Sample records for pch family members

  1. Family Member Casualty Assistance

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Family Member Casualty Assistance Handbook Taking Care of Our Own #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1: Important Documents and Information p 22 Appendix 2: Developing Family Plans in Case Your.S. Army Corps of Engineer (USACE*) Family Members whose Soldier or Department of the Army (DA) Civilian

  2. Family Member Casualty Assistance

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Family Member Casualty Assistance Handbook Taking Care of Our Own #12;2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1: Important Documents and Information p 18 Appendix 2: Developing a Family Plan in Case Your.S. Army Corps of Engineer (USACE*) Family Members whose Soldier or Department of the Army (DA) Civilian

  3. Principal Components of Heritability From Neurocognitive Domains Differ Between Families With Schizophrenia and Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Howard; Klei, Lambertus; Calkins, Monica; Wood, Joel; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Gur, Ruben; Bradford, L. DiAnne; Richard, Jan; Edwards, Neil; Savage, Robert; Kwentus, Joseph; Allen, Trina; McEvoy, Joseph; Santos, Alberto; Gur, Raquel; Devlin, Bernie; Go, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Various measures of neurocognitive function show mean differences among individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), their relatives, and population controls. We use eigenvector transformations that maximize heritability of multiple neurocognitive measures, namely principal components of heritability (PCH), and evaluate how they distribute in SZ families and controls. Methods: African-Americans with SZ or schizoaffective disorder (SZA) (n = 514), their relatives (n = 1092), and adult controls (n = 300) completed diagnostic interviews and computerized neurocognitive tests. PCH were estimated from 9 neurocognitive domains. Three PCH, PCH1–PCH3, were modeled to determine if status (SZ, relative, and control), other psychiatric covariates, and education were significant predictors of mean values. A small-scale linkage analysis was also conducted in a subset of the sample. Results: PCH1, PCH2, and PCH3 account for 72% of the genetic variance. PCH1 represents 8 of 9 neurocognitive domains, is most highly correlated with spatial processing and emotion recognition, and has unadjusted heritability of 68%. The means for PCH1 differ significantly among SZ, their relatives, and controls. PCH2, orthogonal to PCH1, is most closely correlated with working memory and has an unadjusted heritability of 45%. Mean PCH2 is different only between SZ families and controls. PCH3 apparently represents a heritable component of neurocognition similar across the 3 diagnostic groups. No significant linkage evidence to PCH1–PCH3 or individual neurocognitive measures was discovered. Conclusions: PCH1 is highly heritable and genetically correlated with SZ. It should prove useful in future genetic analyses. Mean PCH2 differentiates SZ families and controls but not SZ and unaffected family members. PMID:22234486

  4. PCH-2 regulates Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Xu, Xiangru; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Components or downstream targets of many signaling pathways such as Insulin/IGF-1 and TOR, as well as genes involved in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics can extend worm lifespan 20% or more. The C. elegans gene pch-2 and its homologs, including TRIP13 in humans, have been studied for their functions in cell mitosis and meiosis, but have never been implicated in lifespan regulation. Here we show that over-expression of TRIP13 in human fibroblasts confers resistance to environmental stressors such as UV radiation and oxidative stress. Furthermore, pch-2 overexpression in C. elegans extends worm lifespan, and enhances worm survival in response to various stressors. Conversely, reducing pch-2 expression with RNAi shortens worm lifespan. Additional genetic epistasis analysis indicates that the molecular mechanism of pch-2 in worm longevity is tied to functions of the sirtuin family, implying that pch-2 is another chromatin regulator for worm longevity. These findings suggest a novel function of the pch-2 gene involved in lifespan determination. PMID:25635513

  5. Family Member Involvement in Hastened Death

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Helene Starks; Anthony L. Back; Robert A. Pearlman; Barbara A. Koenig; Clarissa Hsu; Judith R. Gordon; Ashok J. Bharucha

    2007-01-01

    When patients pursue a hastened death, how is the labor of family caregiving affected? The authors examined this question in a qualitative study of 35 families. Four cases reveal the main themes: “taking care” included mutual protection between patients and family members; “midwifing the death” without professional support left families unprepared for adverse events; “tying up loose ends” included dealing

  6. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    PubMed

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question. PMID:24410452

  7. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119 ...Categorically Needy Mandatory Coverage of Qualified Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A...

  8. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119 ...Categorically Needy Mandatory Coverage of Qualified Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A...

  9. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119 ...Categorically Needy Mandatory Coverage of Qualified Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A...

  10. Metabolic Regulation by p53 Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Berkers, Celia R.; Maddocks, Oliver D.K.; Cheung, Eric C.; Mor, Inbal; Vousden, Karen H.

    2013-01-01

    The function of p53 is best understood in response to genotoxic stress, but increasing evidence suggests that p53 also plays a key role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis. p53 and its family members directly influence various metabolic pathways, enabling cells to respond to metabolic stress. These functions are likely to be important for restraining the development of cancer but could also have a profound effect on the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. A better understanding of the metabolic functions of p53 family members may aid in the identification of therapeutic targets and reveal novel uses for p53-modulating drugs. PMID:23954639

  11. Grief elaboration in families with handicapped member.

    PubMed

    Calandra, C; Finocchiaro, G; Raciti, L; Alberti, A

    1992-01-01

    Families with handicapped member seem to follow the same five stages (rejection and isolation, anger, dealing with the problem, depression, acceptance) of Kubler-Ross grief elaboration theory while dealing with the narcissistic wound of a handicapped child. Some of these families show a block in one of the stages. The effort of psychotherapy is to remove the block and let them reach the last stage. In this paper families under systemic psychotherapeutic treatment are analyzed, who had in common the birth of a child with low or modest invalidating signs and psychotic or autistic features. The families structure did not show the characteristics of a psychotic family. Nevertheless either one or both parents ignored the evidence of their child disease and they built a "disease-incongrous" wait around the child, trying to push away the painful reality. The authors explain the importance of this approach for the improvement of the autistic traits. PMID:1476349

  12. Dying and death of a family member.

    PubMed

    Geyman, J P

    1983-07-01

    There are many factors that have mitigated against optimal or even adequate medical care of the dying patient despite recent technological advances in medicine. Major changes are now taking place in terms of public expectations, medical practice, and legislation related to dying and death in this society. The dying patient has five basic requirements that must be met: independence, dignity, acceptance by others of an individual approach to dying, relief of symptoms, and physical care. In many instances the home offers advantages over institutional settings if other family members are able to manage the burdens of care. Regardless of setting, the family physician plays a central role in the care of the dying patient and his or her family during preterminal, terminal, and follow-up stages. This paper presents an approach to comprehensive care whereby the symptoms of incurable terminal illness can be effectively relieved on an individualized basis. Anticipatory guidance and care are important for the effects of terminal illness and death of a family member on the surviving family members, particularly with regard to recognition and treatment of depression. PMID:6190982

  13. Managed Lane Choices by Carpools Comprised of Family Members Compared to Non-family Members

    E-print Network

    Pannu, Mandeep S.

    2011-02-22

    . Tech., Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Mark Burris Carpools can be comprised of family members (fampools), non-family members (non- fampools) or a combination of both. Overall, carpool mode share has... for their guidance and contribution in making me capable of achieving my dreams. vi ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank my advisor, Dr. Mark Burris, for the guidance and support throughout the course...

  14. Intraoperative Progress Reports Decrease Family Members' Anxiety

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jane S. Leske

    1996-01-01

    The researcher used a four-group quasi-experimental posttest design to examine the effect of intraoperative progress reports on 200 family members' anxiety. Group one (ie, control group) received standard perioperative care, which did not include intraoperative progress reports. Group two received in-person progress reports from perioperative nurses. Group three received an “attention” protocol (ie, checklist explaining hospital routines, waiting room procedures).

  15. Variables influencing family members' decisions regarding continued placement of family members with mental disabilities in one state-operated institution

    E-print Network

    Colvin, Alex Don

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of the study is to identify variables influencing family members’ decisions regarding continued placement of family members with mental disabilities in state-operated mental retardation institutions. This study was conducted during...

  16. Family members' influence on family meal vegetable choices

    PubMed Central

    Wenrich, Tionni R.; Brown, J. Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J.; Lengerich, Eugene J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and past experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Design Eight focus groups, two with each segment (men/women vegetable-likers/dislikers based on a screening form). Participants completed a vegetable intake form. Setting Rural Appalachian Pennsylvania. Participants 61 low-income, married/cohabiting men (n=28) and women (n=33). Analysis Thematic analysis within Exchange Theory framework for qualitative data. Descriptive analysis, t-tests and chi-square tests for quantitative data. Results Exchange Theory proved useful for understanding that regardless of sex or vegetable-liker/disliker status, meal preparers see more costs than rewards to serving vegetables. Past experience plus expectations of food preparer role and of deference to family member preferences supported a family norm of serving only vegetables acceptable to everyone. Emphasized vegetables are largely ignored due to unfamiliarity; family norms prevented experimentation and learning through exposure. Conclusions and Implications Interventions to increase vegetable consumption of this audience could 1) alter family norms about vegetables served, 2) change perceptions of past experiences, 3) reduce social and personal costs of serving vegetables and 4) increase tangible and social rewards of serving vegetables. PMID:20452288

  17. Family Members' Reports of the Technology Use of Family Members with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, S. B.; Wehmeyer, M. L.; Davies, D. K.; Stock, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A nationwide survey of family members of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities ranging in age from birth through adulthood was conducted to replicate a similar effort by Wehmeyer and update the knowledge base concerning technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Method: Survey responses…

  18. Perceived Family Resources Based on Number of Members with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Melinda; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how the number of family members with ADHD affects other family members' perceived resources. Method: A total of 40 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD and their mothers, fathers, and adolescent siblings living in the household participated. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze family-level data from a total…

  19. BEING SUPPORTIVE AS A FAMILY MEMBER OR FRIEND

    E-print Network

    Weston, Ken

    BEING SUPPORTIVE AS A FAMILY MEMBER OR FRIEND Distributed by the University Counseling Center, and security. Include your friends, family, and FSU community in the healing process Rely on your support's important to be supportive, you also need some support yourself. Ask friends or family members for help

  20. Listening to the Voices of Family Members, Teachers, and Community Members

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    P. Maureen Musser

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the interrelationships between and among family members and community members who work with middle level children, and middle level teachers from the perspectives of the practitioners.

  1. Family Members' Experience With Hospice in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Gage, L Ashley; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Kruse, Robin; Lewis, Alexandra; Demiris, George

    2014-11-23

    Research has documented numerous benefits and challenges associated with receipt of hospice care in nursing homes; however, study of this partnership from the perspective of residents' family members has been limited. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore family members' experience with hospice services received in the nursing home setting. Researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 175 family member interviews using a thematic analytic approach. Findings highlighted the critical role of communication in supporting residents and their family members. Care coordination, support and oversight, and role confusion also impacted family members' experience of hospice care in the nursing home. Efforts directed at enhancing communication and more clearly articulating the roles of members of the health care team are indicated. PMID:25422516

  2. GATA family members as inducers for cellular reprogramming to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Minjie; Yao, Anzhi; Shao, Sida; Du, Fengxia; Yang, Caiyun; Chen, Wenhan; Wu, Chen; Yang, Weifeng; Sun, Yingli; Deng, Hongkui

    2015-02-01

    Members of the GATA protein family play important roles in lineage specification and transdifferentiation. Previous reports show that some members of the GATA protein family can also induce pluripotency in somatic cells by substituting for Oct4, a key pluripotency-associated factor. However, the mechanism linking lineage-specifying cues and the activation of pluripotency remains elusive. Here, we report that all GATA family members can substitute for Oct4 to induce pluripotency. We found that all members of the GATA family could inhibit the overrepresented ectodermal-lineage genes, which is consistent with previous reports indicating that a balance of different lineage-specifying forces is important for the restoration of pluripotency. A conserved zinc-finger DNA-binding domain in the C-terminus is critical for the GATA family to induce pluripotency. Using RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, we determined that the pluripotency-related gene Sall4 is a direct target of GATA family members during reprogramming and serves as a bridge linking the lineage-specifying GATA family to the pluripotency circuit. Thus, the GATA family is the first protein family of which all members can function as inducers of the reprogramming process and can substitute for Oct4. Our results suggest that the role of GATA family in reprogramming has been underestimated and that the GATA family may serve as an important mediator of cell fate conversion. PMID:25591928

  3. Prospective Screening of Family Members with Moyamoya Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi-Qin; Liu, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zheng-Shan; Yang, Wei-Zhong; Duan, Lian

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic factors play an important role in the pathogenesis of moyamoya disease (MMD). Previous studies concentrated on familial MMD patients. In this study, we focused on family members of sporadic MMD patients, and aimed to gain a clearer understanding of the role that genetic factors play in MMD. Methods The immediate family members of MMD patients were initially screened by transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) and positive cases were verified by magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Results From July 2011 to March 2013, there were 527 MMD patients managed in our hospital, including 38 familial MMD cases. In this study, 285 immediate family members of 245 sporadic MMD patients were screened. Another 41 cases of familial MMD cases were identified, which included 21 family members and 20 corresponding sporadic MMD patients who had family members confirmed positive with MMD. As a result, the proportion of familial MMD patients increased from 7% (38/527) to 15% (79/527) in this period. For the main segments of the circle of Willis, Kappa values between TCD and MRA for the anterior cerebral arteries, middle cerebral arteries and posterior cerebral arteries were 0.91, 0.72, and 0.47, respectively. Familial cases confirmed by our screening showed a significantly higher percentage of asymptomatic patients (57%) compared with 9% from the control group who had a clear family history before. Conclusions Familial MMD patients may account for a higher percentage among all cases than previously thought. Some family members of MMD patients may also have MMD, but not have any obvious symptoms. Routine screening should be implemented for all family members of MMD patients to improve the detection rate for this part of the patient base. TCD has a high diagnostic agreement with MRA for MMD. TCD may be the preferred choice for screening because it is inexpensive and safe. PMID:24586386

  4. Coping with stigma by association and family burden among family members of people with mental illness.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, Remko L M; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Pryor, John B; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we explored stigma by association, family burden, and their impact on the family members of people with mental illness. We also studied the ways in which family members coped with these phenomena. We conducted semistructured interviews with 23 immediate family members of people with mental illness. Participants reported various experiences of stigma by association and family burden. Social exclusion, being blamed, not being taken seriously, time-consuming caregiving activities, and exhaustion appeared to be the predominant forms of stigma by association and family burden experienced by the participants. The participants used problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies, separately or simultaneously, to cope with the negative impact of stigma by association and family burden. The results suggest that family members should have access to services to address these problems. Social, instrumental, and emotional support should be given to family members by community members and mental health professionals. PMID:25198703

  5. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  6. Empowering Family Members for Supporting a Person with Heart Failure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L Jankauskiene; V Lesauskaite

    Family involvement in chronic care regimen has been explored in multiple studies. Chronic illness and full time caregiving place a new stress on the family but this partnership shows positive outcomes. Family members of 60 elderly patients with chronic heart failure filled out the questionnaire prepared in accordance with the educational modules on heart failure of the Heart Failure Society

  7. Lineage Affect Similarity and Health of Older Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troll, Lillian E.

    Interviews with same-sex adult members of three-generation family lines can dramatize similarities and differences by age and generation in ways of thinking and feeling. An analysis of interviews with 157 families examined the health of the grandparent, the happiness of each of the three generational representatives, and family salience. Twelve…

  8. Coping as a caregiver for an elderly family member.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Jordan M; Womble, Frances E

    2015-07-01

    With nearly 30% of the adult U.S. population acting as caregivers for sick, disabled, or elderly family members, it is imperative that caregivers become better equipped to cope with this challenging role. Although caregiving is regarded as an arduous endeavor, caring for an older family member may actually produce positive experiences. This study examines how caregivers use communication as a tool to cope with caring for an older family member. Over a span of 15 months, more than 150 caregiver stories were gathered from AgingCare.com, analyzed thematically, and categorized. The results show that stories utilize emotion-based techniques, including humor (20%), positive framing (16%), and acceptance (11%), to reveal that lasting, meaningful bonds can develop between caregivers and caregivers' relatives. These techniques allow caregivers to redefine their familial role and to find comfort in disheartening situations. Thus, coping is a truly communicative event since emotions can facilitate behaviors directed at ailing family members. PMID:25062386

  9. May 2, 2012 Family Member Verification Deadline

    E-print Network

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    , including social security numbers, on your documents before sending them in. 5. What if I am away from home insurance, supplemental life insurance, ADD, disability, and supplemental disability. Frequently asked are a problem for employers and members nationwide. UC's health & welfare benefits program for faculty, staff

  10. 77 FR 18143 - Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing a CBP Family Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ...USCBP-2012-0008] RIN 1515-AD76 Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing a CBP Family Declaration AGENCIES: U.S. Customs and Border...a single customs declaration for members of a family traveling together upon arrival in the...

  11. 78 FR 76529 - Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing CBP Family Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ...USCBP-2012-0008] RIN 1515-AD76 Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing CBP Family Declaration AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border...declaration. The final rule expands the definitions of family members residing in one household. As a...

