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Sample records for paucimobilis bloodstream infections

  1. Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Nicolò; Lewis, Russell E.; Giannella, Maddalena; Ambretti, Simone; Bartoletti, Michele; Tedeschi, Sara; Tumietto, Fabio; Cristini, Francesco; Trapani, Filippo; Gaibani, Paolo; Viale, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Multidrug resistance associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among K. pneumoniae is endemic in southern Europe. We retrospectively analyzed the impact of resistance on the appropriateness of empirical therapy and treatment outcomes of K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections (BSIs) during a 2-year period at a 1420-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital in northern Italy. We identified 217 unique patient BSIs, including 92 (42%) KPC-positive, 49 (23%) ESBL-positive, and 1 (0.5%) metallo-beta-lactamase-positive isolates. Adequate empirical therapy was administered in 74% of infections caused by non-ESBL non-KPC strains, versus 33% of ESBL and 23% of KPC cases (p?

  2. Infection Control and Bloodstream Infection Prevention: The Perspective of Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    See, Isaac; Shugart, Alicia; Lamb, Carrie; Kallen, Alexander J.; Patel, Priti R.; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda L.

    2015-01-01

    Patients on hemodialysis, particularly those dialyzed through central lines, are at risk of acquiring bloodstream infections. Strategies to prevent bloodstream infections in patients on dialysis include educating patients about infection prevention, although patients’ perspectives on this topic are not known. During focus groups conducted to explore these issues, patients reported that education on infection prevention should begin early in the process of dialysis, and that patients should be actively engaged as partners in infection prevention. PMID:24689263

  3. Alcaligenes xylosoxidans Bloodstream Infections in Outpatient Oncology Office

    PubMed Central

    Bancroft, Elizabeth; Lehnkering, Eleanor; Donlan, Rodney M.; Mascola, Laurene

    2008-01-01

    In 2002, we investigated a cluster of patients with Alcaligenes xylosoxidans bloodstream infections by conducting a matched case–control study and a prospective study. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed on blood culture isolates, and 1 explanted central venous catheter (CVC) was tested for biofilm. We identified 12 cases of A. xylosoxidans bloodstream infection. Case-patients were more likely than controls to have had a CVC (7/7 [100%] vs 4/47 [8.7%], respectively; p<0.0001). Ten case isolates were indistinguishable by PFGE analysis, and A. xylosoxidans biofilm from the CVC matched the outbreak strain. We observed multiple breaches in infection control, which may have caused contamination of multidose vials used to flush the CVCs. Our study links A. xylosoxidans with CVC biofilm and highlights areas for regulation and oversight in outpatient settings.

  4. Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection by Tsukamurella inchonensis in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Takebe, Isao; Sawabe, Etsuko; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Tojo, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of catheter-related bloodstream infection by Tsukamurella inchonensis, identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, in a patient with myelofibrosis who underwent a bone marrow transplant. Tsukamurella species infections are rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case of T. inchonensis bloodstream infection in an immunocompromised patient. PMID:24671800

  5. Biofilm-based central line-associated bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Yousif, Ammar; Jamal, Mohamed A; Raad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Different types of central venous catheters (CVCs) have been used in clinical practice to improve the quality of life of chronically and critically ill patients. Unfortunately, indwelling devices are usually associated with microbial biofilms and eventually lead to catheter-related bloodstream infections (CLABSIs).An estimated 250,000-400,000 CLABSIs occur every year in the United States, at a rate of 1.5 per 1,000 CVC days and a mortality rate of 12-25 %. The annual cost of caring for patients with CLABSIs ranges from 296 million to 2.3 billion dollars.Biofilm formation occurs on biotic and abiotic surfaces in the clinical setting. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand biofilm formation, including different biofilm developmental stages, biofilm matrix compositions, quorum-sensing regulated biofilm formation, biofilm dispersal (and its clinical implications), and multi-species biofilms that are relevant to polymicrobial infections.When microbes form a matured biofilm within human hosts through medical devices such as CVCs, the infection becomes resistant to antibiotic treatment and can develop into a chronic condition. For that reason, many techniques have been used to prevent the formation of biofilm by targeting different stages of biofilm maturation. Other methods have been used to diagnose and treat established cases of CLABSI.Catheter removal is the conventional management of catheter associated bacteremia; however, the procedure itself carries a relatively high risk of mechanical complications. Salvaging the catheter can help to minimize these complications.In this article, we provide an overview of microbial biofilm formation; describe the involvement of various genetic determinants, adhesion proteins, organelles, mechanism(s) of biofilm formation, polymicrobial infections, and biofilm-associated infections on indwelling intravascular catheters; and describe the diagnosis, management, and prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections. PMID:25366227

  6. Genetic characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bloodstream infections in Austria.

    PubMed

    Luxner, Josefa; Zarfel, Gernot; Johler, Sophia; Feierl, Gebhard; Leitner, Eva; Hoenigl, Martin; Grisold, Andrea J

    2014-02-01

    A total of 112 Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates were genetically characterized. Spa typing and DNA microanalysis exhibited high diversity, resulting in 64 different spa types and 9 different SplitsTree clusters. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were found in 6 cases only, including the first case of life-stock-associated MRSA (MRSA ST398) in bloodstream infection in Austria. PMID:24321355

  7. Prior infections are associated with increased mortality from subsequent blood-stream infections among patients with hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J A; David, M Z; Pitrak, D L; Hall, J B; Kress, J P

    2014-09-01

    Many patients who are evaluated and treated for sepsis have histories of recent infections. The prognostic implications of surviving an infectious process are not well understood. We undertook this study to determine the clinical impact of prior infections among patients with hematological malignancies, a population at high risk for developing and dying from sepsis. The medical records of 203 patients with hematological malignancies and blood-stream infections admitted over a 3-year period to an urban teaching hospital were retrospectively reviewed. The 30-day mortality after blood-stream infection in these high-risk patients was 24 %. There were 46 patients (23 %) who had inpatient infections in the 90 days prior to the index blood-stream infection. History of recent infection portended worse prognosis from blood-stream infection under multivariable analysis [odds ratio (OR) 2.60, p?=?0.04, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.04-6.47]. There were 86 patients (42 %) who had subsequent infections in the first 90 days after the index blood-stream infection. Patients with subsequent infections had greater mortality during days 91-365 than patients without subsequent infections [hazard ratio (HR) 1.97, p?=?0.02, 95 % CI 1.13-3.44]. Recent infections prognosticate worse outcomes from subsequent blood-stream infections for this high-risk population. Further research into the clinical and biochemical reasons for this observation may lead to targets for intervention, and, ultimately, improvements in long-term mortality from sepsis. PMID:24791952

  8. Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection after cardiac surgery: risk factors and outcome.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Christian; Tammelin, Ann; Thelin, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients (10 cases and 28 controls) were included in a case-control study of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection after cardiac surgery in 833 patients. All bacterial strains were found to be unique by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. In multivariable risk-factor analysis, only valve prosthesis implantation was associated with bloodstream infection. The early and late case mortality rate was 0%. PMID:16418995

  9. Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection and Endocarditis - A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Le Moing, Vincent; Alla, François; Doco-Lecompte, Thanh; Delahaye, François; Piroth, Lionel; Chirouze, Catherine; Tattevin, Pierre; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Erpelding, Marie-Line; Hoen, Bruno; Vandenesch, François; Duval, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To update the epidemiology of S. aureus bloodstream infection (SAB) in a high-income country and its link with infective endocarditis (IE). Methods All consecutive adult patients with incident SAB (n = 2008) were prospectively enrolled between 2009 and 2011 in 8 university hospitals in France. Results SAB was nosocomial in 54%, non-nosocomial healthcare related in 18% and community-acquired in 26%. Methicillin resistance was present in 19% of isolates. SAB Incidence of nosocomial SAB was 0.159/1000 patients-days of hospitalization (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.111-0.219). A deep focus of infection was detected in 37%, the two most frequent were IE (11%) and pneumonia (8%). The higher rates of IE were observed in injecting drug users (IE: 38%) and patients with prosthetic (IE: 33%) or native valve disease (IE: 20%) but 40% of IE occurred in patients without heart disease nor injecting drug use. IE was more frequent in case of community-acquired (IE: 21%, adjusted odds-ratio (aOR) = 2.9, CI = 2.0-4.3) or non-nosocomial healthcare-related SAB (IE: 12%, aOR = 2.3, CI = 1.4-3.5). S. aureus meningitis (IE: 59%), persistent bacteremia at 48 hours (IE: 25%) and C-reactive protein > 190 mg/L (IE: 15%) were also independently associated with IE. Criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock were met in 30% of SAB without IE (overall in hospital mortality rate 24%) and in 51% of IE (overall in hospital mortality rate 35%). Conclusion SAB is still a severe disease, mostly related to healthcare in a high-income country. IE is the most frequent complication and occurs frequently in patients without known predisposing conditions. PMID:26020939

  10. Developments for improved diagnosis of bacterial bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Loonen, A J M; Wolffs, P F G; Bruggeman, C A; van den Brule, A J C

    2014-10-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are associated with high mortality and increased healthcare costs. Optimal management of BSI depends on several factors including recognition of the disease, laboratory tests and treatment. Rapid and accurate identification of the etiologic agent is crucial to be able to initiate pathogen specific antibiotic therapy and decrease mortality rates. Furthermore, appropriate treatment might slow down the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains. Culture-based methods are still considered to be the "gold standard" for the detection and identification of pathogens causing BSI. Positive blood cultures are used for Gram-staining. Subsequently, positive blood culture material is subcultured on solid media, and (semi-automated) biochemical testing is performed for species identification. Finally, a complete antibiotic susceptibility profile can be provided based on cultured colonies, which allows the start of pathogen-tailored antibiotic therapy. This conventional workflow is extremely time-consuming and can take up to several days. Furthermore, fastidious and slow-growing microorganisms, as well as antibiotic pre-treated samples can lead to false-negative results. The main aim of this review is to present different strategies to improve the conventional laboratory diagnostic steps for BSI. These approaches include protein-based (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry) and nucleic acid-based (polymerase chain reaction [PCR]) identification from subculture, blood cultures, and whole blood to decrease time to results. Pathogen enrichment and DNA isolation methods, to enable optimal pathogen DNA recovery from whole blood, are described. In addition, the use of biomarkers as patient pre-selection tools for molecular assays are discussed. PMID:24848132

  11. Implantable arterial port-related bloodstream infection in patients with primary or metastatic hepatic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hitoshi; Sakurai, Yasuo; Kang, Jong-Hon; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Matsuura, Hirotaka; Warren, David K

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of implantable arterial post-related bloodstream infections (IAP-RBSI) among patients with unresectable hepatic malignancies is not well defined. We reviewed the 9-year incidence of IAP-RBSI in patients with hepatic malignancies, at a tertiary care center in Japan. The incidence was 1.9 infections per 10,000 catheter days. PMID:23594477

  12. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit of a medical center: a three-year review.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ya-Chun; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Chih; Su, Bai-Horng; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui

    2002-09-01

    Bloodstream infections are the most frequent nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units. This retrospective study surveyed the epidemiologic characteristics of nosocomial bloodstream infections which occurred in the neonatal intensive care unit from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1999. The overall infection patient rate was 5.5% in the 3-year period, and the overall infection patient-day rate was 4.4 per 1000 patient-days. Low birth weight was a risk factor for bloodstream infections. The rate of infection for neonates with birth weight below 1000 g ranged from 36.6% to 45.8% (1997: 36.6%; 1998: 45.8% and 1999: 38.9%). The most common pathogens causing nosocomial bloodstream infection were: Staphylococcus aureus (18.5%) (with 92% oxacillin-resistant), Acinectobacter baumannii (16.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.9%), Escherichia coli (9.6%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.1%). The mortality due to nosocomial bloodstream infection was highest among gram-negative bacteria, especially with P. aeruginosa (45.5%). Therefore, surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infection and successful strategies to decrease nosocomial bloodstream infection, such as infection control and optimal antibiotic use, are warranted. PMID:12380789

  13. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10?M HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at ?=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at ?=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  14. Reducing Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections ?on Inpatient Oncology Units Using Peer Review.

    PubMed

    Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich; Malast, Tracey; Festus, Onyekachi; Riskie, Vickie

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a peer-to-peer program and the outcomes of interventions to reduce the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infections in patients in bone marrow transplantation, medical, and surgical oncology units. The article reviews the process and describes tools used to achieve success in a Magnet®-designated academic medical center. PMID:26583628

  15. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph; Seifert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen. PMID:26689082

  16. Increasing the Reliability of Fully Automated Surveillance for Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Snyders, Rachael E; Goris, Ashleigh J; Gase, Kathleen A; Leone, Carole L; Doherty, Joshua A; Woeltje, Keith F

    2015-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To increase reliability of the algorithm used in our fully automated electronic surveillance system by adding rules to better identify bloodstream infections secondary to other hospital-acquired infections. METHODS Intensive care unit (ICU) patients with positive blood cultures were reviewed. Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) determinations were based on 2 sources: routine surveillance by infection preventionists, and fully automated surveillance. Discrepancies between the 2 sources were evaluated to determine root causes. Secondary infection sites were identified in most discrepant cases. New rules to identify secondary sites were added to the algorithm and applied to this ICU population and a non-ICU population. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and kappa were calculated for the new models. RESULTS Of 643 positive ICU blood cultures reviewed, 68 (10.6%) were identified as central line-associated bloodstream infections by fully automated electronic surveillance, whereas 38 (5.9%) were confirmed by routine surveillance. New rules were tested to identify organisms as central line-associated bloodstream infections if they did not meet one, or a combination of, the following: (I) matching organisms (by genus and species) cultured from any other site; (II) any organisms cultured from sterile site; (III) any organisms cultured from skin/wound; (IV) any organisms cultured from respiratory tract. The best-fit model included new rules I and II when applied to positive blood cultures in an ICU population. However, they didn't improve performance of the algorithm when applied to positive blood cultures in a non-ICU population. CONCLUSION Electronic surveillance system algorithms may need adjustment for specific populations. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36(12):1396-1400. PMID:26329691

  17. Tsukamurella catheter-related bloodstream infection in a pediatric patient with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wendorf, Kristen A.; Espinosa, Claudia M.; LeBar, William D.; Weinberg, Jason B.

    2010-01-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) are important complications in patients with long-term indwelling central venous catheters. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old male with pulmonary hypertension treated with continuous treprostinil infusion, who presented with a CR-BSI caused by a Tsukamurella species. This case highlights the potential for this unusual organism to cause infection in immunocompetent patients. PMID:24470887

  18. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Salzer, Helmut J.F.; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen. PMID:26689082

  19. Risk factors of nosocomial bloodstream infections in surgical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing; Tong, Meng-Meng; Zhang, Miao-Zun; Zhu, Hui-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many studies have examined risk factors of nosocomial bloodstream infections. However risk factors of nosocomial bloodstream infections in surgical intensive care unit have never been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate this topic. Methods: Retrospective surgical intensive care unit patients’ data were collected in a tertiary hospital from January 2010 to August 2014. Infected and non-infected patients were compared with univariate analysis of categorical variables to obtain statistical significance risk factors. Then multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to acquire the final risk factors. Results: 98 patients were diagnosed with nosocomial bloodstream infections in total. Mortality rate was 29.6% (n=29). The data indicated gram-positive cocci were the main pathogens (64.3%; n=63). Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that age (>65 years old) (OR, 2.297; CI95, 0.870 to 6.062), acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score (>18) (OR, 6.981; CI95, 2.330 to 15.865), multiple organ dysfunction score (>8) (OR, 9.857; CI95, 6.395 to 19.505), mechanical ventilation (OR, 4.583; CI95, 2.134 to 10.956), central venous catheter (OR, 5.875; CI95, 2.212 to 13.456) and selective surgery (OR, 3.455; CI95, 3.442-9.235) were risk factors of nosocomial BSI. Conclusions: Patients with nosocomial bloodstream infections in surgical intensive care unit setting often have a poor prognosis. Age (>65 years old), chronic health evaluation II score (>18), multiple organ dysfunction score (>8), usage of mechanical ventilation, central venous catheter and selective surgery can be regarded as risk factors. PMID:26629203

  20. Duration of antibiotic therapy for critically ill patients with bloodstream infections: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Havey, Thomas C; Fowler, Robert A; Pinto, Ruxandra; Elligsen, Marion; Daneman, Nick

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal duration of antibiotic treatment for bloodstream infections is unknown and understudied. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of critically ill patients with bloodstream infections diagnosed in a tertiary care hospital between March 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011 was undertaken. The impact of patient, pathogen and infectious syndrome characteristics on selection of shorter (?10 days) or longer (>10 days) treatment duration, and on the number of antibiotic-free days, was examined. The time profile of clinical response was evaluated over the first 14 days of treatment. Relapse, secondary infection and mortality rates were compared between those receiving shorter or longer treatment. RESULTS: Among 100 critically ill patients with bloodstream infection, the median duration of antibiotic treatment was 11 days, but was highly variable (interquartile range 4.5 to 17 days). Predictors of longer treatment (fewer antibiotic-free days) included foci with established requirements for prolonged treatment, underlying respiratory tract focus, and infection with Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas species. Predictors of shorter treatment (more antibiotic-free days) included vascular catheter source and bacteremia with coagulase-negative staphylococci. Temperature improvements plateaued after the first week; white blood cell counts, multiple organ dysfunction scores and vasopressor dependence continued to decline into the second week. Among 72 patients who survived to 10 days, clinical outcomes were similar between those receiving shorter and longer treatment. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic treatment durations for patients with bloodstream infection are highly variable and often prolonged. A randomized trial is needed to determine the duration of treatment that will maximize cure while minimizing adverse consequences of antibiotics. PMID:24421823

  1. Persistent Bloodstream Infection with Kocuria rhizophila Related to a Damaged Central Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Karsten; Mérens, Audrey; Ferroni, Agnès; Dubern, Béatrice; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2012-01-01

    A case of persistent bloodstream infection with Kocuria rhizophila related to a damaged central venous catheter in a 3-year-old girl with Hirschsprung's disease is reported. The strain was identified as K. rhizophila by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. Arbitrarily primed PCR analysis showed a clonal strain. The repeated septic episodes were resolved with the catheter repair. PMID:22259211

  2. Persistent bloodstream infection with Kocuria rhizophila related to a damaged central catheter.

    PubMed

    Moissenet, Didier; Becker, Karsten; Mérens, Audrey; Ferroni, Agnès; Dubern, Béatrice; Vu-Thien, Hoang

    2012-04-01

    A case of persistent bloodstream infection with Kocuria rhizophila related to a damaged central venous catheter in a 3-year-old girl with Hirschsprung's disease is reported. The strain was identified as K. rhizophila by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Arbitrarily primed PCR analysis showed a clonal strain. The repeated septic episodes were resolved with the catheter repair. PMID:22259211

  3. Impact of fluoroquinolone resistance in Gram-negative bloodstream infections on healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Brigmon, M M; Bookstaver, P Brandon; Kohn, J; Albrecht, H; Al-Hasan, M N

    2015-09-01

    There has been a concerning increase in fluoroquinolone resistance among Gram-negative bloodstream isolates. This retrospective cohort study examines the implications of fluoroquinolone resistance on use of healthcare resources in patients with Gram-negative bloodstream infections (BSI). Hospitalized adults with first episodes of community-onset Gram-negative BSI from 2010 to 2012 at Palmetto Health Hospitals in Columbia, SC, USA were identified. Multivariate linear regression was used to examine risk factors for prolonged hospital length of stay (HLOS) in survivors of Gram-negative BSI. Among 474 unique patients, 384 (81%) and 90 (19%) had BSI due to fluoroquinolone-susceptible (FQ-S) and fluoroquinolone non-susceptible (FQ-NS) Gram-negative bacilli, respectively. The FQ-NS bloodstream isolates, particularly Escherichia coli, were more likely than FQ-S isolates to be multi-drug resistant (56% versus 6%, p < 0.001). Compared with patients with BSI due to FQ-S bloodstream isolates, those with FQ-NS isolates were more likely to receive inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy (26% versus 3%, p < 0.001), have longer mean HLOS (11.6 versus 9.3 days, p 0.03) and treatment duration with intravenous antibiotics during hospitalization (9.1 versus 7.1 days, p 0.001), and use outpatient intravenous antibiotics at hospital discharge (15% versus 8%, p 0.05). After adjustments in the multivariate model, inappropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy was an independent risk factor for prolonged HLOS in survivors of Gram-negative BSI (parameter estimate 3.65 days, 95% CI 0.43-6.86). Multi-drug resistance among FQ-NS bloodstream isolates limits both empirical and definitive antimicrobial treatment options and poses excessive burdens on the healthcare system. PMID:26003282

  4. Procalcitonin Levels in Gram-Positive, Gram-Negative, and Fungal Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ferranti, Marta; Moretti, Amedeo; Al Dhahab, Zainab Salim; Cenci, Elio; Mencacci, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) can discriminate bacterial from viral systemic infections and true bacteremia from contaminated blood cultures. The aim of this study was to evaluate PCT diagnostic accuracy in discriminating Gram-positive, Gram-negative, and fungal bloodstream infections. A total of 1,949 samples from patients with suspected bloodstream infections were included in the study. Median PCT value in Gram-negative (13.8?ng/mL, interquartile range (IQR) 3.4–44.1) bacteremias was significantly higher than in Gram-positive (2.1?ng/mL, IQR 0.6–7.6) or fungal (0.5?ng/mL, IQR 0.4–1) infections (P < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve (AUC) for PCT of 0.765 (95% CI 0.725–0.805, P < 0.0001) in discriminating Gram-negatives from Gram-positives at the best cut-off value of 10.8?ng/mL and an AUC of 0.944 (95% CI 0.919–0.969, P < 0.0001) in discriminating Gram-negatives from fungi at the best cut-off of 1.6?ng/mL. Additional results showed a significant difference in median PCT values between Enterobacteriaceae and nonfermentative Gram-negative bacteria (17.1?ng/mL, IQR 5.9–48.5 versus 3.5?ng/mL, IQR 0.8–21.5; P < 0.0001). This study suggests that PCT may be of value to distinguish Gram-negative from Gram-positive and fungal bloodstream infections. Nevertheless, its utility to predict different microorganisms needs to be assessed in further studies. PMID:25852221

  5. Cost-effectiveness of a quality improvement programme to reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections in intensive care units in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Herzer, Kurt R; Niessen, Louis; Constenla, Dagna O; Ward, William J; Pronovost, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of a multifaceted quality improvement programme focused on reducing central line-associated bloodstream infections in intensive care units. Design Cost-effectiveness analysis using a decision tree model to compare programme to non-programme intensive care units. Setting USA. Population Adult patients in the intensive care unit. Costs Economic costs of the programme and of central line-associated bloodstream infections were estimated from the perspective of the hospital and presented in 2013 US dollars. Main outcome measures Central line-associated bloodstream infections prevented, deaths averted due to central line-associated bloodstream infections prevented, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed. Results Compared with current practice, the programme is strongly dominant and reduces bloodstream infections and deaths at no additional cost. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that there was an almost 80% probability that the programme reduces bloodstream infections and the infections’ economic costs to hospitals. The opportunity cost of a bloodstream infection to a hospital was the most important model parameter in these analyses. Conclusions This multifaceted quality improvement programme, as it is currently implemented by hospitals on an increasingly large scale in the USA, likely reduces the economic costs of central line-associated bloodstream infections for US hospitals. Awareness among hospitals about the programme's benefits should enhance implementation. The programme's implementation has the potential to substantially reduce morbidity, mortality and economic costs associated with central line-associated bloodstream infections. PMID:25256190

  6. Manipulation of Autophagy in Phagocytes Facilitates Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Kate M.; Wilk, Mieszko M.; Leech, John M.; Murphy, Alison G.; Laabei, Maisem; Monk, Ian R.; Massey, Ruth C.; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity for intracellular survival within phagocytes is likely a critical factor facilitating the dissemination of Staphylococcus aureus in the host. To date, the majority of work on S. aureus-phagocyte interactions has focused on neutrophils and, to a lesser extent, macrophages, yet we understand little about the role played by dendritic cells (DCs) in the direct killing of this bacterium. Using bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs), we demonstrate for the first time that DCs can effectively kill S. aureus but that certain strains of S. aureus have the capacity to evade DC (and macrophage) killing by manipulation of autophagic pathways. Strains with high levels of Agr activity were capable of causing autophagosome accumulation, were not killed by BMDCs, and subsequently escaped from the phagocyte, exerting significant cytotoxic effects. Conversely, strains that exhibited low levels of Agr activity failed to accumulate autophagosomes and were killed by BMDCs. Inhibition of the autophagic pathway by treatment with 3-methyladenine restored the bactericidal effects of BMDCs. Using an in vivo model of systemic infection, we demonstrated that the ability of S. aureus strains to evade phagocytic cell killing and to survive temporarily within phagocytes correlated with persistence in the periphery and that this effect is critically Agr dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that strains of S. aureus exhibiting high levels of Agr activity are capable of blocking autophagic flux, leading to the accumulation of autophagosomes. Within these autophagosomes, the bacteria are protected from phagocytic killing, thus providing an intracellular survival niche within professional phagocytes, which ultimately facilitates dissemination. PMID:26099586

  7. Manipulation of Autophagy in Phagocytes Facilitates Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Kate M; Wilk, Mieszko M; Leech, John M; Murphy, Alison G; Laabei, Maisem; Monk, Ian R; Massey, Ruth C; Lindsay, Jodi A; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2015-09-01

    The capacity for intracellular survival within phagocytes is likely a critical factor facilitating the dissemination of Staphylococcus aureus in the host. To date, the majority of work on S. aureus-phagocyte interactions has focused on neutrophils and, to a lesser extent, macrophages, yet we understand little about the role played by dendritic cells (DCs) in the direct killing of this bacterium. Using bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs), we demonstrate for the first time that DCs can effectively kill S. aureus but that certain strains of S. aureus have the capacity to evade DC (and macrophage) killing by manipulation of autophagic pathways. Strains with high levels of Agr activity were capable of causing autophagosome accumulation, were not killed by BMDCs, and subsequently escaped from the phagocyte, exerting significant cytotoxic effects. Conversely, strains that exhibited low levels of Agr activity failed to accumulate autophagosomes and were killed by BMDCs. Inhibition of the autophagic pathway by treatment with 3-methyladenine restored the bactericidal effects of BMDCs. Using an in vivo model of systemic infection, we demonstrated that the ability of S. aureus strains to evade phagocytic cell killing and to survive temporarily within phagocytes correlated with persistence in the periphery and that this effect is critically Agr dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that strains of S. aureus exhibiting high levels of Agr activity are capable of blocking autophagic flux, leading to the accumulation of autophagosomes. Within these autophagosomes, the bacteria are protected from phagocytic killing, thus providing an intracellular survival niche within professional phagocytes, which ultimately facilitates dissemination. PMID:26099586

  8. Bathing With 2% Chlorhexidine Gluconate: Evidence and Costs Associated With Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Shah, Hena N; Schwartz, Jennifer L; Luna, Gaye; Cullen, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    In a coordinated national effort reported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the use of 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) has reduced the central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rate by 40%. Conversely, a recent randomized clinical trial determined that chlorhexidine bathing did not reduce the CLABSI rate. The objectives of this study were to conduct meta-analysis and clarify the effectiveness of 2% CHG bathing by nurses on CLABSIs in adult intensive care unit patients and to determine the contributing costs attributable to CLABSIs and 2% CHG bathing. Eligible studies that included the outcome of bloodstream infection rate for central lines were considered. A rigorous systematic review protocol and software tools available from the Joanna Briggs Institute via OvidSP were used. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality tools assisted with identifiable CHG bathing costs. Four studies were included in the meta-analysis for the outcome of primary bloodstream infections, and 2 studies narratively supported the meta-analysis. A relative risk of 0.46 with 95% confidence interval (0.34-0.63) was determined. This significant effect is seen in an overall z-score of 4.84 (P < .0001). This meta-analysis supports that 2% CHG reduces CLABSIs. The estimated cost increase of 2% CHG-impregnated cloths is $4.10 versus nonmedicated bathing cloths. The cost associated with a single CLABSI is 10 times more than the cost of using 2% CHG-impregnated cloths. Nursing provides significant influence for the prevention of CLABSIs in critical care via evidence-based best practices. PMID:26633158

  9. Epidemiology of community-onset bloodstream infections in Bouaké, central Côte d’Ivoire

    PubMed Central

    Akoua-Koffi, C.; Tia, H.; Plo, J.K.; Monemo, P.; Cissé, A.; Yao, C.; Yenan, P.J.; Touré, F.S.; Ilupeju, V.; Bogoch, I.I.; Utzinger, J.; Herrmann, M.; Becker, S.L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial bloodstream infections (BSI) account for considerable morbidity worldwide, but epidemiological data from resource-constrained tropical settings are scarce. We analysed 293 blood cultures from patients presenting to a regional referral hospital in Bouaké, central Côte d’Ivoire, to determine the aetiology of community-onset BSI. The prevalence of bacteraemia was 22.5%, with children being most commonly affected. Enterobacteriaceae (predominantly Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica) accounted for 94% of BSI. Staphylococcus aureus was the only relevant Gram-positive pathogen. Clinical signs and symptoms were not significantly associated with blood culture positivity after controlling for malaria. PMID:26442153

  10. Late-Onset Bloodstream Infection and Perturbed Maturation of the Gastrointestinal Microbiota in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Randell, Paul; Cox, Michael J.; McClure, Zoë E.; Li, Ming-Shi; Donaldson, Hugo; Langford, Paul R.; Cookson, William O. C. M.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Kroll, J. Simon

    2015-01-01

    Background Late-onset bloodstream infection (LO-BSI) is a common complication of prematurity, and lack of timely diagnosis and treatment can have life-threatening consequences. We sought to identify clinical characteristics and microbial signatures in the gastrointestinal microbiota preceding diagnosis of LO-BSI in premature infants. Method Daily faecal samples and clinical data were collected over two years from 369 premature neonates (<32 weeks gestation). We analysed samples from 22 neonates who developed LO-BSI and 44 matched control infants. Next-generation sequencing of 16S rRNA gene regions amplified by PCR from total faecal DNA was used to characterise the microbiota of faecal samples preceding diagnosis from infants with LO-BSI and controls. Culture of selected samples was undertaken, and bacterial isolates identified using MALDI-TOF. Antibiograms from bloodstream and faecal isolates were compared to explore strain similarity. Results From the week prior to diagnosis, infants with LO-BSI had higher proportions of faecal aerobes/facultative anaerobes compared to controls. Risk factors for LO-BSI were identified by multivariate analysis. Enterobacteriaceal sepsis was associated with antecedent multiple lines, low birth weight and a faecal microbiota with prominent Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcal sepsis was associated with Staphylococcus OTU faecal over-abundance, and the number of days prior to diagnosis of mechanical ventilation and of the presence of centrally-placed lines. In 12 cases, the antibiogram of the bloodstream isolate matched that of a component of the faecal microbiota in the sample collected closest to diagnosis. Conclusions The gastrointestinal tract is an important reservoir for LO-BSI organisms, pathogens translocating across the epithelial barrier. LO-BSI is associated with an aberrant microbiota, with abundant staphylococci and Enterobacteriaceae and a failure to mature towards predominance of obligate anaerobes. PMID:26167683

  11. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fc? and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host Bmore »cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.« less

  12. Bloodstream infections in patients with hematological malignancies: which is more fatal – cancer or resistant pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    Gedik, Habip; ?im?ek, Funda; Kantürk, Arzu; Yildirmak, Taner; Arica, Deniz; Aydin, Demet; Demirel, Naciye; Yoku?, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to report the incidence of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and clinically or microbiologically proven bacterial or fungal BSIs during neutropenic episodes in patients with hematological malignancies. Methods In this retrospective observational study, all patients in the hematology department older than 14 years who developed febrile neutropenia during chemotherapy for hematological cancers were evaluated. Patients were included if they had experienced at least one neutropenic episode between November 2010 and November 2012 due to chemotherapy in the hematology ward. Results During 282 febrile episodes in 126 patients, 66 (23%) episodes of bacteremia and 24 (8%) episodes of fungemia were recorded in 48 (38%) and 18 (14%) patients, respectively. Gram-negative bacteria caused 74% (n=49) of all bacteremic episodes. Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (n=6) caused 12% and 9% of Gram-negative bacteremia episodes and all bacteremia episodes, respectively. Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria included Acinetobacter baumannii (n=4), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=1), and Serratia marcescens (n=1). Culture-proven invasive fungal infection occurred in 24 episodes in 18 cases during the study period, with 15 episodes in ten cases occurring in the first study year and nine episodes in eight cases in the second study year. In 13 of 18 cases (72%) with bloodstream yeast infections, previous azole exposure was recorded. Candida parapsilosis, C. glabrata, and C. albicans isolates were resistant to voriconazole and fluconazole. Conclusion BSIs that occur during febrile neutropenic episodes in hematology patients due to Gram-negative bacteria should be treated initially with non-carbapenem-based antipseudomonal therapy taking into consideration antimicrobial stewardship. Non-azole antifungal drugs, including caspofungin and liposomal amphotericin B, should be preferred as empirical antifungal therapy in the events of possible or probable invasive fungal infections with an absence of pulmonary findings due to increase azole resistance. PMID:25258539

  13. Coordinated Molecular Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus, Endothelial Cells and Platelets in Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Garciarena, Carolina D; McHale, Tony M; Watkin, Rebecca L; Kerrigan, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often carried asymptomatically on the human body. Upon entry to the otherwise sterile environment of the cardiovascular system, S. aureus can lead to serious complications resulting in organ failure and death. The success of S. aureus as a pathogen in the bloodstream is due to its ability to express a wide array of cell wall proteins on its surface that recognise host receptors, extracellular matrix proteins and plasma proteins. Endothelial cells and platelets are important cells in the cardiovascular system and are a major target of bloodstream infection. Endothelial cells form the inner lining of a blood vessel and provide an antithrombotic barrier between the vessel wall and blood. Platelets on the other hand travel throughout the cardiovascular system and respond by aggregating around the site of injury and initiating clot formation. Activation of either of these cells leads to functional dysregulation in the cardiovascular system. In this review, we will illustrate how S. aureus establish intimate interactions with both endothelial cells and platelets leading to cardiovascular dysregulation. PMID:26690226

  14. Population-Based Epidemiology and Microbiology of Community-Onset Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a major cause of infectious disease morbidity and mortality worldwide. While a positive blood culture is mandatory for establishment of the presence of a BSI, there are a number of determinants that must be considered for establishment of this entity. Community-onset BSIs are those that occur in outpatients or are first identified <48 h after admission to hospital, and they may be subclassified further as health care associated, when they occur in patients with significant prior health care exposure, or community associated, in other cases. The most common causes of community-onset BSI include Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Antimicrobial-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and extended-spectrum ?-lactamase/metallo-?-lactamase/carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae, have emerged as important etiologies of community-onset BSI. PMID:25278570

  15. The Impact of Implementation of Bundle to Reduce Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Goncalves; Ardison, Kym Marcel Martins; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Gaspar, Gilberto Gambero; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Puga, Marcelo Lourencini; Laus, Ana Maria; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Auxiliadora-Martins, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate how control bundles reduce the rate of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSIs) rates in critically ill patients. Methods This is a prospective before-and-after study designed to evaluate whether a set of control measures (bundle) can help prevent CVC-BSI. The bundles included a checklist that aimed to correct practices related to CVC insertion, manipulation, and maintenance based on guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Results We examined 123 checklists before and 155 checklists after implementation of the training program. Compared with the pre-intervention period, CVC-BSI rates decreased. Hand hygiene techniques were used correctly. CVC-BSI incidence was 9.3 and 5.1 per 1,000 catheter-days before and after the training program, respectively. Conclusions The implementation of a bundle and training program effectively reduces CVC-BSI rates. PMID:26491498

  16. Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections in Brazilian Pediatric Patients: Microbiology, Epidemiology, and Clinical Features

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carlos Alberto Pires; Marra, Alexandre R.; Camargo, Luis Fernando Aranha; Pignatari, Antônio Carlos Campos; Sukiennik, Teresa; Behar, Paulo Renato Petersen; Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino Servolo; Ribeiro, Julival; Girão, Evelyne; Correa, Luci; Guerra, Carla; Carneiro, Irna; Brites, Carlos; Reis, Marise; de Souza, Marta Antunes; Tranchesi, Regina; Barata, Cristina U.; Edmond, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality and are the most frequent type of nosocomial infection in pediatric patients. Methods We identified the predominant pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibilities of nosocomial bloodstream isolates in pediatric patients (?16 years of age) in the Brazilian Prospective Surveillance for nBSIs at 16 hospitals from 12 June 2007 to 31 March 2010 (Br SCOPE project). Results In our study a total of 2,563 cases of nBSI were reported by hospitals participating in the Br SCOPE project. Among these, 342 clinically significant episodes of BSI were identified in pediatric patients (?16 years of age). Ninety-six percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-negative organisms caused 49.0% of these BSIs, Gram-positive organisms caused 42.6%, and fungi caused 8.4%. The most common pathogens were Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) (21.3%), Klebsiella spp. (15.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (10.6%), and Acinetobacter spp. (9.2%). The crude mortality was 21.6% (74 of 342). Forty-five percent of nBSIs occurred in a pediatric or neonatal intensive-care unit (ICU). The most frequent underlying conditions were malignancy, in 95 patients (27.8%). Among the potential factors predisposing patients to BSI, central venous catheters were the most frequent (66.4%). Methicillin resistance was detected in 37 S. aureus isolates (27.1%). Of the Klebsiella spp. isolates, 43.2% were resistant to ceftriaxone. Of the Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 42.9% and 21.4%, respectively, were resistant to imipenem. Conclusions In our multicenter study, we found a high mortality and a large proportion of gram-negative bacilli with elevated levels of resistance in pediatric patients. PMID:23861860

  17. Bloodstream infection following 217 consecutive systemic-enteric drained pancreas transplants

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Natalie; Guggenbichler, Sigmund; Steurer, Wolfgang; Margreiter, Christian; Mayer, Gert; Kafka, Reinhold; Mark, Walter; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Margreiter, Raimund; Bonatti, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    Background Combined kidney pancreas transplantation (PTx) evolved as excellent treatment for diabetic nephropathy. Infections remain common and serious complications. Methods 217 consecutive enteric drained PTxs performed from 1997 to 2004 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to bloodstream infection. Immunosuppression consisted of antithymocyteglobuline induction, tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids for the majority of cases. Standard perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis consisted of pipercillin/tazobactam in combination with ciprofloxacin and fluconazole. Results One year patient, pancreas and kidney graft survival were 96.4%, 88.5% and 94.8%, surgical complication rate was 35%, rejection rate 30% and rate of infection 59%. In total 46 sepsis episodes were diagnosed in 35 patients (16%) with a median onset on day 12 (range 1–45) post transplant. Sepsis source was intraabdominal infection (IAI) (n = 21), a contaminated central venous line (n = 10), wound infection (n = 5), urinary tract infection (n = 2) and graft transmitted (n = 2). Nine patients (4%) experienced multiple episodes of sepsis. Overall 65 pathogens (IAI sepsis 39, line sepsis 15, others 11) were isolated from blood. Gram positive cocci accounted for 50 isolates (77%): Coagulase negative staphylococci (n = 28, i.e. 43%) (nine multi-resistant), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 11, i.e. 17%) (four multi-resistant), enterococci (n = 9, i.e. 14%) (one E. faecium). Gram negative rods were cultured in twelve cases (18%). Patients with blood borne infection had a two year pancreas graft survival of 76.5% versus 89.4% for those without sepsis (p = 0.036), patient survival was not affected. Conclusion Sepsis remains a serious complication after PTx with significantly reduced pancreas graft, but not patient survival. The most common source is IAI. PMID:16895603

  18. Polymorphisms in Fibronectin Binding Proteins A and B among Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Isolates Are Not Associated with Arthroplasty Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu; Park, Lawrence P.; Rude, Thomas H.; Ruffin, Felicia; Hos, Nina J.; Seifert, Harald; Rieg, Siegbert; Kern, Winfried V.; Lower, Steven K.; Fowler, Vance G.; Kaasch, Achim J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in fibronectin binding protein A (fnbA) of Staphylococcus aureus are associated with cardiac device infections. However, the role of fnbA SNPs in S. aureus arthroplasty infection is unknown. Methods Bloodstream S. aureus isolates from a derivation cohort of patients at a single U.S. medical center with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) and prosthetic hip or knee arthroplasties that were infected (PJI, n = 27) or uninfected (PJU, n = 43) underwent sequencing of fnbA and fnbB. A validation cohort of S. aureus bloodstream PJI (n = 12) and PJU (n = 58) isolates from Germany also underwent fnbA and fnbB sequencing. Results Overall, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were significantly associated with the PJI or PJU clinical groups within the derivation cohort. Similarly, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were associated with PJI or PJU when the analysis was restricted to patients with either early SAB (i.e., bacteremia occurring <1 year after placement or manipulation of prostheses) or late SAB (i.e., bacteremia >1 year after placement or manipulation of prostheses). Conclusions In contrast to cardiac device infections, there is no association between nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA or fnbB of bloodstream S. aureus isolates and arthroplasty infection. These results suggest that initial steps leading to S. aureus infection of cardiovascular and orthopedic prostheses may arise by distinct processes. PMID:26606522

  19. Bloodstream infections in very low birth weight infants with intestinal failure

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Conrad R.; Hansen, Nellie I.; Higgins, Rosemary D.; Bell, Edward F.; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R.; Walsh, Michele C.; Hale, Ellen C.; Newman, Nancy S.; Das, Abhik; Stoll, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine pathogens and other characteristics associated with late-onset bloodstream infections (BSI) in infants with intestinal failure (IF) as a consequence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Study design Infants 401–1500 grams at birth who survived >72 hours and received care at NICHD Neonatal Research Network centers were studied. Frequency of culture positive BSI and pathogens were compared for infants with medical NEC, NEC managed surgically without IF, and surgical IF. Among infants with IF, duration of parenteral nutrition (PN) and other outcomes were evaluated. Results 932 infants were studied (IF, n=78; surgical NEC without IF, n=452; medical NEC, n=402). The proportion with BSI after NEC diagnosis was higher in infants with IF than with surgical NEC (p=0.007) or medical NEC (p<0.001). Gram positive pathogens were most frequent. Among infants with IF, increased number of infections was associated with longer hospitalization and duration on PN (0, 1, ?2 infections; median stay (days): 172, 188, 260, p=0.06; median days on PN: 90, 112, 115, p=0.003), and the proportion who achieved full feeds during hospitalization decreased (87%, 67%, 50%, p=0.03). Conclusion Recurrent BSIs are common in VLBW infants with IF. Gram positive bacteria were most commonly identified in these infants. PMID:21840538

  20. Bloodstream infections in intensive care unit patients: distribution and antibiotic resistance of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Russotto, Vincenzo; Cortegiani, Andrea; Graziano, Giorgio; Saporito, Laura; Raineri, Santi Maurizio; Mammina, Caterina; Giarratano, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are among the leading infections in critically ill patients. The case-fatality rate associated with BSIs in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) reaches 35%–50%. The emergence and diffusion of bacteria with resistance to antibiotics is a global health problem. Multidrug-resistant bacteria were detected in 50.7% of patients with BSIs in a recently published international observational study, with methicillin resistance detected in 48% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, carbapenem resistance detected in 69% of Acinetobacter spp., in 38% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and in 37% of Pseudomonas spp. Prior hospitalization and antibiotic exposure have been identified as risk factors for infections caused by resistant bacteria in different studies. Patients with BSIs caused by resistant strains showed an increased risk of mortality, which may be explained by a higher incidence of inappropriate empirical therapy in different studies. The molecular genetic characterization of resistant bacteria allows the understanding of the most common mechanisms underlying their resistance and the adoption of surveillance measures. Knowledge of epidemiology, risk factors, mechanisms of resistance, and outcomes of BSIs caused by resistant bacteria may have a major influence on global management of ICU patients. The aim of this review is to provide the clinician an update on BSIs caused by resistant bacteria in ICU patients. PMID:26300651

  1. Elimination of Bloodstream Infections Associated with Candida albicans Biofilm in Intravascular Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Freshta; Kjellerup, Birthe Veno

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular catheters are among the most commonly inserted medical devices and they are known to cause a large number of catheter related bloodstream infections (BSIs). Biofilms are associated with many chronic infections due to the aggregation of microorganisms. One of these organisms is the fungus Candida albicans. It has shown to be one of the leading causes of catheter-related BSIs. The presence of biofilm on intravascular catheters provide increased tolerance against antimicrobial treatments, thus alternative treatment strategies are sought. Traditionally, many strategies, such as application of combined antimicrobials, addition of antifungals, and removal of catheters, have been practiced, but they were not successful in eradicating BSIs. Since these fungal infections can result in significant morbidity, mortality, and increased healthcare cost, other promising preventive strategies, including antimicrobial lock therapy, chelating agents, alcohol, and biofilm disruptors, have been applied. In this review, current success and failure of these new approaches, and a comparison with the previous strategies are discussed in order to understand which preventative treatment is the most effective in controlling the catheter-related BSIs. PMID:26131615

  2. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase B Knockdown Compromises Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Form Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Inês; Faria, Joana; Clayton, Christine; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Santarém, Nuno; Roy, Nilanjan; Cordeiro-da-Siva, Anabela; Tavares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive drug target waiting further characterization. In this study, Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B showed in vitro isomerase activity. RNAi against this enzyme reduced parasites' in vitro growth, and more importantly, bloodstream forms infectivity. Mice infected with induced RNAi clones exhibited lower parasitaemia and a prolonged survival compared to control mice. Phenotypic reversion was achieved by complementing induced RNAi clones with an ectopic copy of Trypanosoma cruzi gene. Our results present the first functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, and show the relevance of an enzyme belonging to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway in the context of Trypanosoma brucei infection. PMID:25568941

  3. Reduction of Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection Rates in Patients in the Adult Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Mary C; Macy, Deborah L

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) prolong hospital stays and increase cost, morbidity, and mortality. An intensive care unit (ICU) in a suburban Baltimore hospital reduced CLABSI rates to zero in 2012, by revising central venous access device policies and initiatives, which included a bloodstream infection alert system, bundle compliance monitoring and routine evaluation, and use of positive displacement needleless connectors. The hospital's ICU infection rate decreased from 2.9/1000 central-line days in 2010 to 0.8 by 2011, 0 by 2012, and 0.91 in 2013. The utilization ratio was 0.64 in 2011, 0.60 in 2012, and 0.58 in 2013. CLABSI prevention involves all disciplines and requires staff accountability for patient safety. PMID:26714119

  4. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Microbes Causing Bloodstream Infections in Unguja, Zanzibar

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Annette; Said, Abdulrahman K.; Jørstad, Melissa; Jenum, Pål A.; Blomberg, Bjørn

    2015-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections (BSI) are frequent and cause high case-fatality rates. Urgent antibiotic treatment can save patients’ lives, but antibiotic resistance can render antibiotic therapy futile. This study is the first to collect epidemiological data on BSI from Unguja, Zanzibar. Methods Clinical data and blood for culturing and susceptibility testing of isolated microbes were obtained from 469 consecutively enrolled neonates, children and adults presenting with signs of systemic infections at Mnazi Mmoja Hospital (MMH), Zanzibar. Results Pathogenic bacteria were recovered from the blood of 14% of the patients (66/469). The most frequently isolated microbes were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp. and Staphylococcus aureus. Infections were community-acquired in 56 patients (85%) and hospital-acquired in 8 (12%) (data missing for 2 patients). BSI caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli, K. pneumoniae) was found in 5 cases, of which 3 were community-acquired and 2 hospital-acquired. Three of these patients died. Six of 7 Salmonella Typhi isolates were multidrug resistant. Streptococcus pneumoniae was found in one patient only. Conclusions This is the first report of ESBL-producing bacteria causing BSI from the Zanzibar archipelago. Our finding of community-acquired BSI caused by ESBL-producing bacteria is alarming, as it implies that these difficult-to-treat bacteria have already spread in the society. In the local setting these infections are virtually impossible to cure. The findings call for increased awareness of rational antibiotic use, infection control and surveillance to counteract the problem of emerging antimicrobial resistance. PMID:26700032

  5. New Insight on Epidemiology and Management of Bacterial Bloodstream Infection in Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Menzo, Sara Lo; la Martire, Giulia; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Venditti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSI) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in onco-hematologic patients. The Gram-negative bacteria were the main responsible for the febrile neutropenia in the sixties; their impact declined due to the use of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. This situation was followed by the gradual emergence of Gram-positive bacteria also following the increased use of intravascular devices and the introduction of new chemotherapeutic strategies. In the last decade, the Gram-negative etiology is raising again because of the emergence of resistant strains that make questionable the usefulness of current strategies for prophylaxis and empirical treatment. Gram-negative BSI attributable mortality is relevant, and the appropriate empirical treatment significantly improves the prognosis; on the other hand the adequate delayed treatment of Gram-positive BSI does not seem to have a high impact on survival. The clinician has to be aware of the epidemiology of his institution and colonizations of his patients to choose the most appropriate empiric therapy. In a setting of high endemicity of multidrug-resistant infections also the choice of targeted therapy can be a challenge, often requiring strategies based on off-label prescriptions and low grade evidence. In this review, we summarize the current evidence for the best targeted therapies for difficult to treat bacteria BSIs and future perspectives in this topic. We also provide a flow chart for a rational approach to the empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia in a multidrug resistant, high prevalence setting. PMID:26185609

  6. Incidence, Clinical Characteristics and Attributable Mortality of Persistent Bloodstream Infection in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jen-Fu; Chu, Shih-Ming; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Yang, Pong-Hong; Lien, Reyin; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Tsai, Ming-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Background An atypical pattern of neonatal sepsis, characterized by persistent positive blood culture despite effective antimicrobial therapy, has been correlated with adverse outcomes. However, previous studies focused only on coagulate-negative staphylococcus infection. Methods All episodes of persistent bloodstream infection (BSI), defined as 3 or more consecutive positive blood cultures with the same bacterial species, at least two of them 48 hours apart, during a single sepsis episode, were enrolled over an 8-year period in a tertiary level neonatal intensive care unit. These cases were compared with all non-persistent BSI during the same period. Results We identified 81 episodes of persistent BSI (8.5% of all neonatal late-onset sepsis) in 74 infants, caused by gram-positive pathogens (n=38, 46.9%), gram-negative pathogens (n=21, 25.9%), fungus (n=20, 24.7%) and polymicrobial bacteremia (n=2, 2.5%). Persistent BSI does not differ from non-persistent BSI in most clinical characteristics and patient demographics, but tends to have a prolonged septic course, longer duration of feeding intolerance and more frequent requirement of blood transfusions. No difference was observed for death attributable to infection (9.8% vs. 6.5%), but neonates with persistent BSI had significantly higher rates of infectious complications (29.6% vs. 9.2%, P < 0.001), death from all causes (21.6% vs. 11.7%, P = 0.025), and duration of hospitalization among survivors [median (interquartile range): 80.0 (52.5-117.5) vs. 64.0 (40.0-96.0) days, P = 0.005] than those without persistent BSI. Conclusions Although persistent BSI does not contribute directly to increased mortality, the associated morbidities, infectious complications and prolonged septic courses highlight the importance of aggressive treatment to optimize outcomes. PMID:25875677

  7. Bacterial Landscape of Bloodstream Infections in Neutropenic Patients via High Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gyarmati, Peter; Kalin, Mats; Öhrmalm, Lars; Giske, Christian G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a common and potentially life-threatening complication in patients with hematological malignancies and therapy-induced neutropenia. Administration of broad spectrum antibiotics has substantially decreased the mortality rate in febrile neutropenia, but bacterial infection is documented in only one-third or fewer of the cases. BSI is typically diagnosed by blood culture; however, this method can detect only culturable pathogens. Methods In the present study, a total of 130 blood samples from hematological patients receiving dose-intensive antitumoural treatment were subjected to 16S rRNA PCR and 62 of them were cultured. PCR positive samples were processed to high throughput sequencing by amplifying the V1-V3 regions of the 16S rRNA gene to obtain a full spectrum of bacteria present in BSI. Results Five phyla and 30 genera were identified with sequencing compared to 2 phyla and 4 genera with culture. The largest proportion of bacteria detected by sequencing belonged to Proteobacteria (55.2%), Firmicutes (33.4%) and Actinobacteria (8.6%), while Fusobacteria (0.4%) and Bacteroidetes (0.1%) were also detected. Ninety-eight percent of the bacteria identified by sequencing were opportunistic human pathogens and 65% belonged to the normal human microbiota. Conclusions The present study indicates that BSIs in neutropenic hosts contain a much broader diversity of bacteria, likely with host origin, than previously realized. The elevated ratio of Proteobacteria in BSI corroborates the results found in other systemic inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease or mucosal infections. This knowledge may become of value for tailoring antimicrobial drug administration. PMID:26270467

  8. Rapid Diagnosis of Infection in the Critically Ill, a Multicenter Study of Molecular Detection in Bloodstream Infections, Pneumonia, and Sterile Site Infections*

    PubMed Central

    Brealey, David; Libert, Nicolas; Abidi, Nour Elhouda; O’Dwyer, Michael; Zacharowski, Kai; Mikaszewska-Sokolewicz, Malgorzata; Schrenzel, Jacques; Simon, François; Wilks, Mark; Picard-Maureau, Marcus; Chalfin, Donald B.; Ecker, David J.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Singer, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Early identification of causative microorganism(s) in patients with severe infection is crucial to optimize antimicrobial use and patient survival. However, current culture-based pathogen identification is slow and unreliable such that broad-spectrum antibiotics are often used to insure coverage of all potential organisms, carrying risks of overtreatment, toxicity, and selection of multidrug-resistant bacteria. We compared the results obtained using a novel, culture-independent polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry technology with those obtained by standard microbiological testing and evaluated the potential clinical implications of this technique. Design: Observational study. Setting: Nine ICUs in six European countries. Patients: Patients admitted between October 2013 and June 2014 with suspected or proven bloodstream infection, pneumonia, or sterile fluid and tissue infection were considered for inclusion. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: We tested 616 bloodstream infection, 185 pneumonia, and 110 sterile fluid and tissue specimens from 529 patients. From the 616 bloodstream infection samples, polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry identified a pathogen in 228 cases (37%) and culture in just 68 (11%). Culture was positive and polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry negative in 13 cases, and both were negative in 384 cases, giving polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry a sensitivity of 81%, specificity of 69%, and negative predictive value of 97% at 6 hours from sample acquisition. The distribution of organisms was similar with both techniques. Similar observations were made for pneumonia and sterile fluid and tissue specimens. Independent clinical analysis of results suggested that polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry technology could potentially have resulted in altered treatment in up to 57% of patients. Conclusions: Polymerase chain reaction/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry provides rapid pathogen identification in critically ill patients. The ability to rule out infection within 6 hours has potential clinical and economic benefits. PMID:26327198

  9. Update: Delayed onset Pseudomonas fluorescens bloodstream infections after exposure to contaminated heparin flush--Michigan and South Dakota, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    In March 2005, CDC reported a multistate outbreak of Pseudomonas fluorescens bloodstream infections associated with use of syringes preloaded with heparin intravenous catheter flush. The heparin flush became contaminated during preparation by IV Flush, LLC (Rowlett, Texas). Thirty-six patients in four states were identified who had been exposed to the contaminated flush and subsequently experienced P. fluorescens bloodstream infection during December 2004-February 2005. Based on a recommendation by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), IV Flush voluntarily recalled the preloaded syringes in late January; on January 31 and February 4, 2005, FDA issued nationwide alerts recommending that consumers and institutions stop using and return the preloaded syringes to IV Flush or the distributor (Pinnacle Medical Supply, Rowlett, Texas). Approximately 3 months after the product was recalled, patients in Michigan and South Dakota were identified with P. fluorescens bloodstream infections. As of April 2006, a total of 15 patients in Michigan and 13 in South Dakota had been identified with delayed onset P. fluorescens bloodstream infections, with occurrences ranging from 84 to 421 days after their last potential exposure to the contaminated flush. The patients all had indwelling central venous catheters and received treatment during October 2005-February 2006 at clinics known to have used the contaminated flush. This report describes the investigation of these cases, which determined that these were delayed onset cases of P. fluorescens bloodstream infection from a past exposure to contaminated flush, and provides recommendations for ongoing surveillance for delayed P. fluorescens bloodstream infections among similarly exposed patients. PMID:16960550

  10. Factors influencing mortality in solid organ transplant recipients with bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Oriol, I; Sabé, N; Melilli, E; Lladó, L; González-Costello, J; Soldevila, L; Carratalà, J

    2015-12-01

    Although bloodstream infection (BSI) is a major cause of mortality after solid organ transplantation, information regarding its prognostic factors is scarce. To identify risk factors for 30-day mortality in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients with BSI, we prospectively recorded all episodes of BSI occurring in adult SOT recipients from January 2007 to October 2014 at a university hospital. We identified 361 consecutive episodes of BSI involving 246 patients. The 30-day case-fatality rate from the onset of BSI was 11.4%. Factors independently associated with 30-day mortality in a logistic regression analysis were shock at presentation (OR 13.658; 95% CI 5.985-31.168), acute graft rejection in the previous 6 months (OR 3.681; 95% CI 1.059-12.795), and a platelet count of <50 000 × 10(9)/L (OR 3.070; 95% CI 1.173-8.038). Kidney recipients were the patients with the best prognosis (OR 0.375; 95% CI 0.156-0.900). Our findings may help to identify SOT recipients with BSI who are at the highest risk of death. PMID:26253289

  11. Using real time process measurements to reduce catheter related bloodstream infections in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Wall, R; Ely, E; Elasy, T; Dittus, R; Foss, J; Wilkerson, K; Speroff, T

    2005-01-01

    ??Problem: Measuring a process of care in real time is essential for continuous quality improvement (CQI). Our inability to measure the process of central venous catheter (CVC) care in real time prevented CQI efforts aimed at reducing catheter related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) from these devices. Design: A system was developed for measuring the process of CVC care in real time. We used these new process measurements to continuously monitor the system, guide CQI activities, and deliver performance feedback to providers. Setting: Adult medical intensive care unit (MICU). Key measures for improvement: Measured process of CVC care in real time; CR-BSI rate and time between CR-BSI events; and performance feedback to staff. Strategies for change: An interdisciplinary team developed a standardized, user friendly nursing checklist for CVC insertion. Infection control practitioners scanned the completed checklists into a computerized database, thereby generating real time measurements for the process of CVC insertion. Armed with these new process measurements, the team optimized the impact of a multifaceted intervention aimed at reducing CR-BSIs. Effects of change: The new checklist immediately provided real time measurements for the process of CVC insertion. These process measures allowed the team to directly monitor adherence to evidence-based guidelines. Through continuous process measurement, the team successfully overcame barriers to change, reduced the CR-BSI rate, and improved patient safety. Two years after the introduction of the checklist the CR-BSI rate remained at a historic low. Lessons learnt: Measuring the process of CVC care in real time is feasible in the ICU. When trying to improve care, real time process measurements are an excellent tool for overcoming barriers to change and enhancing the sustainability of efforts. To continually improve patient safety, healthcare organizations should continually measure their key clinical processes in real time. PMID:16076796

  12. Epidemiology and microbiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections: analysis of 482 cases from a retrospective surveillance study*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian-nong; Gan, Tie-er; Zhu, Yue-xian; Cao, Jun-min; Ji, Cong-hua; Wu, Yi-hua; Lv, Bin

    2015-01-01

    In many traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) hospitals, most patients are elderly with chronic diseases. Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. A retrospective surveillance study was performed to examine the epidemiology and microbiology of nBSIs in a TCM hospital from 2009 to 2011. A total of 482 patients with nBSIs were included in the study period. The incidence rate was 5.7/1000 admissions. Escherichia coli (25.5%) was the most common Gram-negative and coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) (14.1%) was the most common Gram-positive organism isolated. One-third of the E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from the nBSIs were the third-generation cephalosporin-resistant. Half of the Acinetobacter species isolates were resistant to imipenem. Of all the CoNS isolates, 90.7% were resistant to methicillin. Carbapenems and glycopeptide were the most frequently used for nBSI therapy. Only about one-third of patients (157/482) received appropriate empirical therapy. Septic shock, hemodialysis, Pitt bacteremia score >4, urinary tract infection, and appropriate empirical therapy were most strongly associated with 28-d mortality. The incidence of nBSIs was low in the TCM hospital but the proportion of nBSIs due to antibiotic-resistant organisms was high. A high Pitt bacteremia score was one of the most important risk factors for mortality in nBSIs. Therefore, the implementation of appropriate empirical therapy is crucial to improve the clinical outcome of nBSIs. PMID:25559958

  13. Outbreak of Serratia marcescens Bloodstream Infections in Patients Receiving Parenteral Nutrition Prepared by a Compounding Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Neil; Hocevar, Susan N.; Moulton-Meissner, Heather A.; Stevens, Kelly M.; McIntyre, Mary G.; Jensen, Bette; Kuhar, David T.; Noble-Wang, Judith A.; Schnatz, Rick G.; Becker, Shawn C.; Kastango, Eric S.; Shehab, Nadine; Kallen, Alexander J.

