analysis of the Processes Involved and the Products Generated in a Written Synthesis Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sole, Isabel; Miras, Mariana; Castells, Nuria; Espino, Sandra; Minguela, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The case study reported here explores the processes involved in producing a written synthesis of three history texts and their possible relation to the characteristics of the texts produced and the degree of comprehension achieved following the task. The processes carried out by 10 final-year compulsory education students (15 and 16 years old) to…

  9. Next generation sequencing (NGS) database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching.

    PubMed

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Raju, S Viswanadha

    2016-03-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB) for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats) in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching. PMID:26981434

  10. Next generation sequencing (NGS) database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching

    PubMed Central

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Raju, S. Viswanadha

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB) for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats) in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching. PMID:26981434

  11. Pattern search in multi-structure data: a framework for the next-generation evidence-based medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Ainsworth, Keela C.

    2014-03-01

    With the impetus towards personalized and evidence-based medicine, the need for a framework to analyze/interpret quantitative measurements (blood work, toxicology, etc.) with qualitative descriptions (specialist reports after reading images, bio-medical knowledgebase, etc.) to predict diagnostic risks is fast emerging. Addressing this need, we pose and answer the following questions: (i) How can we jointly analyze and explore measurement data in context with qualitative domain knowledge? (ii) How can we search and hypothesize patterns (not known apriori) from such multi-structure data? (iii) How can we build predictive models by integrating weakly-associated multi-relational multi-structure data? We propose a framework towards answering these questions. We describe a software solution that leverages hardware for scalable in-memory analytics and applies next-generation semantic query tools on medical data.

  12. Activation of the central pattern generators for locomotion by serotonin and excitatory amino acids in neonatal rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cazalets, J R; Sqalli-Houssaini, Y; Clarac, F

    1992-01-01

    1. The role of serotonin (5-HT) and excitatory amino-acids (EAAs) in the activation of the neural networks (i.e. the central pattern generators) that organize locomotion in mammals was investigated in an isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparation from the newborn rat. 2. The neuroactive substances were bath applied and the activity of fictive locomotion was recorded in the ventral roots. 3. Serotonin initiated an alternating pattern of right and left action potential bursts. The period of this rhythm was dose dependent, i.e. it decreased from around 10 s at 2 x 10(-5) M to 5 s at 10(-4) M. The effects of serotonin were blocked by a 5-HT1 antagonist (propranolol) and by 5-HT2 antagonists (ketanserin, cyproheptadine, mianserin). 5-HT3 antagonists were ineffective. The effects of methoxytryptamine, a non-selective 5-HT agonist, mimicked the 5-HT effects. 4. The endogenous EAAs, glutamate and aspartate, also triggered an alternating rhythmic pattern. Their effects were blocked by 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP-5; a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker) and 6,7-dinitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (a non-NMDA receptor blocker). 5. Several EAA agonists (N-methyl-D,L-aspartate (NMA) and kainate) initiated rhythmic activity. The period of the induced rhythm (from 3 to 1 s) was similar with both of these substances but in a range of concentrations which was ten times lower in the case of kainate (10(-6) to 5 x 10(-6) M) than in that of NMA (10(-5) to 4 x 10(-5) M). alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate and quisqualate occasionally triggered some episodes of fictive locomotion with a threshold at 6 x 10(-7) and 10(-5) M, respectively. PMID:1362441

  13. NON-NEUTRALIZED ELECTRIC CURRENT PATTERNS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: ORIGIN OF THE SHEAR-GENERATING LORENTZ FORCE

    SciTech Connect

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Mikic, Zoran

    2012-12-10

    Using solar vector magnetograms of the highest available spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, we perform a detailed study of electric current patterns in two solar active regions (ARs): a flaring/eruptive and a flare-quiet one. We aim to determine whether ARs inject non-neutralized (net) electric currents in the solar atmosphere, responding to a debate initiated nearly two decades ago that remains inconclusive. We find that well-formed, intense magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) within ARs are the only photospheric magnetic structures that support significant net current. More intense PILs seem to imply stronger non-neutralized current patterns per polarity. This finding revises previous works that claim frequent injections of intense non-neutralized currents by most ARs appearing in the solar disk but also works that altogether rule out injection of non-neutralized currents. In agreement with previous studies, we also find that magnetically isolated ARs remain globally current-balanced. In addition, we confirm and quantify the preference of a given magnetic polarity to follow a given sense of electric currents, indicating a dominant sense of twist in ARs. This coherence effect is more pronounced in more compact ARs with stronger PILs and must be of sub-photospheric origin. Our results yield a natural explanation of the Lorentz force, invariably generating velocity and magnetic shear along strong PILs, thus setting a physical context for the observed pre-eruption evolution in solar ARs.

  14. Extreme ultraviolet patterned mask inspection performance of advanced projection electron microscope system for 11nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Novel projection electron microscope optics have been developed and integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) , and the resulting system shows promise for application to half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask inspection. To improve the system's inspection throughput for 11-nm hp generation defect detection, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and an image capture area deflector that operates simultaneously with the mask scanning motion have been developed. A learning system has been used for the mask inspection tool to meet the requirements of hp 11-nm node EUV patterned mask inspection. Defects are identified by the projection electron microscope system using the "defectivity" from the characteristics of the acquired image. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and costs associated with adjustment of the detection capability to cope with newly-defined mask defects. We describe the integration of the developed elements into the inspection tool and the verification of the designed specification. We have also verified the effectiveness of the learning system, which shows enhanced detection capability for the hp 11-nm node.

  15. MRCK-1 Drives Apical Constriction in C. elegans by Linking Developmental Patterning to Force Generation.

    PubMed

    Marston, Daniel J; Higgins, Christopher D; Peters, Kimberly A; Cupp, Timothy D; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Moore, Regan P; Cox, Amanda H; Kiehart, Daniel P; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-08-22

    Apical constriction is a change in cell shape that drives key morphogenetic events including gastrulation and neural tube formation. Apical force-producing actomyosin networks drive apical constriction by contracting while connected to cell-cell junctions. The mechanisms by which developmental patterning regulates these actomyosin networks and associated junctions with spatial precision are not fully understood. Here we identify a myosin light-chain kinase MRCK-1 as a key regulator of C. elegans gastrulation that integrates spatial and developmental patterning information. We show that MRCK-1 is required for activation of contractile actomyosin dynamics and elevated cortical tension in the apical cell cortex of endoderm precursor cells. MRCK-1 is apically localized by active Cdc42 at the external, cell-cell contact-free surfaces of apically constricting cells, downstream of cell fate determination mechanisms. We establish that the junctional components α-catenin, β-catenin, and cadherin become highly enriched at the apical junctions of apically constricting cells and that MRCK-1 and myosin activity are required in vivo for this enrichment. Taken together, our results define mechanisms that position a myosin activator to a specific cell surface where it both locally increases cortical tension and locally enriches junctional components to facilitate apical constriction. These results reveal crucial links that can tie spatial information to local force generation to drive morphogenesis. PMID:27451898

  16. Prominent role of the spinal central pattern generator in the recovery of locomotion after partial spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Barrière, Grégory; Leblond, Hugues; Provencher, Janyne; Rossignol, Serge

    2008-04-01

    The re-expression of hindlimb locomotion after complete spinal cord injuries (SCIs) is caused by the presence of a spinal central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion. After partial SCI, however, the role of this spinal CPG in the recovery of hindlimb locomotion in the cat remains mostly unknown. In the present work, we devised a dual-lesion paradigm to determine its possible contribution after partial SCI. After a partial section of the left thoracic segment T10 or T11, cats gradually recovered voluntary quadrupedal locomotion. Then, a complete transection was performed two to three segments more caudally (T13-L1) several weeks after the first partial lesion. Cats that received intensive treadmill training after the partial lesion expressed bilateral hindlimb locomotion within hours of the complete lesion. Untrained cats however showed asymmetrical hindlimb locomotion with the limb on the side of the partial lesion walking well before the other hindlimb. Thus, the complete spinalization revealed that the spinal CPG underwent plastic changes after the partial lesions, which were shaped by locomotor training. Over time, with further treadmill training, the asymmetry disappeared and a bilateral locomotion was reinstated. Therefore, although remnant intact descending pathways must contribute to voluntary goal-oriented locomotion after partial SCI, the recovery and re-expression of the hindlimb locomotor pattern mostly results from intrinsic changes below the lesion in the CPG and afferent inputs. PMID:18400897

  17. Laser-induced generation of micrometer-sized luminescent patterns on rare-earth-doped amorphous films

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, A.R.; Ribeiro, C.T.M.

    2004-12-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence has been achieved from rare-earth-doped amorphous (a-) GeN films. The samples were prepared by the radio-frequency-sputtering method, and light emission from the rare-earth (RE) centers was obtained after irradiating the films with a highly focused laser beam. As a result of this laser annealing procedure, almost circular holes with approximately 1-{mu}m diameter were produced on the surface of the a-GeN films. The area nearby these holes correspond to crystalline Ge and coincide with the regions, where relatively strong RE-related luminescence takes place. These laser-annealed areas can be easily and conveniently managed in order to generate different microscopic luminescent patterns. Depending on the RE ion employed, visible and near-infrared light emission were obtained from the patterns so produced. The development of these micrometer-sized luminescent centers, as well as their probable mechanisms of excitation-recombination, will be presented and discussed. The importance of the current experimental results to future technological applications such as microdevices, for example, will also be outlined.

  18. Cytotoxic activity of tumor necrosis factor is mediated by early damage of mitochondrial functions. Evidence for the involvement of mitochondrial radical generation.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Osthoff, K; Bakker, A C; Vanhaesebroeck, B; Beyaert, R; Jacob, W A; Fiers, W

    1992-03-15

    of oxygen radicals mainly generated at the ubisemiquinone site is a causal mechanism of TNF cytotoxicity. This conclusion is further supported by the protective effect of antioxidants as well as the selective pattern of damage of mitochondrial chain components and characteristic alterations of the mitochondrial ultrastructure. PMID:1312087

  19. The importance of structured noise in the generation of self-organizing tissue patterns through contact-mediated cell–cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael; Baum, Buzz; Miodownik, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Lateral inhibition provides the basis for a self-organizing patterning system in which distinct cell states emerge from an otherwise uniform field of cells. The development of the microchaete bristle pattern on the notum of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, has long served as a popular model of this process. We recently showed that this bristle pattern depends upon a population of dynamic, basal actin-based filopodia, which span multiple cell diameters. These protrusions establish transient signalling contacts between non-neighbouring cells, generating a type of structured noise that helps to yield a well-ordered and spaced pattern of bristles. Here, we develop a general model of protrusion-based patterning to analyse the role of noise in this process. Using a simple asynchronous cellular automata rule-based model we show that this type of structured noise drives the gradual refinement of lateral inhibition-mediated patterning, as the system moves towards a stable configuration in which cells expressing the inhibitory signal are near-optimally packed. By analysing the effects of introducing thresholds required for signal detection in this model of lateral inhibition, our study shows how filopodia-mediated cell–cell communication can generate complex patterns of spots and stripes, which, in the presence of signalling noise, align themselves across a patterning field. Thus, intermittent protrusion-based signalling has the potential to yield robust self-organizing tissue-wide patterns without the need to invoke diffusion-mediated signalling. PMID:21084342

  20. A Fast Response Mechanism for Insulin Storage in Crystals May Involve a Novel Mode of Kink Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilov, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Crystals, likely rhombohedral, of Zn-insulin hexamers form in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreases of many mammals. The suggested function of crystal formation is to protect the insulin from proteases and increase the degree of conversion of soluble proinsulin. To accomplish this, crystal growth should be fast and adaptable to rate fluctuations in the conversion reaction. Zn-insulin crystals grow layer-by-layer. Each layer spreads by the attachment of molecules to kinks located at the layers' edges, also called steps. The kinks are thought to be generated either by thermal fluctuations, as postulated by Gibbs, or by one-dimensional nucleation of new crystalline rows. The kink density determines the rate at which steps advance, and these two kink-generation mechanisms lead to weak near-linear responses of the growth rate to concentration variations. We demonstrate for the crystallization of Zn-insulin a novel mechanism of kink generation, whereby 2D clusters of several insulin molecules pre-formed on the terraces between steps associate to the steps. This mechanism results in several-fold higher kink density, faster rate of crystallization, and a high sensitivity of the kinetics to small increases of the solute concentration. If the found mechanism operates during insulin crystallization in vivo, it could be a part of the biological regulation of insulin production and function. For other crystallizing materials in biological and non-biological systems, this mechanism provides an understanding of the often seen non-linear acceleration of the kinetics.

  1. A Golgi and tonoplast localized S-acyl transferase is involved in cell expansion, cell division, vascular patterning and fertility in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Baoxiu; Doughty, James; Hooley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    S-acylation of eukaryotic proteins is the reversible attachment of palmitic or stearic acid to cysteine residues, catalysed by protein S-acyl transferases that share an Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif. Previous evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis S-acylation is involved in the control of cell size, polarity and the growth of pollen tubes and root hairs. Using a combination of yeast genetics, biochemistry, cell biology and loss of function genetics the roles of a member of the protein S-acyl transferase PAT family, AtPAT10 (At3g51390), have been explored. In keeping with its role as a PAT, AtPAT10 auto-S-acylates, and partially complements the yeast akr1 PAT mutant, and this requires Cys192 of the DHHC motif. In Arabidopsis AtPAT10 is localized in the Golgi stack, trans-Golgi network/early endosome and tonoplast. Loss-of-function mutants have a pleiotropic phenotype involving cell expansion and division, vascular patterning, and fertility that is rescued by wild-type AtPAT10 but not by catalytically inactive AtPAT10C192A. This supports the hypothesis that AtPAT10 is functionally independent of the other Arabidopsis PATs. Our findings demonstrate a growing importance of protein S-acylation in plants, and reveal a Golgi and tonoplast located S-acylation mechanism that affects a range of events during growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:23795888

  2. Idler-efficiency-enhanced long-wave infrared beam generation using aperiodic orientation-patterned GaAs gratings.

    PubMed

    Gürkan Figen, Ziya; Aytür, Orhan; Arıkan, Orhan

    2016-03-20

    In this paper, we design aperiodic gratings based on orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) for converting 2.1 μm pump laser radiation into long-wave infrared (8-12 μm) in an idler-efficiency-enhanced scheme. These single OP-GaAs gratings placed in an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) or an optical parametric generator (OPG) can simultaneously phase match two optical parametric amplification (OPA) processes, OPA 1 and OPA 2. We use two design methods that allow simultaneous phase matching of two arbitrary χ(2) processes and also free adjustment of their relative strength. The first aperiodic grating design method (Method 1) relies on generating a grating structure that has domain walls located at the zeros of the summation of two cosine functions, each of which has a spatial frequency that equals one of the phase-mismatch terms of the two processes. Some of the domain walls are discarded considering the minimum domain length that is achievable in the production process. In this paper, we propose a second design method (Method 2) that relies on discretizing the crystal length with sample lengths that are much smaller than the minimum domain length and testing each sample's contribution in such a way that the sign of the nonlinearity maximizes the magnitude sum of the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform of the grating function at the relevant phase mismatches. Method 2 produces a similar performance as Method 1 in terms of the maximization of the height of either Fourier peak located at the relevant phase mismatch while allowing an adjustable relative height for the two peaks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that aperiodic OP-GaAs gratings have been proposed for efficient long-wave infrared beam generation based on simultaneous phase matching. PMID:27140581

  3. Thiamine-induced priming against root-knot nematode infection in rice involves lignification and hydrogen peroxide generation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Kun; Ji, Hong-Li; Gheysen, Godelieve; Kyndt, Tina

    2016-05-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1, VB1) can act as a plant defence trigger, or priming agent, leading to a rapid counterattack on pathogen invasion. In this study, the priming effect of thiamine on rice (Oryza sativa cv. Nipponbare) and its activity against root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne graminicola) infection were evaluated. Thiamine treatment and subsequent nematode inoculation activated hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation and lignin deposition in plant roots, and this correlated with enhanced transcription of OsPAL1 and OsC4H, two genes involved in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The number of nematodes in rice roots was slightly but significantly reduced, and the development of the nematodes was delayed, whereas no direct toxic effects of VB1 on nematode viability and infectivity were observed. The combined application of thiamine with l-2-aminooxy-3-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP), an inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), significantly hampered the VB1-priming capacity. These findings indicate that thiamine-induced priming in rice involves H2 O2 and phenylpropanoid-mediated lignin production, which hampers nematode infection. Further cellular and molecular studies on the mechanism of thiamine-induced defence will be useful for the development of novel nematode control strategies. PMID:27103216

  4. Calcium-dependent trichosanthin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species involved in apoptosis of human choriocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunyang; Ma, Hui; Chen, Die Yan

    2001-04-01

    The type-I ribosome-inactivating protein trichosanthin (TCS) has a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities, including abortifacient, anti-tumor and anti-HIV. We found for the first time that TCS induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in JAR cells by using fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate with confocal laser scanning microscopy. TCS-induced ROS showed dependence on the increase in intracellular calcium and on the presence of extracellular calcium. The production of ROS increased rapidly after the application of TCS, which paralleled TCS-indued increase in intracellular calcium monitored using fluo 3-AM, suggesting that TCS-induced ROS might mediate by the increase in intracellular Ca2PLU concentration. Simultaneous observation of the nuclear morphological changes and production of ROS in JAR cells with two-photon laser scanning microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells, which was confirmed by that antioxidant (alpha) -tocopherol prevented TCS-induced ROS formation and cell death. The finding that calcium-dependent TCS-induced ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells might provide new insight into the anti-tumor and anti-HIV mechanism of TCS.