  12. The relationship between family history, gender role attitudes, and susceptibility to gender inequitable perceptions of family and family member functioning

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David C. Ivey; Tamara Yaktus

    1996-01-01

    This research examined how family roles, gender of family leadership, beliefs about the consequences of maternal employment, and family history of parental division of responsibility related to young adults' perceptions of family and individual family member functioning. One hundred seven (107), predominantly Anglo American undergraduate students completing courses in educational psychology at a large midwestern university rated two videotaped family

  13. Rhox Homeobox Gene Cluster: Recent Duplication of Three Family Members

    E-print Network

    Wilkinson, Miles F.

    stage when new members of a gene cluster first appear. In this study we report that the mouseLETTER Rhox Homeobox Gene Cluster: Recent Duplication of Three Family Members James A. MacLean II,1 2006 Summary: We recently reported the discovery of a homeo- box gene cluster on the mouse X chromosome

  14. Comparative Analysis of E2F Family Member Oncogenic Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chunxia Chen; Andrew D. Wells; Jacques Zimmer

    2007-01-01

    The E2F family of transcription factors consists of nine members with both distinct and overlapping functions. These factors are situated downstream of growth factor signaling cascades, where they play a central role in cell growth and proliferation through their ability to regulate genes involved in cell cycle progression. For this reason, it is likely that the members of the E2F

  15. 41 CFR 302-3.203 - If I am transferring in the interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is not...Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.203...interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is...

  16. 41 CFR 302-3.203 - If I am transferring in the interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is not...Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.203...interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is...

  17. Family Members' Influence on Family Meal Vegetable Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, Tionni R.; Brown, J. Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J.; Lengerich, Eugene J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Design: Eight focus groups, 2 with each segment (men/women vegetable…

  18. Tumor necrosis factor receptor family members in the immune system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Loes A. Gravestein; Jannie Borst

    1998-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family contains death receptors, which have a cytoplasmic death domain and can induce apoptosis, as well as receptors with no apparent homology in the cytoplasmic tail. This second group of receptors binds TNF receptor–associated factors (TRAFs), which are implicated in gene regulation and anti–apoptotic signaling. A bewildering variety of TNF receptor family members and

  19. Characterization of murine carcinoembryonic antigen gene family members

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fritz Rudert; Ann M. Saunders; Sabine Rebstock; John A. Thompson; Wolfgang Zimmermann

    1992-01-01

    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a human tumor marker whose gene belongs to a family with more than 20 members. This gene family codes for a group of proteins with in vitro cell adhesion properties and for a group of abundantly expressed pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSG) with unknown functions. As a basis for in vivo functional studies, we have started to

  20. Being Socialised into Language Shift: The Impact of Extended Family Members on Family Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Christmas, Cassie

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a family language policy (FLP) in the context of an extended bilingual Gaelic-English family on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. It demonstrates how certain family members (namely, the children's mother and paternal grandmother) negotiate and reify a strongly Gaelic-centred FLP. It then discusses how other extended family

  1. Family Guide Dear Family Member of a Future Merrillite,

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to members of many different cultures and lifestyles. Together we make up the Merrill community, a groupCollegeEthos Our Ethos: Exploring cultural identities and raising global consciousness. Merrill is a stimulating and innovative college in which to learn. Our students, faculty, and staff represent numerous cultural groups

  2. The PCH family protein, Cdc15p, recruits two F-actin nucleation pathways to coordinate cytokinetic actin ring formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Carnahan, Robert H; Gould, Kathleen L

    2003-09-01

    Cytokinetic actin ring (CAR) formation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe requires two independent actin nucleation pathways, one dependent on the Arp2/3 complex and another involving the formin Cdc12p. Here we investigate the role of the S. pombe Cdc15 homology family protein, Cdc15p, in CAR assembly and find that it interacts with proteins from both of these nucleation pathways. Cdc15p binds directly to the Arp2/3 complex activator Myo1p, which likely explains why actin patches and the Arp2/3 complex fail to be medially recruited during mitosis in cdc15 mutants. Cdc15p also binds directly to Cdc12p. Cdc15p and Cdc12p not only display mutual dependence for CAR localization, but also exist together in a ring-nucleating structure before CAR formation. The disruption of these interactions in cdc15 null cells is likely to be the reason for their complete lack of CARs. We propose a model in which Cdc15p plays a critical role in recruiting and coordinating the pathways essential for the assembly of medially located F-actin filaments and construction of the CAR. PMID:12939254

  3. Family Members and Friends Who Help Beneficiaries Make Health Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Sofaer, Shoshanna; Kreling, Barbara; Kenney, Erin; Swift, Elaine K.; Dewart, Tracey

    2001-01-01

    People enrolled in Medicare often turn to family members and friends for help in making health decisions, including Medicare health plan choices. To learn how family members and friends participate in decisionmaking, what information they currently use, and what information they would like, we held eight focus groups in San Diego and Baltimore. Although responses were different in the two markets, participants in both cities reported receiving inadequate information and indicated they were largely unaware of available CMS-supported information. Beneficiaries want easy-to-use print materials targeted to their needs and opportunities to participate in seminars and receive personal counseling. PMID:12500366

  4. Family Decision Making: Benefits to Persons with Developmental Disabilities and Their Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely-Barnes, Susan; Graff, J. Carolyn; Marcenko, Maureen; Weber, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Family involvement in planning and choosing services has become a key intervention concept in developmental disability services. This study (N = 547) modeled patterns of family decision making and assessed benefits to persons with developmental disabilities (DDs) and their family members. A latent profile analysis identified 4 classes that were…

  5. Nursing Interventions for Family Members Waiting During Cardiac Procedures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kelly Trecartin; Diane L. Carroll

    2011-01-01

    Anxiety is shared by patients and family members (FMs) and can increase throughout the FMs waiting during invasive cardiac procedures (ICP). The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of an informational report (IR) and a postprocedure visit (PPV), on the anxiety of waiting FMs. There were 151 FMs assigned to 3 groups; Group 1 (50 FMs: standard

  6. Can I access my family members' medical records

    E-print Network

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Can I access my family members' medical records through MyChart? Yes ­ As long as that person gives you permission by appointing you as a MyChart proxy. Because proxies are able to see all the information you can in your MyChart, be thoughtful about whom you select as a proxy. A patient over age 18 can

  7. Why Oregon Patients Request Assisted Death: Family Members’ Views

    PubMed Central

    Goy, Elizabeth R.; Dobscha, Steven K.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Physician assisted death (PAD) was legalized through Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act in 1994 and enacted in 1997. OBJECTIVE The objective of this paper was to learn from family members why their loved ones requested PAD. DESIGN This study used the cross-sectional survey. PARTICIPANTS Participants of this study included family members of 83 Oregon decedents who made explicit requests for legalized PAD before their deaths, including 52 decedents who received prescriptions for a lethal medication and 32 who died of PAD. MEASUREMENTS Family members rated the importance of 28 possible reasons their loved ones requested PAD on a 1–5 Likert scale, with higher scores representing greater importance. RESULTS According to family members, the most important reasons that their loved ones requested PAD, all with a median score of 4.5 or greater, were wanting to control the circumstances of death and die at home, and worries about loss of dignity and future losses of independence, quality of life, and self-care ability. No physical symptoms at the time of the request were rated higher than a median of 2 in importance. Worries about symptoms and experiences in the future were, in general, more important reasons than symptoms or experiences at the time of the request. According to family members, the least important reasons their loved ones requested PAD included depression, financial concerns, and poor social support. CONCLUSIONS Interventions that help patients maintain control, independence, and self-care in a home environment may be effective means of addressing serious requests for PAD. PMID:18080719

  8. SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans, and their families

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans, and their families Page 1 SAMHSA's support of behavioral health systems serving service members, veterans systems serving Service Members, Veterans, and their Families; 2. Identify at least two best practices

  9. Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection among Family Members in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Yvonne; Montoya, Jose G.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated 32 families of persons with acute toxoplasmosis in which >1 other family member was tested for Toxoplasma gondii infection; 18 (56%) families had >1 additional family member with acute infection. Family members of persons with acute toxoplasmosis should be screened for infection, especially pregnant women and immunocompromised persons. PMID:24274896

  10. The serendipitous origin of chordate secretin peptide family members

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The secretin family is a pleotropic group of brain-gut peptides with affinity for class 2 G-protein coupled receptors (secretin family GPCRs) proposed to have emerged early in the metazoan radiation via gene or genome duplications. In human, 10 members exist and sequence and functional homologues and ligand-receptor pairs have been characterised in representatives of most vertebrate classes. Secretin-like family GPCR homologues have also been isolated in non-vertebrate genomes however their corresponding ligands have not been convincingly identified and their evolution remains enigmatic. Results In silico sequence comparisons failed to retrieve a non-vertebrate (porifera, cnidaria, protostome and early deuterostome) secretin family homologue. In contrast, secretin family members were identified in lamprey, several teleosts and tetrapods and comparative studies revealed that sequence and structure is in general maintained. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP, VIP and GCG are the most highly conserved members and two major peptide subfamilies exist; i) PACAP-like which includes PACAP, PRP, VIP, PH, GHRH, SCT and ii) GCG-like which includes GCG, GLP1, GLP2 and GIP. Conserved regions flanking secretin family members were established by comparative analysis of the Takifugu, Xenopus, chicken and human genomes and gene homologues were identified in nematode, Drosophila and Ciona genomes but no gene linkage occurred. However, in Drosophila and nematode genes which flank vertebrate secretin family members were identified in the same chromosome. Conclusions Receptors of the secretin-like family GPCRs are present in protostomes but no sequence homologues of the vertebrate cognate ligands have been identified. It has not been possible to determine when the ligands evolved but it seems likely that it was after the protostome-deuterostome divergence from an exon that was part of an existing gene or gene fragment by rounds of gene/genome duplication. The duplicate exon under different evolutionary pressures originated the chordate PACAP-like and GCG-like subfamily groups. This event occurred after the emergence of the metazoan secretin GPCRs and led to the establishment of novel peptide-receptor interactions that contributed to the generation of novel physiological functions in the chordate lineage. PMID:20459630

  11. A Family-Based Diabetes Intervention for Hispanic Adults and Their Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Debra; McCoy, Thomas; Amirehsani, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this quasi-experimental one group longitudinal study is to examine the effects of a family-based intervention program on diabetes self-management behaviors, HbA1c, other biomarkers, psychosocial factors and health-related quality of life in Hispanics with diabetes. Methods Adult patients with diabetes (n = 36) and family members (n = 37) were recruited from a community clinic in rural central North Carolina. Patients and family members attended an 8-week culturally tailored diabetes educational program taught in Spanish. Data was collected pre and post intervention for both patients and family members, with an additional data collection for patients 1 month post intervention. Results Most patients and family members were female and almost all were immigrants. HbA1c dropped by 0.41% on average among patients from pre-intervention to 1 month post intervention. Patients showed significant improvements in systolic blood pressure, diabetes self-efficacy diabetes knowledge, and physical and mental components of health-related quality of life. Higher levels of intake of healthy foods and performance of blood sugar tests and foot inspections were reported. Family members significantly lowered BMI and improved diabetes knowledge from pre- to immediate post-intervention. No significant changes in levels of physical activity were found among patients with diabetes or family members. Conclusions Findings suggest that including family members in educational interventions may provide emotional and psychological support to patients with diabetes, help to develop healthy family behaviors, and promote diabetes self-management. PMID:24248832

  12. Clinical Features: Similar to other types of pontocerebellar hypoplasias (PCH), subtypes PCH2 (OMIM 277470) and PCH4 (OMIM

    E-print Network

    Ober, Carole

    neocortical atrophy, and abnormal mental and motor development. In addition, patients with PCH2 exhibit and olivary nuclei, suggests its importance for the development of these brain areas. Budde et al (2008) sequenced the TSEN54 gene in 58 patients from the Netherlands and other European countries, Brazil

  13. The Lost Boys of Sudan: Ambiguous Loss, Search for Family, and Reestablishing Relationships with Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luster, Tom; Qin, Desiree B.; Bates, Laura; Johnson, Deborah J.; Rana, Meenal

    2008-01-01

    The "Lost Boys of Sudan" were separated from their families by civil war and subsequently lived in 3 other countries--Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 refugees who located surviving family members in Sudan after an average separation of 13.7 years. The interviews probed their experiences of…

  14. "You Needed to Rehab...Families as Well": Family Members' Own Goals for Aphasia Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Tami; Davidson, Bronwyn; Worrall, Linda; Hersh, Deborah; Ferguson, Alison; Sherratt, Sue; Gilbert, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aphasia affects family members in addition to the individuals with the communication disorder. In order to develop appropriate services for the relatives of people with aphasia post-stroke, their rehabilitation goals need to be identified. Aim: The aim of the current investigation was to identify the rehabilitation goals that family

  15. SDSU Nepotism Policy Special Provisions for Immediate Family Members

    E-print Network

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    of employment, will not be decided based on the relationship as an immediate family member. The plan should partner, step-parent, step-child, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, father- in-law, mother-in-law, son-in-law, daughter-in-law, and by guardianship and/or adoption or a person residing in the immediate household except

  16. Family Members' Reports of Abuse in Michigan Nursing Homes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert J. Griffore; Gia E. Barboza; Teresa Mastin; James Oehmke; Lawrence B. Schiamberg; Lori Ann Post

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe abuse and neglect of adults age 65 and older in Michigan nursing homes, as reported by members of their families. Using list-assisted random-digit dialing, data on abuse and neglect for a 12-month period were collected from individuals who had a relative age 65 or older in a Michigan nursing home. Of the

  17. Where are the small Kreutz-family members?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quanzhi; Wiegert, P.; Hui, M.; Kracht, R.

    2013-10-01

    The Kreutz sungrazer family is one of the best-known comet families and contains some of the most spectacular comets in history. However, due to its extreme orbit geometry, most members in this family are either too faint or too close to the sun to be observed from the ground. Space-based coronagraphs launched in recent decades, notably the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), have detected over 2000 Kreutz members that come very close to the sun. The observations are limited to a very short time period 1-2 d) from the perihelion of these objects, and suffer from low astrometric/photometric precision; the states of these objects when they are away from the sun are still unconstrained. In this study, we use the 3.6-m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) to search for small Kreutz comets at low solar elongation 50 deg) on several nights from September 2012 to January 2013. We are able to cover ~10 sq. deg per night to 22.5, a limiting magnitude that should be able to reveal small SOHO-size Kreutz members, according to the brightening rate proposed by Knight et al. (2010, AJ, 139, 926). Preliminary result will be presented in this talk.

  18. Organ Donation Campaigns: Perspective of Dialysis Patient's Family Members

    PubMed Central

    TUMIN, Makmor; RAJA ARIFFIN, Raja Noriza; MOHD SATAR, NurulHuda; NG, Kok-Peng; LIM, Soo-Kun; CHONG, Chin-Sieng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Solving the dilemma of the organ shortage in Malaysia requires educating Malaysians about organ donation and transplantation. This paper aims at exploring the average Malaysian households ’ preferred channels of campaigns and the preferred campaigners in a family setting, targeting at the dialysis family members. Methods We analyzed the responses of 350 respondents regarding organ donation campaigns. The respondents are 2 family members of 175 dialysis patients from 3 different institutions. The information on respondents’ willingness to donate and preferred method and channel of organ donation campaign were collected through questionnaire. Results Malaysian families have a good tendency to welcome campaigns in both the public and private (their homes) spheres. We also found that campaigns facilitated by the electronic media (Television and Radio) and executed by experienced doctors are expected to optimize the outcomes of organ donation, in general. Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics. However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05). Conclusion Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration. By identifying the preferred channel and campaigners, this study hopes to shed some light on the ways to overcome the problem of organ shortage in Malaysia.

  19. Moderating the Covariance Between Family Member’s Substance Use Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Eaves, Lindon J.; Neale, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Twin and family studies implicitly assume that the covariation between family members remains constant across differences in age between the members of the family. However, age-specificity in gene expression for shared environmental factors could generate higher correlations between family members who are more similar in age. Cohort effects (cohort × genotype or cohort × common environment) could have the same effects, and both potentially reduce effect sizes estimated in genome-wide association studies where the subjects are heterogeneous in age. In this paper we describe a model in which the covariance between twins and non-twin siblings is moderated as a function of age difference. We describe the details of the model and simulate data using a variety of different parameter values to demonstrate that model fitting returns unbiased parameter estimates. Power analyses are then conducted to estimate the sample sizes required to detect the effects of moderation in a design of twins and siblings. Finally, the model is applied to data on cigarette smoking. We find that (1) the model effectively recovers the simulated parameters, (2) the power is relatively low and therefore requires large sample sizes before small to moderate effect sizes can be found reliably, and (3) the genetic covariance between siblings for smoking behavior decays very rapidly. Result 3 implies that, e.g., genome-wide studies of smoking behavior that use individuals assessed at different ages, or belonging to different birth-year cohorts may have had substantially reduced power to detect effects of genotype on cigarette use. It also implies that significant special twin environmental effects can be explained by age-moderation in some cases. This effect likely contributes to the missing heritability paradox. PMID:24647834

  20. 41 CFR 302-4.100 - What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? 302-4.100 Section 302-4... § 302-4.100 What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? Except as specifically...

  1. 41 CFR 302-4.100 - What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? 302-4.100 Section 302-4... § 302-4.100 What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? Except as specifically...

  2. 41 CFR 302-4.100 - What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? 302-4.100 Section 302-4... § 302-4.100 What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? Except as specifically...

  3. 41 CFR 302-4.100 - What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? 302-4.100 Section 302-4... § 302-4.100 What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? Except as specifically...

  4. 41 CFR 302-4.100 - What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? 302-4.100 Section 302-4... § 302-4.100 What PCS travel expenses will my immediate family members receive? Except as specifically...