    2014-01-01

    Background.?Compounding pharmacies often prepare parenteral nutrition (PN) and must adhere to rigorous standards to avoid contamination of the sterile preparation. In March 2011, Serratia marcescens bloodstream infections (BSIs) were identified in 5 patients receiving PN from a single compounding pharmacy. An investigation was conducted to identify potential sources of contamination and prevent further infections. Methods.?Cases were defined as S. marcescens BSIs in patients receiving PN from the pharmacy between January and March 2011. We reviewed case patients’ clinical records, evaluated pharmacy compounding practices, and obtained epidemiologically directed environmental cultures. Molecular relatedness of available Serratia isolates was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results.?Nineteen case patients were identified; 9 died. The attack rate for patients receiving PN in March was 35%. No case patients were younger than 18 years. In October 2010, the pharmacy began compounding and filter-sterilizing amino acid solution for adult PN using nonsterile amino acids due to a national manufacturer shortage. Review of this process identified breaches in mixing, filtration, and sterility testing practices. S. marcescens was identified from a pharmacy water faucet, mixing container, and opened amino acid powder. These isolates were indistinguishable from the outbreak strain by PFGE. Conclusions.?Compounding of nonsterile amino acid components of PN was initiated due to a manufacturer shortage. Failure to follow recommended compounding standards contributed to an outbreak of S. marcescens BSIs. Improved adherence to sterile compounding standards, critical examination of standards for sterile compounding from nonsterile ingredients, and more rigorous oversight of compounding pharmacies is needed to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:24729502

  14. Clinical Outcomes in Patients with Heterogeneous Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Casapao, Anthony M.; Leonard, Steven N.; Davis, Susan L.; Lodise, Thomas P.; Patel, Nimish; Goff, Debra A.; LaPlante, Kerry L.; Potoski, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of heterogeneous vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA) infections varies in the literature, a problem complicated by the lack of routine screening procedures; however, limited data suggest that hVISA has been associated with persistent bloodstream infections (BSI) and vancomycin failure, yet these studies have been confounded by design issues. We conducted this study to compare the characteristics of patients with BSI caused by hVISA with those with vancomycin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (VSSA) treated with vancomycin. This retrospective, multicenter matched (1:1) cohort study compared the clinical characteristics and outcomes of hVISA and VSSA. Patients with hVISA methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) BSI from 2004 to 2012 were matched to VSSA-MRSA BSI patients. The primary outcome was failure of vancomycin treatment, defined as a composite of persistent bacteremia (?7 days), persistent signs and symptoms, change of MRSA antibiotic, recurrent BSI, or MRSA-related mortality. We identified 122 matched cases. The overall vancomycin failure rate was 57% (82% hVISA versus 33% VSSA; P < 0.001). The individual components of failure in hVISA versus VSSA were persistent bacteremia, 59% versus 21% (P < 0.001); change in MRSA therapy, 54% versus 25% (P = 0.001); MRSA-related mortality, 21% versus 10% (P = 0.081); and recurrence of BSI, 26% versus 2% (P < 0.001). Using logistic regression analysis and adjusting for covariates, hVISA (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 11.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3 to 28.7) and intensive care unit (ICU) admission (aOR, 4.5; 95% CI, 1.8 to 11.6) were still independently associated with vancomycin failure. Relative to VSSA BSI, patients with hVISA were more likely to experience failure of vancomycin treatment, including persistent bacteremia and recurrence. Our results indicate that hVISA was responsible for considerable morbidity. PMID:23796929

  15. ID Learning Unit—Diagnostics Update: Current Laboratory Methods for Rapid Pathogen Identification in Patients With Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Rubach, Matthew P.; Hanson, Kimberly E.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic assays that rapidly identify bloodstream pathogens have the potential to improve patient outcomes and antibiotic stewardship efforts. Current tests are based on the detection of nucleic acids that are specific to a targeted pathogen or based on organism identification using mass spectrometry. Most rapid assays require a positive blood culture as their sample input and expedite pathogen identification by 24–72 hours. For those assays that also report detection of drug resistance markers, information on antimicrobial resistance is expedited by 48–96 hours. This learning unit reviews the basic principles of rapid microorganism identification assays for bloodstream infections with the aim of assisting clinicians in the interpretation and optimal utilization of test results. PMID:26719845

  16. Impact of infection control training for interns on PICU-acquired bloodstream infections in a middle-income country

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Yun Yun; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed El-Amin; Gan, Chin Seng; Siham, Anis; Zainol, Hasimah; Lum, Lucy Chai See

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The present study aimed to determine the impact of an extended infection control training programme, which was conducted for all interns posted to the Department of Paediatrics, on the incidence of paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)-acquired bloodstream infections (BSIs) in University Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. METHODS The development of nosocomial BSIs during the baseline period (1 January–31 October 2008) and intervention period (1 November–31 December 2009) was monitored. During the intervention period, all paediatric interns underwent training in hand hygiene and aseptic techniques for accessing vascular catheters. RESULTS A total of 25 patients had PICU-acquired BSIs during the baseline period, while 18 patients had PICU-acquired BSIs during the intervention period (i.e. infection rate of 88 per 1,000 and 41 per 1,000 admissions, respectively). The infections were related to central venous catheters (CVCs) in 22 of the 25 patients who had PICU-acquired BSIs during the baseline period and 11 of the 18 patients who had PICU-acquired BSIs during the intervention period. Thus, the incidence rates of catheter-related BSIs were 25.2 per 1,000 CVC-days and 9.3 per 1,000 CVC-days, respectively (p < 0.05). The Paediatric Risk of Standardised Mortality III score was an independent risk factor for PICU-acquired BSIs and the intervention significantly reduced this risk. CONCLUSION The education of medical interns on infection control, a relatively low-cost intervention, resulted in a substantial reduction in the incidence of PICU-acquired BSIs. PMID:26451053

  17. Rapid Identification of Major Escherichia coli Sequence Types Causing Urinary Tract and Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Day, M.; Ciesielczuk, H.; Hope, R.; Underwood, A.; Reynolds, R.; Wain, J.; Livermore, D. M.; Woodford, N.

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence types (STs) 69, 73, 95, and 131 are collectively responsible for a large proportion of E. coli urinary tract and bloodstream infections, and they differ markedly in their antibiotic susceptibilities. Here, we describe a novel PCR method to rapidly detect and distinguish these lineages. Three hundred eighteen published E. coli genomes were compared in order to identify signature sequences unique to each of the four major STs. The specificities of these sequences were assessed in silico by seeking them in an additional 98 genomes. A PCR assay was designed to amplify size-distinguishable fragments unique to the four lineages and was validated using 515 E. coli isolates of known STs. Genome comparisons identified 22 regions ranging in size from 335 bp to 26.5 kb that are unique to one or more of the four predominant E. coli STs, with two to 10 specific regions per ST. These regions predominantly harbor genes encoding hypothetical proteins and are within or adjacent to prophage sequences. Most (13/22) were highly conserved (>96.5% identity) in the genomes of their respective ST. The new assay correctly identified all 142 representatives of the four major STs in the validation set (n = 515), with only two ST12 isolates misidentified as ST95. Compared with MLST, the assay has 100% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity. The rapid identification of major extraintestinal E. coli STs will benefit future epidemiological studies and could be developed to tailor antibiotic therapy to the different susceptibilities of these dominant lineages. PMID:25355761

  18. Three Epidemics of Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Salmonella Bloodstream Infection in Blantyre, Malawi, 1998–2014

    PubMed Central

    Feasey, Nicholas A.; Masesa, Clemens; Jassi, Chikondi; Faragher, E. Brian; Mallewa, Jane; Mallewa, Macpherson; MacLennan, Calman A.; Msefula, Chisomo; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Melita A.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?The Malawi Liverpool Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Programme (MLW) has routinely collected specimens for blood culture from febrile patients, and cerebrospinal fluid from patients with suspected meningitis, presenting to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre, Malawi, since 1998. Methods.?We present bloodstream infection (BSI) and meningitis surveillance data from 1998 to 2014. Automated blood culture, manual speciation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed at MLW. Population data for minimum-incidence estimates in urban Blantyre were drawn from published estimates. Results.?Between 1998 and 2014, 167 028 blood cultures were taken from adult and pediatric medical patients presenting to QECH; Salmonella Typhi was isolated on 2054 occasions (1.2%) and nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars were isolated 10 139 times (6.1%), of which 8017 (79.1%) were Salmonella Typhimurium and 1608 (15.8%) were Salmonella Enteritidis. There were 392 cases of NTS meningitis and 9 cases of Salmonella Typhi meningitis. There have been 3 epidemics of Salmonella BSI in Blantyre; Salmonella Enteritidis from 1999 to 2002, Salmonella Typhimurium from 2002 to 2008, and Salmonella Typhi, which began in 2011 and was ongoing in 2014. Multidrug resistance has emerged in all 3 serovars and is seen in the overwhelming majority of isolates, while resistance to third-generation cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones is currently uncommon but has been identified. Conclusions.?Invasive Salmonella disease in Malawi is dynamic and not clearly attributable to a single risk factor, although all 3 epidemics were associated with multidrug resistance. To inform nonvaccine and vaccine interventions, reservoirs of disease and modes of transmission require further investigation. PMID:26449953

  19. Can Inpatient Hospital Experiences Predict Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Saman, Daniel M.; Kavanagh, Kevin T.; Johnson, Brian; Lutfiyya, M. Nawal

    2013-01-01

    Background Factors that increase the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are not fully understood. Recently, Hospital Compare began compiling data from hospital-required reporting to the CDC's National Healthcare Safety Network on CLABSIs in intensive care units (ICUs), at over 4,000 Medicare-certified hospitals in the United States, and made this data accessible on a central website. Also available on the same website are results from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey of patients' hospital experiences. Utilizing both databases, our objective was to determine whether patients' hospital experiences were significantly associated with increased risk for reported ICU CLABSI. Methods and Findings We conducted a zero-inflated Poisson regression analysis at the hospital level on CLABSI-observed cases by ICUs in acute care hospitals (n?=?1987) in the United States between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2011. During this period there were a total of 10,866 CLABSI cases and 9,543,765 central line days. In our final model, the percent of patients who reported that they “sometimes” or “never” received help as soon as they wanted was significantly associated with an increased risk for CLABSIs. Conclusions Using national datasets, we found that inpatients' hospital experiences were significantly associated with an increased risk of ICU reported CLABSIs. This study suggests that hospitals with lower staff responsiveness, perhaps because of an understaffing of nurse and supportive personnel, are at an increased risk for CLABSIs. This study bolsters the evidence that patient surveys may be a useful surrogate to predicting the incidence of hospital acquired conditions, including CLABSIs. Moreover, our study found that poor staff responsiveness may be indicative of greater hospital problems and generally poorly performing hospitals; and that this finding may be a symptom of hospitals with a multitude of problems, including patient safety problems, and not a direct cause. PMID:23577195

  20. Rapid identification of major Escherichia coli sequence types causing urinary tract and bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Doumith, M; Day, M; Ciesielczuk, H; Hope, R; Underwood, A; Reynolds, R; Wain, J; Livermore, D M; Woodford, N

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence types (STs) 69, 73, 95, and 131 are collectively responsible for a large proportion of E. coli urinary tract and bloodstream infections, and they differ markedly in their antibiotic susceptibilities. Here, we describe a novel PCR method to rapidly detect and distinguish these lineages. Three hundred eighteen published E. coli genomes were compared in order to identify signature sequences unique to each of the four major STs. The specificities of these sequences were assessed in silico by seeking them in an additional 98 genomes. A PCR assay was designed to amplify size-distinguishable fragments unique to the four lineages and was validated using 515 E. coli isolates of known STs. Genome comparisons identified 22 regions ranging in size from 335 bp to 26.5 kb that are unique to one or more of the four predominant E. coli STs, with two to 10 specific regions per ST. These regions predominantly harbor genes encoding hypothetical proteins and are within or adjacent to prophage sequences. Most (13/22) were highly conserved (>96.5% identity) in the genomes of their respective ST. The new assay correctly identified all 142 representatives of the four major STs in the validation set (n = 515), with only two ST12 isolates misidentified as ST95. Compared with MLST, the assay has 100% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity. The rapid identification of major extraintestinal E. coli STs will benefit future epidemiological studies and could be developed to tailor antibiotic therapy to the different susceptibilities of these dominant lineages. PMID:25355761

  1. Predictors of clinical and microbiological treatment failure in neonatal bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Hsu, J-F; Chu, S-M; Huang, Y-C; Lien, R; Huang, H-R; Lee, C-W; Chiang, M-C; Fu, R-H; Tsai, M-H

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to identify independent predictors of clinical and microbiological treatment failure and develop a predictive model for neonates with bloodstream infection (BSI). This study included 1087 episodes of BSIs in 793 neonates in a tertiary-level neonatal intensive care unit of northern Taiwan between 2004 and 2012. Patient demographics, underlying chronic comorbidities, clinical features, antimicrobial treatment and microbiological characteristics were evaluated. The presence of underlying congenital anomalies (odds ratio [OR] 2.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 4.10) and pulmonary hypertension (OR 3.63, 95% CI 1.70 to 7.74), infections caused by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (OR 2.89, 95% CI 1.23 to 6.79), group B Streptococcus (OR 3.15, 95% CI 1.33 to 7.46), and fungi (OR 4.13, 95% CI 2.02 to 8.46), a Neonatal Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System score of ? 23 (OR 6.96, 95% CI 2.55 to 28.58), inappropriate antibiotics (OR 2.13, 95% CI 1.41 to 3.23), and concomitant meningitis (OR 4.25, 95% CI 2.08 to 8.69) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (OR 2.73, 95% CI 1.22 to 6.13) were identified as independent risk factors for 28-day treatment failure in neonatal BSI. A risk score model was created by adding the points for each independent risk factor, and had a c-statistic of 0.83. Patients with risk scores of 0, 4, 8, 12 and 15 had estimated 28-day treatment failure rates of approximately 3.5%, 17.0%, 53.5%, 86.6% and 95.9%, respectively. This predictive model, calculated after documentation of a BSI, reflects a spectrum of BSI severity and was associated with subsequent treatment failure through illness severity score and case mix variables. This simple score could prove useful in clinical and research settings, and practical in estimating the prognosis. PMID:25749002

  2. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Cleansing in Preventing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection and Acquisition of Multi-drug Resistant Organisms in Younger Patients With Cancer or Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies chlorhexidine gluconate cleansing to see how well it works compared to control cleansing in preventing central line associated bloodstream infection and acquisition of multi-drug resistant organisms in younger patients with cancer or undergoing donor stem cell transplant. Chlorhexidine gluconate may help reduce bloodstream infections and bacterial infections associated with the central line.

  3. The rising tide of bloodstream infections with Actinomyces species: bimicrobial infection with Actinomyces odontolyticus and Escherichia coli in an intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Weiand, Daniel; Barlow, Gavin

    2014-12-01

    Clinicians of all specialties need to be aware of a recent, nationwide increase in the number of Actinomyces bloodstream infections. We report a case of bimicrobial bloodstream infection with Actinomyces odontolyticus and Escherichia coli in an intravenous drug user. A 36-year-old, male intravenous drug user was admitted with acute-onset pleuritic chest pain, back pain, pyrexia, tachycardia, tachypnoea and hypotension. Chest CT showed multiple, bilateral, cavitating lung lesions, most likely the result of septic emboli originating from an infected deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Blood cultures led to a mixed growth of A. odontolyticus, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and E. coli. The rising tide of bloodstream infections with Actinomyces species is likely to continue with the increasing availability of sophisticated molecular identification techniques, including MALDI-TOF. In this case, the results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests were particularly important because the E. coli was susceptible to ciprofloxacin, whereas the A. odontolyticus was resistant. PMID:25988064

  4. The rising tide of bloodstream infections with Actinomyces species: bimicrobial infection with Actinomyces odontolyticus and Escherichia coli in an intravenous drug user

    PubMed Central

    Weiand, Daniel; Barlow, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians of all specialties need to be aware of a recent, nationwide increase in the number of Actinomyces bloodstream infections. We report a case of bimicrobial bloodstream infection with Actinomyces odontolyticus and Escherichia coli in an intravenous drug user. A 36-year-old, male intravenous drug user was admitted with acute-onset pleuritic chest pain, back pain, pyrexia, tachycardia, tachypnoea and hypotension. Chest CT showed multiple, bilateral, cavitating lung lesions, most likely the result of septic emboli originating from an infected deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Blood cultures led to a mixed growth of A. odontolyticus, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF), and E. coli. The rising tide of bloodstream infections with Actinomyces species is likely to continue with the increasing availability of sophisticated molecular identification techniques, including MALDI-TOF. In this case, the results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests were particularly important because the E. coli was susceptible to ciprofloxacin, whereas the A. odontolyticus was resistant. PMID:25988064

  5. Incidence of bloodstream infections in small bowel transplant recipients receiving selective decontamination of the digestive tract: A single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Galloway, David; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; Goldschmidt, Monique; Hemmelgarn, Trina; Courter, Joshua; Nathan, Jaimie D; Alonso, Maria; Tiao, Greg; Fei, Lin; Kocoshis, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing small bowel transplantation are susceptible to postoperative CLABSI. SDD directed against enteric microbes is a strategy for reducing CLABSI. We hypothesized that SDD reduces the frequency of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and allograft rejection during the first 30 days following transplant. A retrospective chart review of 38 pediatric small bowel transplant recipients at CCHMC from 2003 to 2011 was conducted. SDD antimicrobials were oral colistin, tobramycin, and amphotericin B. The incidence of CLABSI, infections outside the bloodstream, and rejection episodes were compared between study periods. The incidence of CLABSI did not differ between study periods (6.9 CLABSI vs. 4.6 CLABSI per 1000 catheter days; p = 0.727), but gram positives and Candida predominated in the first 30 days. Incidence of bacterial infections outside the bloodstream did not differ (p = 0.227). Rejection occurred more frequently during the first month following transplant (p = 0.302). SDD does not alter the incidence of CLABSI, bacterial infections outside the bloodstream, or allograft rejection in the immediate 30 days post-transplantation. However, SDD does influence CLABSI organism types (favoring gram positives and Candida) and Candidal infections outside the bloodstream. PMID:26332092

  6. The changing epidemiology of Acinetobacter spp. producing OXA carbapenemases causing bloodstream infections in Brazil: a BrasNet report.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Barth, Afonso L; Zavascki, Alexandre P; Gales, Ana C; Levin, Anna S; Lucarevschi, Bianca R; Cabral, Blenda G; Brasiliense, Danielle M; Rossi, Flavia; Furtado, Guilherme H C; Carneiro, Irna Carla R S; da Silva, Juliana O; Ribeiro, Julival; Lima, Karla V B; Correa, Luci; Britto, Maria H; Silva, Mariama T; da Conceição, Marília L; Moreira, Marina; Martino, Marinês D V; de Freitas, Marise R; Oliveira, Maura S; Dalben, Mirian F; Guzman, Ricardo D; Cayô, Rodrigo; Morais, Rosângela; Santos, Sânia A; Martins, Willames M B S

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the epidemiology of Acinetobacter spp. recovered from patients diagnosed with bloodstream infections in 9 tertiary hospitals located in all Brazilian geographic regions between April and August 2014. Although OXA-23-producing Acinetobacter baumannii clones were disseminated in most hospitals, it was observed for the first time the spread of OXA-72 among clonally related A. baumannii isolated from distinct hospitals. Interestingly, Acinetobacter pittii was the most frequent species found in a Northern region hospital. Contrasting with the multisusceptible profile displayed by A. pittii isolates, the tetracyclines and polymyxins were the only antimicrobials active against all A. baumannii isolates. PMID:26364001

  7. Bench-to-bedside review: Challenges of diagnosis, care and prevention of central catheter-related bloodstream infections in children

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are indispensable in modern pediatric medicine. CVCs provide secure vascular access, but are associated with a risk of severe complications, in particular bloodstream infection. We provide a review of the recent literature about the diagnostic and therapeutic challenges of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in children and its prevention. Variations in blood sampling and limitations in blood culturing interfere with accurate and timely diagnosis of CRBSI. Although novel molecular testing methods appear promising in overcoming some of the present diagnostic limitations of conventional blood sampling in children, they still need to solidly prove their accuracy and reliability in clinical practice. Standardized practices of catheter insertion and care remain the cornerstone of CRBSI prevention although their implementation in daily practice may be difficult. Technology such as CVC impregnation or catheter locking with antimicrobial substances has been shown less effective than anticipated. Despite encouraging results in CRBSI prevention among adults, the goal of zero infection in children is still not in range. More high-quality research is needed in the field of prevention, accurate and reliable diagnostic measures and effective treatment of CRBSI in children. PMID:24041298

  8. Impact of a modified Broviac maintenance care bundle on bloodstream infections in paediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Furtwängler, Rhoikos; Laux, Carolin; Graf, Norbert; Simon, Arne

    2015-01-01

    Background: During intensive chemotherapy, bloodstream infection (BSI) represents an important complication in paediatric cancer patients. Most patients carry a long-term central venous access device (CVAD). Improved maintenance care of these vascular catheters may decrease the risk of BSI. Methods: Intervention study (adapted CVAD prevention protocol) with two observation periods (P1: 09-2009 until 05-2011; P2: 09-2011 until 05-2013); prospective surveillance of all laboratory confirmed BSIs. In P2, ready to use sterile NaCl 0.9% syringes were used for CVAD flushing and octenidine/isopropanol for the disinfection of catheter hubs and 3-way stopcocks. Results: During P1, 84 patients were included versus 81 patients during P2. There were no significant differences between the two patient populations in terms of median age, gender, underlying malignancy or disease status (first illness or relapse). Nearly all CVADs were Broviac catheters. The median duration from implantation to removal of the CVAD was 192 days (Inter-quartile-range (IQR); 110–288 days) in P1 and 191 days (IQR; 103–270 days) in P2. 28 BSI were diagnosed in 22 patients in P1 (26% of all patients experienced at least one BSI) and 15 BSI in 12 patients in P2 (15% of all patients). The corresponding results for incidence density (ID) were 0.44 (CI95 0.29–0.62) for P1 vs. 0.34 (0.19–0.53) BSI per 100 inpatient days for P2 and for incidence rate (IR) 7.76 (5.16–10.86) in P1 vs. 4.75 (2.66–7.43) BSI per 1,000 inpatient CVAD utilization days. In P1, 9 BSI were caused by CoNS vs. only 2 in P2 (IR 2.49; CI95 0.17–4.17 vs. 0.63; CI95 0.08–1.72). In P1 two BSI (7%) lead to early removal of the device. During P2 one CVAD was prematurely removed due to a Broviac-related BSI (6.7%). Conclusion: The preventive protocol investigated in this study led to a reduction of BSI in paediatric cancer patients. This result was clinically relevant but – due to insufficient power in a single centre observation – the difference did not reach statistical significance. The most pronounced trend in BSI reduction was observed for CoNS infections. Thus, improving maintenance care of the CVAD may result in lower CVAD-linked infection rates. The higher acquisition cost of the ready to use NaCl 0.9% flushing syringes and octenidine/propanol hub disinfection were probably balanced by cost savings in the intervention period. PMID:26605135

  9. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fc? and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.

  10. Incidence of colonization and bloodstream infection with carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in children receiving antineoplastic chemotherapy in Italy.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Desiree; Cesaro, Simone; Fagioli, Franca; Carraro, Francesca; Ziino, Ottavio; Zanazzo, Giulio; Meazza, Cristina; Colombini, Antonella; Castagnola, Elio

    2016-02-01

    Few data are available on the incidence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) infection or colonization in children receiving anticancer chemotherapy. We performed a nationwide survey among centers participating in the pediatric hematology-oncology cooperative study group (Associazione Italiana Ematologia Oncologia Pediatrica, AIEOP). During a 2-year observation period, we observed a threefold increase in the colonization rate, and a fourfold increase of bloodstream infection episodes, caused by CPE, with a 90-day mortality of 14%. This first nationwide Italian pediatric survey shows that the circulation of CPE strains in the pediatric hematology-oncology environment is increasing. Given the mortality rate, which is higher than for other bacterial strains, specific monitoring should be applied and the results should have implications for health-care practice in pediatric hematology-oncology. PMID:26393496

  11. A short-term Borrelia burgdorferi infection model identifies tissue tropisms and bloodstream survival conferred by adhesion proteins.

    PubMed

    Caine, Jennifer A; Coburn, Jenifer

    2015-08-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease in the United States, is able to persist in the joint, heart, skin, and central nervous system for the lifetime of its mammalian host. Borrelia species achieve dissemination to distal sites in part by entry into and travel within the bloodstream. Much work has been performed in vitro describing the roles of many B. burgdorferi outer surface proteins in adhesion to host cell surface proteins and extracellular matrix components, although the biological relevance of these interactions is only beginning to be explored in vivo. A need exists in the field for an in vivo model to define the biological roles of B. burgdorferi adhesins in tissue-specific vascular interactions. We have developed an in vivo model of vascular interaction of B. burgdorferi in which the bacteria are injected intravenously and allowed to circulate for 1 h. This model has shown that the fibronectin binding protein BB0347 has a tropism for joint tissue. We also have shown an importance of the integrin binding protein, P66, in binding to vasculature of the ear and heart. This model also revealed unexpected roles for Borrelia adhesins BBK32 and OspC in bacterial burdens in the bloodstream. The intravenous inoculation model of short-term infection provides new insights into critical B. burgdorferi interactions with the host required for initial survival and tissue colonization. PMID:26015482

  12. Sphingomonas paucimobilis peritonitis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dhanya; Railey, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis, a yellow-pigmented, aerobic, glucose non-fermenting, Gram-negative bacillus, is a rare cause of human infection normally associated with immunocompromised hosts. It has been associated with a few cases of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (PD) and is notorious for its resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. In half of the cases reported so far, the peritonitis was refractory to treatment, necessitating PD catheter removal. We report a case of Sphingomonas paucimobilis peritonitis in a 50-year-old patient who had been on PD for two years. The patient was successfully treated with intraperitoneal and intravenous antibiotics and the PD catheter was salvaged. PMID:26022030

  13. Value of Superficial Cultures for Prediction of Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection in Long-Term Catheters: a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Cultures taken from the skin and from the hubs of short-term central venous catheters can help us to predict catheter-related bloodstream infections (C-RBSIs). The value of these cultures for such predictions has not been assessed in long-term catheters. Our objective was to assess the value of superficial cultures for the prediction of C-RBSI among patients with long-term catheters. Over a 2-year period, we prospectively obtained cultures from the skin overlying reservoir ports (group A) and from the skin insertion site and hubs of all tunneled catheters (group B). This routine was performed by vascular and interventional radiologists immediately before catheter removal (irrespective of the reason for withdrawal). Swabs were processed semiquantitatively. Catheter tips from both groups were cultured using Maki's semiquantitative technique and sonication. We also performed cultures of the reservoir ports at different sites. C-RBSI was defined as the isolation of the same species of microorganism(s) both in the colonized catheter and in at least 1 peripheral blood culture. We included 372 catheters (group A, 223; group B, 149) during the study period. The catheter colonization rate was 23.4% (87/372), and 28 patients had C-RBSI. Validity index values for the capacity of surface cultures to predict C-RBSI in groups A and B were, respectively, as follows: sensitivity, 23.5% and 45.5%; specificity, 59.7% and 63.0%; positive predictive value, 4.6% and 8.9%; and negative predictive value, 90.4% and 93.5%. Superficial cultures of patients with long-term catheters could help us to rule out the catheter as the portal of entry of bloodstream infections. Superficial cultures (from skin and hubs) proved to be a useful conservative diagnostic tool for ruling out C-RBSI among patients with long-term tunneled catheters and totally implantable venous access ports. PMID:23850957

  14. Nosocomial Fungemia Due to Exophiala jeanselmei var. jeanselmei and a Rhinocladiella Species: Newly Described Causes of Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nucci, Marcio; Akiti, Tiyomi; Barreiros, Gloria; Silveira, Fernanda; Revankar, Sanjay G.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Patterson, Thomas F.

    2001-01-01

    Fungi have become increasingly important causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. The major cause of nosocomial fungemia has been Candida spp, but increasingly molds and other yeasts have caused disease. Exophiala jeanselmei and members of the genus Rhinocladiella are dematiaceous moulds, which have been infrequently associated with systemic infection and have not been described as causes of fungemia. In this paper, the occurrence of 23 cases of fungemia due to these organisms over a 10-month period is reported and the clinical characteristics of patients and outcomes are described. The majority of patients were immunosuppressed; 21 of 23 (91%) had received blood products and 78% had a central venous catheter. All patients had at least one manifestation of fever, but only one patient had signs or symptoms suggesting deep-seated infection. Antifungal therapy was given to 19 of the 23 patients; of those who did not receive therapy, 3 died prior to the culture result and 1 had been discharged without therapy. Antifungal susceptibility of the organisms showed activity of amphotericin B, itraconazole, and the new triazole antifungals voriconazole and posaconazole. E. jeanselmei and Rhinocladiella species are potential causes of nosocomial fungemia and may be associated with systemic infection. PMID:11158099

  15. CDC central-line bloodstream infection prevention efforts produced net benefits of at least $640 Million during 1990-2008.

    PubMed

    Scott, R Douglas; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda; Wise, Matthew E; Baggs, James; Goates, Scott; Solomon, Steven L; McDonald, L Clifford; Jernigan, John A

    2014-06-01

    The prevention of central line-associated bloodstream infections in patients in hospital critical care units has been a target of efforts by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) since the 1960s. We developed a historical economic model to measure the net economic benefits of preventing these infections in Medicare and Medicaid patients in critical care units for the period 1990-2008-a time when reductions attributable to federal investment resulted primarily from CDC efforts-using the cost perspective of the federal government as a third-party payer. The estimated net economic benefits ranged from $640 million to $1.8 billion, with the corresponding net benefits per case averted ranging from $15,780 to $24,391. The per dollar rate of return on the CDC's investments ranged from $3.88 to $23.85. These findings suggest that investments in CDC programs targeting other health care-associated infections also have the potential to produce savings by lowering Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements. PMID:24889954

  16. Aseptic non-touch technique and catheter-related bloodstream infection in children receiving parenteral nutrition at home

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Victoria; Hughes, Anna; Hill, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Parenteral nutrition (PN) at home is an acceptable form of delivering long-term PN for children with intestinal failure. Catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is one of the serious complications of long-term PN and can lead to increasing morbidity and mortality. Using aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT) was proven to decrease the incidence of CRBSI in hospital patients. In this study we aimed to review the incidence of CRBSI in children receiving PN at home in our institution using the ANTT and a simplified training programme for parents and carers. Methods We retrospectively collected clinical and microbiological data on all children with intestinal failure (IF) who were on treatment with PN at home under our specialist IF rehabilitation service between November 2012 and November 2013. Results Thirty-five children were included, 16 of whom did not have any infection recorded during the study period. The overall CRBSI rate was 1.3 infections per 1000?line-days, with Staphylococcus being the commonest organism. Twenty-one children did not require catheter change and the overall catheter changes were 1.8 per 1000?line-days. Conclusion In this article, we report a low incidence of CRBSI in a single institution by using the principle of ANTT for accessing central venous catheters combined with a simplified, nurse-led, two-week standardised training programme for parents of children going home on PN. PMID:26279849

  17. Colistin in multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa blood-stream infections: a narrative review for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Martis, Nihal; Leroy, Sylvie; Blanc, Véronique

    2014-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa is on the rise. In the absence of new anti-pseudomonal drugs, clinicians have had to resort to older antimicrobials such as colistin for the treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains. This polymyxin compound acts on the outer membrane of the bacteria resulting in its permeability and cell-death. Its bactericidal action is concentration-dependant. This antibiotic is mainly used as salvage therapy in the treatment of often life-threatening infections due to MDR P. aeruginosa blood-stream infections (BSI). Its potential nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity have been overestimated and have limited the use in its intravenous form. A better understanding of its pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, has facilitated more appropriate dosing strategies with a standard 9 million-unit daily-dose that should be adapted to kidney function. Combination treatment that involves the association of colistin with classical anti-pseudomonal treatment has rarely been clinically tested. In vitro synergy has been reported for certain combinations that could be used to prevent or limit the risk of induced resistance in MDR strains. Positioning colistin in antimicrobial strategies especially as a first-line treatment remains to be properly assessed. PMID:24631777

  18. Outbreak of Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in the Haematology Unit of a South African Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mudau, Maanda; Jacobson, Rachael; Minenza, Nadia; Kuonza, Lazarus; Morris, Vida; Engelbrecht, Heather; Nicol, Mark P.; Bamford, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe an outbreak of multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections (MRPA-BSI) that occurred in the haematology ward of a tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, and determine risk factors for acquisition of MRPA-BSI. Methods The outbreak investigation included a search for additional cases, review of patient records, environmental and staff screening, molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Multi-locus sequencing (MLST) and a retrospective case-control study. Results Ten MRPA-BSI cases occurred in the haematology ward between January 2010 and January 2011. The case fatality rate was 80%. Staff screening specimens were negative for MRPA and an environmental source was not identified. PFGE showed that 9/10 isolates were related. MLST showed that 3 of these 9 isolates belonged to Sequence type (ST) 233 while the unrelated isolate belonged to ST260. Conclusion We have described an outbreak of MRPA-BSI occurring over an extended period of time among neutropenic haematology patients. Molecular typing confirms that the outbreak was predominantly due to a single strain. The source of the outbreak was not identified, but the outbreak appears to have been controlled following intensive infection control measures. PMID:23516393

  19. The Thuringian registry for bloodstream infections, antibiotic resistance and the practice of blood culture sampling-AlertsNet.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Roland P H; Rißner, Florian; Brunkhorst, Frank M

    2015-12-01

    Evidence-based blood culture (BC) testing is of utmost importance for intensive care unit (ICU) patients suspected for sepsis. Knowledge of the aetiological agent and its susceptibility to anti-infective agents enables the clinician to initiate appropriate antimicrobial therapy and guides diagnostic procedures. This has been shown to reduce mortality, ICU stay and antibiotic overuse. Whereas microbiological laboratory practice has been highly standardised, shortfalls in pre-analytic procedures in the ICU have a significant effect on the diagnostic yield. Currently, surveillance data on BC practice lack hospital-, patient- and laboratory-based denominator data. Supporting information on differences in the clinical practice of BC testing, differences in the characteristics of the institution and the case-mix on specific wards, as well as differences in the availability of microbiological laboratories is demanded on a population basis. A population-based survey on BC practice has been established for the German Federal State of Thuringia connecting both hospitals and microbiological laboratories within an electronic registry for immediate enrolment of BC findings (AlertsNet; http://www.alertsnet.de). The registry includes microbiological results and clinical data as well as institutional variables (e.g. case severity indices) from all patients with clinically relevant positive BCs at the participating centres. The main objectives are to sustain and expand a population-based surveillance and warning system for the assessment of diagnosis, risk factors, treatment and outcomes of hospitalised patients and to improve outcomes of patients with bloodstream infections. PMID:26686274

  20. Seasonal changes in the incidence of Escherichia coli bloodstream infection: variation with region and place of onset.

    PubMed

    Deeny, S R; van Kleef, E; Bou-Antoun, S; Hope, R J; Robotham, J V

    2015-10-01

    Previous research has shown that Escherichia coli infection rates peak in the summer; however, to date there has been no investigation as to whether this is seen in both hospital and community-onset cases, and how this differs across regions. We investigated and quantified E. coli bloodstream infection (BSI) seasonality. A generalized additive Poisson model was fitted to mandatory E. coli BSI surveillance data reported in England. There was no impact of seasonality in hospital-onset cases; however, for the community-onset cases, there was statistically significant seasonal variation over time nationally. When examined regionally, seasonality was significant in the North of England only. This variation resulted in an absolute increase of 0.06 (95% CI 0.02-0.1) cases above the mean (3.25) in each hospital trust for each week of the peak summer season, and a decrease of (-) 0.07 (95% CI -0.1 to -0.03) in the autumn. We estimate that fewer than one hospital bed-day per week per hospital is lost because of seasonal increases during the summer. Our findings highlight the need to understand the distinct community and hospital dynamics of E. coli BSI, and to explore the regional differences driving the variation in incidence, in order to design and implement effective control measures. PMID:26141255

  1. Closed Catheter Access System Implementation in Reducing the Bloodstream Infection Rate in Low Birth Weight Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rundjan, Lily; Rohsiswatmo, Rinawati; Paramita, Tiara Nien; Oeswadi, Chrissela Anindita

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bloodstream infection (BSI) is one of the significant causes of morbidity and mortality encountered in a neonatal intensive care unit, especially in developing countries. Despite the implementation of infection control practices, such as strict hand hygiene, the BSI rate in our hospital is still high. The use of a closed catheter access system to reduce BSI related to intravascular catheter has hitherto never been evaluated in our hospital. Objective: To determine the effects of closed catheter access system implementation in reducing the BSI rate in preterm neonates with low birth weight. Methods: Randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 low birth weight preterm infants hospitalized in the neonatal unit at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia from June to September 2013. Randomized subjects either received a closed or non-closed catheter access system. Subjects were monitored for 2?weeks for the development of BSI based on clinical signs, abnormal infection parameters, and blood culture. Results: Closed catheter access system implementation gave a protective effect toward the occurrence of culture-proven BSI (relative risk 0.095, 95% CI 0.011–0.85, p?=?0.026). Risk of culture-proven BSI in the control group was 10.545 (95% CI 1.227–90.662, p?=?0.026). BSI occurred in 75% of neonates without risk factors of infection in the control group compared to none in the study group. Conclusion: The use of a closed catheter access system reduced the BSI in low birth weight preterm infants. Choosing the right device design, proper disinfection of device, and appropriate frequency of connector change should be done simultaneously. PMID:25853110

  2. Rate of FKS Mutations among Consecutive Candida Isolates Causing Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Shields, Ryan K; Nguyen, M Hong; Press, Ellen G; Cumbie, Richard; Driscoll, Eileen; Pasculle, A William; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2015-12-01

    Precise FKS mutation rates among Candida species are undefined because studies have not systematically screened consecutive, disease-causing isolates. The Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) assay measures echinocandin MICs against Candida with less variability than reference broth microdilution methods. However, clinical breakpoint MICs may overstate caspofungin nonsusceptibility compared to other agents. Our objectives were to determine Candida FKS mutation rates by studying consecutive bloodstream isolates and to determine if discrepant susceptibility results were associated with FKS mutations. FKS hot spots were sequenced in echinocandin-intermediate and -resistant isolates and those from patients with breakthrough candidemia or ?3 days of prior echinocandin exposure. Overall, 453 isolates from 384 patients underwent susceptibility testing; 16% were echinocandin intermediate or resistant. Intermediate susceptibility rates were higher for Candida glabrata than for other species (P < 0.0001) and higher for caspofungin than for other agents (P < 0.0001). Resistance rates were similar between agents. FKS mutations were detected in 5% of sequenced isolates and 2% of isolates overall. Corresponding rates among C. glabrata isolates were 8% and 4%, respectively. Among Candida albicans isolates, rates were 5% and <1%, respectively. Mutations occurred exclusively with prior echinocandin exposure and were not detected in other species. Isolates with discrepant susceptibility results did not harbor FKS mutations. Mutation rates among isolates resistant to ?2, 1, and 0 agents were 75%, 13%, and 0%, respectively. In conclusion, FKS mutations were uncommon among non-C. glabrata species, even with prior echinocandin exposure. Discrepancies in echinocandin susceptibility by SYO testing were not driven by mutations and likely reflect imprecise caspofungin clinical breakpoints. PMID:26392494

  3. Draft genome sequence of blaVeb-1, blaoxa-10 producing multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain VRFPA09 recovered from bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Nandagopal; Malathi, Jambulingam; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Madhavan, Hajib NarahariRao

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteremia causes significant mortality rate due to emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) nosocomial infections. We report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain VRFPA09, a human bloodstream isolate, phenotypically proven as MDR strain. Whole genome sequencing on VRFPA09, deciphered betalactamase encoding blav(eb-1) and bla(OXA-10) genes and multiple drug resistance, virulence factor encoding genes. PMID:26413042

  4. Draft genome sequence of blaVeb-1, blaoxa-10producing multi-drug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosastrain VRFPA09 recovered from bloodstream infection

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Nandagopal; Malathi, Jambulingam; Umashankar, Vetrivel; Madhavan, Hajib NarahariRao

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteremia causes significant mortality rate due to emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) nosocomial infections. We report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa strain VRFPA09, a human bloodstream isolate, phenotypically proven as MDR strain. Whole genome sequencing on VRFPA09, deciphered betalactamase encoding blaveb-1 and blaOXA-10genes and multiple drug resistance, virulence factor encoding genes. PMID:26413042

  5. Molecular and Clinical Characteristics of Hospital and Community Onset Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Associated with Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Lisa; van Balen, Joany; Mediavilla, José R.; Pan, Xueliang; Hoet, Armando E.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Pancholi, Preeti; Stevenson, Kurt B.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections (BSI) are classified epidemiologically as health care-associated hospital onset (HAHO)-, health care-associated community onset (HACO)-, or community-associated (CA)-MRSA. Clinical and molecular differences between HAHO- and HACO-MRSA BSI are not well known. Thus, we evaluated clinical and molecular characteristics of MRSA BSI to determine if distinct features are associated with HAHO- or HACO-MRSA strains. Molecular genotyping and medical record reviews were conducted on 282 MRSA BSI isolates from January 2007 to December 2009. MRSA classifications were 38% HAHO-, 54% HACO-, and 8% CA-MRSA. Comparing patients with HAHO-MRSA to those with HACO-MRSA, HAHO-MRSA patients had significantly higher rates of malignancy, surgery, recent invasive devices, and mortality and longer hospital stays. Patients with HACO-MRSA were more likely to have a history of renal failure, hemodialysis, residence in a long-term-care facility, long-term invasive devices, and higher rate of MRSA relapse. Distinct MRSA molecular strain differences also were seen between HAHO-MRSA (60% staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type II [SCCmec II], 30% SCCmec III, and 9% SCCmec IV) and HACO-MRSA (47% SCCmec II, 35% SCCmec III, and 16% SCCmec IV) (P < 0.001). In summary, our study reveals significant clinical and molecular differences between patients with HAHO- and HACO-MRSA BSI. In order to decrease rates of MRSA infection, preventive efforts need to be directed toward patients in the community with health care-associated risk factors in addition to inpatient infection control. PMID:25740776

  6. Clinical and molecular characteristics of bloodstream infections caused by Candida albicans in children from 2003 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Tsai, M-H; Wang, S-H; Hsu, J-F; Lin, L-C; Chu, S-M; Huang, H-R; Chiang, M-C; Fu, R-H; Lu, J-J; Huang, Y-C

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the clinical and molecular characteristics of Candida albicans bloodstream infection (BSI) in children from a tertiary-level medical centre in Taiwan over a 9-year period from January 2003 to December 2011. We performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to investigate the genetic relatedness of these C. albicans BSI isolates. A total of 79 episodes of C. albicans BSI in 76 paediatric patients were identified, including 41 (51.9%) from the paediatric intensive care unit, 24 (30.4%) from the neonatal intensive care unit and 14 (17.7%) from general wards. More than half (59.5%) of these patients had underlying chronic co-morbidities, and the majority (94.9%) had a catheter or some other artificial device. All the isolates were susceptible to the antifungal agents tested. Only 32.9% (26/79) received effective antifungal agents within 24 h of onset of candidaemia. Twenty-five (31.6%) patients had persistent candidaemia (>3 days after the start of antifungal treatment) and candidaemia-attributable mortality rate was 22.8% (18/79). The 72 isolates available for MLST yielded 53 unique diploid sequence types (DSTs). Forty-five DSTs were singletons and eight DSTs were shared by 27 (37.5%) isolates. Seventy-one (98.6%) isolates were clustered within previously known clades. Based on the definition of two or more strains with shared DST occurring within a period of 90 days, 10.1% of the infections were categorized as nosocomial clusters, most commonly identified in the intensive care units. Although cluster-associated candidaemia was not associated with a higher mortality rate, none of the clusters were identified by the hospital infection control team. PMID:26148466

  7. Recipient-born bloodstream infection due to extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii after emergency heart transplant: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Andini, Roberto; Agrusta, Federica; Mattucci, Irene; Malgeri, Umberto; Cavezza, Giusi; Utili, Riccardo; Durante-Mangoni, Emanuele

    2015-10-01

    Infections due to drug-resistant Gram-negative rods are an emerging risk factor for increased mortality after solid organ transplant. Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Acinetobacter baumannii (Acb) is a major threat in several critical care settings. The limited available data on the outcome of XDR Acb infections in organ transplant recipients mostly comes from cases of donor-derived infections. However, recipients of life-saving organs are often critically ill patients, staying long term in intensive care units, and therefore at high risk for nosocomial infections. In this report, we describe our experience with the exceedingly complex management of a recipient-born XDR Acb bloodstream infection clinically ensued shortly after heart transplant. We also review the current literature on this mounting issue relevant for intensive care, transplant medicine and infectious diseases. PMID:25828937

  8. A Case-Control Study to Identify Risk Factors for Totally Implantable Central Venous Port-Related Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guk Jin; Hong, Sook Hee; Roh, Sang Young; Park, Sa Rah; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Hong, Young Seon; Kang, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Youn Jeong; Chun, Ho Jong; Oh, Jung Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To date, the risk factors for central venous port-related bloodstream infection (CVPBSI) in solid cancer patients have not been fully elucidated. We conducted this study in order to determine the risk factors for CVP-BSI in patients with solid cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 1,642 patients with solid cancer received an implantable central venous port for delivery of chemotherapy between October 2008 and December 2011 in a single center. CVP-BSI was diagnosed in 66 patients (4%). We selected a control group of 130 patients, who were individually matched with respect to age, sex, and catheter insertion time. Results CVP-BSI occurred most frequently between September and November (37.9%). The most common pathogen was gram-positive cocci (n=35, 53.0%), followed by fungus (n=14, 21.2%). Multivariate analysis identified monthly catheter-stay as a risk factor for CVP-BSI (p=0.000), however, its risk was lower in primary gastrointestinal cancer than in other cancer (p=0.002). Initial metastatic disease and long catheter-stay were statistically significant factors affecting catheter life span (p=0.005 and p=0.000). Results of multivariate analysis showed that recent transfusion was a risk factor for mortality in patients with CVP-BSI (p=0.047). Conclusion In analysis of the results with respect to risk factors, prolonged catheter-stay should be avoided as much as possible. It is necessary to be cautious of CVP-BSI in metastatic solid cancer, especially non-gastrointestinal cancer. In addition, avoidance of unnecessary transfusion is essential in order to reduce the mortality of CVP-BSI. Finally, considering the fact that confounding factors may have affected the results, conduct of a well-designed prospective controlled study is warranted. PMID:25038760

  9. How to discriminate contamination from bloodstream infection due to coagulase-negative staphylococci: a prospective study with 654 patients.

    PubMed

    Elzi, L; Babouee, B; Vögeli, N; Laffer, R; Dangel, M; Frei, R; Battegay, M; Widmer, A F

    2012-09-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are frequent contaminants of blood cultures. We aimed to evaluate the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria in patients with CoNS bacteraemia for discrimination between true bloodstream infection (BSI) and contamination. Prospective evaluation was carried out of clinical and laboratory parameters in adults with at least one positive blood culture with CoNS at the University Hospital of Basel between 2003 and 2007. Of 3060 positive blood cultures, 654 episodes of CoNS bacteraemia were identified. Of these, 232 (35%) were considered to be true BSI and 422 (65%) were considered to be contamination. Overall, 80% of study participants had at least one SIRS criterion, fever being the most common, and 49% had at least two SIRS criteria. In the multivariate analysis, independent predictors of BSI were fever or hypothermia (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.91-4.5), tachycardia (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.50-3.50), tachypnoea (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.30-4.43), leucocytosis or leucopenia (OR 4.15, 95% CI 2.17-6.36) and the presence of a central venous line (OR 5.38, 95% CI 3.25-8.88). The probability of BSI increased with each additional SIRS criterion, ranging from 42.4% in patients with only one SIRS criterion to 56.7% for those with two criteria, and 72.3% for patients with three SIRS criteria. A positive blood culture with CoNS most likely represents true BSI if the patient has at least three SIRS criteria or two SIRS criteria and a central venous catheter. These simple bedside criteria may guide decision to treat, decreasing the use of glycopeptides. PMID:22784359

  10. Ethanol versus heparin locks for the prevention of central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections: a randomized trial in adult haematology patients with Hickman devices.

    PubMed

    Worth, L J; Slavin, M A; Heath, S; Szer, J; Grigg, A P

    2014-09-01

    The effectiveness of ethanol locks for prevention of central venous catheter (CVC)-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) in adult haematology patients has not been thoroughly evaluated. This study aimed to compare prospectively heparinized saline with 70% ethanol locks using 2 h dwell time in patients with tunnelled CVCs. In saline (N = 43) and ethanol (N = 42) groups, CLABSI rates were 6.0 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.4-9.8] and 4.1 (95% CI: 1.9-7.7) per 1000 CVC days, respectively (P = 0.42). In the ethanol group, two exit-site infections and one tunnel/pocket infection were observed. Reduction in device-associated infection was not achieved with prophylactic 70% ethanol locks in patients with haematological malignancy and tunnelled CVCs. PMID:25063013

  11. Gender Differences in Rates of Carriage and Bloodstream Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Are They Real, Do They Matter and Why?

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Hilary; Fitzpatick, Fidelma; Harvey, Brian J

    2015-12-01

    There is increasing interest in sexual and gender dimorphism in disease. We reviewed the epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage and bloodstream infection (BSI), which shows a male predominance, and explored some of the possible reasons. Males are more prone to bacterial sepsis, but some studies suggest females may have a poorer prognosis from BSI. Hand-hygiene behavior varies according to gender. Males are less compliant, which in turn may predispose them to higher colonization and infection rates. Female hormones such as estrogen affect the expression of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and although not studied, this may also apply to S. aureus. Further research is required on the relationship between gender and risk of infection, the reasons for higher MRSA carriage and BSI rates in males, the value of gender-specific infection prevention campaigns, and other factors such as the possible role of contact sports and occupation. PMID:26202769

  12. Biomarkers and Molecular Analysis to Improve Bloodstream Infection Diagnostics in an Emergency Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Loonen, Anne J. M.; de Jager, Cornelis P. C.; Tosserams, Janna; Kusters, Ron; Hilbink, Mirrian; Wever, Peter C.; van den Brule, Adriaan J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular pathogen detection from blood is still expensive and the exact clinical value remains to be determined. The use of biomarkers may assist in preselecting patients for immediate molecular testing besides blood culture. In this study, 140 patients with ? 2 SIRS criteria and clinical signs of infection presenting at the emergency department of our hospital were included. C-reactive protein (CRP), neutrophil-lymphocyte count ratio (NLCR), procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) levels were determined. One ml EDTA blood was obtained and selective pathogen DNA isolation was performed with MolYsis (Molzym). DNA samples were analysed for the presence of pathogens, using both the MagicPlex Sepsis Test (Seegene) and SepsiTest (Molzym), and results were compared to blood cultures. Fifteen patients had to be excluded from the study, leaving 125 patients for further analysis. Of the 125 patient samples analysed, 27 presented with positive blood cultures of which 7 were considered to be contaminants. suPAR, PCT, and NLCR values were significantly higher in patients with positive blood cultures compared to patients without (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves of the 4 biomarkers for differentiating bacteremia from non-bacteremia showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) for PCT (0.806 (95% confidence interval 0.699–0.913)). NLCR, suPAR and CRP resulted in an AUC of 0.770, 0.793, and 0.485, respectively. When compared to blood cultures, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for SepsiTest and MagicPlex Sepsis Test were 11%, 96%, 43%, 80%, and 37%, 77%, 30%, 82%, respectively. In conclusion, both molecular assays perform poorly when one ml whole blood is used from emergency care unit patients. NLCR is a cheap, fast, easy to determine, and rapidly available biomarker, and therefore seems most promising in differentiating BSI from non-BSI patients for subsequent pathogen identification using molecular diagnostics. PMID:24475269

  13. Use of Six Sigma strategies to pull the line on central line-associated bloodstream infections in a neurotrauma intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Kelli; Tilley, Terry; Hoffman, Jason; Bradburn, Eric; Harvey, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The creation of a consistent culture of safety and quality in an intensive care unit is challenging. We applied the Six Sigma Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control (DMAIC) model for quality improvement (QI) to develop a long-term solution to improve outcomes in a high-risk neurotrauma intensive care unit. We sought to reduce central line utilization as a cornerstone in preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs). This study describes the successful application of the DMAIC model in the creation and implementation of evidence-based quality improvement designed to reduce CLABSIs to below national benchmarks. PMID:25768963

  14. Direct MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Assay of Blood Culture Broths for Rapid Identification of Candida Species Causing Bloodstream Infections: an Observational Study in Two Large Microbiology Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Fiori, Barbara; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Campoli, Serena; Ruggeri, Alberto; Tumbarello, Mario; Canu, Giulia; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Parisi, Gabriella; Tronci, Mirella; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Fadda, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the reliability of the Bruker Daltonik's MALDI Biotyper system in species-level identification of yeasts directly from blood culture bottles. Identification results were concordant with those of the conventional culture-based method for 95.9% of Candida albicans (187/195) and 86.5% of non-albicans Candida species (128/148). Results were available in 30 min (median), suggesting that this approach is a reliable, time-saving tool for routine identification of Candida species causing bloodstream infection. PMID:22090401

  15. Prediction of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified Infection Probability Score (mIPS).

    PubMed

    Schalk, Enrico; Hanus, Lynn; Färber, Jacqueline; Fischer, Thomas; Heidel, Florian H

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the probability of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) in patients with haematologic malignancies using a modified version of the Infection Probability Score (mIPS). In order to perform a prospective, mono-centric surveillance of complications in clinical routine due to short-term central venous catheters (CVCs) in consecutive patients receiving chemotherapy from March 2013 to September 2014, IPS was calculated at CVC insertion and removal (mIPSin and mIPSex, respectively). We used the 2012 Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society of Haematology and Medical Oncology (AGIHO/DGHO) criteria to define CRBSI. In total, 143 patients (mean 59.5 years, 61.4 % male) with 267 triple-lumen CVCs (4044 CVC days; mean 15.1 days, range 1-60 days) were analysed. CVCs were inserted for therapy of acute leukaemia (53.2 %), multiple myeloma (24.3 %) or lymphoma (11.2 %), and 93.6 % were inserted in the jugular vein. A total of 66 CRBSI cases (24.7 %) were documented (12 definite/13 probable/41 possible). The incidence was 16.3/1000 CVC days (2.9/3.1/10.1 per 1000 CVC days for definite/probable/possible CRBSI, respectively). In CRBSI cases, the mIPSex was higher as compared to cases without CRBSI (13.1 vs. 7.1; p?infection are excluded, a mIPSex ?8 and duration of CVC use of about 10 days predict a very high risk of CRBSI. Patients with a mIPSex <8 have a low risk of CRBSI of 8 %. PMID:25933677

  16. Characterization of the extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli ST131 clone among isolates recovered from urinary and bloodstream infections in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Ciesielczuk, H; Doumith, M; Hope, R; Woodford, N; Wareham, D W

    2015-12-01

    The multidrug-resistant ST131-O25b clone of Escherichia coli is well established as a significant cause of extra-intestinal infections worldwide. However, there have been only two small regional studies comparing ST131 isolates from the UK. Therefore, we characterized 143 ST131 E. coli (38 urinary, 105 bloodstream) collected between January 2011 and March 2012 from 38 centres located across the UK and Republic of Ireland. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of clonal isolates revealed high rates of resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanate (56?%), cefotaxime (32?%), ciprofloxacin (79?%), temocillin (69?%, bloodstream isolates only), gentamicin (67?%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (59?%). The most frequently detected extended-spectrum beta-lactamase was CTX-M-15 (87?%), predominantly encoded on IncF plasmids, although it was also associated with IncU plasmids in two isolates. The majority of UK ST131 clonal isolates possessed the O25b antigen (97?%) and the H30 fimH allele (92?%), but three serogroups (O19a, O136 and O153) novel to ST131 were identified among our strains. Contrary to previous reports, UK ST131-O16 isolates were typically susceptible to ciprofloxacin and lacked beta-lactamase genes (n?=?12/12). In summary, ST131 strains of E. coli circulating in the UK possess characteristic clonal features, but are becoming more diverse than other international ST131 populations. PMID:26445772

  17. UTILIZATION OF FLUORANTHENE BY PSEUDOMONAS PAUCIMOBILIS STRAIN EPA505

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pseudomonas paucimobilis strain EPA505, was previously purified from a 7-membered bacterial community originally isolated from a creosote-contaminated soil for its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components of creosote. The unique ability of this organism...