  5. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns of high lycopene tomato generated from seeds after long-term space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinying; Ren, Chunxiao; Pan, Yi; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Liu, Min

    Lycopene content is a most vital trait of tomatoes due to the role of lycopene in reducing the risk of some kinds of cancers. In this experiment, we gained a high lycopene (hl) tomato (named HY-2), after seven generations of self-cross selection, from seeds Russian MNP-1 carried in Russia MIR space station for six years. HPLC result showed that the lycopene content was 1.6 times more than that in Russian MNP-1 (the wild type). Microarray analysis presented the general profile of differential expressed genes at the tomato developmental stage of 7DPB (days post breaker). One hundred and forty three differential expression genes were identified according to the following criterion: the average changes were no less than 1.5 folds with q-value (similar to FDR) less than 0.05 or changes were no less than 1.5 folds in all three biological replications. Most of the differential expressed genes were mainly involved in metabolism, response to stimulus, biosynthesis, development and regulation. Particularly, we discussed the genes involved in protein metabolism, response to unfolded protein, carotenoid biosynthesis and photosynthesis that might be related to the fruit development and the accumulation of lycopene. What's more, we conducted QRT-PCR validation of five key genes (Fps, CrtL-b, CrtR-b, Zep and Nxs) in the lycopene biosynthesis pathway through time courses and that provided the direct molecular evidence for the hl phenotype. Our results demonstrate that long-term space flight, as a rarely used tool, can positively cause some beneficial mutations in the seeds and thus to help to generate a high quality variety, combined with ground selections.

  6. Colistin-Induced Apoptosis of Neuroblastoma-2a Cells Involves the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Velkov, Tony; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-09-01

    Neurotoxicity remains a poorly characterized adverse effect associated with colistin therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of colistin-induced neurotoxicity using the mouse neuroblastoma2a (N2a) cell line. Colistin treatment (0-200 μM) of N2a neuronal cells induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity was associated with a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with a concomitant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the glutathione (GSH) levels. Mitochondrial dysfunction was evident from the dissipation of membrane potential and the increase of Bax/Bcl-2, followed by the release of cytochrome c (CytC). Caspase-3/7, -8, and -9 activations were also detected. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity significantly increased the gene expression of p53 (1.6-fold), Bax (3.3-fold), and caspase-8 (2.2-fold) (all p < 0.01). The formation of autophagic vacuoles was evident with the significant increases (all p < 0.05 or 0.01) of both of Beclin 1 and LC3B following colistin treatment (50-200 μM). Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy by pretreatment with chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) enhanced colistin-induced apoptosis via caspase activation, which could be attenuated by co-treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. In summary, our study reveals that colistin-induced neuronal cell death involves ROS-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. A knowledge base of the neuronal signaling pathways involved in colistin-induced neurotoxicity will greatly facilitate the discovery of neuroprotective agents for use in combination with colistin to prevent this undesirable side effect. PMID:26316077

  7. Automated pattern recognition to support geological mapping and exploration target generation - A case study from southern Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Detlef; Hutchins, David; Das, Sonali; Majumdar, Anandamayee; Paasche, Hendrik

    2015-06-01

    to the result obtained from unsupervised fuzzy clustering. Furthermore, a comparison of the aposterior probability of class assignment with the trustworthiness values provided by fuzzy clustering also indicates only slight differences. These observed differences can be explained by the exponential class probability term which tends to deliver either fairly high or low probability values. The methodology and results presented here demonstrate that automated objective pattern recognition can essentially contribute to geological mapping of large study areas and mineral exploration target generation. This methodology is considered well suited to a number of African countries whose large territories have recently been covered by high resolution airborne geophysical data, but where existing geological mapping is poor, incomplete or outdated.

  8. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  9. Identification and expression patterns of extracellular matrix-associated genes fibropellin-ia and tenascin involved in regeneration of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Ba, Huazhong; Yao, Feng; Yang, Lei; Qin, Tong; Luan, Hong; Li, Zhengmin; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Sea cucumbers have a strong regenerative capacity. Many important genes involved in the molecular mechanism of regeneration and associated with intercellular signaling pathways of regeneration have been identified. The product of the fibropellin-ia gene forms a layer known as the apical lamina that surrounds the sea cucumber embryo throughout development. Meanwhile, the tenascin gene displays highly restricted and dynamic patterns of expression in the embryo and is expressed in the adult during normal processes such as wound healing, nerve regeneration and tissue involution. In this study, we cloned for the first time full-length cDNAs of fibropellin-ia (1390 bp, encoding a 199 amino acid protein) and tenascin (1366 bp, encoding a 179 amino acid protein) from Apostichopus japonicus (designated Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin, respectively) using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The structures and characteristics of these two genes were analyzed bioinformatically, and their expression patterns associated with extracellular matrix remodeling in regeneration of A. japonicus were investigated by real-time PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH). Expression levels of Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin in the regeneration tissues were higher than those in normal tissues. The highest expression levels of Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin were shown in the intestine and respiratory tree on the 15th and 20th days after sea cucumbers were eviscerated. In the body wall, the highest expression levels of Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin occurred at 35 and 45 min during early regeneration and then emerged between 5 and 7 days again during late regeneration after the body wall was injured. ISH analysis revealed expression of these genes in the body wall, longitudinal muscle, intestine and respiratory tree. These findings suggest that Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin are crucial genes that play important roles in the regeneration of the sea cucumber. PMID:25841990

  10. A method to integrate patterned electrospun fibers with microfluidic systems to generate complex microenvironments for cell culture applications

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Patric; Zandén, Carl; Carlberg, Björn; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Liu, Johan; Gold, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The properties of a cell’s microenvironment are one of the main driving forces in cellular fate processes and phenotype expression invivo. The ability to create controlled cell microenvironments invitro becomes increasingly important for studying or controlling phenotype expression in tissue engineering and drug discovery applications. This includes the capability to modify material surface properties within well-defined liquid environments in cell culture systems. One successful approach to mimic extra cellular matrix is with porous electrospun polymer fiber scaffolds, while microfluidic networks have been shown to efficiently generate spatially and temporally defined liquid microenvironments. Here, a method to integrate electrospun fibers with microfluidic networks was developed in order to form complex cell microenvironments with the capability to vary relevant parameters. Spatially defined regions of electrospun fibers of both aligned and random orientation were patterned on glass substrates that were irreversibly bonded to microfluidic networks produced in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Concentration gradients obtained in the fiber containing channels were characterized experimentally and compared with values obtained by computational fluid dynamic simulations. Velocity and shear stress profiles, as well as vortex formation, were calculated to evaluate the influence of fiber pads on fluidic properties. The suitability of the system to support cell attachment and growth was demonstrated with a fibroblast cell line. The potential of the platform was further verified by a functional investigation of neural stem cell alignment in response to orientation of electrospun fibers versus a microfluidic generated chemoattractant gradient of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. The described method is a competitive strategy to create complex microenvironments invitro that allow detailed studies on the interplay of topography, substrate surface properties, and soluble

  11. Generating Within-Plant Spatial Distributions of an Insect Herbivore Based on Aggregation Patterns and Per-Node Infestation Probabilities.

    PubMed

    Rincon, Diego F; Hoy, Casey W; Cañas, Luis A

    2015-04-01

    Most predator-prey models extrapolate functional responses from small-scale experiments assuming spatially uniform within-plant predator-prey interactions. However, some predators focus their search in certain plant regions, and herbivores tend to select leaves to balance their nutrient uptake and exposure to plant defenses. Individual-based models that account for heterogeneous within-plant predator-prey interactions can be used to scale-up functional responses, but they would require the generation of explicit prey spatial distributions within-plant architecture models. The silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), is a significant pest of tomato crops worldwide that exhibits highly aggregated populations at several spatial scales, including within the plant. As part of an analytical framework to understand predator-silverleaf whitefly interactions, the objective of this research was to develop an algorithm to generate explicit spatial counts of silverleaf whitefly nymphs within tomato plants. The algorithm requires the plant size and the number of silverleaf whitefly individuals to distribute as inputs, and includes models that describe infestation probabilities per leaf nodal position and the aggregation pattern of the silverleaf whitefly within tomato plants and leaves. The output is a simulated number of silverleaf whitefly individuals for each leaf and leaflet on one or more plants. Parameter estimation was performed using nymph counts per leaflet censused from 30 artificially infested tomato plants. Validation revealed a substantial agreement between algorithm outputs and independent data that included the distribution of counts of both eggs and nymphs. This algorithm can be used in simulation models that explore the effect of local heterogeneity on whitefly-predator dynamics. PMID:26313173

  12. A method to integrate patterned electrospun fibers with microfluidic systems to generate complex microenvironments for cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Patric; Zandén, Carl; Carlberg, Björn; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Liu, Johan; Gold, Julie

    2012-06-01

    The properties of a cell's microenvironment are one of the main driving forces in cellular fate processes and phenotype expression invivo. The ability to create controlled cell microenvironments invitro becomes increasingly important for studying or controlling phenotype expression in tissue engineering and drug discovery applications. This includes the capability to modify material surface properties within well-defined liquid environments in cell culture systems. One successful approach to mimic extra cellular matrix is with porous electrospun polymer fiber scaffolds, while microfluidic networks have been shown to efficiently generate spatially and temporally defined liquid microenvironments. Here, a method to integrate electrospun fibers with microfluidic networks was developed in order to form complex cell microenvironments with the capability to vary relevant parameters. Spatially defined regions of electrospun fibers of both aligned and random orientation were patterned on glass substrates that were irreversibly bonded to microfluidic networks produced in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Concentration gradients obtained in the fiber containing channels were characterized experimentally and compared with values obtained by computational fluid dynamic simulations. Velocity and shear stress profiles, as well as vortex formation, were calculated to evaluate the influence of fiber pads on fluidic properties. The suitability of the system to support cell attachment and growth was demonstrated with a fibroblast cell line. The potential of the platform was further verified by a functional investigation of neural stem cell alignment in response to orientation of electrospun fibers versus a microfluidic generated chemoattractant gradient of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. The described method is a competitive strategy to create complex microenvironments invitro that allow detailed studies on the interplay of topography, substrate surface properties, and soluble

  13. Transcriptional Profiling of Newly Generated Dentate Granule Cells Using TU Tagging Reveals Pattern Shifts in Gene Expression during Circuit Integration1,2

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Christina; Shen, Rongkun; Goodman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite representing only a small fraction of hippocampal granule cells, adult-generated newborn granule cells have been implicated in learning and memory (Aimone et al., 2011). Newborn granule cells undergo functional maturation and circuit integration over a period of weeks. However, it is difficult to assess the accompanying gene expression profiles in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution using traditional methods. Here we used a novel method [“thiouracil (TU) tagging”] to map the profiles of nascent mRNAs in mouse immature newborn granule cells compared with mature granule cells. We targeted a nonmammalian uracil salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, to newborn neurons and mature granule cells using retroviral and lentiviral constructs, respectively. Subsequent injection of 4-TU tagged nascent RNAs for analysis by RNA sequencing. Several hundred genes were significantly enhanced in the retroviral dataset compared with the lentiviral dataset. We compared a selection of the enriched genes with steady-state levels of mRNAs using quantitative PCR. Ontology analysis revealed distinct patterns of nascent mRNA expression, with newly generated immature neurons showing enhanced expression for genes involved in synaptic function, and neural differentiation and development, as well as genes not previously associated with granule cell maturation. Surprisingly, the nascent mRNAs enriched in mature cells were related to energy homeostasis and metabolism, presumably indicative of the increased energy demands of synaptic transmission and their complex dendritic architecture. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our modified TU-tagging method provides a foundation for comparison with steady-state RNA analyses by traditional transcriptomic approaches in defining the functional roles of newborn neurons. PMID:27011954

  14. 12. Patterns of Adrenal Gland Involvement from Lung Cancer Shown by 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Compared to Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zubeldia; Abou-Zied; Nabi

    2000-07-01

    Purpose: The frequency of adrenal metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) varies between 4 to 25%. Adrenal metastases are frequently missed (78%) by Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The purpose of this study was to characterize the patterns of adrenal gland involvement from lung cancer by 18-F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (18FDG-PET).Methods: Retrospective review of patients evaluated for known or suspected lung carcinoma. Results of 18FDG-PET, CT, MRI, and scans were compared.Results: From February 1996 to May 2000, 91 patients with known (85 patients) or suspected (6 patients) lung cancer were evaluated with 18FDG-PET scan. Twenty-two patients (mean age 63, range 38-88 years) had abnormal adrenal glands by either 18FDG-PET (16 patients), CT (12 patients) or MRI (1 patient). In 13 cases 18FDG-PET scan was ordered to clarify CT or MRI findings. Only 7 patients showed adrenal gland involvement: 5 patients (5.5%) with unilateral disease and 2 patients (2.2%) with bilateral disease. PET depicted unsuspected findings in 9 patients: 8 patients (8.8%) with unilateral disease and 1 patient (1.1%) with bilateral disease.(18)FDG-PET upstaged 9 patients from limited (N1M0) to widespread disease (M1), thus obviating surgical intervention.Conclusion: This study demonstrates the potential of 18FDG-PET scanning in revealing unsuspected adrenal metastases in patients with early stages of NSCLC as well as characterizing CT or MRI equivocal adrenal masses. PMID:11150769

  15. Localization of the central rhythm generator involved in spontaneous consummatory licking in rats: functional ablation and electrical brain stimulation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Brozek, G; Zhuravin, I A; Megirian, D; Bures, J

    1996-01-01

    Localization of the central rhythm generator (CRG) of spontaneous consummatory licking was studied in freely moving rats by microinjection of tetrodotoxin (TTX) into the pontine reticular formation. Maximum suppression of spontaneous water consumption was elicited by TTX (1 ng) blockade of the oral part of the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NRG), whereas TTX injections into more caudal or rostral locations caused significantly weaker disruption of drinking. To verify the assumption that TTX blocked the proper CRG of licking rather than some relay in its output, spontaneously drinking thirsty rats were intracranially stimulated via electrodes chronically implanted into the oral part of the NRG. Lick-synchronized stimulation (a 100-ms train of 0.1-ms-wide rectangular pulses at 100 Hz and 25-150 microA) applied during continuous licking (after eight regular consecutive licks) caused a phase shift of licks emitted after stimulus delivery. The results suggest that the stimulation has reset the CRG of licking without changing its frequency. The reset-inducing threshold current was lowest during the tongue retraction and highest during the tongue protrusion period of the lick cycle. It is concluded that the CRG of licking is located in the oral part of NRG. PMID:8622936

  16. Patterns of thyroid hormone receptor expression in zebrafish and generation of a novel model of resistance to thyroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Federica; Carra, Silvia; Agostini, Maura; Cotelli, Franco; Peeters, Robin; Chatterjee, Krishna; Persani, Luca

    2016-03-15

    Resistance to thyroid hormone can be due to heterozygous, dominant negative (DN) THRA (RTHα) or THRB (RTHβ) mutations, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we delineate the spatiotemporal expression of TH receptors (TRs) in zebrafish and generated morphants expressing equivalent amounts of wild-type and DN TRαs (thraa_MOs) and TRβs (thrb_MOs) in vivo. Both morphants show severe developmental abnormalities. The phenotype of thraa_MOs includes brain and cardiac defects, but normal thyroid volume and tshba expression. A combined modification of dio2 and dio3 expression can explain the high T3/T4 ratio seen in thraa_MOs, as in RTHα. Thrb_MOs show abnormal eyes and otoliths, with a typical RTHβ pattern of thyroid axis. The coexpression of wild-type, but not mutant, human TRs can rescue the phenotype in both morphants. High T3 doses can partially revert the dominant negative action of mutant TRs in morphant fish. Therefore, our morphants recapitulate the RTHα and RTHβ key manifestations representing new models in which the functional consequences of human TR mutations can be rapidly and faithfully evaluated. PMID:26802880

  17. A novel approach to locomotion learning: Actor-Critic architecture using central pattern generators and dynamic motor primitives

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cai; Lowe, Robert; Ziemke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose an architecture of a bio-inspired controller that addresses the problem of learning different locomotion gaits for different robot morphologies. The modeling objective is split into two: baseline motion modeling and dynamics adaptation. Baseline motion modeling aims to achieve fundamental functions of a certain type of locomotion and dynamics adaptation provides a “reshaping” function for adapting the baseline motion to desired motion. Based on this assumption, a three-layer architecture is developed using central pattern generators (CPGs, a bio-inspired locomotor center for the baseline motion) and dynamic motor primitives (DMPs, a model with universal “reshaping” functions). In this article, we use this architecture with the actor-critic algorithms for finding a good “reshaping” function. In order to demonstrate the learning power of the actor-critic based architecture, we tested it on two experiments: (1) learning to crawl on a humanoid and, (2) learning to gallop on a puppy robot. Two types of actor-critic algorithms (policy search and policy gradient) are compared in order to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different actor-critic based learning algorithms for different morphologies. Finally, based on the analysis of the experimental results, a generic view/architecture for locomotion learning is discussed in the conclusion. PMID:25324773

  18. A novel approach to locomotion learning: Actor-Critic architecture using central pattern generators and dynamic motor primitives.

    PubMed

    Li, Cai; Lowe, Robert; Ziemke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose an architecture of a bio-inspired controller that addresses the problem of learning different locomotion gaits for different robot morphologies. The modeling objective is split into two: baseline motion modeling and dynamics adaptation. Baseline motion modeling aims to achieve fundamental functions of a certain type of locomotion and dynamics adaptation provides a "reshaping" function for adapting the baseline motion to desired motion. Based on this assumption, a three-layer architecture is developed using central pattern generators (CPGs, a bio-inspired locomotor center for the baseline motion) and dynamic motor primitives (DMPs, a model with universal "reshaping" functions). In this article, we use this architecture with the actor-critic algorithms for finding a good "reshaping" function. In order to demonstrate the learning power of the actor-critic based architecture, we tested it on two experiments: (1) learning to crawl on a humanoid and, (2) learning to gallop on a puppy robot. Two types of actor-critic algorithms (policy search and policy gradient) are compared in order to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different actor-critic based learning algorithms for different morphologies. Finally, based on the analysis of the experimental results, a generic view/architecture for locomotion learning is discussed in the conclusion. PMID:25324773

  19. Massively parallel E-beam inspection: enabling next-generation patterned defect inspection for wafer and mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Wurm, Stefan; Mukhtar, Maseeh; Quoi, Kathy; Kemen, Thomas; Zeidler, Dirk; Eberle, Anna Lena; Garbowski, Tomasz; Dellemann, Gregor; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    SEMATECH aims to identify and enable disruptive technologies to meet the ever-increasing demands of semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM). As such, a program was initiated in 2012 focused on high-speed e-beam defect inspection as a complement, and eventual successor, to bright field optical patterned defect inspection [1]. The primary goal is to enable a new technology to overcome the key gaps that are limiting modern day inspection in the fab; primarily, throughput and sensitivity to detect ultra-small critical defects. The program specifically targets revolutionary solutions based on massively parallel e-beam technologies, as opposed to incremental improvements to existing e-beam and optical inspection platforms. Wafer inspection is the primary target, but attention is also being paid to next generation mask inspection. During the first phase of the multi-year program multiple technologies were reviewed, a down-selection was made to the top candidates, and evaluations began on proof of concept systems. A champion technology has been selected and as of late 2014 the program has begun to move into the core technology maturation phase in order to enable eventual commercialization of an HVM system. Performance data from early proof of concept systems will be shown along with roadmaps to achieving HVM performance. SEMATECH's vision for moving from early-stage development to commercialization will be shown, including plans for development with industry leading technology providers.