  5. Mitochondria in Apoptosis: Bcl-2 family Members and Mitochondrial Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Martinou, Jean-Claude; Youle, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria participate in apoptosis through a range of mechanisms that vary between vertebrates and invertebrates. In vertebrates, they release intermembrane space proteins, such as cytochrome c, to promote caspase activation in the cytosol. This process is the result of the loss of integrity of the outer mitochondrial membrane caused by proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family. This event is always accompanied by a fissioning of the organelle. Fission of mitochondria has also been reported to participate in apoptosis in Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. However, in these organisms, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization does not occur and the mechanism by which mitochondrial dynamics participates in cell death remains elusive. PMID:21763611

  6. Recurrent cutaneous abscesses in two Italian family members

    PubMed Central

    Cantisani, Carmen; Richetta, Antonio G.; Bitonti, Andrea; Curatolo, Pietro; Ferretti, Gianfranco; Mattozzi, Carlo; Luca, Melis; Silvestri, Emidio; Calvieri, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Environmental mycobacteria are the causative factors of an increasing number of infections worldwide. Cutaneous infections as a result of such mycobacteria are often misdiagnosed, and their treatment is difficult since they can show in vivo and in vitro multidrug resistance. Absence of pathognomonic clinical signs and variable histological findings often delay diagnosis. We report a case of localized recurrent soft tissue swelling by Mycobacterium marinum in 2 members of the same family. The cases are being reported for their uncommon clinical presentation and the associated etiological agent. Patients recovered completely following therapy with rifampicin 600 mg plus isoniazide 300 mg daily for 45 days. PMID:24470891

  7. The Lost Boys of Sudan: Ambiguous Loss, Search for Family, and Reestablishing Relationships With Family Members

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tom Luster; Desiree B. Qin; Laura Bates; Deborah J. Johnson; Meenal Rana

    2008-01-01

    The Lost Boys of Sudan were separated from their families by civil war and subsequently lived in 3 other countries—Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 refugees who located surviving family members in Sudan after an average separation of 13.7 years. The interviews probed their experiences of ambiguous loss, relationships in the refugee camps, the

  8. 78 FR 33699 - Visas: Classification of Immediate Family Members as G Nonimmigrants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ...1400-AD21 Visas: Classification of Immediate Family Members as G Nonimmigrants AGENCY: State...This rule permits qualified immediate family members of A-1 or A-2 nonimmigrants...nonimmigrants. It also clarifies that immediate family members of G-1, G-2, G-3,...

  9. Family Members End of Life Decision Making Experiences Aiza Garcia, Nursing, Janet Carpenter, Nursing

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Family Members End of Life Decision Making Experiences Aiza Garcia, Nursing, Janet Carpenter was to explore the experiences of individuals who accept the role of decision maker for a family member for their family members at their end of life to ultimately improve the way clinicians interact with them

  10. REQUEST TO ADD OR DELETE MEMBERS TO A CURRENT FAMILY FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS (FEHB) ENROLLMENT

    E-print Network

    Number Add the Following Family Members to My Coverage Name DOB Sex Relationship SSN Reason for Addition Delete the Following Family Members From My Coverage Name DOB Sex Relationship SSN Reason for DeletionREQUEST TO ADD OR DELETE MEMBERS TO A CURRENT FAMILY FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS (FEHB

  11. Certification of Health Care Provider for Family Member's Serious Health Condition

    E-print Network

    McGaughey, Alan

    of Health Care Provider for Family Member's Serious Health Condition Carnegie Mellon University HR for FMLA leave to care for a covered family member with a serious health condition. If requested by your: _____________________________________________________________ If family member is your son or daughter, date of birth

  12. Family Members' Reports of Non-Staff Abuse in Michigan Nursing Homes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenmei Zhang; Connie Page; Tom Conner; Lori A. Post

    2012-01-01

    Recent research showed that mistreatment of nursing home residents by other residents may be highly prevalent. The present study examined the issue from family members' perspectives. The data came from the 2005 and 2007 random-digit dial telephone surveys of Michigan households with a family member in long-term care. Based on family members' reports, about 10% of nursing home residents aged

  13. 41 CFR 302-3.203 - If I am transferring in the interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is not in the interest...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.203 If I am transferring...the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is not in the...

  14. 41 CFR 302-3.203 - If I am transferring in the interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is not in the interest...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.203 If I am transferring...the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is not in the...

  15. Correlated Outcomes of a Pilot Intervention for People Injecting Drugs and Their Family Members in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Liang, Li-Jung; Lin, Chunqing; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2013-01-01

    Background The interrelationship between the well-being of injecting drug users (IDUs) and their family environment has been widely documented. However, few intervention programs have addressed the needs of both IDUs and their family members. Methods This study describes a randomized intervention pilot targeting 83 IDUs and 83 of their family members from four communes in Phú Th? province, Vietnam. The IDUs and family members in the intervention condition received multiple group sessions, with the intent to improve psychological well-being and family relationships. The intervention outcomes (depressive symptoms and family relations) were evaluated at baseline, 3-month and 6-month follow-up assessments. Results Depressive symptoms and family relations reported by IDUs were found to be correlated to those reported by their family members. Overall, significant intervention effects on depressive symptoms and family relations were observed for both IDUs and family members. A similar improvement pattern in family relations emerged for both the IDU and family member samples, although the intervention effect of reducing depressive symptoms was more sustainable for family members at the 6-month assessment when compared to the IDU sample. Conclusion The intervention pilot addressed challenges faced by IDUs and their family members and revealed correlated outcomes for the two groups. Findings suggest a vital need to include family members in future drug prevention and harm reduction intervention efforts. PMID:24305572

  16. Studying the Effect Dialogic Reading Has on Family Members' Verbal Interactions during Shared Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Diana; Dauksas, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The effect dialogic reading training has on the verbal interactions of family members and their "at risk" preschool children was studied. There were significant differences at the time of the post-test between family members who received dialogic reading training and the group that participated in the preschool's traditional family time. Family

  17. Al-Anon Family Groups: Newcomers and Members

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Christine; Cronkite, Ruth; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Laudet, Alexandre; Roth, Jeffrey; Moos, Rudolf H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Empirical knowledge is lacking about Al-Anon Family Groups (Al-Anon), the most widely used form of help by people concerned about another’s drinking, partly because conducting research on 12-step groups is challenging. Our purpose was to describe a new method of obtaining survey data from 12-step group attendees and to examine influences on initial Al-Anon attendance and attendees’ recent life contexts and functioning. Method: Al-Anon’s World Service Office sent a mailing to a random sample of groups, which subsequently yielded surveys from newcomers (n = 359) and stable members (n = 264). Results: Reasons for groups’ nonparticipation included having infrequent newcomers and the study being seen as either contrary to the 12 Traditions or too uncomfortable for newcomers. Main concerns prompting initial Al-Anon attendance were problems with overall quality of life and with the Al-Anon trigger (a significant drinking individual), and being stressed and angry. Goals for Al-Anon attendance were related to the following concerns: better quality of life, fewer trigger-related problems, and less stress. Members reported better functioning in some of these domains (quality of life, relationship with the trigger) but did not differ from newcomers on physical and psychological health. Newcomers were more likely to have recently drunk alcohol and to have obtained treatment for their own substance misuse problems. Conclusions: This method of collecting data from 12-step group attendees yielded valid data and also was seen by many in Al-Anon as consistent with the Traditions. Both newcomers and members had aimed to improve their overall quality of life and well-being through Al-Anon, and, indeed, members were more satisfied with their quality of life than were newcomers. PMID:24172125

  18. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember. 825...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.124...

  19. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember. 825...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.124...

  20. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember. 825...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.124...

  1. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember. 825...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.124...

  2. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 false Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember. 825...DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.124...

  3. Muscarinic toxicity among family members after consumption of mushrooms.

    PubMed

    George, Peter; Hegde, Narasimha

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are commercially cultivated over the world and safe for human consumption, except in those with known allergies. Among the thousands of mushroom species identified, few are considered to be edible. Mushroom hunting has emerged as an adventure and recreational activity in recent decades. Wild forms of mushrooms are often poisonous and visually mimic the edible ones, thus leading to mistaken harvesting, consumption, and toxicities. In literature, various systemic toxic syndromes associated with mushroom poisoning have been described. We report four members of a family with muscarinic manifestations after accidental consumption of poisonous mushrooms. The Clitocybe species of mushrooms they consumed resulted in their muscarinic toxicity. Patients with muscarinic mushroom toxicity have early onset of symptoms and they respond well to atropine and symptomatic supportive care. PMID:23833447

  4. Functional and cancer genomics of ASXL family members

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, M

    2013-01-01

    Additional sex combs-like (ASXL)1, ASXL2 and ASXL3 are human homologues of the Drosophila Asx gene that are involved in the regulation or recruitment of the Polycomb-group repressor complex (PRC) and trithorax-group (trxG) activator complex. ASXL proteins consist of ASXN, ASXH, ASXM1, ASXM2 and PHD domains. ASXL1 directly interacts with BAP1, KDM1A (LSD1), NCOA1 and nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs), such as retinoic acid receptors, oestrogen receptor and androgen receptor. ASXL family members are epigenetic scaffolding proteins that assemble epigenetic regulators and transcription factors to specific genomic loci with histone modifications. ASXL1 is involved in transcriptional repression through an interaction with PRC2 and also contributes to transcriptional regulation through interactions with BAP1 and/or NHR complexes. Germ-line mutations of human ASXL1 and ASXL3 occur in Bohring-Opitz and related syndromes. Amplification and overexpression of ASXL1 occur in cervical cancer. Truncation mutations of ASXL1 occur in colorectal cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI), malignant myeloid diseases, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and liver, prostate and breast cancers; those of ASXL2 occur in prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer and breast cancer and those of ASXL3 are observed in melanoma. EPC1-ASXL2 gene fusion occurs in adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma. The prognosis of myeloid malignancies with misregulating truncation mutations of ASXL1 is poor. ASXL family members are assumed to be tumour suppressive or oncogenic in a context-dependent manner. PMID:23736028

  5. Mental health outcomes of family members of Oregonians who request physician aid in dying.

    PubMed

    Ganzini, Linda; Goy, Elizabeth R; Dobscha, Steven K; Prigerson, Holly

    2009-12-01

    Oregon legalized physician aid in dying over 10 years ago but little is known about the effects of this choice on family members' mental health. We surveyed 95 family members of decedent Oregonians who had explicitly requested aid in dying, including 59 whose loved one received a lethal prescription and 36 whose loved one died by lethal ingestion. For comparison purposes, family members of Oregonians who died of cancer or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also were surveyed. A mean of 14 months after death, 11% of family members whose loved one requested aid in dying had major depressive disorder, 2% had prolonged grief, and 38% had received mental health care. Among those whose family member requested aid in dying, whether or not the patient accessed a lethal prescription had no influence on subsequent depression, grief, or mental health services use; however, family members of Oregonians who received a lethal prescription were more likely to believe that their loved one's choices were honored and less likely to have regrets about how the loved one died. Comparing family members of those who requested aid in dying to those who did not revealed no differences in primary mental health outcomes of depression, grief, or mental health services use. Family members of Oregonians who requested aid in dying felt more prepared and accepting of the death than comparison family members. In summary, pursuit of aid in dying does not have negative effects on surviving family members and may be associated with greater preparation and acceptance of death. PMID:19783401

  6. Emotional Disorders in Pairs of Patients and Their Family Members during and after ICU Stay

    PubMed Central

    Fumis, Renata Rego Lins; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Martins, Paulo Sérgio; Schettino, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients and family members undergo different experiences of suffering from emotional disorders during ICU stay and after ICU discharge. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in pairs (patient and respective family member), during stay at an open visit ICU and at 30 and 90-days post-ICU discharge. We hypothesized that there was a positive correlation with the severity of symptoms among pairs and different patterns of suffering over time. Methods A prospective study was conducted in a 22-bed adult general ICU including patients with >48 hours stay. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was completed by the pairs (patients/respective family member). Interviews were made by phone at 30 and 90-days post-ICU discharge using the Impact of Event Scale (IES) and the HADS. Multivariate models were constructed to predict IES score at 30 days for patients and family members. Results Four hundred and seventy one family members and 289 patients were interviewed in the ICU forming 184 pairs for analysis. Regarding HADS score, patients presented less symptoms than family members of patients who survived and who deceased at 30 and 90-days (p<0.001). However, family members of patients who deceased scored higher anxiety and depression symptoms (p = 0.048) at 90-days when compared with family members of patients who survived. Patients and family members at 30-days had a similar IES score, but it was higher in family members at 90-days (p = 0.019). For both family members and patients, age and symptoms of anxiety and depression during ICU were the major determinants for PTSD at 30-days. Conclusions Anxiety, depression and PTSD symptoms were higher in family members than in the patients. Furthermore, these symptoms in family members persisted at 3 months, while they decreased in patients. PMID:25616059

  7. CERTIFICATION OF HEALTHCARE PROVIDER FOR FAMILY MEMBER'S SERIOUS HEALTH CONDITION/PARENTAL LEAVE

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    CERTIFICATION OF HEALTHCARE PROVIDER FOR FAMILY MEMBER'S SERIOUS HEALTH CONDITION/PARENTAL LEAVE Medical and/or FMLA leave to care for a covered family member with a serious health condition. Failure, date of birth: _____________________________________ Describe care you will provide to your family

  8. Parents and children only? Acculturation and the influence of extended family members among Vietnamese refugees

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laila Tingvold; Anne-Lise Middelthon; James Allen; Edvard Hauff

    The nuclear family is often the point of departure in much of the existing acculturation research on refugee youth and children of refugees. The influence of other extended family members appears to receive less attention in understanding acculturation processes and intergenerational perspectives. This qualitative study explores the influence of extended family members upon a small sample of Vietnamese refugee parents

  9. Syncope in genotype-negative long QT syndrome family members.

    PubMed

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Ruwald, Martin H; Goldenberg, Ilan; Wieling, Wouter; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Wilde, Arthur A M; van Dijk, Nynke; Moss, Arthur J

    2014-10-15

    Unaffected long-QT syndrome family members (FMs) frequently experience syncope. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that syncope events in FMs are benign events and to compare clinical characteristics, triggers eliciting the syncope events, and long-term outcomes between FMs and those with LQT1 or LQT2 mutations from the international Long QT Syndrome Registry. A total of 679 FMs, 864 LQT1 patients, and 782 LQT2 patients were included. Seventy-eight FMs (11%) experienced cardiovascular events. Almost all cardiovascular events were nonfatal syncope; only 1 FM, with an additional mitral valve prolapse, experienced aborted cardiac arrest during exercise. The mean age at first syncope in FMs was 17 years, and female FMs experienced syncope more frequently than male FMs (14% vs 9%, p = 0.027). Syncope was more frequently triggered by exercise in LQT1 patients (43% in LQT1 patients vs 5% in FMs, p <0.001), while syncope triggered by a variety of other triggers was more frequent in FMs (54% in FMs vs 22% in LQT1 patients and 30% in LQT2 patients, p <0.001 for both). None of the FMs experienced aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death after the first syncopal episode. In conclusion, syncope is frequently present in FMs, and these syncopal events occurred more frequently in female than in male FMs, with an increased incidence in midadolescence. Triggers eliciting the syncopal events were different between FMs and patients with long-QT syndrome mutations. Hence, the type of trigger is useful in distinguishing between high- and low-risk syncope. These data indicate that FMs from families with LQTS have a benign form of syncope, most likely related to vasovagal syncope and not ventricular tachyarrhythmic syncope. PMID:25173441

  10. An intervention to improve mental health and family well-being of injecting drug users and family members in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Lin, Chunqing; Tuan, Nguyen Anh; Tuan, Le Anh; Farmer, Shu C; Detels, Roger

    2014-06-01

    Family plays an important role in the lives of injecting drug users (IDUs) in Vietnam. This study examined the preliminary outcomes of an intervention targeting IDUs and their family members in Vietnam. Eighty-three families, including 83 IDUs and 83 family members, were recruited from 4 communes in Phú T?o Province, Vietnam. The 4 communes were randomized to either an intervention condition or a standard care condition. The IDUs and their family members in the intervention condition completed 4 group sessions, with the aims to improve their mental health and family relations and to promote positive behavioral change. The intervention effect was evaluated at baseline and 3- and 6-month follow-up assessments. A significant reduction in depressive symptoms and improvement in family functioning were reported for IDUs in the intervention group compared with those in the standard care group. The family members in the intervention group reported better coping skills at 3 months, fewer depressive symptoms at 6 months, and improved family function at both 3 and 6 months compared with those in the standard care group. However, no significant intervention effect was observed for IDUs in terms of drug-using behavior. This study demonstrates the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of an intervention that simultaneously targets IDUs and their family members in Vietnam. Study findings highlight the importance of including family members and enhancing their role in drug use intervention efforts. PMID:24079647

  11. Bi73-: the missing family member, finally isolated and characterized.

    PubMed

    Perla, Luis G; Oliver, Allen G; Sevov, Slavi C

    2015-02-01

    The synthesis and structure of Bi(7)(3-), the only missing member of the family of heptanuclear pnictogen cluster anions Pn(7)(3-) (Pn = pnictogen, a group 15 element excluding the unique nitrogen), is reported. The new species is synthesized by oxidation of a solution of K(5)Bi(4) by the solvent pyridine in the presence of (C(6)H(6))Cr(CO)(3). The existence of the species in solution is confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry, while its structure is elucidated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction in the compound [K(2,2,2-crypt)](3)Bi(7)·2py (monoclinic, P2(1)/n, a = 13.8739(13) Å, b = 24.878(2) Å, c = 26.401(2) Å, ? = 96.353(4)°, V = 9056.5(14) Å(3), Z = 4, and R1/wR2 = 0.0636/0.1390 for the observed data and 0.0901/0.1541 for all data). PMID:25314100

  12. STS-106 crew gathers to greet family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    While meeting with family on the day before launch, the STS-106 crew poses for a photo. Waving, left to right, are Mission Specialist Richard A. Mastracchio, Commander Terrence W. Wilcutt, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Edward T. Lu, Yuri I. Malenchenko, Boris V. Morukov and Daniel C. Burbank. Malenchenko and Morukov are with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. In the background (left) is Launch Pad 39B and Space Shuttle Atlantis, with the Rotating Service Structure still in place. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:45 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed '''Expedition One,''' is due to arrive at the Station in late fall. Landing is targeted for Sept. 19 at 4:59 a.m. EDT at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility.