  18. Bloodstream infections, antibiotic resistance and the practice of blood culture sampling in Germany: study design of a Thuringia-wide prospective population-based study (AlertsNet)

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Roland P; Rißner, Florian; Castell, Stefanie; Töpel, Sandra; Jakob, Matthias; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Mikolajczyk, Rafael T

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bloodstream infections are a major cause of death worldwide; blood culture (BC) sampling remains the most important tool for their diagnosis. Current data suggest that BC rates in German hospitals are considerably lower than recommended; this points to shortfalls in the application of microbiological analyses. Since early and appropriate BC diagnostics are associated with reduced case fatality rates and a shorter duration of antimicrobial therapy, a multicomponent study for the improvement of BC diagnostics was developed. Methods and analysis An electronic BC registry established for the German Federal state of Thuringia is the structural basis of this study. The registry includes individual patient data (microbiological results and clinical data) and institutional information for all clinically relevant positive BCs at the participating centres. First, classic result quality indicators for bloodstream infections (eg, sepsis rates) will be studied using Poisson regression models (adjusted for institutional characteristics) in order to derive relative ranks for feedback to clinical institutions. Second, a target value will be established for the process indicator BC rate. On the basis of this target value, recommendations will be made for a given combination of institutional characteristics as a reference for future use in quality control. An interventional study aiming at the improvement of BC rates will be conducted thereafter. On the basis of the results of a survey in the participating institutions, a targeted educational intervention will be developed. The success of the educational intervention will be measured by changes in the process indicator and the result indicators over time using a pre–post design. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval was obtained from the Ethics committee of the University Hospital Jena and from the Ethics committee of the State Chamber of Physicians of Thuringia. Findings of AlertsNet will be disseminated through public media releases and publications in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number DRKS00004825. PMID:26671957

  19. Mechanisms of Reovirus Bloodstream Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, Karl W.; Lai, Caroline M.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2015-01-01

    Many viruses cause disease within an infected host after spread from an initial portal of entry to secondary sites of replication. Viruses can disseminate via the bloodstream or through nerves. Mammalian orthoreoviruses (reoviruses) are neurotropic viruses that use both bloodborne and neural pathways to spread systemically within their hosts to cause disease. Using a robust mouse model and a dynamic reverse genetics system, we have identified a viral receptor and a viral nonstructural protein that are essential for hematogenous reovirus dissemination. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily expressed in tight junctions and on hematopoietic cells that serves as a receptor for all reovirus serotypes. Expression of JAM-A is required for infection of endothelial cells and development of viremia in mice, suggesting that release of virus into the bloodstream from infected endothelial cells requires JAM-A. Nonstructural protein ?1s is implicated in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in reovirus-infected cells but is completely dispensable for reovirus replication in cultured cells. Surprisingly, a recombinant ?1s-null reovirus strain fails to spread hematogenously in infected mice, suggesting that ?1s facilitates apoptosis of reovirus-infected intestinal epithelial cells. It is possible that apoptotic bodies formed as a consequence of ?1s expression lead to reovirus uptake by dendritic cells for subsequent delivery to the mesenteric lymph node and the blood. Thus, both host and viral factors are required for efficient hematogenous dissemination of reovirus. Understanding mechanisms of reovirus bloodborne spread may shed light on how microbial pathogens invade the bloodstream to disseminate and cause disease in infected hosts. PMID:23809919

  20. A survey of Preventive Measures Used and their Impact on Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections (CLABSI) in Intensive Care Units (SPIN-BACC)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Quebec central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) in intensive care units (ICUs) Surveillance Program saw a decrease in CLABSI rates in most ICUs. Given the surveillance trends observed in recent years, we aimed to determine what preventive measures have been implemented, if compliance to measures was monitored and its impact on CLABSI incidence rates. Methods All hospitals participating in the Quebec healthcare-associated infections surveillance program (SPIN-BACC – n?=?48) received a 77-question survey about preventive measures implemented and monitored in their ICU. The questionnaire was validated for construct, content, face validity, and reliability. We used Poisson regression to measure the association between compliance monitoring to preventive measures and CLABSI rates. Results Forty-two (88%) eligible hospitals completed the survey. Two components from the maximum barrier precautions were used less optimally: cap (88%) and full sterile body drape (71%). Preventive measures reported included daily review of catheter need (79%) and evaluation of insertion site for the presence of inflammation (90%). Two hospitals rewired lines even if an infection was suspected or documented. In adult ICUs, there was a statistically significant greater decrease in CLABSI rates in ICUs that monitored compliance to preventive insertion measures, after adjusting for teaching status and the number of hospital beds (p?=?0.036). Conclusions Hospitals participating to the SPIN-BACC program follow recommendations for CLABSI prevention, but only a minority locally monitor their application. Compliance monitoring of preventive measures for catheter insertion was associated with a decrease in CLABSI incidence rates. PMID:24289473

  1. Risk factors for bloodstream infections due to colistin-resistant KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae: results from a multicenter case-control-control study.

    PubMed

    Giacobbe, D R; Del Bono, V; Trecarichi, E M; De Rosa, F G; Giannella, M; Bassetti, M; Bartoloni, A; Losito, A R; Corcione, S; Bartoletti, M; Mantengoli, E; Saffioti, C; Pagani, N; Tedeschi, S; Spanu, T; Rossolini, G M; Marchese, A; Ambretti, S; Cauda, R; Viale, P; Viscoli, C; Tumbarello, M

    2015-12-01

    The increasing prevalence of colistin resistance (ColR) Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae (Kp) is a matter of concern because of its unfavourable impact on mortality of KPC-Kp bloodstream infections (BSI) and the shortage of alternative therapeutic options. A matched case-control-control analysis was conducted. The primary study end point was to assess risk factors for ColR KPC-Kp BSI. The secondary end point was to describe mortality and clinical characteristics of these infections. To assess risk factors for ColR, 142 patients with ColR KPC-Kp BSI were compared to two controls groups: 284 controls without infections caused by KPC-Kp (control group A) and 284 controls with colistin-susceptible (ColS) KPC-Kp BSI (control group B). In the first multivariate analysis (cases vs. group A), previous colistin therapy, previous KPC-Kp colonization, ?3 previous hospitalizations, Charlson score ?3 and neutropenia were found to be associated with the development of ColR KPC-Kp BSI. In the second multivariate analysis (cases vs. group B), only previous colistin therapy, previous KPC-Kp colonization and Charlson score ?3 were associated with ColR. Overall, ColR among KPC-Kp blood isolates increased more than threefold during the 4.5-year study period, and 30-day mortality of ColR KPC-Kp BSI was as high as 51%. Strict rules for the use of colistin are mandatory to staunch the dissemination of ColR in KPC-Kp-endemic hospitals. PMID:26278669

  2. Timing of positive blood samples does not differentiate pathogens causing healthcare-associated from community-acquired bloodstream infections in children in England: a linked retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Henderson, K L; Müller-Pebody, B; Wade, A; Sharland, M; Minaji, M; Johnson, A P; Gilbert, R

    2015-08-01

    Paediatricians recognize that using the time-dependent community-acquired vs. hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) dichotomy to guide empirical treatment no longer distinguishes between causative pathogens due to the emergence of healthcare-associated BSIs. However, paediatric epidemiological evidence of the aetiology of BSIs in relation to hospital admission in England is lacking. For 12 common BSI-causing pathogens in England, timing of laboratory reports of positive paediatric (3 months to 5 years) bacterial blood isolates were linked to in-patient hospital data and plotted in relation to hospital admission. The majority (88·6%) of linked pathogens were isolated <2 days after hospital admission, including pathogens widely regarded as hospital acquired: Enterococcus spp. (67·2%) and Klebsiella spp. (88·9%). Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, group A streptococcus and Salmonella spp. were unlikely to cause hospital-acquired BSI. Pathogens commonly associated with hospital-acquired BSI are being isolated <2 days after hospital admission alongside pathogens commonly associated with community-acquired BSI. We confirm that timing of blood samples alone does not differentiate between bacterial pathogens. Additional factors including clinical patient characteristics and healthcare contact should be considered to help predict the causative pathogen and guide empirical antibiotic therapy. PMID:25483268

  3. Increased Anti-Flagellin and Anti-Lipopolysaccharide Immunoglobulins in Pediatric Intestinal Failure: Associations With Fever and Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, David P.; Troutt, Misty L.; Kocoshis, Samuel A.; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Ziegler, Thomas R.; Cole, Conrad R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) pose a significant challenge in the lives of patients with intestinal failure (IF). We hypothesized that plasma immunoglobulins against flagellin (FLiC) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) would be able to differentiate CLABSIs from nonbacterial febrile episodes and that levels would increase with infection and decline following appropriate antibiotic treatment. Materials and Methods Patients with IF, due to short bowel syndrome, between the ages of 3 months and 4 years of age, were recruited at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. Anti-FLiC and anti-LPS plasma antibody levels were measured in 13 children with IF at baseline, during febrile events, and also following treatment with antibiotics. These were also measured in 11 healthy children without IF who were recruited as controls. Results Plasma anti-FLiC IgA levels increased during febrile episodes in all patients with IF (baseline mean of 1.10 vs febrile episode mean of 1.32 optical density units, respectively; P = .046). Neither plasma anti- FLiC nor anti-LPS IgA or IgG levels distinguished CLABSI from nonbacterial febrile episodes compared with baseline levels. Compared with controls, patients with IF had significantly higher plasma levels of anti-FLiC and anti-LPS IgA at baseline. Conclusion Plasma anti-FLiC IgA antibody levels rise during febrile episodes but do not differentiate between nonbacterial febrile illnesses and CLABSIs in pediatric IF. However, the upregulation of these antibodies in IF suggests the baseline systemic presence of Gram-negative bacterial products. PMID:24898211

  4. Use of Disinfection Cap to Reduce Central-Line-Associated Bloodstream Infection and Blood Culture Contamination Among Hematology-Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Kamboj, Mini; Blair, Rachel; Bell, Natalie; Son, Crystal; Huang, Yao-Ting; Dowling, Mary; Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Eagan, Janet; Sepkowitz, Kent

    2015-12-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study, we examined the impact of routine use of a passive disinfection cap for catheter hub decontamination in hematology-oncology patients. SETTING A tertiary care cancer center in New York City METHODS In this multiphase prospective study, we used 2 preintervention phases (P1 and P2) to establish surveillance and baseline rates followed by sequential introduction of disinfection caps on high-risk units (HRUs: hematologic malignancy wards, hematopoietic stem cell transplant units and intensive care units) (P3) and general oncology units (P4). Unit-specific and hospital-wide hospital-acquired central-line-associated bloodstream infection (HA-CLABSI) rates and blood culture contamination (BCC) with coagulase negative staphylococci (CONS) were measured. RESULTS Implementation of a passive disinfection cap resulted in a 34% decrease in hospital-wide HA-CLABSI rates (combined P1 and P2 baseline rate of 2.66-1.75 per 1,000 catheter days at the end of the study period). This reduction occurred only among high-risk patients and not among general oncology patients. In addition, the use of the passive disinfection cap resulted in decreases of 63% (HRUs) and 51% (general oncology units) in blood culture contamination, with an estimated reduction of 242 BCCs with CONS. The reductions in HA-CLABSI and BCC correspond to an estimated annual savings of $3.2 million in direct medical costs. CONCLUSION Routine use of disinfection caps is associated with decreased HA-CLABSI rates among high-risk hematology oncology patients and a reduction in blood culture contamination among all oncology patients. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36(12):1401-1408. PMID:26394849

  5. Impact of a multidimensional infection control approach on central line-associated bloodstream infections rates in adult intensive care units of 8 cities of Turkey: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABs) have long been associated with excess lengths of stay, increased hospital costs and mortality attributable to them. Different studies from developed countries have shown that practice bundles reduce the incidence of CLAB in intensive care units. However, the impact of the bundle strategy has not been systematically analyzed in the adult intensive care unit (ICU) setting in developing countries, such as Turkey. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional infection control approach to reduce the rates of CLAB in 13 ICUs of 13 INICC member hospitals from 8 cities of Turkey. Methods We conducted active, prospective surveillance before-after study to determine CLAB rates in a cohort of 4,017 adults hospitalized in ICUs. We applied the definitions of the CDC/NHSN and INICC surveillance methods. The study was divided into baseline and intervention periods. During baseline, active outcome surveillance of CLAB rates was performed. During intervention, the INICC multidimensional approach for CLAB reduction was implemented and included the following measures: 1- bundle of infection control interventions, 2- education, 3- outcome surveillance, 4- process surveillance, 5- feedback of CLAB rates, and 6- performance feedback on infection control practices. CLAB rates obtained in baseline were compared with CLAB rates obtained during intervention. Results During baseline, 3,129 central line (CL) days were recorded, and during intervention, we recorded 23,463 CL-days. We used random effects Poisson regression to account for clustering of CLAB rates within hospital across time periods. The baseline CLAB rate was 22.7 per 1000 CL days, which was decreased during the intervention period to 12.0 CLABs per 1000 CL days (IRR 0.613; 95% CI 0.43 – 0.87; P 0.007). This amounted to a 39% reduction in the incidence rate of CLAB. Conclusions The implementation of multidimensional infection control approach was associated with a significant reduction in the CLAB rates in adult ICUs of Turkey, and thus should be widely implemented. PMID:23641950

  6. Evaluation of the Broad-Range PCR/ESI-MS Technology in Blood Specimens for the Molecular Diagnosis of Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jordana-Lluch, Elena; Giménez, Montserrat; Quesada, Mª Dolores; Rivaya, Belén; Marcó, Clara; Domínguez, Mª Jesús; Arméstar, Fernando; Martró, Elisa; Ausina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background Rapid identification of the etiological agent in bloodstream infections is of vital importance for the early administration of the most appropriate antibiotic therapy. Molecular methods may offer an advantage to current culture-based microbiological diagnosis. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of IRIDICA, a platform based on universal genetic amplification followed by mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) for the molecular diagnosis of sepsis-related pathogens directly from the patient’s blood. Methods A total of 410 whole blood specimens from patients admitted to Emergency Room (ER) and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with clinical suspicion of sepsis were tested with the IRIDICA BAC BSI Assay (broad identification of bacteria and Candida spp.). Microorganisms grown in culture and detected by IRIDICA were compared considering blood culture as gold standard. When discrepancies were found, clinical records and results from other cultures were taken into consideration (clinical infection criterion). Results The overall positive and negative agreement of IRIDICA with blood culture in the analysis by specimen was 74.8% and 78.6%, respectively, rising to 76.9% and 87.2% respectively, when compared with the clinical infection criterion. Interestingly, IRIDICA detected 41 clinically significant microorganisms missed by culture, most of them from patients under antimicrobial treatment. Of special interest were the detections of one Mycoplasma hominis and two Mycobacterium simiae in immunocompromised patients. When ICU patients were analyzed separately, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values compared with blood culture were 83.3%, 78.6%, 33.9% and 97.3% respectively, and 90.5%, 87.2%, 64.4% and 97.3% respectively, in comparison with the clinical infection criterion. Conclusions IRIDICA is a promising technology that offers an early and reliable identification of a wide variety of pathogens directly from the patient’s blood within 6h, which brings the opportunity to improve management of septic patients, especially for those critically ill admitted to the ICU. PMID:26474394

  7. Differential association of fluconazole dose and dose/MIC ratio with mortality in patients with Candida albicans and non-albicans bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Brosh-Nissimov, T; Ben-Ami, R

    2015-11-01

    Targeting fluconazole therapy to achieve predefined pharmacodynamic goals has been suggested as a means of optimizing the treatment of patients with candidaemia. However, data regarding species-specific dosing targets are inconclusive. We retrospectively analysed a cohort of 75 adult patients with Candida bloodstream infection (BSI) who received initial treatment with fluconazole for ?48 h (36 Candida albicans and 39 non-albicans Candida (NAC)). Fluconazole dose, the dose/MIC ratio and the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24)/MIC ratio were determined for each patient, and classification and regression tree analysis was used to determine breakpoints for significant interactions with 30-day survival. Both fluconazole exposure parameters and patient-related and disease-related variables were assessed in univariable and multivariable survival models. The crude 30-day mortality rate was 32% (44% and 21% for C. albicans and NAC, respectively). An average fluconazole dose of >200 mg/day, a dose/MIC ratio of >400 and an AUC24/MIC ratio of >400 were associated with a higher 30-day survival rate and better microbiological response in patients with C. albicans BSI but not in those with NAC BSI. Baseline chronic kidney disease was a risk factor for fluconazole underdosing and mortality. Severity of sepsis (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score) was the only significant predictor of death in patients with NAC BSI. We conclude that, although pharmacodynamic target-directed fluconazole dosing may help to optimize outcomes for patients with C. albicans BSI, additional studies are needed to define the role of fluconazole in the treatment of NAC BSI. PMID:26183300

  8. Comparison of colistin monotherapy and non-colistin combinations in the treatment of multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter spp. bloodstream infections: A Multicenter retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Balkan, Ilker Inanc; Batirel, Ayse; Karabay, Oguz; Agalar, Canan; Akalin, Serife; Alici, Ozlem; Alp, Emine; Altay, Fatma Aybala; Altin, Nilgun; Arslan, Ferhat; Aslan, Turan; Bekiroglu, Nural; Cesur, Salih; Celik, Aygul Dogan; Dogan, Mustafa; Durdu, Bulent; Duygu, Fazilet; Engin, Aynur; Engin, Derya Ozturk; Gonen, Ibak; Guclu, Ertugrul; Guven, Tumer; Hatipoglu, Cigdem Ataman; Hosoglu, Salih; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasim; Kilic, Aysegul Ulu; Ormen, Bahar; Ozdemir, Davut; Ozer, Serdar; Oztoprak, Nefise; Sezak, Nurbanu; Turhan, Vedat; Turker, Nesrin; Yilmaz, Hava

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy of colistin (COL) monotherapy versus non-COL based combinations in the treatment of bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to multidrug resistant Acinetobacter spp.(MDR-A). Materials and Methods: Retrospective data of 107 MDR-A BSI cases from 27 tertiary centers in Turkey were included. Primary End-Point: 14-day mortality. Secondary End-Points: Microbial eradication and clinical improvement. Results: Thirty-six patients in the COL monotherapy (CM) group and 71 in the non-COL based combinations (NCC) group were included in the study. Mean age was 59.98 ± 20 years (range: 18–89) and 50.5% were male. Median duration of follow-up was 40 days (range: 9–297). The 14-day survival rates were 52.8% in CM and 47.23% in NCC group (P = 0.36). Microbiological eradication was achieved in 69% of CM and 83% of NCC group (P = 0.13). Treatment failure was detected in 22.9% of cases in both CM and NCC groups. Univariate analysis revealed that mean age (P = 0.001), Charlson comorbidity index (P = 0.03), duration of hospital stay before MDR-A BSI (P = 0.04), Pitt bacteremia score (P = 0.043) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score (P = 0.05) were significant in terms of 14-day mortality. Advanced age (P = 0.01) and duration of hospital stay before MDR-A BSI (P = 0.04) were independently associated with 14-day mortality in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: No significant difference was detected between CM and non-COL based combinations in the treatment of MDR-A BSIs in terms of efficacy and 14-day mortality. PMID:25821319

  9. Use of Universal 16S rRNA Gene PCR as a Diagnostic Tool for Venous Access Port-Related Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Marín, M.; Martín-Rabadán, P.; Echenagusia, A.; Camúñez, F.; Rodríguez-Rosales, G.; Simó, G.; Echenagusia, M.; Bouza, E.

    2013-01-01

    Amplification of the universal 16S rRNA gene using PCR has improved the diagnostic yield of microbiological samples. However, no data have been reported on the reliability of this technique with venous access ports (VAPs). We assessed the utility of 16S rRNA PCR for the prediction of VAP-related bloodstream infection (VAP-RBSI). During a 2-year period, we prospectively received all VAPs removed by interventional radiologists. PCR and conventional cultures were performed using samples from the different VAP sites. We compared the results of PCR with those of conventional culture for patients with confirmed VAP-RBSI. We collected 219 VAPs from 219 patients. Conventional VAP culture revealed 15 episodes of VAP-RBSI. PCR revealed a further 4 episodes in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy which would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Moreover, it had a negative predictive value of 97.8% for the prediction of VAP-RBSI when it was performed using biofilm from the internal surface of the port. In conclusion, universal 16S rRNA PCR performed with samples from the inside of VAPs proved to be a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI. It increased detection of VAP-RBSI episodes by 21.1% in patients undergoing antibiotic therapy whose episodes would have gone undetected using conventional culture. Therefore, we propose a new application of 16S rRNA PCR as a useful tool for the diagnosis of VAP-RBSI in patients receiving antibiotic therapy. PMID:23254136

  10. Geographical Variability in the Likelihood of Bloodstream Infections Due to Gram-Negative Bacteria: Correlation with Proximity to the Equator and Health Care Expenditure

    PubMed Central

    Carmeli, Yehuda; Perencevich, Eli; Tuite, Ashleigh R.; Mermel, Leonard A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Infections due to Gram-negative bacteria exhibit seasonal trends, with peak infection rates during warmer months. We hypothesized that the likelihood of a bloodstream infection due to Gram-negative bacteria increases with proximity to the equator. We tested this hypothesis and identified geographical, climatic and social factors associated with this variability. Design We established a network of 23 international centers in 22 cities. Setting: De-identified results of positive blood cultures from 2007–2011 and data sources for geographic, climatic and socioeconomic factors were assembled for each center. Participants Patients at the 23 centers with positive blood cultures. Main outcome Due to variability in the availability of total culture volumes across sites, our primary outcome measure was the fraction of positive blood cultures that yielded Gram-negative bacteria; sources of variability in this outcome measure were explored using meta-regression techniques. Results The mean fraction of bacteremia associated with Gram-negative bacteria was 48.4% (range 26.4% to 61.8%). Although not all sites displayed significant seasonality, the overall P-value for seasonal oscillation was significant (P<0.001). In univariate meta-regression models, temperature, latitude, latitude squared, longitude, per capita gross domestic product and percent of gross domestic product spent on healthcare were all associated with the fraction of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria. In multivariable models, only percent of gross domestic product spent on healthcare and distance from the equator (ie. latitude squared) were significantly associated with the fraction of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusions The likelihood of bacteremia due to Gram-negative bacteria varies markedly between cities, in a manner that appears to have both geographic (latitude) and socioeconomic (proportion gross domestic product devoted to health spending) determinants. Thus, the optimal approach to initial management of suspected bacteremia may be geographically specific. The rapid emergence of highly antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative pathogens may have geographically specific impacts. PMID:25521300

  11. Hospital costs of central line-associated bloodstream infections and cost-effectiveness of closed vs. open infusion containers. The case of Intensive Care Units in Italy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to evaluate direct health care costs of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) and to calculate the cost-effectiveness ratio of closed fully collapsible plastic intravenous infusion containers vs. open (glass) infusion containers. Methods A two-year, prospective case-control study was undertaken in four intensive care units in an Italian teaching hospital. Patients with CLABSI (cases) and patients without CLABSI (controls) were matched for admission departments, gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Costs were estimated according to micro-costing approach. In the cost effectiveness analysis, the cost component was assessed as the difference between production costs while effectiveness was measured by CLABSI rate (number of CLABSI per 1000 central line days) associated with the two infusion containers. Results A total of 43 cases of CLABSI were compared with 97 matched controls. The mean age of cases and controls was 62.1 and 66.6 years, respectively (p = 0.143); 56% of the cases and 57% of the controls were females (p = 0.922). The mean length of stay of cases and controls was 17.41 and 8.55 days, respectively (p < 0.001). Overall, the mean total costs of patients with and without CLABSI were € 18,241 and € 9,087, respectively (p < 0.001). On average, the extra cost for drugs was € 843 (p < 0.001), for supplies € 133 (p = 0.116), for lab tests € 171 (p < 0.001), and for specialist visits € 15 (p = 0.019). The mean extra cost for hospital stay (overhead) was € 7,180 (p < 0.001). The closed infusion container was a dominant strategy. It resulted in lower CLABSI rates (3.5 vs. 8.2 CLABSIs per 1000 central line days for closed vs. open infusion container) without any significant difference in total production costs. The higher acquisition cost of the closed infusion container was offset by savings incurred in other phases of production, especially waste management. Conclusions CLABSI results in considerable and significant increase in utilization of hospital resources. Use of innovative technologies such as closed infusion containers can significantly reduce the incidence of healthcare acquired infection without posing additional burden on hospital budgets. PMID:20459753

  12. Prevalence of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Bloodstream Infection in Febrile Neutropenia Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single Center Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Ying; Fan, Xing; Tang, Wei; Hu, Jiong

    2015-11-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). To evaluate the causative bacteria and identify risk factors for BSI associated mortality in febrile neutropenia patients undergoing HSCT, we collected the clinical and microbiological data from patients underwent HSCT between 2008 and 2014 and performed a retrospective analysis. Throughout the study period, among 348 episodes of neutropenic fever in patients underwent HSCT, 89 episodes in 85 patients had microbiological defined BSI with a total of 108 isolates. Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) were the most common isolates (76, 70.3%) followed by gram-positive bacteria (GPB, 29, 26.9%) and fungus (3, 2.8%). As to the drug resistance, 26 multiple drug resistance (MDR) isolates were identified. Resistant isolates (n?=?23) were more common documented in GNB, mostly Escherichia coli (9/36, 25%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (6/24, 25%). A total of 12 isolated were resistant to carbapenem including 4 K pneumoniae (4/24, 16.7%), 3 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, and 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other 4 GNB isolates (Citrobacter freumdii, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Acinetobacter baumanii, and Chryseobacterium indologenes). As to the GPB, only 3 resistant isolates were documented including 2 methicillin-resistant isolates (Staphylococcus hominis and Arcanobacterium hemolysis) and 1 vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. Among these 85 patients with documented BSI, 11 patients died of BSI as primary or associated cause with a BSI-related mortality of 13.1?±?3.7% and 90-day overall survival after transplantation at 80.0?±?4.3%. Patients with high-risk disease undergoing allo-HSCT, prolonged neutropenia (?15 days) and infection with carbapenem-resistant GNB were associated with BSI associated mortality in univariate and multivariate analyses. Our report revealed a prevalence of GNB in BSI of neutropenic patients undergoing HSCT. Patients with high-risk diseases with prolonged neutropenia and carbapenem-resistant GNB were independent risk factors for BSI-related mortality. PMID:26559260

  13. Marked increase in incidence for bloodstream infections due to Escherichia coli, a side effect of previous antibiotic therapy in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie L.; Blanc, Dominique S.; Gbaguidi-Haore, Houssein; Dos Santos Borges, Sandra; Viboud, Quentin; Bertrand, Xavier; Quentin, Roland

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a survey including 3334 bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to E. coli diagnosed in 2005–2014 at a stable cohort of hospitals. Marked increases in incidence were observed for community-acquired (CA) BSIs in patients aged >75 years, CA-BSIs of digestive origin in patients aged 60–74 years, healthcare-associated BSIs, and BSIs associated with ESBL (extended-spectrum B-lactamase)-producing E. coli (ESBLEc). Using MLST, we studied the genetic diversity of 412 BSI isolates recovered during the 2014 survey: 7 major sequence type complexes (STCs) were revealed in phylogenetic group B2, 3 in group A/B1 and 2 in group D. Among the 31 ESBLEc isolates, 1/3 belonged to STC 131. We searched for possible associations between clonal groups, clinical determinants and characteristics of BSIs: isolates from groups B2 (except STC 131) and D were susceptible to antibiotics and associated with BSIs of urinary origin in patients <60 years. STC 131 and group A/B1 isolates were multi-drug resistant and associated with CA-BSIs of digestive origin in patients aged 60–74 with a recent history of antibiotic treatment. STC 131 isolates were associated with HCA-BSIs in patients with recent/present hospitalization in a long-stay unit. We provide a unique population-based picture of the epidemiology of E. coli BSI. The aging nature of the population led to an increase in the number of cases caused by the B2 and D isolates generally implicated in BSIs. In addition, the association of a trend toward increasing rates of gut colonization with multi drug-resistant isolates revealed by the rise in the incidence of BSIs of digestive origin caused by STC 131 and A/B1 (STCs 10, 23, and 155) isolates, and a significant increase in the frequency of BSIs in elderly patients with recent antibiotic treatment suggested that antibiotic use may have contributed to the growing incidence of BSI. PMID:26175721

  14. Meningococcal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... are a type of bacteria that cause serious infections. The most common infection is meningitis, which is an inflammation of the ... also cause other problems, including a serious bloodstream infection called sepsis. Meningococcal infections can spread from person ...

  15. Bone Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the body, bones can get infected. The infections are usually bacterial, but can also be fungal. ... bloodstream. People who are at risk for bone infections include those with diabetes, poor circulation, or recent ...

  16. Effect of metallo-?-lactamase production and multidrug resistance on clinical outcomes in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood stream infections (BSI) with Pseudomonas aeruginosa lead to poor clinical outcomes. The worldwide emergence and spread of metallo-?-lactamase (MBL) producing, often multidrug-resistant organisms may further aggravate this problem. Our study aimed to investigate the effect of MBL-producing P. aeruginosa (MBL-PA) and various other resistance phenotypes on clinical outcomes. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in three German hospitals. Medical files from 2006 until 2012 were studied, and a number of 113 patients with P. aeruginosa BSI were included. The presence of VIM, IMP and NDM genes was detected using molecular techniques. Genetic relatedness was assessed through multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The effect of resistance patterns or MBL production on clinical outcomes was investigated by using multivariate Cox regression models. Results In-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with MBL-PA and multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. However, neither BSI with MBL-PA nor BSI with various resistance phenotypes of P. aeruginosa were independently associated with mortality or length of hospital stay. In multivariate models, the SAPS II score (HR 1.046), appropriate definitive treatment (HR range 0.25-0.26), and cardiovascular disease (HR range 0.44-0.46) were independent predictors of mortality. Concomitant infections were associated with an excess length of stay (HR?infection remains the key for improving clinical outcomes in patients with P. aeruginosa BSI and should be combined with a strict implementation of routine infection control measures. PMID:24176052

  17. Risk factors for mortality in patients with bloodstream infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa: clinical impact of bacterial virulence and strains on outcome.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Su Jin; Yoon, Sang Sun; Bae, Il Kwon; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Kim, June Myung; Lee, Kyungwon

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA) bacteremia has increased in recent years, and infections caused by CRPA result in higher mortality than those caused by susceptible strains. This study was performed to evaluate the risk factors for mortality and to study the impact of virulence factors and bacterial strains on clinical outcomes in patients with CRPA bacteremia. Data on 63 episodes of CRPA bacteremia that have occurred between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2009, in a teaching hospital (2000 beds) in Seoul, Korea, were analyzed. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score at the time of CRPA bacteremia and the capacity of CRPA to form biofilm were independent predictive factors for mortality in patients with CRPA bacteremia. In addition, the biofilm-forming ability and elastase activity of strains were correlated with APACHE II scores to measure the severity of disease and estimate predicted mortality in the patients. PMID:25112900

  18. Epidemiology and Risk Factors for Echinocandin Nonsusceptible Candida glabrata Bloodstream Infections: Data From a Large Multisite Population-Based Candidemia Surveillance Program, 2008–2014

    PubMed Central

    Vallabhaneni, Snigdha; Cleveland, Angela A.; Farley, Monica M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Schaffner, William; Beldavs, Zintar G.; Derado, Gordana; Pham, Cau D.; Lockhart, Shawn R.; Smith, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background.?Echinocandins are first-line treatment for Candida glabrata candidemia. Echinocandin resistance is concerning due to limited remaining treatment options. We used data from a multisite, population-based surveillance program to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for echinocandin nonsusceptible (NS) C glabrata candidemia. Methods.?The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infections Program conducts population-based laboratory surveillance for candidemia in 4 metropolitan areas (7.9 million persons; 80 hospitals). We identified C glabrata cases occurring during 2008–2014; medical records of cases were reviewed, and C glabrata isolates underwent broth microdilution antifungal susceptibility testing. We defined echinocandin-NS C glabrata (intermediate or resistant) based on 2012 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute minimum inhibitory concentration breakpoints. Independent risk factors for NS C glabrata were determined by stepwise logistic regression. Results.?Of 1385 C glabrata cases, 83 (6.0%) had NS isolates (19 intermediate and 64 resistant); the proportion of NS isolates rose from 4.2% in 2008 to 7.8% in 2014 (P < .001). The proportion of NS isolates at each hospital ranged from 0% to 25.8%; 3 large, academic hospitals accounted for almost half of all NS isolates. In multivariate analysis, prior echinocandin exposure (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 5.3; 95% CI, 2.6–1.2), previous candidemia episode (aOR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2–5.1), hospitalization in the last 90 days (aOR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0–3.5, and fluconazole resistance [aOR, 3.6; 95% CI, 2.0–6.4]) were significantly associated with NS C glabrata. Fifty-nine percent of NS C glabrata cases had no known prior echinocandin exposure. Conclusion.?The proportion of NS C glabrata isolates rose significantly during 2008–2014, and NS C glabrata frequency differed across hospitals. In addition to acquired resistance resulting from prior drug exposure, occurrence of NS C glabrata without prior echinocandin exposure suggests possible transmission of resistant organisms. PMID:26677456

  19. Emerging Technologies for Rapid Identification of Bloodstream Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Atul; Morgan, Margie; Haake, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Technologies for rapid microbial identification are poised to revolutionize clinical microbiology and enable informed decision making for patients with life-threatening bloodstream infections. Species identification of microorganisms in positive blood cultures can be performed in minutes using commercial fluorescence in situ hybridization tests or mass spectroscopy. Microorganisms in positive blood cultures can also be identified within 1–2.5 hours using automated polymerase chain reaction–based systems that can also detect selected antibiotic resistance markers, such as methicillin resistance. When combined with antibiotic stewardship programs, these approaches improve clinical outcomes and reduce healthcare expenditures. Tests for direct detection in whole blood samples are highly desirable because of their potential to identify bloodstream pathogens without waiting 1-2 days for blood cultures to become positive. However, results for pathogen detection in whole blood do not overlap with those of conventional blood culture techniques and we are still learning how best to use these approaches. PMID:24771332

  20. Candida Infection of the Bloodstream - Candidemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... receive corticosteroids, broad spectrum antibiotics or have a central venous catheter in place, you are predisposed to develop Candidemia. A central venous catheter is a tube that is inserted in ...

  1. Uncommon opportunistic yeast bloodstream infections from Qatar.

    PubMed

    Taj-Aldeen, Saad J; AbdulWahab, Atqah; Kolecka, Anna; Deshmukh, Anand; Meis, Jacques F; Boekhout, Teun

    2014-07-01

    Eleven uncommon yeast species that are associated with high mortality rates irrespective of antifungal therapy were isolated from 17/187 (201 episodes) pediatric and elderly patients with fungemia from Qatar. The samples were taken over a 6-year period (January 2004-December 2010). Isolated species included Kluyveromyces marxianus, Lodderomyces elongisporus, Lindnera fabianii, Candida dubliniensis, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Candida intermedia, Pichia kudriavzevii, Yarrowia lipolytica, Clavispora lusitaniae, Candida pararugosa, and Wickerhamomyces anomalus. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry provided correct identifications compared with molecular analysis testing of the same isolates. Low minimal inhibitory concentrations were found when isavuconazole and voriconazole were used for all uncommon yeast species evaluated in this study. Resistance to antifungal drugs was low and remained restricted to a few species. PMID:24934803

  2. Stable transformation of pleomorphic bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    MacGregor, Paula; Rojas, Federico; Dean, Samuel; Matthews, Keith R

    2013-08-01

    African trypanosomes differentiate between various developmental stages both in mammalian hosts and their tsetse vector to adapt to and survive in the different environments they encounter. In the bloodstream, trypanosomes naturally exist as either proliferative slender-forms or non-proliferative stumpy-forms, the latter being responsible for both prolonged infection and transmission. However, most trypanosome studies are carried out on laboratory-adapted monomorphic cell lines, incapable of differentiating to stumpy-forms or completing the life cycle through the tsetse fly. Partly, this has been due to the inefficiency of transfection of pleomorphic strains which have retained the ability to generate stumpy-forms. Recently, Amaxa Nucleofector® technology was shown to increase transfection efficiency for monomorphic bloodstream forms. Using this technology we have optimised a similar method for pleomorphic bloodstream form transfection, generating transfection efficiencies of 10(-7)-10(-6). This permits routine genetic manipulation of pleomorphic lines, which have the most biological relevance for trypanosomes in the field. PMID:23835071

  3. Endothelial JAM-A promotes reovirus viremia and bloodstream dissemination.

    PubMed

    Lai, Caroline M; Boehme, Karl W; Pruijssers, Andrea J; Parekh, Vrajesh V; Van Kaer, Luc; Parkos, Charles A; Dermody, Terence S

    2015-02-01

    Viruses that cause systemic disease often spread through the bloodstream to infect target tissues. Although viremia is an important step in the pathogenesis of many viruses, how viremia is established is not well understood. Reovirus has been used to dissect mechanisms of viral pathogenesis and is being evaluated in clinical trials as an oncolytic agent. After peroral entry into mice, reovirus replicates within the gastrointestinal tract and disseminates systemically via hematogenous or neural routes. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a tight junction protein that serves as a receptor for reovirus. JAM-A is required for establishment of viremia and viral spread to sites of secondary replication. JAM-A also is expressed on the surface of circulating hematopoietic cells. To determine contributions of endothelial and hematopoietic JAM-A to reovirus dissemination and pathogenesis, we generated strains of mice with altered JAM-A expression in these cell types and assessed bloodstream spread of reovirus strain type 1 Lang (T1L), which disseminates solely by hematogenous routes. We found that endothelial JAM-A but not hematopoietic JAM-A facilitates reovirus T1L bloodstream entry and egress. Understanding how viruses establish viremia may aid in development of inhibitors of this critical step in viral pathogenesis and foster engineering of improved oncolytic viral vectors. PMID:25149763

  4. Optimization of culture medium compositions for gellan gum production by a halobacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Ya-chen; Fan, Lin-lin; Jiao, Zhi-hua; Chen, Qi-he

    2015-01-22

    The effect of culture medium compositions on gellan gum production produced by fermentation with a halobacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis QHZJUJW CGMCC2428 was studied. In this work, a fractional factorial design was applied to investigate the main factors that affected gellan gum production by S. paucimobilis QHZJUJW CGMCC2428. Sucrose was the best carbon source for gellan gum and peptone displayed better inducing effect. Central composite design and response surface methodology were adopted to derive a statistical model for optimizing submerged culture medium composition. These experimental results showed that the optimum culture medium for producing gellan gum was composed of 40.00 (w/v) sucrose, 3.00% peptone (w/v), MgSO4 (w/v), 9.20% KH2PO4 (w/v), 7.50% Na2HPO4 (w/v), 4.30% K2SO4 (w/v), pH 6.8-7.0. The maximal gellan gum was 19.89±0.68 g/L, which was agreed closely with the predicated value (20.12 g/L). After incubated for 72 h under the optimized culture medium in 5-L bioreactor, the gellan gum fermentation reached about 19.90±0.68 g/L, which was higher than that in the initial cultivation medium. PMID:25439950

  5. Biosynthesis and characterisation of silver nanoparticles using Sphingomonas paucimobilis sp. BDS1.

    PubMed

    Gou, Yujun; Zhang, Feng; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Li, Xiangqian

    2015-04-01

    Sphingomonas is a novel and abundant microbial resource for biodegradation of aromatic compounds. It has great potential in environment protection and industrial production. The use of microorganisms for the synthesis of nanoparticles is in the limelight of modern nanotechnology, since it is cost effective, non-toxic and friendly to the ever-overwhelmed environment. In this paper, the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using Sphingomonas paucimobilis sp. BDS1 under ambient conditions was investigated for the first time. Biosynthesised AgNPs were characterised with powder ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The overall results revealed that well-dispersed face centred cubic spherical AgNPs in the range of 50-80 nm were produced on the surface of Sphingomonas paucimobilis sp. BDS1, after challenging pure wet biomass with silver nitrate solution. This suggests that the capture of silver ions may be a complex process of physical and chemical adsorption and the proteins on the surface of the bacteria may play the role of reduction and stabilising agent with regard to the result of FTIR. PMID:25829169

  6. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Cleansing in Preventing Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infection and Acquisition of Multi-drug Resistant Organisms in Younger Patients With Cancer or Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-13

    Bacterial Infection; Benign Neoplasm; Malignant Neoplasm; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Myeloid Neoplasm

  7. Effects of surfactants on fluoranthene mineralization by Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain EPA 505

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, S.; Mueller, J.G.; Lin, J.E.; Pritchard, P.H.

    1995-12-31

    Past results from surfactant-enriched biodegradation studies have been equivocal because of inhibitory effects of the surfactants and a poor understanding of the characteristics of PAH-degrading microorganisms that make them responsive to surfactants. The authors have studied the mineralization of {sup 14}C-radiolabeled fluoranthene by high cell masses of Sphingomonas paucimobilis, strain EPA 505, and have shown that initial rates of mineralization can be enhanced by concentrations of the surfactant Triton X-100 as high as 2%. Mass balances are reported that show complete degradation of fluoranthene. The presence of soil stimulated biodegradation of fluoranthene in the same manner as surfactants, presumably because of increased dissolution rates from soil particulates. The usefulness of this bacterium in the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil is discussed.

  8. Sphingomonas paucimobilis beta-glucosidase Bgl1: a member of a new bacterial subfamily in glycoside hydrolase family 1.

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Pedro M; Videira, Paula; Fialho, Arsénio M; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    The Sphingomonas paucimobilis beta-glucosidase Bgl1 is encoded by the bgl1 gene, associated with an 1308 bp open reading frame. The deduced protein has a potential signal peptide of 24 amino acids in the N-terminal region, and experimental evidence is consistent with the processing and export of the Bgl1 protein through the inner membrane to the periplasmic space. A His(6)-tagged 44.3 kDa protein was over-produced in the cytosol of Escherichia coli from a recombinant plasmid, which contained the S. paucimobilis bgl1 gene lacking the region encoding the putative signal peptide. Mature beta-glucosidase Bgl1 is specific for aryl-beta-glucosides and has no apparent activity with oligosaccharides derived from cellulose hydrolysis and other saccharides. A structure-based alignment established structural relations between S. paucimobilis Bgl1 and other members of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 1 enzymes. At subsite -1, the conserved residues required for catalysis by GH1 enzymes are present in Bgl1 with only minor differences. Major differences are found at subsite +1, the aglycone binding site. This alignment seeded a sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of GH1 enzymes, revealing an absence of horizontal transfer between phyla. Bootstrap analysis supported the definition of subfamilies and revealed that Bgl1, the first characterized beta-glucosidase from the genus Sphingomonas, represents a very divergent bacterial subfamily, closer to archaeal subfamilies than to others of bacterial origin. PMID:12444924

  9. Adaptations in the Glucose Metabolism of Procyclic Trypanosoma brucei Isolates from Tsetse Flies and during Differentiation of Bloodstream Forms?

    PubMed Central

    van Grinsven, Koen W. A.; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Van den Bossche, Peter; van Hellemond, Jaap J.; Tielens, Aloysius G. M.

    2009-01-01

    Procyclic forms of Trypanosoma brucei isolated from the midguts of infected tsetse flies, or freshly transformed from a strain that is close to field isolates, do not use a complete Krebs cycle. Furthermore, short stumpy bloodstream forms produce acetate and are apparently metabolically preadapted to adequate functioning in the tsetse fly. PMID:19542311

  10. Genetically modified microorganism Spingomonas paucimobilis UT26 for simultaneously degradation of methyl-parathion and ?-hexachlorocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wen S; Lu, Ti K; Qin, Zhi F; Shi, Xiu J; Wang, Jin J; Hu, Yun F; Chen, Bin; Zhu, Yi H; Liu, Zheng

    2014-07-01

    Bioremediation of pesticide residues by bacteria is an efficient and environmentally friendly method to deal with environmental pollution. In this study, a genetically modified microorganism (GMM) named UT26XEGM was constructed by introducing a parathion hydrolase gene into an initially ?-hexachlorocyclohexane (?-HCH) degrading bacterium Spingomonas paucimobilis UT26. In order to reduce its potential risk of gene escaping into the environment for the public concern on biosafety, a suicide system was also designed that did not interfere with the performance of the GMM until its physiological function was activated by specific signal. The system was designed with circuiting suicide cassettes consisting of killing genes gef and ecoRIR from Escherichia coli controlled by Pm promoter and the xylS gene. The cell viability and original degradation characteristics were not affected by the insertion of exogenous genes. The novel GMM was capable of degrading methyl-parathion and ?-HCH simultaneously. In laboratory scale testing, the recombinant bacteria were successfully applied to the bioremediation of mixed pesticide residues with the activity of self-destruction after 3-methylbenzoate induction. PMID:24648032

  11. Kinetics of degradation of surfactant-solubilized fluoranthene by a Sphingomonas paucimobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Willumsen, P.A. . Dept. of Marine Ecology and Microbiology); Arvin, E. . Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering)

    1999-08-01

    To achieve a better quantitative understanding of the stimulating or inhibiting effect of surfactants on the metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a biodegradation model describing solubilization, bioavailability, and biodegradation of crystalline fluoranthene is proposed and used to model experimental data. The degradation was investigated in batch systems containing the PAH-degrading bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain EPA505, the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100, and a fluoranthene-amended liquid mineral salts medium. Surfactant-enhanced biodegradation is complex; however, the biodegradation model predicted fluoranthene disappearance and the initial mineralization well. Surfactant-amendment did increase fluoranthene mineralization rates by strain EPA505; however, the increases were not proportional to the rates of fluoranthene solubilization. The surfactant clearly influenced the microbial PAH metabolism as indicated by a rapid accumulation of colored products and by a surfactant -related decreased in the overall extent of fluoranthene mineralization. Model estimations of the bioavailability of micelle-solubilized fluoranthene, the relatively fast fluoranthene disappearance, and the accumulation of extracellular compounds in the degradation system suggest that low availability of micellar fluoranthene is not the only factor controlling surfactant-enhanced biodegradation. Also factors such as the extent of accumulation and bioavailability of the PAH metabolites and the crystalline solubilization rate in the presence of surfactants may determine the overall effect of surfactant-enhanced biodegradation of high molecular weight PAHs.

  12. Purification and Characterization of a Fucoidanase (FNase S) from a Marine Bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis PF-1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jung; Park, Joo Woong; Park, Jae Kweon; Choi, Doo Jin; Park, Yong Il

    2015-01-01

    The Search for enzyme activities that efficiently degrade marine polysaccharides is becoming an increasingly important area for both structural analysis and production of lower-molecular weight oligosaccharides. In this study, an endo-acting fucoidanase that degrades Miyeokgui fucoidan (MF), a sulfated galactofucan isolated from the sporophyll (called Miyeokgui in Korean) of Undaria pinnatifida, into smaller-sized galactofuco-oligosaccharides (1000–4000 Da) was purified from a marine bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis PF-1, by ammonium sulfate precipitation, diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sepharose column chromatography, and chromatofocusing. The specific activity of this enzyme was approximately 112-fold higher than that of the crude enzyme, and its molecular weight was approximately 130 kDa (FNase S), as determined by native gel electrophoresis and 130 (S1), 70 (S2) and 60 (S3) kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH and temperature of FNase S were pH 6.0–7.0 and 40–45 °C, respectively. FNase S activity was enhanced by Mn2+ and Na+ (115.7% and 131.2%), but it was inhibited by Ca2+, K+, Ba2+, Cu2+ (96%, 83.7%, 84.3%, and 89.3%, respectively), each at 1 mM. The Km, Vmax and Kcat values of FNase S on MF were 1.7 mM, 0.62 mg·min?1, and 0.38·S?1, respectively. This enzyme could be a valuable tool for the structural analysis of fucoidans and production of bioactive fuco-oligosaccharides. PMID:26193285

  13. Purification and Characterization of a Fucoidanase (FNase S) from a Marine Bacterium Sphingomonas paucimobilis PF-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo Jung; Park, Joo Woong; Park, Jae Kweon; Choi, Doo Jin; Park, Yong Il

    2015-07-01

    The Search for enzyme activities that efficiently degrade marine polysaccharides is becoming an increasingly important area for both structural analysis and production of lower-molecular weight oligosaccharides. In this study, an endo-acting fucoidanase that degrades Miyeokgui fucoidan (MF), a sulfated galactofucan isolated from the sporophyll (called Miyeokgui in Korean) of Undaria pinnatifida, into smaller-sized galactofuco-oligosaccharides (1000-4000 Da) was purified from a marine bacterium, Sphingomonas paucimobilis PF-1, by ammonium sulfate precipitation, diethylaminoethyl (DEAE)-Sepharose column chromatography, and chromatofocusing. The specific activity of this enzyme was approximately 112-fold higher than that of the crude enzyme, and its molecular weight was approximately 130 kDa (FNase S), as determined by native gel electrophoresis and 130 (S1), 70 (S2) and 60 (S3) kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The optimum pH and temperature of FNase S were pH 6.0-7.0 and 40-45 °C, respectively. FNase S activity was enhanced by Mn2+ and Na+ (115.7% and 131.2%), but it was inhibited by Ca2+, K+, Ba2+, Cu2+ (96%, 83.7%, 84.3%, and 89.3%, respectively), each at 1 mM. The Km, Vmax and Kcat values of FNase S on MF were 1.7 mM, 0.62 mg·min-1, and 0.38·S-1, respectively. This enzyme could be a valuable tool for the structural analysis of fucoidans and production of bioactive fuco-oligosaccharides. PMID:26193285

  14. Growth-promoting Sphingomonas paucimobilis?ZJSH1 associated with Dendrobium officinale through phytohormone production and nitrogen fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Suijuan; Zhang, Xinghai; Cao, Zhaoyun; Zhao, Kaipeng; Wang, Sai; Chen, Mingxue; Hu, Xiufang

    2014-01-01

    Growth-promoting Sphingomonas paucimobilis?ZJSH1, associated with Dendrobium officinale, a traditional Chinese medicinal plant, was characterized. At 90 days post-inoculation, strain ZJSH1 significantly promoted the growth of D. officinale seedlings, with increases of stems by 8.6% and fresh weight by 7.5%. Interestingly, the polysaccharide content extracted from the inoculated seedlings was 0.6% higher than that of the control. Similar growth promotion was observed with the transplants inoculated with strain ZJSH1. The mechanism of growth promotion was attributed to a combination of phytohormones and nitrogen fixation. Strain ZJSH1 was found using the Kjeldahl method to have a nitrogen fixation activity of 1.15 mg l?1, which was confirmed by sequencing of the nifH gene. Using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, strain ZJSH1 was found to produce various phytohormones, including salicylic acid (SA), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), Zeatin and abscisic acid (ABA). The growth curve showed that strain ZJSH1 grew well in the seedlings, especially in the roots. Accordingly, much higher contents of SA, ABA, IAA and c-ZR were detected in the inoculated seedlings, which may play roles as both phytohormones and ‘Systemic Acquired Resistance’ drivers. Nitrogen fixation and secretion of plant growth regulators (SA, IAA, Zeatin and ABA) endow S. paucimobilis?ZJSH1 with growth-promoting properties, which provides a potential for application in the commercial growth of D. officinale. PMID:25142808

  15. Prospective intervention study with a microarray-based, multiplexed, automated molecular diagnosis instrument (Verigene system) for the rapid diagnosis of bloodstream infections, and its impact on the clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiromichi; Hitomi, Shigemi; Yaguchi, Yuji; Tamai, Kiyoko; Ueda, Atsuo; Kamata, Kazuhiro; Tokuda, Yasuharu; Koganemaru, Hiroshi; Kurihara, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hiroichi; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Yanagihara, Katsunori

    2015-12-01

    The Verigene Gram-positive blood culture test (BC-GP) and the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture test (BC-GN) identify representative Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and their antimicrobial resistance by detecting resistance genes within 3 h. Significant benefits are anticipated due to their rapidity and accuracy, however, their clinical utility is unproven in clinical studies. We performed a clinical trial between July 2014 and December 2014 for hospitalized bacteremia patients. During the intervention period (N = 88), Verigene BC-GP and BC-GN was used along with conventional microbiological diagnostic methods, while comparing the clinical data and outcomes with those during the control period (N = 147) (UMIN registration ID: UMIN000014399). The median duration between the initiation of blood culture incubation and the reporting time of the Verigene system results was 21.7 h (IQR 18.2-26.8) and the results were found in 88% of the cases by the next day after blood cultures were obtained without discordance. The hospital-onset infection rate was higher in the control period (24% vs. 44%, p = 0.002), however, no differences were seen in co-morbidities and severity between the control and intervention periods. During the intervention period, the time of appropriate antimicrobial agents' initiation was significantly earlier than that in the control period (p = 0.001) and most cases (90%; 79/88) were treated with antimicrobial agents with in-vitro susceptibility for causative bacteria the day after the blood culture was obtained. The costs for antimicrobial agents were lower in the intervention period (3618 yen vs. 8505 yen, p = 0.001). The 30-day mortality was lower in the intervention period (3% vs. 13%, p = 0.019). PMID:26433422

  16. Host-Like Carbohydrates Promote Bloodstream Survival of Vibrio vulnificus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Jean-Bernard; Lewis, Warren G.; Gilbert, Nicole M.; Weimer, Cory M.; Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Boyd, E. Fidelma

    2015-01-01

    Sialic acids are found on all vertebrate cell surfaces and are part of a larger class of molecules known as nonulosonic acids. Many bacterial pathogens synthesize related nine-carbon backbone sugars; however, the role(s) of these non-sialic acid molecules in host-pathogen interactions is poorly understood. Vibrio vulnificus is the leading cause of seafood-related death in the United States due to its ability to quickly access the host bloodstream, which it can accomplish through gastrointestinal or wound infection. However, little is known about how this organism persists systemically. Here we demonstrate that sialic acid-like molecules are present on the lipopolysaccharide of V. vulnificus, are required for full motility and biofilm formation, and also contribute to the organism's natural resistance to polymyxin B. Further experiments in a murine model of intravenous V. vulnificus infection demonstrated that expression of nonulosonic acids had a striking benefit for bacterial survival during bloodstream infection and dissemination to other tissues in vivo. In fact, levels of bacterial persistence in the blood corresponded to the overall levels of these molecules expressed by V. vulnificus isolates. Taken together, these results suggest that molecules similar to sialic acids evolved to facilitate the aquatic lifestyle of V. vulnificus but that their emergence also resulted in a gain of function with life-threatening potential in the human host. PMID:26015477

  17. Healthcare-Associated Infections (HAIs) Data and Statistics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infections ( C. difficile ), and hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia (bloodstream infections). The current report ... Personnel Klebsiella MRSA Mycobacterium abscessus Norovirus ... Staphylococcus aureus Tuberculosis VISA / VRSA Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) ...

  18. Water: the bloodstream of the biosphere.

    PubMed Central

    Ripl, Wilhelm

    2003-01-01

    Water, the bloodstream of the biosphere, determines the sustainability of living systems. The essential role of water is expanded in a conceptual model of energy dissipation, based on the water balance of whole landscapes. In this model, the underlying role of water phase changes--and their energy-dissipative properties--in the function and the self-organized development of natural systems is explicitly recognized. The energy-dissipating processes regulate the ecological dynamics within the Earth's biosphere, in such a way that the development of natural systems is never allowed to proceed in an undirected or random way. A fundamental characteristic of self-organized development in natural systems is the increasing role of cyclic processes while loss processes are correspondingly reduced. This gives a coincidental increase in system efficiency, which is the basis of growing stability and sustainability. Growing sustainability can be seen as an increase of ecological efficiency, which is applicable at all levels up to whole landscapes. Criteria for necessary changes in society and for the design of the measures that are necessary to restore sustainable landscapes and waters are derived. PMID:14728789

  19. Structural and enzymatical comparison of lignostilbene-alpha,beta-dioxygenase isozymes, I, II, and III, from Pseudomonas paucimobilis TMY1009.

    PubMed

    Kamoda, S; Saburi, Y

    1993-06-01

    Three isozymes of lignostilbene-alpha,beta-dioxygenase (LSD) from Pseudomonas paucimobilis TMY1009 were separated on QAE-Toyopearl chromatography. All active fractions were further chromatographed on DEAE-Toyopearl, Butyl-Toyopearl, and Sephacryl S-300 columns. Then the isozymes I, II, and III were purified homogeneously. All three isozymes consisted of two subunits with the same mol. mass. According to the N-terminal amino acid sequences up to 25 residues of these three isozymes and the reversed-phase HPLC patterns of peptidase-digested them, it was found that LSD-I, II, and III consisted of alpha alpha, alpha beta, and beta beta subunits, respectively. They showed different specificities for several substrates that are stilbene and styrene derivatives. PMID:7763880

  20. Species Distribution and Susceptibility to Azole Antifungals of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Eight University Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Sol; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, Mi-Na; Shin, Bo-Moon; Uh, Young; Lee, Wee-Gyo; Lee, Hye Soo; Chang, Chulhun L; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of Candida bloodstream infections (BSI) has increased over the past two decades. The rank order of occurrence and the susceptibility to antifungals of the various Candida species causing BSI are important factors driving the establishment of empirical treatment protocols; however, very limited multi-institutional data are available on Candida bloodstream isolates in Korea. Materials and Methods We investigated the susceptibility to azole antifungals and species distribution of 143 Candida bloodstream isolates recovered from eight university hospitals over a six-month period. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole for each isolate were determined by the broth microdilution method of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results The Candida species recovered most frequently from the blood cultures was C. albicans (49%), followed by C. parapsilosis (22%), C. tropicalis (14%), and C. glabrata (11%). The MIC ranges for the Candida isolates were 0.125 to 64 µg/mL for fluconazole, 0.03 to 2 µg/mL for itraconazole, and 0.03 to 1 µg/mL for voriconazole. Overall, resistance to fluconazole was found in only 2% of the Candida isolates (3/143), while the dose-dependent susceptibility was found in 6% (8/143). The resistance and dose-dependent susceptibility of itraconazole were found in 4% (6/143) and 14% (20/143) of the isolates, respectively. All bloodstream isolates were susceptible to voriconazole (MIC, ? 1 µg/mL). Conclusion Our findings show that C. albicans is the most common cause of Candida-related BSI, followed by C. parapsilosis, and that the rates of resistance to azole antifungals are still low among bloodstream isolates in Korea. PMID:17963334

  1. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus domination of intestinal microbiota is enabled by antibiotic treatment in mice and precedes bloodstream invasion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ubeda, Carles; Taur, Ying; Jenq, Robert R.; Equinda, Michele J.; Son, Tammy; Samstein, Miriam; Viale, Agnes; Socci, Nicholas D.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Kamboj, Mini; Pamer, Eric G.

    2010-01-01

    Bloodstream infection by highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE), is a growing clinical problem that increasingly defies medical intervention. Identifying patients at high risk for bacterial sepsis remains an important clinical challenge. Recent studies have shown that antibiotics can alter microbial diversity in the intestine. Here, we characterized these effects using 16s rDNA pyrosequencing and demonstrated that antibiotic treatment of mice enabled exogenously administered VRE to efficiently and nearly completely displace the normal microbiota of the small and large intestine. In the clinical setting, we found that intestinal domination by VRE preceded bloodstream infection in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Our results demonstrate that antibiotics perturb the normal commensal microbiota and set the stage for intestinal domination by bacteria associated with hospital-acquired infections. Thus, high-throughput DNA sequencing of the intestinal microbiota could identify patients at high risk of developing bacterial sepsis. PMID:21099116

  2. Review Article von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream

    E-print Network

    Springer, Timothy A.

    are so closely intertwined that, like mem- bers of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use Skywalker, Star Wars VWF architecture Domains in the VWF monomer von blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side

  3. Biochemical characterization of the beta-1,4-glucuronosyltransferase GelK in the gellan gum-producing strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis A.T.C.C. 31461.

    PubMed Central

    Videira, P; Fialho, A; Geremia, R A; Breton, C; Sá-Correia, I

    2001-01-01

    Biosynthesis of bacterial polysaccharide-repeat units proceeds by sequential transfer of sugars, from the appropriate sugar donor to an activated lipid carrier, by committed glycosyltransferases (GTs). Few studies on the mechanism of action for this type of GT are available. Sphingomonas paucimobilis A.T.C.C. 31461 produces the industrially important polysaccharide gellan gum. We have cloned the gelK gene from S. paucimobilis A.T.C.C. 31461. GelK belongs to family 1 of the GT classification [Campbell, Davies, Bulone, Henrissat (1997) Biochem. J. 326, 929-939]. Sequence similarity studies suggest that GelK consists of two protein modules corresponding to the -NH(2) and -CO(2)H halves, the latter possibly harbouring the GT activity. The gelK gene and the open reading frames coding for the -NH(2) (GelK(NH2)) and -CO(2)H (GelK(COOH)) halves were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. GelK and GelK(NH2) were present in both the soluble and membrane fractions of E. coli, whereas GelK(COOH) was only present in the soluble fraction. GelK catalysed the transfer of [(14)C]glucuronic acid from UDP-[(14)C]glucuronic acid into a glycolipid extracted from S. paucimobilis or E. coli, even in the presence of EDTA, and the radioactive sugar was released from the glycolipid by beta-1,4-glucuronidase. GelK was not able to use synthetic glucosyl derivatives as acceptors, indicating that the PP(i)-lipid moiety is needed for enzymic activity. Recombinant GelK(NH2) and GelK(COOH) did not show detectable activity. Based on the biochemical characteristics of GelK and on sequence similarities with N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase, we propose that GT families 1 and 28 form a superfamily. PMID:11513745

  4. The selenoproteome is dispensable in bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Aeby, Eric; Seidel, Viktoria; Schneider, André

    2009-12-01

    Here we show that absence of Sep-tRNA:Sec-tRNA synthase (SepSecS) a key enzyme required for the synthesis of the three trypanosomal selenoproteins does not affect growth of bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei. Both life cycle stages of T. brucei are highly sensitive to auranofin, a compound known to target selenoproteins. However, the same sensitivity is observed in the SepSecS double knockout cell lines indicating that the trypanocidal action of auranofin is not connected to selenoproteins. Finally, we show that absence of selenoproteins does not increase sensitivity to H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. Thus in cell culture normal growth of procyclic and bloodstream T. brucei does not depend on selenoproteins. PMID:19723543

  5. A Study of Plazomicin Compared With Colistin in Patients With Infection Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-10

    Bloodstream Infections (BSI) Due to CRE; Hospital-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia (HABP) Due to CRE; Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia (VABP) Due to CRE; Complicated Urinary Tract Infection (cUTI) Due to CRE; Acute Pyelonephritis (AP) Due to CRE

  6. Characterizing the Promiscuity of LigAB, a Lignin Catabolite Degrading Extradiol Dioxygenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Kevin P.; Taylor, Erika A.