  20. Neuroethological approach to frontolimbic epileptic seizures and parasomnias: The same central pattern generators for the same behaviours.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, C A; Cantalupo, G; Högl, B; Cortelli, P; Tassi, L; Francione, S; Nobili, L; Meletti, S; Rubboli, G; Gardella, E

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this report is not to make a differential diagnosis between epileptic nocturnal seizures and non-epileptic sleep-related movement disorders, or parasomnias. On the contrary, our goal is to emphasize the commonly shared semiological features of some epileptic seizures and parasomnias. Such similar features might be explained by the activation of the same neuronal networks (so-called 'central pattern generators' or CPG). These produce the stereotypical rhythmic motor sequences - in other words, behaviours - that are adaptive and species-specific (such as eating/alimentary, attractive/aversive, locomotor and nesting habits). CPG are located at the subcortical level (mainly in the brain stem and spinal cord) and, in humans, are under the control of the phylogenetically more recent neomammalian neocortical structures, according to a simplified Jacksonian model. Based on video-polygraphic recordings of sleep-related epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events (parasomnias), we have documented how a transient "neomammalian brain" dysfunction - whether epileptic or not - can 'release' (disinhibition?) the CPG responsible for involuntary motor behaviours. Thus, in both epileptic seizures and parasomnias, we can observe: (a) oroalimentary automatisms, bruxism and biting; (b) ambulatory behaviours, ranging from the classical bimanual-bipedal activity of 'frontal' hypermotor seizures, epileptic and non-epileptic wanderings, and somnambulism to periodic leg movements (PLM), alternating leg muscle activation (ALMA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS); and (c) various sleep-related events such as ictal fear, sleep terrors, nightmares and violent behaviour. PMID:19733874

  1. A targeted next-generation sequencing assay for the molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders with orodental involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Megana K; Geoffroy, Véronique; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Dumas, Michael; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Switala, Marzena; Gasse, Barbara; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Leheup, Bruno; Droz, Dominique; Dalstein, Amelie; Loing, Adeline; Grollemund, Bruno; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Lopez-Cazaux, Séréna; Minoux, Maryline; Jung, Sophie; Obry, Frédéric; Vogt, Vincent; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Davit-Beal, Tiphaine; Kaiser, Anne-Sophie; Moog, Ute; Richard, Béatrice; Morrier, Jean-Jacques; Duprez, Jean-Pierre; Odent, Sylvie; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Rousset, Monique Marie; Merametdijan, Laure; Toutain, Annick; Joseph, Clara; Giuliano, Fabienne; Dahlet, Jean-Christophe; Courval, Aymeric; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Laouina, Samir; Soskin, Sylvie; Guffon, Nathalie; Dieux, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Feierabend, Stephanie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Fournier, Benjamin; de la Dure Molla, Muriel; Alembik, Yves; Tardieu, Corinne; Clauss, François; Berdal, Ariane; Stoetzel, Corinne; Manière, Marie Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Background Orodental diseases include several clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that can present in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. Due to the vast number of genes implicated in these disorders, establishing a molecular diagnosis can be challenging. We aimed to develop a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay to diagnose mutations and potentially identify novel genes mutated in this group of disorders. Methods We designed an NGS gene panel that targets 585 known and candidate genes in orodental disease. We screened a cohort of 101 unrelated patients without a molecular diagnosis referred to the Reference Centre for Oro-Dental Manifestations of Rare Diseases, Strasbourg, France, for a variety of orodental disorders including isolated and syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), isolated and syndromic selective tooth agenesis (STHAG), isolated and syndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta, isolated dentin dysplasia, otodental dysplasia and primary failure of tooth eruption. Results We discovered 21 novel pathogenic variants and identified the causative mutation in 39 unrelated patients in known genes (overall diagnostic rate: 39%). Among the largest subcohorts of patients with isolated AI (50 unrelated patients) and isolated STHAG (21 unrelated patients), we had a definitive diagnosis in 14 (27%) and 15 cases (71%), respectively. Surprisingly, COL17A1 mutations accounted for the majority of autosomal-dominant AI cases. Conclusions We have developed a novel targeted NGS assay for the efficient molecular diagnosis of a wide variety of orodental diseases. Furthermore, our panel will contribute to better understanding the contribution of these genes to orodental disease. Trial registration numbers NCT01746121 and NCT02397824. PMID:26502894

  2. New role for Kruppel-like factor 14 as a transcriptional activator involved in the generation of signaling lipids.

    PubMed

    de Assuncao, Thiago M; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A; Huebert, Robert C; Urrutia, Raul A; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-05-30

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  3. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  4. Pentylentetrazole-induced loss of blood-brain barrier integrity involves excess nitric oxide generation by neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Danjo, Sonoko; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masatomo; Nakamura, Yu; Itoh, Kouichi

    2013-09-12

    Dysfunction of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major pathophysiological consequences of epilepsy. The increase in the permeability caused by BBB failure is thought to contribute to the development of epileptic outcomes. We developed a method by which the BBB permeability can be demonstrated by gadolinium-enhanced T1 weighted imaging (GdET1WI). The present study examined the changes in the BBB permeability in mice with generalized convulsive seizures (GCS) induced by acute pentylentetrazole (PTZ) injection. At 15min after PTZ-induced GCS, the BBB temporarily leaks BBB-impermeable contrast agent into the parenchyma of the diencephalon, hippocampus and cerebral cortex in mice, and the loss of BBB integrity was gradually recovered by 24h. The temporary BBB failure is a critical link to the glutamatergic activities that occur following the injection of PTZ. PTZ activates the glutamatergic pathway via the NMDA receptor, then nitric oxide (NO) is generated by NMDA receptor-coupled neuronal NO synthase (nNOS). To examine the influence of nNOS-derived NO induced by PTZ on the increases of the BBB permeability, GdET1WI was performed using conventional nNOS gene-deficient mice with or without PTZ injection. The failure of the BBB induced by PTZ was completely protected by nNOS deficiency in the brain. These results suggest that nNOS-derived excess NO in the glutamatergic pathway plays a key role in the failure of the BBB during PTZ-induced GCS. The levels of NO synthetized by nNOS in the brain may represent an important target for the future development of drugs to protect the BBB. PMID:23831997

  5. Analysis of APC types involved in CD4 tolerance and regulatory T cell generation using reaggregated thymic organ cultures.

    PubMed

    Guerri, Lucia; Peguillet, Isabelle; Geraldo, Yvette; Nabti, Sabrina; Premel, Virginie; Lantz, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Tolerance to self-Ags is generated in the thymus. Both epithelial and hematopoietic thymic stromal cells play an active and essential role in this process. However, the role of each of the various stromal cell types remains unresolved. To our knowledge, we describe the first comparative analysis of several types of thymic hematopoietic stromal cells (THSCs) for their ability to induce CD4 tolerance to self, in parallel with the thymic epithelium. The THSCs--two types of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), plasmacytoid dendritic cells, macrophages (MΦs), B lymphocytes, and eosinophils--were first characterized and quantified in adult mouse thymus. They were then examined in reaggregated thymic organ cultures containing mixtures of monoclonal and polyclonal thymocytes. This thymocyte mixture allows for the analysis of Ag-specific events while avoiding the extreme skewing frequently seen in purely monoclonal systems. Our data indicate that thymic epithelium alone is capable of promoting self-tolerance by eliminating autoreactive CD4 single-positive thymocytes and by supporting regulatory T cell (Treg) development. We also show that both non-Treg CD4 single-positive thymocytes and Tregs are efficiently deleted by the two populations of cDCs present in the thymus, as well as to a lesser extent by MΦs. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and eosinophils were not able to do so. Finally, cDCs were also the most efficient THSCs at supporting Treg development in the thymus, suggesting that although they may share some characteristics required for negative selection with MΦs, they do not share those required for the support of Treg development, making cDCs a unique cell subset in the thymus. PMID:23365074

  6. xCyp26c Induced by Inhibition of BMP Signaling Is Involved in Anterior-Posterior Neural Patterning of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Saet-Byeol; Umair, Zobia; Kumar, Shiv; Lee, Unjoo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Il; Kim, SungChan; Park, Jae-Bong; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jaebong

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate neurogenesis requires inhibition of endogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signals in the ectoderm. Blocking of BMPs in animal cap explants causes the formation of anterior neural tissues as a default fate. To identify genes involved in the anterior neural specification, we analyzed gene expression profiles using a Xenopus Affymetrix Gene Chip after BMP-4 inhibition in animal cap explants. We found that the xCyp26c gene, encoding a retinoic acid (RA) degradation enzyme, was upregulated following inhibition of BMP signaling in early neuroectodermal cells. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis showed that xCyp26c expression started in the anterior region during the early neurula stage. Overexpression of xCyp26c weakly induced neural genes in animal cap explants. xCyp26c abolished the expression of all trans-/cis-RA-induced posterior genes, but not basic FGF-induced posterior genes. Depletion of xCyp26c by morpholino-oligonucleotides suppressed the normal formation of the axis and head, indicating that xCyp26c plays a critical role in the specification of anterior neural tissue in whole embryos. In animal cap explants, however, xCyp26c morpholinos did not alter anterior-to-posterior neural tissue formation. Together, these results suggest that xCyp26c plays a specific role in anterior-posterior (A-P) neural patterning of Xenopus embryos. PMID:26923193

  7. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. I: Spike Generating Models on Converging Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    In neural systems, synaptic plasticity is usually driven by spike trains. Due to the inherent noises of neurons and synapses as well as the randomness of connection details, spike trains typically exhibit variability such as spatial randomness and temporal stochasticity, resulting in variability of synaptic changes under plasticity, which we call efficacy variability. How the variability of spike trains influences the efficacy variability of synapses remains unclear. In this paper, we try to understand this influence under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) when the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded (synaptic homeostasis). Specifically, we systematically study, analytically and numerically, how four aspects of statistical features, i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations, as well as their interactions influence the efficacy variability in converging motifs (simple networks in which one neuron receives from many other neurons). Neurons (including the post-synaptic neuron) in a converging motif generate spikes according to statistical models with tunable parameters. In this way, we can explicitly control the statistics of the spike patterns, and investigate their influence onto the efficacy variability, without worrying about the feedback from synaptic changes onto the dynamics of the post-synaptic neuron. We separate efficacy variability into two parts: the drift part (DriftV) induced by the heterogeneity of change rates of different synapses, and the diffusion part (DiffV) induced by weight diffusion caused by stochasticity of spike trains. Our main findings are: (1) synchronous firing and burstiness tend to increase DiffV, (2) heterogeneity of rates induces DriftV when potentiation and depression in STDP are not balanced, and (3) heterogeneity of cross-correlations induces DriftV together with heterogeneity of rates. We anticipate our work

  8. An integrated geochemical and geological approach for determining hydrocarbon generation-migration patterns: Central Gulf Coast Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Echols, J.B.; Zimmerman, R.K.; Goddard, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    New geochemical, geological, and well-production data indicate a Mesozoic hydrocarbon source for many younger reservoirs in central Louisiana and southwest Mississippi. A Jurassic source has been determined for several Cretaceous reservoirs in oil and gas fields of northeast Louisiana. The characteristic Wilcox, Sparta, and Frio biomarker, Bisnorhopane, identified in Austin Chalk oils from southwest Mississippi, links these Mesozoic and Tertiary oils. Cross-plots of {delta}{sup 13}C{sub AROM} versus {delta}{sup 13}C{sub SAT} indicate an Upper Jurassic (Smackover) and Lower Cretaceous source for certain Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary oils. However, the pristane/C{sub 17} ratio versus {delta}{sup 13}C{sub SAT} cross-plot indicates Wilcox and Sparta oils are heavily biodegraded Mesozoic (Lower Cretaceous) oils. There is an absence of gas accumulations in central Louisiana and southwest Mississippi in Midway, Wilcox, and Sparta reservoirs updip from coeval gas-prone source rocks. This is an indication of (1) a sealing regional fault system and/or stratigraphic migration barrier paralleling the Paleocene-Eocene shelf edge or (2) an earlier selective escape via vertical migration pathways. Vertical migration of hydrocarbons in northeast Louisiana, central Louisiana, and southwest Mississippi was accomplished primarily through fracture systems caused by wrench faulting; to the south and west, salt tectonics and related normal faulting played significant roles in the process. In onshore and offshore south Louisiana, normal faulting and salt-related tectonics created primary migration pathways. Regional hydrocarbon generation-migration patterns differ conceptually from those illustrated in previous models employing long-range migration based primarily on geochemical considerations. This new interpretation integrates geochemical, geological, and production data useful in identifying new exploration plays in north and central Louisiana and in southwest Mississippi.

  9. An integrated geochemical and geological approach for determining hydrocarbon generation-migration patterns: Central Gulf Coast Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Echols, J.B.; Zimmerman, R.K.; Goddard, D.A.

    1994-09-01

    New geochemical, geological, and well-production data indicate a Mesozoic hydrocarbon source for many younger reservoirs in central Louisiana and southwest Mississippi. A Jurassic source has been determined for several oil and gas fields in northeast Louisiana. The characteristic Wilcox and Sparta biomarker, bisnorhopane, identified in Austin Chalk oils from southwest Mississippi, links these Mesozoic and Tertiary oils. Cross-plots of {delta}{sup 13}C{sub AROM} vs. {delta}{sup 13}C{sub SAT} indicate a lower Cretaceous source for certain upper Cretaceous and Tertiary oils, while crossplots of pristane/nC{sub 17} ratio vs. {delta}{sup 13}C{sub SAT} crossplots indicate that Wilcox and Sparta oils are heavily biodegraded Mesozoic (lower Cretaceous) oils. There is an absence of gas accumulations in central Louisiana and southwest Mississippi in Midway, Wilcox, and Sparta reservoirs updip from coeval gas-prone source rocks. This is an indication of a sealing regional fault system and/or stratigraphic migration barrier paralleling the Paleocene-Eocene shelf edge. Vertical migration of hydrocarbons in northeast Louisiana, central Louisiana, and southwest Mississippi was accomplished primarily through fracture systems caused by wrench faulting; to the south and west, salt tectonics and related normal faulting played significant roles in the process. In onshore and offshore south Louisiana, normal faulting and salt-related tectonics created primary migration pathways. Regional hydrocarbon generation-migration patterns differ conceptually from those illustrated in previous models employing long-range migration based primarily on geochemical considerations. This new interpretation integrates geochemical, geological, and production data especially useful in identifying new exploration plays in north and central Louisiana and in southwest Mississippi.

  10. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns activate expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, immunity and detoxification in the amebocyte-producing organ of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-Ming; Loker, Eric S; Sullivan, John T

    2016-03-01

    The anterior pericardial wall of the snail Biomphalaria glabrata has been identified as a site of hemocyte production, hence has been named the amebocyte-producing organ (APO). A number of studies have shown that exogenous abiotic and biotic substances, including pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), are able to stimulate APO mitotic activity and/or enlarge its size, implying a role for the APO in innate immunity. The molecular mechanisms underlying such responses have not yet been explored, in part due to the difficulty in obtaining sufficient APO tissue for gene expression studies. By using a modified RNA extraction technique and microarray technology, we investigated transcriptomic responses of APOs dissected from snails at 24 h post-injection with two bacterial PAMPs, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and peptidoglycan (PGN), or with fucoidan (FCN), which may mimic fucosyl-rich glycan PAMPs on sporocysts of Schistosoma mansoni. Based upon the number of genes differentially expressed, LPS exhibited the strongest activity, relative to saline-injected controls. A concurrent activation of genes involved in cell proliferation, immune response and detoxification metabolism was observed. A gene encoding checkpoint 1 kinase, a key regulator of mitosis, was highly expressed after stimulation by LPS. Also, seven different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases that play an essential role in protein synthesis were found to be highly expressed. In addition to stimulating genes involved in cell proliferation, the injected substances, especially LPS, also induced expression of a number of immune-related genes including arginase, peptidoglycan recognition protein short form, tumor necrosis factor receptor, ficolin, calmodulin, bacterial permeability increasing proteins and E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. Importantly, significant up-regulation was observed in four GiMAP (GTPase of immunity-associated protein) genes, a result which provides the first evidence suggesting an immune role of Gi

  11. Swing, release, and escape mechanisms contribute to the generation of phase-locked cluster patterns in a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Horacio G.; Wu, Hui

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the mechanism of generation of phase-locked cluster patterns in a globally coupled FitzhHugh-Nagumo model where the fast variable (activator) receives global feedback from the slow variable (inhibitor). We identify three qualitatively different mechanisms (swing-and-release, hold-and-release, and escape-and-release) that contribute to the generation of these patterns. We describe these mechanisms and use this framework to explain under what circumstances two initially out-of-phase oscillatory clusters reach steady phase-locked and in-phase synchronized solutions, and how the phase difference between these steady state cluster patterns depends on the clusters relative size, the global coupling intensity, and other model parameters.