  13. Redundant Roles of PRDM Family Members in Zebrafish Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hai-Lei; Clouthier, David E.; Artinger, Kristin B.

    2014-01-01

    Background PRDM proteins are evolutionary conserved Zn-Finger transcription factors that share a characteristic protein domain organization. Previous studies have shown that prdm1a is required for the specification and differentiation of neural crest cells in the zebrafish. Results Here we examine other members of this family, specifically prdm3, 5, and 16, in the differentiation of the zebrafish craniofacial skeleton. prdm3 and prdm16 are strongly expressed in the pharyngeal arches, while prdm5 is expressed specifically in the area of the forming neurocranium. Knockdown of prdm3 and prdm16 results in a reduction in the neural crest markers dlx2a and barx1 and defects in both the viscerocranium and the neurocranium. The knockdown of prdm3 and prdm16 in combination is additive in the neurocranium, but not in the viscerocranium. Injection of sub-optimal doses of prdm1a with prdm3 or prdm16 Morpholinos together leads to more severe phenotypes in the viscerocranium and neurocranium. prdm5 mutants have defects in the neurocranium and prdm1a and prdm5 double mutants also show more severe phenotypes. Conclusions Overall, our data reveal that prdm3, 5, and 16 are involved in the zebrafish craniofacial development and that prdm1a may interact with prdm3, 5, and 16 in the formation of the craniofacial skeleton in zebrafish. PMID:23109401

  14. Depression, Anxiety and Somatization in Women with War Missing Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Barakovi?, Devla; Avdibegovi?, Esmina; Sinanovi?, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: During the war circumstances, women and children are exposed to multiple traumatic experiences, one of which is an violent disappearance of a family member. Goal: The aim of this research was to establish the presence of symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatization in women in Bosnia and Herzegovina who have sought their war missing family members for 15 to 18 years. Subjects and Methods: The research was based on a sample of 120 women with war missing family member and 40 women without a war missing family member as a control group. For assessment of depression, anxiety and symptoms of somatization the self-rating Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), Somatic Symptoms Index (SSI) questionnaire and a general questionnaire on the sociodemographic data and data on war missing family members were used. Results: A significantly higher intensity of symptoms of depression (p<0.001), anxiety (p<0.001) and somatization (p = 0.013) was present in women with, in comparison to women without a missing family member. In comparison of the kinship with the missing family members, statistically significantly higher intensity of symptoms of depression, anxiety and somatization was in women with a missing child (p<0.001) in comparison to other missing family members. Conclusion: A prolonged period of seeking, waiting and uncertainty of what happened in the war with the missing family member presents for those women a prolonged suffering manifested through depression, anxiety and symptoms of somatization. PMID:24167436

  15. IL-17 family member cytokines: regulation, and function in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joseph M.; Angkasekwinai, Pornpimon; Dong, Chen

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the IL-17 family member cytokines have become prominent subjects of investigation. IL-17 (IL-17A) is the best-described member of this family where its production has been mainly attributed to a specialized T helper subset of the adaptive immune response termed Th17. However, recent research on this and other Th17 cytokines has revealed new sources and functions of IL-17 family members in the innate immune response. This review will highlight recent advances in the field of IL-17 family member cytokines and will predominately focus on the innate regulation and function of IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-25. PMID:21074482

  16. Racial disparity in capital punishment and its impact on family members of capital defendants.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A review of the literature was conducted to explore the continuing racial disparity in capital punishment and its effects on family members of African American capital defendants. Statistical studies conducted on both the state and national level conclude that racial bias influences all stages of the death penalty process, with race of the victim being one of the most significant factors. This racial bias places an added burden on family members of African American capital defendants. While research has explored the impact of capital punishment on family members of capital defendants, the unique experiences of family members of African American defendants has not been addressed in the research literature. PMID:23581803

  17. Should Family Members Be Present During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation? A Review of the Literature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Dana Critchell; Paul E. Marik

    2007-01-01

    During resuscitation, family members are often escorted out of the room for fear of immediate and long-term consequences to the family, the patient, and the physician. However, mounting evidence suggests that family presence during resuscitation could, in fact, be beneficial. The Emergency Nurses Association and the American Heart Association endorse family-witnessed resuscitation and the development of hospital policies to facilitate

  18. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before...transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when...Transfers Prior Return of Immediate Family Members § 302-3.225 If my...

  19. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before...transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when...Transfers Prior Return of Immediate Family Members § 302-3.225 If my...

  20. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before...transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when...Transfers Prior Return of Immediate Family Members § 302-3.225 If my...

  1. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before...transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when...Transfers Prior Return of Immediate Family Members § 302-3.225 If my...

  2. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before...transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when...Transfers Prior Return of Immediate Family Members § 302-3.225 If my...

  3. Everyday Living with Diabetes Described by Family Members of Adult People with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Eija; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  4. 41 CFR 302-4.101 - Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official...TRANSPORTATION Travel Expenses § 302-4.101 Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old...

  5. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under...303 May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once...

  6. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under...303 May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once...

  7. 41 CFR 302-4.101 - Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official...TRANSPORTATION Travel Expenses § 302-4.101 Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old...

  8. 41 CFR 302-11.104 - When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my residence to be eligible for the allowance... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

  9. 41 CFR 302-3.226 - Will the Government reimburse me if I am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S. and choose to send them at my own expense? 302-3.226...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S....

  10. 41 CFR 302-11.104 - When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my residence to be eligible for the allowance... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

  11. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S...Separation § 302-3.302 May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be...

  12. 41 CFR 302-3.226 - Will the Government reimburse me if I am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S. and choose to send them at my own expense? 302-3.226...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S....

  13. 41 CFR 302-3.226 - Will the Government reimburse me if I am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S. and choose to send them at my own expense? 302-3.226...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S....

  14. 41 CFR 302-4.101 - Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official...TRANSPORTATION Travel Expenses § 302-4.101 Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old...

  15. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S...Separation § 302-3.302 May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be...

  16. 41 CFR 302-11.104 - When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my residence to be eligible for the allowance... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

  17. 41 CFR 302-11.104 - When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my residence to be eligible for the allowance... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

  18. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under...303 May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once...

  19. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S...Separation § 302-3.302 May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be...

  20. 41 CFR 302-4.101 - Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official...TRANSPORTATION Travel Expenses § 302-4.101 Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old...

  1. 41 CFR 302-4.101 - Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official...TRANSPORTATION Travel Expenses § 302-4.101 Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old...

  2. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S...Separation § 302-3.302 May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be...

  3. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...true May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under...303 May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once...

  4. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S...Separation § 302-3.302 May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be...

  5. 41 CFR 302-11.104 - When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my residence to be eligible for the allowance... When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

  6. 41 CFR 302-3.226 - Will the Government reimburse me if I am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S. and choose to send them at my own expense? 302-3.226...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S....

  7. 41 CFR 302-3.226 - Will the Government reimburse me if I am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S. and choose to send them at my own expense? 302-3.226...am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S....

  8. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under...303 May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once...

  9. Family business Information Update Please list all members that would like to receive information about the Family Business Council events.

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Family business Information Update Please list all members that would like to receive information about the Family Business Council events. Name Company Mailing Address City State/Province ZipPhone #12;Thank you for helping us update our records. Please send information about the Family Business

  10. The many roles of family members in "family-centered care"--part I.

    PubMed

    Dokken, Deborah; Ahmann, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This article is the first in a series highlighting parental roles in family-centered care. A brief history of family-centered care from the 1960s to the present provides the context for the development of numerous roles parents have begun to play in the health care system. This background is followed by a mother's description of the steps in her own evolution as a "parent advocate." Deborah Dokken first developed her voice in the health care system as a parent to three premature infants, one of whom survived. Dokken used the skills she developed as a NICU parent to help other families through a peer-support program. She was subsequently invited to serve on a hospital's Ethics Committee; later to participate as a co-investigator and consultant on a palliative care education project; and most recently to be a member of several federal level health care advisory committees. Several themes in her development as a parent advocate included: readiness and commitment to assume new roles; the open support of at least one care professional in each setting; the identification of roles that matched her interest, background, and skills; and a growing conviction of her ability to contribute in a holistic way. Subsequent articles in this series will introduce other parents as they describe a variety of parental roles in family-centered care. We hope that illustration of these roles will inspire further involvement of parents in the pediatric health care system, at all levels. PMID:17256294

  11. Dementia Management Strategies and Adjustment of Family Members of Older Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; Niederehe, George

    1994-01-01

    Examined how strategies to manage dementia problems in 152 older people were associated with adjustment of family members while providing assistance to relative. Identified three dementia management strategies (criticism, encouragement, and active management) that were associated with three indices of family members' emotional adjustment (burden,…

  12. Catapulting Shifts in Images, Understandings, and Actions for Family Members through Research-Based Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Sherry L.; Gillies, Jennifer; Mitchell, Gail J.; Jonas-Simpson, Christine; Whyte, Colleen; Carson, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This article examined how images, understandings, and actions change for family members of persons with dementia after the introduction of a research-based drama called I'm Still Here. Guided by interpretivist phenomenology, a set of seven pre- and post-performance focus groups were conducted with family members (n = 48) in four cities. Findings…

  13. Members of the NAP/SET Family of Proteins Interact Specifically with B-Type Cyclins

    E-print Network

    Murray, Andrew W.

    Members of the NAP/SET Family of Proteins Interact Specifically with B-Type Cyclins Douglas R. This approach has led to the identifi- cation of a 60-kD protein called NAP1 that interacts specifically with members of the cyclin B family. This interaction has been highly conserved during evolution: NAP1

  14. Familial idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Evidence of lung inflammation in unaffected family members

    SciTech Connect

    Bitterman, P.B.; Rennard, S.I.; Keogh, B.A.; Wewers, M.D.; Adelberg, S.; Crystal, R.G.

    1986-05-22

    We evaluated 17 clinically unaffected members of three families with an autosomal dominant form of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis for evidence of alveolar inflammation. Each person in the study was examined by gallium-67 scanning for a general estimate of pulmonary inflammation, and by bronchoalveolar lavage for characterization of the types of recovered cells and their state of activation. Eight of the 17 subjects had evidence of alveolar inflammation on the lavage studies. Supporting data included increased numbers of neutrophils and activated macrophages that released one or more neutrophil chemoattractants, and growth factors for lung fibroblasts--findings similar to those observed in patients with overt idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Four of these eight also had a positive gallium scan; in all the other clinically unaffected subjects the scan was normal. During a follow-up of two to four years in seven of the eight subjects who had evidence of inflammation, no clinical evidence of pulmonary fibrosis has appeared. These results indicate that alveolar inflammation occurs in approximately half the clinically unaffected family members at risk of inheriting autosomal dominant idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Whether these persons with evidence of pulmonary inflammation but no fibrosis will proceed to have clinically evident pulmonary fibrosis is not yet known.

  15. Genealogy of an ancient protein family: the Sirtuins, a family of disordered members

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sirtuins genes are widely distributed by evolution and have been found in eubacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. While prokaryotic and archeal species usually have one or two sirtuin homologs, in humans as well as in eukaryotes we found multiple versions and in mammals this family is comprised of seven different homologous proteins being all NAD-dependent de-acylases. 3D structures of human SIRT2, SIRT3, and SIRT5 revealed the overall conformation of the conserved core domain but they were unable to give a structural information about the presence of very flexible and dynamically disordered regions, the role of which is still structurally and functionally unclear. Recently, we modeled the 3D-structure of human SIRT1, the most studied member of this family, that unexpectedly emerged as a member of the intrinsically disordered proteins with its long disordered terminal arms. Despite clear similarities in catalytic cores between the human sirtuins little is known of the general structural characteristics of these proteins. The presence of disorder in human SIRT1 and the propensity of these proteins in promoting molecular interactions make it important to understand the underlying mechanisms of molecular recognition that reasonably should involve terminal segments. The mechanism of recognition, in turn, is a prerequisite for the understanding of any functional activity. Aim of this work is to understand what structural properties are shared among members of this family in humans as well as in other organisms. Results We have studied the distribution of the structural features of N- and C-terminal segments of sirtuins in all known organisms to draw their evolutionary histories by taking into account average length of terminal segments, amino acid composition, intrinsic disorder, presence of charged stretches, presence of putative phosphorylation sites, flexibility, and GC content of genes. Finally, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of the putative phosphorylation sites in human sirtuins confirming those sites already known experimentally for human SIRT1 and 2 as well as extending their topology to all the family to get feedback of their physiological functions and cellular localization. Conclusions Our results highlight that the terminal segments of the majority of sirtuins possess a number of structural features and chemical and physical properties that strongly support their involvement in activities of recognition and interaction with other protein molecules. We also suggest how a multisite phosphorylation provides a possible mechanism by which flexible and intrinsically disordered segments of a sirtuin supported by the presence of positively or negatively charged stretches might enhance the strength and specificity of interaction with a particular molecular partner. PMID:23497088

  16. The Family Preferences Index: helping family members who want to participate in the care of a hospitalized older adult.

    PubMed

    Messecar, Deborah; Powers, Bethel Ann; Nagel, Corey L

    2008-09-01

    Family members are an important but often underappreciated resource in caring for hospitalized older adults. The Family Preferences Index is a 14-item approach to exploring caregivers' personal choices for participating in the care of hospitalized older adult family members. It can be administered as a structured interview or as a questionnaire. Higher scores indicate a greater preference to participate in care. The nurse can use the responses to the index to plan care that builds a partnership with the family. To watch a free video demonstrating the use of the index, go to http://links.lww.com/A296. PMID:18756158

  17. Empowerment in outpatient care for patients with chronic kidney disease - from the family member's perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Family members of persons with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease may experience feelings of vulnerability and insecurity as the disease follows its course. Against this background, the aim of the present study was to explore empowerment in outpatient care as experienced by these family members. Methods An inductive approach for qualitative data analysis was chosen. The study sample comprised 12 family members of pre-dialysis patients at an outpatient kidney clinic. Two interviews with each family member were subjected to content analysis to gain an understanding of empowerment from the family members' perspective. Results Having strength to assume the responsibility was the main theme that emerged from the following five sub-themes: Being an involved participant, Having confirming encounters, Trusting in health-care staff, Comprehending through knowledge, and Feeling left out. Four of these five sub-themes were positive. The fifth subtheme illuminated negative experience, indicating the absence of empowerment. Conclusions Family members' experience of empowerment is dependent on their ability to assume the responsibility for a relative with chronic kidney disease when needed. The findings emphasise the need for a family perspective and the significance of a supportive environment for family members of persons in outpatient care. PMID:22035275

  18. Screening of Household Family Members of Brucellosis Cases and Neighboring Community Members in Azerbaijan

    PubMed Central

    Ismayilova, Rita; Mody, Rupal; Abdullayev, Rakif; Amirova, Kamala; Jabbarova, Latafat; Ustun, Narmin; Jahanov, Musa; Nasirova, Emilya; Powers, Marilyn; Rivard, Robert; Hepburn, Matthew; Bautista, Christian T.