    2014-01-01

    LigAB from Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6 is the only structurally characterized dioxygenase of the largely uncharacterized superfamily of Type II extradiol dioxygenases (EDO). This enzyme catalyzes the oxidative ring-opening of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid or PCA) in a pathway allowing the degradation of lignin derived aromatic compounds (LDACs). LigAB has also been shown to utilize two other LDACs from the same metabolic pathway as substrates, gallate, and 3-O-methyl gallate; however, kcat/KM had not been reported for any of these compounds. In order to assess the catalytic efficiency and get insights into the observed promiscuity of this enzyme, steady-state kinetic analyses were performed for LigAB with these and a library of related compounds. The dioxygenation of PCA by LigAB was highly efficient, with a kcat of 51 s?1 and a kcat/KM of 4.26 × 106 M?1s?1. LigAB demonstrated the ability to use a variety of catecholic molecules as substrates beyond the previously identified gallate and 3-O-methyl gallate, including 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide, homoprotocatechuate, catechol, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile. Interestingly, 3,4-dihydroxybenzamide (DHBAm) behaves in a manner similar to that of the preferred benzoic acid substrates, with a kcat/Km value only ~4-fold lower than that for gallate and ~10-fold higher than that for 3-O-methyl gallate. All of these most active substrates demonstrate mechanistic inactivation of LigAB. Additionally, DHBAm exhibits potent product inhibition that leads to an inactive enzyme, being more highly deactivating at lower substrate concentration, a phenomena that, to our knowledge, has not been reported for another dioxygenase substrate/product pair. These results provide valuable catalytic insight into the reactions catalyzed by LigAB and make it the first Type II EDO that is fully characterized both structurally and kinetically. PMID:23977959

  7. Method and apparatus for injecting a substance into the bloodstream of a subject

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Bennett, G.W.; Duncan, C.C.; Ducote, L.W.

    1983-10-18

    An apparatus and method is disclosed for injecting a substance, such as a radiopharmaceutical, into the bloodstream of a subject. The apparatus comprises an injection means, such as a servo controlled syringe, a means for measuring the concentration of that substance in the subject's bloodstream, and means for controlling the injection in response to the measurement so that the concentration of the substance follows a predetermined function of time. The apparatus of the subject invention functions to inject a substance into a subject's bloodstream at a rate controlled by an error signal proportional to the difference between the concentration of the substance in the subject's bloodstream and the predetermined function. 2 figs.

  8. Method and apparatus for injecting a substance into the bloodstream of a subject

    DOEpatents

    Lambrecht, Richard M. (Quogue, NY); Bennett, Gerald W. (East Moriches, NY); Duncan, Charles C. (New Haven, CT); Ducote, Louis W. (Shoreham, NY)

    1983-10-18

    An apparatus and method for injecting a substance, such as a radiopharmaceutical, into the bloodstream of a subject. The apparatus comprises an injection means, such as a servo controlled syringe, a means for measuring the concentration of that substance in the subject's bloodstream, and means for controlling the injection in response to the measurement so that the concentration of the substance follows a predetermined function of time. The apparatus of the subject invention functions to inject a substance into a subject's bloodstream at a rate controlled by an error signal proportional to the difference between the concentration of the substance in the subject's bloodstream and the predetermined function.

  9. Method and apparatus for injecting a substance into the bloodstream of a subject

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Bennett, G.W.; Duncan, C.C.; Ducote, L.W.

    1981-05-29

    An apparatus and method for injecting a substance, such as a radiopharmaceutical, into the bloodstream of a subject is described. The apparatus comprises an injection means, such as a servo controlled syringe, a means for measuring the concentration of that substance in the subject's bloodstream, and means for controlling the injection in response to the measurement so that the concentration of the substance follows a predetermined function of time. The apparatus of the subject invention functions to inject a substance into a subject's bloodstream at a rate controlled by an error signal proportional to the difference between the concentration of the substance in the subject's bloodstream and the predetermined function.

  10. Bromodomain Proteins Contribute to Maintenance of Bloodstream Form Stage Identity in the African Trypanosome

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R.; Paulsen, Eda-Margaret; Kim, Hee-Sook; Chung, Chun-wa W.; Tough, David F.; Rioja, Inmaculada; Prinjha, Rab K.; Papavasiliou, F. Nina; Debler, Erik W.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness, is transmitted to its mammalian host by the tsetse. In the fly, the parasite’s surface is covered with invariant procyclin, while in the mammal it resides extracellularly in its bloodstream form (BF) and is densely covered with highly immunogenic Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG). In the BF, the parasite varies this highly immunogenic surface VSG using a repertoire of ~2500 distinct VSG genes. Recent reports in mammalian systems point to a role for histone acetyl-lysine recognizing bromodomain proteins in the maintenance of stem cell fate, leading us to hypothesize that bromodomain proteins may maintain the BF cell fate in trypanosomes. Using small-molecule inhibitors and genetic mutants for individual bromodomain proteins, we performed RNA-seq experiments that revealed changes in the transcriptome similar to those seen in cells differentiating from the BF to the insect stage. This was recapitulated at the protein level by the appearance of insect-stage proteins on the cell surface. Furthermore, bromodomain inhibition disrupts two major BF-specific immune evasion mechanisms that trypanosomes harness to evade mammalian host antibody responses. First, monoallelic expression of the antigenically varied VSG is disrupted. Second, rapid internalization of antibodies bound to VSG on the surface of the trypanosome is blocked. Thus, our studies reveal a role for trypanosome bromodomain proteins in maintaining bloodstream stage identity and immune evasion. Importantly, bromodomain inhibition leads to a decrease in virulence in a mouse model of infection, establishing these proteins as potential therapeutic drug targets for trypanosomiasis. Our 1.25Å resolution crystal structure of a trypanosome bromodomain in complex with I-BET151 reveals a novel binding mode of the inhibitor, which serves as a promising starting point for rational drug design. PMID:26646171

  11. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Springer, Timothy A

    2014-08-28

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use "the Force" to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned. PMID:24928861

  12. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use “the Force” to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned. PMID:24928861

  13. Organization of lin Genes and IS6100 among Different Strains of Hexachlorocyclohexane-Degrading Sphingomonas paucimobilis: Evidence for Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Charu; Raina, Vishakha; Pal, Rinku; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Lal, Sukanya; Gartemann, Karl-Heinz; Holliger, Christof; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Lal, Rup

    2004-01-01

    The organization of lin genes and IS6100 was studied in three strains of Sphingomonas paucimobilis (B90A, Sp+, and UT26) which degraded hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers but which had been isolated at different geographical locations. DNA-DNA hybridization data revealed that most of the lin genes in these strains were associated with IS6100, an insertion sequence classified in the IS6 family and initially found in Mycobacterium fortuitum. Eleven, six, and five copies of IS6100 were detected in B90A, Sp+, and UT26, respectively. IS6100 elements in B90A were sequenced from five, one, and one regions of the genomes of B90A, Sp+, and UT26, respectively, and were found to be identical. DNA-DNA hybridization and DNA sequencing of cosmid clones also revealed that S. paucimobilis B90A contains three and two copies of linX and linA, respectively, compared to only one copy of these genes in strains Sp+ and UT26. Although the copy number and the sequence of the remaining genes of the HCH degradative pathway (linB, linC, linD, and linE) were nearly the same in all strains, there were striking differences in the organization of the linA genes as a result of replacement of portions of DNA sequences by IS6100, which gave them a strange mosaic configuration. Spontaneous deletion of linD and linE from B90A and of linA from Sp+ occurred and was associated either with deletion of a copy of IS6100 or changes in IS6100 profiles. The evidence gathered in this study, coupled with the observation that the G+C contents of the linA genes are lower than that of the remaining DNA sequence of S. paucimobilis, strongly suggests that all these strains acquired the linA gene through horizontal gene transfer mediated by IS6100. The association of IS6100 with the rest of the lin genes further suggests that IS6100 played a role in shaping the current lin gene organization. PMID:15060023

  14. Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Swimmer's Ear (Otitis Externa) Syphilis Tetanus Tonsillitis Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxic Synovitis Tuberculosis Urinary Tract Infections Vaginal ... Roseola Rubella (German Measles) Scabies Scarlet Fever Toxic Shock Syndrome Vitiligo Warts Sign up for our free ...

  15. Unfolded Protein Response Pathways in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei?

    PubMed

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Brown, Abigail E N A; Bangs, James D

    2015-11-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a stress mechanism to cope with misfolded proteins in the early secretory pathway, the hallmark being transcriptional upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperones such as BiP and protein disulfide isomerase. Despite the lack of transcriptional regulation and the absence of the classical UPR machinery, African trypanosomes apparently respond to persistent ER stress by a UPR-like response, including upregulation of BiP, and a related spliced leader silencing (SLS) response whereby SL RNA transcription is shut down. Initially observed by knockdown of the secretory protein translocation machinery, both responses are also induced by chemical agents known to elicit UPR in mammalian cells (H. Goldshmidt, D. Matas, A. Kabi, A. Carmi, R. Hope, S. Michaeli, PLoS Pathog 6:e1000731, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1000731). As these findings were generated primarily in procyclic-stage trypanosomes, we have investigated both responses in pathogenic bloodstream-stage parasites. RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of the core translocon subunit Trypanosoma brucei Sec61? (TbSec61?) failed to induce either response. Interestingly, cell growth halted within 16 h of silencing, but sufficient TbSec61? remained to allow full competence for translocation of nascent secretory proteins for up to 24 h, indicating that replication is finely coupled with the capacity to synthesize and transport secretory cargo. Tunicamycin and thapsigargin at concentrations compatible with short-term (4 h) and long-term (24 h) viability also failed to induce any of the indicators of UPR-like or SLS responses. Dithiothreitol (DTT) was lethal at all concentrations tested. These results indicate that UPR-like and SLS responses to persistent ER stress do not occur in bloodstream-stage trypanosomes. PMID:26318397

  16. Chronic Superantigen Exposure Induces Systemic Inflammation, Elevated Bloodstream Endotoxin, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance in Rabbits: Possible Role in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Bao G.; Stach, Christopher S.; Kulhankova, Katarina; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Excessive weight and obesity are associated with the development of diabetes mellitus type 2 (DMII) in humans. They also pose high risks of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and overt infections. S. aureus causes a wide range of severe illnesses in both healthy and immunocompromised individuals. Among S. aureus virulence factors, superantigens are essential for pathogenicity. In this study, we show that rabbits that are chronically exposed to S. aureus superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) experience impaired glucose tolerance, systemic inflammation, and elevated endotoxin levels in the bloodstream, all of which are common findings in DMII. Additionally, such DMII-associated findings are also seen through effects of TSST-1 on isolated adipocytes. Collectively, our findings suggest that chronic exposure to S. aureus superantigens facilitates the development of DMII, which may lead to therapeutic targeting of S. aureus and its superantigens. PMID:25714716

  17. Developmental regulation and extracellular release of a VSG expression-site-associated gene product from Trypanosoma brucei bloodstream forms

    PubMed Central

    Barnwell, Eleanor M.; van Deursen, Frederick J.; Jeacock, Laura; Smith, Katherine A.; Maizels, Rick M.; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro; Matthews, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosomes evade host immunity by exchanging variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) coats. VSG genes are transcribed from telomeric expression sites, which contain a diverse family of expression-site-associated genes (ESAGs). We have discovered that the mRNAs for one ESAG family, ESAG9, are strongly developmentally regulated, being enriched in stumpy forms, a life-cycle stage in the mammalian bloodstream that is important for the maintenance of chronic parasite infections and for tsetse transmission. ESAG9 gene sequences are highly diverse in the genome and encode proteins with weak similarity to the massively diverse MASP proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi. We demonstrate that ESAG9 proteins are modified by N-glycosylation and can be shed to the external milieu, this being dependent upon coexpression with at least one other family member. The expression profile and extracellular release of ESAG9 proteins represents a novel and unexpected aspect of the transmission biology of trypanosomes in their mammalian host. We suggest that these molecules might interact with the external environment, with possible implications for infection chronicity or parasite transmission. PMID:20826456

  18. Antigenic and phenotypic modifications of Yersinia pestis under calcium and glucose concentrations simulating the mammalian bloodstream environment.

    PubMed

    Feodorova, Valentina A; Golova, Alina B

    2005-05-01

    To study the possible mechanism of extracellular resistance to phagocytes developed by Yersinia pestis in the early stage of plague infection, the behaviour of two Y. pestis strains, the vaccine EV-76 and fully virulent 231 (LD(50), 10 c.f.u.), was studied in-depth after cultivation in vitro at the host temperature in conditions simulating the bloodstream environment of mammals. For this, two standard basal media supplemented with calcium and glucose in appropriate concentrations were employed: Hottinger broth, routinely used for growth of Y. pestis in vitro, and RPMI 1640, simulating human extracellular fluid. Although both media permitted Y. pestis to achieve the resistant state, RPMI enabled significantly higher bacterial proliferation and increased modifications in the production of the principal surface antigens that affect the relevant phenotype characteristics. In general, our results indicate that the Y. pestis bacteria in the resistant state do not produce species-specific antigens, i.e. fraction 1 or F1, 'murine' toxin or Ymt, plasminogen activator (Pla) and any surface-specific polysaccharides, resulting in unmasking of the cross-reactive epitopes of lipid A in reduced Y. pestis lipopolysaccharide. This may produce mimicry by Y. pestis of some human tissue and blood cell components, with no immune response and inflammation at the site of infection at the early stage, which enables Y. pestis to survive, extensively multiply and spread into the circulation. PMID:15824419

  19. Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Coinfection Among Adults With Candidemia in Atlanta, GA, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Reno, Jessica; Doshi, Saumil; Tunali, Amy K; Stein, Betsy; Farley, Monica M; Ray, Susan M; Jacob, Jesse T

    2015-11-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with candidemia are at risk for other invasive infections, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infection (BSI). OBJECTIVE To identify the risk factors for, and outcomes of, BSI in adults with Candida spp. and MRSA at the same time or nearly the same time. DESIGN Population-based cohort study. SETTING Metropolitan Atlanta, March 1, 2008, through November 30, 2012. PATIENTS All residents with Candida spp. or MRSA isolated from blood. METHODS The Georgia Emerging Infections Program conducts active, population-based surveillance for candidemia and invasive MRSA. Medical records for patients with incident candidemia were reviewed to identify cases of MRSA coinfection, defined as incident MRSA BSI 30 days before or after candidemia. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with coinfection in patients with candidemia. RESULTS Among 2,070 adult candidemia cases, 110 (5.3%) had coinfection within 30 days. Among these 110 coinfections, MRSA BSI usually preceded candidemia (60.9%; n=67) or occurred on the same day (20.0%; n=22). The incidence of coinfection per 100,000 population decreased from 1.12 to 0.53 between 2009 and 2012, paralleling the decreased incidence of all MRSA BSIs and candidemia. Thirty-day mortality was similarly high between coinfection cases and candidemia alone (45.2% vs 36.0%, P=.10). Only nursing home residence (odds ratio, 1.72 [95% CI, 1.03-2.86]) predicted coinfection. CONCLUSIONS A small but important proportion of patients with candidemia have MRSA coinfection, suggesting that heightened awareness is warranted after 1 major BSI pathogen is identified. Nursing home residents should be targeted in BSI prevention efforts. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36(11):1298-1304. PMID:26310725

  20. MATH 360-1, Fall 2010 MENU Applied Analysis Project 1: Medication in the Bloodstream

    E-print Network

    Goerss, Paul

    . Now assume that if it goes above forty, the patient will fall asleep. Does this happen? 8. (MatlabMATH 360-1, Fall 2010 MENU Applied Analysis Project 1: Medication in the Bloodstream Important that if the amount of antihistamine rises above 30 units, the patient is groggy and drowsy. Estimate when this occurs

  1. Invasive Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium infections, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Ley, Benedikt; Le Hello, Simon; Lunguya, Octavie; Lejon, Veerle; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Weill, François-Xavier; Jacobs, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium sequence type (ST) 313 is associated with high rates of drug resistance, bloodstream infections, and death. To determine whether ST313 is dominant in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, we studied 180 isolates collected during 2007-2011; 96% belonged to CRISPOL type CT28, which is associated with ST313. PMID:24655438

  2. Hospital-associated infections in small animal practice.

    PubMed

    Stull, Jason W; Weese, J Scott

    2015-03-01

    Hospital-associated infections (HAIs) occur in veterinary hospitals of all types and sizes, and their frequency is likely to increase. Urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bloodstream infections, surgical site infections, and infectious diarrhea are the HAIs most frequently identified in veterinary medicine. A hospital infection control program, consisting of an infectious disease control officer, written protocols, and staff training, is critical to reducing HAIs and promoting patient, staff, and client health. Infection control protocols (plans) should include discussion of hand hygiene and use of personal protective equipment, cleaning and disinfection, patient management, with-in hospital surveillance, and antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:25559054

  3. Shiga toxin producing E coli bloodstream infection secondary to Strongyloides penetration through intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Cyr, Sancta; Nagpal, Avish; Sohail, Muhammad Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman with diabetes, who immigrated to the USA 22?years ago from Laos, was admitted to the hospital for evaluation of fever, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhoea. A workup for acute gastroenteritis revealed a positive stool PCR for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli. Two sets of blood cultures drawn at admission were positive for E coli. A review of her previous medical records revealed the presence of eosinophilia, up to 20%, 14?years prior to that was never investigated. Therefore, stool samples were examined and two of three specimens were positive for Strongyloides stercoralis larvae, confirming the diagnosis of Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome. PMID:24022903

  4. Crystal Structure of Haloalkane Dehalogenase LinB from Sphingomonas paucimobilis UT26 at 0.95 Å Resolution: Dynamics of Catalytic Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Oakley, Aaron J.; Klvana, Martin; Otyepka, Michal; Nagata, Yuji; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Damborsky, Jiri

    2010-11-16

    We present the structure of LinB, a 33-kDa haloalkane dehalogenase from Sphingomonas paucimobilis UT26, at 0.95 {angstrom} resolution. The data have allowed us to directly observe the anisotropic motions of the catalytic residues. In particular, the side-chain of the catalytic nucleophile, Asp108, displays a high degree of disorder. It has been modeled in two conformations, one similar to that observed previously (conformation A) and one strained (conformation B) that approached the catalytic base (His272). The strain in conformation B was mainly in the C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}}-C{sub {gamma}} angle (126{sup o}) that deviated by 13.4{sup o} from the 'ideal' bond angle of 112.6{sup o}. On the basis of these observations, we propose a role for the charge state of the catalytic histidine in determining the geometry of the catalytic residues. We hypothesized that double-protonation of the catalytic base (His272) reduces the distance between the side-chain of this residue and that of the Asp108. The results of molecular dynamics simulations were consistent with the structural data showing that protonation of the His272 side-chain nitrogen atoms does indeed reduce the distance between the side-chains of the residues in question, although the simulations failed to demonstrate the same degree of strain in the Asp108 C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}}-C{sub {gamma}} angle. Instead, the changes in the molecular dynamics structures were distributed over several bond and dihedral angles. Quantum mechanics calculations on LinB with 1-chloro-2,2-dimethylpropane as a substrate were performed to determine which active site conformations and protonation states were most likely to result in catalysis. It was shown that His272 singly protonated at N{sub {delta}1} and Asp108 in conformation A gave the most exothermic reaction ({Delta}H = -22 kcal/mol). With His272 doubly protonated at N{sub {delta}1} and N{sub {epsilon}2}, the reactions were only slightly exothermic or were endothermic. In all calculations starting with Asp108 in conformation B, the Asp108 C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}}-C{sub {gamma}} angle changed during the reaction and the Asp108 moved to conformation A. The results presented here indicate that the positions of the catalytic residues and charge state of the catalytic base are important for determining reaction energetics in LinB.

  5. Epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream Candida isolates in Quebec: Report on 453 cases between 2003 and 2005

    PubMed Central

    St-Germain, Guy; Laverdière, Michel; Pelletier, René; René, Pierre; Bourgault, Anne-Marie; Lemieux, Claude; Libman, Michael

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Between May 2003 and April 2005, a population-based surveillance of Candida bloodstream infections was conducted in Quebec. A total of 453 episodes of candidemia (464 yeast isolates) from 54 participating hospitals were studied. RESULTS The annual incidence rate was three per 100,000 population. Global hospital mortality was 38%. The most common predisposing factors were the presence of an intravascular catheter (80%), use of antibacterial therapy (67%), stay in an intensive care unit (49%), use of parenteral nutrition (32%) and intra-abdominal surgery (31%). Fluconazole alone or in association with other antifungals was used for treatment in over 80% of cases. Candida albicans comprised 62% of isolates, followed by Candida glabrata (17%), Candida parapsilosis (9%), Candida tropicalis (5%), Candida lusitaniae (3%) and Candida krusei (3%). Of the 288 C albicans isolates, seven (2%) were resistant to flucytosine, one to fluconazole and none to itraconazole or voriconazole. Of the 75 non-C albicans species isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluconazole (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] 16 ?g/mL or greater), none were susceptible to itraconazole (MIC 0.12 mg/L or lower), whereas 71 (95%) were susceptible to voriconazole (MIC 1 ?g/mL or lower). However, only five of 12 (42%) fluconazole-resistant isolates were susceptible to voriconazole. Posaconazole, ravuconazole and caspofungin displayed a broad spectrum of activity against these isolates, with MICs of 1 mg/L or lower in 56%, 92% and 100% of isolates, respectively. Overall, a correlation (r2>0.87) was observed among increasing fluconazole MICs and the geometric mean MICs of itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole and ravuconazole. CONCLUSIONS These surveillance results when compared with those of the 1993 to 1995 survey confirm little variation in the distribution of species causing invasive Candida infection over a 10-year period in Quebec, as well as the continuous excellent overall in vitro activity of fluconazole. PMID:19145263

  6. [Prevention of catheter-related infections].

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, K; Christ, M; Battegay, M; Widmer, A

    2012-10-01

    Bloodstream infections due to intravascular catheterization, peritoneal catheters for dialysis, suprapubic or transurethral catheters, are one of the major sources of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the prevention of catheter-associated infections is an important issue for physicians and nursing staff working in hospitals or in outpatient settings. The risk can be minimized by diligent checking of the indications, hygienic measures, using the right materials, thorough follow-up and education of the medical and nursing staff. Thus it is possible to avoid individual suffering of patients and to reduce costs in the healthcare system. PMID:23080356

  7. [Prevention of catheter-related infections].

    PubMed

    Schwaiger, K; Christ, M; Battegay, M; Widmer, A

    2012-06-01

    Bloodstream infections due to intravascular catheterization, peritoneal catheters for dialysis, suprapubic or transurethral catheters, are one of the major sources of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the prevention of catheter-associated infections is an important issue for physicians and nursing staff working in hospitals or in outpatient settings. The risk can be minimized by diligent checking of the indications, hygienic measures, using the right materials, thorough follow-up and education of the medical and nursing staff. Thus it is possible to avoid individual suffering of patients and to reduce costs in the healthcare system. PMID:22562110

  8. Invasive Bacterial and Fungal Infections Among Hospitalized HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Adults and Adolescents in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ramadhani, Habib O.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Mwako, Mtumwa S.; Yang, Lan-Yan; Chow, Shein-Chung; Morpeth, Susan C.; Reyburn, Hugh; Njau, Boniface N.; Shaw, Andrea V.; Diefenthal, Helmut C.; Shao, John F.; Bartlett, John A.; Maro, Venance P.

    2011-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Levine and Farag, on pages 349-351.) Background. Few studies describe patterns of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infections in African hospitals in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. Methods. We enrolled consecutive admitted patients aged ?13 years with oral temperature of ?38.0°C during 1 year in Moshi, Tanzania. A standardized clinical history and physical examination was done and hospital outcome recorded. HIV antibody testing, aerobic and mycobacterial blood cultures, and malaria film were performed. HIV-infected patients also received serum cryptococcal antigen testing and CD4+ T lymphocyte count (CD4 cell count). Results. Of 403 patients enrolled, the median age was 38 years (range, 14–96 years), 217 (53.8%) were female, and 157 (39.0%) were HIV-infected. Of HIV-infected patients, the median CD4 cell count was 98 cells/?L (range, 1–1,105 cells/ ?L), 20 (12.7%) were receiving ART, and 29 (18.5%) were receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. There were 112 (27.7%) patients who had evidence of invasive disease, including 26 (23.2%) with Salmonella serotype Typhi infection, 24 (21.4%) with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, 17 (15.2%) with Cryptococcus neoformans infection, 12 (10.7%) with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection, 8 (7.1%) with Plasmodium falciparum infection, and 7 (6.3%) with Escherichia coli infection. HIV infection was associated with M. tuberculosis and C. neoformans bloodstream infection but not with E. coli, S. pneumoniae, or P. falciparum infection. HIV infection appeared to be protective against Salmonella. Typhi bloodstream infection (odds ratio, .12; P = .001). Conclusions. While Salmonella Typhi and S. pneumoniae were the most common causes of invasive infection overall, M. tuberculosis and C. neoformans were the leading causes of bloodstream infection among HIV-infected inpatients in Tanzania in the ART era. We demonstrate a protective effect of HIV against Salmonella. Typhi bloodstream infection in this setting. HIV co-infections continue to account for a large proportion of febrile admissions in Tanzania. PMID:21217181

  9. Mouse infection and pathogenesis by Trypanosoma brucei motility mutants

    PubMed Central

    Kisalu, Neville K.; Langousis, Gerasimos; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Ralston, Katherine S.; Hill, Kent L.

    2014-01-01

    The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei is an essential and multifunctional organelle that drives parasite motility and is receiving increased attention as a potential drug target. In the mammalian host, parasite motility is suspected to contribute to infection and disease pathogenesis. However, it has not been possible to test this hypothesis owing to lack of motility mutants that are viable in the bloodstream life cycle stage that infects the mammalian host. We recently identified a bloodstream-form motility mutant in 427-derived T. brucei in which point mutations in the LC1 dynein subunit disrupt propulsive motility but do not affect viability. These mutants have an actively beating flagellum, but cannot translocate. Here we demonstrate that the LC1 point mutant fails to show enhanced cell motility upon increasing viscosity of the surrounding medium, which is a hallmark of wild type T. brucei, thus indicating that motility of the mutant is fundamentally altered compared to wild type cells. We next used the LC1 point mutant to assess the influence of trypanosome motility on infection in mice. We surprisingly found that disrupting parasite motility has no discernible effect on T. brucei bloodstream infection. Infection time-course, maximum parasitemia, number of waves of parasitemia, clinical features and disease outcome are indistinguishable between motility mutant and control parasites. Our studies provide an important step toward understanding the contribution of parasite motility to infection and a foundation for future investigations of T. brucei interaction with the mammalian host. PMID:24286532

  10. Invasive Fungal Infection Due to Triadelphia pulvinata in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abdely, Hail M.; AlThawadi, Sahar; Wickes, Brian L.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Madrid, Hugo; Guarro, Josep; Sutton, Deanna A.

    2013-01-01

    Triadelphia pulvinata is a rare dematiaceous fungus found in soil. We report the first case of invasive disease in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who had a bloodstream infection with possibly both lung and brain involvement. Identification was by combined phenotypic features and fungal ribosomal DNA sequence analysis. PMID:23863568

  11. Muscle Releases Alpha-Sarcoglycan Positive Extracellular Vesicles Carrying miRNAs in the Bloodstream

    PubMed Central

    Guescini, Michele; Canonico, Barbara; Lucertini, Francesco; Maggio, Serena; Annibalini, Giosué; Barbieri, Elena; Luchetti, Francesca; Papa, Stefano; Stocchi, Vilberto

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, skeletal muscle has emerged as an important secretory organ producing soluble factors, called myokines, that exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects. Moreover, recent studies have shown that muscle releases microRNAs into the bloodstream in response to physical exercise. These microRNAs affect target cells, such as hormones and cytokines. The mechanisms underlying microRNA secretion are poorly characterized at present. Here, we investigated whether muscle tissue releases extracellular vesicles (EVs), which carry microRNAs in the bloodstream under physiological conditions such as physical exercise. Using density gradient separation of plasma from sedentary and physically fit young men we found EVs positive for TSG101 and alpha-sarcoglycan (SGCA), and enriched for miR-206. Cytometric analysis showed that the SGCA+ EVs account for 1–5% of the total and that 60–65% of these EVs were also positive for the exosomal marker CD81. Furthermore, the SGCA-immuno captured sub-population of EVs exhibited higher levels of the miR-206/miR16 ratio compared to total plasma EVs. Finally, a significant positive correlation was found between the aerobic fitness and muscle-specific miRNAs and EV miR-133b and -181a-5p were significantly up-regulated after acute exercise. Thus, our study proposes EVs as a novel means of muscle communication potentially involved in muscle remodeling and homeostasis. PMID:25955720

  12. Hematogenous placental infection in acute respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Sandu, Claudia; Folescu, Roxana; Pop, Elena; Motoc, A G M

    2013-01-01

    The study focuses on the macroscopic and microscopic aspects of the placentae resulting from abortions or febrile births and their correlation with acute disorders of the upper or lower respiratory apparatus in pregnant women in various stages of pregnancy. The viral, bacterial or mycotic disorders were considered responsible for triggering septic abortion, premature or full-term deliveries, followed by septic complications of the child/fetus or of the mother. When the mother's acute respiratory infection is induced by highly virulent pathogens, in patients with low immunity or lacking adequate medical treatment, the infection may spread through the mother's bloodstream to the placenta. The study was conducted on 90 placentae. Microscopic analysis of the tissue samples revealed acute inflammatory infiltration. Two of the study cases should be mentioned here: a four-month pregnant woman suffering from septic abortion and a nine-month pregnant woman whose fetus died in the womb because of acute pneumopathy on a non-breathing lung. Both pregnant women had the same type of disorder and neither followed any medical treatment prescribed by a physician. The prevention of placental infection is closely connected to the prevention of acute respiratory diseases or their proper treatment after their onset. PMID:23529324

  13. Virus Infections in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Koyuncu, Orkide O.; Hogue, Ian B.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2013-01-01

    Virus infections usually begin in peripheral tissues and can invade the mammalian nervous system (NS), spreading into the peripheral (PNS) and more rarely the central nervous systems (CNS). The CNS is protected from most virus infections by effective immune responses and multi-layer barriers. However, some viruses enter the NS with high efficiency via the bloodstream or by directly infecting nerves that innervate peripheral tissues, resulting in debilitating direct and immune-mediated pathology. Most viruses in the NS are opportunistic or accidental pathogens, but a few, most notably the alpha herpesviruses and rabies virus, have evolved to enter the NS efficiently and exploit neuronal cell biology. Remarkably, the alpha herpesviruses can establish quiescent infections in the PNS, with rare but often fatal CNS pathology. Here we review how viruses gain access to and spread in the well-protected CNS, with particular emphasis on alpha herpesviruses, which establish and maintain persistent NS infections. PMID:23601101

  14. Identification and partial purification of a stage-specific 33 kDa mitochondrial protein as the alternative oxidase of the Trypanosoma brucei brucei bloodstream trypomastigotes.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, M; Ajayi, W; Temple, S; Hill, G C

    1995-01-01

    The glycerophosphate oxidase (GPO), the unique terminal oxidase of bloodstream trypanosome (TAO), appears to be functionally similar to the alternative oxidases of some plants and higher fungi. Immunoblotting of mitochondrial proteins of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei with monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies to Sauromatum guttatum (voodoo lily) and Symplocarpus foetidus (skunk cabbage) alternative oxidases respectively revealed two proteins of about 33 kDa (p33) and 68 kDa (p68). These proteins are not present in procyclic trypomastigotes. Electrophoresis under rigorous denaturing conditions indicated p68 to be the dimer of p33. Indirect immunofluorescent studies of bloodstream and procyclic trypomastigotes with monoclonal antibody to plant alternative oxidase also showed the localization of 33 kDa protein in the mitochondria of the bloodstream trypomastigotes. The functional TAO activity could be solubilized efficiently from the mitochondrial membrane of the bloodstream trypomastigotes by 1% NP-40 or 10 mM lauryl maltoside. When fractionated by Superose 12 gel filtration chromatography, p33 was co-purified with the TAO enzymatic activity. The apparent molecular size of the active enzyme complex was found to be 160 kDa. Gradual disappearance of the 33 kDa protein and the TAO enzymatic activity were well correlated during in vitro differentiation of the bloodstream to procyclic trypomastigotes. This study implies that the net biosynthesis of p33, an essential subunit of TAO, is decreased during differentiation from bloodstream to procyclic trypomastigotes. PMID:7581322

  15. In vitro interactions between different beta-lactam antibiotics and fosfomycin against bloodstream isolates of enterococci.

    PubMed Central

    Pestel, M; Martin, E; Aucouturier, C; Lemeland, J F; Caron, F

    1995-01-01

    The effects of 16 different beta-lactam-fosfomycin combinations against 50 bloodstream enterococci were compared by a disk diffusion technique. Cefotaxime exhibited the best interaction. By checkerboard studies, the cefotaxime-fosfomycin combination provided a synergistic bacteriostatic effect against 45 of the 50 isolates (MIC of cefotaxime at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited, >2,048 micrograms/ml; MIC of fosfomycin at which 90% of the isolates were inhibited, 128 micrograms/ml; mean of fractional inhibitory concentration indexes, 0.195). By killing curves, cefotaxime (at 64 micrograms/ml) combined with fosfomycin (at > or = 64 micrograms/ml) was bactericidal against 6 of 10 strains tested. PMID:8619593

  16. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intensive care and oncology units. Infection rates are the highest in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (where bloodstream infections are the most frequent), and are usually associated with intravascular devices. On general paediatric wards, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections predominate, reflecting the occurrence in the community. The surveillance of nosocomial infections identifies priorities for infection control activities and permits evaluation of interventions. The prevention of transmission between patients and to personnel requires that certain measures be taken with all patients, and that additional precautions be taken with some infections, based on the route of transmission. The prevention of transmission from personnel involves ensuring that personnel are appropriately immunized and counselled about working with infections. The prevention of nosocomial infection also involves control of visitors, appropriate management of invasive procedures and devices, sterilization and disinfection of equipment, provision of a clean environment and adequate staffing. Severely immunocompromised children require extra protection, including ventilation systems that reduce the risk of exposure to filamentous fungi. Infection control in paediatrics is an evolving field that must adapt to changes in the paediatric patient population and in health care technology. PMID:20084127

  17. Modern trends in infection control practices in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Gandra, Sumanth; Ellison, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are common in intensive care unit (ICU) patients and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. There has been an increasing effort to prevent HAIs, and infection control practices are paramount in avoiding these complications. In the last several years, numerous developments have been seen in the infection prevention strategies in various health care settings. This article reviews the modern trends in infection control practices to prevent HAIs in ICUs with a focus on methods for monitoring hand hygiene, updates in isolation precautions, new methods for environmental cleaning, antimicrobial bathing, prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia, central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and Clostridium difficile infection. PMID:23753240

  18. Infection control in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Eggimann, P; Pittet, D

    2001-12-01

    Nosocomial infections (NIs) now concern 5 to 15% of hospitalized patients and can lead to complications in 25 to 33% of those patients admitted to ICUs. The most common causes are pneumonia related to mechanical ventilation, intra-abdominal infections following trauma or surgery, and bacteremia derived from intravascular devices. This overview is targeted at ICU physicians to convince them that the principles of infection control in the ICU are based on simple concepts and that the application of preventive strategies should not be viewed as an administrative or constraining control of their activity but, rather, as basic measures that are easy to implement at the bedside. A detailed knowledge of the epidemiology, based on adequate surveillance methodologies, is necessary to understand the pathophysiology and the rationale of preventive strategies that have been demonstrated to be effective. The principles of general preventive measures such as the implementation of standard and isolation precautions, and the control of antibiotic use are reviewed. Specific practical measures, targeted at the practical prevention and control of ventilator-associated pneumonia, sinusitis, and bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections are detailed. Recent data strongly confirm that these strategies may only be effective over prolonged periods if they can be integrated into the behavior of all staff members who are involved in patient care. Accordingly, infection control measures are to be viewed as a priority and have to be integrated fully into the continuous process of improvement of the quality of care. PMID:11742943

  19. Antifungal Susceptibility Survey of 2,000 Bloodstream Candida Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis; Rex, John H.; Pappas, Peter G.; Hamill, Richard J.; Larsen, Robert A.; Horowitz, Harold W.; Powderly, William G.; Hyslop, Newton; Kauffman, Carol A.; Cleary, John; Mangino, Julie E.; Lee, Jeannette

    2003-01-01

    Candida bloodstream isolates (n = 2,000) from two multicenter clinical trials carried out by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group between 1995 and 1999 were tested against amphotericin B (AMB), flucytosine (5FC), fluconazole (FLU), itraconazole (ITR), voriconazole (VOR), posaconazole (POS), caspofungin (CFG), micafungin (MFG), and anidulafungin (AFG) using the NCCLS M27-A2 microdilution method. All drugs were tested in the NCCLS-specified RPMI 1640 medium except for AMB, which was tested in antibiotic medium 3. A sample of isolates was also tested in RPMI 1640 supplemented to 2% glucose and by using the diluent polyethylene glycol (PEG) in lieu of dimethyl sulfoxide for those drugs insoluble in water. Glucose supplementation tended to elevate the MIC, whereas using PEG tended to decrease the MIC. Trailing growth occurred frequently with azoles. Isolates were generally susceptible to AMB, 5FC, and FLU. Rates of resistance to ITR approached 20%. Although no established interpretative breakpoints are available for the candins (CFG, MFG, and AFG) and the new azoles (VOR and POS), they all exhibited excellent antifungal activity, even for those strains resistant to the other aforementioned agents. PMID:14506023

  20. The Krebs Cycle Enzyme ?-Ketoglutarate Decarboxylase Is an Essential Glycosomal Protein in Bloodstream African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Steven; Szempruch, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    ?-Ketoglutarate decarboxylase (?-KDE1) is a Krebs cycle enzyme found in the mitochondrion of the procyclic form (PF) of Trypanosoma brucei. The bloodstream form (BF) of T. brucei lacks a functional Krebs cycle and relies exclusively on glycolysis for ATP production. Despite the lack of a functional Krebs cycle, ?-KDE1 was expressed in BF T. brucei and RNA interference knockdown of ?-KDE1 mRNA resulted in rapid growth arrest and killing. Cell death was preceded by progressive swelling of the flagellar pocket as a consequence of recruitment of both flagellar and plasma membranes into the pocket. BF T. brucei expressing an epitope-tagged copy of ?-KDE1 showed localization to glycosomes and not the mitochondrion. We used a cell line transfected with a reporter construct containing the N-terminal sequence of ?-KDE1 fused to green fluorescent protein to examine the requirements for glycosome targeting. We found that the N-terminal 18 amino acids of ?-KDE1 contain overlapping mitochondrion- and peroxisome-targeting sequences and are sufficient to direct localization to the glycosome in BF T. brucei. These results suggest that ?-KDE1 has a novel moonlighting function outside the mitochondrion in BF T. brucei. PMID:25416237

  1. The Cooperative Roles of Two Kinetoplastid-Specific Kinesins in Cytokinesis and in Maintaining Cell Morphology in Bloodstream Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ying; Hu, Huiqing; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Li, Ziyin

    2013-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma brucei, a unicellular eukaryote and a parasitic protozoan, is defined by the subpellicular microtubule corset that is arranged underneath the plasma membrane. We recently identified two orphan kinesins, TbKIN-C and TbKIN-D, that cooperate to regulate the organization of the subpellicular microtubule corset and thereby maintain cell morphology in the procyclic form of T. brucei. In this report, we characterize the function of TbKIN-C and TbKIN-D in the bloodstream form of T. brucei and investigate their functional cooperation in both the bloodstream and procyclic forms. TbKIN-C and TbKIN-D form a tight complex in vivo in the bloodstream form. TbKIN-C is strongly enriched at the posterior tip of the cell, whereas TbKIN-D is distributed throughout the cell body at all cell cycle stages. RNAi of TbKIN-C or TbKIN-D in the bloodstream form inhibits cell proliferation and leads to cell death, due to cytokinesis defects. RNAi of TbKIN-C and TbKIN-D also results in defects in basal body segregation, but does not affect the synthesis and segregation of the flagellum and the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ) filament. Knockdown of TbKIN-C and TbKIN-D does not disrupt the organization of the subpellicular microtubule corset, but produces multinucleated cells with an enlarged flagellar pocket and misplaced flagella. Interestingly, depletion of TbKIN-C results in rapid degradation of TbKIN-D and, similarly, knockdown of TbKIN-C destabilizes TbKIN-D, suggesting that formation of TbKIN-C/TbKIN-D complex stabilizes both kinesins and is required for the two kinesins to execute their essential cellular functions. Altogether, our results demonstrate the essential role of the two kinesins in cell morphogenesis and cytokinesis in the bloodstream form and the requirement of heteromeric complex formation for maintaining the stability of the two kinesins. PMID:24069240

  2. Mycoplasmal Upper Respiratory Infection Presenting as Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mana; Agrawal, Abhinav; Parikh, Manan; Banayat, Rikka; Thomas, Maria Joana; Guo, Tianhua; Lee, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma is a virulent organism that is known to primarily infect the respiratory tract; however, affection of the skin, nervous system, kidneys, heart and bloodstream has been observed in various forms, which include Stevens Johnson syndrome, erythema multiforme, toxic epidermal necrolysis, encephalitis, renal failure, conduction system abnormalities and hemolytic anemia. Small vessel vasculitis is a lesser-known complication of mycoplasma pneumonia infection. We report a case of mycoplasmal upper respiratory tract infection with striking cutaneous lesions as the presenting symptom. Mycoplasmal infection was confirmed by serology testing, skin biopsy was suggestive of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. This case brings forth an uncommon manifestation of mycoplasmal infection with extra-pulmonary affection, namely small vessel vasculitis. PMID:25874067

  3. Reducing the risk of infection associated with vascular access devices through nanotechnology: a perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Keogh, Samantha; Rickard, Claire M

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular catheter-related infections are still a major problem in health care and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and additional cost. The formation of microbial biofilm on catheters makes these infections particularly complicated, as microbial cells that detach from the biofilm can lead to infection, and because these microorganisms are highly resistant to many antimicrobial agents; thus, catheter removal is often required to successfully treat infection. To reduce the risks of catheter-related infections, many strategies have been applied, such as improvements in aseptic insertion and post-insertion care practices, implantation techniques, and antibiotic coated or impregnated materials. However, despite significant advances in using these methods, it has not been possible to completely eradicate biofilm infections. Currently, nanotechnology approaches seem to be among the most promising for preventing biofilm formation and resultant catheter-related bloodstream infection (especially with multi-resistant bacterial strains). In this review, current knowledge about catheter technology and design, the mechanisms of catheter-related bloodstream infection, and the insertion and care practices performed by medical staff, are discussed, along with novel, achievable approaches to infection prevention, based on nanotechnology. PMID:24293997

  4. Antifungal Susceptibilities of Bloodstream Isolates of Candida Species from Nine Hospitals in Korea: Application of New Antifungal Breakpoints and Relationship to Antifungal Usage

    PubMed Central

    Won, Eun Jeong; Shin, Jong Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Lee, Wee Gyo; Park, Yeon-Joon; Uh, Young; Kim, Shine-Young; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    We applied the new clinical breakpoints (CBPs) of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) to a multicenter study to determine the antifungal susceptibility of bloodstream infection (BSI) isolates of Candida species in Korea, and determined the relationship between the frequency of antifungal-resistant Candida BSI isolates and antifungal use at hospitals. Four hundred and fifty BSI isolates of Candida species were collected over a 1-year period in 2011 from nine hospitals. The susceptibilities of the isolates to four antifungal agents were determined using the CLSI M27 broth microdilution method. By applying the species-specific CBPs, non-susceptibility to fluconazole was found in 16.4% (70/428) of isolates, comprising 2.6% resistant and 13.8% susceptible-dose dependent isolates. However, non-susceptibility to voriconazole, caspofungin, or micafungin was found in 0% (0/370), 0% (0/437), or 0.5% (2/437) of the Candida BSI isolates, respectively. Of the 450 isolates, 72 (16.0%) showed decreased susceptibility to fluconazole [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ?4 ?g/ml]. The total usage of systemic antifungals varied considerably among the hospitals, ranging from 190.0 to 7.7 defined daily dose per 1,000 patient days, and fluconazole was the most commonly prescribed agent (46.3%). By Spearman’s correlation analysis, fluconazole usage did not show a significant correlation with the percentage of fluconazole resistant isolates at hospitals. However, fluconazole usage was significantly correlated with the percentage of fluconazole non-susceptible isolates (r = 0.733; P = 0.025) or the percentage of isolates with decreased susceptibility to fluconazole (MIC ?4 ?g/ml) (r = 0.700; P = 0.036) at hospitals. Our work represents the first South Korean multicenter study demonstrating an association between antifungal use and antifungal resistance among BSI isolates of Candida at hospitals using the new CBPs of the CLSI. PMID:25706866

  5. Allocation of Klebsiella pneumoniae Bloodstream Isolates into Four Distinct Groups by ompK36 Typing in a Taiwanese University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing-Jou; Zheng, Po-Xing; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Tsai, Shu-Huei; Wang, Li-Rong; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-10-01

    The OmpK36 porin plays a role in carbapenem resistance and may contribute to bacterial virulence in Klebsiella pneumoniae. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of different groups of K. pneumoniae separated by ompK36 typing. Among 226 nonduplicate K. pneumoniae bloodstream isolates collected at a Taiwanese hospital in 2011, four ompK36 types, designated types A, B, C, and D, were identified by PCR in 61, 28, 100, and 36 isolates, respectively; 1 isolate was untypeable. Statistical analysis showed significantly higher rates of antimicrobial resistance (all tested antibiotics except meropenem), extended-spectrum ?-lactamases or DHA-1 (47.5% together), Qnr-type quinolone resistance determinants (50.8%), and IncFIIA-type plasmids (49.2%) in group A than in others. Seventeen isolates were identified as belonging to 3 international high-risk clones (4 sequence type 11 [ST11], 10 ST15, and 3 ST147 isolates); all isolates but 1 ST15 isolate were classified in group A. The significant characteristics of group C were hypermucoviscosity (62.0%) and a higher virulence gene content. This group included all serotype K1 (n = 30), K2 (n = 25), and K5 (n = 3) isolates, 6 of 7 K57 isolates, all isolates of major clones associated with pyogenic liver abscesses (29 ST23, 11 ST65, 5 ST86, 7 ST373, and 1 ST375 isolates), and 16 (94.1%) of 17 isolates causing bacteremic liver abscesses. Twelve (42.9%) of the group B isolates were responsible for bacteremic biliary tract infections. Group D was predominant (83.3%) among 12 K20 isolates. This study suggests that most clinical K. pneumoniae isolates can be allocated into four groups with distinct characteristics based on ompK36 types. PMID:26224840

  6. Blood-brain barrier and retroviral infections

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Florence; Afonso, Philippe V.; Gessain, Antoine; Ceccaldi, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS) is maintained by active interfaces between the bloodstream and the brain parenchyma. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) constitutes a selective filter for exchange of water, solutes, nutrients, and controls toxic compounds or pathogens entry. Some parasites, bacteria, and viruses have however developed various CNS invasion strategies, and can bypass the brain barriers. Concerning viruses, these strategies include transport along neural pathways, transcytosis, infection of the brain endothelial cells, breaching of the BBB, and passage of infected-leukocytes. Moreover, neurotropic viruses can alter BBB functions, thus compromising CNS homeostasis. Retroviruses have been associated to human neurological diseases: HIV (human immunodeficiency virus 1) can induce HIV-associated dementia, and HTLV-1 (human T lymphotropic virus 1) is the etiological factor of tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM). The present review focuses on how the different retroviruses interact with this structure, bypass it and alter its functions. PMID:22460635

  7. A mouse model of food borne Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Bou Ghanem, Elsa N.; Myers-Morales, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes cause foodborne disease in humans that ranges in severity from mild, self-limiting gastroenteritis to life-threatening systemic infections of the blood, brain, or placenta. The most commonly used animal model of listeriosis is intravenous infection of mice. This systemic model is highly reproducible, and thus, useful for studying cell-mediated immune responses against an intracellular bacterial pathogen, but it completely bypasses the gastrointestinal phase of L. monocytogenes infection. Intragastric inoculation of L. monocytogenes produces more variable results and may cause direct bloodstream invasion in some animals. The food borne transmission model described here does not require specialized skills to perform and results in infections that more closely mimic human disease. This natural feeding model can be used to study both the host and pathogen-derived factors that govern susceptibility or resistance to orally acquired L. monocytogenes. PMID:24510293

  8. Nosocomial infections in dialysis access.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Alexander; Trevino, Sergio; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections in patients requiring renal replacement therapy have a high impact on morbidity and mortality. The most dangerous complication is bloodstream infection (BSI) associated with the vascular access, with a low BSI risk in arteriovenous fistulas or grafts and a comparatively high risk in central venous catheters. The single most important measure for preventing BSI is therefore the reduction of catheter use by means of early fistula formation. As this is not always feasible, prevention should focus on educational efforts, hand hygiene, surveillance of dialysis-associated events, and specific measures at and after the insertion of catheters. Core measures at the time of insertion include choosing the optimal site of insertion, the use of maximum sterile barrier precautions, adequate skin antisepsis, and the choice of catheter type; after insertion, access care needs to ensure hub disinfection and regular dressing changes. The application of antimicrobial locks is reserved for special situations. Evidence suggests that bundling a selection of the aforementioned measures can significantly reduce infection rates. The diagnosis of central line-associated BSI (CLABSI) is based on clinical signs and microbiological findings in blood cultures ideally drawn both peripherally and from the catheter. The prompt installation of empiric antibiotic treatment covering the most commonly encountered organisms is key regarding CLABSI treatment. Catheter removal is recommended in complicated cases or if cultures yield Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Pseudomonas or fungi. In other cases, guide wire exchange or catheter salvage strategies with antibiotic lock solutions may be acceptable alternatives. PMID:25676304

  9. The inhibition of pyruvate transport across the plasma membrane of the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei and its metabolic implications.

    PubMed Central

    Wiemer, E A; Michels, P A; Opperdoes, F R

    1995-01-01

    The pyruvate produced by glycolysis in the bloodstream form of the trypanosome is excreted into the host bloodstream by a facilitated diffusion carrier. The sensitivity of pyruvate transport for alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate and the compound UK5099 [alpha-cyano-beta-(1-phenylindol-3-yl)acrylate], which are known to be selective inhibitors of pyruvate (monocarboxylate) transporters present in mitochondria and the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells, was examined. The trypanosomal pyruvate carrier was found to be rather insensitive to inhibition by alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 17 mM) but could be completely blocked by UK5099 (Ki = 49 microM). Inhibition of pyruvate transport resulted in the retention, and concomitant accumulation, of pyruvate within the trypanosomes, causing acidification of the cytosol and osmotic destabilization of the cells. Our results indicate that this physiological state has serious metabolic consequences and ultimately leads to cell death; thereby identifying the pyruvate carrier as a possible target for chemotherapeutic intervention. Images Figure 3 PMID:8526859

  10. Probing the Metabolic Network in Bloodstream-Form Trypanosoma brucei Using Untargeted Metabolomics with Stable Isotope Labelled Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Creek, Darren J.; Mazet, Muriel; Achcar, Fiona; Anderson, Jana; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kamour, Ruwida; Morand, Pauline; Millerioux, Yoann; Biran, Marc; Kerkhoven, Eduard J.; Chokkathukalam, Achuthanunni; Weidt, Stefan K.; Burgess, Karl E. V.; Breitling, Rainer; Watson, David G.; Bringaud, Frédéric; Barrett, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics coupled with heavy-atom isotope-labelled glucose has been used to probe the metabolic pathways active in cultured bloodstream form trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma brucei, a parasite responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. Glucose enters many branches of metabolism beyond glycolysis, which has been widely held to be the sole route of glucose metabolism. Whilst pyruvate is the major end-product of glucose catabolism, its transamination product, alanine, is also produced in significant quantities. The oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway is operative, although the non-oxidative branch is not. Ribose 5-phosphate generated through this pathway distributes widely into nucleotide synthesis and other branches of metabolism. Acetate, derived from glucose, is found associated with a range of acetylated amino acids and, to a lesser extent, fatty acids; while labelled glycerol is found in many glycerophospholipids. Glucose also enters inositol and several sugar nucleotides that serve as precursors to macromolecule biosynthesis. Although a Krebs cycle is not operative, malate, fumarate and succinate, primarily labelled in three carbons, were present, indicating an origin from phosphoenolpyruvate via oxaloacetate. Interestingly, the enzyme responsible for conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate to oxaloacetate, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, was shown to be essential to the bloodstream form trypanosomes, as demonstrated by the lethal phenotype induced by RNAi-mediated downregulation of its expression. In addition, glucose derivatives enter pyrimidine biosynthesis via oxaloacetate as a precursor to aspartate and orotate. PMID:25775470

  11. Overview of Fungal Infections - The Italian Experience.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Matteo; Righi, Elda

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of severe fungal infections has increased worldwide and represents a serious threat, especially among immunocompromised and critically ill patients. Most common pulmonary fungal infections include aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. Among nosocomial bloodstream infections, Candida spp. is the most common isolated fungus. Mortality rates up to 60% in critically ill patients with Candida infections and 90% in hematological patients with invasive aspergillosis are reported. Furthermore, fungal infections contribute to high morbidity and prolonged hospitalizations. Since standard cultural methods can show low sensitivity or provide delayed responses, new non-culture-dependent methods such as galactomannan ?-D-glucan are now available. Novel antifungal compounds (e.g., amphotericin B lipid formulations, last-generation azoles, and echinocandins) have been introduced in the recent years. Nevertheless, despite new advances the appropriate use of diagnostic assays along with a thorough therapeutic management remain the key to ensure an early appropriate targeted treatment that represents the crucial factor to attain a successful approach to severe fungal infections. PMID:26398544

  12. Growth of bloodstream and procyclic T. brucei colonies on agarose plates Vern B. Carruthers & Kevin Tan, Laboratory of Molecular Parasitology, Rockefeller University.

    E-print Network

    Cross, George

    a suspension of low melting temperature agarose (Type VII, Sigma Cat. # A4018) in a tissue culture media bottle and growth of bloodstream forms in liquid culture (see separate protocol). I have successfully grown three or possibly antibodies (not tested). Vern's original protocol (A) Preparation of 2X HMI-9--Dissolve powdered

  13. A Descriptive Study of Nosocomial Infections in an Adult Intensive Care Unit in Fiji: 2011-12

    PubMed Central

    Nabose, Ilisapeci; Ram, Sharan; Viney, Kerri; Graham, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial infections in an intensive care unit (ICU) are common and associated with a high mortality but there are no published data from the Oceania region. A retrospective study in Fiji's largest ICU (2011-12) reported that 114 of a total 663 adult ICU admissions had bacteriological culture-confirmed nosocomial infection. The commonest sites of infection were respiratory and bloodstream. Gram negative bacteria were the commonest pathogens isolated, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae (extended-spectrum ?-Lactamase-producing), Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas species. Mortality for those with a known outcome was 33%. Improved surveillance and implementation of effective preventive interventions are needed. PMID:25309601

  14. the bloodstream, producing a collection of symptoms such as a runny nose, itchy

    E-print Network

    Shoubridge, Eric

    immune systems that react against these substances. The body fights back by releasing a chemical called with the common cold or an ear or sinus infection and that confusion can keep E M P L O Y E E Open windows, longer reacts to allergens such as pollens, grass and airborne fungi. Approximately 20 percent of Canadians have

  15. Chlamydia Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... chlamydia can infect the urinary tract. In women, infection of the reproductive system can lead to pelvic ... Babies born to infected mothers can get eye infections and pneumonia from chlamydia. In men, chlamydia can ...