  12. Gene expression patterns in response to pathogen challenge and interaction with hemolin suggest that the Yippee protein of Antheraea pernyi is involved in the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yuxuan; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Wei, Guoqing; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2016-07-01

    Yippee was first identified as a protein that physically interacts with the Hemolin protein of Hyalophora cecropia. In this study, we identified a gene with a 366bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a 121 amino acid protein containing a conserved Yippee domain. We named this gene Ap-Yippee (Yippee gene from Antheraea pernyi), and investigated the role of the protein in the host immune response. A recombinant Ap-Yippee protein was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and polyclonal antibodies were produced against the recombinant protein. Real-time PCR and a Western blot analysis revealed that Ap-Yippee is expressed in the hemocytes, Malpighian tubules, midgut, silk gland, epidermis, and fat bodies of A. pernyi, with the highest expression level observed in Malpighian tubules. The fifth instar larvae of A. pernyi were challenged by injecting them with nucleopolyhedrovirus (AP-NPV), the Gram-negative bacterium E. coli, the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus, or the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana. These challenges with diverse pathogens resulted in differential expression patterns of the protein. A knockdown of the Ap-Yippee gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection had a significant influence on the expression of the hemolin in the pupae which was confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, a possible protein-protein interaction between Ap-Yippee and Hemolin was explored by Far-Western blotting. Therefore, our data suggest that the Ap-Yippee protein is involved in a pathway that regulates the immune response of insects. PMID:27261060

  13. Involvement of oxidants and oxidant-generating enzyme(s) in tumour-necrosis-factor-alpha-mediated apoptosis: role for lipoxygenase pathway but not mitochondrial respiratory chain.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, V B; Spycher, S; Azzi, A

    1995-08-15

    Cellular signalling by the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) has been suggested to involve generation of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Certain antioxidants and metal chelators can inhibit cytotoxicity and gene expression in response to TNF alpha in numerous cell types. However, neither the source nor function of TNF alpha-induced oxidant generation is known. Using specific inhibitors, we ruled out involvement of several oxidant-generating enzymes [cyclo-oxygenase (indomethacin), cytochrome P-450 (metyrapone), nitric oxide synthase (NG-methyl-L-arginine), NADPH oxidase (iodonium diphenyl), xanthine oxidase (allopurinol), ribonucleotide reductase (hydroxyurea)] in TNF alpha-mediated apoptosis of the murine fibrosarcoma line, L929. We also demonstrated no role for mitochondrial-derived radicals/respiratory chain in the lytic pathway using specific inhibitors/uncouplers (rotenone, KCN, carboxin, fluoroacetate, antimycin, malonate, carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone) and chloramphenicol-derived respiration-deficient cells. Significant ROS (H2O2, O2-.) generation was not observed in response to TNF alpha in L929 cells using four separate assays. Also, prevention of intracellular H2O2 removal by inhibition of catalase did not potentiate TNF alpha-mediated cell death. These data suggest that neither H2O2 nor O2-. plays a direct role in TNF alpha cytotoxicity. Finally, we suggest a central role for lipoxygenase in TNF alpha-mediated lysis. Three inhibitors of this radical-generating signalling pathway, including an arachidonate analogue (5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid), could protect cells against TNF alpha. The inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid is also a radical scavenger, but it could not protect cells from ROS toxicity at concentrations that effectively prevented TNF alpha killing. Therefore protection by nordihydroguaiaretic acid cannot be due to scavenging of cytotoxic H2O or O2-.. The lipoxygenase product

  14. Calcium-activated non-selective cation currents are involved in generation of tonic and bursting activity in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta.

    PubMed

    Mrejeru, Ana; Wei, Aguan; Ramirez, Jan Marino

    2011-05-15

    Nigral dopamine neurons are transiently activated by high frequency glutamatergic inputs relaying reward-predicting sensory information. The tonic firing pattern of dopamine cells responds to these inputs with a transient burst of spikes that requires NMDA receptors. Here, we show that NMDA receptor activation further excites the cell by recruiting a calcium-activated non-selective cation current (ICAN) capable of generating a plateau potential. Burst firing in vitro is eliminated after blockade of ICAN with flufenamic acid, 9-phenanthrol, or intracellular BAPTA. ICAN is likely to be mediated by a transient receptor potential (TRP) channel, and RT-PCR was used to confirm expression of TRPM2 and TRPM4mRNA in substantia nigra pars compacta.We propose that ICAN is selectively activated during burst firing to boost NMDA currents and allow plateau potentials. This boost mechanism may render DA cells vulnerable to excitotoxicity. PMID:21486760

  15. Induction of apoptosis through B-cell receptor cross-linking occurs via de novo generated C16-ceramide and involves mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, B J; Pettus, B; Luberto, C; Busman, M; Sietsma, H; de Leij, L; Hannun, Y A

    2001-04-27

    B-cells, triggered via their surface B-cell receptor (BcR), start an apoptotic program known as activation-induced cell death (AICD), and it is widely believed that this phenomenon plays a role in the restriction and focusing of the immune response. Although both ceramide and caspases have been proposed to be involved in AICD, the contribution of either and the exact molecular events through which AICD commences are still unknown. Here we show that in Ramos B-cells, BcR-triggered cell death is associated with an early rise of C16 ceramide that derives from activation of the de novo pathway, as demonstrated using a specific inhibitor of ceramide synthase, fumonisin B1 (FB1), and using pulse labeling with the metabolic sphingolipid precursor, palmitate. There was no evidence for activation of sphingomyelinases or hydrolysis of sphingomyelin. Importantly, FB1 inhibited several specific apoptotic hallmarks such as poly(A)DP-ribose polymerase cleavage and DNA fragmentation. Electron microscopy revealed morphological evidence of mitochondrial damage, suggesting the involvement of mitochondria in BcR-triggered apoptosis, and this was inhibited by FB1. Moreover, a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was observed in Ramos cells after BcR cross-linking, which was inhibited by the addition of FB1. Interestingly, benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-dl-Asp, a broad spectrum caspase inhibitor did not inhibit BcR-induced mitochondrial membrane permeability transition but did block DNA fragmentation. These results suggest a crucial role for de novo generated C16 ceramide in the execution of AICD, and they further suggest an ordered and more specific sequence of biochemical events in which de novo generated C16 ceramide is involved in mitochondrial damage resulting in a downstream activation of caspases and apoptosis. PMID:11278517

  16. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased. PMID:26474845

  17. Intergenerational Relationship Quality, Gender and Grandparent Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Melissa A.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Ontai, Lenna L.; Conger, Rand D.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective, intergenerational study (N = 181) considered how parent (G1, generation 1)–child (G2, generation 2) relationship quality during adolescence and adulthood is associated with G1’s level of involvement with their 3–4 year-old grandchildren (G3, generation 3). Path model analyses indicated different patterns of results for the involvement of grandmothers and grandfathers with the children of their G2 sons and daughters. Current parent-reported G1-G2 relationship quality was positively associated with G2 report of G1 involvement with G3, especially for G2 daughters. The relations among confounding variables, including geographic distance, socioeconomic status, and grandparent marital status and grandparent involvement with grandchildren were considered. Results highlight the roles of intergenerational relationship quality and gender configuration of the G1-G2 dyad in shaping grandparent involvement with grandchildren. PMID:20454593

  18. Tuning and playing a motor rhythm: how metabotropic glutamate receptors orchestrate generation of motor patterns in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Nistri, Andrea; Ostroumov, Konstantin; Sharifullina, Elina; Taccola, Giuliano

    2006-04-15

    Repeated motor activities like locomotion, mastication and respiration need rhythmic discharges of functionally connected neurons termed central pattern generators (CPGs) that cyclically activate motoneurons even in the absence of descending commands from higher centres. For motor pattern generation, CPGs require integration of multiple processes including activation of ion channels and transmitter receptors at strategic locations within motor networks. One emerging mechanism is activation of glutamate metabotropic receptors (mGluRs) belonging to group I, while group II and III mGluRs appear to play an inhibitory function on sensory inputs. Group I mGluRs generate neuronal membrane depolarization with input resistance increase and rapid fluctuations in intracellular Ca(2+), leading to enhanced excitability and rhythmicity. While synchronicity is probably due to modulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission, these oscillations occurring in coincidence with strong afferent stimuli or application of excitatory agents can trigger locomotor-like patterns. Hence, mGluR-sensitive spinal oscillators play a role in accessory networks for locomotor CPG activation. In brainstem networks supplying tongue muscle motoneurons, group I receptors facilitate excitatory synaptic inputs and evoke synchronous oscillations which stabilize motoneuron firing at regular, low frequency necessary for rhythmic tongue contractions. In this case, synchronicity depends on the strong electrical coupling amongst motoneurons rather than inhibitory transmission, while cyclic activation of K(ATP) conductances sets its periodicity. Activation of mGluRs is therefore a powerful strategy to trigger and recruit patterned discharges of motoneurons. PMID:16469790

  19. Coos County Youth and Out-of-School Activities: Patterns of Involvement and Barriers to Participation. New England Fact Sheet No. 7, Fall 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Erin Hiley

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet draws from surveys administered to a cohort of 416 participants in 7th grade in 2008, again when they were in 8th grade in 2009, and most recently as 10th graders in 2011 to look at patterns of participation in structured activities over time and whether male and female students differ in these patterns of participation. It also…

  20. Savannah River Site Public and Regulatory Involvement in the Cercla Low-Level Waste (LLW) Program and Their Effect on Decisions to Dispose of LLW Generated by Cercla

    SciTech Connect

    Belencan, H.

    2008-07-01

    The key to successful public involvement at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been and continues to be vigorous, up-front involvement of the public, federal and state regulators with technical experts. The SRS Waste Management Program includes all forms of radioactive waste. All of the decisions associated with the management of these wastes are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without including the public up-front in the program formulation. Serious problems can result if program decisions are made without public involvement, and if the public is informed after key decisions are made. This paper will describe the regulatory and public involvement program and their effects on the decisions concerning the disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of LLW generated from CERCLA Removal and Remedial Actions. At SRS the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) project has generated large amounts of LLW from the removal of buildings and processing facilities. The D and D project is expected to generate even larger amounts of LLW in the future. The most cost effective disposal alternated is to use the onsite LLW disposal facility in E-Area. The E-Area LLW Facility is owned and operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) under its authority granted by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. Since the disposal of CERCLA generated waste is also governed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) CERCLA regulations, it is important that EPA, DOE, and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) work together to resolve any conflicts in implementation of the D and D project so that all regulations are followed and the project can be continued successfully. An issue of particular significance will be described in this paper that, were it not resolved successfully, would have jeopardized the completion of one project and resulted in higher overall project costs. The EPA determined in review of

  1. Patterns of Broken Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. W.; Park, G. B.; Changala, P. B.; Baraban, J. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Merer, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopy - it is all about patterns. Some patterns look so indescribably complicated that, unlike pornography, you do not know one when you see one. It is tempting to say that, at high vibrational excitation, interactions among normal mode basis states are so strong and widespread that all patterns are obliterated. But this is not true. When normal mode frequencies are in near integer multiple ratios, polyads emerge. A polyad is a robust pattern often comprising many vibrational eigenstates. Each such pattern might span many hundreds of cm^{-1}, and it is inevitable that several unrelated polyad patterns overlap. When polyads overlap, it might seem impossible to disentangle them. However, the key to disentanglement is that polyads come in families in which successive generations are related by harmonic oscillator matrix element selection and scaling rules. Families of polyads are described by families of scaling-based effective Hamiltonian matrices, {H}^{{eff}}. No matter how complex and overlapped, the polyad {H}^{{eff}} serves as a magic decoder for picking out the polyad pattern. Sometimes the polyad patterns are systematically broken (a meta-pattern), owing to proximity to an isomerization barrier, as occurs in highly excited bending levels of the S_{1} state of HCCH, which encode the trans-cis minimum energy isomerization path. Quantum Chemists often dismiss {H}^{{eff}} models, precisely because they are models that do not express the full dimensionality of the complete Hamiltonian. But an {H}^{{eff}} explains rather than describes. Shunning {H}^{{eff}}s is like throwing out the baby with the bath water. Don't do it!

  2. Defining preBötzinger Complex Rhythm- and Pattern-Generating Neural Microcircuits In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yan; Kam, Kaiwen; Sherman, David; Janczewski, Wiktor A; Zheng, Yu; Feldman, Jack L

    2016-08-01

    Normal breathing in rodents requires activity of glutamatergic Dbx1-derived (Dbx1(+)) preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) neurons expressing somatostatin (SST). We combined in vivo optogenetic and pharmacological perturbations to elucidate the functional roles of these neurons in breathing. In transgenic adult mice expressing channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in Dbx1(+) neurons, photoresponsive preBötC neurons had preinspiratory or inspiratory firing patterns associated with excitatory effects on burst timing and pattern. In transgenic adult mice expressing ChR2 in SST(+) neurons, photoresponsive preBötC neurons had inspiratory or postinspiratory firing patterns associated with excitatory responses on pattern or inhibitory responses that were largely eliminated by blocking synaptic inhibition within preBötC or by local viral infection limiting ChR2 expression to preBötC SST(+) neurons. We conclude that: (1) preinspiratory preBötC Dbx1(+) neurons are rhythmogenic, (2) inspiratory preBötC Dbx1(+) and SST(+) neurons primarily act to pattern respiratory motor output, and (3) SST(+)-neuron-mediated pathways and postsynaptic inhibition within preBötC modulate breathing pattern. PMID:27497222

  3. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  4. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qiong; Hu, Hao; Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  5. Retraction Notice: Generation of Knock down Tools for Transcription Factor 7-like-2 (TCF7L2) and Evaluation of its Expression Pattern in Developing Chicken Optic Tectum.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The publishers have decided to retract the manuscript entitled "Generation of Knock Down Tools for Transcription Factor 7-Like-2 (TCF7L2) and Evaluation of its Expression Pattern in Developing Chicken Optic Tectum" published in MicroRNA, volume 4, issue 3, page numbers 209-216, 2015, for the following reasons. • Due to conflict of interests between authors and the Principal Investigator. PMID:26861895

  6. Involvement of plasma membrane Ca2+ channels, IP3 receptors, and ryanodine receptors in the generation of spontaneous rhythmic contractions of the cricket lateral oviduct.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, Hirotake; Yoshino, Masami

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, the isolated cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) lateral oviduct exhibited spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRCs) with a frequency of 0.29±0.009 Hz (n=43) and an amplitude of 14.6±1.25 mg (n=29). SRCs completely disappeared following removal of extracellular Ca2+ using a solution containing 5mM EGTA. Application of the non-specific Ca2+ channel blockers Co2+, Ni2+, and Cd2+ also decreased both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs in dose-dependent manners, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through plasma membrane Ca2+ channels is essential for the generation of SRCs. Application of ryanodine (30 μM), which depletes intracellular Ca2+ by locking ryanodine receptor (RyR)-Ca2+ channels in an open state, gradually reduced the frequency and amplitude of SRCs. A RyR antagonist, tetracaine, reduced both the frequency and amplitude of SRCs, whereas a RyR activator, caffeine, increased the frequency of SRCs with a subsequent increase in basal tonus, indicating that RyRs are essential for generating SRCs. To further investigate the involvement of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) in SRCs, we examined the effect of a PLC inhibitor, U73122, and an IP3R antagonist, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), on SRCs. Separately, U73122 (10 μM) and 2-APB (30-50 μM) both significantly reduced the amplitude of SRCs with little effect on their frequency, further indicating that the PLC/IP3R signaling pathway is fundamental to the modulation of the amplitude of SRCs. A hypotonic-induced increase in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs and a hypertonic-induced decrease in the frequency and amplitude of SRCs indicated that mechanical stretch of the lateral oviduct is involved in the generation of SRCs. The sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-pump ATPase inhibitors thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid impaired or suppressed the relaxation phase of SRCs. Taken together, the present results indicate that Ca2+ influx through plasma membrane Ca2

  7. Environmentalism as a context for expressing identity and generativity: patterns among activists and uninvolved youth and midlife adults.

    PubMed

    Matsuba, M Kyle; Pratt, Michael W; Norris, Joan E; Mohle, Erika; Alisat, Susan; McAdams, Dan P

    2012-08-01

    Previous qualitative studies have identified themes of generativity and identity development in the interviews of environmental activists (Chan, 2009; Horwitz, 1996), suggesting their importance as motives for environmental behavior. The purpose of our study was to extend this work by identifying positive relationships between identity maturity, generativity, and environmentalism using quantitative methodologies. To explore these relationships, we designed quasi-experimental and correlational studies. We recruited 54 environmental activists and 56 comparison individuals, half of whom were youth (mean age = 22 years) and the other half midlife adults (mean age = 43 years). Sixty-three percent of our sample was female. Participants completed several environmental, generativity, and identity questionnaires. We found that activists and comparison individuals differed on the identity maturity, generativity, and environmental measures overall. Further, greater identity maturity and generativity were associated with higher environmental engagement. And generativity was found to mediate the relation between identity maturity and environmentalism. Our findings suggest that engaging in generative behaviors may be an important part of the process in forming an environmental identity and engaging in environmental actions. PMID:22224847

  8. Walk-Off-Induced Modulation Instability, Temporal Pattern Formation, and Frequency Comb Generation in Cavity-Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, F.; Hansson, T.; Ricciardi, I.; De Rosa, M.; Coen, S.; Wabnitz, S.; Erkintalo, M.

    2016-01-01

    We derive a time-domain mean-field equation to model the full temporal and spectral dynamics of light in singly resonant cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We show that the temporal walk-off between the fundamental and the second-harmonic fields plays a decisive role under realistic conditions, giving rise to rich, previously unidentified nonlinear behavior. Through linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we discover a new kind of quadratic modulation instability which leads to the formation of optical frequency combs and associated time-domain dissipative structures. Our numerical simulations show excellent agreement with recent experimental observations of frequency combs in quadratic nonlinear media [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063839 (2015)]. Thus, in addition to unveiling a new, experimentally accessible regime of nonlinear dynamics, our work enables predictive modeling of frequency comb generation in cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We expect our findings to have wide impact on the study of temporal and spectral dynamics in a diverse range of dispersive, quadratically nonlinear resonators.