    2013-01-01

    Brucellosis is an endemic zoonotic disease in Azerbaijan. The first human brucellosis case reported in 1922 was in Pardabil village of a region currently named Shabran. Household members of brucellosis index cases are a population at risk for brucellosis infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of seropositivity of brucellosis among household and neighboring community members of brucellosis index cases in Azerbaijan. Twenty-one household members of 8 index brucellosis cases and 27 community neighbors were serologically tested for evidence of exposure by the serum agglutination test. Of these, the brucellosis seropositivity rate was 9.5% and 7.4%, respectively. Screening of household members of index cases and individuals who live in proximity to infected household members is a practical approach to increase the detection of brucellosis exposure. PMID:23478582

  19. The Family As Role Model for Educating Its Members: Childhood through Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehner, Wilhelm

    The key element for survival in today's technological society is the family and the role it plays in the education of its members. Educational attainments are closely linked to family background; not only for children, but for adults as well. Children tend to gain levels of education similar to, if not higher than those of family heads, and…

  20. Family Members Affected by a Close Relative's Addiction: The Stress-Strain-Coping-Support Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Templeton, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the stress-strain-coping-support (SSCS) model which underpins the whole programme of work described in this supplement. The need for such a model is explained: previous models of substance misuse and the family have attributed dysfunction or deficiency to families or family members. In contrast, the SSCS model assumes that…

  1. Kpn I Family of Long Interspersed Repeated DNA Sequences in Primates: Polymorphism of Family Members and Evidence for Transcription

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael I. Lerman; Ronald E. Thayer; Maxine F. Singer

    1983-01-01

    An ≈ 2-kilobase-pair-long member (Kpn I-LS1) of the African green monkey Kpn I family of repeated sequences has been cloned, subjected to sequence analysis, and compared to other family members which are over 6 kilobase pairs (Kpn I-alpha 7) and 829 base pairs (Kpn I-RET) long. Both Kpn I-LS1 and Kpn I-RET lack sequences found at the ends of the

  2. Television in Indian Adolescents' Lives: A Member of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Suman; Larson, Reed W.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the context in which eighth graders in India watch television through an experience sampling study of 100 urban middle-class Indian families. As a whole, findings indicate that the television viewing of middle-class Indian youth is typically a relaxed antidote to the stresses of the day that they share with their families. (SLD)

  3. Accommodating family life: mentoring future female faculty members.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-03-01

    The demands of family life are crucial factors in successfully retaining women in science. Retention efforts should focus on creating a family-friendly environment within the laboratory and the institute. Based on my own experiences, I suggest ways to attract top young scientists and support their development into leading researchers. PMID:25601644

  4. Patient-focused, family-centered end-of-life medical care: views of the guidelines and bereaved family members.

    PubMed

    Teno, J M; Casey, V A; Welch, L C; Edgman-Levitan, S

    2001-09-01

    A fundamental barrier to improving the quality of medical care at the end of life is the lack of measurement tools. The Toolkit of Instruments to Measure End of Life Care (TIME) aims to fill that void by creating measurement tools that capture the patient and family perspective. To develop a conceptual model for a retrospective survey of bereaved family members that incorporates both professional and family perspectives on what constitutes good care at the end of life, a qualitative literature review of existing professional guidelines and six focus groups with bereaved family members from acute care hospitals (n = 2), nursing homes (n = 2), and hospice/VNA home health services (n = 2) was performed. The focus groups were held in Arizona, New York, and Massachusetts and included 42 bereaved family members/friends contacted 3-12 months from the time of patient's death. Domains of care that define quality end-of-life care were defined. Focus group participants defined high quality medical care as: 1) providing dying persons with desired physical comfort; 2) helping dying persons control decisions about medical care and daily routines; 3) relieving family members of the burden of being present at all times to advocate for their loved one; 4) educating family members so they felt confident to care for their loved ones at home; and 5) providing family members with emotional support both before and after the patient's death. The qualitative literature review yielded similar results, except that the professional guidelines did not mention the advocacy burden felt by families. These two sources provided the foundation for a conceptual model of patient-focused, family-centered medical care and a new tool for surveying bereaved family members. Views of bereaved family members' stories and professional guidelines help to identify key domains of quality of end-of-life care. A new survey instrument provides a way to incorporate the perspectives of bereaved family members in measuring the quality of end-of-life care. PMID:11532587

  5. Using focus groups to design a psychoeducation program for patients with schizophrenia and their family members

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yan; Liu, Dan; Chen, Yuxiang; He, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine what factors to be considered in planning a psychoeducation program to better meet the needs of patients with schizophrenia and their family members. Methods: Three focus group sessions were conducted and recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by members of the research team. Results: Patients hoped to grasp the fullest possible knowledge about schizophrenia, whereas the factors influencing the efficacy of the schizophrenia health education curriculum included: discrimination, non-understanding of family members, easy to forget, unreasonable timetable. Health education was mainly in the form of classroom teaching. Conclusions: 1. At present, there are a few psychiatric education courses in China; 2. Patients and their family members are eager to acquire knowledge about the contents of schizophrenia; 3. Misconceptions would hinder the rehabilitation of patients; 4. Worry about being discriminated; 5. There is a different knowledge demand between the patients and their family members. PMID:24482705

  6. Psychiatric Worker and Family Members: Pathways Towards Co-Operation Networks within Psychiatric Assistance Services

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The family’s role in patient care was greatly altered by Law 180. This law, introduced in Italy in 1978, led to a gradual phasing out of custodial treatment for psychiatric patients. This different mindset, which views the family as an alternative to institutionalization, leads to it being seen as an essential entity in the setting up of community service dynamics. We interviewed health professionals in order to understand obstacles of collaboration between family members and mental health care workers. The goal was to uncover actions that promote collaboration and help build alliances between families and psychiatric workers. Results showed that health professionals view the family as a therapeutic resource. Despite this view, family members were rarely included in patient treatment. The reasons is: the structures have a theoretical orientation of collaboration with the family but, for nurses not are organized a few meeting spaces with family members. Services should create moments, such as multi-family groups or groups of information, managed by nurses and not only by doctors. These occasions it might facilitate the knowledge between professionals and family members. PMID:25478137

  7. Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members

    MedlinePLUS

    ... workers involved. Few responsibilities are more difficult for managers than that of informing the family about an ... When an employee dies on the job, the manager suddenly takes on new and unfamiliar tasks that ...

  8. MEMBER'S REGISTRATION Fall 2013 First Name: _________________________ Family Name: _________________________________

    E-print Network

    Kambhampati, Patanjali

    : _________________________ Family Name: _________________________________ Telephone: ____________________________________________________________________________ Apt: ________ City: ______________________ Postal Code digital Photography 241 September 27 10 a.m. 275 History of the blues 1041 October 11 1 p.m. 303 Managing

  9. Associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients in Flanders: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Catthoor, Kirsten; Schrijvers, Didier; Hutsebaut, Joost; Feenstra, Dineke; Persoons, Philippe; De Hert, Marc; Peuskens, Jozef; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess presence and severity of associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients and factors for higher associative stigma. METHODS: Standardized semi-structured interview of 150 family members of psychotic patients receiving full time treatment. This study on associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients was part of a larger research program on the burden of the family, using “Interview for the Burden of the Family” and the chapters stigma, treatment and attribution from the “Family interview Schedule”. The respondents were relatives, one per patient, either partner or parent. The patients had been diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder. All contacts with patients and relatives were in Dutch. Relatives were deemed suitable to participate in this research if they saw the patient at least once a week. Recruitment took place in a standardized way: after obtaining the patient’s consent, the relatives were approached to participate. The results were analyzed using SPSS Version 18.0. RESULTS: The prevalence of associative stigma in this sample is 86%. Feelings of depression in the majority of family members are prominent. Twenty-one point three percent experienced guilt more or less frequent, while shame was less pronounced. Also, 18.6% of all respondents indicated that they tried to hide the illness of their family member for others regularly or more. Three six point seven percent really kept secret about it in certain circumstances and 29.3% made efforts to explain what the situation or psychiatric condition of their family member really is like. Factors with marked significance towards higher associative stigma are a worsened relationship between the patient and the family member, conduct problems to family members, the patients’ residence in a residential care setting, and hereditary attributional factors like genetic hereditability and character. The level of associative stigma has significantly been predicted by the burden of aggressive disruptions to family housemates of the psychotic patient. CONCLUSION: Family members of psychotic patients in Flanders experience higher associative stigma compared to previous international research. Disruptive behavior by the patient towards in-housing family members is the most accurate predictor of higher associative stigma.

  10. Family Quality of Life before and after Out-of-Home Placement of a Family Member with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Shirli; Edwards, Meaghan; Baum, Nehama T.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of out-of-home residential placement on families has been previously studied. However, no study has examined this issue through the lens of "family quality of life" (FQoL). The aim of this study was to produce a picture of FQoL among families with a member with an intellectual disability (ID) who has multiple diagnoses (i.e., an…

  11. The significance of services in a psychiatric hospital for family members of persons with mental illness.

    PubMed

    Shor, Ron; Shalev, Anat

    2015-03-01

    Hospitalization of persons with mental illness may cause their family members to experience multiple stressors that stem from the hospitalization as well as from the duties of helping him or her. However, providing support services in psychiatric hospitals for family members has received only limited attention. To change this situation, mental health professionals in a psychiatric hospital in Israel developed an innovative family-centered practice model, the Family Members' Support and Consultation (FMSC) service center. We examined the significance to family members of the services they received from the FMSC service center in a study that included 20 caregivers. Ten participated in 2 focus groups of 5 participants each; 10 were interviewed personally. We implemented a thematic analysis to analyze the data. According to the participants, the staff of the FMSC service center provided support services that helped them cope with the stressors and difficulties they experienced within the context of the psychiatric hospital. The participants emphasized the significance of the immediacy and accessibility of support provided, as well as the positive effects of systemic interventions aimed at changing the relationships between family members and systems in the psychiatric hospital. Our findings show the importance of integrating a service that focuses on the needs of family members of persons with mental illness within a psychiatric hospital. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25485823

  12. 77 FR 61775 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Petition for Qualifying Family Member of a U-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services...Petition for Qualifying Family Member of a U-1 Nonimmigrant, Form Number I-929...Department of Homeland Security (DHS), U.S. Citizenship and Immigration...

  13. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.307 Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? A...

  14. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.307 Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? A...

  15. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children...

  16. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children...

  17. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children...

  18. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.307 Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? A...

  19. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.307 Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? A...

  20. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.307 Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? A...

  1. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children...

  2. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility § 894.306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children...

  3. Seed Protein Bodies from Several Members of the Family Umbelliferae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ernest Spitzer

    1981-01-01

    Protein bodies of the seeds of the family Umbelliferae have not been studied extensively since late in the nineteenth century. Using a variety of recent technology and methodology certain aspects of the protein bodies of carrot (Daucus carota L. cv imperator 408), caraway (Carum carvi L.), anise (Pimpinella anisum L.), dill (Anethum graveolens L.), celery (Apium graveolens L. cv tall

  4. Play Interactions of Family Members towards Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Ghoroury, Nabil Hassan; Romanczyk, Raymond G.

    1999-01-01

    Siblings, mothers, and fathers in nine families of a child with autism were observed in dyadic play interactions with the autistic child. Parents exhibited more play behaviors toward children than siblings, but the autistic children initiated more interactions toward siblings than toward parents. Vineland Adaptive Behavior scale scores correlated…

  5. The Psychological Effects of a Stillbirth on Surviving Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFrain, John; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Interview and written testimony from over 300 mothers and fathers who had experienced a stillbirth suggest themes common to these bereaved families: shock, blame, guilt and hardship; desperate need to remember; utility of autopsies and funerals; irrational and terrifying thoughts; need for support systems; issues surrounding surviving siblings and…

  6. Potential phylogenetic utility of WRKY gene family members

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single and low copy nuclear genes represent a source of multiple, unlinked and independently-evolving loci, the ideal data set for molecular phylogenetic inference due to their high rate of synonymous substitution compared to chloroplast or mitochondrial genes. The WRKY gene family of transcription ...

  7. Experiences of family members of patients with colostomies and expectations about professional intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Umpiérrez, Augusto; Fort-Fort, Zoraida

    2014-01-01

    Objective the objective was to understand the experience of a group of family members of patients with colostomies, revealing their expectations regarding the intervention of health professionals. Method qualitative research, with the social phenomenological approach of Alfred Schütz, conducted in Montevideo in 2012; twelve family members of patients with colostomies participated, from an ostomy service of a health institution. Results the following categories were identified: family ties, trust in the health care team, the nurse as the articulator of the process, the desire to humanize care, and adaptation to new family life. Conclusions knowing the experience and expectations of the families of colostomy patients was achieved, emphasizing the previous family relationships to build upon them, and the trust in the health team, emphasizing the nurse as articulator of the process. Expectations focused on the desire for humanized care, enhancing adaptation of the nuclear family to the new way of life, restoring and enhancing its strengths, and collaborating in overcoming its weaknesses.

  8. The Molecular Clock Runs at Different Rates Among Closely Related Members of a Gene Family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter E. M. Gibbs; Werner F. Witke; Achilles Dugaiczyk

    1998-01-01

    .   The serum albumin gene family is composed of four members that have arisen by a series of duplications from a common ancestor.\\u000a From sequence differences between members of the gene family, we infer that a gene duplication some 580 Myr ago gave rise\\u000a to the vitamin D–binding protein (DBP) gene and a second lineage, which reduplicated about 295 Myr

  9. Expression of Hepatoma-derived growth factor family members in the adult central nervous system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heba M El-Tahir; Frank Dietz; Ralf Dringen; Kerstin Schwabe; Karen Strenge; Sørge Kelm; Mekky M Abouzied; Volkmar Gieselmann; Sebastian Franken

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) belongs to a polypeptide family containing five additional members called HDGF related proteins 1–4 (HRP-1 to -4) and Lens epithelial derived growth factor. Whereas some family members such as HDGF and HRP-2 are expressed in a wide range of tissues, the expression of others is very restricted. HRP-1 and -4 are only expressed in testis,

  10. Identification and characterization of a new member of the TNF family that induces apoptosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven R. Wiley; Ken Schooley; Pamela J. Smolak; Wenie S. Din; Chang-Pin Huang; Jillian K. Nicholl; Grant R. Sutherland; Terri Davis Smith; Charles Rauch; Craig A. Smith; Raymond G. Goodwin

    1995-01-01

    A novel tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family member has been cloned and characterized. This protein, designated TNF-related apoptosis-Inducing ligand (TRAIL), consists of 281 and 291 as in the human and murine forms, respectively, which share 65% as identity. TRAIL is a type II membrane protein, whose C-terminal extracellular domain shows clear homology to other TNF family members. TRAIL transcripts are

  11. What are motives of family members who take responsibility in palliative cancer care?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa Sand; Mariann Olsson; Peter Strang

    2010-01-01

    Background and aim.?Some studies show that the family members willingly take great responsibility in palliative care. However, their motives for doing so have not been much explored and the aim of this study is to investigate that further.Method.?Twenty family members of patients enrolled in palliative care were interviewed in depth. The interviews were taped, transcribed and analysed using a qualitative,

  12. Establishing the surgical nurse liaison role to improve patient and family member communication.

    PubMed

    Herd, Hope A; Rieben, Melissa A

    2014-05-01

    Having clear personal communication with a surgical patient's family members decreases the anxiety and increases patient and family member satisfaction. Perioperative team members at one East Coast community hospital implemented a new approach to communication in the perioperative area to address patient satisfaction after patient survey scores declined in the areas of communication and calming fears. An additional consideration was the facility's plan to move to a new facility in which the surgical department would be split across two floors. A literature review revealed that adding a surgical nurse liaison can increase patient, family member, and staff member satisfaction. The administration approved creation of the position, with duties that included managing the waiting area, facilitating interaction between physicians and patients' family members, and assisting with family visits to the perianesthesia unit. After implementation of this position, results of surveys showed increases in patient satisfaction. One year after the position was established, staff members reported they were happy with the position as well. PMID:24766921

  13. A Cooperative Communication Intervention for Nursing Home Staff and Family Members of Residents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karl Pillemer; J. Jill Suitor; Charles R. Henderson; Rhoda Meador; Leslie Schultz; Julie Robison; Carol Hegeman

    Purpose: This article reports on a randomized, con- trolled study of Partners in Caregiving, an intervention designed to increase cooperation and effective communication between family members and nursing home staff. Design and Methods: Participants in- cluded 932 relatives and 655 staff members recruited from 20 nursing homes, randomly assigned to treatment and control conditions. Parallel training sessions on communication and

  14. Photometric Observations of a Very Young Family-Member Asteroid (832) Karin

    E-print Network

    Malhotra, Renu

    Photometric Observations of a Very Young Family-Member Asteroid (832) Karin Fumi Yoshida1 Budi (Received 2004 March 15; accepted 2004 April 15) Abstract Asteroid (832) Karin is the largest member in optical bands. The rotational period of asteroid Karin was determined to be 18.346 ± 0.096 hr. Its

  15. Television in Indian Adolescents' Lives: A Member of the Family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suman Verma; Reed W. Larson

    2002-01-01

    To understand the effects of TV on youth, it is important to know the context in which they view it. This paper reports findings from an Experience Sampling study of 100 urban, middle-class Indian families to elucidate the “context of use” for this group. Mothers, fathers, and 8th graders carried alarm watches for 1 week and provided 13,674 reports on

  16. Genetic Counseling and Presenilin-1 Alzheimer's Disease: “Research FamilyMembers Share Some Thoughts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Linda E. Nee

    2007-01-01

    Genetic counseling is a 2-way street between counselor and the counseled. In this article, both share experiences gained through more than 25 years of searching for the gene, finding the presenilin-1 Alzheimer's disease gene, and waiting for a cure. “Research Families” made research models a reality. Few family members requested presymptomatic testing.

  17. Psychosocial Concerns of Adults with Developmental Disabilities: Perspectives of the Self, Family Member, and the Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudet, Laura; Pulos, Steve; Crethar, Hugh; Burger, Susan

    2002-01-01

    In this study, self-reports of 34 individuals with developmental disabilities (DD) were compared with proxy ratings from family and providers. Correlations between the ratings of individuals with DD and the proxy raters were low, as were the correlations between family members and providers. In all scales except "cognition," the individual with DD…

  18. The relationship of adverse childhood experiences to a history of premature death of family members

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert F Anda; Maxia Dong; David W Brown; Vincent J Felitti; Wayne H Giles; Geraldine S Perry; Edwards J Valerie; Shanta R Dube

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To assess the association between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), including childhood abuse and neglect, and serious household dysfunction, and premature death of a family member. Because ACEs increase the risk for many of the leading causes of death in adults and tend to be familial and intergenerational, we hypothesized that persons who report having more ACEs would be more

  19. A new member of the frizzled family from Drosophila functions as a Wingless receptor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Purnima Bhanot; Marcel Brink; Cindy Harryman Samos; Jen-Chih Hsieh; Yanshu Wang; Jennifer P. Macke; Deborah Andrew; Jeremy Nathans; Roel Nusse

    1996-01-01

    Receptors for Wingless and other signalling molecules of the Wnt gene family have yet to be identified. We show here that cultured Drosophila cells transfected with a novel member of the frizzled gene family in Drosophila, Dfz2, respond to added Wingless protein by elevating the level of the Armadillo protein. Moreover, Wingless binds to Drosophila or human cells expressing Dfz2.