  16. Antifungal Susceptibility Profiles of Bloodstream Yeast Isolates by Sensititre YeastOne over Nine Years at a Large Italian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Posteraro, Brunella; Spanu, Teresa; Fiori, Barbara; De Maio, Flavio; De Carolis, Elena; Giaquinto, Alessia; Prete, Valentina; De Angelis, Giulia; Torelli, Riccardo; D'Inzeo, Tiziana; Vella, Antonietta; De Luca, Alessio; Tumbarello, Mario; Ricciardi, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Sensititre YeastOne (SYO) is an affordable alternative to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference method for antifungal susceptibility testing. In this study, the MICs of yeast isolates from 1,214 bloodstream infection episodes, generated by SYO during hospital laboratory activity (January 2005 to December 2013), were reanalyzed using current CLSI clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoff values to assign susceptibility (or the wild-type [WT] phenotype) to systemic antifungal agents. Excluding Candida albicans (57.4% of all isolates [n = 1,250]), the most predominant species were Candida parapsilosis complex (20.9%), Candida tropicalis (8.2%), Candida glabrata (6.4%), Candida guilliermondii (1.6%), and Candida krusei (1.3%). Among the non-Candida species (1.9%), 7 were Cryptococcus neoformans and 17 were other species, mainly Rhodotorula species. Over 97% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to amphotericin B and flucytosine. Rates of susceptibility (WT phenotype) to fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole were 98.7% in C. albicans, 92.3% in the C. parapsilosis complex, 96.1% in C. tropicalis, 92.5% in C. glabrata, 100% in C. guilliermondii, and 100% (excluding fluconazole) in C. krusei. The fluconazole-resistant isolates consisted of 6 C. parapsilosis complex isolates, 3 C. glabrata isolates, 2 C. albicans isolates, 2 C. tropicalis isolates, and 1 Candida lusitaniae isolate. Of the non-Candida isolates, 2 C. neoformans isolates had the non-WT phenotype for susceptibility to fluconazole, whereas Rhodotorula isolates had elevated azole MICs. Overall, 99.7% to 99.8% of Candida isolates were susceptible (WT phenotype) to echinocandins, but 3 isolates were nonsusceptible (either intermediate or resistant) to caspofungin (C. albicans, C. guilliermondii, and C. krusei), anidulafungin (C. albicans and C. guilliermondii), and micafungin (C. albicans). However, when the intrinsically resistant non-Candida isolates were included, the rate of echinocandin nonsusceptibility reached 1.8%. In summary, the SYO method proved to be able to detect yeast species showing antifungal resistance or reduced susceptibility. PMID:25896705

  17. Comparative activity of oritavancin against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream isolates from Geneva University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Vaudaux, Pierre; Huggler, Elzbieta; Arhin, Francis F; Moeck, Gregory; Renzoni, Adriana; Lew, Daniel P

    2009-12-01

    In this study, we assessed by broth microdilution the in vitro activity of oritavancin, a semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide currently under development, against selected meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream isolates (n=56) from Geneva University Hospital, Switzerland, displaying a wide range of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) (0.25-4 microg/mL). The MRSA resistance phenotype was confirmed by broth microdilution (oxacillin MIC > or = 4 microg/mL) for all isolates; 89% and 100% of the tested isolates were also resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin, respectively. For 53 MRSA isolates for which vancomycin MICs were in the susceptible range (0.5-2.0 microg/mL), the oritavancin MICs ranged from 0.03 microg/mL to 0.5 microg/mL. For these 53 vancomycin-susceptible isolates, the cumulative distribution of oritavancin MICs was markedly different from those of vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin and linezolid MICs, yielding an oritavancin MIC for 90% of the organisms (MIC(90)) (0.25 microg/mL) that was four times lower than the MIC(90) values (1 microg/mL) of comparators. For three MRSA isolates with a vancomycin-intermediate phenotype (vancomycin MIC=4 microg/mL), oritavancin MICs (0.5-1.0 microg/mL) were 2-4-fold lower than vancomycin, teicoplanin or daptomycin MICs, but were equivalent to linezolid MICs. Pairwise comparison for each bloodstream isolate showed that oritavancin was > or =4-fold more active than vancomycin, teicoplanin and daptomycin, against 86%, 75% and 59% of all MRSA isolates, respectively. PMID:19744838

  18. Mouse Model for Sublethal Leptospira interrogans Infection.

    PubMed

    Richer, Luciana; Potula, Hari-Hara; Melo, Rita; Vieira, Ana; Gomes-Solecki, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Although Leptospira can infect a wide range of mammalian species, most studies have been conducted in golden Syrian hamsters, a species particularly sensitive to acute disease. Chronic disease has been well characterized in the rat, one of the natural reservoir hosts. Studies in another asymptomatic reservoir host, the mouse, have occasionally been done and have limited infection to mice younger than 6 weeks of age. We analyzed the outcome of sublethal infection of C3H/HeJ mice older than age 10 weeks with Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni. Infection led to bloodstream dissemination of Leptospira, which was followed by urinary shedding, body weight loss, hypothermia, and colonization of the kidney by live spirochetes 2 weeks after infection. In addition, Leptospira dissemination triggered inflammation in the kidney but not in the liver or lung, as determined by increased levels of mRNA transcripts for the keratinocyte-derived chemokine, RANTES, macrophage inflammatory protein 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1?, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon in kidney tissue. The acquired humoral response to Leptospira infection led to the production of IgG mainly of the IgG1 subtype. Flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes from infected mice revealed that cellular expansion was primarily due to an increase in the levels of CD4(+) and double-negative T cells (not CD8(+) cells) and that CD4(+) T cells acquired a CD44(high) CD62L(low) effector phenotype not accompanied by increases in memory T cells. A mouse model for sublethal Leptospira infection allows understanding of the bacterial and host factors that lead to immune evasion, which can result in acute or chronic disease or resistance to infection (protection). PMID:26416909

  19. Chlorhexidine Bathing and Healthcare-Associated Infections: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Michael J.; Domenico, Henry J.; Byrne, Daniel W.; Talbot, Tom; Rice, Todd W.; Bernard, Gordon R.; Wheeler, Arthur P.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Daily bathing of critically ill patients with the broad spectrum, topical antimicrobial agent chlorhexidine is widely performed and may reduce healthcare-associated infections. Objective To determine if daily bathing of critically ill patients with chlorhexidine decreases the incidence of healthcare-associated infections. Design, setting, and participants A pragmatic cluster-randomized, cross-over study of 9,340 patients admitted to five adult intensive care units of a tertiary medical center in Nashville, Tennessee Intervention Units performed once-daily bathing of all patients with disposable cloths impregnated with 2% chlorhexidine or non-antimicrobial cloths as a control. Bathing treatments were performed for a 10-week period followed by a two-week washout period during which patients were bathed with non-antimicrobial disposable cloths, before crossover to the alternate bathing treatment for 10 weeks. Each unit crossed over between bathing assignments three times during the study Main Outcome and Measures The primary prespecified outcome was a composite of central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), and Clostridium difficile infections. Secondary outcomes included rates of clinical cultures positive for multi-drug resistant organisms, blood culture contamination, healthcare-associated bloodstream infections, and rates of the primary outcome by ICU. Results A total of 55 and 60 infections occurred during chlorhexidine and control bathing periods, respectively (4 and 4 CLABSI, 21 and 32 CAUTI, 17 and 8 VAP, 13 and 16 C. difficile infections, respectively, between chlorhexidine and control bathing periods). The primary outcome rate was 2.86 per 1000 patient-days and 2.90 per 1000 patient-days during chlorhexidine and control bathing periods, respectively (rate difference, ?0.04; 95% CI, ?1.09 to 1.01; P=0.95). After adjusting for baseline variables, no difference between groups in the rate of the primary outcome was detected. Chlorhexidine bathing did not change rates of infection-related secondary outcomes including hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, blood culture contamination, or clinical cultures yielding multi-drug resistant organisms. In a prespecified subgroup analysis, no difference in the primary outcome was detected in any individual ICU. Conclusion and Relevance In this pragmatic trial, daily bathing with chlorhexidine did not reduce the incidence of healthcare-associated infections including central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, ventilator-associated pneumonia, or C. difficile. These findings do not support daily bathing of critically ill patients with chlorhexidine. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02033187 PMID:25602496

  20. Novel Approaches to the Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment of Medical Device-Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Vergidis, Paschalis; Patel, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis The pathogenesis of device-associated infections is related to biofilm bacteria that exhibit distinct characteristics with respect to growth rate, structural features, and protection from host immune mechanisms when compared to planktonic counterparts. Biofilm-associated infections are prevented, diagnosed and treated differently than infections not associated with biofilms. This article reviews innovative concepts for the prevention of biofilm formation, such as use of antisense molecules, quorum-sensing inhibitors, and bacteriophages, and novel approaches for treatment, such as enhancement of antimicrobial activity against biofilm bacteria by use of electric current or ultrasound. Specific approaches for the diagnosis and prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract and bloodstream infections, infections associated with orthopedic implants, and cardiovascular implantable electronic devices, are also discussed. PMID:22284383

  1. Eye Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Your eyes can get infections from bacteria, fungi, or viruses. Eye infections can occur in different parts of the eye and can affect just one eye or both. Two common eye infections are Conjunctivitis - also known as pinkeye. Conjunctivitis is ...

  2. Staphylococcal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced "staff infections"), including ... Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder ...

  3. Staph Infections

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    ... Staph Infection? Staph is the shortened name for Staphylococcus (pronounced: staf-uh-low-KAH-kus), a type ... most staph infections are caused by the species Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) . Which of these infections do you ...

  4. Vaginal Infections

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    ... Two common vaginal infections are bacterial vaginosis and yeast infections . Bacterial vaginosis (BV) happens when a certain ... increases the chances that you’ll get BV. Yeast infections happen when a fungus (a type of ...

  5. The enzymes of the classical pentose phosphate pathway display differential activities in procyclic and bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Cronín, C N; Nolan, D P; Voorheis, H P

    1989-02-13

    The specific activities of each of the enzymes of the classical pentose phosphate pathway have been determined in both cultured procyclic and bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei. Both forms contained glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49), 6-phosphogluconolactonase (EC 3.1.1.31), 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.44), ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (EC 5.3.1.6) and transaldolase (EC 2.2.1.2). However, ribulose-5-phosphate 3'-epimerase (EC 5.1.3.1) and transketolase (EC 2.2.1.1) activities were detectable only in procyclic forms. These results clearly demonstrate that both forms of T. brucei can metabolize glucose via the oxidative segment of the classical pentose phosphate pathway in order to produce D-ribose-5-phosphate for the synthesis of nucleic acids and reduced NADP for other synthetic reactions. However, only procyclic forms are capable of using the non-oxidative segment of the classical pentose phosphate pathway to cycle carbon between pentose and hexose phosphates in order to produce D-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as a net product of the pathway. Both forms lack the key gluconeogenic enzyme, fructose-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). Consequently, neither form should be able to engage in gluconeogenesis nor should procyclic forms be able to return any of the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate produced in the pentose phosphate pathway to glucose 6-phosphate. This last specific metabolic arrangement and the restriction of all but the terminal steps of glycolysis to the glycosome may be the observations required to explain the presence of distinct cytosolic and glycosomal isoenzymes of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and phosphoglycerate kinase. These same observations also may provide the basis for explaining the presence of cytosolic hexokinase and phosphoglucose isomerase without the presence of any cytosolic phosphofructokinase activity. The key enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase (EC 4.2.1.12) and 2-keto-3-deoxy-6-phosphogluconate aldolase (EC 4.1.2.14) were not detected in either procyclic or bloodstream forms of T. brucei. PMID:2924907

  6. Use of an in vivo system to determine the G418 resistance phenotype of bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei brucei transfectants.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, N B; Muthiani, A M; Peregrine, A S

    1993-01-01

    We determined the level of susceptibility of Trypanosoma brucei brucei to the aminoglycoside G418 in vivo and demonstrated that it is possible to select for G418-resistant transfected T. brucei brucei bloodstream parasites in a mouse host by inoculating the drug intraperitoneally at doses between 40 and 80 mg/kg of body weight daily for 3 days. The ability to select for transfectants in vivo offers new possibilities for studies on genetic recombination in these parasites. Images PMID:8517708

  7. Genotyping of 353 Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Isolates Collected between 2004 and 2009 at a Norwegian University Hospital and Potential Associations with Clinical Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Blomfeldt, Anita; Eskesen, Arne N.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed 353 Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream isolates from 2004 to 2009 to identify dominant genotypes, changes over time, and associations between genotype, phenotype, and clinical parameters. The isolates were genotyped with regard to spa type and presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1-encoding genes. A high level of genetic diversity was detected. All but three isolates were methicillin sensitive. Interestingly, spa clonal complex 021 showed a weak association with higher all-cause hospital mortality. PMID:22785198

  8. Overview of nosocomial infections caused by gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Gaynes, Robert; Edwards, Jonathan R

    2005-09-15

    We analyzed data from the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System from 1986-2003 to determine the epidemiology of gram-negative bacilli in intensive care units (ICUs) for the most frequent types of hospital-acquired infection: pneumonia, surgical site infection (SSI), urinary tract infection (UTI), and bloodstream infection (BSI). We analyzed >410,000 bacterial isolates associated with hospital-acquired infections in ICUs during 1986-2003. In 2003, gram-negative bacilli were associated with 23.8% of BSIs, 65.2% of pneumonia episodes, 33.8% of SSIs, and 71.1% of UTIs. The percentage of BSIs associated with gram-negative bacilli decreased from 33.2% in 1986 to 23.8% in 2003. The percentage of SSIs associated with gram-negative bacilli decreased from 56.5% in 1986 to 33.8% in 2003. The percentages pneumonia episodes and UTIs associated with gram-negative bacilli remained constant during the study period. The proportion of ICU pneumonia episodes associated with Acinetobacter species increased from 4% in 1986 to 7.0% in 2003 (P<.001, by the Cochran-Armitage chi2 test for trend). Significant increases in resistance rates were uniformly seen for selected antimicrobial-pathogen combinations. Gram-negative bacilli are commonly associated with hospital-acquired infections in ICUs. The proportion of Acinetobacter species associated with ICU pneumonia increased from 4% in 1986 to 7.0% in 2003. PMID:16107985

  9. The within-host dynamics of African trypanosome infections

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Keith R.; McCulloch, Richard; Morrison, Liam J.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomes are single-celled protozoan parasites that are capable of long-term survival while living extracellularly in the bloodstream and tissues of mammalian hosts. Prolonged infections are possible because trypanosomes undergo antigenic variation—the expression of a large repertoire of antigenically distinct surface coats, which allows the parasite population to evade antibody-mediated elimination. The mechanisms by which antigen genes become activated influence their order of expression, most likely by influencing the frequency of productive antigen switching, which in turn is likely to contribute to infection chronicity. Superimposed upon antigen switching as a contributor to trypanosome infection dynamics is the density-dependent production of cell-cycle arrested parasite transmission stages, which limit the infection while ensuring parasite spread to new hosts via the bite of blood-feeding tsetse flies. Neither antigen switching nor developmental progression to transmission stages is driven by the host. However, the host can contribute to the infection dynamic through the selection of distinct antigen types, the influence of genetic susceptibility or trypanotolerance and the potential influence of host-dependent effects on parasite virulence, development of transmission stages and pathogenicity. In a zoonotic infection cycle where trypanosomes circulate within a range of host animal populations, and in some cases humans, there is considerable scope for a complex interplay between parasite immune evasion, transmission potential and host factors to govern the profile and outcome of infection. PMID:26150654

  10. The within-host dynamics of African trypanosome infections.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Keith R; McCulloch, Richard; Morrison, Liam J

    2015-08-19

    African trypanosomes are single-celled protozoan parasites that are capable of long-term survival while living extracellularly in the bloodstream and tissues of mammalian hosts. Prolonged infections are possible because trypanosomes undergo antigenic variation-the expression of a large repertoire of antigenically distinct surface coats, which allows the parasite population to evade antibody-mediated elimination. The mechanisms by which antigen genes become activated influence their order of expression, most likely by influencing the frequency of productive antigen switching, which in turn is likely to contribute to infection chronicity. Superimposed upon antigen switching as a contributor to trypanosome infection dynamics is the density-dependent production of cell-cycle arrested parasite transmission stages, which limit the infection while ensuring parasite spread to new hosts via the bite of blood-feeding tsetse flies. Neither antigen switching nor developmental progression to transmission stages is driven by the host. However, the host can contribute to the infection dynamic through the selection of distinct antigen types, the influence of genetic susceptibility or trypanotolerance and the potential influence of host-dependent effects on parasite virulence, development of transmission stages and pathogenicity. In a zoonotic infection cycle where trypanosomes circulate within a range of host animal populations, and in some cases humans, there is considerable scope for a complex interplay between parasite immune evasion, transmission potential and host factors to govern the profile and outcome of infection. PMID:26150654

  11. Development of a Clinical Data Warehouse for Hospital Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Mary F.; Kieszkowski, Piotr; Zagorski, Brandon M.; Trick, William E.; Sommers, Michael; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Existing data stored in a hospital's transactional servers have enormous potential to improve performance measurement and health care quality. Accessing, organizing, and using these data to support research and quality improvement projects are evolving challenges for hospital systems. The authors report development of a clinical data warehouse that they created by importing data from the information systems of three affiliated public hospitals. They describe their methodology; difficulties encountered; responses from administrators, computer specialists, and clinicians; and the steps taken to capture and store patient-level data. The authors provide examples of their use of the clinical data warehouse to monitor antimicrobial resistance, to measure antimicrobial use, to detect hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, to measure the cost of infections, and to detect antimicrobial prescribing errors. In addition, they estimate the amount of time and money saved and the increased precision achieved through the practical application of the data warehouse. PMID:12807807

  12. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  13. Characterization of Pneumococcal Genes Involved in Bloodstream Invasion in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Layla K.; Van der Hoek, Mark B.; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Paton, James C.; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) continues to account for significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, causing life-threatening diseases such as pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, as well as less serious infections such as sinusitis, conjunctivitis and otitis media. Current polysaccharide vaccines are strictly serotype-specific and also drive the emergence of non-vaccine serotype strains. In this study, we used microarray analysis to compare gene expression patterns of either serotype 4 or serotype 6A pneumococci in the nasopharynx and blood of mice, as a model to identify genes involved in invasion of blood in the context of occult bacteremia in humans. In this manner, we identified 26 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the nasopharynx and 36 genes that were significantly up-regulated in the blood that were common to both strains. Gene Ontology classification revealed that transporter and DNA binding (transcription factor) activities constitute the significantly different molecular functional categories for genes up-regulated in the nasopharynx and blood. Targeted mutagenesis of selected genes from both niches and subsequent virulence and pathogenesis studies identified the manganese-dependent superoxide dismutase (SodA) as most likely to be essential for colonization, and the cell wall-associated serine protease (PrtA) as important for invasion of blood. This work extends our previous analyses and suggests that both PrtA and SodA warrant examination in future studies aimed at prevention and/or control of pneumococcal disease. PMID:26539717

  14. Urine as a Specimen to Diagnose Infections in Twenty-First Century: Focus on Analytical Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Tuuminen, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Urine as a clinical specimen to diagnose infections has been used since ancient times. Many rapid technologies to assist diagnosis of infections are currently in use. Alongside traditional enzyme immunoassays (EIA), new technologies have emerged. Molecular analysis of transrenal DNA to diagnose infections is also a rapidly growing field. The majority of EIAs utilize the detection of excreted sugar compounds of the outer microbial cell-wall shed into the bloodstream and excreted into the urine. This mini-review focuses on current knowledge on rapid urinary antigen detection tests to diagnose most common infections, and highlights their diagnostic utility. The past and the future of urinalysis are also briefly discussed. The analysis of the literature shows that some methods are not quantitative, and analytical sensitivity may remain suboptimal. In addition, the performance criteria and technical documentation of some commercial tests are insufficient. Clinical microbiologists and physicians should be alert to assay limitations. PMID:22566927

  15. Predictive Factors for Metastatic Infection in Patients With Bacteremia Caused by Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumiya; Hosaka, Yumiko; Hoshina, Tokio; Tamura, Kumi; Nakaharai, Kazuhiko; Kato, Tetsuro; Nakazawa, Yasushi; Yoshida, Masaki; Hori, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Metastatic infections such as infective endocarditis and psoas abscess are serious complications of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia because failure to identify these infections may result in bacteremia relapse or poor prognosis. In the present study, we determined the predictive factors for metastatic infection due to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among patients with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia at the Jikei University Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012. Factors analyzed included the underlying disease, initial antimicrobial treatment and primary site of infection. Results: During the 5-year study period, 73 patients met the inclusion criteria and were assessed. The most common primary site of bacteremia was catheter-related bloodstream infection (25/73 [34.2%]). Metastatic infection occurred in 14 of 73 patients (19.2%) (infective endocarditis [3], septic pulmonary abscess [3], spondylitis [4], psoas abscess [4], epidural abscess [3] and septic arthritis [1]). Six patients had multiple metastatic infections. Multivariate analysis revealed that the predictive factors associated with the development of metastatic infection were a delay in appropriate antimicrobial treatment of >48 hours, persistent fever for >72 hours after starting antibiotic treatment and lowest C-reactive protein levels of >3 mg/dL during 2 weeks after the onset of bacteremia. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that additional diagnostic tests should be conducted to identify metastatic infection, particularly in patients with delayed antimicrobial treatment, persistent fever and persistently high C-reactive protein levels. PMID:25250988

  16. Giardia Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... water. Diarrhea is the main symptom of giardia infection. Others include Passing gas Greasy stools Stomach cramps ... people have no symptoms at all. Symptoms of infection often last two to six weeks. Stool sample ...

  17. Opportunistic Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Infections Opportunistic Infections and Their Relationship to HIV/AIDS People with healthy immune systems can be exposed ... Disease Dementia Hospitalization & Palliative Care Related Topics on AIDS.gov Signs and Symptoms Immune System 101 Stages ...

  18. Infection Control

    MedlinePLUS

    ... lost because of the spread of infections in hospitals. Health care workers can take steps to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective way ...

  19. Anaerobic Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... been associated with conditions like chronic ear infections, deep skin infections, and lung abscesses. Cultures can be ... Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be used as a substitute ...

  20. Rotavirus Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Rotavirus is a virus that causes gastroenteritis. Symptoms include severe diarrhea, vomiting, fever, and dehydration. Almost all ... the U.S. are likely to be infected with rotavirus before their 5th birthday. Infections happen most often ...

  1. Fatal skin and soft tissue infection of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Aqsa; Botha, John; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Acinetobacter baumannii is usually associated with respiratory tract, urinary tract and bloodstream infections. Recent reports suggest that it is increasingly causing skin and soft tissue infections. It is also evolving as a multidrug resistant organism that can be difficult to treat. We present a fatal case of multidrug resistant A. baumannii soft tissue infection and review of relevant literature. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 41 year old morbidly obese man, with history of alcoholic liver disease presented with left superficial pre-tibial abrasions and cellulitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) A. baumannii. In spite of early antibiotic administration he developed extensive myositis and fat necrosis requiring extensive and multiple surgical debridements. He deteriorated despite appropriate antibiotic therapy and multiple surgical interventions with development of multi-organ failure and died. DISCUSSION Managing Acinetobacter infections remains difficult due to the array of resistance and the pathogens ability to develop new and ongoing resistance. The early diagnosis of necrotizing soft tissue infection may be challenging, but the key to successful management of patients with necrotizing soft tissue infection are early recognition and complete surgical debridement. CONCLUSION A. baumannii is emerging as an important cause of severe, life-threatening soft tissue infections. Multidrug resistant A. baumannii soft tissue infections may carry a high mortality in spite of early and aggressive treatment. Clinicians need to consider appropriate early empirical antibiotic coverage or the use of combination therapy to include MDR A. baumannii as a cause of skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:25016080

  2. [Epidemiology of nosocomial bacterial infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Morocco].

    PubMed

    Maoulainine, F-M-R; Elidrissi, N-S; Chkil, G; Abba, F; Soraa, N; Chabaa, L; Amine, M; Aboussad, A

    2014-09-01

    In neonatal intensive care units, the incidence of nosocomial infection is high. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of a nosocomial bacterial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit of Mohamed VI university hospital. A total of 702 newborns were included in this study. Of the 702 neonates studied, 91 had developed a nosocomial infection. The incidence rate was 13% and incidence density was 21.2 per 1000 patient-days. The types of infection were: bloodstream infections (89%), pneumonia (6.6%), meningitis (3.3%), and urinary tract infections (1.1%). Nosocomial infection was particularly frequent in cases of low birth weight, prematurity, young age at admission, umbilical venous catheter, and mechanical ventilation. Multiresistant bacteria included enterobacteria producing betalactamase (76.9%), especially enterobacteria that were dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.7%). The mortality rate was 52.7% in nosocomial infections, 19 (20.87%) of whom had septic shock. The results of this study show that nosocomial infection is an intrahospital health problem that could be remedied by a prevention strategy. PMID:24993147

  3. State-mandated reporting of health care-associated infections in the United States: trends over time.

    PubMed

    Herzig, Carolyn T A; Reagan, Julie; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Srinath, Divya; Stone, Patricia W

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, most US states and territories began mandating that acute care hospitals report health care-associated infections (HAIs) to their departments of health. Trends in state HAI law enactment and data submission requirements were determined through systematic legal review; state HAI coordinators were contacted to confirm collected data. As of January 31, 2013, 37 US states and territories (71%) had adopted laws requiring HAI data submission, most of which were enacted and became effective in 2006 and 2007. Most states with HAI laws required reporting of central line-associated bloodstream infections in adult intensive care units (92%), and about half required reporting of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile infections (54% and 51%, respectively). Overall, data submission requirements were found to vary across states. Considering the facility and state resources needed to comply with HAI reporting mandates, future studies should focus on whether these laws have had the desired impact of reducing infection rates. PMID:24951104

  4. Detection of circulating parasite-derived microRNAs in filarial infections.

    PubMed

    Tritten, Lucienne; Burkman, Erica; Moorhead, Andrew; Satti, Mohammed; Geary, James; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-07-01

    Filarial nematodes cause chronic and profoundly debilitating diseases in both humans and animals. Applications of novel technology are providing unprecedented opportunities to improve diagnosis and our understanding of the molecular basis for host-parasite interactions. As a first step, we investigated the presence of circulating miRNAs released by filarial nematodes into the host bloodstream. miRNA deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics revealed over 200 mature miRNA sequences of potential nematode origin in Dirofilaria immitis-infected dog plasma in two independent analyses, and 21 in Onchocerca volvulus-infected human serum. Total RNA obtained from D. immitis-infected dog plasma was subjected to stem-loop RT-qPCR assays targeting two detected miRNA candidates, miR-71 and miR-34. Additionally, Brugia pahangi-infected dog samples were included in the analysis, as these miRNAs were previously detected in extracts prepared from this species. The presence of miR-71 and miR-34 discriminated infected samples (both species) from uninfected samples, in which no specific miRNA amplification occurred. However, absolute miRNA copy numbers were not significantly correlated with microfilaraemia for either parasite. This may be due to the imprecision of mf counts to estimate infection intensity or to miRNA contributions from the unknown number of adult worms present. Nonetheless, parasite-derived circulating miRNAs are found in plasma or serum even for those species that do not live in the bloodstream. PMID:25033073

  5. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections in Intensive Care Unit Patients.

    PubMed

    Tedja, Rudy; Wentink, Jean; O'Horo, John C; Thompson, Rodney; Sampathkumar, Priya

    2015-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To delineate the epidemiology of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) and to better understand the value of urine cultures for evaluation of fever in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting DESIGN Two-year retrospective review (2012-2013) SETTING A single tertiary center with 1,200 hospital beds and 158 adult ICU beds PATIENTS ICU patients with a CAUTI event METHODS The cohort was identified from a prospective infection prevention database. Charts were reviewed to characterize the patients. CAUTI rates and device utilization ratio (DUR) were calculated. Clinical outcomes were recorded. RESULTS A total of 105 CAUTIs were identified using the National Health and Safety Network (NHSN) definition. Fever was the primary indication for obtaining urine culture in 102 patients (97%). Of these 105 patients, 51 (51%) had an alternative infection to explain the fever, with pneumonia (55%) being the most common followed by bloodstream infection (22%). A total of 18 patients (18%) had fever due to noninfectious cause, and 32 patients (32%) had no alternative explanation. Of these, 66% received appropriate empiric antimicrobial therapy, but no targeted therapy changes were made based on urine culture results. The other 34% did not receive antimicrobial therapy at all. Only 6% of all CAUTIs resulted in blood cultures positive for the same organism within 2 days. The urinary tract was not definitely established as the source of bloodstream infection. CONCLUSIONS Urine cultures obtained for evaluation of fever form the basis for identification of CAUTIs in the ICU. However, most patients with CAUTIs are eventually found to have alternative explanations for fever. CAUTI is associated with a low complication rate. Infect. Control Hosp. Epidemiol. 2015;36(11):1330-1334. PMID:26190686

  6. Detection of Circulating Parasite-Derived MicroRNAs in Filarial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tritten, Lucienne; Burkman, Erica; Moorhead, Andrew; Satti, Mohammed; Geary, James; Mackenzie, Charles; Geary, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Filarial nematodes cause chronic and profoundly debilitating diseases in both humans and animals. Applications of novel technology are providing unprecedented opportunities to improve diagnosis and our understanding of the molecular basis for host-parasite interactions. As a first step, we investigated the presence of circulating miRNAs released by filarial nematodes into the host bloodstream. miRNA deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics revealed over 200 mature miRNA sequences of potential nematode origin in Dirofilaria immitis-infected dog plasma in two independent analyses, and 21 in Onchocerca volvulus-infected human serum. Total RNA obtained from D. immitis-infected dog plasma was subjected to stem-loop RT-qPCR assays targeting two detected miRNA candidates, miR-71 and miR-34. Additionally, Brugia pahangi-infected dog samples were included in the analysis, as these miRNAs were previously detected in extracts prepared from this species. The presence of miR-71 and miR-34 discriminated infected samples (both species) from uninfected samples, in which no specific miRNA amplification occurred. However, absolute miRNA copy numbers were not significantly correlated with microfilaraemia for either parasite. This may be due to the imprecision of mf counts to estimate infection intensity or to miRNA contributions from the unknown number of adult worms present. Nonetheless, parasite-derived circulating miRNAs are found in plasma or serum even for those species that do not live in the bloodstream. PMID:25033073

  7. The essential neutral sphingomyelinase is involved in the trafficking of the variant surface glycoprotein in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon A; Smith, Terry K

    2010-01-01

    Sphingomyelin is the main sphingolipid in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. In vitro and in vivo characterization of the T. brucei neutral sphingomyelinase demonstrates that it is directly involved in sphingomyelin catabolism. Gene knockout studies in the bloodstream form of the parasite indicate that the neutral sphingomyelinase is essential for growth and survival, thus highlighting that the de novo biosynthesis of ceramide is unable to compensate for the loss of sphingomyelin catabolism. The phenotype of the conditional knockout has given new insights into the highly active endocytic and exocytic pathways in the bloodstream form of T. brucei. Hence, the formation of ceramide in the endoplasmic reticulum affects post-Golgi sorting and rate of deposition of newly synthesized GPI-anchored variant surface glycoprotein on the cell surface. This directly influences the corresponding rate of endocytosis, via the recycling endosomes, of pre-existing cell surface variant surface glycoprotein. The trypanosomes use this coupled endocytic and exocytic mechanism to maintain the cell density of its crucial variant surface glycoprotein protective coat. TbnSMase is therefore genetically validated as a drug target against African trypanosomes, and suggests that interfering with the endocytic transport of variant surface glycoprotein is a highly desirable strategy for drug development against African trypanosomasis. PMID:20398210

  8. A cell-body groove housing the new flagellum tip suggests an adaptation of cellular morphogenesis for parasitism in the bloodstream form of Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Louise; Towers, Katie; Starborg, Tobias; Gull, Keith; Vaughan, Sue

    2013-12-15

    Flagella are highly conserved organelles present in a wide variety of species. In Trypanosoma brucei the single flagellum is necessary for morphogenesis, cell motility and pathogenesis, and is attached along the cell body. A new flagellum is formed alongside the old during the cell division cycle. In the (insect) procyclic form, the flagella connector (FC) attaches the tip of the new flagellum to the side of the old flagellum, ensuring faithful replication of cell architecture. The FC is not present in the bloodstream form of the parasite. We show here, using new imaging techniques including serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM), that the distal tip of the new flagellum in the bloodstream form is embedded within an invagination in the cell body plasma membrane, named the groove. We suggest that the groove has a similar function to the flagella connector. The groove is a mobile junction located alongside the microtubule quartet (MtQ) and occurred within a gap in the subpellicular microtubule corset, causing significant modification of microtubules during elongation of the new flagellum. It appears likely that this novel form of morphogenetic structure has evolved to withstand the hostile immune response in the mammalian blood. PMID:24127564

  9. [Obesity as pathology of adipocytes: number of cells, volume of arterial bloodstream,local pools of circulation in vivo, natriuretic peptides and arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Dmitriev, V A

    2015-03-01

    The non-specific systemic biological reaction of arterial pressure from the level of organism. vasomotor center and proximal section of arterial bloodstream is appealed to compensate disorders of metabolism and microcirculation in distal section of arteries. This phenomenon occurs in several cases. The primarily local disorders of metabolism at autocrine level, physiological (aphysiological) death of cells, "littering" of intercellular medium become the cause of disorder of microcirculation in paracrin cenosises and deteriorate realization of biological functions of homeostasis, trophology, endoecology and adaptation. The local compensation of affected perfusion in paracrin cenosises at the expense of function of peripheral peristaltic pumps, redistribution of local bloodflow in biological reaction of endothelium-depended vaso-dilation has no possibility to eliminate disorders in realization of biological functions. The systemic increase of arterial pressure under absence of specific symptoms of symptomatic arterial hypertension is a test to detect disorder of biological functions of homeostasis, trophology, biological function of endoecology and adaptation. Allforms of arterial hypertension develop by common algorithm independently from causes of disorders of blood flow, microcirculation in distal section of arteries. The non-specific systemic compensation ofdisorders of metabolism from level of organism, in proximal section of arterial bloodstream always is the same one and results in aphysiological alterations in organs-targets. To comprehend etiological characteristics of common pathogenesis of arterial hypertension is possible in case of application of such technically complicated and still unclear in differential diagnostic of deranged functions modes of metabolomics. PMID:26031157

  10. Replacing paper data collection forms with electronic data entry in the field: findings from a study of community-acquired bloodstream infections in Pemba, Zanzibar

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Entering data on case report forms and subsequently digitizing them in electronic media is the traditional way to maintain a record keeping system in field studies. Direct data entry using an electronic device avoids this two-step process. It is gaining in popularity and has replaced the paper-based data entry system in many studies. We report our experiences with paper- and PDA-based data collection during a fever surveillance study in Pemba Island, Zanzibar, Tanzania. Methods Data were collected on a 14-page case report paper form in the first period of the study. The case report paper forms were then replaced with handheld computers (personal digital assistants or PDAs). The PDAs were used for screening and clinical data collection, including a rapid assessment of patient eligibility, real time errors, and inconsistency checking. Results A comparison of paper-based data collection with PDA data collection showed that direct data entry via PDA was faster and 25% cheaper. Data was more accurate (7% versus 1% erroneous data) and omission did not occur with electronic data collection. Delayed data turnaround times and late error detections in the paper-based system which made error corrections difficult were avoided using electronic data collection. Conclusions Electronic data collection offers direct data entry at the initial point of contact. It has numerous advantages and has the potential to replace paper-based data collection in the field. The availability of information and communication technologies for direct data transfer has the potential to improve the conduct of public health research in resource-poor settings. PMID:22353420

  11. Campylobacter infection

    MedlinePLUS

    Food poisoning - campylobacter enteritis; Infectious diarrhea - campylobacter enteritis; Bacterial diarrhea; Campy ... also one of the many causes of traveler's diarrhea or food poisoning . People most often get infected ...

  12. Infections after lung transplantation: time of occurrence, sites, and microbiologic etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Ji Hyun; Jo, Kyung-Wook; Choi, Se Hoon; Lee, Jina; Chae, Eun Jin; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Choi, Dae-Kee; Choi, In-Cheol; Hong, Sang-Bum; Shim, Tae Sun; Kim, Hyeong Ryul; Kim, Dong Kwan; Park, Seung-Il

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Infections are major causes of both early and late death after lung transplantation (LT). The development of prophylaxis strategies has altered the epidemiology of post-LT infections; however, recent epidemiological data are limited. We evaluated infections after LT at our institution by time of occurrence, site of infections, and microbiologic etiologies. Methods All consecutive patients undergoing lung or heart-lung transplantation between October 2008 and August 2014 at our institution were enrolled. Cases of infections after LT were initially identified from the prospective registry database, which was followed by a detailed review of the patients' medical records. Results A total of 108 episodes of post-LT infections (56 bacterial, 43 viral, and nine fungal infections) were observed in 34 LT recipients. Within 1 month after LT, the most common bacterial infections were catheter-related bloodstream infections (42%). Pneumonia was the most common site of bacterial infection in the 2- to 6-month period (28%) and after 6 months (47%). Cytomegalovirus was the most common viral infection within 1 month (75%) and in the 2- to 6-month period (80%). Respiratory viruses were the most common viruses after 6 months (48%). Catheter-related candidemia was the most common fungal infection. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis developed after 6 months. Survival rates at the first and third years were 79% and 73%, respectively. Conclusions Although this study was performed in a single center, we provide valuable and recent detailed epidemiology data for post-LT infections. A further multicenter study is required to properly evaluate the epidemiology of post-LT infections in Korea. PMID:26161017

  13. Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Urinary Tract Infections KidsHealth > Teens > Infections > Common Infections > Urinary Tract Infections ... especially girls — visit a doctor. What Is a Urinary Tract Infection? A bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI) is the ...

  14. Ear Infections in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ear Infections, and Deafness Ear Infections in Children Ear Infections in Children On this page: What is ... additional information about ear infections? What is an ear infection? An ear infection is an inflammation of ...

  15. Coronavirus Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Coronaviruses are common viruses that most people get some time in their life. They are common throughout the world, and they can infect people and animals. Several different coronaviruses can infect people and make them sick. They usually cause mild to moderate ...

  16. Salmonella Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infections with bacteria of the genus Salmonella are responsible for both acute and chronic poultry diseases. These diseases cause economically significant losses for poultry producers in many nations and absorb large investments of public and private resources in testing and control efforts. Infect...

  17. 78 FR 48175 - Retrospective Review of Draft Guidance Documents Issued Before 2010; Withdrawal of Guidances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ...prostatitis, bacterial vaginosis, catheter-related bloodstream infections...pharyngitis and tonsillitis, uncomplicated urinary tract infections, and vuvlovaginal...issued July 1998. 17. ``Catheter-Related Bloodstream...

  18. Nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit: Incidence, risk factors, outcome and associated pathogens in a public tertiary teaching hospital of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Sugata; Das, Soumi; Chawan, Neeraj S.; Hazra, Avijit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The increased morbidity and mortality associated with nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) is a matter of serious concern today. Aims: To determine the incidence of nosocomial infections acquired in the ICU, their risk factors, the causative pathogens and the outcome in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 12 bedded combined medical and surgical ICU of a medical college hospital. The study group comprised 242 patients admitted for more than 48 h in the ICU. Data were collected regarding severity of the illness, primary reason for ICU admission, presence of risk factors, presence of infection, infecting agent, length of ICU and hospital stay, and survival status and logistic regression analysis was done. Results: The nosocomial infection rate was 11.98% (95% confidence interval 7.89–16.07%). Pneumonia was the most frequently detected infection (62.07%), followed by urinary tract infections and central venous catheter associated bloodstream infections. Prior antimicrobial therapy, urinary catheterization and length of ICU stay were found to be statistically significant risk factors associated with nosocomial infection. Nosocomial infection resulted in a statistically significant increase in length of ICU and hospital stay, but not in mortality. Conclusion: Nosocomial infections increase morbidity of hospitalized patients. These findings can be utilized for planning nosocomial infection surveillance program in our setting. PMID:25624645

  19. Multistate Point-Prevalence Survey of Health Care–Associated Infections

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Shelley S.; Edwards, Jonathan R.; Bamberg, Wendy; Beldavs, Zintars G.; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Kainer, Marion A.; Lynfield, Ruth; Maloney, Meghan; McAllister-Hollod, Laura; Nadle, Joelle; Ray, Susan M.; Thompson, Deborah L.; Wilson, Lucy E.; Fridkin, Scott K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Currently, no single U.S. surveillance system can provide estimates of the burden of all types of health care–associated infections across acute care patient populations. We conducted a prevalence survey in 10 geographically diverse states to determine the prevalence of health care–associated infections in acute care hospitals and generate updated estimates of the national burden of such infections. METHODS We defined health care–associated infections with the use of National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One-day surveys of randomly selected inpatients were performed in participating hospitals. Hospital personnel collected demographic and limited clinical data. Trained data collectors reviewed medical records retrospectively to identify health care–associated infections active at the time of the survey. Survey data and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample data, stratified according to patient age and length of hospital stay, were used to estimate the total numbers of health care–associated infections and of inpatients with such infections in U.S. acute care hospitals in 2011. RESULTS Surveys were conducted in 183 hospitals. Of 11,282 patients, 452 had 1 or more health care–associated infections (4.0%; 95% confidence interval, 3.7 to 4.4). Of 504 such infections, the most common types were pneumonia (21.8%), surgical-site infections (21.8%), and gastrointestinal infections (17.1%). Clostridium difficile was the most commonly reported pathogen (causing 12.1% of health care–associated infections). Device-associated infections (i.e., central-catheter–associated bloodstream infection, catheter-associated urinary tract infection, and ventilator-associated pneumonia), which have traditionally been the focus of programs to prevent health care–associated infections, accounted for 25.6% of such infections. We estimated that there were 648,000 patients with 721,800 health care–associated infections in U.S. acute care hospitals in 2011. CONCLUSIONS Results of this multistate prevalence survey of health care–associated infections indicate that public health surveillance and prevention activities should continue to address C. difficile infections. As device- and procedure-associated infections decrease, consideration should be given to expanding surveillance and prevention activities to include other health care–associated infections. PMID:24670166

  20. Cluster of Cryptococcus neoformans Infections in Intensive Care Unit, Arkansas, USA, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Haselow, Dirk; Lloyd, Spencer; Lockhart, Shawn; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Lester, Laura; Wheeler, Gary; Gladden, Linda; Garner, Kelley; Derado, Gordana; Park, Benjamin; Harris, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated an unusual cluster of 6 patients with Cryptococcus neoformans infection at a community hospital in Arkansas during April–December 2013, to determine source of infection. Four patients had bloodstream infection and 2 had respiratory infection; 3 infections occurred within a 10-day period. Five patients had been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with diagnoses other than cryptococcosis; none had HIV infection, and 1 patient had a history of organ transplantation. We then conducted a retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to the ICU during April–December 2013 to determine risk factors for cryptococcosis. Four patients with C. neoformans infection had received a short course of steroids; this short-term use was associated with increased risk for cryptococcosis (rate ratio 19.1; 95% CI 2.1–170.0; p<0.01). Although long-term use of steroids is a known risk factor for cryptococcosis, the relationship between short-term steroid use and disease warrants further study PMID:26403080

  1. Tackling antibiotic resistance in febrile neutropenia: current challenges with and recommendations for managing infections with resistant Gram-negative organisms.

    PubMed

    Nouér, Simone A; Nucci, Marcio; Anaissie, Elias

    2015-10-01

    Multidrug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) have emerged as important pathogens and a serious challenge in the management of neutropenic patients worldwide. The great majority of infections are caused by the Enterobacteriaceae (especially Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp.) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and less frequently Acinetobacter spp. and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. A broader-spectrum empiric antibiotic regimen is usually recommended in patients with a history of prior bloodstream infection caused by a MDR GNB, in those colonized by a MDR GNB, and if MDR GNBs are frequently isolated in the initial blood cultures. In any situation, de-escalation to standard empiric regimen is advised if infection with MDR GNB is not documented. PMID:26115679

  2. Yeast Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Candida is the scientific name for yeast. It is a fungus that lives almost everywhere, including in ... infection that causes white patches in your mouth Candida esophagitis is thrush that spreads to your esophagus, ...

  3. Hand Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spread to others. Necrotizing Fasciitis, or “Flesh-Eating Bacteria” Necrotizing fasciitis is a very rare but severe infection. Streptococcus pyogenes or other “flesh-eating bacteria” enter the body through a cut. Bacteria toxins ...

  4. Mycobacterial Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... many different kinds. The most common one causes tuberculosis. Another one causes leprosy. Still others cause infections ... aren't "typical" because they don't cause tuberculosis. But they can still harm people, especially people ...

  5. Norovirus Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Noroviruses are a group of related viruses. Infection with these viruses causes an illness called gastroenteritis, an inflammation of the stomach and intestines. It can spread from person to person, or ...

  6. Hantavirus Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breathe infected air or come into contact with rodents or their urine or droppings. You cannot catch ... symptoms include coughing and shortness of breath. Controlling rodents in and around your house is the best ...

  7. Shigella Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC E. Coli Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature Cholera What ... Hands? Cholera Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea Shigellosis Salmonellosis E. Coli Contact Us Print Additional resources Send to a ...

  8. Neonatal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hospital. Back Continue E. Coli What is it? Escherichia coli (E. coli) is another bacterial culprit behind some ... at home. Most newborns who become ill from E. coli infection have particularly fragile immune systems that make them ...

  9. Breast infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... breastfeeding. Breast infections that are not related to breastfeeding might be a rare form of breast cancer . ... may be cultured. In women who are not breastfeeding, tests may include: Breast biopsy Breast MRI Breast ultrasound Mammogram

  10. Oral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Stolman, Lewis P.

    1976-01-01

    This article reviews and discusses recognition and management of eight common primary infections of the mouth: thrush, perlèche, warts, necrotizing gingivitis, aphthous ulcers, herpes simplex, herpangina and syphilis. PMID:21308082

  11. Campylobacter Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... household pets , most often puppies, cats, hamsters and birds. Infection can also spread by person-to-person ... with the feces of dogs, cats, hamsters, and birds. Wash your hands carefully after touching the underclothes ...

  12. Ear Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Ear Infections Overview How does the ear work? The ear works by receiving sound waves and sending messages to the brain. The outer ear includes the part of the ear you can ...

  13. Biofilms formed by Candida albicans bloodstream isolates display phenotypic and transcriptional heterogeneity that are associated with resistance and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans infections have become increasingly recognised as being biofilm related. Recent studies have shown that there is a relationship between biofilm formation and poor clinical outcomes in patients infected with biofilm proficient strains. Here we have investigated a panel of clinical isolates in an attempt to evaluate their phenotypic and transcriptional properties in an attempt to differentiate and define levels of biofilm formation. Results Biofilm formation was shown to be heterogeneous; with isolates being defined as either high or low biofilm formers (LBF and HBF) based on different biomass quantification. These categories could also be differentiated using a cell surface hydrophobicity assay with 24 h biofilms. HBF isolates were more resistance to amphotericin B (AMB) treatment than LBF, but not voriconazole (VRZ). In a Galleria mellonella model of infection HBF mortality was significantly increased in comparison to LBF. Histological analysis of the HBF showed hyphal elements intertwined indicative of the biofilm phenotype. Transcriptional analysis of 23 genes implicated in biofilm formation showed no significant differential expression profiles between LBF and HBF, except for Cdr1 at 4 and 24 h. Cluster analysis showed similar patterns of expression for different functional classes of genes, though correlation analysis of the 4 h biofilms with overall biomass at 24 h showed that 7 genes were correlated with high levels of biofilm, including Als3, Eap1, Cph1, Sap5, Plb1, Cdr1 and Zap1. Conclusions Our findings show that biofilm formation is variable amongst C. albicans isolates, and categorising isolates depending on this can be used to predict how pathogenic the isolate will behave clinically. We have shown that looking at individual genes in less informative than looking at multiple genes when trying to categorise isolates at LBF or HBF. These findings are important when developing biofilm-specific diagnostics as these could be used to predict how best to treat patients infected with C. albicans. Further studies are required to evaluate this clinically. PMID:24996549

  14. Body surface infrared thermometry in patients with central venous cateter-related infections.

    PubMed

    Silvah, José Henrique; Lima, Cristiane Maria Mártires de; Unamuno, Maria do Rosário Del Lama de; Schetino, Marco Antônio Alves; Schetino, Luana Pereira Leite; Fassini, Priscila Giácomo; Brandão, Camila Fernanda Costa E Cunha Moraes; Basile-Filho, Anibal; Cunha, Selma Freire Carvalho da; Marchini, Julio Sergio

    2015-09-01

    Objective To evaluate if body surface temperature close to the central venous catheter insertion area is different when patients develop catheter-related bloodstream infections.Methods Observational cross-sectional study. Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, 3 consecutive measurements of body surface temperature were collected from 39 patients with central venous catheter on the following sites: nearby the catheter insertion area or totally implantable catheter reservoir, the equivalent contralateral region (without catheter), and forehead of the same subject.Results A total of 323 observations were collected. Respectively, both in male and female patients, disregarding the occurrence of infection, the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the contralateral region (mean ± standard deviation: -0.3±0.6°C versus-0.2±0.5ºC; p=0.36), and the mean temperature on the catheter area minus that on the forehead (mean ± standard deviation: -0.2±0.5°C versus-0.1±0.5ºC; p=0.3) resulted in negative values. Moreover, in infected patients, higher values were obtained on the catheter area (95%CI: 36.6-37.5ºC versus 36.3-36.5ºC; p<0.01) and by temperature subtractions: catheter area minus contralateral region (95%CI: -0.17 - +0.33ºC versus -0.33 - -0.20ºC; p=0.02) and catheter area minus forehead (95%CI: -0.02 - +0.55ºC versus-0.22 - -0.10ºC; p<0.01).Conclusion Using a non-contact infrared thermometer, patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections had higher temperature values both around catheter insertion area and in the subtraction of the temperatures on the contralateral and forehead regions from those on the catheter area. PMID:26466058

  15. Bacterial Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Balletto, Elisa; Mikulska, Ma?gorzata

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are major complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT). They consist mainly of bloodstream infections (BSI), followed by pneumonia and gastrointestinal infections, including typhlitis and Clostridium difficile infection. Microbiological data come mostly from BSI. Coagulase negative staphylococci and Enterobacteriaceae are the most frequent pathogens causing approximately 25% of BSI each, followed by enterococci, P. aeruginosa and viridans streptococci. Bacterial pneumonia is frequent after HSCT, and Gram-negatives are predominant. Clostridium difficile infection affects approximately 15% of HSCT recipients, being more frequent in case of allogeneic than autologous HSCT. The epidemiology and the prevalence of resistant strains vary significantly between transplant centres. In some regions, multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative rods are increasingly frequent. In others, vancomycin-resistant enterococci are predominant. In the era of increasing resistance to antibiotics, the efficacy of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and standard treatment of febrile neutropenia have been questioned. Therefore, a thorough evaluation of local epidemiology is mandatory to decide the need for prophylaxis and the choice of the best regimen for empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia. For the latter, individualised approach has been proposed, consisting of either escalation or de-escalation strategy. De-escalation strategy is recommended since resistant bacteria should be covered upfront, mainly in patients with severe clinical presentation and previous infection or colonisation with a resistant pathogen. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as screening for resistant bacteria, applying isolation and contact precautions should be put in place to limit the spread of MDR bacteria. Antimicrobial stewardship program should be implemented in transplant centres. PMID:26185610

  16. Cerebral infections.

    PubMed

    Karampekios, Spyros; Hesselink, John

    2005-03-01

    Despite the development of many effective antibiotic therapies and the general improvement in hygiene and health care systems all over the world, the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) infection has increased significantly in the past 15 years. This can be attributed primarily to the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic and its devastating effect on the immune system and secondarily to various immunosuppressive agents that are being used in aggressive cancer treatment and in organ transplantations. The brain particularly is protected from infection by the calvarium, meninges and blood brain barrier. However, different types of pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, can reach the brain hematogenously or, less likely, by direct extension from an adjacent infected focus. The early detection and specific diagnosis of infection are of great importance, since brain infections are potentially treatable diseases. Imaging studies play a crucial role in the diagnostic process, along with the history (exposure to infectious agents), host factors (open head trauma, CSF leak, sinusitis, otitis, immune status), physical examination and laboratory analysis of CSF. PMID:15627191

  17. Incidence and Pathogen Distribution of Healthcare-Associated Infections in Pilot Hospitals in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    See, Isaac; Lessa, Fernanda C.; ElAta, Omar Abo; Hafez, Soad; Samy, Karim; El-Kholy, Amani; El Anani, Mervat Gaber; Ismail, Ghada; Kandeel, Amr; Galal, Ramy; Ellingson, Katherine; Talaat, Maha

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report type and rates of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) as well as pathogen distribution and antimicrobial resistance patterns from a pilot HAI surveillance system in Egypt. Methods Prospective surveillance was conducted from April 2011–March 2012 in 46 intensive care units (ICUs) in Egypt. Definitions were adapted from the CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network. Trained healthcare workers identified HAIs and recorded data on clinical symptoms and up to four pathogens. A convenience sample of clinical isolates was tested for antimicrobial resistance at a central reference laboratory. Multidrug resistance was defined by international consensus criteria. Results ICUs from 11 hospitals collected 90,515 patient-days of surveillance data. Of 472 HAIs identified, 47% were pneumonia, 22% were bloodstream infections, and 15% were urinary tract infections; case fatality among HAI case-patients was 43%. The highest rate of device-associated infections was reported for ventilator-associated pneumonia (pooled mean rate: 7.47 VAP/1,000 ventilator-days). The most common pathogens reported were Acinetobacter spp. (21.8%) and Klebsiella spp. (18.4%). All Acinetobacter spp. isolates tested (31/31) were multidrug-resistant, and 71% (17/24) of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were extended spectrum beta-lactamase producers. Conclusions Infection control priorities in Egypt should include preventing pneumonia and preventing infections due to antimicrobial-resistant pathogens. PMID:24225613

  18. [Legionella infections].

    PubMed

    Fleurette, J

    1983-01-01

    The authors review the bacteriological features of Legionella infections, their clinical symptoms and the methods of diagnosis. They stress the unusual ecological features of Legionella which generally lives in natural water reservoirs or in artificial reservoirs (drinking water piping, air conditioning). In the clinical situation, current emphasis is on the extrapulmonary infections whose pathogenesis has not yet been fully explained. The incidence and prevalence of Legionella in pneumonia still needs to be defined. The methods of bacteriological and serological diagnosis are described as well as the ways of interpreting the results. PMID:6666882

  19. Fungal nail infection

    MedlinePLUS

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  20. Paratyphoid Infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The numerous motile members of the bacterial genus Salmonella are collectively referred to as paratyphoid (PT) salmonellae. Found throughout the world, these organisms infect a wide variety of hosts (including invertebrate and vertebrate wildlife, domestic animals, and humans) to yield either asympt...

  1. Tinea Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Tinea is the name of a group of diseases caused by a fungus. Types of tinea include ringworm, athlete's foot and jock itch. These infections are ... depend on the affected area of the body: Ringworm is a red skin rash that forms a ...

  2. Bacterial Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  3. Giardia infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on surfaces that have come into contact with animal or human waste. You may become infected if you: Are exposed to a family member with giardiasis Drink water from lakes or streams where animals such as beavers and muskrats, or domestic animals ...

  4. Streptococcal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disease) Group B strep can cause blood infections, pneumonia and meningitis in newborns. A screening test during pregnancy can tell if you have it. If you do, I.V. antibiotics during labor can save your baby's ... and pneumonia in adults. Antibiotics are used to treat strep ...

  5. Transient Loss of Protection Afforded by a Live Attenuated Non-typhoidal Salmonella Vaccine in Mice Co-infected with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Lokken, Kristen L.; Nanton, Minelva R.; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; McSorley, Stephen J.; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2015-01-01

    In immunocompetent individuals, non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars (NTS) are associated with gastroenteritis, however, there is currently an epidemic of NTS bloodstream infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Plasmodium falciparum malaria is an important risk factor for invasive NTS bloodstream in African children. Here we investigated whether a live, attenuated Salmonella vaccine could be protective in mice, in the setting of concurrent malaria. Surprisingly, mice acutely infected with the nonlethal malaria parasite Plasmodium yoelii 17XNL exhibited a profound loss of protective immunity to NTS, but vaccine-mediated protection was restored after resolution of malaria. Absence of protective immunity during acute malaria correlated with maintenance of antibodies to NTS, but a marked reduction in effector capability of Salmonella-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells. Further, increased expression of the inhibitory molecule PD1 was identified on memory CD4 T cells induced by vaccination. Blockade of IL-10 restored protection against S. Typhimurium, without restoring CD4 T cell effector function. Simultaneous blockade of CTLA-4, LAG3, and PDL1 restored IFN-? production by vaccine-induced memory CD4 T cells but was not sufficient to restore protection. Together, these data demonstrate that malaria parasite infection induces a temporary loss of an established adaptive immune response via multiple mechanisms, and suggest that in the setting of acute malaria, protection against NTS mediated by live vaccines may be interrupted. PMID:26366739

  6. Accuracy of administrative data for surveillance of healthcare-associated infections: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Mourik, Maaike S M; van Duijn, Pleun Joppe; Moons, Karel G M; Bonten, Marc J M; Lee, Grace M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Measuring the incidence of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) is of increasing importance in current healthcare delivery systems. Administrative data algorithms, including (combinations of) diagnosis codes, are commonly used to determine the occurrence of HAI, either to support within-hospital surveillance programmes or as free-standing quality indicators. We conducted a systematic review evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of administrative data for the detection of HAI. Methods Systematic search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL and Cochrane for relevant studies (1995–2013). Methodological quality assessment was performed using QUADAS-2 criteria; diagnostic accuracy estimates were stratified by HAI type and key study characteristics. Results 57 studies were included, the majority aiming to detect surgical site or bloodstream infections. Study designs were very diverse regarding the specification of their administrative data algorithm (code selections, follow-up) and definitions of HAI presence. One-third of studies had important methodological limitations including differential or incomplete HAI ascertainment or lack of blinding of assessors. Observed sensitivity and positive predictive values of administrative data algorithms for HAI detection were very heterogeneous and generally modest at best, both for within-hospital algorithms and for formal quality indicators; accuracy was particularly poor for the identification of device-associated HAI such as central line associated bloodstream infections. The large heterogeneity in study designs across the included studies precluded formal calculation of summary diagnostic accuracy estimates in most instances. Conclusions Administrative data had limited and highly variable accuracy for the detection of HAI, and their judicious use for internal surveillance efforts and external quality assessment is recommended. If hospitals and policymakers choose to rely on administrative data for HAI surveillance, continued improvements to existing algorithms and their robust validation are imperative. PMID:26316651

  7. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Listeria Infections KidsHealth > Parents > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Listeria ... Preventing Listeriosis When to Call the Doctor About Listeria Listeria infections (known as listeriosis ) are rare. When ...

  8. Who Gets Fungal Infections?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infections can also happen in people without weak immune systems Fungal infections that are not life-threatening, such ... likely to cause an infection. People with weak immune systems Infections that happen because a person’s immune system ...

  9. Stages of HIV Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... HIV Infection Translate Text Size Print Stages of HIV Infection How Does HIV Progress In Your Body? Without treatment, HIV advances ... are the three stages of HIV infection: Acute HIV Infection Stage Within 2-4 weeks after HIV ...

  10. Urinary tract infection - adults

    MedlinePLUS

    Bladder infection - adults; UTI - adults; Cystitis - bacterial - adults; Pyelonephritis - adults; Kidney infection - adults ... Most urinary tract infections are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and then the bladder. The infection most commonly develops ...

  11. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Meeting Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News media ... who suffer from the most common type of ear infection, called middle ear infection or otitis media ( ...

  12. Yeast Infection (Candidiasis)

    MedlinePLUS

    newsletter | contact Share | Yeast Infection (Candidiasis) Information for adults A A A This is a candida (yeast) infection of the skin folds of the abdomen. Overview Candidiasis, commonly known as a yeast infection, is an infection with the common yeast ( ...

  13. Prevention of central venous catheter-related infection in the neonatal unit: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jacqueline E; McDonald, Susan J; Tan, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    Central venous catheter infections are the leading cause of healthcare-associated bloodstream infections and contribute significantly to mortality and morbidity in neonatal intensive care units. Moreover, infection poses significant economic consequence which increased hospital costs and increased length of hospital stay. Prevention strategies are detailed in guidelines published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States; nevertheless, recent surveys in neonatal units in the United States, and Australia and New Zealand demonstrate these are not always followed. This review discusses the numerous evidence-based strategies to prevent catheter infections including hand hygiene, maximal sterile barriers during insertion, skin disinfection, selection of insertion site, dressings, aseptic non-touch technique, disinfection of catheter hubs/ports, administration set management, prompt removal of catheter, antibiotic locks, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis and chlorhexidine bathing. Furthermore, it will describe different strategies that can be implemented into clinical practice to reduce infection rates. These include the use of care bundles including checklists, education and the use of CVC teams. PMID:25076387

  14. Photoacoustic detection of hemozoin in human mononuclear cells as an early indicator of malaria infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Jonathan R.; Kariuki, Michael; Beerntsen, Brenda T.; Viator, John A.

    2010-02-01

    Malaria is a blood borne infection affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide2. The parasites reproduce within the blood cells, eventually causing their death and lysis. This process releases the parasites into the blood, continuing the cycle of infection. Usually, malaria is diagnosed only after a patient presents symptoms, including high fever, nausea, and, in advanced cases, coma and death. While invading the bloodstream of a host, malaria parasites convert hemoglobin into an insoluble crystal, known as hemozoin. These crystals, approximately several hundred nanometers in size, are contained within red blood cells and white blood cells that ingest free hemozoin in the blood. Thus, infected red blood cells and white blood cells contain a unique optical absorber that can be detected in blood samples using static photoacoustic detection methods. We separated the white blood cells from malaria infected blood and tested it in a photoacoustic set up using a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator pumped by an Nd:YAG laser with pulse duration of 5 ns. Our threshold of detection was 10 infected white blood cells per microliter, which is more sensitive than current diagnosis methods using microscopic analysis of blood.