  9. Bud structure, position and fate generate various branching patterns along shoots of closely related Rosaceae species: a review

    PubMed Central

    Costes, Evelyne; Crespel, Laurent; Denoyes, Béatrice; Morel, Philippe; Demene, Marie-Noëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Eric; Wenden, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Branching in temperate plants is closely linked to bud fates, either floral or vegetative. Here, we review how the fate of meristematic tissues contained in buds and their position along a shoot imprint specific branching patterns which differ among species. Through examples chosen in closely related species in different genera of the Rosaceae family, a panorama of patterns is apparent. Patterns depend on whether vegetative and floral buds are borne individually or together in mixed buds, develop as the shoot grows or after a rest period, and are located in axillary or terminal positions along the parent shoot. The resulting branching patterns are conserved among varieties in a given species but progressively change with the parent shoot length during plant ontogeny. They can also be modulated by agronomic and environmental conditions. The existence of various organizations in the topology and fate of meristematic tissues and their appendages in closely related species questions the between-species conservation of physiological and molecular mechanisms leading to bud outgrowth vs. quiescence and to floral induction vs. vegetative development. PMID:25520729

  10. Changes in the pattern of distribution of von Willebrand factor in rat aortic endothelial cells following thrombin generation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Senis, Y A; Richardson, M; Tinlin, S; Maurice, D H; Giles, A R

    1996-04-01

    The pattern of distribution of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in relatively large sheets of rat aortic endothelial cells (EC) obtained by the Häutchen technique were analysed by immunocytochemistry and light microscopy. EC were examined pre and post administration of a procoagulant mixture of factor Xa (F.Xa) and phosphotidylcholine/phosphotidylserine (PCPS) vesicles which was demonstrated to result in the selective loss of high molecular weight multimers (HMWM) of plasma VWF in the rat. In placebo animals the pattern was heterogenous both in overall distribution and in individual cells which showed both a diffuse and granular pattern. Groups of intensely stained EC were oriented parallel to the longitudinal axis of the aorta and staining was particularly prominent around the orifices of the intercostal arteries, implicating shear-stress as a possible factor in VWF expression by EC. Changes in the pattern of distribution of staining were observed at various time points post-infusion of F.Xa/PCPS, suggesting the immediate release of VWF from EC stores followed by the recruitment of EC to synthesize and store VWF. These changes are consistent with the decrease in EC Weibel-Palade Body (WPB) content observed by EM in previously reported studies using this model. PMID:8611460

  11. Using a model to assess the role of the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibitory input and intrasegmental electrical coupling in the intersegmental and side-to-side coordination of motor neurons by the leech heartbeat central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    García, Paul S; Wright, Terrence M; Cunningham, Ian R; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2008-09-01

    Previously we presented a quantitative description of the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibitory synaptic input from the heartbeat central pattern generator (CPG) to segmental motor neurons that drive heartbeat in the medicinal leech and the resultant coordination of CPG interneurons and motor neurons. To begin elucidating the mechanisms of coordination, we explore intersegmental and side-to-side coordination in an ensemble model of all heart motor neurons and their known synaptic inputs and electrical coupling. Model motor neuron intrinsic properties were kept simple, enabling us to determine the extent to which input and electrical coupling acting together can account for observed coordination in the living system in the absence of a substantive contribution from the motor neurons themselves. The living system produces an asymmetric motor pattern: motor neurons on one side fire nearly in synchrony (synchronous), whereas on the other they fire in a rear-to-front progression (peristaltic). The model reproduces the general trends of intersegmental and side-to-side phase relations among motor neurons, but the match with the living system is not quantitatively accurate. Thus realistic (experimentally determined) inputs do not produce similarly realistic output in our model, suggesting that motor neuron intrinsic properties may contribute to their coordination. By varying parameters that determine electrical coupling, conduction delays, intraburst synaptic plasticity, and motor neuron excitability, we show that the most important determinant of intersegmental and side-to-side phase relations in the model was the spatiotemporal pattern of synaptic inputs, although phasing was influenced significantly by electrical coupling. PMID:18579654

  12. Use of adaptive network burst detection methods for multielectrode array data and the generation of artificial spike patterns for method evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, G. D. C.; Morrisroe, E.; Petrou, S.; Halgamuge, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Multielectrode arrays are an informative extracellular recording technology that enables the analysis of cultured neuronal networks and network bursts (NBs) are a dominant feature observed in these recordings. This paper focuses on the validation of NB detection methods on different network activity patterns and developing a detection method that performs robustly across a wide variety of activity patterns. Approach. A firing rate based approach was used to generate artificial spike timestamps where NBs were introduced as episodes where the probability of spiking increases. Variations in firing and bursting characteristics were also included. In addition, an improved methodology of detecting NBs is proposed, based on time-binned average firing rates and time overlaps of single channel bursts. The robustness of the proposed method was compared against three existing algorithms using simulated, publicly available and newly acquired data. Main results. A range of activity patterns were generated by changing simulation variables that correspond to NB duration (40-2200 ms), intervals (0.3-16 s), firing rates (0.1-1 spikes s-1), local burst percentage (0%-90%), number of channels in local bursts (20-40) as well as the number of tonic and frequently-bursting channels. By extracting simulation parameters directly from real data, we generated synthetic data that closely resemble activity of mouse and rat cortical cultures at native and chemically perturbed states. In 50 simulated data sets with randomly selected parameter values, the improved NB detection method performed better (ascertained by the f-measure) than three existing methods (p < 0.005). The improved method was also able to detect clustered, long-tailed and short-frequent NBs on real data. Significance. This work presents an objective method of assessing the applicability of NB detection methods for different neuronal activity patterns. Furthermore, it proposes an improved NB detection method that can

  13. Multidimensional religious involvement and tobacco smoking patterns over 9-10 years: A prospective study of middle-aged adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zinzi D; Slopen, Natalie; Albert, Michelle; Williams, David R

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the relationship between multiple dimensions of religious involvement and transitions of tobacco smoking abstinence, persistence, cessation and relapse over 9-10 years of follow-up in a national sample of adults in the United States. Using data provided at baseline and follow-up, participants were categorized as non-smokers, persistent smokers, ex-smokers, and relapsed smokers. Religious involvement over the two time points were categorized into combinations of "high" and "low" involvement within the domains of (a) religious attendance, (b) religious importance, (c) spiritual importance, (d) religious/spiritual comfort seeking, and (e) religious/spiritual decision-making. High levels of religious involvement across five dimensions (religious attendance, religious importance, spiritual importance, religious/spiritual comfort-seeking, and religious/spiritual decision-making) were associated with lower odds of being a persistent smoker or ex-smoker. Religious involvement was not associated with smoking cessation among smokers at baseline. Interventions to increase smoking abstinence may be more effective if they draw on ties to religious and spiritual organizations and beliefs. Meanwhile, religious involvement is unlikely to affect smoking cessation effectiveness. PMID:26093070

  14. Perception of the Arabidopsis Danger Signal Peptide 1 Involves the Pattern Recognition Receptor AtPEPR1 and Its Close Homologue AtPEPR2*

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Elzbieta; Mentzel, Tobias; Chinchilla, Delphine; Boller, Thomas; Felix, Georg; Kemmerling, Birgit; Postel, Sandra; Arents, Michael; Jeworutzki, Elena; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Becker, Dirk; Hedrich, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Plasma membrane-borne pattern recognition receptors, which recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns, provide the first line of defense in innate immunity. In plants, leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases fulfill this role, as exemplified by FLS2 and EFR, the receptors for the microbe-associated molecular patterns flagellin and elongation factor Tu. Here we examined the perception of the damage-associated molecular pattern peptide 1 (AtPep1), an endogenous peptide of Arabidopsis identified earlier and shown to be perceived by the leucine-rich repeat protein kinase PEPR1. Using seedling growth inhibition, elicitation of an oxidative burst and induction of ethylene biosynthesis, we show that wild type plants and the pepr1 and pepr2 mutants, affected in PEPR1 and in its homologue PEPR2, are sensitive to AtPep1, but that the double mutant pepr1/pepr2 is completely insensitive. As a central body of our study, we provide electrophysiological evidence that at the level of the plasma membrane, AtPep1 triggers a receptor-dependent transient depolarization through activation of plasma membrane anion channels, and that this effect is absent in the double mutant pepr1/pepr2. The double mutant also fails to respond to AtPep2 and AtPep3, two distant homologues of AtPep1 on the basis of homology screening, implying that the PEPR1 and PEPR2 are responsible for their perception too. Our findings provide a basic framework to study the biological role of AtPep1-related danger signals and their cognate receptors. PMID:20200150

  15. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Wiser, Ryan H; Wiser, Ryan H; Fripp, Matthias

    2008-05-01

    Wind power production is variable, but also has diurnal and seasonal patterns. These patterns differ between sites, potentially making electric power from some wind sites more valuable for meeting customer loads or selling in wholesale power markets. This paper investigates whether the timing of wind significantly affects the value of electricity from sites in California and the Northwestern United States. We use both measured and modeled wind data and estimate the time-varying value of wind power with both financial and load-based metrics. We find that the potential difference in wholesale market value between better-correlated and poorly correlated wind sites is modest, on the order of 5-10 percent. A load-based metric, power production during the top 10 percent of peak load hours, varies more strongly between sites, suggesting that the capacity value of different wind projects could vary by as much as 50 percent based on the timing of wind alone.

  16. Suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion by a selective GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonist. Direct evidence for involvement of endogenous GHRH in the generation of GH pulses.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, C A; Friberg, R D; Barkan, A L

    1993-01-01

    To study the potential involvement of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in the generation of growth hormone (GH) pulses in humans we have used a competitive antagonist to the GHRH receptor, (N-Ac-Tyr1,D-Arg2)GHRH(1-29)NH2(GHRH-Ant). Six healthy young men were given a bolus injection of GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg body wt or vehicle at 2200 h and nocturnal GH concentrations were assessed by every 10-min blood sampling until 0800 h. Integrated total and pulsatile GH secretion were suppressed during GHRH-Ant treatment by 40 +/- 6 (SE) % and 75 +/- 5%, respectively. GHRH-Ant suppressed maximum (7.6 +/- 2.2 vs 1.8 +/- 0.5 micrograms/liter; P < 0.001) and mean (3.3 +/- 1.0 vs 1.1 +/- 0.2 micrograms/liter; P = 0.02) GH pulse amplitudes. There was no change in integrated nonpulsatile GH levels, pulse frequency, or interpulse GH concentration. GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg also suppressed the GH responses to intravenous boluses of GHRH 0.33 micrograms/kg given 1, 6, 12, and 24 h later by 95, 81, 59, and 4%, respectively. In five healthy men, the responses to 10-fold larger GHRH boluses (3.3 micrograms/kg) were suppressed by 82 and 0%, 1 and 6 h after GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg, respectively. These studies provide the first direct evidence that endogenous GHRH participates in the generation of spontaneous GH pulses in humans. PMID:8349808

  17. An Impact Velocity Device Design for Blood Spatter Pattern Generation with Considerations for High-Speed Video Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stotesbury, Theresa; Illes, Mike; Vreugdenhil, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    A mechanical device that uses gravitational and spring compression forces to create spatter patterns of known impact velocities is presented and discussed. The custom-made device uses either two or four springs (k1 = 267.8 N/m, k2 = 535.5 N/m) in parallel to create seventeen reproducible impact velocities between 2.1 and 4.0 m/s. The impactor is held at several known spring extensions using an electromagnet. Trigger inputs to the high-speed video camera allow the user to control the magnet's release while capturing video footage simultaneously. A polycarbonate base is used to allow for simultaneous monitoring of the side and bottom views of the impact event. Twenty-four patterns were created across the impact velocity range and analyzed using HemoSpat. Area of origin estimations fell within an acceptable range (ΔXav = -5.5 ± 1.9 cm, ΔYav = -2.6 ± 2.8 cm, ΔZav = +5.5 ± 3.8 cm), supporting distribution analysis for the use in research or bloodstain pattern training. This work provides a framework for those interested in developing a robust impact device. PMID:27404625

  18. PERK pathway is involved in oxygen-glucose-serum deprivation-induced NF-kB activation via ROS generation in spinal cord astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinbo; Du, Lijian

    2015-11-13

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a direct target of hypoxic/ischemic stress in astrocytes, which results in the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous reports showed that ROS can activate NF-kB in spinal cord astrocytes, which occurs as a secondary injury during the pathological process of spinal cord injury (SCI). Protein kinase RNA (PKR)-like ER kinase (PERK) plays an important role in mitochondrial dysfunction. To elucidate the specific role of PERK in hypoxic/ischemic-induced NF-kB activation in spinal astrocytes, we utilized an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model, which showed an enhanced formation of ROS and NF-kB activation. Knockdown of PERK resulted in reduced activation of PERK and ROS generation in astrocytes under OGD conditions. Notably, the knockdown of PERK also induced NF-kB activation in astrocytes. These data suggest that PERK is required for the hypoxic/ischemic-induced-dependent regulation of ROS and that it is involved in NF-kB activation in the astrocytes. PMID:26454173

  19. Student-generated questions during chemistry lectures: Patterns, self-appraisals, and relations with motivational beliefs and achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergey, Bradley W.

    Self-generated questions are a central mechanism for learning, yet students' questions are often infrequent during classroom instruction. As a result, little is known about the nature of student questioning during typical instructional contexts such as listening to a lecture, including the extent and nature of student-generated questions, how students evaluate their questions, and the relations among questions, motivations, and achievement. This study examined the questions undergraduate students (N = 103) generated during 8 lectures in an introductory chemistry course. Students recorded and appraised their question in daily question logs and reported lecture-specific self-efficacy beliefs. Self-efficacy, personal interest, goal orientations, and other motivational self-beliefs were measured before and after the unit. Primary analyses included testing path models, multiple regressions, and latent class analyses. Overall, results indicated that several characteristics of student questioning during lectures were significantly related to various motivations and achievement. Higher end-of-class self-efficacy was associated with fewer procedural questions and more questions that reflected smaller knowledge deficits. Lower exam scores were associated with questions reflecting broader knowledge deficits and students' appraisals that their questions had less value for others than for themselves. Individual goal orientations collectively and positively predicted question appraisals. The questions students generated and their relations with motivational variables and achievement are discussed in light of the learning task and academic context.

  20. Academic Generations and Academic Work: Patterns of Attitudes, Behaviors, and Research Productivity of Polish Academics after 1989

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwiek, Marek

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on a generational change taking place in the Polish academic profession: a change in behaviors and attitudes between two groups of academics. One was socialized to academia under the communist regime (1945-1989) and the other entered the profession in the post-1989 transition period. Academics of all age groups are beginning to…

  1. Pattern Search in Multi-structure Data: A Framework for the Next-Generation Evidence-based Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Ainsworth, Keela C

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of personalized and evidence-based medicine, the need for a framework to analyze/interpret quantitative measurements (blood work, toxicology, etc.) with qualitative descriptions (specialist reports after reading images, bio-medical knowledge-bases) to predict diagnostic risks is fast emerging. Addressing this need, we pose and address the following questions (i) How can we jointly analyze both qualitative and quantitative data ? (ii) Is the fusion of multi-structure data expected to provide better insights than either of them individually ? We present experiments on two bio-medical data sets - mammography and traumatic brain studies to demonstrate architectures and tools for evidence-pattern search.

  2. Characteristic analysis and comparison of axial flux machines according to magnetization pattern for 500 W-class wind power generator application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yu-Seop; Jang, Seok-Myeong; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Jang-Young; Sung, So-Young

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the electromagnetic characteristic analysis of axial flux machines applied to 500(W) class wind power generators. For the dramatic analysis time reduction, analytical method is applied, and comparative analysis is performed according to magnetization patterns of permanent magnets. Due to their structural features, quasi 3-dimensional analysis is employed, and correction function is introduced to consider the flux leakage of the machines. The analysis results are compared with the results by finite element method and experiment to validate the suggested method performed in this paper showing high reliability.