  20. Family Members' Views on Seeking Placement in State-Supported Living Centers in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colvin, Alex D.; Larke, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the factors that influence family members' decisions to seek placement for relatives with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (ID/DD) into state-supported living centers in Texas. The sample included 51 family caregivers between the ages of 26 and 95. Using descriptive statistics, correlation, and inferential…

  1. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  2. Cloning and Characterization of the Members of the Vertebrate Dlx Gene Family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antonio Simeone; Dario Acampora; Maria Pannese; Maurizio D'Esposito; Anna Stornaiuolo; Massimo Gulisano; Antonio Mallamaci; Kumar Kastury; Teresa Druck; Kay Huebner; Edoardo Boncinelli

    1994-01-01

    A number of vertebrate genes of the Dlx gene family have been cloned in mouse, frog, and zebrafish. These genes contain a homeobox related to that of Distalless, a gene expressed in the developing head and limbs of Drosophila embryos. We cloned and studied the expression of two members of this family, which we named Dlx5 and Dlx6, in human

  3. Sensenbrenner syndrome: a new member of the hepatorenal fibrocystic family.

    PubMed

    Zaffanello, Marco; Diomedi-Camassei, Francesca; Melzi, Maria Luisa; Torre, Giuliano; Callea, Francesco; Emma, Francesco

    2006-11-01

    Cranioectodermal dysplasia (CED, Sensenbrenner syndrome; OMIM #218330) is an autosomal recessive disorder reported only in 15 cases, which is characterized by dolichocephaly, rhizomelic dwarfism, dental and nail dysplasia, and progressive tubulo-interstitial nephritis (TIN) leading to end-stage renal failure. Herein, we describe a new patient with cranio-ectodermal dysplasia. Unlike previously reported cases, this 4-year-old child presented with tubulo-interstitial nephropathy associated with liver cystic disease and elevated liver enzymes. The liver biopsy demonstrated congenital hepatic fibrosis secondary to ductal plate malformation. The coexistence of a chronic tubulo-interstitial renal disease with lesions associated to malformations of the hepatic ductal plate indicates that CED as a new member of the congenital hepatorenal fibrocystic syndromes. PMID:17022080

  4. TRPV3: time to decipher a poorly understood family member!

    PubMed Central

    Nilius, Bernd; Bíró, Tamás; Owsianik, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The vanilloid transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 differs in several aspects from other members of the TRPV subfamily. This Ca2+-, ATP- and calmodulin-regulated channel constitutes a target for many natural compounds and has a unique expression pattern as the most prominent and important TRP channel in keratinocytes of the skin. Although TRPV3 is considered as a thermosensitive channel, its function as a thermosensor in the skin is challenged. Nevertheless, it plays important roles in other skin functions such as cutaneous sensations, hair development and barrier function. More recently, mutations in TRPV3 were linked with a rare genodermatosis known as the Olmsted syndrome. This review gives an overview on properties of TRPV3 and its functions in the skin and skin diseases. PMID:23836684

  5. How family members manage risk around functional decline: The autonomy management process in households facing dementia.

    PubMed

    Berry, Brandon; Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina; Gomez, Yarin

    2015-04-01

    Most dementia research investigates the social context of declining ability through studies of decision-making around medical treatment and end-of-life care. This study seeks to fill an important gap in research about how family members manage the risks of functional decline at home. Drawing on three waves of in-depth interviewing in 2012-2014, it investigates how family members in US households manage decline in an affected individual's natural range of daily activities over time. The findings show that early on in the study period affected individuals were perceived to have awareness of their decline and routinely drew on family members for support. Support transformed when family members detected that the individual's deficit awareness had diminished, creating a corresponding increase in risk of self-harm around everyday activities. With a loss of confidence in the individual's ability to regulate his or her own activities to avoid these risks, family members employed unilateral practices to manage the individual's autonomy around his or her activity involvements. These practices typically involved various deceits and ruses to discourage elders from engaging in activities perceived as potentially dangerous. The study concludes by discussing the implications that the social context of interpretive work around awareness and risk plays an important role in how families perceive an elder's functional ability and manage his or her activity involvements. PMID:25697634

  6. Behind Family Lines : Family members? adaptations to military-induced separations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manon Daniëlle Andres

    2010-01-01

    The interrelation between work and family life has long been recognized and in many of today?s Western societies, both men and women face the challenges of combining work and family demands. Above and beyond the widespread prevalence of work affecting family, work is especially likely to bear upon family life in the course of job-induced separations. In such instances, work

  7. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Mission Specialist Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev, a Russian cosmonaut, and his wife Vera Sergeevna Usacheva during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  8. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Commander James D. Halsell Jr. waves as he stands with his wife Kathy during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  9. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber and her husband Jerome Elkind during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  10. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A light-hearted moment during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. From left, Commander James D. Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber and Pilot Scott J. Horowitz. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  11. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The STS-101 crew gather during a meeting with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. From left, Mission Specialist Susan J. Helms, Commander James D. Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, Pilot Scott J. Horowitz and Mission Specialists Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev, Jeffery N. Williams and James S. Voss. In the background is the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the pad. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  12. The organ donor family members' perception of stressful situations during the organ donation experience.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, M

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what the individual organ/tissue donor family members appraised as most stressful during the anticipation, confrontation and post-confrontation stages of the organ-donation process. The Lazarus and Folkman stress and coping theory guided the development and interpretation of the study. Family members who had lost a loved one suddenly and consented to donation in 1988 were interviewed. Data were analysed by means of content analysis. Findings showed that family members appraised different types of stressful situations during the three stages. The most frequently reported stressful situations centred around the threat of losing a loved one, confirmation of brain death, failure of the health professionals to identify the loved one as a potential donor and to approach the family regarding organ donation, and adjusting to the many changes associated with the loss. Significantly, five families requested donation, while two readily consented when approached. All family members reported that organ donation had helped with their grief. The findings of this study contribute to the development of knowledge required to guide nursing interventions to provide sensitive care to donors and their families. PMID:1537995

  13. Holding blame at bay? ‘Gene talk' in family members' accounts of schizophrenia aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Callard, Felicity; Rose, Diana; Hanif, Emma-Louise; Quigley, Jody; Greenwood, Kathryn; Wykes, Til

    2012-01-01

    We provide the first detailed analysis of how, for what purposes and with what consequences people related to someone with a diagnosis of schizophrenia use ‘gene talk'. The article analyses findings from a qualitative interview study conducted in London and involving 19 participants (mostly women). We transcribed the interviews verbatim and analysed them using grounded theory methods. We analyse how and for what purposes participants mobilized ‘gene talk' in their affectively freighted encounter with an unknown interviewer. Gene talk served to (re)position blame and guilt, and was simultaneously used imaginatively to forge family history narratives. Family members used ‘gene talk' to recruit forebears with no psychiatric diagnosis into a family history of mental illness, and presented the origins of the diagnosed family member's schizophrenia as lying temporally before, and hence beyond the agency of the immediate family. Gene talk was also used in attempts to dislodge the distressing figure of the schizophrenia-inducing mother. ‘Gene talk', however, ultimately displaced, rather than resolved, the (self-)blame of many family members, particularly mothers. Our article challenges the commonly expressed view that genetic accounts will absolve family members' sense of (self-)blame in relation to their relative's/relatives' diagnosis. PMID:23227107

  14. Perceptions of barriers in managing diabetes: perspectives of Hispanic immigrant patients and family members

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jie; Amirehsani, Karen; Wallace, Debra; Letvak, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Hispanics show poorer self-management of type 2 diabetes than non-Hispanic Whites. Although previous studies have reported socioeconomic and cultural barriers to diabetes self-management by Hispanics, little is known about perceived barriers to diabetes self-management from the perspectives of both Hispanics and their family members. Purpose The purpose of the study was to explore perceived barriers among Hispanic immigrants with diabetes and their family members. Methods A qualitative study using five focus groups was conducted. A total of 73 Hispanic immigrants with type 2 diabetes (n=36) and family members (n=37) were recruited in the southeastern United States for a family-based intervention study of diabetes-self management. Participants were asked to describe their perceptions of barriers to self-management. The five sessions were audiotaped and transcribed, translated from Spanish into English, and analyzed using standard content analysis. Demographics, hemoglobin A1C levels, blood pressure and BMI were obtained both for participants with diabetes and for their family members. Results Barriers to diabetes self-management themes identified by participants with diabetes were in three major themes categorize: suffering from diabetes, difficulties in managing the disease, and lack of resources/support. Two key themes emerged pertaining to family members: we can provide support and we lack knowledge. Conclusions Perceived barriers to diabetes self-management described by Hispanic immigrants with diabetes and family members indicate a lack of intervention strategies to meet their needs. Interventions should include culturally relevant resources, family support, and diabetes self-management skills education. PMID:23640301

  15. Strange Stars : An interesting member of the compact object family

    E-print Network

    Manjari Bagchi; Subharthi Ray; Jishnu Dey; Mira Dey

    2008-02-10

    We have studied strange star properties both at zero temperature and at finite temperatures and searched signatures of strange stars in gamma-ray, x-ray and radio astronomy. We have a set of Equations of State (EoS) for strange quark matter (SQM) and solving the TOV equations, we get the structure of strange stars. The maximum mass for a strange star decreases with the increase of temperature, because at high temperatures, the EoS become softer. One important aspect of strange star is that, surface tension depends on the size and structure of the star and is significantly larger than the conventional values. Moment of inertia is another important parameter for compact stars as by comparing theoretical values with observed estimate, it is possible to constrain the dense matter Equation of State. We hope that this approach will help us to decide whether the members of the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039 are neutron stars or strange stars.

  16. Strange Stars : An interesting member of the compact object family

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Manjari [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhaba Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Ray, Subharthi [Inter University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira [Dept. of Physics, Presidency College, Kolkata 700073 (India)

    2008-01-10

    We have studied strange star properties both at zero temperature and at finite temperatures and searched signatures of strange stars in gamma-ray, x-ray and radio astronomy. We have a set of Equations of State (EoS) for strange quark matter (SQM) and solving the TOV equations, we get the structure of strange stars. The maximum mass for a strange star decreases with the increase of temperature, because at high temperatures, the EoS become softer. One important aspect of strange star is that, surface tension depends on the size and structure of the star and is significantly larger than the conventional values. Moment of inertia is another important parameter for compact stars as by comparing theoretical values with observed estimate, it is possible to constrain the dense matter Equation of State. We hope that this approach will help us to decide whether the members of the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039 are neutron stars or strange stars.

  17. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Commander Kevin Kregel enjoys a reunion with his wife, Jeanne, near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  18. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Pilot Dominic Gorie enjoys a reunion with his wife, Wendy, near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  19. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele enjoys a reunion with his wife near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  20. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi poses for photographers near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  1. Leiomodins: larger members of the tropomodulin (Tmod) gene family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.; Fritz-Six, K. L.; Almenar-Queralt, A.; Fowler, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    The 64-kDa autoantigen D1 or 1D, first identified as a potential autoantigen in Graves' disease, is similar to the tropomodulin (Tmod) family of actin filament pointed end-capping proteins. A novel gene with significant similarity to the 64-kDa human autoantigen D1 has been cloned from both humans and mice, and the genomic sequences of both genes have been identified. These genes form a subfamily closely related to the Tmods and are here named the Leiomodins (Lmods). Both Lmod genes display a conserved intron-exon structure, as do three Tmod genes, but the intron-exon structure of the Lmods and the Tmods is divergent. mRNA expression analysis indicates that the gene formerly known as the 64-kDa autoantigen D1 is most highly expressed in a variety of human tissues that contain smooth muscle, earning it the name smooth muscle Leiomodin (SM-Lmod; HGMW-approved symbol LMOD1). Transcripts encoding the novel Lmod gene are present exclusively in fetal and adult heart and adult skeletal muscle, and it is here named cardiac Leiomodin (C-Lmod; HGMW-approved symbol LMOD2). Human C-Lmod is located near the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy locus CMH6 on human chromosome 7q3, potentially implicating it in this disease. Our data demonstrate that the Lmods are evolutionarily related and display tissue-specific patterns of expression distinct from, but overlapping with, the expression of Tmod isoforms. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. Characterization of Members of the Legionellaceae Family by Automated Ribotyping

    PubMed Central

    Cordevant, Christophe; Tang, Jane S.; Cleland, David; Lange, Marc

    2003-01-01

    In order to implement a new and reliable method for characterizing different species of Legionella, a genetic fingerprinting study with an automated ribotyping system (RiboPrinter) was completed with members of this genus which were deposited at the American Type Culture Collection. The RiboPrinter examined the different patterns of EcoRI digestion fragments from the rRNA operons of 110 strains, representing 48 of the 49 described Legionella species as well as 70 serogroups of those species. Distinctive and consistent patterns were obtained for the type strains of the 48 species investigated. Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri and L. pneumophila subsp. pascullei each generated a specific pattern, whereas L. pneumophila subsp. pneumophila produced six different fingerprint patterns. No correlation seemed to exist between the ribotypes obtained and the 15 serotypes of L. pneumophila. For the other species, those with two known serogroups presented two distinctive patterns with the RiboPrinter with the exception of L. hackeliae and L. quinlivanii, which yielded only one pattern. We also encountered ribotypes for strains which were not identified to the species level. The ribotypes generated for these strains with the RiboPrinter did not match those generated for known type strains, suggesting the putative description of new serogroups or species. Although the automated system did not have sufficient discriminatory ability to serve as an epidemiological tool in a clinical setting, it appeared to be a powerful tool for general genomic analysis of the Legionella isolates (e.g., determination of new species) and assessment of the interrelationship among Legionella strains through the RiboPrinter database connection. PMID:12517822

  3. Parents and Children Only? Acculturation and the Influence of Extended Family Members among Vietnamese Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Tingvold, Laila; Middelthon, Anne-Lise; Allen, James; Hauff, Edvard

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear family is often the point of departure in much of the existing acculturation research on refugee youth and children of refugees. The influence of other extended family members appears to receive less attention in understanding acculturation processes and intergenerational perspectives. This qualitative study explores the influence of extended family members upon a small sample of Vietnamese refugee parents and their adolescents while they undergo acculturation through their long-term resettlement process in Norway. With repeated interviews over a time span of 3 years, we identified situations and processes in family life in which extended kin become particularly activated and influential. Vietnamese refugee families in Norway keep close contact with extended kin even in the face of geographical distance to kin remaining in Vietnam, or globally dispersed. Aunts, uncles, and cousins are experienced as significant persons in the lives of many adolescents. Additionally, birth order of parents can often influence relationship dynamics among siblings and siblings children. Extended kin surfaced as especially important and influential at critical stages and crisis situations in family life. Extended family, and in particular, parental siblings play important roles in the acculturation experience and family functioning of Vietnamese refugee families in Norway. This has important implications for the study of Vietnamese and other refugee and immigrant families in acculturation research. PMID:24510190

  4. Children exposed to the arrest of a family member: Associations with mental health

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Frank J.; Kaufman, Joy S.; Finley, Meghan K.; Griffin, Amy; Anderson, Janet; Marshall, Tim; Radway, Susan; Stack, Virginia; Crusto, Cindy A.