  15. Immune response to a Trichinella spiralis infection in house mice from lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Elizabeth M; Schutz, Heidi; Meek, Thomas H; Acosta, Wendy; Downs, Cynthia J; Platzer, Edward G; Chappell, Mark A; Garland, Theodore

    2013-11-15

    Four lines of mice bred for high voluntary wheel running (HR lines) have high baseline circulating corticosterone levels and increased daily energy expenditure as compared with four non-selected control (C) lines. High corticosterone may suppress immune function and competing energy demands may limit ability to mount an immune response. We hypothesized that HR mice have a reduced immune response and therefore a decreased ability to fight an infection by Trichinella spiralis, an ecologically relevant nematode common in mammals. Infections have an acute, intestinal phase while the nematode is migrating, reproducing and traveling throughout the bloodstream, followed by a chronic phase with larvae encysted in muscles. Adult males (generation 55 of the selection experiment) were sham-infected or infected by oral gavage with ~300 J1 T. spiralis larvae. During the chronic phase of infection, mice were given wheel access for 6 days, followed by 2 days of maximum aerobic performance trials. Two weeks post-infection, infected HR had significantly lower circulating immunoglobulin E levels compared with infected C mice. However, we found no statistical difference between infected HR and C mice in numbers of encysted larvae within the diaphragm. As expected, both voluntary running and maximum aerobic performance were significantly higher in HR mice and lower in infected mice, with no line type-by-infection interactions. Results complement those of previous studies suggesting decreased locomotor abilities during the chronic phase of T. spiralis infection. However, despite reduced antibody production, breeding for high voluntary wheel exercise does not appear to have a substantial negative impact on general humoral function. PMID:23948476

  16. A mathematical model for Chagas disease with infection-age-dependent infectivity

    E-print Network

    Inaba, Hisashi

    follows the invasion of the bloodstream by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This stage lasts from animals) of the protozoan parasite. In this paper, we formulate a structured population model for the s

  17. Adoptive transfer of resistance to acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection with T-lymphocyte-enriched spleen cells.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, S G

    1980-01-01

    Inbred C57BL/10 mice immunized with live culture forms of Trypanosoma cruzi were resistant to acute infection after challenge with bloodstream forms. Splenic leukocytes or serum from immunized mice were transferred to syngeneic recipients 2 days before of 2 days after challenge. Protection was not observed in recipients of serum, although the serum contained high levels of agglutinating antibody. Unfractionated splenic leukocytes from immunized donors conferred partial protection, and preparations enriched for T lymphocytes were significantly more effective than preparations enriched for B lymphocytes. Recipients of T-lymphocyte-enriched spleen cells had significantly higher survival times and significantly lower parasitemias than did recipients of B-lymphocyte-enriched spleen cells. PMID:6772557

  18. Long-Term Central Venous Catheter Use and Risk of Infection in Older Adults With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lipitz-Snyderman, Allison; Sepkowitz, Kent A.; Elkin, Elena B.; Pinheiro, Laura C.; Sima, Camelia S.; Son, Crystal H.; Atoria, Coral L.; Bach, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Long-term central venous catheters (CVCs) are often used in patients with cancer to facilitate venous access to administer intravenous fluids and chemotherapy. CVCs can also be a source of bloodstream infections, although this risk is not well understood. We examined the impact of long-term CVC use on infection risk, independent of other risk factors such as chemotherapy, in a population-based cohort of patients with cancer. Patients and Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis using SEER-Medicare data for patients age > 65 years diagnosed from 2005 to 2007 with invasive colorectal, head and neck, lung, or pancreatic cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or invasive or noninvasive breast cancer. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the relationship between CVC use and infections, with CVC exposure as a time-dependent predictor. We used multivariable analysis and propensity score methods to control for patient characteristics. Results CVC exposure was associated with a significantly elevated infection risk, adjusting for demographic and disease characteristics. For patients with pancreatic cancer, risk of infections during the exposure period was three-fold greater (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 2.93; 95% CI, 2.58 to 3.33); for those with breast cancer, it was six-fold greater (AHR, 6.19; 95% CI, 5.42 to 7.07). Findings were similar when we accounted for propensity to receive a CVC and limited the cohort to individuals at high risk of infections. Conclusion Long-term CVC use was associated with an increased risk of infections for older adults with cancer. Careful assessment of the need for long-term CVCs and targeted strategies for reducing infections are critical to improving cancer care quality. PMID:24982458

  19. Vaginal Yeast Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Vaginal Yeast Infections KidsHealth > Teens > Infections > Fungal Infections > Vaginal Yeast ... side effect of taking antibiotics. What Is a Yeast Infection? A yeast infection is a common infection ...

  20. A Rat Model of Central Venous Catheter to Study Establishment of Long-Term Bacterial Biofilm and Related Acute and Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Ashwini; Lebeaux, David; Decante, Benoit; Kriegel, Irene; Escande, Marie-Christine; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Beloin, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Formation of resilient biofilms on medical devices colonized by pathogenic microorganisms is a major cause of health-care associated infection. While in vitro biofilm analyses led to promising anti-biofilm approaches, little is known about their translation to in vivo situations and on host contribution to the in vivo dynamics of infections on medical devices. Here we have developed an in vivo model of long-term bacterial biofilm infections in a pediatric totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP) surgically placed in adult rats. Using non-invasive and quantitative bioluminescence, we studied TIVAP contamination by clinically relevant pathogens, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, and we demonstrated that TIVAP bacterial populations display typical biofilm phenotypes. In our study, we showed that immunocompetent rats were able to control the colonization and clear the bloodstream infection except for up to 30% that suffered systemic infection and death whereas none of the immunosuppressed rats survived the infection. Besides, we mimicked some clinically relevant TIVAP associated complications such as port-pocket infection and hematogenous route of colonization. Finally, by assessing an optimized antibiotic lock therapy, we established that our in vivo model enables to assess innovative therapeutic strategies against bacterial biofilm infections. PMID:22615964

  1. Additive Function of Vibrio vulnificus MARTXVv and VvhA Cytolysins Promotes Rapid Growth and Epithelial Tissue Necrosis During Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hee-Gon; Satchell, Karla J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a pathogen that causes both severe necrotizing wound infections and life-threatening food-borne infections. Food-borne infection is particularly lethal as the infection can progress rapidly to primary septicemia resulting in death from septic shock and multiorgan failure. In this study, we use both bioluminescence whole animal imaging and V. vulnificus bacterial colonization of orally infected mice to demonstrate that the secreted multifunctional-autoprocessing RTX toxin (MARTXVv) and the cytolysin/hemolysin VvhA of clinical isolate CMCP6 have an important function in the gut to promote early in vivo growth and dissemination of this pathogen from the small intestine to other organs. Using histopathology, we find that both cytotoxins can cause villi disruption, epithelial necrosis, and inflammation in the mouse small intestine. A double mutant deleted of genes for both cytotoxins was essentially avirulent, did not cause intestinal epithelial tissue damage, and was cleared from infected mice by 36 hours by an effective immune response. Therefore, MARTXVv and VvhA seem to play an additive role for pathogenesis of CMCP6 causing intestinal tissue damage and inflammation that then promotes dissemination of the infecting bacteria to the bloodstream and other organs. In the absence of these two secreted factors, we propose that this bacterium is unable to cause intestinal infection in humans. PMID:22457618

  2. Real-World Experience with Echinocandin MICs against Candida Species in a Multicenter Study of Hospitals That Routinely Perform Susceptibility Testing of Bloodstream Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, M. Hong; Shoham, Shmuel; Vazquez, Jose A.; Morris, Arthur J.; Pasculle, William A.; Kubin, Christine J.; Klinker, Kenneth P.; Carver, Peggy L.; Hanson, Kimberly E.; Chen, Sharon; Lam, Simon W.; Potoski, Brian A.; Clarke, Lloyd G.; Shields, Ryan K.; Clancy, Cornelius J.

    2014-01-01

    Reference broth microdilution methods of Candida echinocandin susceptibility testing are limited by interlaboratory variability in caspofungin MICs. Recently revised Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint MICs for echinocandin nonsusceptibility may not be valid for commercial tests employed in hospital laboratories. Indeed, there are limited echinocandin susceptibility testing data from hospital laboratories. We conducted a multicenter retrospective study of 9 U.S., Australian, and New Zealand hospitals that routinely tested Candida bloodstream isolates for echinocandin susceptibility from 2005 to 2013. Eight hospitals used Sensititre YeastOne assays. The Candida spp. were C. albicans (n = 1,067), C. glabrata (n = 911), C. parapsilosis (n = 476), C. tropicalis (n = 185), C. krusei (n = 104), and others (n = 154). Resistance and intermediate rates were ?1.4% and ?3%, respectively, for each echinocandin against C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis. Resistance rates among C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates were ?7.5% and ?5.6%, respectively. Caspofungin intermediate rates among C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates were 17.8% and 46.5%, respectively, compared to ?4.3% and ?4.4% for other echinocandins. Using CLSI breakpoints, 18% and 19% of C. glabrata isolates were anidulafungin susceptible/caspofungin nonsusceptible and micafungin susceptible/caspofungin nonsusceptible, respectively; similar discrepancies were observed for 38% and 39% of C. krusei isolates. If only YeastOne data were considered, interhospital modal MIC variability was low (within 2 doubling dilutions for each agent). In conclusion, YeastOne assays employed in hospitals may reduce the interlaboratory variability in caspofungin MICs against Candida species that are observed between reference laboratories using CLSI broth microdilution methods. The significance of classifying isolates as caspofungin intermediate and anidulafungin/micafungin susceptible will require clarification in future studies. PMID:24395235

  3. Real-world experience with echinocandin MICs against Candida species in a multicenter study of hospitals that routinely perform susceptibility testing of bloodstream isolates.

    PubMed

    Eschenauer, Gregory A; Nguyen, M Hong; Shoham, Shmuel; Vazquez, Jose A; Morris, Arthur J; Pasculle, William A; Kubin, Christine J; Klinker, Kenneth P; Carver, Peggy L; Hanson, Kimberly E; Chen, Sharon; Lam, Simon W; Potoski, Brian A; Clarke, Lloyd G; Shields, Ryan K; Clancy, Cornelius J

    2014-01-01

    Reference broth microdilution methods of Candida echinocandin susceptibility testing are limited by interlaboratory variability in caspofungin MICs. Recently revised Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint MICs for echinocandin nonsusceptibility may not be valid for commercial tests employed in hospital laboratories. Indeed, there are limited echinocandin susceptibility testing data from hospital laboratories. We conducted a multicenter retrospective study of 9 U.S., Australian, and New Zealand hospitals that routinely tested Candida bloodstream isolates for echinocandin susceptibility from 2005 to 2013. Eight hospitals used Sensititre YeastOne assays. The Candida spp. were C. albicans (n=1,067), C. glabrata (n=911), C. parapsilosis (n=476), C. tropicalis (n=185), C. krusei (n=104), and others (n=154). Resistance and intermediate rates were ?1.4% and ?3%, respectively, for each echinocandin against C. albicans, C. parapsilosis, and C. tropicalis. Resistance rates among C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates were ?7.5% and ?5.6%, respectively. Caspofungin intermediate rates among C. glabrata and C. krusei isolates were 17.8% and 46.5%, respectively, compared to ?4.3% and ?4.4% for other echinocandins. Using CLSI breakpoints, 18% and 19% of C. glabrata isolates were anidulafungin susceptible/caspofungin nonsusceptible and micafungin susceptible/caspofungin nonsusceptible, respectively; similar discrepancies were observed for 38% and 39% of C. krusei isolates. If only YeastOne data were considered, interhospital modal MIC variability was low (within 2 doubling dilutions for each agent). In conclusion, YeastOne assays employed in hospitals may reduce the interlaboratory variability in caspofungin MICs against Candida species that are observed between reference laboratories using CLSI broth microdilution methods. The significance of classifying isolates as caspofungin intermediate and anidulafungin/micafungin susceptible will require clarification in future studies. PMID:24395235

  4. Fluconazole Susceptibilities of Bloodstream Candida sp. Isolates as Determined by National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards Method M27-A and Two Other Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cantón, Emilia; Pemán, Javier; Carrillo-Muñoz, Alfonso; Orero, Ana; Ubeda, Pedro; Viudes, Angel; Gobernado, Miguel

    1999-01-01

    The in vitro activity of fluconazole against 143 Candida spp. obtained from the bloodstreams of 143 hospitalized patients from 1995 to 1997 was studied. Susceptibility tests were carried out by two macrodilution methods, the M27-A and a modified M27-A method (0.165 M, pH 7/morpholinepropanesulfonic acid-buffered RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 20 g of d-dextrose per liter), and by the agar diffusion method (with 15-?g fluconazole [Neo-Sensitab] tablets). With 2 ?g of fluconazole per ml, 96.92% of 65 C. albicans isolates, 86.2% of 58 C. parapsilosis isolates 7 of 8 C. tropicalis isolates, and 1 of 6 C. glabrata isolates were inhibited. Only one strain of C. albicans and one strain of C. tropicalis were resistant. The agreement between the two macrodilution methods was greater than 90% within ±2 log2 dilutions for all strains except C. glabrata (83.3%) and C. tropicalis (87.5%). Generally, MICs were 1 log2 dilution lower in glucose-supplemented RPMI 1640 medium. No correlation between zone sizes and MICs was found. All strains susceptible by the diffusion test were susceptible by the dilution method, but the converse was not necessarily true. Interestingly, inhibition zones were smaller for C. albicans, for which the geometric mean MIC was 0.29 ?g/ml and the mean inhibition zone diameter was 25.7 mm, while for C. parapsilosis the geometric mean MIC was 0.96 ?g/ml and the mean inhibition zone diameter was 31.52 mm. In conclusion, the two macrodilution methods give similar results. The modified M27-A method with 2% dextrose has the advantage of shortening the incubation time and simplifying the endpoint determination. PMID:10364585

  5. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Aisling F; Murphy, Alison G; Lalor, Stephen J; Leech, John M; O'Keeffe, Kate M; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O'Halloran, Dara P; Lacey, Keenan A; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P; van Wamel, Willem J; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Lavelle, Ed C; Rogers, Thomas R; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2015-11-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFN? responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  6. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lalor, Stephen J.; Leech, John M.; O’Keeffe, Kate M.; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O’Halloran, Dara P.; Lacey, Keenan A.; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H.; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P.; van Wamel, Willem J.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Lavelle, Ed C.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFN? responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  7. Characterization of human placental glycosaminoglycans and regional binding to VAR2CSA in malaria infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Beaudet, Julie M.; Mansur, Leandra; Joo, Eun Ji; Kamhi, Eyal; Yang, Bo; Clausen, Thomas M; Salanti, Ali; Zhang, Fuming

    2013-01-01

    Placental malaria is a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Young women are particular susceptible to contracting this form of malaria during their first or second pregnancy despite previously acquired immunity from past infections. Placental malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum parasites expressing VAR2CSA on the erythrocyte surface. This protein adheres to a low-sulfated chondroitin sulfate-A found in placental tissue causing great harm to both mother and developing fetus. In rare cases, the localization of infected erythrocytes to the placenta can even result in the vertical transmission of malaria. In an effort to better understand this infection, chondroitin sulfate was isolated from the cotyledon part of the placenta, which should be accessible for parasite adhesion, as well as two non-accessible parts of the placenta to serve as controls. The placental chondroitin sulfate structures and their VAR2CSA binding were characterized. All portions of human placenta contained sufficient amounts of the appropriate low-sulfated chondroitin sulfate-A to display high-affinity binding to a recombinant truncated VAR2CSA construct, as determined using surface plasmon resonance. The cotyledon is the only placental tissue accessible to parasites in the bloodstream, suggesting it is the primary receptor for parasite infected red blood cells. PMID:24158546

  8. Characterization of human placental glycosaminoglycans and regional binding to VAR2CSA in malaria infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Beaudet, Julie M; Mansur, Leandra; Joo, Eun Ji; Kamhi, Eyal; Yang, Bo; Clausen, Thomas M; Salanti, Ali; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2014-02-01

    Placental malaria is a serious problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Young women are particular susceptible to contracting this form of malaria during their first or second pregnancy despite previously acquired immunity from past infections. Placental malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum parasites expressing VAR2CSA on the erythrocyte surface. This protein adheres to a low-sulfated chondroitin sulfate-A found in placental tissue causing great harm to both mother and developing fetus. In rare cases, the localization of infected erythrocytes to the placenta can even result in the vertical transmission of malaria. In an effort to better understand this infection, chondroitin sulfate was isolated from the cotyledon part of the placenta, which should be accessible for parasite adhesion, as well as two non-accessible parts of the placenta to serve as controls. The placental chondroitin sulfate structures and their VAR2CSA binding were characterized. All portions of human placenta contained sufficient amounts of the appropriate low-sulfated chondroitin sulfate-A to display high-affinity binding to a recombinant truncated VAR2CSA construct, as determined using surface plasmon resonance. The cotyledon is the only placental tissue accessible to parasites in the bloodstream, suggesting it is the primary receptor for parasite infected red blood cells. PMID:24158546

  9. The Flagellar Arginine Kinase in Trypanosoma brucei Is Important for Infection in Tsetse Flies

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Cher-Pheng; Rotureau, Brice; Gribaldo, Simonetta; Georgikou, Christina; Julkowska, Daria; Blisnick, Thierry; Perrot, Sylvie; Subota, Ines; Bastin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomes are flagellated parasites that cause sleeping sickness. Parasites are transmitted from one mammalian host to another by the bite of a tsetse fly. Trypanosoma brucei possesses three different genes for arginine kinase (AK) including one (AK3) that encodes a protein localised to the flagellum. AK3 is characterised by the presence of a unique amino-terminal insertion that specifies flagellar targeting. We show here a phylogenetic analysis revealing that flagellar AK arose in two independent duplication events in T. brucei and T. congolense, the two species of African trypanosomes that infect the tsetse midgut. In T. brucei, AK3 is detected in all stages of parasite development in the fly (in the midgut and in the salivary glands) as well as in bloodstream cells, but with predominance at insect stages. Genetic knockout leads to a slight reduction in motility and impairs parasite infectivity towards tsetse flies in single and competition experiments, both phenotypes being reverted upon expression of an epitope-tagged version of AK3. We speculate that this flagellar arginine kinase is important for T. brucei infection of tsetse, especially in the context of mixed infections and that its flagellar targeting relies on a system equivalent to that discovered for calflagins, a family of trypanosome flagellum calcium binding proteins. PMID:26218532

  10. Emergence of a novel subpopulation of CC398 Staphylococcus aureus infecting animals is a serious hazard for humans

    PubMed Central

    van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie L.; Corvaglia, Anna; Haenni, Marisa; Bertrand, Xavier; Franck, Jean-Baptiste; Kluytmans, Jan; Girard, Myriam; Quentin, Roland; François, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, Staphylococcus aureus from clonal complex (CC)398 were mostly described as colonizing asymptomatic raised pigs and pig-farmers. Currently, the epidemiology of the CC398 lineage is becoming more complex. CC398 human-adapted isolates are increasingly being identified in bloodstream infections in humans living in animal-free environments. In addition, CC398 isolates are increasingly responsible for invasive infections in various animals. CC398 isolates that colonize asymptomatic pigs and the isolates that infect humans living in animal-free environments (human-adapted isolates) both lack several clinically important S. aureus–associated virulence factors but differ on the basis of their prophage content. Recent findings have provided insight into the influence of a ?MR11-like helper prophage on the ability of CC398 isolates to infect humans. To assess the recent spread of the CC398 lineage to various animal species and to investigate the links between the ?MR11-like prophage and the emergence of CC398 isolates infecting animals, we studied 277 isolates causing infections in unrelated animals. The prevalence of CC398 isolates increased significantly between 2007 and 2013 (p < 0.001); 31.8% of the animal isolates harbored the ?MR11-like prophage. High-density DNA microarray experiments with 37 representative infected-animal isolates positive for ?MR11-like DNA established that most infected-animal isolates carried many genetic elements related to antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes, and a ?3 prophage encoding immune-modulating proteins and associated with animal-to-human jumps. Our findings suggest recent clonal expansion and dissemination of a new subpopulation of CC398 isolates, responsible for invasive infections in various animals, with a considerable potential to colonize and infect humans, probably greater than that of human-adapted CC398 isolates, justifying active surveillance. PMID:25538688

  11. Congenital CMV Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CDC Feature on Prenatal Infections Congenital CMV Infection Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Good Hand Hygiene CDC Feature on Prenatal Infections Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  12. Infections and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    If you are pregnant, an infection can be more than just a problem for you. Some infections can be dangerous to your baby. You can help yourself avoid infections: Don't eat raw or undercooked meat Don' ...

  13. Severe Strep Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... severe group A strep infections may lead to shock, organ failure, and death. Therefore, healthcare providers must diagnose and treat such infections quickly. Treatment Antibiotics used to treat these severe infections include ...

  14. Urinary tract infection - children

    MedlinePLUS

    UTI - children; Cystitis - children; Bladder infection - children; Kidney infection - children; Pyelonephritis - children ... Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can occur when bacteria get into the bladder or the kidneys. These bacteria are common ...

  15. Vaginal Yeast Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Vaginal Yeast Infection Vaginal yeast infection, or vulvovaginal candidiasis, is a common cause ... all adult women have had at least one "yeast infection" in their lifetime, according to the Centers ...

  16. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact CDC-INFO Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Information For: Travelers ...

  17. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Contact CDC-INFO Pinworm Infection General Information Pinworm Infection FAQs Epidemiology & Risk Factors Biology Disease Diagnosis Treatment Prevention & Control Resources for Health Professionals Publications Information For: Travelers ...

  18. Kinetics of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Metapopulation Movement during Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Matthew S.; Lane, M. Chelsea; Vigil, Patrick D.; Smith, Sara N.; Walk, Seth T.; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The urinary tract is one of the most frequent sites of bacterial infection in humans. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are the leading cause of urinary tract infections (UTIs) and are responsible for greater than 80% of uncomplicated cases in adults. Infection of the urinary tract occurs in an ascending manner, with colonization of the bladder leading to possible kidney infection and bacteremia. The goal of this study was to examine the population dynamics of UPEC in vivo using a murine model of ascending UTI. To track individual UPEC lineages within a host, we constructed 10 isogenic clones of UPEC strain CFT073 by inserting unique signature tag sequences between the pstS and glmS genes at the attTn7 chromosomal site. Mice were transurethrally inoculated with a mixture containing equal numbers of unique clones. After 4 and 48 h, the tags present in the bladders, kidneys, and spleens of infected mice were enumerated using tag-specific primers and quantitative real-time PCR. The results indicated that kidney infection and bacteremia associated with UTI are most likely the result of multiple rounds of ascension and dissemination from motile UPEC subpopulations, with a distinct bottleneck existing between the kidney and bloodstream. The abundance of tagged lineages became more variable as infection progressed, especially after bacterial ascension to the upper urinary tract. Analysis of the population kinetics of UPEC during UTI revealed metapopulation dynamics, with lineages that constantly increased and decreased in abundance as they migrated from one organ to another. PMID:22318320

  19. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Infections in a General Hospital: Patient Characteristics, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Treatment Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Samonis, George; Karageorgopoulos, Drosos E.; Maraki, Sofia; Levis, Panagiotis; Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Spernovasilis, Nikolaos A.; Kofteridis, Diamantis P.; Falagas, Matthew E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is acquiring increasing importance as a nosocomial pathogen. Methods We retrospectively studied the characteristics and outcome of patients with any type of S. maltophilia infection at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece, between 1/2005–12/2010. S. maltophilia antimicrobial susceptibility was tested with the agar dilution method. Prognostic factors for all-cause in-hospital mortality were assessed with multivariate logistic regression. Results Sixty-eight patients (median age: 70.5 years; 64.7% males) with S. maltophilia infection, not related to cystic fibrosis, were included. The 68 patients were hospitalized in medical (29.4%), surgical (26.5%), hematology/oncology departments (23.5%), or the intensive care units (ICU; 20.6%). The most frequent infection types were respiratory tract (54.4%), bloodstream (16.2%), skin/soft tissue (10.3%), and intra-abdominal (8.8%) infection. The S. maltophilia-associated infection was polymicrobial in 33.8% of the cases. In vitro susceptibility was higher to colistin (91.2%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and netilmicin (85.3% each), and ciprofloxacin (82.4%). The empirical and the targeted treatment regimens were microbiologically appropriate for 47.3% and 63.6% of the 55 patients with data available, respectively. Most patients received targeted therapy with a combination of agents other than trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The crude mortality and the mortality and the S. maltophilia infection-related mortality were 14.7% and 4.4%, respectively. ICU hospitalization was the only independent prognostic factor for mortality. Conclusion S. maltophilia infection in a general hospital can be associated with a good prognosis, except for the patients hospitalized in the ICU. Combination reigmens with fluoroquinolones, colistin, or tigecycline could be alternative treatment options to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. PMID:22624022

  20. Infections caused by non-tuberculous mycobacteria in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed; Al-Jasser, Asma M; Al-Anazi, Waleed Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are acid-fast bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment and can colonize soil, dust particles, water sources, and food supplies. They are divided into rapidly growing mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium fortuitum, Mycobacterium chelonae, and Mycobacterium abscessus as well as slowly growing species such as Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium marinum. About 160 different species, which can cause community acquired and health care-associated infections, have been identified. NTM are becoming increasingly recognized in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with incidence rates ranging between 0.4 and 10%. These infections are 50-600 times commoner in transplant recipients than in the general population and the time of onset ranges from day 31 to day 1055 post-transplant. They have been reported following various forms of HSCT. Several risk factors predispose to NTM infections in recipients of stem cell transplantation and these are related to the underlying medical condition and its treatment, the pre-transplant conditioning therapies as well as the transplant procedure and its complications. Clinically, NTM may present with: unexplained fever, lymphadenopathy, osteomyelitis, soft tissue and skin infections, central venous catheter infections, bacteremia, lung, and gastrointestinal tract involvement. However, disseminated infections are commonly encountered in severely immunocompromised individuals and bloodstream infections are almost always associated with catheter-related infections. It is usually difficult to differentiate colonization from true infection, thus, the threshold for starting therapy remains undetermined. Respiratory specimens such as sputum, pleural fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage in addition to cultures of blood, bone, skin, and soft tissues are essential diagnostically. Susceptibility testing of mycobacterial isolates is a basic component of optimal care. Currently, there are no guidelines for the treatment of NTM infections in recipients of stem cell transplantation, but such infections have been successfully treated with surgical debridement, removal of infected or colonized indwelling intravascular devices, and administration of various combinations of antimicrobials. Monotherapy can be associated with development of drug resistance due to new genetic mutation. The accepted duration of treatment is 9?months in allogeneic stem cell transplantation and 6?months in autologous setting. Unfortunately, eradication of NTM infections may be impossible and their treatment is often complicated by adverse effects and interactions with other transplant-related medication. PMID:25426446

  1. Attenuated Mutants of Ehrlichia chaffeensis Induce Protection against Wild-Type Infection Challenge in the Reservoir Host and in an Incidental Host.

    PubMed

    Nair, Arathy D S; Cheng, Chuanmin; Jaworski, Deborah C; Ganta, Suhasini; Sanderson, Michael W; Ganta, Roman R

    2015-07-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, a tick-borne rickettsial organism, causes the disease human monocytic ehrlichiosis. The pathogen also causes disease in several other vertebrates, including dogs and deer. In this study, we assessed two clonally purified E. chaffeensis mutants with insertions within the genes Ech_0379 and Ech_0660 as vaccine candidates in deer and dogs. Infection with the Ech_0379 mutant and challenge with wild-type E. chaffeensis 1 month following inoculation with the mutant resulted in the reduced presence of the organism in blood compared to the presence of wild-type infection in both deer and dogs. The Ech_0660 mutant infection resulted in its rapid clearance from the bloodstream. The wild-type infection challenge following Ech_0660 mutant inoculation also caused the pathogen's clearance from blood and tissue samples as assessed at the end of the study. The Ech_0379 mutant-infected and -challenged animals also remained positive for the organism in tissue samples in deer but not in dogs. This is the first study that documents that insertion mutations in E. chaffeensis that cause attenuated growth confer protection against wild-type infection challenge. This study is important in developing vaccines to protect animals and people against Ehrlichia species infections. PMID:25916990

  2. Tsetse fly saliva: Could it be useful in fly infection when feeding in chronically aparasitemic mammalian hosts

    PubMed Central

    Awuoche, E.O.

    2012-01-01

    Sleeping sickness and nagana are two important diseases cuased by African trypanosomes in humans and animals respectively, in tropical african countries. A number of trypanosome species are implicated in these diseases, but it is the Trypanosoma brucei group that is responsible for the chronic form of sleeping sickness. During the course of this chronic infection the parasite shows a clear tropism for organs and tissues and only sporadically appears in the blood stream. Notwithstanding this feature, tsetse flies normally get infected from chronically infected apparasitemic hosts. For some pathogens like the microfilaria, it has already shown that the saliva of the vector, black fly saliva contribute to orient the pathogen to the site of the vector bite. Chemotaxis of tsetse saliva may perhaps stimulate movement of Trypanosoma brucei parasites from tissues to the bloodstream and via the vascular to the tsetse feeding site, and could explain the relatively high infection rate of tsetse flies feeding on chronically infected animals. This review paper looks into the possible role of trypanosome-vector saliva in ensuring parasite acquisition and its application in the tsetse – trypanosome interaction at the host skin interphase.

  3. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Our ePublications > Urinary tract infection fact sheet ePublications Urinary tract infection fact sheet Print this fact sheet Urinary tract ... a urinary (YOOR-uh-nair-ee) tract infection (UTI)? A UTI is an infection anywhere in the ...

  4. Four country healthcare associated infection prevalence survey 2006: overview of the results.

    PubMed

    Smyth, E T M; McIlvenny, G; Enstone, J E; Emmerson, A M; Humphreys, H; Fitzpatrick, F; Davies, E; Newcombe, R G; Spencer, R C

    2008-07-01

    A survey of adult patients was conducted in February 2006 to May 2006 in acute hospitals across England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland to estimate the prevalence of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). A total of 75 694 patients were surveyed; 5743 of these had HCAIs, giving a prevalence of 7.59% (95% confidence interval: 7.40-7.78). HCAI prevalence in England was 8.19%, in Wales 6.35%, in Northern Ireland 5.43% and in the Republic of Ireland 4.89%. The most common HCAI system infections were gastrointestinal (20.6% of all HCAI), urinary tract (19.9%), surgical site (14.5%), pneumonia (14.1%), skin and soft tissue (10.4%) and primary bloodstream (7.0%). Prevalence of MRSA was 1.15% with MRSA being the causative organism in 15.8% of all system infections. Prevalence of Clostridium difficile was 1.21%. This was the largest HCAI prevalence survey ever performed in the four countries. The methodology and organisation used is a template for future HCAI surveillance initiatives, nationally, locally or at unit level. Information obtained from this survey will contribute to the prioritisation of resources and help to inform Departments of Health, hospitals and other relevant bodies in the continuing effort to reduce HCAI. PMID:18550218

  5. Epidemiology, Clinical Presentation, Laboratory Diagnosis, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Antimicrobial Management of Invasive Salmonella Infections.

    PubMed

    Crump, John A; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; Gordon, Melita A; Parry, Christopher M

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella enterica infections are common causes of bloodstream infection in low-resource areas, where they may be difficult to distinguish from other febrile illnesses and may be associated with a high case fatality ratio. Microbiologic culture of blood or bone marrow remains the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis. Antimicrobial resistance has emerged in Salmonella enterica, initially to the traditional first-line drugs chloramphenicol, ampicillin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility and then fluoroquinolone resistance have developed in association with chromosomal mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and also by plasmid-mediated resistance mechanisms. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has occurred more often in nontyphoidal than in typhoidal Salmonella strains. Azithromycin is effective for the management of uncomplicated typhoid fever and may serve as an alternative oral drug in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is common. In 2013, CLSI lowered the ciprofloxacin susceptibility breakpoints to account for accumulating clinical, microbiologic, and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data suggesting that revision was needed for contemporary invasive Salmonella infections. Newly established CLSI guidelines for azithromycin and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi were published in CLSI document M100 in 2015. PMID:26180063

  6. [Infection and urinary lithiasis].

    PubMed

    Bruyere, F; Traxer, O; Saussine, C; Lechevallier, E

    2008-12-01

    Urinary infection is a risk factor for lithiasis. Urinary tract infection is a factor of gravity of urinary stone. The stone can exist before the infection which colonizes the stone, infected stone. The infection can be the cause of the stone, infectious stone (struvite stone). Infectious stones can be secondary to a non urinary infectious agent, oxalobacter formigenes (OF) and nanobacteria. The first-line treatment of struvite stone is percutaneous surgery. Perioperative antibiotics, renal urines and stone cultures are obligatory. PMID:19033073

  7. What Counts? An Ethnographic Study of Infection Data Reported to a Patient Safety Program

    PubMed Central

    Dixon-Woods, Mary; Leslie, Myles; Bion, Julian; Tarrant, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    Context Performance measures are increasingly widely used in health care and have an important role in quality. However, field studies of what organizations are doing when they collect and report performance measures are rare. An opportunity for such a study was presented by a patient safety program requiring intensive care units (ICUs) in England to submit monthly data on central venous catheter bloodstream infections (CVC-BSIs). Methods We conducted an ethnographic study involving ?855 hours of observational fieldwork and 93 interviews in 17 ICUs plus 29 telephone interviews. Findings Variability was evident within and between ICUs in how they applied inclusion and exclusion criteria for the program, the data collection systems they established, practices in sending blood samples for analysis, microbiological support and laboratory techniques, and procedures for collecting and compiling data on possible infections. Those making decisions about what to report were not making decisions about the same things, nor were they making decisions in the same way. Rather than providing objective and clear criteria, the definitions for classifying infections used were seen as subjective, messy, and admitting the possibility of unfairness. Reported infection rates reflected localized interpretations rather than a standardized dataset across all ICUs. Variability arose not because of wily workers deliberately concealing, obscuring, or deceiving but because counting was as much a social practice as a technical practice. Conclusions Rather than objective measures of incidence, differences in reported infection rates may reflect, at least to some extent, underlying social practices in data collection and reporting and variations in clinical practice. The variability we identified was largely artless rather than artful: currently dominant assumptions of gaming as responses to performance measures do not properly account for how categories and classifications operate in the pragmatic conduct of health care. These findings have important implications for assumptions about what can be achieved in infection reduction and quality improvement strategies. PMID:22985281

  8. Prevalence of Healthcare-Associated Infections in Acute Care Hospitals in Jacksonville, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Magill, Shelley S.; Hellinger, Walter; Cohen, Jessica; Kay, Robyn; Bailey, Christine; Boland, Bonnie; Carey, Darlene; de Guzman, Jessica; Dominguez, Karen; Edwards, Jonathan; Goraczewski, Lori; Horan, Teresa; Miller, Melodee; Phelps, Marti; Saltford, Rebecca; Seibert, Jacquelyn; Smith, Brenda; Starling, Patricia; Viergutz, Bonnie; Walsh, Karla; Rathore, Mobeen; Guzman, Nilmarie; Fridkin, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine healthcare-associated infection (HAI) prevalence in nine Jacksonville, FL hospitals, evaluate the performance of proxy indicators for HAIs, and refine methodology in preparation for a multi-state survey. Design Point prevalence survey. Patients Acute care inpatients of any age. Methods HAIs were defined using National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. In each facility a trained Primary Team (PT) of infection prevention (IP) staff performed the survey on 1 day, reviewing records and collecting data on a random sample of inpatients. PTs assessed patients with ?1 proxy indicator (abnormal white blood cell count, abnormal temperature, or antimicrobial therapy) for the presence of HAIs. An external IP expert team collected data from a subset of patient records reviewed by PTs to assess proxy indicator performance and PT data collection. Results Of 851 patients surveyed by PTs, 51 had ?1 HAI (6.0%, 95% confidence interval 4.5–7.7%). Surgical site infections (n=18), urinary tract infections (n=9), pneumonia (n=9), and bloodstream infections (n=8) accounted for 75.8% of 58 HAIs detected by PTs. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen, causing 9 HAIs (15.5%). Antimicrobial therapy was the most sensitive proxy indicator, identifying 95.5% of patients with HAIs. Conclusions HAI prevalence in this pilot was similar to that reported in the 1970s from CDC’s Study on the Efficacy of Nosocomial Infection Control. Antimicrobial therapy was a sensitive screening variable with which to identify higher-risk patients and reduce data collection burden. Additional work is needed on validation and feasibility to extend this methodology to a national scale. PMID:22314066

  9. Déjà vu: Ralstonia mannitolilytica infection associated with a humidifying respiratory therapy device, Israel, June to July 2011.

    PubMed

    Block, C; Ergaz-Shaltiel, Z; Valinsky, L; Temper, V; Hidalgo-Grass, C; Minster, N; Weissman, C; Benenson, S; Jaffe, J; Moses, A E; Bar-Oz, B

    2013-01-01

    Following a bloodstream infection in June 2011 with Ralstonia mannitolilytica in a premature infant treated with a humidifying respiratory therapy device, an investigation was initiated at the Hadassah Medical Centres in Jerusalem. The device delivers a warmed and humidified mixture of air and oxygen to patients by nasal cannula. The investigation revealed colonisation with R. mannitolilytica of two of 15 patients and contamination of components of five of six devices deployed in the premature units of the Hadassah hospitals. Ten isolates from the investigation were highly related and indistinguishable from isolates described in an outbreak in 2005 in the United States (US). Measures successful in containing the US outbreak were not included in user instructions provided to our hospitals by the distributor of the device. PMID:23725776

  10. [Infection prevention and control for foodborne infections].

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    Patients' care for foodborne infections is sometimes very critical, since these patients exerting high copy numbers of contagious pathogens. Recently, Norovirus infection became the most frequent pathogen for large outbreaks in the community and the hospital around the world. Norovirus is alcohol-resistant and highly contagious. For preventing outbreaks of foodborne infections, standard precaution(and contact precaution for diaper changing patients) is required by the CDC's isolation precaution guideline revised at 2007. We need to provide for infection prevention and control in the epidemic winter period not only in healthcare facilities but also for communities. PMID:22894082

  11. Implementation of infection control best practice in intensive care units throughout Europe: a mixed-method evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The implementation of evidence-based infection control practices is essential, yet challenging for healthcare institutions worldwide. Although acknowledged that implementation success varies with contextual factors, little is known regarding the most critical specific conditions within the complex cultural milieu of varying economic, political, and healthcare systems. Given the increasing reliance on unified global schemes to improve patient safety and healthcare effectiveness, research on this topic is needed and timely. The ‘InDepth’ work package of the European FP7 Prevention of Hospital Infections by Intervention and Training (PROHIBIT) consortium aims to assess barriers and facilitators to the successful implementation of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) prevention in intensive care units (ICU) across several European countries. Methods We use a qualitative case study approach in the ICUs of six purposefully selected acute care hospitals among the 15 participants in the PROHIBIT CRBSI intervention study. For sensitizing schemes we apply the theory of diffusion of innovation, published implementation frameworks, sensemaking, and new institutionalism. We conduct interviews with hospital health providers/agents at different organizational levels and ethnographic observations, and conduct rich artifact collection, and photography during two rounds of on-site visits, once before and once one year into the intervention. Data analysis is based on grounded theory. Given the challenge of different languages and cultures, we enlist the help of local interpreters, allot two days for site visits, and perform triangulation across multiple data sources. Qualitative measures of implementation success will consider the longitudinal interaction between the initiative and the institutional context. Quantitative outcomes on catheter-related bloodstream infections and performance indicators from another work package of the consortium will produce a final mixed-methods report. Conclusion A mixed-methods study of this scale with longitudinal follow-up is unique in the field of infection control. It highlights the ‘Why’ and ‘How’ of best practice implementation, revealing key factors that determine success of a uniform intervention in the context of several varying cultural, economic, political, and medical systems across Europe. These new insights will guide future implementation of more tailored and hence more successful infection control programs. Trial registration Trial number: PROHIBIT-241928 (FP7 reference number) PMID:23421909

  12. Acute bacterial infection negatively impacts cancer specific survival of colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Attiê, Regina; Chinen, Ludmilla Thomé Domingos; Yoshioka, Eliane Muta; Silva, Michele Cristina F; de Lima, Vladmir Cláudio Cordeiro

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the impact of bacterial infections on cancer-specific survival in patients with colorectal cancer. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of colorectal cancer patients treated at the A.C. Camargo Cancer Center between January 2006 and April 2010. The presence of bacterial infection during cancer treatment, or up to one year after, was confirmed by laboratory tests or by the physician. Infections of the urinary, respiratory or digestive tracts, bloodstream, skin or surgical site were defined by testing within a single laboratory. Criteria for exclusion from the study were: chronically immunosuppressed patients; transplant patients (due to chronic immunosuppression); human immunodeficiency virus carriers; chronic use of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive drugs; patients with autoimmune disease or primary immunodeficiency; known viral or parasitic infections. Patients with infections that did not require hospitalization were not included in the study because of the difficulty of collecting and tracking data related to infectious processes. In addition, patients hospitalized for pulmonary thromboembolism, stroke, acute myocardial infarction, uncontrolled diabetes, malignant hypercalcemia or other serious non-infectious complications not directly related to infection were also excluded. Survival curves were plotted using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests (univariate analysis) and a Cox test assuming a proportional hazards model (multivariate analysis) were performed to examine associations between clinical history and characteristics of infection with cancer-specific survival. RESULTS: One-hundred and six patients with colorectal cancer were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of bacterial infection. Patient ages ranged from 23 to 91 years, with a median of 55 years. The majority of patients were male (57/106, 53.77%) with stage III colorectal cancer (45/106, 44.11%). A total of 86 bacteriologic events were recorded. Results indicate that the presence and number of infections during or after the end of treatment were associated with poorer-cancer specific survivals (P = 0.02). Elevated neutrophil counts were also associated with poorer cancer-specific survival (P = 0.02). Analysis of patient age revealed that patients > 65 years of age had a poorer cancer-specific survival (P = 0.04). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that infection was an independent predictor of poor survival (HR = 2.62, 95%CI: 1.26-5.45; P = 0.01) along with advanced clinical staging (HR = 2.63, 95%CI: 1.08-6.39; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Infection and high neutrophil counts are associated with a poorer cancer-specific survival in colorectal cancer patients. PMID:25320529

  13. Inflammation, Infection, and Future Cardiovascular Risk

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2005-06-23

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Myocardial Infarction; Venous Thromboembolism; Heart Diseases; Infection; Chlamydia Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Helicobacter Infections; Herpesviridae Infections; Inflammation

  14. Ear infection - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... Chole RA. Chronic otitis media, mastoiditis, and petrositis. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund LJ, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head & Neck Surgery . 6th ed. ...

  15. Necrotizing soft tissue infection

    MedlinePLUS

    Necrotizing fasciitis; Fasciitis - necrotizing; Flesh-eating bacteria; Soft tissue gangrene; Gangrene - soft tissue ... Many different types of bacteria can cause this infection. A very ... of necrotizing soft tissue infection is due to Streptococcus ...

  16. Bacterial Nail Infection (Paronychia)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... also be caused by herpes, a type of viral infection. Chronic paronychia occurs most often in people whose hands ... the affected area and test for bacteria or viral infection. Prescribe ... chronic paronychia, your doctor may: Prescribe a topical steroid. ...

  17. Vaginal Yeast Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for sure if yogurt with Lactobacillus or other probiotics can prevent or treat vaginal yeast infections. If ... for sure if yogurt with Lactobacillus or other probiotics can prevent or treat vaginal yeast infections. If ...

  18. Particle exposures and infections

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Ci...

  19. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cases of diarrhea around the world each year. E. coli bacteria are found in the bowel movements of ... Others can cause traveler's diarrhea, a milder infection. E. coli infections spread through direct person-to-person contact ...

  20. Salivary gland infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Salivary gland infections affect the glands that produce saliva (spit). The infection may be due to bacteria ... the mouth. All of the salivary glands empty saliva into the mouth. The saliva enters the mouth ...

  1. E. Coli Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... adults with weak immune systems. You can get E. coli infections by eating foods containing the bacteria. Symptoms of ... pool contaminated with human waste. Most cases of E. coli infection get better without treatment in 5 to 10 ...

  2. C. difficile Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patients Home / Digestive Health Topic / C. difficile Infection C. difficile Infection Basics Overview Diarrhea is a frequent ... that change the normal colon bacteria allowing the C. difficile bacteria to grow and produce its toxins. ...

  3. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... kidneys, two ureters, a bladder, and a urethra. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection in the body. You may have a UTI if you notice Pain or burning when you ...

  5. Middle Ear Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Middle Ear Infections Article Body What are the new guidelines? ... illness. What if a child with a middle ear infection is in great pain and discomfort? The ...

  6. Middle ear infection (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A middle ear infection is also known as otitis media. It is one of the most common of childhood infections. With this illness, the middle ear becomes red, swollen, and inflamed because of bacteria ...

  7. Coxsackievirus Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... they can live for several days. In cooler climates, outbreaks of coxsackievirus infections most often occur in ... wide variety of symptoms. About half of all kids infected with coxsackievirus have no symptoms. Others suddenly ...

  8. Vaginal yeast infection

    MedlinePLUS

    Yeast infection - vagina; Vaginal candidiasis; Monilial vaginitis ... Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the ...

  9. The incidence and risk factors of peripherally inserted central catheter-related infection among cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yufang; Liu, Yuxiu; Ma, Xiaoyan; Wei, Lili; Chen, Weifen; Song, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background As the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) increased in chemotherapy, the identification of complications and risk factors became essential to prevent patient harm. But little is known about PICC-related infection and risk factors among patients with cancer. Our study was to identify the prevalence, patterns, and risk factors of catheter-related infections associated with PICCs. Methods A 3-year prospective cohort study was conducted in a university-affiliated hospital. All patients with cancer who met inclusion criteria were enrolled. The patients were followed up until catheter removal. Tip cultures were routinely performed at the time of catheter removal. The general information was recorded at the time of PICC insertion, weekly care, and removal. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied for identification of risk factors. Results In total, 912 cancer patients with 912 PICCs of 96,307 catheter days were enrolled. Ninety-four developed PICC-related infection; 46 were exit-site infection, 43 were catheter bacterial colonization, and five were PICC-related bloodstream infection. The median time from catheter insertion to infection was 98.26 days. Multivariate analysis showed StatLock fixing (odds ratio [OR] =0.555, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.326–0.945) and tip position located in the lower one-third of the superior vena cava (OR =0.340, 95% CI: 0.202–0.571) were associated with lower PICC infection rate. Catheter care delay (OR =2.612, 95% CI: 1.373–4.969) and indwelling mostly in summer (OR =4.784, 95% CI: 2.681–8.538) were associated with higher infection incidence. Conclusion StatLock fixing and tip position located in the lower one-third of the superior vena cava were protective factors against PICC-related infection, while catheter care delay and indwelling mostly in summer were risk factors. Policy and measures targeting these factors may be necessary to reduce the risk of infection. PMID:26045668

  10. Cutaneous Infections in Wrestlers

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Eugene K.; deWeber, Kevin; Berry, James W.; Wilckens, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Cutaneous infections are common in wrestlers. Although many are simply a nuisance in the everyday population, they can be problematic to wrestlers because such infections may result in disqualification from practice or competition. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are therefore important. Evidence Acquisition: Medline and PubMed databases, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and UpToDate were searched through 2012 with the following keywords in various combinations: skin infections, cutaneous infections, wrestlers, athletes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, skin and soft tissue infections, tinea corporis, tinea capitis, herpes simplex, varicella zoster, molluscum contagiosum, verruca vulgaris, warts, scabies, and pediculosis. Relevant articles found in the primary search, and selected references from those articles were reviewed for pertinent clinical information. Results: The most commonly reported cutaneous infections in wrestlers are herpes simplex virus infections (herpes gladiatorum), bacterial skin and soft tissue infections, and dermatophyte infections (tinea gladiatorum). The clinical appearance of these infections can be different in wrestlers than in the community at large. Conclusion: For most cutaneous infections, diagnosis and management options in wrestlers are similar to those in the community at large. With atypical presentations, testing methods are recommended to confirm the diagnosis of herpes gladiatorum and tinea gladiatorum. There is evidence to support the use of prophylactic medications to prevent recurrence of herpes simplex virus and reduce the incidence of dermatophyte infections in wrestlers. PMID:24427413

  11. Middle Ear Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Middle Ear Infections KidsHealth > Parents > Infections > Bacterial & Viral Infections > Middle ... 3 years old. A Close Look at the Ear To understand how ear infections develop, let's review ...

  12. Opportunistic Infections and Other Conditions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... toxo) Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) Tuberculosis (TB) Vaginal yeast infections Treatments for HIV/AIDS Research and clinical ... fact sheet Urinary tract infections fact sheet Vaginal yeast infections fact sheet More information on opportunistic infections ...

  13. Suicide HSVtk gene delivery by neurotensin-polyplex nanoparticles via the bloodstream and GCV Treatment specifically inhibit the growth of human MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer tumors xenografted in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa A; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L; Escobedo, Lourdes; Hernandez-Baltazar, Daniel; Gompel, Anne; Forgez, Patricia; Martínez-Fong, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 has the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) phenotype, which is an aggressive subtype with no specific treatment. MDA-MB-231 cells express neurotensin receptor type 1 (NTSR1), which makes these cells an attractive target of therapeutic genes that are delivered by the neurotensin (NTS)-polyplex nanocarrier via the bloodstream. We addressed the relevance of this strategy for TNBC treatment using NTS-polyplex nanoparticles harboring the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) suicide gene and its complementary prodrug ganciclovir (GCV). The reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used as a control. NTS-polyplex successfully transfected both genes in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells. The transfection was demonstrated pharmacologically to be dependent on activation of NTSR1. The expression of HSVtk gene decreased cell viability by 49% (P<0.0001) and induced apoptosis in cultured MDA-MB-231 cells after complementary GCV treatment. In the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model, NTS-polyplex nanoparticles carrying either the HSVtk gene or GFP gene were injected into the tumors or via the bloodstream. Both routes of administration allowed the NTS-polyplex nanoparticles to reach and transfect tumorous cells. HSVtk expression and GCV led to apoptosis, as shown by the presence of cleaved caspase-3 and Apostain immunoreactivity, and significantly inhibited the tumor growth (55-60%) (P<0.001). At the end of the experiment, the weight of tumors transfected with the HSVtk gene was 55% less than that of control tumors (P<0.05). The intravenous transfection did not induce apoptosis in peripheral organs. Our results offer a promising gene therapy for TNBC using the NTS-polyplex nanocarrier. PMID:24824754

  14. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Preece, P M; Pearl, K N; Peckham, C S

    1984-01-01

    Clinical details of 50 infants with congenital cytomegalovirus infection identified in a prospective study are reported. The mean birthweight, gestational age, and head circumference of children with congenital cytomegalovirus infection were not significantly different from those of controls. Three (6%) had symptoms at birth--two neurological and one pneumonitis. In the first four months of life transient hepatosplenomegaly occurred in two infected children and six suffered interstitial pneumonitis. Three congenitally infected children have major neurological handicaps including spastic quadriplegia, microcephaly, and psychomotor delay, and five (10%), including the one with quadriplegia, have sensorineural deafness which is bilateral in three (6%). Estimates based on these findings suggest that the impact of congenital cytomegalovirus infection is comparable to that of congenital rubella in the era before vaccination. Of the 42 children where the nature of maternal infection was classifiable, congenital infection followed primary maternal infection in 32 (76%) and recurrent infection in 10 (24%). Neurological defects followed exposure to primary maternal infection in all three trimesters of pregnancy and also recurrent maternal infection. PMID:6098225

  15. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infections

    PubMed Central

    Odell, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary infections due to nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are increasingly recognized worldwide. Although over 150 different species of NTM have been described, pulmonary infections are most commonly due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), Mycobacterium kansasii, and Mycobacterium abscessus. The identification of these organisms in pulmonary specimens does not always equate with active infection; supportive radiographic and clinical findings are needed to establish the diagnosis. It is difficult to eradicate NTM infections. A prolonged course of therapy with a combination of drugs is required. Unfortunately, recurrent infection with new strains of mycobacteria or a relapse of infection caused by the original organism is not uncommon. Surgical resection is appropriate in selected cases of localized disease or in cases in which the infecting organism is resistant to medical therapy. Additionally, surgery may be required for infections complicated by hemoptysis or abscess formation. This review will summarize the practical aspects of the diagnosis and management of NTM thoracic infections, with emphasis on the indications for surgery and the results of surgical intervention. The management of NTM disease in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections is beyond the scope of this article and, unless otherwise noted, comments apply to hosts without HIV infection PMID:24624285

  16. Phase 1/2 Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Dose Escalation, Safety, and Pharmacokinetic Study of Pagibaximab (BSYX-A110), an Antistaphylococcal Monoclonal Antibody for the Prevention of Staphylococcal Bloodstream Infections, in Very-Low-Birth-Weight Neonates?

    PubMed Central

    Weisman, Leonard E.; Thackray, Helen M.; Garcia-Prats, Joseph A.; Nesin, Mirjana; Schneider, Joseph H.; Fretz, Jennifer; Kokai-Kun, John F.; Mond, James J.; Kramer, William G.; Fischer, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcal sepsis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants. A human chimeric monoclonal antibody, pagibaximab, was developed against staphylococcal lipoteichoic acid. We evaluated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of pagibaximab in VLBW neonates. A phase 1/2, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation study was conducted in VLBW infants (700 to 1,300 g) 3 to 7 days old. Patients received two doses 14 days apart of intravenous pagibaximab (10, 30, 60, or 90 mg/kg of body weight) or placebo in a 2:1 ratio. Blood and urine samples were obtained pre- and postinfusion for analysis of safety and pharmacokinetics, and data on adverse events were gathered. Staphylococcal organisms causing sepsis were collected and evaluated. Fifty-three patients received at least one dose of pagibaximab or placebo. The average gestational age was 27.6 weeks; the average birth weight was 1,003 g. All serious adverse events were deemed unrelated or probably not drug related. Morbidity and mortality were similar across treatment groups. No evidence of immunogenicity of pagibaximab was detected. Pagibaximab pharmacokinetics was linear. The mean clearance (CL), volume of distribution, and elimination half-life of pagibaximab were independent of dose. The serum half-life was 20.5 ± 6.8 days. Pagibaximab enhanced serum opsonophagocytic activity. All staphylococci causing sepsis were opsonizable by pagibaximab. Two infusions of pagibaximab, administered 2 weeks apart to high-risk neonates appeared safe and tolerable, and pharmacokinetics were linear. Evaluation of more frequent doses, at the highest doses tested, in neonates at high-risk of staphylococcal sepsis, is warranted. PMID:19380597

  17. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  18. Fungal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Caputo, R V

    1986-01-01

    Fungal infections of the skin represent a relatively common problem in pediatric dermatology. Although fungal infections of the feet, nails, and groin are uncommon in the pediatric age group, fungal infections of the scalp are very common and must be diagnosed early because they may lead to permanent hair loss if left untreated. Perhaps the most significant change in fungal infections in children has occurred in tinea capitis, including the causative agent and the type of infection this organism may produce; these factors are focused upon in this article. Also discussed are infections caused by the yeast organisms Candida albicans and Pityrosporum orbiculare, as well as the deep mycoses, specifically chromoblastomycosis and cutaneous aspergillosis. PMID:2941199

  19. Particle exposures and infections.

    PubMed

    Ghio, A J

    2014-06-01

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, agricultural work, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), wood stoves, traffic-related emissions, gas stoves, and ambient air pollution are all particle-related exposures associated with an increased risk for respiratory infections. In addition, cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, and ETS can result in an elevated risk for tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis. One of the mechanisms for particle-related infections includes an accumulation of iron by surface functional groups of particulate matter (PM). Since elevations in metal availability are common to every particle exposure, all PM potentially contributes to these infections. Therefore, exposures to wood stove emissions, diesel exhaust, and air pollution particles are predicted to increase the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis, albeit these elevations are likely to be small and detectable only in large population studies. Since iron accumulation correlates with the presence of surface functional groups and dependent metal coordination by the PM, the risk for infection continues as long as the particle is retained. Subsequently, it is expected that the cessation of exposure will diminish, but not totally reverse, the elevated risk for infection. PMID:24488331

  20. Coxiella burnetii infection.

    PubMed

    Kazar, Jan

    2005-12-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterium that causes a worldwide zoonosis, Q fever, and can be misused as a biological warfare agent. Infection in animals (coxiellosis) is mostly persistent. Infection in humans is often asymptomatic, but it can manifest as an acute disease (usually a self-limited flu-like illness, pneumonia, or hepatitis) or as a chronic form (mainly endocarditis, but also hepatitis and chronic fatigue syndrome). C. burnetii infection in pregnant women may result in abortions, premature deliveries, and stillbirths. Infection in nature is maintained and transmitted by ticks as the principal vector and reservoir. Cattle, sheep, and goats are the most important source of human infections. Humans contract C. burnetii infection mostly by aerosol in contact with contaminated environs, wind playing an important factor in spreading the infection. The wide distribution of C. burnetii contributes to a high resistance of its extracellular small cell variant to environmental conditions. Its intracellular large cell variant, adapted to survive under harsh conditions of phagolysosomes, enables long-term survival and persistence of C. burnetii, namely in monocytes/macrophages. Host factors such as underlying disease and cell-mediated immunity play a decisive role in the clinical expression of C. burnetii infection. Complete genome analysis of C. burnetii will certainly contribute to better understanding of the pathogenesis of C. burnetii infection and will improve Q fever diagnosis and immunoprophylaxis. PMID:16481501

  1. Bacterial Skin Infections.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Fadi; Khan, Tariq; Pujalte, George G A

    2015-12-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections account for 0.5% of outpatient visits to primary care. Skin and soft tissue infections can usually be managed in an outpatient setting. However, there are certain circumstances as discussed in this article that require more urgent care or inpatient management. Primary care providers should be able to diagnose, manage, and provide appropriate follow-up care for these frequently seen skin infections. This article provides family physicians with a comprehensive review of the assessment and management of common bacterial skin infections. PMID:26612370

  2. Infection in Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Cook, Gillian E; Markel, David C; Ren, Weiping; Webb, Lawrence X; McKee, Michael D; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2015-12-01

    Infection in orthopaedic trauma patients is a common problem associated with significant financial and psychosocial costs, and increased morbidity. This review outlines technologies to diagnose and prevent orthopaedic infection, examines implant-related infection and its management, and discusses the treatment of post-traumatic osteomyelitis. The gold standard for diagnosing infection has a number of disadvantages, and thus new technologies to diagnose infection are being explored, including multilocus polymerase chain reaction with electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and optical imaging. Numerous strategies have been employed to prevent orthopaedic infection, including use of antibiotic-impregnated implant coatings and cement; however, further research is required to optimize these technologies. Biofilm formation on orthopaedic implants is attributed to the glycocalyx-mediated surface mode of bacterial growth and is usually treated through a secondary surgery involving irrigation, debridement and the appropriate use of antibiotics, or complete removal of the infected implant. Research into the treatment of post-traumatic osteomyelitis has focused on developing an optimal local antibiotic delivery vehicle, such as antibiotic-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement beads or bioabsorbable bone substitute (BBS) delivery systems. As these new technologies to diagnose, prevent and treat orthopaedic infection advance, the incidence of infection will decrease and patient care will be optimized. PMID:26584261

  3. Unusual infections in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Neafie, R C; Marty, A M

    1993-01-01

    Nine cases of unusual infections in humans are presented. In each case, we present the clinical history, histopathologic changes (if indicated), morphologic features of the causative organism, diagnosis, discussion, differential diagnosis, therapy, and current literature. All of the cases are illustrated with pertinent photographs. The nine cases are as follows: (i) acanthocephaliasis, the first acquired human infection by Moniliformis moniliformis in the United States; (ii) dipylidiasis, an uncommon infection caused by the dog tapeworm, Dipylidium caninum; (iii) granulomatous amebic encephalitis, caused by the recently identified leptomyxid group of amebae; (iv) schistosomiasis, a dual infection of the urinary bladder with the rare presentation of both adult worms and eggs of Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni in tissue sections; (v) syphilitic gastritis, an uncommon presentation of Treponema pallidum infection, in a patient with an additional incidental infection by Helicobacter pylori; (vi) microsporidiosis, the only infection caused by a Pleistophora sp. in humans; (vii) sporotrichosis, a rare disseminated infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii with numerous yeast cells in the scrotum; (viii) angiostrongyliasis, the first and only infection caused by Angiostrongylus costaricensis acquired in either Puerto Rico or the United States; and (ix) botryomycosis of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, caused by gram-positive cocci with an unusually large number of granules. Images PMID:8457979

  4. Delinking CARD9 and IL-17: CARD9 Protects against Candida tropicalis Infection through a TNF-?-Dependent, IL-17-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Whibley, Natasha; Jaycox, Jillian R; Reid, Delyth; Garg, Abhishek V; Taylor, Julie A; Clancy, Cornelius J; Nguyen, M Hong; Biswas, Partha S; McGeachy, Mandy J; Brown, Gordon D; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2015-10-15

    Candida is the third most common cause of bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients. Immunity to C. albicans, the most frequent species to be isolated in candidiasis, involves a well-characterized Dectin-1/caspase-associated recruitment domain adaptor 9 (CARD9)/IL-17 signaling axis. Infections caused by non-albicans Candida species are on the rise, but surprisingly little is known about immunity to these pathogens. In this study, we evaluated a systemic infection model of C. tropicalis, a clinically relevant, but poorly understood, non-albicans Candida. Mice lacking CARD9 were profoundly susceptible to C. tropicalis, displaying elevated fungal burdens in visceral organs and increased mortality compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Unlike C. albicans, IL-17 responses were induced normally in CARD9(-/-) mice following C. tropicalis infection. Moreover, there was no difference in susceptibility to C. tropicalis infection between WT and IL-23p19(-/-), IL-17RA(-/-), or Act1(-/-) mice. However, TNF-? expression was markedly impaired in CARD9(-/-) mice. Consistently, WT mice depleted of TNF-? were more susceptible to C. tropicalis, and CARD9-deficient neutrophils and monocytes failed to produce TNF-? following stimulation with C. tropicalis Ags. Both neutrophils and monocytes were necessary for defense against C. tropicalis, because their depletion in WT mice enhanced susceptibility to C. tropicalis. Disease in CARD9(-/-) mice was not due to defective neutrophil or monocyte recruitment to infected kidneys. However, TNF-? treatment of neutrophils in vitro enhanced their ability to kill C. tropicalis. Thus, protection against systemic C. tropicalis infection requires CARD9 and TNF-?, but not IL-17, signaling. Moreover, CARD9-dependent production of TNF-? enhances the candidacidal capacity of neutrophils, limiting fungal disease during disseminated C. tropicalis infection. PMID:26336150

  5. Delinking CARD9 and IL-17: CARD9 Protects against Candida tropicalis Infection through a TNF-?–Dependent, IL-17–Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Whibley, Natasha; Jaycox, Jillian R.; Reid, Delyth; Garg, Abhishek V.; Taylor, Julie A.; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Nguyen, M. Hong; Biswas, Partha S.; McGeachy, Mandy J.; Brown, Gordon D.