  3. Presentation of postweaning Escherichia coli diarrhea in southern Ontario, prevalence of hemolytic E. coli serogroups involved, and their antimicrobial resistance patterns

    PubMed Central

    Amezcua, Rocio; Friendship, Robert M.; Dewey, Catherine E.; Gyles, Carlton; Fairbrother, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Post-weaning Escherichia coli diarrhea (PWECD) in Ontario was investigated using a case-control study involving 50 Ontario nurseries. The clinical signs and the impact on productive parameters were determined by means of a producer survey. The hemolytic E. coli serogroups involved in PWECD (O149:K91:K88) were examined in this study. Based on a polymerase chain reaction test, the hemolytic E. coli from 82% of the case herds were positive for 3 enterotoxins (STa, STb, and LT), those from 12% of the case herds were positive for STb and LT only, and those from one herd (6%) were positive for 3 enterotoxins, as well as for verotoxin and F18 pili. The E. coli involved in disease were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Case farms commonly used a wide variety of antibiotics either in the feed or water, or as injectable drugs. The most common antibiotic used to treat PWECD on the study farms was apramycin, but evidence of resistance to this antibiotic was noted. The PWECD problem was commonly seen within a week of weaning but onset of diarrhea was reported as late as the grower-finisher stage. Growth rate was poorer in case herds and mortality was higher than in control herds, demonstrating that PWECD is an economically important disease in Ontario. PMID:11989737

  4. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Identification in Tegumentary Lesions of Patients with Paracoccidioidomycosis and Different Patterns of NETs Generation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Della Coletta, Amanda Manoel; Bachiega, Tatiana Fernanda; de Quaglia e Silva, Juliana Carvalho; Soares, Ângela Maria Victoriano de Campos; De Faveri, Julio; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis, endemic in most Latin American countries, especially in Brazil. It is caused by the thermo-dimorphic fungus of the genus Paracoccidioides (Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii). Innate immune response plays a crucial role in host defense against fungal infections, and neutrophils (PMNs) are able to combat microorganisms with three different mechanisms: phagocytosis, secretion of granular proteins, which have antimicrobial properties, and the most recent described mechanism called NETosis. This new process is characterized by the release of net-like structures called Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), which is composed of nuclear (decondensed DNA and histones) and granular material such as elastase. Several microorganisms have the ability of inducing NETs formation, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, viruses and some fungi. We proposed to identify NETs in tegumentary lesions of patients with PCM and to analyze the interaction between two strains of P. brasiliensis and human PMNs by NETs formation in vitro. In this context, the presence of NETs in vivo was evidenced in tegumentary lesions of patients with PCM by confocal spectrum analyzer. Furthermore, we showed that the high virulent P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18) and the lower virulent strain Pb265 are able to induce different patterns of NETs formation in vitro. The quantification of extracellular DNA corroborates the idea of the ability of P. brasiliensis in inducing NETs release. In conclusion, our data show for the first time the identification of NETs in lesions of patients with PCM and demonstrate distinct patterns of NETs in cultures challenged with fungi in vitro. The presence of NETs components both in vivo and in vitro open new possibilities for the detailed investigation of immunity in PCM. PMID:26327485

  5. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Identification in Tegumentary Lesions of Patients with Paracoccidioidomycosis and Different Patterns of NETs Generation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Della Coletta, Amanda Manoel; Bachiega, Tatiana Fernanda; de Quaglia e Silva, Juliana Carvalho; Soares, Ângela Maria Victoriano de Campos; De Faveri, Julio; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis, endemic in most Latin American countries, especially in Brazil. It is caused by the thermo-dimorphic fungus of the genus Paracoccidioides (Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii). Innate immune response plays a crucial role in host defense against fungal infections, and neutrophils (PMNs) are able to combat microorganisms with three different mechanisms: phagocytosis, secretion of granular proteins, which have antimicrobial properties, and the most recent described mechanism called NETosis. This new process is characterized by the release of net-like structures called Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), which is composed of nuclear (decondensed DNA and histones) and granular material such as elastase. Several microorganisms have the ability of inducing NETs formation, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, viruses and some fungi. We proposed to identify NETs in tegumentary lesions of patients with PCM and to analyze the interaction between two strains of P. brasiliensis and human PMNs by NETs formation in vitro. In this context, the presence of NETs in vivo was evidenced in tegumentary lesions of patients with PCM by confocal spectrum analyzer. Furthermore, we showed that the high virulent P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18) and the lower virulent strain Pb265 are able to induce different patterns of NETs formation in vitro. The quantification of extracellular DNA corroborates the idea of the ability of P. brasiliensis in inducing NETs release. In conclusion, our data show for the first time the identification of NETs in lesions of patients with PCM and demonstrate distinct patterns of NETs in cultures challenged with fungi in vitro. The presence of NETs components both in vivo and in vitro open new possibilities for the detailed investigation of immunity in PCM. PMID:26327485

  6. Different sources involved in generation of continental arc volcanism: The Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks in the northern margin of the North China block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuan-Hong; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Jian-Min; Hu, Zhao-Chu

    2016-01-01

    New zircon U-Pb dating results on the Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks in the northern margin of the North China block (NCB) indicate their eruption during the Early Carboniferous to Late Permian from 347 ± 3 Ma to 258 ± 1 Ma and a slight decrease of the upper limits of the volcanic sequences from west to east. They have a main rock association of basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite, rhyolite, tuff, and tufaceous sandstone. Most of them have calc-alkaline compositions and exhibit variable SiO2 contents from 48.2 wt.% to 77.1 wt.%. There is no significant gap between the mafic and felsic volcanic rocks in major and trace element classification diagrams, indicating that they are not bimodal in composition. The Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks exhibit subduction-related geochemical features such as negative Nb and Ta anomalies of mafic to intermediate rocks on primitive mantle-normalized diagrams, indicating they were formed in an Andean-type continental arc during southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate beneath the northern NCB. However, their wide range of whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic compositions indicate that their source areas are very complex and different sources were involved in generation of these volcanic rocks. Geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic results show that the basalt and some andesite were produced by fractional crystallization of mafic magma derived from partial melting of mantle wedge and subducted oceanic crust; however, most of the intermediate to felsic volcanic rocks were derived from partial melting of lower continental crust. There is an increasing input of crustal materials from the Carboniferous to Permian as indicated by increasing volumes of felsic volcanic rocks in the volcanic sequences. The results show that origin of the continental arc volcanism is very complex and both materials from the subducted oceanic crust and sediments, mantle wedge and arc continental crust could be involved in their

  7. Near-ultraviolet light perceived by the retina generates the signal suppressing melatonin synthesis in the chick pineal gland-an involvement of NMDA glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Rosiak, Jolanta; Zawilska, Jolanta B

    2005-05-13

    Exposure of dark-adapted chicks to near ultraviolet (UV-A) light significantly decreased melatonin (MEL) content and the activity of serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT; the penultimate and key regulatory enzyme in MEL production) in the pineal glands. Significant reduction in MEL level and AA-NAT activity was also found in pineals of animals whose heads were covered with black opaque tape, an observation suggesting that in the chicken UV-A light perceived by the eyes alone is capable of affecting MEL synthesis in the pineal gland. Covering the chick's eyes, in addition to the head, totally blocked the studied UV-A action. Although SCH 23390 (a selective D1-dopamine receptor antagonist), injected directly into both eyes at a dose of 10 nmol/eye, prevented the decline in pineal AA-NAT activity produced by retinal illumination with white light, the drug did not modify the UV-A light-evoked decrease in the enzyme activity. MK-801 (a selective antagonist of NMDA glutamate receptors; 1 nmol/eye) abolished the suppressive action of UV-A light on pineal AA-NAT activity, but it was inactive in the case of white light. Intraocularly injected sulpiride and CNQX (selective antagonists of D2-dopamine and AMPA/kainite glutamate receptors, respectively) had no effect on the actions of both UV-A and white light (acting on the eyes only) on pineal AA-NAT activity. It is concluded that in the chick retinally perceived UV-A light generates a signal which suppresses MEL production in the pineal gland. At the level of the retina, such signal does not involve dopamine, but is dependent on the stimulation of NMDA glutamate receptors. PMID:15843066

  8. Reversal of Endothelial Dysfunction by GPBAR1 Agonism in Portal Hypertension Involves a AKT/FOXOA1 Dependent Regulation of H2S Generation and Endothelin-1

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Cipriani, Sabrina; Carino, Adriana; Simonetti, Michele; Zampella, Angela; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Background GPBAR1 is a bile acids activated receptor expressed in entero-hepatic tissues. In the liver expression of GPBAR1 is restricted to sinusoidal and Kuppfer cells. In the systemic circulation vasodilation caused by GPBAR1 agonists is abrogated by inhibition of cystathione-γ-liase (CSE), an enzyme essential to the generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a vasodilatory agent. Portal BAR501 is a semisynthetic bile acid derivative endowed with a potent and selective agonistic activity toward GPBAR1. Methods Cirrhosis was induced in mice by carbon tetrachloride (CCL4) administration for 9 weeks. Liver endothelial dysfunction was induced by feeding wild type and Gpbar1-/- mice with methionine for 4 weeks. In both models, mice were administered BAR501, 15 mg/kg/day. Results By transactivation assay we demonstrate that BAR501 is a selective GPBAR1 agonist devoid of any FXR agonistic activity. In naïve rats, BAR501 effectively reduced hepatic perfusion pressure and counteracted the vasoconstriction activity of norepinephrine. In the CCl4 model, 9 weeks treatment with BAR501 effectively protected against development of endothelial dysfunction by increasing liver CSE expression and activity and by reducing endothelin (ET)-1 gene expression. In mice feed methionine, treatment with BAR501 attenuated endothelial dysfunction and caused a GPBAR1-dependent regulation of CSE. Using human liver sinusoidal cells, we found that modulation of CSE expression/activity is mediated by both genomic (recruitment of CREB to CRE in the CSE promoter) and non-genomic effects, involving a Akt-dependent phosporylation of CSE and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS). BAR501, phosphorylates FOXO1 and inhibits ET-1 transcription in liver sinusoidal cells. Conclusions BAR501, a UDCA-like GPBAR1 agonist, rescues from endothelial dysfunction in rodent models of portal hypertension by exerting genomic and non-genomic effects on CSE, eNOS and ET-1 in liver sinusoidal cells. PMID:26539823

  9. A putative miR172-targeted CeAPETALA2-like gene is involved in floral patterning regulation of the orchid Cymbidium ensifolium.

    PubMed

    Yang, F X; Zhu, G F; Wang, Z; Liu, H L; Huang, D

    2015-01-01

    APETALA2 plays critical roles in establishing meristem and organ identity during plant floral development. In this study, we obtained a CeAP2-like gene by using the mRNA differential display technique to analyze the wild type and a multitepal mutant of the orchid Cymbidium ensifolium. The full-length cDNA encoding the CeAP2-like transcription factor shows significant similarity to the cDNA of AP2 from Erycina pusilla and contains nucleotides complementary to miR172. Using a transient gene expression system of Arabidopsis protoplasts, we found that the accumulation of CeAP2-like protein and transcripts was negatively regulated by miR172, indicating this gene as a putative target of miR172. Northern blotting revealed that CeAP2-like is dominantly expressed in the sepals and petals of the wild-type flower, and shows low expression in the gynostemium. In contrast, the accumulation of CeAP2-like transcripts decreased significantly, especially in the central part of the mutant flower, corresponding to its abnormal petals and the absence of the gynostemium. Furthermore, we found an antagonistic expression pattern between CeAP2-like and AGAMOUS in the wild type, representing A- and C-class genes that specify floral organ fate. However, this antagonistic distribution was modified in the multitepal mutant, and both genes showed lower expression than that in the wild type. This result suggested that the balance between CeAP2-like and AGAMOUS activity was important for the regulation of floral patterning in C. ensifolium. This study represents the first report on a class A gene and its regulatory role for floral development in the orchid C. ensifolium. PMID:26505352

  10. Adaptation of the targeted capture Methyl-Seq platform for the mouse genome identifies novel tissue-specific DNA methylation patterns of genes involved in neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Hing, Benjamin; Ramos, Enrique; Braun, Patricia; McKane, Melissa; Jancic, Dubravka; Tamashiro, Kellie L K; Lee, Richard S; Michaelson, Jacob J; Druley, Todd E; Potash, James B

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-Seq was recently developed as a targeted approach to assess DNA methylation (DNAm) at a genome-wide level in human. We adapted it for mouse and sought to examine DNAm differences across liver and 2 brain regions: cortex and hippocampus. A custom hybridization array was designed to isolate 99 Mb of CpG islands, shores, shelves, and regulatory elements in the mouse genome. This was followed by bisulfite conversion and sequencing on the Illumina HiSeq2000. The majority of differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs) were present at greater than expected frequency in introns, intergenic regions, near CpG islands, and transcriptional enhancers. Liver-specific enhancers were observed to be methylated in cortex, while cortex specific enhancers were methylated in the liver. Interestingly, commonly shared enhancers were differentially methylated between the liver and cortex. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed that genes that were hypomethylated in the cortex and hippocampus were enriched for neuronal components and neuronal function. In contrast, genes that were hypomethylated in the liver were enriched for cellular components important for liver function. Bisulfite-pyrosequencing validation of 75 DMCs from 19 different loci showed a correlation of r = 0.87 with Methyl-Seq data. We also identified genes involved in neurodevelopment that were not previously reported to be differentially methylated across brain regions. This platform constitutes a valuable tool for future genome-wide studies involving mouse models of disease. PMID:25985232

  11. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valade, Laurent; Fuchs, Vladimir; Ekedahl, Annika; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-01

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra).

  12. Effect of the electric field pattern on the generation of fast electrons in front of lower hybrid launchers

    SciTech Connect

    Valade, Laurent Ekedahl, Annika; Colas, Laurent; Goniche, Marc; Hillairet, Julien; Fuchs, Vladimir; Petrzilka, Vaclav; Li, Miaohui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-12-10

    The effect of the detailed waveguide spectrum on the electron acceleration has been studied for the 3.7 GHz LHCD launchers in Tore Supra, i.e. the ITER-like passive-active multijunction (PAM) launcher and the fully-active-multijunction (FAM) launcher, using test electron modelling technique. The detailed launched antenna wave spectrum is used as input to the code that computes the dynamics of the electrons in the electric field. Comparison with the LHCD launchers in EAST, operating at 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz, has also been made. The simulations show that the PAM-design generates lower flux of fast electrons than FAM-launchers, this could be the consequence of the wider waveguide of PAM-launcher (14.65 mm for Tore-Supra) than FAM-launcher (8 mm for Tore-Supra)

  13. 3D imaging of flow patterns in an internally-pumped microfluidic device: redox magnetohydrodynamics and electrochemically-generated density gradients.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Kreidermacher, Adam; Fritsch, Ingrid; Heyes, Colin D

    2013-05-01

    Redox magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a promising technique for developing new electrochemical-based microfluidic flow devices with unique capabilities, such as easily switching flow direction and adjusting flow speeds and flow patterns as well as avoiding bubble formation. However, a detailed description of all the forces involved and predicting flow patterns in confined geometries is lacking. In addition to redox-MHD, density gradients caused by the redox reactions also play important roles. Flow in these devices with small fluid volumes has mainly been characterized by following microbead motion by optical microscopy either by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) or by processing the microbead images by particle image velocimetry (PIV) software. This approach has limitations in spatial resolution and dimensionality. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to quantitatively and accurately measure flow speeds and patterns in the ~5-50 μm/s range in redox-MHD-based microfluidic devices, from which 3D flow maps are obtained with a spatial resolution down to 2 μm. The 2 μm spatial resolution flow speeds map revealed detailed flow profiles during redox-MHD in which the velocity increases linearly from above the electrode and reaches a plateau across the center of the cell. By combining FCS and video-microscopy (with PTV and PIV processing approaches), we are able to quantify a vertical flow of ~10 μm/s above the electrodes as a result of density gradients caused by the redox reactions and follow convection flow patterns. Overall, combining FCS, PIV, and PTV analysis of redox-MHD is a powerful combination to more thoroughly characterize the underlying forces in these promising microfluidic devices. PMID:23537496

  14. 3D Imaging of Flow Patterns in an Internally-Pumped Microfluidic Device: Redox Magnetohydrodynamics and Electrochemically-Generated Density Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Kreidermacher, Adam; Fritsch, Ingrid; Heyes, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Redox magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a promising technique for developing new electrochemical-based microfluidic flow devices with unique capabilities, such as easily switching flow direction, adjusting flow speeds and flow patterns as well as avoiding bubble formation. However, a detailed description of all the forces involved and predicting flow patterns in confined geometries is lacking. In addition to redox-MHD, density gradients caused by the redox reactions also play important roles. Flow in these devices with small fluid volumes has mainly been characterized by following microbead motion by optical microscopy either by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) or by processing the microbead images by particle image velocimetry (PIV) software. This approach has limitations in spatial resolution and dimensionality. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to quantitatively and accurately measure flow speeds and patterns in the ~5-50 μm/s range in redox-MHD-based microfluidic devices, from which 3D flow maps are obtained with a spatial resolution down to 2 μm. The 2 μm spatial resolution flow speeds map revealed detailed flow profiles during redox-MHD in which the velocity increases linearly from above the electrode, and reaches a plateau across the center of the channel. By combining FCS and video-microscopy (with PTV and PIV processing approaches), we are able to quantify a vertical flow of ~10 μm/s above the electrodes as a result of density gradients caused by the redox reactions and follow convection flow patterns. Overall, combining FCS, PIV and PTV analysis of redox-MHD is a powerful combination to more thoroughly characterize the underlying forces in these promising microfluidic devices. PMID:23537496

  15. Monoaminergic tone supports conductance correlations and stabilizes activity features in pattern generating neurons of the lobster, Panulirus interruptus.