    2013-01-01

    The arrest of a parent or other family member can be detrimental to children’s health. To study the impact of exposure to the arrest of a family member on children’s mental health and how said association may change across developmental periods, we examined baseline data for children (birth through 11 years) entering family-based systems of care (SOC). Children exposed to the arrest of a family member had experienced significantly more 5.38 (SD = 2.59) different types of potentially traumatic events (PTE) than children not exposed to arrest 2.84 (SD = 2.56). Multiple regression model results showed that arrest exposure was significantly associated with greater behavioral and emotional challenges after controlling for children’s age, gender, race/ethnicity, household income, caregiver’s education, parenting factors, and other PTE exposure. Further analyses revealed differences in internalizing and externalizing behaviors associated with arrest exposure across developmental levels. This study highlights some of the mental health challenges for children exposed to the arrest of a family member, while adding to our knowledge of how such an event affects children across different developmental periods. More trauma-informed, developmentally appropriate systems need to be in place at all levels to assist children and families experiencing arrest. PMID:24829537

  5. Survey of Asian patients with hepatitis B infection: limited knowledge of transmission and screening of family members.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Tara; Zheng, Patricia; Nguyen, Cynthia; Brown, Abigail M; Chen, Yi-Wen; Peters, Marion G

    2015-02-01

    Asian American families are disproportionately affected by Hepatitis B (HBV) infection. We aimed to assess the extent of screening family members of Asian patients with known HBV infection as well as patients' knowledge of HBV disease. A cross-sectional survey of established Asian patients with HBV-infection was performed at a university liver clinic. Outcome measures included the percentage of family members whose HBV serostatus was unknown and the percentage of patients who were able to correctly identify modes of transmission. A total of 803 US-based family members were identified by 58 patients. Patients did not know the HBV serostatus of 50% of their family members and 28% of their immediate family members. Fifty percent of participants did not know how they had acquired HBV or stated unlikely transmission modes. Though nationwide vaccination campaigns target this underrepresented population, screening family members of Asian patients with HBV remains a challenge. PMID:23913129

  6. Payment or reimbursement for certain medical expenses for Camp Lejeune family members. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-09-24

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is promulgating regulations to implement statutory authority to provide payment or reimbursement for hospital care and medical services provided to certain veterans' family members who resided at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, for at least 30 days during the period beginning on January 1, 1957, and ending on December 31, 1987. Under this rule, VA will reimburse family members, or pay providers, for medical expenses incurred as a result of certain illnesses and conditions that may be attributed to exposure to contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune during this time period. Payment or reimbursement will be made within the limitations set forth in statute and Camp Lejeune family members will receive hospital care and medical services that are consistent with the manner in which we provide hospital care and medical services to Camp Lejeune veterans. PMID:25255501

  7. Ethnicity, expressed emotion, and schizophrenia patients' perceptions of their family members' criticism.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Amy G; Rosales, Grace A; Kymalainen, Jennifer A; Armesto, Jorge C

    2006-09-01

    Expressed emotion is a widely researched construct. However, less is known about patients' own perceptions of their relatives' expressed emotion. Using a sample of 42 patient/family member dyads with schizophrenia, we examined the concordance between the number of criticisms expressed by relatives during the Camberwell Family Interview and patients' perceptions of how critical they perceived their relative to be. As predicted, white and Latino family members who expressed more criticism during the Camberwell Family Interview were indeed perceived as more critical by patients. Among blacks, however, no significant association was found between relatives' expressed criticism and patients' perceptions of their relatives' criticism. Findings from this study suggest that cultural/ethnic values may influence how criticism from relatives is perceived and experienced by patients. PMID:16971814

  8. Ethnicity, expressed emotion, and communication deviance in family members of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kymalainen, Jennifer A; Weisman, Amy G; Rosales, Grace A; Armesto, Jorge C

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the relationships among expressed emotion (EE), communication deviance (CD), and ethnicity in a sample of 57 white, Latino, and black relatives of patients with schizophrenia. A new method of assessing CD from the Five Minute Speech Sample was also developed and evaluated against an existing method (the Camberwell Family Interview; CFI). As hypothesized, high expressed emotion rated (from the CFI) was associated with higher levels of CD, and the Five Minute Speech Sample and CFI methods of assessing CD were concordant. CD statements made by white family members focused most on patient behaviors/symptoms that reflected a lack of independent functioning. CD statements of Latino and black relatives, however, focused most on patient behaviors that interfered with the family's interdependent functioning. Family members may have particular difficulty communicating coherently when discussing patients' inability to uphold important values and behaviors that are sanctioned by their ethnic background. PMID:16772854

  9. A muslim family with several members with celiac disease and other autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni

    2015-04-01

    The Bedouin community of Israel is a traditional Muslim society. It is characterized by one of the highest rates of population growth in the world. The custom of intermarriage, especially among cousins or within the extended family, is very common because of the community's tribal structure. The rate of genetic disease in this population is high. We present a Bedouin family in which the father suffers from celiac disease and Hashimoto's disease, his daughter has celiac and Crohn's disease, three other children have IgA deficiency, and a half uncle has Crohn's disease. In describing this family we present the familial nature of these diseases, the age at diagnosis, the marital relationships of the family members and co-morbid diseases and medical conditions. Family doctors can develop and use genograms that can facilitate their understanding of the situation and enable them to develop plans for health promotion and disease prevention counseling in the community. PMID:24242154

  10. Integrating Spirituality into Family Therapy Training: An Exploration of Faculty Members’ Beliefs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Winnie A. Grams; Thomas Stone Carlson; Christi R. McGeorge

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the beliefs and attitudes of marriage and family therapy (MFT) faculty as they relate\\u000a to the appropriateness of addressing spirituality in the context of therapy and training of future MFTs. Ninety-three MFT\\u000a faculty members at masters and doctoral level programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Marriage and Family\\u000a Therapy Education

  11. Genetic aspects of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in a family with multiple affected members: a research article

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis remains unknown and different factors have been suggested as causal. Hereditary factors can also determine the etiology of the disease; however, the pattern of inheritance remains unknown. Autosomal dominant, X-linked and multifactorial patterns of inheritances have been reported. Other studies have suggested possible chromosome regions related to the etiology of idiopathic scoliosis. We report the genetic aspects of and investigate chromosome regions for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in a Brazilian family. Methods Evaluation of 57 family members, distributed over 4 generations of a Brazilian family, with 9 carriers of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The proband presented a scoliotic curve of 75 degrees, as determined by the Cobb method. Genomic DNA from family members was genotyped. Results Locating a chromosome region linked to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was not possible in the family studied. Conclusion While it was not possible to determine a chromosome region responsible for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis by investigation of genetic linkage using microsatellites markers during analysis of four generations of a Brazilian family with multiple affected members, analysis including other types of genomic variations, like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could contribute to the continuity of this study. PMID:20374654

  12. An uncharacterized member of the ribokinase family in Thermococcus kodakarensis exhibits myo-inositol kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takaaki; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Yukika; Kuwata, Keiko; Kusaka, Eriko; Fujita, Haruo; Miki, Kunio; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2013-07-19

    Here we performed structural and biochemical analyses on the TK2285 gene product, an uncharacterized protein annotated as a member of the ribokinase family, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. The three-dimensional structure of the TK2285 protein resembled those of previously characterized members of the ribokinase family including ribokinase, adenosine kinase, and phosphofructokinase. Conserved residues characteristic of this protein family were located in a cleft of the TK2285 protein as in other members whose structures have been determined. We thus examined the kinase activity of the TK2285 protein toward various sugars recognized by well characterized ribokinase family members. Although activity with sugar phosphates and nucleosides was not detected, kinase activity was observed toward d-allose, d-lyxose, d-tagatose, d-talose, d-xylose, and d-xylulose. Kinetic analyses with the six sugar substrates revealed high Km values, suggesting that they were not the true physiological substrates. By examining activity toward amino sugars, sugar alcohols, and disaccharides, we found that the TK2285 protein exhibited prominent kinase activity toward myo-inositol. Kinetic analyses with myo-inositol revealed a greater kcat and much lower Km value than those obtained with the monosaccharides, resulting in over a 2,000-fold increase in kcat/Km values. TK2285 homologs are distributed among members of Thermococcales, and in most species, the gene is positioned close to a myo-inositol monophosphate synthase gene. Our results suggest the presence of a novel subfamily of the ribokinase family whose members are present in Archaea and recognize myo-inositol as a substrate. PMID:23737529

  13. An Uncharacterized Member of the Ribokinase Family in Thermococcus kodakarensis Exhibits myo-Inositol Kinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takaaki; Fujihashi, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Yukika; Kuwata, Keiko; Kusaka, Eriko; Fujita, Haruo; Miki, Kunio; Atomi, Haruyuki

    2013-01-01

    Here we performed structural and biochemical analyses on the TK2285 gene product, an uncharacterized protein annotated as a member of the ribokinase family, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis. The three-dimensional structure of the TK2285 protein resembled those of previously characterized members of the ribokinase family including ribokinase, adenosine kinase, and phosphofructokinase. Conserved residues characteristic of this protein family were located in a cleft of the TK2285 protein as in other members whose structures have been determined. We thus examined the kinase activity of the TK2285 protein toward various sugars recognized by well characterized ribokinase family members. Although activity with sugar phosphates and nucleosides was not detected, kinase activity was observed toward d-allose, d-lyxose, d-tagatose, d-talose, d-xylose, and d-xylulose. Kinetic analyses with the six sugar substrates revealed high Km values, suggesting that they were not the true physiological substrates. By examining activity toward amino sugars, sugar alcohols, and disaccharides, we found that the TK2285 protein exhibited prominent kinase activity toward myo-inositol. Kinetic analyses with myo-inositol revealed a greater kcat and much lower Km value than those obtained with the monosaccharides, resulting in over a 2,000-fold increase in kcat/Km values. TK2285 homologs are distributed among members of Thermococcales, and in most species, the gene is positioned close to a myo-inositol monophosphate synthase gene. Our results suggest the presence of a novel subfamily of the ribokinase family whose members are present in Archaea and recognize myo-inositol as a substrate. PMID:23737529

  14. Promoter Methylation Status of Ras-Association Domain Family Members in Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Antje M.; Zimmermann, Tobias; Haag, Tanja; Walesch, Sara K.; Dammann, Reinhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) are rare neuroendocrine tumors that arise from the medulla of the adrenal gland or the sympathetic ganglia and are characterized by the secretion of catecholamines. In 30–40% of patients, PCCs are genetically determined by susceptibility genes as various as RET, VHL, and NF1. We have analyzed the Ras-association domain family members (RASSFs) in PCCs regarding their inactivating promoter hypermethylation status. Previously, we reported a promoter methylation in PCC for the first family member RASSF1A. Promoter hypermethylation of CpG islands leads to the silencing of the according transcript and is a common mechanism for inactivation of tumor suppressors. In this study, we observed inactivating DNA modifications for the RASSF members RASSF2, RASSF5A, RASSF9, and RASSF10, but not for the members RASSF3, RASSF4, RASSF5C, RASSF6, RASSF7, and RASSF8. The degree of promoter methylation was 19% for RASSF2, 67% for RASSF5A, 18% for RASSF9, and 74% for RASSF10. Interestingly, the degree of hypermethylation for RASSF10 in hereditary PCCs was 89 vs. 60% in sporadic PCCs. A similar but less dramatic effect was observed in RASSF5A and RASSF9. Including all RASSF members, we found that of 25 PCCs, 92% show promoter methylation in at least in one RASSF member. In 75% of the hereditary PCC samples, we found two or more methylated RASSF promoters, whereas in sporadic PCCs only 46% were observed. In summary, we could show that in PCC several RASSF members are strongly hypermethylated in their promoter regions and methylation of more than one RASSF member occurs in the majority of PCCs. This adds the inactivation of genes of the RASSF tumor suppressor family to the already known deregulated genes of PCC. PMID:25750636

  15. Paradoxical role of an Egr transcription factor family member, Egr2\\/Krox20, in learning and memory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roseline Poirier; Caroline Mailhes; Patrick Charnay; Sabrina Davis; Serge Laroche; Carmen Sandi

    2007-01-01

    It is well established that Egr1\\/zif268, a member of the Egr family of transcription factors, is critical for the consolidation of several forms of memories. Recently, the Egr3 family member has also been implicated in learning and memory. Because Egr family members encode closely related zinc-finger transcription factors sharing a highly homologous DNA binding domain that recognises the same DNA

  16. Complete sequence and genetic characterization of Raspberry latent virus, a novel member of the family Reoviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new virus isolated from red raspberry plants and detected in the main production areas in northern Washington State, the United States and British Columbia, Canada was fully sequenced and found to be a novel member of the family Reoviridae. The virus was designated as Raspberry latent virus (RpLV)...

  17. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member of the Family Potyviridae with an Unusually Long Leader Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides excluding the 3’-polyadenylated tail. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the ‘hall-mark proteins’ of potyviruses including a s...

  18. Photo of family members of STS-5 commander, Vance D. Brand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Erik Brand and his mother Beverly are seen in a photo of family members of STS-5 commander Vance D. Brand. Erik holds a small model of the space shuttle with its solid rocket boosters and external fuel tank still attached.

  19. Morphological and molecular evidence that Culex nigripalpus baculovirus is an unusual member of the family Baculoviridae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bettina A. Moser; James J. Becnel; Susan E. White; Claudio Afonso; Gerald Kutish; Savita Shanker; Ernesto Almira

    2001-01-01

    We present evidence that a newly discovered mosquito virus from Culex nigripalpus is an unusual member of the family Baculoviridae. Development of this virus was restricted to nuclei of midgut epithelial cells in the gastric caeca and posterior stomach. The globular occlusion bodies were not enveloped, measured around 400 nm in diameter, occurred exclusively in nuclei of infected cells and

  20. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(1):6877, Spring 2007 Two members of the family Enterobacteriacea,

    E-print Network

    and the subsequent effects on human health. Key words: birds, cattle, Escherichia coli, prevalence, Salmonella management and human health. A review of Shiga toxin Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in cattleHuman­Wildlife Conflicts 1(1):68­77, Spring 2007 Two members of the family Enterobacteriacea

  1. Two members of the Ustilago maydis velvet family influence teliospore development and virulence on maize seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the fungal-specific velvet protein family regulate sexual and asexual spore production in the Ascomycota. We predicted, therefore, that velvet homologs in the basidiomycetous plant pathogen Ustilago maydis would regulate sexual spore development, which is also associated with plant disea...

  2. Posttraumatic Symptoms in Japanese Bereaved Family Members with Special Regard to Suicide and Homicide Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n =…

  3. BERA Sports Clearance: Weight Room: Any contractor or family member wishing to use the Weight

    E-print Network

    BERA Sports Clearance: Weight Room: Any contractor or family member wishing to use the Weight Room will be kept on file. BERA League Sports: BSA paid employees must fill out this BERA Sports Clearance Form or while playing in BERA sports league on site, you must call the Occupation Medical Clinic at ext. 3670

  4. Supplementary material to: Members of the gibberellin receptor gene family (GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE

    E-print Network

    Leubner, Gerhard

    DWARF1) play distinct roles during Lepidium sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana seed germination Antje sequence alignments of the Brassicaceae GID1 family members of Lepidium sativum (LesaGID1a, LesaGID1b, Lesa. Sequence alignment of the predicted GID1 proteins of Lepidium sativum (LesaGID1a, LesaGID1b, LesaGD1c

  5. Differential expression of sirtuin family members in the developing, adult, and aged rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Sidorova-Darmos, Elena; Wither, Robert G.; Shulyakova, Natalya; Fisher, Carl; Ratnam, Melanie; Aarts, Michelle; Lilge, Lothar; Monnier, Philippe P.; Eubanks, James H.

    2014-01-01

    The sirtuins are NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and/or ADP-ribosyltransferases that play roles in metabolic homeostasis, stress response and potentially aging. This enzyme family resides in different subcellular compartments, and acts on a number of different targets in the nucleus, cytoplasm and in the mitochondria. Despite their recognized ability to regulate metabolic processes, the roles played by specific sirtuins in the brain—the most energy demanding tissue in the body—remains less well investigated and understood. In the present study, we examined the regional mRNA and protein expression patterns of individual sirtuin family members in the developing, adult, and aged rat brain. Our results show that while each sirtuin is expressed in the brain at each of these different stages, they display unique spatial and temporal expression patterns within the brain. Further, for specific members of the family, the protein expression profile did not coincide with their respective mRNA expression profile. Moreover, using primary cultures enriched for neurons and astrocytes respectively, we found that specific sirtuin members display preferential neural lineage expression. Collectively, these results provide the first composite illustration that sirtuin family members display differential expression patterns in the brain, and provide evidence that specific sirtuins could potentially be targeted to achieve cell-type selective effects within the brain. PMID:25566066

  6. Self-Concept and Depression among Children Who Experienced the Death of a Family Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Hong T.; Scott, Amy N.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the moderating effects of physical and academic self-concept on depression among children who experienced the death of a family member. Data from Phase III of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care was used in the present study. Having a higher physical self-concept…

  7. The Experiences of Affected Family Members: A Summary of Two Decades of Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Velleman, Richard; Copello, Alex; Templeton, Lorna; Ibanga, Akanidomo

    2010-01-01

    This article is based upon the collective findings of a number of studies conducted in a number of countries during the past 20 years. Female partners and mothers are the family members who have been most represented in the study samples, but the latter also included sizeable numbers of male partners, fathers, sisters, brothers and adult sons and…

  8. INTRODUCTION Members of the spalt (sal) gene family encode zinc-finger

    E-print Network

    Emmons, Scott

    , the sal gene sem-4 controls the fate of several different cell types including neurons, muscleINTRODUCTION Members of the spalt (sal) gene family encode zinc-finger proteins that both control and hypodermis (Basson and Horvitz, 1996). The human gene SALL1 (also known as Hsal1) is mutated in patients

  9. Sequence Conservation in Families Whose Members Have Little or No Sequence Similarity

    E-print Network

    Hill, Emma

    Sequence Conservation in Families Whose Members Have Little or No Sequence Similarity: The Four and genetic simi- larities that imply a common evolutionary origin, can have sequences whose similarities are low or undetectable by conventional sequence com- parison procedures. Do these proteins have sequence

  10. CERTIFICATION OF PHYSICIAN/PRACTITIONER FAMILY MEMBER HEALTH CONDITION RETURN TO: Human Resources, University of Oregon, 677 East 12th

    E-print Network

    Oregon, University of

    CERTIFICATION OF PHYSICIAN/PRACTITIONER FAMILY MEMBER HEALTH CONDITION RETURN TO: Human Resources: _________________________________________ Date: ______________ 9. Print name of Physician or Practitioner) ___________________________________________________________________ Signature of Physician or Practitioner

  11. Chipmunk parvovirus is distinct from members in the genus Erythrovirus of the family Parvoviridae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaojun; Chen, Aaron Yun; Cheng, Fang; Qiu, Jianming

    2010-01-01

    The transcription profile of chipmunk parvovirus (ChpPV), a tentative member of the genus Erythrovirus in the subfamily Parvovirinae of the family Parvoviridae, was characterized by transfecting a nearly full-length genome. We found that it is unique from the profiles of human parvovirus B19 and simian parvovirus, the members in the genus Erythrovirus so far characterized, in that the small RNA transcripts were not processed for encoding small non-structural proteins. However, like the large non-structural protein NS1 of the human parvovirus B19, the ChpPV NS1 is a potent inducer of apoptosis. Further phylogenetic analysis of ChpPV with other parvoviruses in the subfamily Parvovirinae indicates that ChpPV is distinct from the members in genus Erythrovirus. Thus, we conclude that ChpPV may represent a new genus in the family Parvoviridae. PMID:21151930