    2015-01-01

    Candida is the third most common cause of bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients. Immunity to C. albicans, the most frequent species to be isolated in candidiasis, involves a well-characterized Dectin-1/caspase-associated recruitment domain adaptor 9 (CARD9)/IL-17 signaling axis. Infections caused by non-albicans Candida species are on the rise, but surprisingly little is known about immunity to these pathogens. In this study, we evaluated a systemic infection model of C. tropicalis, a clinically relevant, but poorly understood, non-albicans Candida. Mice lacking CARD9 were profoundly susceptible to C. tropicalis, displaying elevated fungal burdens in visceral organs and increased mortality compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Unlike C. albicans, IL-17 responses were induced normally in CARD9?/? mice following C. tropicalis infection. Moreover, there was no difference in susceptibility to C. tropicalis infection between WT and IL-23p19?/?, IL-17RA?/?, or Act1?/? mice. However, TNF-? expression was markedly impaired in CARD9?/? mice. Consistently, WT mice depleted of TNF-? were more susceptible to C. tropicalis, and CARD9-deficient neutrophils and monocytes failed to produce TNF-? following stimulation with C. tropicalis Ags. Both neutrophils and monocytes were necessary for defense against C. tropicalis, because their depletion in WT mice enhanced susceptibility to C. tropicalis. Disease in CARD9?/? mice was not due to defective neutrophil or monocyte recruitment to infected kidneys. However, TNF-? treatment of neutrophils in vitro enhanced their ability to kill C. tropicalis. Thus, protection against systemic C. tropicalis infection requires CARD9 and TNF-?, but not IL-17, signaling. Moreover, CARD9-dependent production of TNF-? enhances the candidacidal capacity of neutrophils, limiting fungal disease during disseminated C. tropicalis infection. PMID:26336150

  6. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection (RSV): Infection and Incidence

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Links Unexplained Respiratory Disease Outbreaks Red Book® Online Infection and Incidence Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir RSV can cause upper respiratory infections (such as colds) and lower respiratory tract infections ( ...

  7. Repeated Infections in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cause of an infection, such as being in day-care centers. Children in day-care centers give infections to each other. They drool ... winter, you could move your child out of day care, where so many other children would have colds. ...

  8. Nail Fungal Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... know where or how you got a fungal nail infection. A warm, wet place is a good place for a fungus to grow. If you often wear heavy work ... in locker rooms, you can pick up a fungus from the warm, wet floors. ... fungal infections in their nails at the same time. This can happen because ...

  9. Preventing Giardia Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beer, W. Nicholas

    1993-01-01

    Outdoor recreationists are at risk for developing giardia infection from drinking contaminated stream water. Giardia is the most common human parasite found in contaminated water that causes gastrointestinal illness. Describes medical treatment and ways of preventing infection through water treatment, including heat, filtration, and chemical…

  10. Genitourinary infection in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Julka, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is known to increase the risk of infection and the commonest amongst them are the ones involving the genitourinary tract. The infections in a diabetic patient are unique in that they are recurrent, more severe, requiring hospitalization, and also have higher mortality than nondiabetics. Some infections are exclusively found in diabetics like the emphysematous pyelonephritis while others have their natural history complicated due to hyperglycemia. Asymptomatic bacteriuria may lead to albuminuria and urinary tract infection and may need to be treated in diabetics. Not just this certain organisms have a predilection for the genitourinary tract of the diabetic patient. All of the above makes the diabetic patient vulnerable to infections and therefore early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is mandatory. PMID:24251228

  11. Occupational Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Jeong, Jae Sim

    2010-01-01

    Occupational infection is a human disease caused by work-associated exposure to microbial agents through human and environmental contact. According to the literature, occupational infection was the third leading cause of occupational disease (861 cases, 8.0%), and health care, agricultural, forestry, and fishery workers were risk groups in Korea. In addition, most high-risk groups have not been protected by workers' compensation, which could lead to underestimation of the exact spectrum and magnitude of the problem, and may also result in a lack of development and implementation of occupational infection management. Through a review of national guidelines and documentations on prevention and control of occupational infection, a management strategy would promote adherence to worker safety regulations if it is explicit with regard to the agent and mode of infection in each of the high-risk groups. PMID:21258592

  12. Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Disease Symptoms

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Toxoplasma infection can result from congenital infection or infection after birth by any of the modes of transmission discussed on the epidemiology and risk factors page. Eye lesions from congenital ...

  13. What Is an Ear Infection?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Body Works Main Page What Is an Ear Infection? KidsHealth > Kids > Illnesses & Injuries > I Feel Sick! > ... pain and a fever . What Is a Middle Ear Infection? Middle ear infections are one of the ...

  14. Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infections are caused by different species of parasitic worms. They are transmitted by eggs present in human ... is based on: periodical deworming to eliminate infecting worms health education to prevent re-infection improved sanitation ...

  15. Edinburgh Research Explorer Infection homeostasis

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Infection homeostasis Citation for published version: Kotzamanis, K, Angulo, A & Ghazal, P 2015, 'Infection homeostasis: implications for therapeutic and immune programming homeostasis: implications for therapeutic and immune programming of metabolism in controlling infection

  16. Preventing Infections in Cancer Patients

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and the flu. How Does the Body Normally Fight Infections? The immune system helps your body protect ... and making it harder for your body to fight infections. An infection can lead to sepsis, the ...

  17. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary of 43 countries for 2007-2012. Device-associated module.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Víctor Daniel; Maki, Dennis George; Mehta, Yatin; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Memish, Ziad Ahmed; Al-Mousa, Haifaa Hassan; Balkhy, Hanan; Hu, Bijie; Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Raka, Lul; Cuellar, Luis E; Ahmed, Altaf; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; El-Kholy, Amani Ali; Kanj, Souha Sami; Bat-Erdene, Ider; Duszynska, Wieslawa; Van Truong, Nguyen; Pazmino, Leonardo N; See-Lum, Lucy Chai; Fernández-Hidalgo, Rosalia; Di-Silvestre, Gabriela; Zand, Farid; Hlinkova, Sona; Belskiy, Vladislav; Al-Rahma, Hussain; Luque-Torres, Marco Tulio; Bayraktar, Nesil; Mitrev, Zan; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Fisher, Dale; Abu-Khader, Ilham Bulos; Berechid, Kamal; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Arnaldo; Horhat, Florin George; Requejo-Pino, Osiel; Hadjieva, Nassya; Ben-Jaballah, Nejla; García-Mayorca, Elías; Kushner-Dávalos, Luis; Pasic, Srdjan; Pedrozo-Ortiz, Luis E; Apostolopoulou, Eleni; Mejía, Nepomuceno; Gamar-Elanbya, May Osman; Jayatilleke, Kushlani; de Lourdes-Dueñas, Miriam; Aguirre-Avalos, Guadalupe

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of an International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) surveillance study from January 2007-December 2012 in 503 intensive care units (ICUs) in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. During the 6-year study using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) U.S. National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infection (DA-HAI), we collected prospective data from 605,310 patients hospitalized in the INICC's ICUs for an aggregate of 3,338,396 days. Although device utilization in the INICC's ICUs was similar to that reported from ICUs in the U.S. in the CDC's NHSN, rates of device-associated nosocomial infection were higher in the ICUs of the INICC hospitals: the pooled rate of central line-associated bloodstream infection in the INICC's ICUs, 4.9 per 1,000 central line days, is nearly 5-fold higher than the 0.9 per 1,000 central line days reported from comparable U.S. ICUs. The overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia was also higher (16.8 vs 1.1 per 1,000 ventilator days) as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (5.5 vs 1.3 per 1,000 catheter days). Frequencies of resistance of Pseudomonas isolates to amikacin (42.8% vs 10%) and imipenem (42.4% vs 26.1%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates to ceftazidime (71.2% vs 28.8%) and imipenem (19.6% vs 12.8%) were also higher in the INICC's ICUs compared with the ICUs of the CDC's NHSN. PMID:25179325

  18. Host Genetic Background Influences the Response to the Opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Altering Cell-Mediated Immunity and Bacterial Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P. aeruginosa infection. These results now provide a basis for mapping genomic regions underlying host susceptibility to P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:25268734

  19. Neurological Consequences of Cytomegalovirus Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Neurological Consequences of Cytomegalovirus Infection Information Page Synonym(s): Giant Cell Inclusion Disease, Cytomegalovirus Infection, Salivary Gland Disease, Cytomegalic Inclusion Body ...

  20. Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Harry R.; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is a worldwide disease. An improved understanding of the natural history of HEV infection has been achieved within the last decade. Several reservoirs and transmission modes have been identified. Hepatitis E is an underdiagnosed disease, in part due to the use of serological assays with low sensitivity. However, diagnostic tools, including nucleic acid-based tests, have been improved. The epidemiology and clinical features of hepatitis E differ between developing and developed countries. HEV infection is usually an acute self-limiting disease, but in developed countries it causes chronic infection with rapidly progressive cirrhosis in organ transplant recipients, patients with hematological malignancy requiring chemotherapy, and individuals with HIV. HEV also causes extrahepatic manifestations, including a number of neurological syndromes and renal injury. Acute infection usually requires no treatment, but chronic infection should be treated by reducing immunosuppression in transplant patients and/or the use of antiviral therapy. In this comprehensive review, we summarize the current knowledge about the virus itself, as well as the epidemiology, diagnostics, natural history, and management of HEV infection in developing and developed countries. PMID:24396139

  1. Zebrafish and Streptococcal Infections.

    PubMed

    Saralahti, A; Rämet, M

    2015-09-01

    Streptococcal bacteria are a versatile group of gram-positive bacteria capable of infecting several host organisms, including humans and fish. Streptococcal species are common colonizers of the human respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, but they also cause some of the most common life-threatening, invasive infections in humans and aquaculture. With its unique characteristics and efficient tools for genetic and imaging applications, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a powerful vertebrate model for infectious diseases. Several zebrafish models introduced so far have shown that zebrafish are suitable models for both zoonotic and human-specific infections. Recently, several zebrafish models mimicking human streptococcal infections have also been developed. These models show great potential in providing novel information about the pathogenic mechanisms and host responses associated with human streptococcal infections. Here, we review the zebrafish infection models for the most relevant streptococcal species: the human-specific Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes, and the zoonotic Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae. The recent success and the future potential of these models for the study of host-pathogen interactions in streptococcal infections are also discussed. PMID:26095827

  2. Rapid Reduction of Central Line Infections in Hospitalized Pediatric Oncology Patients Through Simple Quality Improvement Methods

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung W.; Chang, Lawrence; Hanauer, David A.; Shaffer-Hartman, Jackie; Teitelbaum, Daniel; Lewis, Ian; Blackwood, Alex; Akcasu, Nur; Steel, Janell; Christensen, Joy; Niedner, Matthew F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) patients are at significant risk for developing central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs) due to their prolonged dependence on such catheters. Effective strategies to eliminate these preventable infections are urgently needed. In this study, we investigated the implementation of bundled central line maintenance practices and their effect on hospital-acquired CLA-BSIs. Materials and Methods CLA-BSI rates were analyzed within a single-institution’s PHO unit between January 2005 and June 2011. In May 2008, a multidisciplinary quality improvement team developed techniques to improve the PHO unit’s safety culture and implemented the use of catheter maintenance practices tailored to PHO patients. Data analysis was performed using time-series methods to evaluate the pre- and post-intervention effect of the practice changes. Results The pre-intervention CLA-BSI incidence was 2.92 per 1000-patient days (PD) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most prevalent pathogen (29%). In the post-intervention period, the CLA-BSI rate decreased substantially (45%) to 1.61 per 1000-PD (p<0.004). Early on, blood and marrow transplant (BMT) patients had a three-fold higher CLA-BSI rate compared to non-BMT patients (p<0.033). With additional infection control countermeasures added to the bundled practices, BMT patients experienced a larger CLA-BSI rate reduction such that BMT and non-BMT CLA-BSI rates were not significantly different post-intervention. Conclusions By adopting and effectively implementing uniform maintenance catheter care practices, learning multidisciplinary teamwork, and promoting a culture of patient safety, the CLA-BSI incidence in our study population was significantly reduced and maintained. PMID:22522576

  3. Sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery: incidence and risk factors according to clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Lemaignen, A; Birgand, G; Ghodhbane, W; Alkhoder, S; Lolom, I; Belorgey, S; Lescure, F-X; Armand-Lefevre, L; Raffoul, R; Dilly, M-P; Nataf, P; Lucet, J C

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after cardiac surgery depends on the definition used. A distinction is generally made between mediastinitis, as defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and superficial SSI. Our objective was to decipher these entities in terms of presentation and risk factors. We performed a 7-year single centre analysis of prospective surveillance of patients with cardiac surgery via median sternotomy. SSI was defined as the need for reoperation due to infection. Among 7170 patients, 292 (4.1%) developed SSI, including 145 CDC-defined mediastinitis (CDC-positive SSI, 2.0%) and 147 superficial SSI without associated bloodstream infection (CDC-negative SSI, 2.1%). Median time to reoperation for CDC-negative SSI was 18 days (interquartile range, 14-26) and 16 (interquartile range, 11-24) for CDC-positive SSI (p 0.02). Microorganisms associated with CDC-negative SSI were mainly skin commensals (62/147, 41%) or originated in the digestive tract (62/147, 42%); only six were due to Staphylococcus aureus (4%), while CDC-positive SSI were mostly due to S. aureus (52/145, 36%) and germs from the digestive tract (52/145, 36%). Risk factors for SSI were older age, obesity, chronic obstructive bronchopneumonia, diabetes mellitus, critical preoperative state, postoperative vasopressive support, transfusion or prolonged ventilation and coronary artery bypass grafting, especially if using both internal thoracic arteries in female patients. The number of internal thoracic arteries used and factors affecting wound healing were primarily associated with CDC-negative SSI, whereas comorbidities and perioperative complications were mainly associated with CDC-positive SSI. These 2 entities differed in time to revision surgery, bacteriology and risk factors, suggesting a differing pathophysiology. PMID:25882356

  4. Superficial Fungal Infections.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Neha; Pujalte, George G A; Reese, Stephanie T

    2015-12-01

    Superficial fungal infections grow in dark and moist areas and invade various parts of the body. These infections are easily treatable in immunocompetent individuals. In immunosuppressed individuals, the presentation can be quite severe, requiring use of more potent antifungal agents. The treatment for these conditions consists of topical antifungal agents, creams, and oral systemic medications. The use of prednisone can alter the appearance of superficial fungal infections, making them difficult to diagnose. It is important for primary care providers to become adept at understanding the epidemiology, transmission, clinical presentation, diagnosis techniques, and treatment options available. PMID:26612371

  5. Ocular Infection: Endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Stephen G; Flynn, Harry W; Das, Taraprasad; Mieler, William F

    2016-01-01

    Endophthalmitis is characterized by marked inflammation of intraocular fluids and tissues. Infective endophthalmitis may be categorized by the cause of the infection, which helps predict the underlying etiology and most likely causative organisms. The major category remains acute-onset postoperative endophthalmitis. Infective endophthalmitis is a clinical diagnosis but is confirmed by evaluation of intraocular fluid specimens. The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study offered important guidelines for the initial management of endophthalmitis, and these guidelines remain relevant to this day. Prompt initiation of empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial therapy is important in achieving best outcomes. PMID:26501897

  6. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  7. Detection and Characterization of Infections and Infection Susceptibility

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-24

    Immune Disorders; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; Genetic Immunological Deficiencies; Hyperimmunoglobulin-E Recurrent Infection Syndrome; Recurrent Infections; Unknown Immune Deficiency; GATA2 Deficiency (MonoMAC),; Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections; Hyper IgE (Job s) Syndrome; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Susceptibility to Disseminated Infections; Primary Immune Deficiency Disease (PIDD)

  8. Other avian paramyxovirus infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian paramyxovirus infections have been reported for chickens and turkeys in association with respiratory disease or drops in egg production. This book chapter provides general information on etiology, clinical signs, lesions, diagnosis, prevention and control of avian paramyxoviruses except Newca...

  9. Staph infections - hospital

    MedlinePLUS

    ... catheters, IVs, or central lines In surgical wounds, pressure sores (also called bed sores), or foot ulcers Once ... Saunders; 2011:chap 296. Fishman N, Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: ...

  10. Ear infection - acute

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Risk factors for acute ear infections include: Attending day care (especially those with more than 6 children) Changes ... hands and toys often. If possible, choose a day care that has 6 or fewer children. This can ...

  11. Fungal Nail Infection (Onychomycosis)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... disorders. In the most common form of fungal nail infections, fungus grows under the growing portion of the nail ... doctor may perform testing, such as scraping a nail to examine for fungi or clipping a nail to look for bacterial ...

  12. Pets and Pasteurella Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Pets and Pasteurella Infections Article Body Bacterial organisms from ... your child is bitten or scratched by a pet, wild animal, or any animal unknown to you, ...

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two- ... breath or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of ...

  14. Phlebovirus infections in Greece.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Kontana, Anastasia; Tsergouli, Katerina

    2015-07-01

    Sandfly fever viruses are endemic in the Mediterranean region causing to humans asymptomatic or mild infections to severe neurological syndromes. In order to investigate the epidemiology of phlebovirus infections in Greece, samples from 499 patients with acute febrile illness (50.2% accompanied by neurological symptoms) were tested during 2010-2014 by serological and molecular methods. Phlebovirus infection was detected in 40 (8%) patients, 25 of them presenting acute neurological infection. Most cases were observed in the summer, with a peak in August. Increased number of cases was observed in 2013, and three of them were observed in Athens. Toscana virus lineage C RNA was detected in one encephalitis case, while the serological results showed that most cases were caused by phleboviruses belonging to the sandfly fever Naples virus serocomplex. This study provided the first insight into the epidemiology of phleboviral disease in Greece. PMID:25733059

  15. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests. PMID:26096095

  16. Toxoplasmosis (Toxoplasma infection) Treatment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Parasites - Toxoplasmosis ( Toxoplasma infection) Parasites Home Share Compartir Treatment On ... Healthy people (nonpregnant) Most healthy people recover from toxoplasmosis without treatment. Persons who are ill can be ...

  17. Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Group B Strep Infection Overview What is group B strep? Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for ... skin, lips, or nails may turn blue) Diagnosis & Tests How will I know I have group B ...

  18. E. Coli Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is E. coli? E. coli is short for Escherichia coli -- bacteria (germs) that cause severe cramps and diarrhea. E. ... and especially in people who have another illness. E. coli infection is more common during the summer months and ...

  19. Yeast infections (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Yeast infections may follow a course of antibiotics that were prescribed for another purpose. The antibiotics change the normal "balance" between organisms in the vagina by suppressing the growth of protective bacteria that normally have an antifungal effect.

  20. Acute cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by CMV. Other tests such as a CMV antibody test may be done to check your body’s response to the CMV infection. Other tests include: Blood tests for platelets and white blood cells Chemistry panel Liver function ...

  1. Treatment of HIV Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Treatment of HIV Infection Photo of a variety of different drug ... drugs in order to maintain their health quality. HIV/AIDS Treatment Research NIAID is focused on finding ...

  2. Arcanobacterium Haemolyticum Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Haemolyticum Infections Article Body Arcanobacterium (formerly classified as Corynebacterium ) haemolyticum is an organism that most often causes ... Guide (Copyright © 2006 American Academy of Pediatrics) The information contained on this Web site should not be ...

  3. Fungal Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Quiz) Structure and Function of the Skin (Video) Skin Cancer (News) Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Nail Fungus (News) Health Tip: Easing Hives Additional Content Medical News Overview of Fungal Skin Infections by Denise M. Aaron, MD NOTE: This ...

  4. Bacterial Skin Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Quiz) Structure and Function of the Skin (Video) Skin Cancer (News) Health Tip: Recognizing Signs of Nail Fungus (News) Health Tip: Easing Hives Additional Content Medical News Overview of Bacterial Skin Infections by A. Damian Dhar, MD, JD NOTE: ...

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... a bladder infection, your doctor will order some medicine for you to take to kill the bacteria. ... the hospital. At the hospital, the germ-fighting medicine can be delivered more effectively through a tiny ...

  6. Chlamydial infections - male

    MedlinePLUS

    ... urine from the bladder and passes through the penis). This type of chlamydia infection is passed from ... a burning sensation during urination Discharge from the penis Redness, swelling, or itching of the opening of ...

  7. Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Vandenplas, Y; Badriul, H

    1999-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach of man, especially during childhood. However, H. pylori strains are not created equal, with major differences in virulence factors such as the vacuolating cytotoxin A and the cytotoxic-associated gene A, probably accounting for different clinical symptoms. The majority of infected subjects remain asymptomatic. Symptoms are aspecific. Helicobacter pylori infection is correlated with socioeconomic conditions and hygienic circumstances, resulting in an extremely high prevalence in children in developing countries. The golden standard technique to diagnose Helicobacter infection is culture of gastric biopsies; specificity and sensitivity of serology are low during childhood. Carbon-13 urea breath tests are a useful in the diagnosis but especially during follow-up. Recommended treatment consists of proton pump inhibitors in combination with two antibiotics out of amoxycillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole. The importance or clinical relevance of Helicobacter infection in asymptomatic individuals remains to be determined. PMID:10910617

  8. AVIAN PARAMYXOVIRUS INFECTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian paramyxovirus infections have been reported for chickens and turkeys in association with respiratory disease or drops in egg production. This book chapter provides general information on etiology, clinical signs, lesions, diagnosis, prevention and control of avian paramyxoviruses except Newca...

  9. Mycoplasma infections of plants.

    PubMed

    Bove, J M

    1981-07-01

    Plants can be infected by two types of wall-less procaryotes, spiroplasmas and mycoplasma-like organisms (MLO), both located intracellularly in the phloem tissues of affected plants. Spiroplasmas have been cultured, characterized and shown to be true members of the class Mollicutes. MLO have not yet been cultured or characterized; they are thought to be mycoplasma-like on the basis of their ultrastructure as seen in situ, their sensitivity to tetracycline and resistance to penicillin. Mycoplasmas can also be found on the surface of plants. These extracellularly located organisms are members of the following genera: Spiroplasma. Mycoplasma and Acholeplasma. The presence of such surface mycoplasmas must not be overlooked when attempts to culture MLO from affected plants are undertaken. Sensitive serological techniques such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) can successfully be used to compare the MLO located in the phloem of affected plants with those eventually cultured from the same plants. In California and Morocco periwinkles naturally infected with both Spiroplasma citri and MLO have been reported. With such doubly infected plants, the symptom expression has been that characteristic of the MLO disease (phyllody or stolbur), not that given by S. citri. Only S. citri can be cultured from such plants, but this does not indicate that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease expressed by the plant. In California many nonrutaceous plants have been found to be infected with S. citri. Stubborn affected citrus trees represent an important reservoir of S. citri, and Circulifer tenellus is an active leafhopper vector of S. citri. Hence, it is not surprising that in California MLO-infected fruit trees could also become infected with S. citri but it would not mean that S. citri is the causal agent of the disease. Criteria are discussed that are helpful in distinguishing between MLO infections and S. citri infections. PMID:7287398

  10. Facial bacterial infections: folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Ana Cristina; Schwartz, Robert A; Cohen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Facial bacterial infections are most commonly caused by infections of the hair follicles. Wherever pilosebaceous units are found folliculitis can occur, with the most frequent bacterial culprit being Staphylococcus aureus. We review different origins of facial folliculitis, distinguishing bacterial forms from other infectious and non-infectious mimickers. We distinguish folliculitis from pseudofolliculitis and perifolliculitis. Clinical features, etiology, pathology, and management options are also discussed. PMID:25441463

  11. [Recurrent urinary tract infection].

    PubMed

    Ali, Adel Ben; Bagnis, Corinne Isnard

    2014-09-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infection involves mainly women and exhibits an ecological as well as economical risk. 4% of all urinary tract infection are recurrent and usually secondary to general or local abnormalities. A multidisciplinary medical and surgical team (urology, nephrology, bacteriology, infectious disease) best performs diagnosis and treatment as well as rules out reversible etiology. Treatment relies on behavioral changes before offering cranberry products and/or antibioprophylaxis if necessary. PMID:25362782

  12. [Pediatric nosocomial infections

    PubMed

    Carvalho, E S; Marques, S R

    1999-07-01

    OBJECTIVE: Considering that the nosocomial infections have been a serious problem of public health all over the world in both developed and developing countries, this revision has the aim of amplifying the pediatrician's knowledge, in different interfaces of the question. METHODS: A review of the articles from the specific literature of the area leading to a practical presentation of the topics as well on the personal experience of the writers, who work in this area. RESULTS: We have characterized which topics are important when dealing with nosocomial infection as, for example, the concepts used in nosocomial infections, the methods of epidemiological surveillance, the nosocomial infections in pediatric critical areas as the intensive care and the neonatal units, the techniques of isolation and precaution, ending with general and specific preventive actions. CONCLUSION: Technical knowledge about the central questions in nosocomial infections should be basis for a conscious and responsible involvement of all the professionals in the health area to control and prevent these infections. PMID:14685481

  13. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  14. Worm Infections in Children.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, Jill E; Hotez, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    • On the basis of research evidence, worm infections are important global child health conditions causing chronic disability that lasts from childhood into adulthood (Table 1). (2)(3) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, the major worm infections found in developing countries include ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infection, and schistosomiasis; toxocariasis, enterobiasis, and cysticercosis are also found in poor regions of North America and Europe. (4)(9)(13) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of expert consensus, children and adolescents are often vulnerable to acquiring large numbers of worms, ie, high-intensity infections (Fig 1)(21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: D • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, moderate and heavy worm burdens cause increased morbidity because of growth and intellectual stunting in children and adolescents. Many of these effects may result from helminth-induced malnutrition. (21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: C • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, worm infections are also commonly associated with eosinophilia. (48) (49) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence as well as consensus, helminthes can cause inflammation in the lung (asthma), gastrointestinal tract (enteritis and colitis), liver (hepatitis and fibrosis), and urogenital tract. (7)(21)(22)(23)(27)(28)(40)(41)(43) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, microscopy techniques for diagnosis of worm infections in children often exhibit suboptimal sensitivities and specificities, necessitating new or improved diagnostic modalities such as polymerase chain reaction. (54)(55) Evidence Quality: A • On the basis of research evidence and expert consensus, mass drug administration (“preventive chemotherapy”) has becomea standard practice for ministries of health in low- and middle-income countries to control intestinal helminth infections and schistosomiasis. (67)(68) Evidence Quality: B. PMID:26232464

  15. Capsular Sialic Acid of Streptococcus suis Serotype 2 Binds to Swine Influenza Virus and Enhances Bacterial Interactions with Virus-Infected Tracheal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingchao; Gagnon, Carl A.; Savard, Christian; Music, Nedzad; Srednik, Mariela; Segura, Mariela; Lachance, Claude; Bellehumeur, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 is an important swine bacterial pathogen, and it is also an emerging zoonotic agent. It is unknown how S. suis virulent strains, which are usually found in low quantities in pig tonsils, manage to cross the first host defense lines to initiate systemic disease. Influenza virus produces a contagious infection in pigs which is frequently complicated by bacterial coinfections, leading to significant economic impacts. In this study, the effect of a preceding swine influenza H1N1 virus (swH1N1) infection of swine tracheal epithelial cells (NTPr) on the ability of S. suis serotype 2 to adhere to, invade, and activate these cells was evaluated. Cells preinfected with swH1N1 showed bacterial adhesion and invasion levels that were increased more than 100-fold compared to those of normal cells. Inhibition studies confirmed that the capsular sialic acid moiety is responsible for the binding to virus-infected cell surfaces. Also, preincubation of S. suis with swH1N1 significantly increased bacterial adhesion to/invasion of epithelial cells, suggesting that S. suis also uses swH1N1 as a vehicle to invade epithelial cells when the two infections occur simultaneously. Influenza virus infection may facilitate the transient passage of S. suis at the respiratory tract to reach the bloodstream and cause bacteremia and septicemia. S. suis may also increase the local inflammation at the respiratory tract during influenza infection, as suggested by an exacerbated expression of proinflammatory mediators in coinfected cells. These results give new insight into the complex interactions between influenza virus and S. suis in a coinfection model. PMID:24082069

  16. Upper respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Jain, N; Lodha, R; Kabra, S K

    2001-12-01

    Acute respiratory infections accounts for 20-40% of outpatient and 12-35% of inpatient attendance in a general hospital. Upper respiratory tract infections including nasopharyngitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis and otitis media constitute 87.5% of the total episodes of respiratory infections. The vast majority of acute upper respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses. Common cold is caused by viruses in most circumstances and does not require antimicrobial agent unless it is complicated by acute otitis media with effusion, tonsillitis, sinusitis, and lower respiratory tract infection. Sinusitis is commonly associated with common cold. Most instances of rhinosinusitis are viral and therefore, resolve spontaneously without antimicrobial therapy. The most common bacterial agents causing sinusitis are S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, M. catarrhalis, S. aureus and S. pyogenes. Amoxycillin is antibacterial of choice. The alternative drugs are cefaclor or cephalexin. The latter becomes first line if sinusitis is recurrent or chronic. Acute pharyngitis is commonly caused by viruses and does not need antibiotics. About 15% of the episodes may be due to Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GABS). Early initiation of antibiotics in pharyngitis due to GABS can prevent complications such as acute rheumatic fever. The drug of choice is penicillin for 10-14 days. The alternative medications include oral cephalosporins (cefaclor, cephalexin), amoxicillin or macrolides. PMID:11838568

  17. Infection control for norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, L.; Park, G. W.; Vega, E.; Hall, A.; Parashar, U.; Vinjé, J.; Lopman, B.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infections are notoriously difficult to prevent and control, owing to their low infectious dose, high shedding titre, and environmental stability. The virus can spread through multiple transmission routes, of which person-to-person and foodborne are the most important. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have helped to establish norovirus as the most common cause of sporadic gastroenteritis and the most common cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis across all ages. In this article, we review the epidemiology and virology of noroviruses, and prevention and control guidelines, with a focus on the principles of disinfection and decontamination. Outbreak management relies on sound infection control principles, including hand hygiene, limiting exposure to infectious individuals, and thorough environmental decontamination. Ideally, all infection control recommendations would rely on empirical evidence, but a number of challenges, including the inability to culture noroviruses in the laboratory and the challenges of outbreak management in complex environments, has made it difficult to garner clear evidence of efficacy in certain areas of infection control. New experimental data on cultivable surrogates for human norovirus and on environmental survivability and relative resistance to commonly used disinfectants are providing new insights for further refinining disinfection practices. Finally, clinical trials are underway to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines, which may shift the current infection control principles to more targeted interventions. PMID:24813073

  18. [COPD and infection].

    PubMed

    Bals, R; Gillissen, A; Lorenz, J; Morr, H; Pfeifer, M; Randerath, W; Rohde, G; Schultze-Werninghaus, G; Steinkamp, G; Taube, C; Vogelmeier, C; Watz, H; Welte, T; Worth, H

    2010-08-01

    Infections are frequent and important causes of exacerbations in patients with COPD. This article reviews underlying mechanisms and therapeutic consequences. A complex interaction exists between COPD, co-morbidities, physical inactivity and systemic inflammation. The components of the postulated chronic inflammatory systemic syndrome need to be identified in more detail; physical inactivity seems to be the least common denominator. The patient's adaptive and innate immune systems play a role for the pathogenesis of infections. When interpreting positive bacterial cultures, it is important to differentiate between colonisation and infection. The impact of viral infections in COPD exacerbation needs further clarification, including the task to distinguish acute infection from viral persistence. Community acquired pneumonias pose a special risk for patients with COPD. Clinical scores and procalcitonin serum concentrations can support decisions on whether or not to start antibiotic treatment. Antibiotics probably do not need to be taken for longer than 5 days, since their efficacy does not increase after longer treatment, while adverse events rise in frequency. Hospitalisations for respiratory exacerbations are associated with increased mortality in COPD. PMID:20533170

  19. Chlamydiaceae infections in pig.

    PubMed

    Schautteet, Katelijn; Vanrompay, Daisy

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria. They are responsible for a broad range of diseases in animals and humans. In pigs, Chlamydia suis, Chlamydia abortus, Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia psittaci have been isolated. Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs are associated with different pathologies such as conjunctivitis, pneumonia, pericarditis, polyarthritis, polyserositis, pseudo-membranous or necrotizing enteritis, periparturient dysgalactiae syndrome, vaginal discharge, return to oestrus, abortion, mummification, delivery of weak piglets, increased perinatal and neonatal mortality and inferior semen quality, orchitis, epididymitis and urethritis in boars. However, Chlamydiaceae are still considered as non-important pathogens because reports of porcine chlamydiosis are rare. Furthermore, Chlamydiaceae infections are often unnoticed because tests for Chlamydiaceae are not routinely performed in all veterinary diagnostic laboratories and Chlamydiaceae are often found in association with other pathogens, which are sometimes more easily to detect. However, recent studies have demonstrated that Chlamydiaceae infections in breeding sows, boars and piglets occur more often than thought and are economically important. This paper presents an overview on: the taxonomy of Chlamydiaceae occurring in pigs, diagnostic considerations, epidemiology and pathology of infections with Chlamydiaceae in pigs, public health significance and finally on prevention and treatment of Chlamydiaceae infections in pigs. PMID:21314912

  20. Dirofilarial infections in Europe.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Claudio; Kramer, Laura H; Rivasi, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    Nematodes of the genus Dirofilaria are currently considered emerging agents of parasitic zoonoses in Europe. Climatic changes and an increase in the movement of reservoirs (mostly infected dogs) have caused an increase in the geographical range of these parasites from the traditionally endemic/hyperendemic southern regions, and the risk for human infection has increased. In the last several years, forecast models have predicted that current summer temperatures are sufficient to facilitate extrinsic incubation of Dirofilaria in many areas of Europe. The global warming projected by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggests that warm summers suitable for Dirofilaria transmission in Europe will be the rule in the future decades, and if the actual trend of temperature increase continues, filarial infection should spread into previously infection-free areas. Dirofilaria repens is currently the filarial species that is most commonly reported as spreading from southern to northern areas. This article reviews the zoonotic aspects, effects of climate, and other global drivers on Dirofilaria infections in Europe and the possible implications on the transmission and control of these mosquito-borne nematodes. PMID:21417922

  1. DENGUE VIRAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Gurugama, Padmalal; Garg, Pankaj; Perera, Jennifer; Wijewickrama, Ananda; Seneviratne, Suranjith L

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections. PMID:20418983

  2. [Diagnosis of maternofetal infections].

    PubMed

    Vauloup-Fellous, Christelle; Bouthry, Elise

    2015-06-01

    Prevention is an essential aspect of management of infections that can be transmitted from mother to fetus during pregnancy: The prescription and interpretation of serologic markers differ according to clinical context: screening, counts, clinical signs, or ultrasound signs. Testing for rubella IgG antibodies is recommended at the beginning of pregnancy, in the absence of written results proving either immunity or previous vaccination with two doses. Monthly serologic monitoring (IgG and IgM) is recommended for woman lacking immunity to toxoplasmosis. Diagnosis of a primary infection requires the concomitant detection of IgG and IgM. Nonetheless, the presence of specific IgM is not necessarily a marker of recent infection. IgG avidity must be measured to confirm or rule out a recent primary infection when IgM is positive. The observation of stable antibody titers is often inaccurately considered to be reassuring. In fact, depending on the individuals tested and especially the technique used, antibodies may reach a plateau several days or several weeks after the onset of the infection. Clinical diagnosis of rubella is not reliable, and its rarity today means that physicians are unlikely to recognize it or consider it as a possible differential diagnosis. Nonetheless, residual circulation of the rubella virus continues in France. A chickenpox rash is diagnosed clinically. For atypical eruptions, the virus can be sought directly in the vesicular fluid. Serology is not helpful in this case. PMID:26033555

  3. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  4. Infections and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Felaco, P; Toniato, E; Castellani, M L; Ciampoli, C; De Amicis, D; Orso, C; Cuccurullo, C; De Lutiis, M A; Patruno, A; Speranza, L; Felaco, M; Caraffa, A; Pandolfi, F; Antinolfi, P L; Cerulli, G; Conti, F; Fulcheri, M; Sabatino, G; Conti, P; Shaik, Y

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells play a role in various physiological functions: innate and acquired immunity, epithelium remodelling and proliferation, angiogenesis, cancer, inflammation and infections. Mast cells are activated by cross-linking of FcERI molecules, which are involved in the binding of multivalent antigens to the attached IgE molecules, resulting in a variety of responses including the immediate release of potent inflammatory mediators. In addition, mast cell biology consists in the capability to secrete preformed mediators which include biogenic amines and newly synthetized mediators, which include lipid-derived mediators and cytokines. It has been reported that parasite infections induce a systemic immunomodulatory network, including regulatory T cells, pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, which might play a key role in the allergic phenotype. Here, in this article, we revisited the relationship between mast cells and infections. PMID:20003762

  5. Emerging and Resistant Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kalil, Andre C.; Fowler, Vance G.; Ghedin, Elodie; Kolls, Jay K.; Nguyen, M. Hong

    2014-01-01

    The lungs are a major target for infection and a key battleground in the fight against the development of antimicrobial drug–resistant pathogens. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is associated with mortality rates of 24–50%. The optimal duration of antibiotic therapy against VAP is unknown, but prolonged courses are associated with the emergence of bacterial resistance. De-escalation strategies in which treatment is discontinued based on signs of clinical resolution, fixed durations of therapy (generally 7–8 d), or serum procalcitonin responses have been shown to decrease antibiotic consumption. Outcomes are comparable to longer treatment courses, with the possible exception of VAP due to nonfermenting, gram-negative bacilli such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of VAP and other infections. Outcomes after S. aureus infection are shaped by the interplay between environmental, bacterial, and host genetic factors. It is increasingly clear that mechanisms of pathogenesis vary in different types of S. aureus infections. Genome-scale studies of S. aureus strains, host responses, and host genetics are redefining our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying VAP. Genome-sequencing technologies are also revolutionizing our understanding of the molecular epidemiology, evolution, and transmission of influenza. Deep sequencing using next-generation technology platforms is defining the remarkable genetic diversity of influenza strains within infected hosts. Investigators have demonstrated that antiviral drug-resistant influenza may be present prior to the initiation of treatment. Moreover, drug-resistant minor variant influenza strains can be transmitted from person to person in the absence of selection pressure. Studies of lung infections and the causative pathogens will remain at the cutting edge of clinical and basic medical research. PMID:25148425

  6. Emerging and resistant infections.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Cornelius J; Kalil, Andre C; Fowler, Vance G; Ghedin, Elodie; Kolls, Jay K; Nguyen, M Hong

    2014-08-01

    The lungs are a major target for infection and a key battleground in the fight against the development of antimicrobial drug-resistant pathogens. Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is associated with mortality rates of 24-50%. The optimal duration of antibiotic therapy against VAP is unknown, but prolonged courses are associated with the emergence of bacterial resistance. De-escalation strategies in which treatment is discontinued based on signs of clinical resolution, fixed durations of therapy (generally 7-8 d), or serum procalcitonin responses have been shown to decrease antibiotic consumption. Outcomes are comparable to longer treatment courses, with the possible exception of VAP due to nonfermenting, gram-negative bacilli such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of VAP and other infections. Outcomes after S. aureus infection are shaped by the interplay between environmental, bacterial, and host genetic factors. It is increasingly clear that mechanisms of pathogenesis vary in different types of S. aureus infections. Genome-scale studies of S. aureus strains, host responses, and host genetics are redefining our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying VAP. Genome-sequencing technologies are also revolutionizing our understanding of the molecular epidemiology, evolution, and transmission of influenza. Deep sequencing using next-generation technology platforms is defining the remarkable genetic diversity of influenza strains within infected hosts. Investigators have demonstrated that antiviral drug-resistant influenza may be present prior to the initiation of treatment. Moreover, drug-resistant minor variant influenza strains can be transmitted from person to person in the absence of selection pressure. Studies of lung infections and the causative pathogens will remain at the cutting edge of clinical and basic medical research. PMID:25148425

  7. Device-associated infection rates and bacterial resistance in six academic teaching hospitals of Iran: Findings from the International Nocosomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    PubMed

    Jahani-Sherafat, Somayeh; Razaghi, Maryam; Rosenthal, Victor D; Tajeddin, Elahe; Seyedjavadi, Simasadat; Rashidan, Marjan; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Rostampour, Maryam; Haghi, Arezo; Sayarbayat, Masoumeh; Farazmandian, Somayeh; Yarmohammadi, Tahere; Arshadi, Fardokht K; Mansouri, Nahid; Sarbazi, Mohammad R; Vilar, Mariano; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-01-01

    Device-associated health care-acquired infections (DA-HAIs) pose a threat to patient safety, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, few data regarding DA-HAI rates and their associated bacterial resistance in ICUs from Iran are available. A DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted in six adult and pediatric ICUs in academic teaching hospitals in Tehran using CDC/NHSN definitions. We collected prospective data regarding device use, DA-HAI rates, and lengths of stay from 2584 patients, 16,796 bed-days from one adult ICU, and bacterial profiles and bacterial resistance from six ICUs. Among the DA-HAIs, there were 5.84 central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABs) per 1000 central line-days, 7.88 ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) per 1000 mechanical ventilator-days and 8.99 catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) per 1000 urinary catheter-days. The device utilization ratios were 0.44 for central lines, 0.42 for mechanical ventilators and 1.0 for urinary catheters. The device utilization ratios of mechanical ventilators and urinary catheters were higher than those reported in the ICUs of the INICC and the CDC's NHSN reports, but central line use was lower. The DA-HAI rates in this study were higher than the CDC's NHSN report. However, compared with the INICC report, the VAP rate in our study was lower, while the CLAB rate was similar and the CAUTI rate was higher. Nearly 83% of the samples showed a mixed-type infection. The most frequent pathogens were Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterococcus spp. In the S. aureus isolates, 100% were resistant to oxacillin. Overall resistances of A. baumannii and K. pneumonia to imipenem were 70.5% and 76.7%, respectively. A multiple drug resistance phenotype was detected in 68.15% of the isolates. The DA-HAI rates in Iran were shown to be higher than the CDC-NHSN rates and similar to the INICC rates. Resistance to oxacillin and imipenem was higher as well. Comparing device use, DA-HAI rates, and bacterial resistance for the primary isolated bacteria indicated a direct association between urinary catheter use and the rates of CAUTI. PMID:26027477

  8. Treatment of the Infected Stone.

    PubMed

    Marien, Tracy; Miller, Nicole L

    2015-11-01

    Infected kidney stones refer to stones that form because of urinary tract infections with urease-producing bacteria, secondarily infected stones of any composition, or stones obstructing the urinary tract leading to pyelonephritis. The mainstay of treatment of infection stones is complete stone removal. Kidney stones that obstruct the urinary tract and cause obstructive pyelonephritis are also frequently referred to as infected stones. Obstructive pyelonephritis is a urologic emergency as it can result in sepsis and even death. Infection stones and obstructive stones causing pyelonephritis are different disease processes, and their workup and management are described separately. PMID:26475943

  9. Fungus Infections: Tinea

    MedlinePLUS

    ... both feet may be involved. Onychomycosis (Tinea unguium, nail fungus) Toenail infection is usually associated with tinea pedis. It is very difficult to eradicate. Often the great toenail is the first to ... injured. The nail yellows, and after years thickens and breaks easily. ...

  10. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Diagnosis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... The first option is to look for the worms in the perianal reqion 2 to 3 hours after the infected person is asleep. The second option is to touch the perianal skin with transparent tape to collect possible pinworm eggs around the anus ...

  11. Infections and Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Christina N; Tsimis, Michael; Burd, Irina

    2015-10-01

    Several different bodies of evidence support a link between infection and altered brain development. Maternal infections, such as influenza and human immunodeficiency virus, have been linked to the development of autism spectrum disorders, differences in cognitive test scores, and bipolar disorder; an association that has been shown in both epidemiologic and retrospective studies. Several viral, bacterial, and parasitic illnesses are associated with alterations in fetal brain structural anomalies including brain calcifications and hydrocephalus. The process of infection can activate inflammatory pathways causing the release of various proinflammatory biomarkers and histological changes consistent with an infectious intrauterine environment (chorioamnionitis) or umbilical cord (funisitis). Elevations in inflammatory cytokines are correlated with cerebral palsy, schizophrenias, and autism. Animal studies indicate that the balance of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines is critical to the effect prenatal inflammation plays in neurodevelopment. Finally, chorioamnionitis is associated with cerebral palsy and other abnormal neurodevelopmental outcomes. In conclusion, a plethora of evidence supports, albeit with various degrees of certainty, the theory that maternal infection and inflammation that occur during critical periods of fetal development could theoretically alter brain structure and function in a time-sensitive manner. PMID:26490164

  12. Mycobacterium riyadhense infections

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Mustafa M.; Alshukairi, Abeer N.; Qutub, Mohammed O.; Elkhizzi, Noura A.; Hilluru, Haris M.; Omrani, Ali S.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium riyadhense is a newly described slowly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacterium species. We describe 2 new cases of Mycobacterium riyadhense infections presenting with extra-pulmonary involvement, and reviewed all previously reported cases in the literature. We also describe the spectrum of the disease and explore treatment options based on the experience with the current and previously reported cases. PMID:25935185

  13. [Nosocomial infections in urology].

    PubMed

    Piechota, H; Kramer, A

    2014-10-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) may be a serious and mostly avoidable consequence of medical procedures and often cause a significant aggravation of the patients underlying disease. Following surgical site infections, urinary tract infections (UTI) represent the second most common fraction of NIs (22.4%) in Germany and contribute to approximately 155,000 nosocomial UTIs (nUTI) every year.Prevention of NI is of utmost individual as well as socioeconomic importance especially regarding the continuing worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance. National legislature has responded to this challenge by amending the German Law on the Prevention and Control of Infectious Diseases (IfSG) and other measures. Their practical importance for various clinical settings in urology is outlined in this overview.The correct use of urinary catheters has the greatest impact for prevention and control as nUTIs are associated with urinary catheters in most of the cases (80%). The recently updated guidelines of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention of the Robert Koch Institute (KRINKO) and the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) provide detailed recommendations in an evidence-based and practice-oriented manner as summarized in this article. PMID:25292308

  14. Biophysics of Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines a likely basis of the tenacity of biofilm infections that has received relatively little attention: the resistance of biofilms to mechanical clearance. One way that a biofilm infection persists is by withstanding the flow of fluid or other mechanical forces that work to wash or sweep microorganisms out of the body. The fundamental criterion for mechanical persistence is that the biofilm failure strength exceeds the external applied stress. Mechanical failure of the biofilm and release of planktonic microbial cells is also important in vivo because it can result in dissemination of infection. The fundamental criterion for detachment and dissemination is that the applied stress exceeds the biofilm failure strength. The apparent contradiction for a biofilm to both persist and disseminate is resolved by recognizing that biofilm material properties are inherently heterogeneous. There are also mechanical aspects to the ways that infectious biofilms evade leukocyte phagocytosis. The possibility of alternative therapies for treating biofilm infections that work by reducing biofilm cohesion could: 1) allow prevailing hydrodynamic shear to remove biofilm, 2) increase the efficacy of designed interventions for removing biofilms, 3) enable phagocytic engulfment of softened biofilm aggregates, and 4) improve phagocyte mobility and access to biofilm. PMID:24376149

  15. Urinary Tract Infections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  16. Salmonella Infections in Childhood.

    PubMed

    Bula-Rudas, Fernando J; Rathore, Mobeen H; Maraqa, Nizar F

    2015-08-01

    Salmonella are gram-negative bacilli within the family Enterobacteriaceae. They are the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Animals (pets) are an important reservoir for nontyphoidal Salmonella, whereas humans are the only natural host and reservoir for Salmonella Typhi. Salmonella infections are a major cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. They account for an estimated 2.8 billion cases of diarrheal disease each year. The transmission of Salmonella is frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated water and food of animal origin, and it is facilitated by conditions of poor hygiene. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infections have a worldwide distribution, whereas most typhoidal Salmonella infections in the United States are acquired abroad. In the United States, Salmonella is a common agent for food-borne–associated infections. Several outbreaks have been identified and are most commonly associated with agricultural products. Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection is usually characterized by a self-limited gastroenteritis in immunocompetent hosts in industrialized countries, but it may also cause invasive disease in vulnerable individuals (eg, children less than 1 year of age, immunocompromised). Antibiotic treatment is not recommended for treatment of mild to moderate gastroenteritis by nontyphoidal Salmonella in immunocompetent adults or children more than 1 year of age. Antibiotic treatment is recommended for nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in infants less than 3 months of age, because they are at higher risk for bacteremia and extraintestinal complications. Typhoid (enteric) fever and its potential complications have a significant impact on children, especially those who live in developing countries. Antibiotic treatment of typhoid fever has become challenging because of the emergence of Salmonella Typhi strains that are resistant to classically used first-line agents: ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol. The choice of antibiotics for the management of typhoid fever should be guided by the local resistance pattern. Recommendations include using an extended spectrum cephalosporin, azithromycin, or a fluoroquinolone. Fecal carriage of Salmonella is an important factor in the spread of the organism to healthy individuals. The most important measures to prevent the spread and outbreaks of Salmonella infections and typhoid fever are adequate sanitation protocols for food processing and handling as well as hand hygiene. In the United States, 2 vaccines are commercially available against Salmonella Typhi. The WHO recommends the use of these vaccines in endemic areas and for outbreak control. PMID:26205108

  17. Candida infection of the skin

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hosts a variety of germs, including bacteria and fungi. Some of these are useful to the body, ... harmful infections. Some fungal infections are caused by fungi that live on the hair, nails, and outer ...

  18. Thrush and Other Candida Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... these infections are caused by Candida albicans, a yeast-like fungus, although other species of Candida are ... in some cases. Teenaged girls who develop a yeast infection of the vagina and the surrounding area ...

  19. Hand infections: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Capdarest-Arest, Nicole; Bertoch, Spencer T.; Bakken, Erik C.; Hoover, Susan E.; Zou, Jiyao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Hand infections are common, usually resulting from an untreated injury. In this retrospective study, we report on hand infection cases needing surgical drainage in order to assess patient demographics, causation of infection, clinical course, and clinical management. Methods. Medical records of patients presenting with hand infections, excluding post-surgical infections, treated with incision and debridement over a one-year period were reviewed. Patient demographics; past medical history; infection site(s) and causation; intervals between onset of infection, hospital admission, surgical intervention and days of hospitalization; gram stains and cultures; choice of antibiotics; complications; and outcomes were reviewed. Results. Most infections were caused by laceration and the most common site of infection was the palm or dorsum of the hand. Mean length of hospitalization was 6 days. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, beta-hemolytic Streptococcus and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus were the most commonly cultured microorganisms. Cephalosporins, clindamycin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, penicillin, vancomycin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole were major antibiotic choices. Amputations and contracture were the primary complications. Conclusions. Surgery along with medical management were key to treatment and most soft tissue infections resolved without further complications. With prompt and appropriate care, most hand infection patients can achieve full resolution of their infection. PMID:25210653

  20. Edinburgh Research Explorer Infection homeostasis

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Infection homeostasis Citation for published version: Kotzamanis, K, Angulo, A & Ghazal, P 2015, 'Infection homeostasis: implications for therapeutic and immune programming:395­407 DOI 10.1007/s00430-015-0402-5 REVIEW Infection homeostasis: implications for therapeutic and immune

  1. In vivo magnetic enrichment, photoacoustic diagnosis, and photothermal purging of infected blood using multifunctional gold and magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Shashkov, Evgeny; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Beenken, Karen E; Basnakian, Alexei G; Shirtliff, Mark E; Kim, Jin-Woo; Smeltzer, Mark S; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Bacteremia is a particular concern owing to the possibility of septic shock and the development of metastatic infections. Treatment of bacteremia is increasingly compromised by the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains, creating an urgent need for alternative therapy. Here, we introduce a method for in vivo photoacoustic (PA) detection and photothermal (PT) eradication of Staphylococcus aureus in tissue and blood. We show that this method could be applicable for label-free diagnosis and treatment of in the bloodstream using intrinsic near-infrared absorption of endogenous carotenoids with nonlinear PA and PT contrast enhancement. To improve sensitivity and specificity for detection of circulating bacteria cells (CBCs), two-color gold and multilayer magnetic nanoparticles with giant amplifications of PA and PT contrasts were functionalized with an antibody cocktail for molecular targeting of S. aureus surface-associated markers such as protein A and lipoprotein. With a murine model, the utility of this approach was demonstrated for ultrasensitive detection of CBCs with threshold sensitivity as low as 0.5 CBCs/mL, in vivo magnetic enrichment of CBCs, PT eradication of CBCs, and real-time monitoring of therapeutic efficacy by CBC counting. Our PA-PT nano-theranostic platform, which integrates in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification, multicolor recognition, and feedback control, could be used as a biological tool to gain insights on dissemination pathways of CBCs, infection progression by bacteria re-seeding, and sepsis development and treatment, and could potentially be feasible in humans, especially using bypass schematic. PMID:23049814

  2. Chronic Helminth Infection Does Not Exacerbate Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hübner, Marc P.; Killoran, Kristin E.; Rajnik, Michael; Wilson, Samuel; Yim, Kevin C.; Torrero, Marina N.; Morris, Christopher P.; Nikonenko, Boris; Blanco, Jorge C. G.; Hemming, Val G.; Mitre, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic helminth infections induce a Th2 immune shift and establish an immunoregulatory milieu. As both of these responses can suppress Th1 immunity, which is necessary for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection, we hypothesized that chronic helminth infections may exacerbate the course of MTB. Methodology/Principal Findings Co-infection studies were conducted in cotton rats as they are the natural host for the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis and are an excellent model for human MTB. Immunogical responses, histological studies, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures were assessed two months after MTB challenge in cotton rats with and without chronic L. sigmodontis infection. Spleen cell proliferation and interferon gamma production in response to purified protein derivative were similar between co-infected and MTB-only infected animals. In contrast to our hypothesis, MTB loads and occurrence and size of lung granulomas were not increased in co-infected animals. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that chronic filaria infections do not exacerbate MTB infection in the cotton rat model. While these results suggest that filaria eradication programs may not facilitate MTB control, they indicate that it may be possible to develop worm-derived therapies for autoimmune diseases that do not substantially increase the risk for infections. PMID:23285308

  3. In Vivo Magnetic Enrichment, Photoacoustic Diagnosis, and Photothermal Purging of Infected Blood Using Multifunctional Gold and Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Shashkov, Evgeny; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Beenken, Karen E.; Basnakian, Alexei G.; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Kim, Jin-Woo; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a primary cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Bacteremia is a particular concern owing to the possibility of septic shock and the development of metastatic infections. Treatment of bacteremia is increasingly compromised by the emergence of antibiotic resistant strains, creating an urgent need for alternative therapy. Here, we introduce a method for in vivo photoacoustic (PA) detection and photothermal (PT) eradication of Staphylococcus aureus in tissue and blood. We show that this method could be applicable for label-free diagnosis and treatment of in the bloodstream using intrinsic near-infrared absorption of endogenous carotenoids with nonlinear PA and PT contrast enhancement. To improve sensitivity and specificity for detection of circulating bacteria cells (CBCs), two-color gold and multilayer magnetic nanoparticles with giant amplifications of PA and PT contrasts were functionalized with an antibody cocktail for molecular targeting of S. aureus surface-associated markers such as protein A and lipoprotein. With a murine model, the utility of this approach was demonstrated for ultrasensitive detection of CBCs with threshold sensitivity as low as 0.5 CBCs/mL, in vivo magnetic enrichment of CBCs, PT eradication of CBCs, and real-time monitoring of therapeutic efficacy by CBC counting. Our PA-PT nano-theranostic platform, which integrates in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification, multicolor recognition, and feedback control, could be used as a biological tool to gain insights on dissemination pathways of CBCs, infection progression by bacteria re-seeding, and sepsis development and treatment, and could potentially be feasible in humans, especially using bypass schematic. PMID:23049814

  4. Clinical correlation between HBV infection and concomitant bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Jin, Ronghua; Chen, Peng; Zhao, Guoxian; Li, Ning; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common in patients suffering viral hepatitis and critical for prognosis. However, any correlation between HBV and concomitant bacterial infections is not well characterized. A retrospective study was conducted from Jan 2012 to Jan 2014 on 1333 hospitalized patients infected with bacteria. Among them, 491 HBV-infected patients were co-infected with E. coli (268), S. aureus (61), P. aeruginosa (64) or K. pneumoniae (98). A group of 300 complication-free chronically HBV-infected patients were controls. We found that HBV DNA levels were elevated in patients with each of the bacterial infections (all P?infections by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Patients with HBV DNA???2000?IU/mL had higher rates of all four concomitant bacterial infections (all P?infections (P?=?0.022, 0.017 and 0.016, respectively), but not S. aureus (P?=?0.194). In conclusion, bacterial infections are associated with a high level of HBV replication, which, in turn, has a significant positive impact on bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. These correlations vary between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26634436

  5. Clinical correlation between HBV infection and concomitant bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Jin, Ronghua; Chen, Peng; Zhao, Guoxian; Li, Ning; Wu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are common in patients suffering viral hepatitis and critical for prognosis. However, any correlation between HBV and concomitant bacterial infections is not well characterized. A retrospective study was conducted from Jan 2012 to Jan 2014 on 1333 hospitalized patients infected with bacteria. Among them, 491 HBV-infected patients were co-infected with E. coli (268), S. aureus (61), P. aeruginosa (64) or K. pneumoniae (98). A group of 300 complication-free chronically HBV-infected patients were controls. We found that HBV DNA levels were elevated in patients with each of the bacterial infections (all P?infections by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Patients with HBV DNA???2000?IU/mL had higher rates of all four concomitant bacterial infections (all P?infections (P?=?0.022, 0.017 and 0.016, respectively), but not S. aureus (P?=?0.194). In conclusion, bacterial infections are associated with a high level of HBV replication, which, in turn, has a significant positive impact on bacterial resistance to antimicrobials. These correlations vary between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:26634436

  6. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal

    PubMed Central

    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D’Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the potential value of examining hematological parameters as an approach to better understand the ecological relevance of parasite-host interactions. PMID:26657699

  7. Co-Infection and Wild Animal Health: Effects of Trypanosomatids and Gastrointestinal Parasites on Coatis of the Brazilian Pantanal.