    PubMed

    Krenz, Wulf-Dieter; Parker, Anna R; Rodgers, Edmund; Baro, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies demonstrate that different sets of intrinsic and synaptic conductances can give rise to equivalent activity patterns. This is because the balance of conductances, not their absolute values, defines a given activity feature. Activity-dependent feedback mechanisms maintain neuronal conductance correlations and their corresponding activity features. This study demonstrates that tonic nM concentrations of monoamines enable slow, activity-dependent processes that can maintain a correlation between the transient potassium current (I(A) and the hyperpolarization activated current (Ih) over the long-term (i.e., regulatory change persists for hours after removal of modulator). Tonic 5 nM DA acted through an RNA interference silencing complex (RISC)- and RNA polymerase II-dependent mechanism to maintain a long-term positive correlation between I(A) and Ih in the lateral pyloric neuron (LP) but not in the pyloric dilator neuron (PD). In contrast, tonic 5 nM 5HT maintained a RISC-dependent positive correlation between I(A) and Ih in PD but not LP over the long-term. Tonic 5 nM OCT maintained a long-term negative correlation between I(A) and Ih in PD but not LP; however, it was only revealed when RISC was inhibited. This study also demonstrated that monoaminergic tone can also preserve activity features over the long-term: the timing of LP activity, LP duty cycle and LP spike number per burst were maintained by tonic 5 nM DA. The data suggest that low-level monoaminergic tone acts through multiple slow processes to permit cell-specific, activity-dependent regulation of ionic conductances to maintain conductance correlations and their corresponding activity features over the long-term. PMID:26539083

  16. Monoaminergic tone supports conductance correlations and stabilizes activity features in pattern generating neurons of the lobster, Panulirus interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Krenz, Wulf-Dieter; Parker, Anna R.; Rodgers, Edmund; Baro, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and computational studies demonstrate that different sets of intrinsic and synaptic conductances can give rise to equivalent activity patterns. This is because the balance of conductances, not their absolute values, defines a given activity feature. Activity-dependent feedback mechanisms maintain neuronal conductance correlations and their corresponding activity features. This study demonstrates that tonic nM concentrations of monoamines enable slow, activity-dependent processes that can maintain a correlation between the transient potassium current (IA) and the hyperpolarization activated current (Ih) over the long-term (i.e., regulatory change persists for hours after removal of modulator). Tonic 5 nM DA acted through an RNA interference silencing complex (RISC)- and RNA polymerase II-dependent mechanism to maintain a long-term positive correlation between IA and Ih in the lateral pyloric neuron (LP) but not in the pyloric dilator neuron (PD). In contrast, tonic 5 nM 5HT maintained a RISC-dependent positive correlation between IA and Ih in PD but not LP over the long-term. Tonic 5 nM OCT maintained a long-term negative correlation between IA and Ih in PD but not LP; however, it was only revealed when RISC was inhibited. This study also demonstrated that monoaminergic tone can also preserve activity features over the long-term: the timing of LP activity, LP duty cycle and LP spike number per burst were maintained by tonic 5 nM DA. The data suggest that low-level monoaminergic tone acts through multiple slow processes to permit cell-specific, activity-dependent regulation of ionic conductances to maintain conductance correlations and their corresponding activity features over the long-term. PMID:26539083

  17. Nuclear envelope alterations generate an aging-like epigenetic pattern in mice deficient in Zmpste24 metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Fernando G; Varela, Ignacio; Lara, Ester; Puente, Xose S; Espada, Jesús; Santoro, Raffaella; Freije, José M P; Fraga, Mario F; López-Otín, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Mutations in the nuclear envelope protein lamin A or in its processing protease ZMPSTE24 cause human accelerated aging syndromes, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Similarly, Zmpste24-deficient mice accumulate unprocessed prelamin A and develop multiple progeroid symptoms, thus representing a valuable animal model for the study of these syndromes. Zmpste24-deficient mice also show marked transcriptional alterations associated with chromatin disorganization, but the molecular links between both processes are unknown. We report herein that Zmpste24-deficient mice show a hypermethylation of rDNA that reduces the transcription of ribosomal genes, being this reduction reversible upon treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors. This alteration has been previously described during physiological aging in rodents, suggesting its potential role in the development of the progeroid phenotypes. We also show that Zmpste24-deficient mice present global hypoacetylation of histones H2B and H4. By using a combination of RNA sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate that these histone modifications are associated with changes in the expression of several genes involved in the control of cell proliferation and metabolic processes, which may contribute to the plethora of progeroid symptoms exhibited by Zmpste24-deficient mice. The identification of these altered genes may help to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying aging and progeroid syndromes as well as to define new targets for the treatment of these dramatic diseases. PMID:20961378

  18. Analysis of the impact of professional involvement in evidence generation for the HTA Process, subproject "cochlear implants": methodology, results and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, S; Arslan, E; Baggiani, A; Burdo, S; Cassandro, E; Cuda, D; Filipo, R; Rossi, P Giorgi; Mancini, P; Martini, A; Quaranta, A; Quaranta, N; Turchetti, G; Forli, F

    2011-10-01

    The aim of Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is to provide decision-makers, distributors and recipients with information on the effectiveness, cost and impact of health technologies. The present study constitutes a subproject within the wider project "Analysis of the impact of professional involvement in evidence generation for the HTA process", which is part of the strategic programme "Transfer of the results of the research in clinical practice and organisation of healthcare services", coordinated by Laziosanità - Agency of Public Healthcare of the Lazio Region and AgeNaS (National Agency for Regional Healthcare Services). The objectives of the present subproject (cochlear implants) are as follows: a) to produce a report regarding the health impact of cochlear implants (CI) on their recipients, through a systematic review of literature and extensive selection of relative studies, combining the outcomes with metanalytical techniques. Output: report on the indications of usage in the groups of population for which benefits are controversial; b) to create a registry of patients using cochlear implants. The registry should contain a selection of anagraphic and clinical information relative to patient follow-up in order to assess factors associated with safety and impact on cochlear implant users. This source of information is essential for future observational studies. This was divided into 4 phases: 1(st) phase: definition of key participants in the assessment process; 2(nd) phase: definition of methods and timing of "Aims" (definition of the objective); 3(rd) phase: definition of the methods and times of the "assessment process", 4(th) phase: production of the final report. From the analysis of systematic reviews and italian and international guidelines, the Working Group members approved recommendations on the following topics: results after CI in children in relation to age at implantation, bilateral CI in children, CI in deaf children with associated

  19. Albedo patterns and gypsum generation in the central Namib Desert - Land, sea and air interactions on an arid West Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, M. J.; Helms, D. R.; Whitehead, V. S.

    1992-01-01

    In the central Namib Desert, dune-free surfaces are separated abruptly from a sea of yellow and red sand dunes at the Kuiseb River canyon. The off-white hues of the dune-free area result from anomalously high surficial gypsum enrichment. Satellite imagery indicates that the gypsum surfaces are associated with lower surface maximum temperatures than those of the darker dune surfaces to the south. One of various sources of sulfate for the gypsum bodies is oceanic H2S, supplied to desert land-surfaces by regular fog incursions. Since fog events are widespread along the coast, the question of anomalous gypsum accumulations north of the dune sea arises. Satellite imagery, in conjunction with more detailed handheld photography from the space shuttle, indicates that the penetration of fog inland is significantly greater over the gypsum surfaces than it is over the dunes. It is postulated that the thermal gradient between these surfaces generates a heat low centered over the northern part of dune sea and that this enhances fog and H2S advection on its north side onto the nearby dune-free zone. In such a system, gypsum/caliche surfaces reinforce advection of fog over themselves in a positive feedback mode.

  20. Generation patterns of four groups of cholinergic neurons in rat cervical spinal cord: a combined tritiated thymidine autoradiographic and choline acetyltransferase immunocytochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Phelps, P.E.; Barber, R.P.; Vaughn, J.E.

    1988-07-22

    This report examines the generation of cholinergic neurons in the spinal cord in order to determine whether the transmitter phenotype of neurons is associated with specific patterns of neurogenesis. Previous immunocytochemical studies identified four groups of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive neurons in the cervical enlargement of the rat spinal cord. These cell groups vary in both somatic size and location along the previously described ventrodorsal neurogenic gradient of the spinal cord. Thus, large (and small) motoneurons are located in the ventral horn, medium-sized partition cells are found in the intermediate gray matter, small central canal cluster cells are situated within lamina X, and small dorsal horn neurons are scattered predominantly through laminae III-V. The relationships among the birthdays of these four subsets of cholinergic neurons have been examined by combining 3H-thymidine autoradiography and ChAT immunocytochemistry. Embryonic day 11 was the earliest time that neurons were generated within the cervical enlargement. Large and small ChAT-positive motoneurons were produced on E11 and 12, with 70% of both groups being born on E11. ChAT-positive partition cells were produced between E11 and 13, with their peak generation occurring on E12. Approximately 70% of the cholinergic central canal cluster and dorsal horn cells were born on E13, and the remainder of each of these groups was generated on E14. Other investigators have shown that all neurons within the rat cervical spinal cord are produced in a ventrodorsal sequence between E11 and E16. In contrast, ChAT-positive neurons are born only from E11 to E14 and are among the earliest cells generated in the ventral, intermediate, and dorsal subdivisions of the spinal cord.

  1. Parent Involvement, Parental Depression, and Program Satisfaction among Low-Income Parents Participating in a Two-Generation Early Childhood Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaForett, Dore R.; Mendez, Julia L.

    2010-01-01

    Research Findings: This study simultaneously examined parental depression and parent involvement as predictors of satisfaction with an early childhood intervention program. Parents (N = 203) of Head Start children participated in this short-term longitudinal study. Measures of parent involvement and satisfaction assessed multiple dimensions of…

  2. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Different patterns of high-energy and low-energy electrons in an atmospheric-pressure microplasma generated by a hairpin resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wei; Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2010-02-01

    A newly developed device, a hairpin resonator, is used to generate an atmospheric-pressure microplasma with a 1.8 GHz power supply in argon. The two-dimensional distributions of emission lines in such a microplasma are obtained by a spatially resolved optical system. For the first time, it is found that the distributions of high-energy and low-energy electrons have different patterns. The density distribution of the high-energy electrons (with energy higher than that of argon 2p levels) is obtained from the line intensity, while the density of the low-energy ones (approximately equal to the total electron density) is deduced from the emission line ratios. The difference in distribution between the two groups of electrons is related to the different energy-loss characteristic lengths.

  3. Genetic Control of a Central Pattern Generator: Rhythmic Oromotor Movement in Mice Is Controlled by a Major Locus near Atp1a2

    PubMed Central

    Boughter, John D.; Mulligan, Megan K.; St. John, Steven J.; Tokita, Kenichi; Lu, Lu; Heck, Detlef H.; Williams, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Fluid licking in mice is a rhythmic behavior that is controlled by a central pattern generator (CPG) located in a complex of brainstem nuclei. C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2) strains differ significantly in water-restricted licking, with a highly heritable difference in rates (h2≥0.62) and a corresponding 20% difference in interlick interval (mean ± SEM = 116.3±1 vs 95.4±1.1 ms). We systematically quantified motor output in these strains, their F1 hybrids, and a set of 64 BXD progeny strains. The mean primary interlick interval (MPI) varied continuously among progeny strains. We detected a significant quantitative trait locus (QTL) for a CPG controlling lick rate on Chr 1 (Lick1), and a suggestive locus on Chr 10 (Lick10). Linkage was verified by testing of B6.D2-1D congenic stock in which a segment of Chr 1 of the D2 strain was introgressed onto the B6 parent. The Lick1 interval on distal Chr 1 contains several strong candidate genes. One of these is a sodium/potassium pump subunit (Atp1a2) with widespread expression in astrocytes, as well as in a restricted population of neurons. Both this subunit and the entire Na+/K+-ATPase molecule have been implicated in rhythmogenesis for respiration and locomotion. Sequence variants in or near Apt1a2 strongly modulate expression of the cognate mRNA in multiple brain regions. This gene region has recently been sequenced exhaustively and we have cataloged over 300 non-coding and synonymous mutations segregating among BXD strains, one or more of which is likely to contribute to differences in central pattern generator tempo. PMID:22675444

  4. Alternative mRNA Splicing from the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) Gene Generates Isoforms with Distinct Subcellular mRNA Localization Patterns in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Rune; Daugaard, Tina F.; Holm, Ida E.; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate filament network of astrocytes includes Glial fibrillary acidic protein (Gfap) as a major component. Gfap mRNA is alternatively spliced resulting in generation of different protein isoforms where Gfapα is the most predominant isoform. The Gfapδ isoform is expressed in proliferating neurogenic astrocytes of the developing human brain and in the adult human and mouse brain. Here we provide a characterization of mouse Gfapδ mRNA and Gfapδ protein. RT-qPCR analysis showed that Gfapδ mRNA and Gfapα mRNA expression is coordinately increased in the post-natal period. Immunohistochemical staining of developing mouse brain samples showed that Gfapδ is expressed in the sub-ventricular zones in accordance with the described localization in the developing and adult human brain. Immunofluorescence analysis verified incorporation of Gfapδ into the Gfap intermediate filament network and overlap in Gfapδ and Gfapα subcellular localization. Subcellular mRNA localization studies identified different localization patterns of Gfapδ and Gfapα mRNA in mouse primary astrocytes. A larger fraction of Gfapα mRNA showed mRNA localization to astrocyte protrusions compared to Gfapδ mRNA. The differential mRNA localization patterns were dependent on the different 3′-exon sequences included in Gfapδ and Gfapα mRNA. The presented results show that alternative Gfap mRNA splicing results in isoform-specific mRNA localization patterns with resulting different local mRNA concentration ratios which have potential to participate in subcellular region-specific intermediate filament dynamics during brain development, maintenance and in disease. PMID:23991052

  5. Multimodal function of the sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic β-cells: generation of diverse patterns of intracellular signals by sweet agonists.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Mogami, Hideo; Lohse, Martin; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru

    2013-01-01

    The sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste bud and is activated by numerous sweet molecules with diverse chemical structures. It is, however, not known whether these sweet agonists induce a similar cellular response in target cells. Using MIN6 cells, a pancreatic β-cell line expressing endogenous sweet taste receptor, we addressed this question by monitoring changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and cAMP ([cAMP]i) induced by four sweet taste receptor agonists. Glycyrrhizin evoked sustained elevation of [Ca2+]i but [cAMP]i was not affected. Conversely, an artificial sweetener saccharin induced sustained elevation of [cAMP]i but did not increase [Ca2+]i. In contrast, sucralose and acesulfame K induced rapid and sustained increases in both [Ca2+]i and [cAMP]i. Although the latter two sweeteners increased [Ca2+]i and [cAMP]i, their actions were not identical: [Ca2+]i response to sucralose but not acesulfame K was inhibited by gurmarin, an antagonist of the sweet taste receptor which blocks the gustducin-dependent pathway. In addition, [Ca2+]i response to acesulfame K but not to sucralose was resistant to a Gq inhibitor. These results indicate that four types of sweeteners activate the sweet taste receptor differently and generate distinct patterns of intracellular signals. The sweet taste receptor has amazing multimodal functions producing multiple patterns of intracellular signals. PMID:23933592

  6. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process. PMID:25611867

  7. Texture analysis of collagen second-harmonic generation images based on local difference local binary pattern and wavelets differentiates human skin abnormal scars from normal scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Guannan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative methods for noninvasive diagnosis of scars are a challenging issue in medicine. This work aims to implement a texture analysis method for quantitatively discriminating abnormal scars from normal scars based on second-harmonic generation (SHG) images. A local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) operator combined with a wavelet transform was explored to extract diagnosis features from scar SHG images that were related to the alteration in collagen morphology. Based on the quantitative parameters including the homogeneity, directional and coarse features in SHG images, the scar collagen SHG images were classified into normal or abnormal scars by a support vector machine classifier in a leave-one-out cross-validation procedure. Our experiments and data analyses demonstrated apparent differences between normal and abnormal scars in terms of their morphological structure of collagen. By comparing with gray level co-occurrence matrix, wavelet transform, and combined basic local binary pattern and wavelet transform with respect to the accuracy and receiver operating characteristic analysis, the method proposed herein was demonstrated to achieve higher accuracy and more reliable classification of SHG images. This result indicated that the extracted texture features with the proposed method were effective in the classification of scars. It could provide assistance for physicians in the diagnostic process.

  8. Theoretical and computational analysis of second- and third-harmonic generation in periodically patterned graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenide monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weismann, Martin; Panoiu, Nicolae C.

    2016-07-01

    Remarkable optical and electrical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers, offer vast technological potential for novel and improved optoelectronic nanodevices, many of which rely on nonlinear optical effects in these 2D materials. This paper introduces a highly effective numerical method for efficient and accurate description of linear and nonlinear optical effects in nanostructured 2D materials embedded in periodic photonic structures containing regular three-dimensional (3D) optical materials, such as diffraction gratings and periodic metamaterials. The proposed method builds upon the rigorous coupled-wave analysis and incorporates the nonlinear optical response of 2D materials by means of modified electromagnetic boundary conditions. This allows one to reduce the mathematical framework of the numerical method to an inhomogeneous scattering matrix formalism, which makes it more accurate and efficient than previously used approaches. An overview of linear and nonlinear optical properties of graphene and TMDC monolayers is given and the various features of the corresponding optical spectra are explored numerically and discussed. To illustrate the versatility of our numerical method, we use it to investigate the linear and nonlinear multiresonant optical response of 2D-3D heteromaterials for enhanced and tunable second- and third-harmonic generation. In particular, by employing a structured 2D material optically coupled to a patterned slab waveguide, we study the interplay between geometric resonances associated to guiding modes of periodically patterned slab waveguides and plasmon or exciton resonances of 2D materials.

  9. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-27

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when usedmore » in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes.« less

  10. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-27

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when used in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes.

  11. Exploiting lipopolysaccharide-induced deformation of lipid bilayers to modify membrane composition and generate two-dimensional geometric membrane array patterns

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Peter G.; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Paxton, Walter F.; Nogan, John J.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Firestone, Millicent A.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2015-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers have proven effective as model membranes for investigating biophysical processes and in development of sensor and array technologies. The ability to modify lipid bilayers after their formation and in situ could greatly advance membrane technologies, but is difficult via current state-of-the-art technologies. Here we demonstrate a novel method that allows the controlled post-formation processing and modification of complex supported lipid bilayer arrangements, under aqueous conditions. We exploit the destabilization effect of lipopolysaccharide, an amphiphilic biomolecule, interacting with lipid bilayers to generate voids that can be backfilled to introduce desired membrane components. We further demonstrate that when used in combination with a single, traditional soft lithography process, it is possible to generate hierarchically-organized membrane domains and microscale 2-D array patterns of domains. Significantly, this technique can be used to repeatedly modify membranes allowing iterative control over membrane composition. This approach expands our toolkit for functional membrane design, with potential applications for enhanced materials templating, biosensing and investigating lipid-membrane processes. PMID:26015293

  12. Mandatory fortification with folic acid in the United States is not associated with changes in the degree or the pattern of global DNA methylation in cells involved in cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Azrad, Maria; Jhala, Darshana; Macaluso, Maurizio; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Brill, Ilene; Niveleau, Alain; Jhala, Nirag; Grizzle, William E

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether mandatory fortification of grain products with folic acid in the USA is associated with changes in global DNA methylation in cells involved in cervical carcinogenesis. Archived specimens of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) diagnosed before (1990-92) and after mandatory folic acid fortification (2000-02) were used to examine for global DNA methylation in specific lesions involved in cervical carcinogenesis by using a monoclonal antibody specific for 5 methyl cytosine (5-mc). The total number of lesions examined was 152 in the pre-fortification period and 172 in the post-fortification period. Immunohistochemical staining for 5-mc, the assessment of methylation status and data entry were blinded with regard to the fortification status. Age- and race-adjusted mean percentage of cells positive for 5-mc or the 5-mc score was not significantly different (P>0.05) between the pre- and post fortification periods in any of the individual lesions evaluated (i.e., normal cervical epithelium, reactive cervical epithelium, metaplastic cervical epithelium, CIN or carcinoma in situ). The degree of global DNA methylation was significantly higher (P<0.0001) in >or= CIN 2 lesions compared to pattern of global DNA methylation in cells involved in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:17264397

  13. Developing Empathetic Skills among Teachers and Learners in High Schools in Tshwane: An Inter-Generational Approach Involving People with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alant, Erna; Geyer, Stephan; Verde, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and outcomes of an experiential learning approach to facilitate the development of empathetic skills among teachers and learners at two high schools in Tshwane, South Africa. An inter-generational training programme, the Memory Bridge Initiative (MBI), aimed at exposing participants to interactions with…

  14. Safety Case Patterns: Theory and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen W.; Pai, Ganesh J.

    2015-01-01

    We develop the foundations for a theory of patterns of safety case argument structures, clarifying the concepts involved in pattern specification, including choices, labeling, and well-founded recursion. We specify six new patterns in addition to those existing in the literature. We give a generic way to specify the data required to instantiate patterns and a generic algorithm for their instantiation. This generalizes earlier work on generating argument fragments from requirements tables. We describe an implementation of these concepts in AdvoCATE, the Assurance Case Automation Toolset, showing how patterns are defined and can be instantiated. In particular, we describe how our extended notion of patterns can be specified, how they can be instantiated in an interactive manner, and, finally, how they can be automatically instantiated using our algorithm.