    PubMed

    Olifiers, Natalie; Jansen, Ana Maria; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Bianchi, Rita de Cassia; D'Andrea, Paulo Sergio; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Gompper, Matthew Edzart

    2015-01-01

    Wild animals are infected by diverse parasites, but how they influence host health is poorly understood. We examined the relationship of trypanosomatids and gastrointestinal parasites with health of wild brown-nosed coatis (Nasua nasua) from the Brazilian Pantanal. We used coati body condition and hematological parameters as response variables in linear models that were compared using an information theoretic approach. Predictors were high/low parasitemias by Trypanosoma cruzi and T. evansi, and indices representing the abundance of distinct groups of gastrointestinal parasites. We also analyzed how host health changed with host sex and reproductive seasonality. Hemoparasites was best related to coati body condition and hematological indices, whereas abundance of gastrointestinal parasites was relatively less associated with coati health. Additionally, some associations were best predicted by models that incorporated reproductive seasonality and host sex. Overall, we observed a lower health condition during the breeding season, when coatis are under reproductive stress and may be less able to handle infection. In addition, females seem to handle infection better than males. Body condition was lower in coatis with high parasitemias of T. evansi, especially during the reproductive season. Total red blood cell counts, packed cell volume, platelets and eosinophils were also lower in animals with high T. evansi parasitemias. Total white blood cell counts and mature neutrophils were lower in animals with high parasitemias for both Trypanosoma species, with neutrophils decreasing mainly during the reproductive season. Overall, decreases in hematological parameters of females with T. evansi high parasitemias were less evident. For T. cruzi, monocytes decreased in individuals with high parasitemias. High abundances of microfilariae in the bloodstream, and cestode eggs and coccidian oocysts in feces were also associated with coati blood parameters. This study shows the potential value of examining hematological parameters as an approach to better understand the ecological relevance of parasite-host interactions. PMID:26657699

  8. Testing and Diagnosis of CMV Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hygiene CDC Feature on Prenatal Infections Testing and Diagnosis of CMV Infection Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Tests that detect the virus are used to diagnosis CMV infection at birth (congenital CMV infection). A ...

  9. Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Pieter

    Aquatic eutrophication promotes pathogenic infection in amphibians Pieter T. J. Johnson* , Jonathan Ribeiroia ondatrae sequentially infects birds, snails, and amphibian larvae, frequently causing severe limb of snail hosts, and, ultimately, the intensity of infection in amphibians. Infection also negatively

  10. Varicella infection modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Katherine A.; Finley, Patrick D.; Moore, Thomas W.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Martin, Nathaniel; Bandlow, Alisa; Detry, Richard Joseph; Evans, Leland B.; Berger, Taylor Eugen

    2013-09-01

    Infectious diseases can spread rapidly through healthcare facilities, resulting in widespread illness among vulnerable patients. Computational models of disease spread are useful for evaluating mitigation strategies under different scenarios. This report describes two infectious disease models built for the US Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) motivated by a Varicella outbreak in a VA facility. The first model simulates disease spread within a notional contact network representing staff and patients. Several interventions, along with initial infection counts and intervention delay, were evaluated for effectiveness at preventing disease spread. The second model adds staff categories, location, scheduling, and variable contact rates to improve resolution. This model achieved more accurate infection counts and enabled a more rigorous evaluation of comparative effectiveness of interventions.

  11. [New foodborne infections].

    PubMed

    Rottman, Martin; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2003-05-15

    The last 20 years have witnessed a profound reshaping of the spectrum of foodborne infections in industrialized countries. Food products are overall very safe, but the industrial scale and standardisation of food production have spawned spectacular epidemics, bringing into the light previously little known microorganisms such as Listeria or Escherichia coli O157:H7, the causative agent of the "hamburger disease". The recent "mad cow disease" crisis is another illustration of a food industry gone astray under the pressure of underlying economic stakes. Through unprecedented efforts from the countries involved--epitomized in France by the creation of the Agence française de sécurité sannitaire des aliments in 1999--these diseases are about to be curtailed in their epidemic form. But new dangers emerge yet with Campylobacter infections, Norovirus gastroenteritis or the spread of multi-resistant bacteria. Issues mostly unknown to the general public that are likely to be strongly publicized in the future. PMID:12846023

  12. [Cryptococcosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Badaoui, L; Ouladlahsen, A; Sodqi, M; Marih, L; Chakib, A; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2015-12-01

    Cryptococcosis is a cosmopolitan fungal serious condition due to an encapsulated yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. This is the systemic fungal infection the most common in HIV infection. This yeast is present in the environment and its main entrance in the body is the respiratory tract. Its gravity is linked to its tropism for the central nervous system. It generally affects subjects with severe deficit of cellular immunity and in particular, patients living with HIV. The diagnosis of neuromeningeal cryptococcosis is based on the detection of encapsulated yeasts at microscopic examination of cerebrospinal fluid, the detection of capsular polysaccharide antigen in serum or cerebrospinal fluid, but especially on the culture. A staging is always essential. The prognosis is severe. The control of intracranial hypertension is a major element of prognosis. PMID:26515783

  13. Viral infections and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen; Schneider-Schaulies, Sibylle

    2013-01-01

    Besides their essential role in the immune system, sphingolipids and their metabolites are potential key regulators in the life cycle of obligatory intracellular pathogens such as viruses. They are involved in lateral and vertical segregation of receptors required for attachment, membrane fusion and endocytosis, as well as in the intracellular replication, assembly and release of viruses. Glycosphingolipids may themselves act as receptors for viruses, such as Galactosylceramide for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In addition, sphingolipids and their metabolites are inseparably interwoven in signal transduction processes, dynamic alterations of the cytoskeleton, and the regulation of innate and intrinsic responses of infected target cells. Depending on the nature of the intracellular pathogen, they may support or inhibit infections. Understanding of the underlying mechanisms depending on the specific virus, immune control, and type of disease may open new avenues for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23563664

  14. Human microsporidial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, R; Bryan, R T; Schwartz, D A; Owen, R L

    1994-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular spore-forming protozoal parasites belonging to the phylum Microspora. Their host range is extensive, including most invertebrates and all classes of vertebrates. More than 100 microsporidial genera and almost 1,000 species have now been identified. Five genera (Enterocytozoon spp., Encephalitozoon spp., Septata spp., Pleistophora sp., and Nosema spp.) and unclassified microsporidia (referred to by the collective term Microsporidium) have been associated with human disease, which appears to manifest primarily in immunocompromised persons. The clinical manifestations of microsporidiosis are diverse and include intestinal, pulmonary, ocular, muscular, and renal disease. Among persons not infected with human immunodeficiency virus, ten cases of microsporidiosis have been documented. In human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, on the other hand, over 400 cases of microsporidiosis have been identified, the majority attributed to Enterocytozoon bieneusi, an important cause of chronic diarrhea and wasting. Diagnosis of microsporidiosis currently depends on morphological demonstration of the organisms themselves. Initial detection of microsporidia by light microscopic examination of tissue sections and of more readily obtainable specimens such as stool, duodenal aspirates, urine, sputum, nasal discharge, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and conjunctival smears is now becoming routine practice. Definitive species identification is made by using the specific fluorescein-tagged antibody (immunofluorescence) technique or electron microscopy. Treatment options are limited, but symptomatic improvement of Enterocytozoon bieneusi infection may be achieved with the anthelmintic-antiprotozoal drug albendazole. Preliminary observations suggest that Septata intestinalis and Encephalitozoon infections may be cured with albendazole. Progress is being made with respect to in vitro propagation of microsporidia, which is crucial for developing antimicrosporidial drugs. Furthermore, molecular techniques are being developed for diagnostic purposes, taxonomic classification, and analysis of phylogenetic relationships of microsporidia. Images PMID:7834600

  15. Interaction of obesity and infections.

    PubMed

    Dhurandhar, N V; Bailey, D; Thomas, D

    2015-12-01

    There is evidence that certain infections may induce obesity. Obese persons may also have more severe infections and have compromised response to therapies. The objective of this study is to review the available literature identifying infections that potentially contribute to greater body mass index (BMI) and differential responses of overweight and obese persons to infections. A systematic literature review of human studies examining associations between infections and weight gain, differential susceptibility, severity, and response to prevention and treatment of infection according to BMI status (January 1980-July 2014) was conducted. Three hundred and forty-three studies were eligible for inclusion. Evidence indicated that viral infection by human adenovirus Ad36 and antibiotic eradication of Helicobacter pylori were followed by weight gain. People who were overweight or obese had higher susceptibility to developing post-surgical infections, H1N1 influenza and periodontal disease. More severe infections tended to be present in people with a larger BMI. People with a higher BMI had a reduced response to vaccinations and antimicrobial drugs. Higher doses of antibiotics were more effective in obese patients. Infections may influence BMI, and BMI status may influence response to certain infections, as well as to preventive and treatment measures. These observations have potential clinical implications. PMID:26354800

  16. Paleomicrobiology of Bartonella infections.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Drancourt, Michel; Aboudharam, Gérard; Raoult, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Studying ancient infectious diseases is a challenge, as written contemporary descriptions, when available, are often imprecise and do not allow for accurate discrimination among the pathogens endemic at that time. Paleomicrobiology offers a unique access to the history of these infections by identifying precisely the causative agents. Body louse-transmitted infections are amongst the most epidemic diseases in history, especially in war and famine periods. Of these, Bartonella quintana was detected by suicide PCR in 4000-year-old human remains, thus representing the oldest evidence to date of an arthropod-transmitted infection to human beings. This species has also been detected in human specimens from the 11th to 15th, 18th and 19th centuries. In addition, Bartonella henselae, a cat- and flea-associated pathogen, was detected in cat specimens from the 13th to 18th centuries, therefore demonstrating an association of the bacterium and its reservoir for over 800 years. Therefore, pathogenic Bartonella species have been involved in several outbreaks in the past millennia and should systematically be investigated in human remains from suspected epidemics. PMID:26369716

  17. Amebic infection in humans.

    PubMed

    Choudhuri, Gourdas; Rangan, Murali

    2012-07-01

    Clinical human infections with the protozoa Entamoeba histolytica is still estimated to occur in 50 million people worldwide, of which approximately 100,000 die annually. Although most clinical symptoms are due to involvement of the large intestine, 1 % present with involvement of the liver in the form of a liver abscess, a potentially fatal condition. Distinguishing an invasive form (E. histolytica) from a morphologically identical non-invasive one (E. dispar) requires molecular or enzymatic characterization. Further, the pattern of infection, interpretation of presence of antibodies in the host, manifestations of disease, approach to investigations and strategies for management remain complex. This article also provides a comprehensive review of the parasite and host factors that govern the complex relationship of the prozoa and humans, and tries to explain why some develop a particular form of the disease in endemic zones. Application of modern imaging and image guided therapy seems to be playing a major role in diagnosis and management of the potentially most serious form of the disease, amebic liver abscess. Despite lack of controlled studies there is a tendency to lower the threshold of their use in clinical practice, and indeed in-hospital mortality rate seems to be falling for amebic liver abscess. In a world getting increasingly swamped by non-infectious metabolic diseases, awareness of amebic infections, its bed-side diagnosis, the use of appropriate laboratory tests, and decision making in management are shrinking. This review tries to update the scientific developments in amebiasis. PMID:22903366

  18. Saliva and viral infections.

    PubMed

    Corstjens, Paul L A M; Abrams, William R; Malamud, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 10 years there have been only a handful of publications dealing with the oral virome, which is in contrast to the oral microbiome, an area that has seen considerable interest. Here, we survey viral infections in general and then focus on those viruses that are found in and/or are transmitted via the oral cavity; norovirus, rabies, human papillomavirus, Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex viruses, hepatitis C virus, and HIV. Increasingly, viral infections have been diagnosed using an oral sample (e.g. saliva mucosal transudate or an oral swab) instead of blood or urine. The results of two studies using a rapid and semi-quantitative lateral flow assay format demonstrating the correlation of HIV anti-IgG/sIgA detection with saliva and serum samples are presented. When immediate detection of infection is important, point-of-care devices that obtain a non-invasive sample from the oral cavity can be used to provide a first line diagnosis to assist in determining appropriate counselling and therapeutic path for an increasing number of diseases. PMID:26662485

  19. Hydroxyurea for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Zachary, K C; Davis, B

    1998-04-01

    Hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of DNA synthesis, is used to treat HIV infection. By inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase, hydroxyurea depletes the pool of deoxynucleoside triphosphates, particularly dATP, available for DNA synthesis. Hydroxyurea may be a candidate for use with nucleoside analogs, particularly ddI. Hydroxyurea's use in treating HIV infection with and without ddI, with ddI and without d4T, and with ddI plus a protease inhibitor are discussed. Studies using hydroxyurea with ddI and d4T have shown clinical promise and could be a viable antiretroviral strategy in some patients, especially in countries with limited resources. A regimen containing hydroxyurea, ddI, and a protease inhibitor could be used in aggressive initial or salvage antiretroviral therapy. It is also possible that during acute HIV infection, hydroxyurea's cytostatic properties could contribute to the ultimate preservation of normal immunologic function. Hydroxyurea's dosage level is still uncertain; 500 mg twice daily has been used most often. PMID:11365149

  20. Infections on Cruise Ships.

    PubMed

    Kak, Vivek

    2015-08-01

    The modern cruise ship is a small city on the seas, with populations as large as 5,000 seen on large ships. The growth of the cruise ship industry has continued in the twenty-first century, and it was estimated that nearly 21.3 million passengers traveled on cruise ships in 2013, with the majority of these sailing from North America. The presence of large numbers of individuals in close proximity to each other facilitates transmission of infectious diseases, often through person-to-person spread or via contaminated food or water. An infectious agent introduced into the environment of a cruise ship has the potential to be distributed widely across the ship and to cause significant morbidity. The median cruise ship passenger is over 45 years old and often has chronic medical problems, so it is important that, to have a safe cruise ship experience, any potential for the introduction of an infecting agent as well as its transmission be minimized. The majority of cruise ship infections involve respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. This article discusses infectious outbreaks on cruise ships and suggests preventative measures for passengers who plan to travel on cruise ships. PMID:26350312

  1. Cryptic Leishmania infantum infection in Italian HIV infected patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a protozoan diseases caused in Europe by Leishmania (L.) infantum. Asymptomatic Leishmania infection is more frequent than clinically apparent disease. Among HIV infected patients the risk of clinical VL is increased due to immunosuppression, which can reactivate a latent infection. The aims of our study were to assess the prevalence of asymptomatic L. infantum infection in HIV infected patients and to study a possible correlation between Leishmania parasitemia and HIV infection markers. Methods One hundred and forty-five HIV infected patients were screened for the presence of anti-Leishmania antibodies and L. infantum DNA in peripheral blood. Statistical analysis was carried out by using a univariate regression analysis. Results Antibodies to L. infantum were detected in 1.4% of patients. L. infantum DNA was detected in 16.5% of patients. Significant association for PCR-Leishmania levels with plasma viral load was documented (p = 0.0001). Conclusion In our area a considerable proportion of HIV infected patients are asymptomatic carriers of L. infantum infection. A relationship between high HIV viral load and high parasitemic burden, possibly related to a higher risk of developing symptomatic disease, is suggested. PCR could be used for periodic screening of HIV patients to individuate those with higher risk of reactivation of L. infantum infection. PMID:20003257

  2. Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Infection: From an Infection Prevention Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sastry, Sangeeta; Rahman, Riaz; Yassin, Mohamed H.

    2015-01-01

    A cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) is indicated for patients with severely reduced ejection fraction or with life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias. Infection related to a CIED is one of the most feared complications of this life-saving device. The rate of CIED infection has been estimated to be between 2 and 25; though evidence shows that this rate continues to rise with increasing expenditure to the patient as well as healthcare systems. Multiple risk factors have been attributed to the increased rates of CIED infection and host comorbidities as well as procedure related risks. Infection prevention efforts are being developed as defined bundles in numerous hospitals around the country given the increased morbidity and mortality from CIED related infections. This paper aims at reviewing the various infection prevention measures employed at hospitals and also highlights the areas that have relatively less established evidence for efficacy. PMID:26550494

  3. Infections Caused by Scedosporium spp.

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Roilides, Emmanuel; Quiroz-Telles, Flavio; Meletiadis, Joseph; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Knudsen, Tena; Buchanan, Wendy; Milanovich, Jeffrey; Sutton, Deanna A.; Fothergill, Annette; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Shea, Yvonne R.; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Kottilil, Shyam; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    Scedosporium spp. are increasingly recognized as causes of resistant life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Scedosporium spp. also cause a wide spectrum of conditions, including mycetoma, saprobic involvement and colonization of the airways, sinopulmonary infections, extrapulmonary localized infections, and disseminated infections. Invasive scedosporium infections are also associated with central nervous infection following near-drowning accidents. The most common sites of infection are the lungs, sinuses, bones, joints, eyes, and brain. Scedosporium apiospermum and Scedosporium prolificans are the two principal medically important species of this genus. Pseudallescheria boydii, the teleomorph of S. apiospermum, is recognized by the presence of cleistothecia. Recent advances in molecular taxonomy have advanced the understanding of the genus Scedosporium and have demonstrated a wider range of species than heretofore recognized. Studies of the pathogenesis of and immune response to Scedosporium spp. underscore the importance of innate host defenses in protection against these organisms. Microbiological diagnosis of Scedosporium spp. currently depends upon culture and morphological characterization. Molecular tools for clinical microbiological detection of Scedosporium spp. are currently investigational. Infections caused by S. apiospermum and P. boydii in patients and animals may respond to antifungal triazoles. By comparison, infections caused by S. prolificans seldom respond to medical therapy alone. Surgery and reversal of immunosuppression may be the only effective therapeutic options for infections caused by S. prolificans. PMID:18202441

  4. Submasseteric Infection: A Rare, Deep Space Cheek Infection Causing Trismus.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Richard H; Bahadori, Robert S; Willis, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Submasseteric space infections are rare at any age but particularly so in primary school children. The origin of the infection is usually odontogenic, from pericoronitis in a third molar. Submasseteric inflammation is a deep facial space inflammation, often progressing to mature abscess, and usually misdiagnosed as staphylococcal or streptococcal lymphadenitis or pyogenic parotitis. The hallmark of a masticatory space infection is trismus. The cardinal signs of this infection include a firm mass in the body of the masseter muscle with overlying cellulitis with trismus. PMID:25411856

  5. Opportunistic Infections in Patients with HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Sekioka, Toshio; Usui, Masakatsu

    2015-01-01

    As an acquired immunodeficiency, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is primarily responsible for opportunistic infections in infected patients. However, opportunistic infections also occur in individuals with human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here, we report opportunistic infections in two Japanese HTLV-1-seropositive patients. The first patient was a 67-year-old male, who had cytomegalovirus infection associated with esophagogastritis and terminal ileitis. The patient was HTLV-1-positive and was diagnosed with smoldering adult T cell leukemia (ATL). High levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R; 4,304?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (75.5%) in peripheral blood were also detected. The second patient was a 78-year-old female, a known asymptomatic HTLV-1 carrier, who presented with persistent herpes zoster, followed by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Disease progression of smoldering ATL along opportunistic infections was observed with very high levels of serum sIL-2R (14,058?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (87.2%) in peripheral blood. In patients with suspected opportunistic infections, both HTLV-1 and HIV should be considered. In HTLV-1-positive patients, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ T cell subset may have its value as a prognostic marker. PMID:26693362

  6. Opportunistic Infections in Patients with HTLV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Sekioka, Toshio; Usui, Masakatsu; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2015-01-01

    As an acquired immunodeficiency, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is primarily responsible for opportunistic infections in infected patients. However, opportunistic infections also occur in individuals with human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here, we report opportunistic infections in two Japanese HTLV-1-seropositive patients. The first patient was a 67-year-old male, who had cytomegalovirus infection associated with esophagogastritis and terminal ileitis. The patient was HTLV-1-positive and was diagnosed with smoldering adult T cell leukemia (ATL). High levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R; 4,304?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (75.5%) in peripheral blood were also detected. The second patient was a 78-year-old female, a known asymptomatic HTLV-1 carrier, who presented with persistent herpes zoster, followed by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Disease progression of smoldering ATL along opportunistic infections was observed with very high levels of serum sIL-2R (14,058?U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (87.2%) in peripheral blood. In patients with suspected opportunistic infections, both HTLV-1 and HIV should be considered. In HTLV-1-positive patients, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ T cell subset may have its value as a prognostic marker. PMID:26693362

  7. Two Novel Point Mutations in Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Reduce Linezolid Susceptibility and Switch on the Stringent Response to Promote Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Chua, Kyra; Davies, John K.; Newton, Hayley J.; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F.; Holmes, Natasha E.; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Hong, Jong-In; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus frequently invades the human bloodstream, leading to life threatening bacteremia and often secondary foci of infection. Failure of antibiotic therapy to eradicate infection is frequently described; in some cases associated with altered S. aureus antimicrobial resistance or the small colony variant (SCV) phenotype. Newer antimicrobials, such as linezolid, remain the last available therapy for some patients with multi-resistant S. aureus infections. Using comparative and functional genomics we investigated the molecular determinants of resistance and SCV formation in sequential S. aureus isolates from a patient who had a persistent and recurrent S. aureus infection, after failed therapy with multiple antimicrobials, including linezolid. Two point mutations in key staphylococcal genes dramatically affected clinical behaviour of the bacterium, altering virulence and antimicrobial resistance. Most strikingly, a single nucleotide substitution in relA (SACOL1689) reduced RelA hydrolase activity and caused accumulation of the intracellular signalling molecule guanosine 3?, 5?-bis(diphosphate) (ppGpp) and permanent activation of the stringent response, which has not previously been reported in S. aureus. Using the clinical isolate and a defined mutant with an identical relA mutation, we demonstrate for the first time the impact of an active stringent response in S. aureus, which was associated with reduced growth, and attenuated virulence in the Galleria mellonella model. In addition, a mutation in rlmN (SACOL1230), encoding a ribosomal methyltransferase that methylates 23S rRNA at position A2503, caused a reduction in linezolid susceptibility. These results reinforce the exquisite adaptability of S. aureus and show how subtle molecular changes cause major alterations in bacterial behaviour, as well as highlighting potential weaknesses of current antibiotic treatment regimens. PMID:20548948

  8. Povidone Iodine Rectal Preparation at Time of Prostate Needle Biopsy is a Simple and Reproducible Means to Reduce Risk of Procedural Infection.

    PubMed

    Raman, Jay D; Lehman, Kathleen K; Dewan, Kalyan; Kirimanjeswara, Girish

    2015-01-01

    Single institution and population-based studies highlight that infectious complications following transrectal ultrasound guided prostate needle biopsy (TRUS PNB) are increasing. Such infections are largely attributable to quinolone resistant microorganisms which colonize the rectal vault and are translocated into the bloodstream during the biopsy procedure. A povidone iodine rectal preparation (PIRP) at time of biopsy is a simple, reproducible method to reduce rectal microorganism colony counts and therefore resultant infections following TRUS PNB. All patients are administered three days of oral antibiotic therapy prior to biopsy. The PIRP technique involves initially positioning the patient in the standard manner for a TRUS PNB. Following digital rectal examination, 15 ml of a 10% solution of commercially available povidone iodine is mixed with 5 ml of 1% lidocaine jelly to create slurry. A 4 cmx4 cm sterile gauze is soaked in this slurry and then inserted into the rectal vault for 2 min after which it is removed. Thereafter, a disposable cotton gynecologic swab is used to paint both the perianal area and the rectal vault to a distance of 3 cm from the anus. The povidone iodine solution is then allowed to dry for 2-3 min prior to proceeding with standard transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent biopsy. This PIRP technique has been in practice at our institution since March of 2012 with an associated reduction of post-biopsy infections from 4.3% to 0.6% (p=0.02). The principal advantage of this prophylaxis regimen is its simplicity and reproducibility with use of an easily available, inexpensive agent to reduce infections. Furthermore, the technique avoids exposing patients to additional systemic antibiotics with potential further propagation of multi-drug resistant organisms. Usage of PIRP at TRUS PNB, however, is not applicable for patients with iodine or shellfish allergies. PMID:26436913

  9. Canine systemic fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Krohne, S G

    2000-09-01

    The principal route of infection for the disseminated fungal diseases discussed in this article is inhalation. In some cases, direct wound contamination and ingestion may also have an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease, especially in histoplasmosis. Another common theme of these diseases is the response of the immune system. If the inoculum is small and the animal is not immunocompromised, the infection may be limited to the respiratory tract and may resolve with few or no clinical signs. Dogs are usually presented to the veterinarian when the fungus has disseminated throughout the body via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, thus causing clinical signs secondary to specific organ infection. Draining skin tracts and lymphadenopathy occur in several of the diseases. The ocular location that is frequently affected is the choroid, where the organisms cause cell-mediated chorioretinitis. Early detection of these changes is important for saving vision and for diagnosing the systemic nature of the disease. Treatment is often effective, especially early in the disease, although it is expensive and long-term, with many animals needing over a year of treatment. Sometimes the treatment must continue lifelong. Ocular disease may not respond to treatment even when respiratory and other organ system clinical signs are rapidly improving. This isolation of the eye is similar to that of the CNS and requires regular monitoring of ocular disease, especially in the fundus, to ensure that systemic drugs are penetrating into the eye. Once the disease progresses to the anterior segment, the ocular prognosis worsens. Better penetration of the blood-retinal and blood-aqueous barriers may be achieved with fluconazole when compared with the other antifungal drugs. Secondary inflammatory ocular disease must also be monitored and treated appropriately to prevent scarring, which may cause vision loss or glaucoma. PMID:11033875

  10. [Epidemiology of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Blanche, S

    1988-01-01

    Maternal-fetal HIV transmission has become almost the only mode of infection for children in countries that screen their blood supplies. In many African countries with only partial screening of the blood supply, transfusions and the use of poorly sterilized syringes and other medical materials remain major sources of infection. The epidemiology of HIV infection among women and hence among children has progressively changed since the onset of the epidemic in Western countries. The rapid increase in the proportion of seropositive women corresponds to the massive infestation of intravenous drug addicts during 1984-85. Intravenous drug users now account for 18% of adult AIDS cases in Europe, with enormous disparities between countries from 1% in the United Kingdom to 62% in Italy. 60-70% of intravenous drug users in France are likely to be seropositive for HIV, including 30-40,000 women. In May 1988, a multicenter prospective study of infants of seropositive mothers demonstrated that intravenous drug use was the principal mode of transmission for women in France, accounting for 59% of cases. The true importance of heterosexual transmission in France is still difficult to assess. Until now, the vast majority of seropositive women have been infected by men in high-risk groups. The situation is very different in Africa, where HIV 1 seroprevalence reaches 7-8% in some urban areas. Transmission is almost exclusively heterosexual. In rural areas, seroprevalence rates are lower and apparently more stable over time. Data for large parts of Africa are still fragmentary. The rate of HIV transmission from mothers to their children is not well defined. It is estimated at 30-40% according to preliminary data from the multicenter French study. No significant differences have been noted according to the mode of contamination of the mother, but it is not clear that results can be extrapolated to Africa or other geographic zones. Contamination of 1 child by another has never been proven, and nothing should prevent seropositive children from leading as normal a family and social life as possible. PMID:3187865

  11. [Salmonella infection from turtles].

    PubMed

    Torfoss, D; Abrahamsen, T G

    2000-12-10

    Small turtles are asymptomatic carriers of Salmonella. Infants are particularly at risk of clinical infection. We describe an eight months old boy who became sick with Salmonella. The family had two turtles. Salmonella Abony was found in faeces from the child and in samples from both turtles. Commercial distribution of reptiles is prohibited in Norway. However, illegal import from other countries where no such ban exist is common. There are an estimated 10,000 pet reptiles in the Oslo region, most of them are turtles. More than 90% of turtles may be carriers of Salmonella. Many owners of turtles are not aware of the risk of salmonellosis from their pets. PMID:11215934

  12. Haemoproteus infections in waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herman, C.M.

    1954-01-01

    It is proposed that Haemoproteus nettionis (Johnston and Cleland, 1909) Coatney, 1936 be accepted as the correct name for the Haemoproteus of Anatidae. A list of synonyms and amended description of the parasite is given. Infections are reported from wood ducks (Aix sponsa) and from domestic ducks and geese, the last representing a new host record. Natural transmission was demonstrated at the Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland. Possible seasonal variation is suggested with active carriers present as early as mid-April among adult wood ducks and most active transmission occurring in June and early July with limited transmission earlier or later.

  13. Sexually Transmitted Infections.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lindsay; Angarone, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a significant burden on public health in the United States. Primary prevention counseling with early diagnosis and treatment remain the best methods to decrease the incidence of STIs. Through significant public heath interventions, the incidence of gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and trichomoniasis is decreasing; however, the incidence of primary and secondary syphilis is increasing. Human papilloma virus remains the most common STI, but new vaccinations have the possibility of having a significant impact on this virus's disease potential. This review discusses the most common STIs in the United States, focusing on clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26475947

  14. Fungal infections in immunocompromised travelers.

    PubMed

    Lortholary, Olivier; Charlier, Caroline; Lebeaux, David; Lecuit, Marc; Consigny, Paul Henri

    2013-03-01

    Immunocompromised patients represent an increasing group of travelers, for business, tourism, and visiting friends and relatives. Those with severe cellular immunodeficiency (advanced human immunodeficiency virus infection and transplant recipients) display the highest risk of fungal infections. International travel is less risky in most other types of immunodeficiency (except those with neutropenia). A systematic visit in a travel clinic for immunocompromised patients traveling to the tropics ensures that the specific risks of acquiring fungal infections (and others) are understood. When immunocompromised hosts return to their area of residence, a nonbacteriologically documented, potentially severe, febrile pneumonia, with or without dissemination signs (skin lesions, cytopenia) should alert for travel-acquired fungal infection, even years after return. Localized subcutaneous nodule may be also ascribed to fungal infection. Finally, infectious diseases physicians should be aware of major clinical patterns of travel-acquired fungal infection, as well as the fungi involved, and risk factors according to the geographical area visited. PMID:23175562

  15. ‘Matching Michigan’: a 2-year stepped interventional programme to minimise central venous catheter-blood stream infections in intensive care units in England

    PubMed Central

    Bion, Julian; Richardson, Annette; Hibbert, Peter; Beer, Jeanette; Abrusci, Tracy; McCutcheon, Martin; Cassidy, Jane; Eddleston, Jane; Gunning, Kevin; Bellingan, Geoff; Patten, Mark; Harrison, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections from central venous catheters (CVC-BSIs) increase morbidity and costs in intensive care units (ICUs). Substantial reductions in CVC-BSI rates have been reported using a combination of technical and non-technical interventions. Methods We conducted a 2-year, four-cluster, stepped non-randomised study of technical and non-technical (behavioural) interventions to prevent CVC-BSIs in adult and paediatric ICUs in England. Random-effects Poisson regression modelling was used to compare infection rates. A sample of ICUs participated in data verification. Results Of 223 ICUs in England, 215 (196 adult, 19 paediatric) submitted data on 2479 of 2787 possible months and 147 (66%) provided complete data. The exposure rate was 438?887 (404?252 adult and 34?635 paediatric) CVC-patient days. Over 20?months, 1092 CVC-BSIs were reported. Of these, 884 (81%) were ICU acquired. For adult ICUs, the mean CVC-BSI rate decreased over 20?months from 3.7 in the first cluster to 1.48 CVC-BSIs/1000 CVC-patient days (p<0.0001) for all clusters combined, and for paediatric ICUs from 5.65 to 2.89 (p=0.625). The trend for infection rate reduction did not accelerate following interventions training. CVC utilisation rates remained stable. Pre-ICU infections declined in parallel with ICU-acquired infections. Criterion-referenced case note review showed high agreement between adjudicators (? 0.706) but wide variation in blood culture sampling rates and CVC utilisation. Generic infection control practices varied widely. Conclusions The marked reduction in CVC-BSI rates in English ICUs found in this study is likely part of a wider secular trend for a system-wide improvement in healthcare-associated infections. Opportunities exist for greater harmonisation of infection control practices. Future studies should investigate causal mechanisms and contextual factors influencing the impact of interventions directed at improving patient care. PMID:22996571

  16. HIV and co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  17. Radionuclide Imaging of Cardiovascular Infection.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Fozia Zahir; James, Jackie; Memmott, Matthew J; Arumugam, Parthiban

    2016-02-01

    Owing to expanding clinical indications, cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) are being increasingly used. Despite improved surgical techniques and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy, the rate of CIED-related infection is also increasing. Infection is a potentially serious complication, with clinical manifestations ranging from surgical site infection and local symptoms in the region of the generator pocket to fulminant endocarditis. The utility of radionuclide imaging as a stand-alone noninvasive diagnostic imaging test in patients with suspected endocarditis has been less frequently examined. This article summarizes the recent advances in radionuclide imaging for evaluation of patients with suspected cardiovascular infections. PMID:26590786

  18. [Catheter-related infections: microbiology].

    PubMed

    Timsit, J F

    2005-03-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are the most frequent microorganisms responsible for catheter-related infections. A relative frequency of microorganisms varies according to the countries, microenvironment and outbreaks of multiresistant bacterias. Infections due to fungi, S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. are associated with the more severe complications. Recent data suggest that chlorhexidine, either used for cutaneous antisepsis or for catheter impregnation decreases infections due to gram positive cocci. Ecological data should be taken into account when deciding a probabilistic treatment in case of suspicion of catheter-related infection. PMID:15792563

  19. Skin and Soft Tissue Infections.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Kalyanakrishnan; Salinas, Robert C; Agudelo Higuita, Nelson Ivan

    2015-09-15

    Skin and soft tissue infections result from microbial invasion of the skin and its supporting structures. Management is determined by the severity and location of the infection and by patient comorbidities. Infections can be classified as simple (uncomplicated) or complicated (necrotizing or nonnecrotizing), or as suppurative or nonsuppurative. Most community-acquired infections are caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and beta-hemolytic streptococcus. Simple infections are usually monomicrobial and present with localized clinical findings. In contrast, complicated infections can be mono- or polymicrobial and may present with systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The diagnosis is based on clinical evaluation. Laboratory testing may be required to confirm an uncertain diagnosis, evaluate for deep infections or sepsis, determine the need for inpatient care, and evaluate and treat comorbidities. Initial antimicrobial choice is empiric, and in simple infections should cover Staphylococcus and Streptococcus species. Patients with complicated infections, including suspected necrotizing fasciitis and gangrene, require empiric polymicrobial antibiotic coverage, inpatient treatment, and surgical consultation for debridement. Superficial and small abscesses respond well to drainage and seldom require antibiotics. Immunocompromised patients require early treatment and antimicrobial coverage for possible atypical organisms. PMID:26371732

  20. Enterovirus D68 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    First described in 1962 in children hospitalized for pneumonia and bronchiolitis, the Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emergent viral pathogen. Since its discovery, during the long period of surveillance up to 2005, EV-D68 was reported only as a cause of sporadic outbreaks. In recent years, many reports from different countries have described an increasing number of patients with respiratory diseases due to EV-D68 associated with relevant clinical severity. In particular, an unexpectedly high number of children have been hospitalized for severe respiratory disease due to EV-D68, requiring intensive care such as intubation and mechanical ventilation. Moreover, EV-D68 has been associated with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction in children, which has caused concerns in the community. As no specific antiviral therapy is available, treatment is mainly supportive. Moreover, because no vaccines are available, conventional infection control measures (i.e., standard, for contacts and droplets) in both community and healthcare settings are recommended. However, further studies are required to fully understand the real importance of this virus. Prompt diagnosis and continued surveillance of EV-D68 infections are essential to managing and preventing new outbreaks. Moreover, if the association between EV-D68 and severe diseases will be confirmed, the development of adequate preventive and therapeutic approaches are a priority. PMID:26610548

  1. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  2. Enterovirus D68 Infection.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Bosis, Samantha; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    First described in 1962 in children hospitalized for pneumonia and bronchiolitis, the Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is an emergent viral pathogen. Since its discovery, during the long period of surveillance up to 2005, EV-D68 was reported only as a cause of sporadic outbreaks. In recent years, many reports from different countries have described an increasing number of patients with respiratory diseases due to EV-D68 associated with relevant clinical severity. In particular, an unexpectedly high number of children have been hospitalized for severe respiratory disease due to EV-D68, requiring intensive care such as intubation and mechanical ventilation. Moreover, EV-D68 has been associated with acute flaccid paralysis and cranial nerve dysfunction in children, which has caused concerns in the community. As no specific antiviral therapy is available, treatment is mainly supportive. Moreover, because no vaccines are available, conventional infection control measures (i.e., standard, for contacts and droplets) in both community and healthcare settings are recommended. However, further studies are required to fully understand the real importance of this virus. Prompt diagnosis and continued surveillance of EV-D68 infections are essential to managing and preventing new outbreaks. Moreover, if the association between EV-D68 and severe diseases will be confirmed, the development of adequate preventive and therapeutic approaches are a priority. PMID:26610548

  3. [Recurrent urinary tract infections].

    PubMed

    Pigrau-Serrallach, Carlos

    2005-12-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (RUTI) are a frequent clinical problem in sexually active young women, pregnant or postmenopausal women and in patients with underlying urological abnormalities. The present chapter reviews RUTI based on their classification: relapses, which usually occur early (< 1 month), are caused by the same microorganism and are associated with underlying urological abnormalities, and reinfections, which usually occur later and are caused by a new distinct microorganism (or by the same microorganism usually located in the rectum or uroepithelial cells). The pathogenesis of RUTI is reviewed and the risk factors associated with RUTI in premenopausal women (usually related to sexual activity), postmenopausal women (in whom estrogen deficiency has a significant effect on the vaginal Lactobacillus flora), and in pregnant women are discussed. Likewise, an extensive review of the distinct therapeutic strategies to prevent RUTI is provided: self-treatment of cystitis, continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, postcoital antibiotic prophylaxis, topical vaginal estrogens, Lactobacillus, cranberry juice, intravesical administration of non-virulent E. coli strains and vaccines, among others. Several diagnostic-therapeutic algorithms are included. These algorithms are based on the type of urinary infection (relapse-reinfection), on the type of patient (young, postmenopausal, or pregnant women) and on the number of episodes of RUTI. PMID:16854356

  4. Echinacea

    MedlinePLUS

    ... infections including the flu, urinary tract infections, vaginal yeast infections, genital herpes, bloodstream infections (septicemia), gum disease, ... Any benefit is likely to be modest. Vaginal yeast infections. Taking echinacea and applying a medicated cream ...

  5. Clinicians’ Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Infections with Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli in Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juyan Julia; Patel, Sameer J.; Jia, Haomiao; Weisenberg, Scott A.; Furuya, E. Yoko; Kubin, Christine J.; Alba, Luis; Rhee, Kyu; Saiman, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess how healthcare professionals caring for patients in intensive care units (ICUs) understand and use antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) for multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli (MDR-GNB). Design A knowledge, attitude and practice survey assessed ICU clinicians knowledge of antimicrobial resistance, confidence interpreting susceptibility testing, and beliefs regarding the impact of susceptibility testing on patient outcomes. Setting 16 ICUs affiliated with New York-Presbyterian Hospital. Participants Attending physicians and subspecialty residents with primary clinical responsibilities in adult or pediatric ICUs and infectious diseases (ID) subspecialists and clinical pharmacists. Methods Participants completed an anonymous electronic survey. Responses included 4-level Likert scales dichotomized for analysis. Multivariate analyses were performed using Generalized Estimating Equations logistic regression to account for correlation of respondents from the same ICU. Results The response rate was 51% (178/349 eligible participants) of whom 120 (67%) were ICU physicians. Those caring for adult patients were more knowledgeable about antimicrobial activity and more familiar with MDR-GNB infections. Only 33% and 12% of ICU physicians were familiar with standardized and specialized AST methods, respectively, but >95% believed AST improved patient outcomes. When adjusted for demographic and healthcare provider characteristics, those familiar with treatment of MDR-GNB bloodstream infections, those aware of resistance mechanisms, and those aware of AST methods were more confident they could interpret AST and/or request additional in vitro testing. Conclusions Our study uncovered knowledge gaps and educational needs that could serve as the foundation for future interventions. Familiarity with MDR-GNB increased overall knowledge and familiarity with AST increased confidence interpreting these results. PMID:23388362

  6. Incidence and Etiology of Acute Lower Respiratory Tract Infections in Hospitalized Children Younger Than 5 Years in Rural Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Reem; Rhodes, Julia; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Olsen, Sonja J.; Prapasiri, Prabda; Naorat, Sathapana; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Henchaichon, Sununta; Dejsirilert, Surang; Srisaengchai, Prasong; Sawatwong, Pongpun; Jorakate, Possawat; Kaewpan, Anek; Fry, Alicia M.; Erdman, Dean; Chuananon, Somchai; Amornintapichet, Tussanee; Maloney, Susan A.; Baggett, Henry C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumonia remains a leading cause of under-five morbidity and mortality globally. Comprehensive incidence, epidemiologic and etiologic data are needed to update prevention and control strategies. Methods We conducted active, population-based surveillance for hospitalized cases of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRI) among children <5 years of age in rural thailand. ALRI cases were systematically sampled for an etiology study that tested nasopharyngeal specimens by polymerase chain reaction; children without ALRI were enrolled as controls from outpatient clinics. Results We identified 28,543 hospitalized ALRI cases from 2005 to 2010. Among the 49% with chest radiographs, 63% had findings consistent with pneumonia as identified by 2 study radiologists. The hospitalized ALRI incidence rate was 5772 per 100,000 child-years (95% confidence interval: 5707, 5837) and was higher in boys versus girls (incidence rate ratio 1.38, 95% confidence interval: 1.35–1.41) and in children 6–23 months of age versus other age groups (incidence rate ratio 1.76, 95% confidence interval: 1.69–1.84). Viruses most commonly detected in ALRI cases were respiratory syncytial virus (19.5%), rhinoviruses (18.7%), bocavirus (12.8%) and influenza viruses (8%). Compared with controls, ALRI cases were more likely to test positive for respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus and parainfluenza viruses 1 and 3 (P ? 0.01 for all). Bloodstream infections, most commonly Streptococcus pneumoniae and nontyphoidal Salmonella, accounted for 1.8% of cases. Conclusions Our findings underscore the high burden of hospitalization for ALRI and the importance of viral pathogens among children in Thailand. Interventions targeting viral pathogens coupled with improved diagnostic approaches, especially for bacteria, are critical for better understanding of ALRI etiology, prevention and control. PMID:24030346

  7. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  8. Epigenetics and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases. PMID:23209181

  9. Pulmonary Strongyloides stercoralis infection

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Canan; Gayaf, Mine; Ozsoz, Ayse; Sahin, Birsen; Aksel, Nimet; Karasu, Isil; Aydogdu, Zekiye; Turgay, Nevin

    2014-01-01

    The 17-year-old male patient presented with fever, weakness, dyspnea and weight loss. His chest radiography demonstrated diffuse reticulonodular density, and high-resolution lung tomography indicated diffuse micronodules and prevalent ground-glass pattern. The findings were consistent with miliary involvement. The patient underwent examinations for rheumatology, immunology, cytology and infectious conditions. His immune system was normal and had no comorbidities or any history of immunosuppressive treatment. Strongyloides stercoralis larvae were noted upon direct inspection of the feces. Clinical and radiological improvement was achieved with albendazole 400 mg/day. This case is being presented since miliary involvement in the lungs caused by S. stercoralis infection in an individual with intact immune system is rare and difficult to diagnosis. PMID:26029521

  10. [Infection and hemostasis].

    PubMed

    Hudecek, J; Paceková, M; Chudej, J; Kubisz, P

    2004-06-01

    Localised and following systemic inflammatory reaction accompanying progression of infection causes generation of anti-inflammatory cytokines. They activate leucocytes, endothelium, coagulation and fibrinolysis. Sepsis is usually accompanied by already decompensated disseminated intravascular coagulation which significantly affects mortality of patients with this disease. The main cause of hypercoagulation state during sepsis seems to be inhibition of fibrinolysis as a result of overproduction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in later stages of the disease. Some microorganisms have specific properties which affect individual components of hemostasis and thus increase their virulence. Because natural inhibitors of coagulation have not only anticoagulation but also strong anti-inflammatory effect, they seem to be an optimum remedy for fluorid coagulopathy during sepsis. Moreover, their use usually does not increase risk of bleeding. PMID:15346639

  11. Morbillivirus Infections: An Introduction

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Rory D.; Duprex, W. Paul; de Swart, Rik L.

    2015-01-01

    Research on morbillivirus infections has led to exciting developments in recent years. Global measles vaccination coverage has increased, resulting in a significant reduction in measles mortality. In 2011 rinderpest virus was declared globally eradicated – only the second virus to be eradicated by targeted vaccination. Identification of new cellular receptors and implementation of recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent proteins in a range of model systems have provided fundamental new insights into the pathogenesis of morbilliviruses, and their interactions with the host immune system. Nevertheless, both new and well-studied morbilliviruses are associated with significant disease in wildlife and domestic animals. This illustrates the need for robust surveillance and a strategic focus on barriers that restrict cross-species transmission. Recent and ongoing measles outbreaks also demonstrate that maintenance of high vaccination coverage for these highly infectious agents is critical. This introduction briefly summarizes the most important current research topics in this field. PMID:25685949

  12. Bacteriophages Infecting Propionibacterium acnes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Viruses specifically infecting bacteria, or bacteriophages, are the most common biological entity in the biosphere. As such, they greatly influence bacteria, both in terms of enhancing their virulence and in terms of killing them. Since the first identification of bacteriophages in the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been fascinated by these microorganisms and their ability to eradicate bacteria. In this review, we will cover the history of the Propionibacterium acnes bacteriophage research and point out how bacteriophage research has been an important part of the research on P. acnes itself. We will further discuss recent findings from phage genome sequencing and the identification of phage sequence signatures in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). Finally, the potential to use P. acnes bacteriophages as a therapeutic strategy to combat P. acnes-associated diseases will be discussed. PMID:23691509

  13. Corynebacterium Prosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cazanave, Charles; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2012-01-01

    Identification of Corynebacterium species may be challenging. Corynebacterium species are occasional causes of prosthetic joint infection (PJI), but few data are available on the subject. Based on the literature, C. amycolatum, C. aurimucosum, C. jeikeium, and C. striatum are the most common Corynebacterium species that cause PJI. We designed a rapid PCR assay to detect the most common human Corynebacterium species, with a specific focus on PJI. A polyphosphate kinase gene identified using whole-genome sequence was targeted. The assay differentiates the antibiotic-resistant species C. jeikeium and C. urealyticum from other species in a single assay. The assay was applied to a collection of human Corynebacterium isolates from multiple clinical sources, and clinically relevant species were detected. The assay was then tested on Corynebacterium isolates specifically associated with PJI; all were detected. We also describe the first case of C. simulans PJI. PMID:22337986

  14. Infective endocarditis due to brucella.

    PubMed

    Purwar, S; Metgud, S C; Darshan, A; Mutnal, M B; Nagmoti, M B

    2006-10-01

    One of the complications of brucellosis is infective endocarditis, which carries a high mortality rate if undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. We report a case of Brucella infective endocarditis, which was diagnosed serologically and by polymerase chain reaction. After Brucella specific treatment, patient showed dramatic improvement clinically, as evident by echocardiogram findings and other investigations. PMID:17185849

  15. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection – An update

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Smadar; Ford-Jones, E Lee

    1999-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is estimated to be the leading infectious cause of nonheriditary sensorneural loss and a significant cause of mental retardation. Approximately 1% of newborn infants are congenitally infected with the virus. This review summarizes recent developments concerning this infection, including clinical outcome, risk factors for aquisition diagnosis and therapy. PMID:20212987

  16. Ear Infections and Language Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Joanne E.; Zeisel, Susan A.

    Ear infections in infants and preschoolers can cause mild or moderate temporary hearing loss, which may in turn affect a child's ability to understand and learn language. Noting that providing children with proper medical treatment for ear infections or middle ear fluid is important in preventing possible problems with language development, this…

  17. HIV Infection: The Cellular Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jonathan N.; Weiss, Robin A.

    1988-01-01

    Explains a key finding of the research which revealed that initial infection resulted from the binding of the human immunodeficiency virus to a molecule known as the CD4 antigen. Describes various assays used to determine the affect of antibodies on the ability of the virus to infect the cells. (RT)

  18. Bacterial infections complicating tongue piercing

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Catherine HY; Minnema, Brian J; Gold, Wayne L

    2010-01-01

    Tongue piercing has become an increasingly popular form of body art. However, this procedure can occasionally be complicated by serious bacterial infections. The present article reports a case of prosthetic valve endocarditis caused by a Gemella species in a patient with a pierced tongue, and reviews 18 additional cases of local and systemic bacterial infections associated with tongue piercing. Infections localized to the oral cavity and head and neck region included molar abscess, glossal abscess, glossitis, submandibular lymphadenitis, submandibular sialadenitis, Ludwig’s angina and cephalic tetanus. Infections distal to the piercing site included eight cases of infective endocarditis, one case of chorioamnionitis and one case of cerebellar abscess. Oropharyngeal flora were isolated from all cases. While bacterial infections following tongue piercing are rare, there are reports of potentially life-threatening infections associated with the procedure. Both piercers and their clients should be aware of these potential complications, and standardized infection prevention and control practices should be adopted by piercers to reduce the risk. PMID:21358880

  19. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Kang, Guobin; Duan, Lijie; Lu, Wuxun; Katze, Michael G.; Lewis, Mark G.; Haase, Ashley T.; Li, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection. PMID:25933119

  20. SIV Infection of Lung Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Kang, Guobin; Duan, Lijie; Lu, Wuxun; Katze, Michael G; Lewis, Mark G; Haase, Ashley T; Li, Qingsheng

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 depletes CD4+ T cells in the blood, lymphatic tissues, gut and lungs. Here we investigated the relationship between depletion and infection of CD4+ T cells in the lung parenchyma. The lungs of 38 Indian rhesus macaques in early to later stages of SIVmac251 infection were examined, and the numbers of CD4+ T cells and macrophages plus the frequency of SIV RNA+ cells were quantified. We showed that SIV infected macrophages in the lung parenchyma, but only in small numbers except in the setting of interstitial inflammation where large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages were detected. However, even in this setting, the number of macrophages was not decreased. By contrast, there were few infected CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma, but CD4+ T cells were nonetheless depleted by unknown mechanisms. The CD4+ T cells in lung parenchyma were depleted even though they were not productively infected, whereas SIV can infect large numbers of macrophages in the setting of interstitial inflammation without depleting them. These observations point to the need for future investigations into mechanisms of CD4+ T cell depletion at this mucosal site, and into mechanisms by which macrophage populations are maintained despite high levels of infection. The large numbers of SIV RNA+ macrophages in lungs in the setting of interstitial inflammation indicates that lung macrophages can be an important source for SIV persistent infection. PMID:25933119

  1. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly encountered anaerobic organisms associated with PJI. Since anaerobic PJI has also been linked to dental procedures, we also reviewed information on the use of dental procedures and prophylaxis, when available. PMID:26341272

  2. Candida Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Baddley, John W.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Patel, Mukesh; Miró, José; Athan, Eugene; Barsic, Bruno; Bouza, Emilio; Clara, Liliana; Elliott, Tom; Kanafani, Zeina; Klein, John; Lerakis, Stamatios; Levine, Donald; Spelman, Denis; Rubinstein, Ethan; Tornos, Pilar; Morris, Arthur J.; Pappas, Paul; Fowler, Vance G.; Chu, Vivian H.; Cabell, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Candida infective endocarditis (IE) is uncommon but often fatal. Most epidemiologic data are derived from small case series or case reports. This study was conducted to explore epidemiology, treatment patterns, and outcomes of patients with Candida IE. Methods We compared 33 Candida IE cases to 2716 patients with non-fungal IE in the International Collaboration on Endocarditis - Prospective Cohort Study. Patients were enrolled and data collected from June 2000 until August 2005. Results Patients with Candida IE were more likely to have prosthetic valves (p<0.001), short term indwelling catheters (p<0.0001), and have healthcare-associated infection (p<0.001). Reasons for surgery differed between the two groups: myocardial abscess (46.7% vs. 22.2% p=0.026) and persistent positive blood cultures (33.3% vs. 9.9%, p=0.003) were more common among those with Candida IE. Mortality at discharge was higher in patients with Candida IE (30.3%) when compared to non-fungal cases (17%, p=0.046). Among Candida patients, mortality was similar in patients who received combination surgical and antifungal therapy versus antifungal therapy alone (33.3% vs. 27.8%, p=0.26). New antifungal drugs, particularly echinocandins, were used frequently. Conclusions These multi-center data suggest distinct epidemiologic features of Candida IE when compared to non-fungal cases. Indications for surgical intervention are different and mortality is increased. Newer antifungal treatment options are increasingly used. Large, multi-center studies are needed to help better define Candida IE. PMID:18283504

  3. Biofilms in periprosthetic orthopedic infections

    PubMed Central

    McConoughey, Stephen J; Howlin, Rob; Granger, Jeff F; Manring, Maurice M; Calhoun, Jason H; Shirtlif, Mark; Kathju, Sandeep; Stoodley, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As the number of total joint arthroplasty and internal fixation procedures continues to rise, the threat of infection following surgery has significant clinical implications. These infections may have highly morbid consequences to patients, who often endure additional surgeries and lengthy exposures to systemic antibiotics, neither of which are guaranteed to resolve the infection. Of particular concern is the threat of bacterial biofilm development, since biofilm-mediated infections are difficult to diagnose and effective treatments are lacking. Developing therapeutic strategies have targeted mechanisms of biofilm formation and the means by which these bacteria communicate with each other to take on specialized roles such as persister cells within the biofilm. In addition, prevention of infection through novel coatings for prostheses and the local delivery of high concentrations of antibiotics by absorbable carriers has shown promise in laboratory and animal studies. Biofilm development, especially in an arthoplasty environment, and future diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. PMID:25302955

  4. Severe acute malnutrition and infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kelsey D J; Berkley, James A

    2014-01-01

    Severe acute malnutrition (SAM) is associated with increased severity of common infectious diseases, and death amongst children with SAM is almost always as a result of infection. The diagnosis and management of infection are often different in malnourished versus well-nourished children. The objectives of this brief are to outline the evidence underpinning important practical questions relating to the management of infectious diseases in children with SAM and to highlight research gaps. Overall, the evidence base for many aspects covered in this brief is very poor. The brief addresses antimicrobials; antipyretics; tuberculosis; HIV; malaria; pneumonia; diarrhoea; sepsis; measles; urinary tract infection; nosocomial Infections; soil transmitted helminths; skin infections and pharmacology in the context of SAM. The brief is structured into sets of clinical questions, which we hope will maximise the relevance to contemporary practice. PMID:25475887

  5. Genetic susceptibility to Candida infections

    PubMed Central

    Smeekens, Sanne P; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Netea, Mihai G

    2013-01-01

    Candida spp. are medically important fungi causing severe mucosal and life-threatening invasive infections, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, not all individuals at risk develop Candida infections, and it is believed that genetic variation plays an important role in host susceptibility. On the one hand, severe fungal infections are associated with monogenic primary immunodeficiencies such as defects in STAT1, STAT3 or CARD9, recently discovered as novel clinical entities. On the other hand, more common polymorphisms in genes of the immune system have also been associated with fungal infections such as recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and candidemia. The discovery of the genetic susceptibility to Candida infections can lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as to the design of novel immunotherapeutic strategies. This review is part of the review series on host-pathogen interactions. See more reviews from this series. PMID:23629947

  6. [Rotavirus infection: epidemiology, pathology, vaccination].

    PubMed

    Mayanskiy, N A; Mayanskiy, A N; Kulichenko, T V

    2015-01-01

    Diarrheal infections remain the major cause of morbidity and mortality among children under 5 years of age. The rotavirus holds the leading position among principal diarrheal pathogens that include also norovirus, enteropathogenic and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Rotaviruses are transmitted by the fecal-oral route and are extremely contagious and stable in the environment. This facilitates viral transmission, particularly in daycare centers and hospitals. Rotavirus infection causes acute gastroenteritis with diarrhea and dehydration of various degrees resulting primarily from destruction of intestinal villus enterocytes with subsequent impairment of the ion transport and absorption. The incidence of rotavirus infection peaks during the winter and spring in countries with temperate climate. Many children have asymptomatic infection that supports rotavirus circulation in the popula- tion. Several vaccines have been developed for specific prophylaxis of rotavirus infections and demonstrated protection from severe acute rotavirus gastroenteritis and all-cause diarrheal mortality. PMID:26027271

  7. Prevention of Periprosthetic Joint Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Alisina; Parvizi, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a calamitous complication with high morbidity and substantial cost. The reported incidence is low but it is probably underestimated due to the difficulty in diagnosis. PJI has challenged the orthopaedic community for several years and despite all the advances in this field, it is still a real concern with immense impact on patients, and the healthcare system. Eradication of infection can be very difficult. Therefore, prevention remains the ultimate goal. The medical community has executed many practices with the intention to prevent infection and treat it effectively when it encounters. Numerous factors can predispose patients to PJI. Identifying the host risk factors, patients’ health modification, proper wound care, and optimizing operative room environment remain some of the core fundamental steps that can help minimizing the overall incidence of infection. In this review we have summarized the effective prevention strategies along with the recommendations of a recent International Consensus Meeting on Surgical Site and Periprosthetic Joint Infection. PMID:26110171

  8. EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS ON FLUORANTHENE MINERALIZATION BY SPHINGOMONAS PAUCIMOBILIS STRAIN EPA 505

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past results from surfactant-enhanced biodegradation studies have been equivocal because of inhibitory effects of the surfactants and a poor understanding of the characteristics of PAH-degrading microorganisms that make them responsive to surfactants. We have studied the minerali...

  9. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  10. 42 CFR 460.74 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Infection control. 460.74 Section 460...Administrative Requirements § 460.74 Infection control. (a) Standard procedures...and standard procedures with respect to infection control, including at least the...

  11. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483...Term Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to...

  12. 38 CFR 52.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Infection control. 52.190 Section 52...STATE HOMES Standards § 52.190 Infection control. The program management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to...

  13. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483...Term Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to...

  14. 38 CFR 51.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Infection control. 51.190 Section 51...STATE HOMES Standards § 51.190 Infection control. The facility management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to...

  15. 38 CFR 52.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Infection control. 52.190 Section 52...STATE HOMES Standards § 52.190 Infection control. The program management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to...

  16. 42 CFR 460.74 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Infection control. 460.74 Section 460...Administrative Requirements § 460.74 Infection control. (a) Standard procedures...and standard procedures with respect to infection control, including at least the...

  17. 38 CFR 51.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Infection control. 51.190 Section 51...STATE HOMES Standards § 51.190 Infection control. The facility management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to...

  18. Immunization Against Infection Propagation In Heterogeneous Networks

    E-print Network

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    Immunization Against Infection Propagation In Heterogeneous Networks Waseem Abbas, Sajal Bhatia to the effects such node heterogeneity might have in the overall infection (or immunization) process propa- gation, heterogeneous networks, immunization I. INTRODUCTION Infection propagation models have

  19. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share Compartir Frequently Asked Questions about Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections What is a urinary catheter? What is a urinary tract infection? What is a catheter-associated urinary tract infection? ...

  20. Intervention for Postpartum Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-20

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section