  15. The tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist GR205171 abolishes the retching activity of neurons comprising the central pattern generator for vomiting in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Koga, T; Furukawa, N; Nakamura, E; Shiroshita, Y

    1999-01-01

    Tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists are known to act centrally and to have broad-spectrum antiemetic effects, but their precise site of action has not yet been defined. To identify this site, the effects of the NK1 receptor antagonist GR205171 on the activities of neurons comprising the central pattern generator (CPG) for vomiting were observed in decerebrate paralyzed dogs. A non-respiratory neuron in each of nine dogs was considered to be a CPG neuron based on its response to abdominal vagal stimulation, its location in the CPG area in the reticular formation dorsomedial to the retrofacial nucleus, its firing patterns in prodromal and retching phases and its response to apomorphine. In response to vagal stimulation at 3-10 Hz, the firing of these neurons transiently increased at the onset of stimulation (fast component), gradually increased again (slow component), and finally developed into rhythmic bursts synchronous with retching bursts of the phrenic and abdominal muscle nerves. GR205171 (25-50 microg/kg, i.v.) abolished the slow component and retching bursts in the neurons, and the retching activities of both nerves, but did not change the fast component. The responses of these neurons to repetitive pulse-train vagal stimulation exhibited a vigorous 'wind-up' and finally developed into retching bursts. Both the 'wind-up' phenomenon and retching bursts disappeared after the application of GR205171. These results suggest that the site of the antiemetic action of NK1 receptor antagonists is located in the CPG or in the pathway connecting the solitary nucleus to the CPG. PMID:10096468

  16. Preterm labor and preterm premature rupture of membranes have a different pattern in the involved compartments of acute histologoic chorioamnionitis and/or funisitis: Patho-physiologic implication related to different clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan-Wook; Park, Joong Shin; Moon, Kyung Chul; Jun, Jong Kwan; Yoon, Bo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether histo-topographic findings about the involved compartments (i.e., choriodecidua, amnion, chorionic-plate) of acute-histologic chorioamnionitis (acute-HCA) and/or funisitis according to the presence or absence of intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI) and/or fetal inflammatory response syndrome (FIRS) are different between preterm labor and intact membranes (PTL) and preterm premature rupture of membranes (preterm-PROM). The involved compartments of acute-HCA and/or funisitis were examined in 161 singleton preterm-births (<34 weeks) due to PTL (n = 88) and preterm-PROM (n = 73). The study-population was divided into IAI(-)/FIRS(-), IAI(+)/FIRS(-), and IAI(+)/FIRS(+) groups according to the presence or absence of IAI (amniotic-fluid MMP-8 ≥ 23 ng/ml) and/or FIRS (umbilical-cord plasma CRP ≥ 200 ng/ml). Histological inflammation was not detected in any-compartment except choriodecidua in IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group with PTL while inflammation appeared in all-compartment0s (choriodeciduitis-46.2 %; amnionitis-23.1 %; funisitis-30.8 %; chorionic-plate inflammation-7.7 %) in IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group with preterm-PROM. IAI(+)/FIRS(-) group had a significantly higher frequency of inflammation in each-compartment than IAI(-)/FIRS(-) group in PTL (each-for P < 0.01), but not preterm-PROM (each-for P > 0.1). However, IAI(+)/FIRS(+) group had a significantly higher rate of inflammation in each compartment than IAI(+)/FIRS(-) group in both PTL and preterm-PROM (each-for P < 0.05). We first demonstrated that PTL and preterm-PROM had a different pattern in the involved compartments of acute-HCA and/or funisitis in the IAI(-)/FIRS(--) group and in the change of involved compartments from IAI(-)/FIRS(-) to IAI(+)/FIRS(-). PMID:27090052

  17. MUSASHI-Mediated Expression of JMJD3, a H3K27me3 Demethylase, Is Involved in Foamy Macrophage Generation during Mycobacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vikas; Karnam, Anupama; Mukherjee, Tanushree; Mahadik, Kasturi; Parikh, Pankti; Singh, Amit; Rajmani, R. S.; Ramachandra, Subbaraya G.; Balaji, Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Foamy macrophages (FM)s harbor lipid bodies that not only assist mycobacterial persistence within the granulomas but also are sites for intracellular signaling and inflammatory mediators which are essential for mycobacterial pathogenesis. However, molecular mechanisms that regulate intracellular lipid accumulation in FMs during mycobacterial infection are not clear. Here, we report for the first time that jumonji domain containing protein (JMJD)3, a demethylase of the repressive H3K27me3 mark, orchestrates the expression of M. tuberculosis H37Rv-, MDR-JAL2287-, H37Ra- and M. bovis BCG-induced genes essential for FM generation in a TLR2-dependent manner. Further, NOTCH1-responsive RNA-binding protein MUSASHI (MSI), targets a transcriptional repressor of JMJD3, Msx2-interacting nuclear target protein, to positively regulate infection-induced JMJD3 expression, FM generation and M2 phenotype. Investigations in in vivo murine models further substantiated these observations. Together, our study has attributed novel roles for JMJD3 and its regulators during mycobacterial infection that assist FM generation and fine-tune associated host immunity. PMID:27532872

  18. MUSASHI-Mediated Expression of JMJD3, a H3K27me3 Demethylase, Is Involved in Foamy Macrophage Generation during Mycobacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Holla, Sahana; Prakhar, Praveen; Singh, Vikas; Karnam, Anupama; Mukherjee, Tanushree; Mahadik, Kasturi; Parikh, Pankti; Singh, Amit; Rajmani, R S; Ramachandra, Subbaraya G; Balaji, Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy

    2016-08-01

    Foamy macrophages (FM)s harbor lipid bodies that not only assist mycobacterial persistence within the granulomas but also are sites for intracellular signaling and inflammatory mediators which are essential for mycobacterial pathogenesis. However, molecular mechanisms that regulate intracellular lipid accumulation in FMs during mycobacterial infection are not clear. Here, we report for the first time that jumonji domain containing protein (JMJD)3, a demethylase of the repressive H3K27me3 mark, orchestrates the expression of M. tuberculosis H37Rv-, MDR-JAL2287-, H37Ra- and M. bovis BCG-induced genes essential for FM generation in a TLR2-dependent manner. Further, NOTCH1-responsive RNA-binding protein MUSASHI (MSI), targets a transcriptional repressor of JMJD3, Msx2-interacting nuclear target protein, to positively regulate infection-induced JMJD3 expression, FM generation and M2 phenotype. Investigations in in vivo murine models further substantiated these observations. Together, our study has attributed novel roles for JMJD3 and its regulators during mycobacterial infection that assist FM generation and fine-tune associated host immunity. PMID:27532872

  19. Identification of a Specific Isoform of Tomato Lipoxygenase (TomloxC) Involved in the Generation of Fatty Acid-Derived Flavor Compounds1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guoping; Hackett, Rachel; Walker, David; Taylor, Andy; Lin, Zhefeng; Grierson, Donald

    2004-01-01

    There are at least five lipoxygenases (TomloxA, TomloxB, TomloxC, TomloxD, and TomloxE) present in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit, but their role in generation of fruit flavor volatiles has been unclear. To assess the physiological role of TomloxC in the generation of volatile C6 aldehyde and alcohol flavor compounds, we produced transgenic tomato plants with greatly reduced TomloxC using sense and antisense constructs under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The expression level of the TomloxC mRNA in some transgenic plants was selectively reduced by gene silencing or antisense inhibition to between 1% and 5% of the wild-type controls, but the expression levels of mRNAs for the four other isoforms were unaffected. The specific depletion of TomloxC in transgenic tomatoes led to a marked reduction in the levels of known flavor volatiles, including hexanal, hexenal, and hexenol, to as little as 1.5% of those of wild-type controls following maceration of ripening fruit. Addition of linoleic or linolenic acid to fruit homogenates significantly increased the levels of flavor volatiles, but the increase with the TomloxC-depleted transgenic fruit extracts was much lower than with the wild-type control. Confocal imaging of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaf cells expressing a TomloxC-GFP fusion confirmed a chloroplast localization of the protein. Together, these results suggest that TomloxC is a chloroplast-targeted lipoxygenase isoform that can use both linoleic and linolenic acids as substrates to generate volatile C6 flavor compounds. The roles of the other lipoxygenase isoforms are discussed. PMID:15347800

  20. The Effects of Vestibular Stimulation Rate and Magnitude of Acceleration on Central Pattern Generation for Chest Wall Kinematics in Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Emily; Barlow, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the role of vestibular inputs on respiratory and oromotor systems in healthy preterm infants. Study Design 27 preterm infants were quasi-randomly assigned to either the VestibuGlide treatment or control groups. VestibuGlide infants were held in a developmentally supportive position, given a pacifier and received a series of vestibular stimuli, counterbalanced across rate and acceleration conditions, 15 minutes 3x/day for 10 days. The control infants were also held in a developmentally supportive position, given a pacifier for 15 minutes 3x/day for 10 days but did not receive the VestibuGlide stimulation. Result A multi-level regression model revealed that treatment infants increased their respiratory rate in response to vestibular stimulus and that the highest level of vestibular acceleration delivered to the infants (0.51 m/s2) resulted in a significant increase in breaths per minute. Conclusion Vestibular stimulation delivered to preterm infants prior to scheduled feeds effectively modulates respiratory rate and resets the respiratory central pattern generator. PMID:22157627

  1. The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-11-15

    Particular peptides generated from the vicilin-class(7S) globulin of the cocoa beans by acid-induced proteolysis during cocoa fermentation are essential precursors of the cocoa-specific aroma notes. As revealed by in vitro studies, the formation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors depends on the particular cleavage specificity of the cocoa aspartic protease, which cannot be substituted by pepsin. Therefore, we have investigated the effects of aspartic protease inhibitors on both enzymes and comparatively studied their cleavage specificities using different protein substrates and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analyses of the generated oligopeptides. Three classes of cleavage sites have been identified and characterized: (I) sequences exclusively cleaved by the cocoa enzyme, (II) sequences cleaved by both pepsin and the cocoa enzyme, and (III) those cleaved exclusively by pepsin. In contrast to most aspartic proteases from other origins, basic amino acid residues, particularly lysine, were found to be abundant in the specific cleavage sites of the cocoa enzyme. PMID:27283639

  2. Gardenin B-induced cell death in human leukemia cells involves multiple caspases but is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Saavedra, Ester; Del Rosario, Henoc; Perdomo, Juan; Loro, Juan F; Cifuente, Diego A; Tonn, Carlos E; García, Celina; Quintana, José; Estévez, Francisco

    2016-08-25

    Flavonoids have attracted great interest due to their possible anticancer activities. Here we investigated the antiproliferative activity of the flavonoids isolated from Baccharis scandens against human leukemia cell lines and found that the methoxyflavonoid gardenin B was the most cytotoxic compound against HL-60 and U-937 cells, showing IC50 values between 1.6 and 3.0 μM, but had no significant cytotoxic effects against quiescent or proliferating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These effects on viability were accompanied by the concentration- and time-dependent appearance of apoptosis as evidenced by DNA fragmentation, formation of apoptotic bodies and a sub-G1 ratio increase. Comparative studies with the best-studied bioflavonoid quercetin indicate that gardenin B is a more cytotoxic and more apoptotic inducer than quercetin. Cell death induced by gardenin B was associated with: (i) a significant induction of caspase-2, -3, -8 and -9 activities; (ii) cleavage of the initiator caspases (caspase-2, -8 and -9), of the executioner caspase-3, and of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase; and (iii) a concentration-dependent reactive oxygen species generation. In conclusion, apoptosis induced by gardenin B is associated with activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways of cell death and occurs through a mechanism that is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:27423764

  3. Changing clothes easily: connexin41.8 regulates skin pattern variation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masakatsu; Kondo, Shigeru

    2012-05-01

    The skin patterns of animals are very important for their survival, yet the mechanisms involved in skin pattern formation remain unresolved. Turing's reaction-diffusion model presents a well-known mathematical explanation of how animal skin patterns are formed, and this model can predict various animal patterns that are observed in nature. In this study, we used transgenic zebrafish to generate various artificial skin patterns including a narrow stripe with a wide interstripe, a narrow stripe with a narrow interstripe, a labyrinth, and a 'leopard' pattern (or donut-like ring pattern). In this process, connexin41.8 (or its mutant form) was ectopically expressed using the mitfa promoter. Specifically, the leopard pattern was generated as predicted by Turing's model. Our results demonstrate that the pigment cells in animal skin have the potential and plasticity to establish various patterns and that the reaction-diffusion principle can predict skin patterns of animals. PMID:22313791

  4. Generation of lysophosphatidylinositol by DDHD domain containing 1 (DDHD1): Possible involvement of phospholipase D/phosphatidic acid in the activation of DDHD1.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Atsushi; Kumazawa, Tsukasa; Koga, Hiroki; Suzuki, Naotaka; Oka, Saori; Sugiura, Takayuki

    2010-07-01

    GPR55 is a seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptor that has been proposed as a novel type of cannabinoid receptor. Previously, we identified lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), in particular 2-arachidonoyl-LPI, as an agonist for GPR55. In the present study, we examined whether intracellular phospholipase A1 (DDHD domain containing 1, or DDHD1), previously identified as phosphatidic acid (PA)-preferring PLA1 (PA-PLA1), is involved in the formation of 2-arachidonoyl-LPI. HEK293 cells expressing DDHD1 produced [(3)H]arachidonic acid-containing LPI after prelabeling with [(3)H]arachidonic acid and subsequent activation by ionomycin; the formation of [(3)H]LPI was inhibited by n-butanol and the overexpression of an inactive PLD1 mutant PLD1K898R. DDHD1 was translocated from the cytosol to membranes upon ionomycin treatment. A purified recombinant DDHD1 formed [(3)H]LPI when incubated with [(3)H]PI; the V(max) and apparent K(m) were 190 micromol/min/mg protein and 10 mol% PI, respectively. DDHD1 binds PA, and the addition of PA to DDHD1 increased the affinity for PI (K(m) ; 3 mol%) and augmented the PI-PLA1 activity. DDHD1 activated by PA was returned to a basal state by its own PA-hydrolytic activity. These results implicate DDHD1 in the formation of 2-arachidonoyl-LPI and indicate that the process is modulated by PA released by phospholipase D. Similar observations for the production of arachidonic acid-containing LPI in neuroblastoma cells suggest the DDHD1-LPI-GPR55 axis to be involved in functions in the brain. PMID:20359546

  5. The DNA rearrangement that generates the TRK-T3 oncogene involves a novel gene on chromosome 3 whose product has a potential coiled-coil domain.

    PubMed Central

    Greco, A; Mariani, C; Miranda, C; Lupas, A; Pagliardini, S; Pomati, M; Pierotti, M A

    1995-01-01

    Oncogenic rearrangements of the NTRK1 gene (also designated TRKA), encoding one of the receptors for the nerve growth factor, are frequently detected in thyroid carcinomas. Such rearrangements fuse the NTRK1 tyrosine kinase domain to 5'-end sequences belonging to different genes. In previously reported studies we have demonstrated that NTRK1 oncogenic activation involves two genes, TPM3 and TPR, both localized similarly to the receptor tyrosine kinase, on the q arm of chromosome 1. Here we report the characterization of a novel NTRK1-derived thyroid oncogene, named TRK-T3. A cDNA clone, capable of transforming activity, was isolated from a transformant cell line. Sequence analysis revealed that TRK-T3 contains 1,412 nucleotides of NTRK1 preceded by 598 nucleotides belonging to a novel gene that we have named TFG (TRK-fused gene). The TRK-T3 amino acid sequence displays, within the TFG region, a coiled-coil motif that could endow the oncoprotein with the capability to form complexes. The TRK-T3 oncogene encodes a 68-kDa cytoplasmic protein reacting with NTRK1-specific antibodies. By sedimentation gradient experiments the TRK-T3 oncoprotein was shown to form, in vivo, multimeric complexes, most likely trimers or tetramers. The TFG gene is ubiquitously expressed and is located on chromosome 3. The breakpoint producing the TRK-T3 oncogene occurs within exons of both the TFG gene and the NTRK1 gene and produces a chimeric exon that undergoes alternative splicing. Molecular analysis of the NTRK1 rearranged fragments indicated that the chromosomal rearrangement is reciprocal and balanced and involves loss of a few nucleotides of germ line sequences. PMID:7565764

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies Deregulation of MicroRNAs Involved in Both Innate and Adaptive Immune Response in ALK+ ALCL

    PubMed Central

    Steinhilber, Julia; Bonin, Michael; Walter, Michael; Fend, Falko; Bonzheim, Irina; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is divided into two systemic diseases according to the expression of the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). We investigated the differential expression of miRNAs between ALK+ ALCL, ALK- ALCL cells and normal T-cells using next generation sequencing (NGS). In addition, a C/EBPβ-dependent miRNA profile was generated. The data were validated in primary ALCL cases. NGS identified 106 miRNAs significantly differentially expressed between ALK+ and ALK- ALCL and 228 between ALK+ ALCL and normal T-cells. We identified a signature of 56 miRNAs distinguishing ALK+ ALCL, ALK- ALCL and T-cells. The top candidates significant differentially expressed bet