  12. Redetermination of the space weathering rate using spectra of Iannini asteroid family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, Mark; Jedicke, Robert; Nesvorný, David; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Ivezi?, Željko; Fevig, Ronald

    2008-06-01

    We have obtained moderate S/N (˜85) spectra at a realized resolution of R˜100 for 11 members of the Iannini family, until recently the youngest known family at under 5 million years of age [Nesvorný, D., Bottke, W.F., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., 2003. Astrophys. J. 591, 486-497, 720-771]. The spectra were acquired using the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager in its low-resolution prism mode on the Keck II telescope. The family members belong to the S-complex of asteroids with perhaps some K class members. The Iannini family members' average spectral slope, defined as the slope of the best-fit line constrained to pivot about 1 at 550 nm, is (0.30±0.04)/?m, matching the (0.26±0.03)/?m reported by Jedicke et al. [Jedicke, R., Nesvorný, D., Whiteley, R.J., Ivezi?, Ž., Juri?, M., 2004. Nature 429, 275-277] using SDSS [Ivezi?, Ž., Juri?, M., Lupton, R.H., Tabachnik, S., Quinn, T., 2002. In: Tyson, J.A., Wolff, S. (Eds.), Survey and Other Telescope Technologies and Discoveries. In: Proc. SPIE, vol. 4836. SPIE, Bellingham, pp. 98-103] color photometry. Using our spectra for this family as well as new observations of Karin family members [Vernazza, P., Birlan, M., Rossi, A., Dotto, E., Nesvorný, D., Brunetto, R., Fornasier, S., Fulchignoni, M., Renner, S., 2006. Astron. Astrophys. 460, 945-951] and new classifications of some older families we have revised the space weathering rate of S-complex asteroids originally determined by Jedicke et al. [Jedicke, R., Nesvorný, D., Whiteley, R.J., Ivezi?, Ž., Juri?, M., 2004. Nature 429, 275-277]. Following Jedicke et al. [Jedicke, R., Nesvorný, D., Whiteley, R.J., Ivezi?, Ž., Juri?, M., 2004. Nature 429, 275-277] we parameterize the space weathering rate of the principal component color of the spectrum ( PC), which is correlated with the spectral slope, as PC(t)=PC(0)+?PC[1-exp]. Our revised rate suggests that the characteristic time scale for space weathering is ?=570±220 Myr and that new S-complex clusters will have an initial color of PC(0)=0.31±0.04. The revised time scale is in better agreement with lab measurements and our measurements support the use of space weathering as a dating method. Under the assumption that all the spectra should be identical, since the members all derive from the same parent body and are presumably covered with similar regolith, we combined them to obtain a high-S/N composite spectrum for the family. The combined spectrum is within the S-complex.

  13. The expression of lysyl-oxidase gene family members in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, T; Bejar, J; Attias, D; Mischenko, E; Sabo, E; Neufeld, G; Vadasz, Z

    2013-05-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are malignant disorders originating from clonal expansion of a single neoplastic stem cell and characteristically show an increase in bone marrow reticulin fibers. Lysyl oxidases (LOXs) are copper-dependent amine oxidases that play a critical role in the biogenesis of connective tissue by crosslinking extracellular matrix proteins, collagen and elastin. Expression of LOX gene family members is increased in disorders associated with increased fibrosis. To evaluate involvement of LOX gene family in various MPNs. In-situ hybridization was used to detect Lysyl-Oxidase family members in bone marrow biopsies from patients with different MPNs. We compared normal bone marrows and those from patients with polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Serum levels of lysyl-oxidase from patients with PMF and healthy controls were also examined. LOX gene family was not detected in normal bone marrows. All members of the LOX gene family were over expressed in PMF. In other MPNs a differential pattern of expression was observed. Differences in gene expression were statistically significant (P < 0.010). The medianserum LOX levels in normal controls was 28.4 ± 2.5 ng\\ml and 44.6 ± 9.44 ng\\ml in PMF (P = 0.02). The varying pattern of expression of LOX genes may reflect differences in the pathophysiology of bone marrow fibrosis in these MPNs. These observations could be used as the basis for future targeted therapy directed against bone marrow fibrosis. PMID:23494965

  14. Patients’ and Family Members’ Views on Patient-Centered Communication During Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Beard, Renee L.; Alexander, Gwen L.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Firneno, Cassandra; Gaglio, Bridget; Greene, Sarah M.; Lemay, Celeste A.; Robinson, Brandi E.; Roblin, Douglas W.; Walsh, Kathleen; Street, Richard L.; Gallagher, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To explore patients’ and family members’ views on communication during cancer care, and to identify those aspects of clinician-patient communication which were most important to patients and family members. Methods We conducted a secondary data analysis of qualitative data from 137 patients with cancer and family members of patients with cancer. We used a modified version of the constant comparative method and coding paradigm of grounded theory. Results Patients want sensitive, caring clinicians who provide information that they need, when they need it, in a way that they can understand; who listen and respond to questions and concerns, and who attempt to understand the patient’s experience. Effective information exchange and a positive interpersonal relationship with the clinician were of fundamental importance to patients and family members. These were interrelated; for instance, failure to provide information a patient needed could damage the relationship, while excellent listening could foster the relationship. Information exchange and relationship were also integral to decision making, managing uncertainty, responding to emotions, and self-management. Clinicians who were responsive to patients’ needs beyond the immediate medical encounter were valued. Conclusions The complexity of cancer care today suggest that efforts to improve communication must be multi-level, acknowledging and addressing patient, clinician, organizational and policy barriers and facilitators. Measurement tools are needed to assess cancer patients’ and family members’ experiences with communication over the course of cancer care in order to provide meaningful, actionable feedback to those seeking to optimize their effectiveness in communicating with patients with cancer. PMID:23780672

  15. A member of the virus family Narnaviridae from the plant pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora infestans.

    PubMed

    Cai, Guohong; Myers, Kevin; Fry, William E; Hillman, Bradley I

    2012-01-01

    A virus that has properties consistent with inclusion in the virus family Narnaviridae was described in Phytophthora infestans, the oomycete that caused the Irish potato famine. The genome of phytophthora infestans RNA virus 4 (PiRV-4) is 2,984 nt with short complementary terminal sequences and a single open reading frame predicted to encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) most closely related to saccharomyces cerevisiae narnavirus 20S (ScNV-20S) and ScNV-23S, the members of the genus Narnavirus, family Narnaviridae. This report constitutes the first description of a member of the family Narnaviridae from a host taxon outside of the kingdom Fungi. PMID:21971871

  16. Effects of cognitive-behavioral treatment for weight loss in family members.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Raffaella; Moscatiello, Simona; Tarrini, Giulietta; Di Domizio, Silvia; Soverini, Valentina; Romano, Andreina; Mazzotti, Arianna; Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Marchesini, Giulio

    2011-11-01

    The possibility that lifestyle changes may be shared by the family members of subjects with obesity attending cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for weight loss has been scarcely evaluated. The purpose of this study was to measure the changes in body weight, lifestyle habits, and stage of change toward physical activity in the family members of 149 subjects with overweight/obesity enrolled into a weekly group CBT for weight management in the years 2007-2008. 230 adult (aged >18 years) family members (129 spouses, 72 children (43 female, 29 male), 29 with a different family relationship) completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline and soon after the end of the completion of their relatives' program (approximately 6 months later). The questionnaire consisted of qualitative information regarding food choices, estimation of energy and food intake, self-report of height and weight, and motivation toward physical activity. At baseline, self-reported body mass index was normal in 115 cases, in the range 25 to 29.9 in 80 and ?30 in 35. Following CBT of their relatives, the family members significantly reduced their average daily energy intake (-232 kcal/day; P<0.001) and the reported body weight decreased on average by 1 kg (P=0.001). The analysis of food choices revealed a reduced average daily amount of energy from dressings (-40 kcal, P<0.001), main courses with cheese or fat meat (-24 kcal, P=0.002), refined carbohydrates (-16 kcal, P<0.001), bread (-58 kcal, P<0.001), breakfast biscuits (-23 kcal, P=0.005), chocolate (-7 kcal, P=0.024), and nonalcoholic beverages (fruit juices and carbonated drinks; -10 kcal; P=0.013), whereas fruit consumption was increased (+10 kcal; P=0.023). There was also a shift in the stage of change toward exercising. Body mass index changes of family members and CBT subjects were significantly correlated, mainly within spouses. In conclusion, CBT for weight loss positively influences the lifestyle habits of family members of participants, reducing energy intake and promoting a more favorable attitude toward physical activity. PMID:22027054

  17. Proposed regulations could limit access to affordable health coverage for workers' children and family members.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ken; Graham-Squire, Dave; Roby, Dylan H; Kominski, Gerald F; Kinane, Christina M; Needleman, Jack; Watson, Greg; Gans, Daphna

    2011-12-01

    Key Findings. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is designed to offer premium subsidies to help eligible individuals and their families purchase insurance coverage when affordable job-based coverage is not available. However, the law is unclear on how this affordability protection is applied in those instances where self-only coverage offered by an employer is affordable but family coverage is not. Regulations recently proposed by the Department of the Treasury would make family members ineligible for subsidized coverage in the exchange if an employee is offered affordable self-only coverage by an employer, even if family coverage is unaffordable. This could have significant financial consequences for low- and moderate-income families that fall in this gap. Using an alternative interpretation of the law could allow the entire family to enter the exchange when family coverage is unaffordable, which would broaden access to coverage. However, this option has been cited as cost prohibitive. In this brief we consider a middle ground alternative that would base eligibility for the individual worker on the cost of self-only coverage, but would use the additional cost to the employee for family coverage as the basis for determining affordability and eligibility for subsidies for the remaining family members. We find that: Under the middle ground alternative scenario an additional 144,000 Californians would qualify for and use premium subsidies in the California Health Benefit Exchange, half of whom are children. Less than 1 percent of those with employer-based coverage would move to subsidized coverage in the California Health Benefit Exchange as a result of having unaffordable coverage on the job. PMID:23599987

  18. Cancer in the Family: Review of the Psychosocial Perspectives of Patients and Family Members

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane B. Mitschke

    2008-01-01

    As advances in cancer care have led to more treatment options and longer survival for cancer patients, a focus on quality of life for patients and their families has gained importance. This review provides a discussion of stress and coping theory, documents the relevance of this topic area for social work practice, and illuminates the results of a literature review

  19. Cancer in the Family: Review of the Psychosocial Perspectives of Patients and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitschke, Diane B.

    2008-01-01

    As advances in cancer care have led to more treatment options and longer survival for cancer patients, a focus on quality of life for patients and their families has gained importance. This review provides a discussion of stress and coping theory, documents the relevance of this topic area for social work practice, and illuminates the results of a…

  20. Family members’ perceptions of end-of-life care across diverse locations of care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The goal of the study was to assess perceived level of satisfaction with end-of-life care, focusing on the last 48 hours of life. Methods A previously validated instrument was used in a telephone survey with bereaved family members (n=90) of patients who died within an organization in British Columbia. Results Bereaved family members had many unmet needs for information about the patient’s changing condition, the process of dying, how symptoms would be managed and what to do at the time of death. In addition, many bereaved relatives felt that the patient or resident had an unmet need for emotional support and that their own emotional needs were not addressed adequately. The last place of care had the most significant effect on all of these variables, with acute care and residential care having the most unmet needs. Hospice had the fewest unmet needs, followed by the palliative and the intensive care units. Conclusions We discuss these findings in relation to overall satisfaction with care, focus on individual, ethno-cultural and diversity issues, information and decision-making, symptom management and attending to the family. We conclude by offering possible practices address the end-of-life needs of patients and family members. PMID:23870101

  1. A European survey of critical care nurses’ attitudes and experiences of having family members present during cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P Fulbrook; J. W. Albarran; J. M. Latour

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey into the experiences and attitudes of 124 European critical care nurses to the presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Nurses from mainland Europe were less experienced and less sure about the consequences of relatives witnessing resuscitation than United Kingdom (UK) nurses. Generally, nurses supported the presence of family members, although

  2. GASA4, One of the 14-Member Arabidopsis GASA Family of Small Polypeptides, Regulates Flowering and Seed Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the plant-specific gibberellic acid-stimulated Arabidopsis (GASA) gene family play roles in hormone response, defense and development. We have identified six new Arabidopsis GASA genes, bringing the total number of family members to 14. Here we show that these genes all encode small polyp...

  3. Analysis of indigenous members of the citrus-family (Rutacea) for bacteria of the "Candidatus Liberibacter" genus.

    E-print Network

    Analysis of indigenous members of the citrus-family (Rutacea) for bacteria of the "Candidatus on indigenous members of the citrus-family, Rutacea. Bacteria within the genus Liberibacter are plant pathogens on a variety of plant hosts. In South Africa, Ca. L. africanus causes greening disease of citrus and `Ca. L

  4. Giving information to family members of patients in the intensive care unit: Iranian nurses’ ethical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Mansoureh A; Gaeeni, Mina; Mohammadi, Nooreddin; Seyedfatemi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Receiving information related to patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. When health care professionals should decide whether to be honest or to give hope, giving information becomes an ethical challenge We conducted a research to study the ethical approaches of Iranian nurses to giving information to the family members of patients in the intensive care units. This research was conducted in the intensive care units of three teaching hospitals in Iran. It employed a qualitative approach involving semi-structured and in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 12 nurses to identify the ethical approaches to giving information to family members of the intensive care unit patients. A conventional content analysis of the data produced two categories and five subcategories. The two categories were as follows: a) informational support, and b) emotional support. Informational support had 2 subcategories consisting of being honest in giving information, and providing complete and understandable information. Emotional support in giving information had 3 sub-categories consisting of gradual revelation, empathy and assurance. Findings of the study indicated that ethical approaches to giving information can be in the form of either informational support or emotional support, based on patients’ conditions and prognoses, their families’ emotional state, the necessity of providing a calm atmosphere in the ICU and the hospital, and other patients and their families’ peace. Findings of the present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering ethical guidelines in giving information to the families of patients hospitalized in the ICU. PMID:25512830

  5. Family Quality of Life from the Perspectives of Individual Family Members: A Korean-American Family and Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Joo Young; Turnbull, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s, the focus on individual quality of life expanded to family quality of life (FQOL) in the field of intellectual disabilities. However, few studies examined FQOL for families who have children with hearing loss. Furthermore, most studies focused on mothers' perceptions of FQOL. The purpose of this study is to…

  6. Impact of Close Family Members on Older Adults’ Early Response to Depression Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Martire, Lynn M.; Schulz, Richard; Reynolds, Charles F.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Butters, Meryl A.; Hinrichsen, Gregory A.

    2009-01-01

    This study of 130 depressed older adults and their spouses or adult children examined the impact of caregiver burden specific to patients’ depressive symptoms on patients’ response to antidepressant treatment. Primary care patients completed medical, psychiatric, and neuropsychological assessments prior to treatment, and interviews were conducted with their identified family member. As hypothesized, caregivers’ depression-specific burden predicted greater depression severity for the patient at the 6th week of treatment after accounting for patients’ pretreatment characteristics, caregivers’ depressive symptoms, and caregivers’ relationship satisfaction. Future research may identify family attitudes and behaviors that stem from burden and compromise older adults’ ability to recover from depression. PMID:18573018

  7. Costimulatory TNFR family members in control of viral infection: outstanding questions.

    PubMed

    Mbanwi, Achire N; Watts, Tania H

    2014-06-01

    Members of the TNFR family can play prominent roles in controlling the magnitude, duration and phenotype of the immune response to viruses. The importance of particular TNFRs in different viral infections and whether they contribute to viral control or pathology is dependent on the virus and the severity of the infection. TNFRs and their ligands are widely and differentially expressed on both adaptive and innate immune cell types. The cell types through which TNFRs exert their effects, the unique signals provided by each member of the family, and how these signals are ultimately integrated during an anti-viral immune response remain to be fully elucidated. Here we discuss the role of 4-1BB, OX40, CD27 and GITR and their ligands during viral infection and highlight some of the outstanding questions in the field. PMID:24910294

  8. Marriage and family therapy faculty members' balance of work and personal life.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Jennifer L; Rosen, Karen H

    2012-04-01

    A sense of imbalance is common among both professors and therapists, though few studies have been published examining the work and personal life balance of those who work in both professions simultaneously. Using in-depth telephone interviews, this study examined the work and personal life balance of 16 marriage and family therapy (MFT) faculty members. Results showed that six were satisfied with their balance, six were dissatisfied, and four were "middle of the road." Men, older participants, and those who were in their career longer were more likely to report feeling satisfied with their balance. Internal indicators of their balance included family and workplace messages, health indicators, feelings of contentment, and congruence with personal values. Child and relationship status, tenure status, and gender issues also impacted their sense of balance. Specific balance enhancers and reducers were highlighted, and participants discussed coping strategies and recommendations for other MFT faculty members. Clinical, training, and career implications are discussed. PMID:22512300

  9. Assessment of satisfaction with care among family members of survivors in a neuroscience intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Hwang, David Y; Yagoda, Daniel; Perrey, Hilary M; Tehan, Tara M; Guanci, Mary; Ananian, Lillian; Currier, Paul F; Cobb, J Perren; Rosand, Jonathan

    2014-04-01

    Many prior nursing studies regarding family members specifically of neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) patients have focused on identifying their primary needs. A concept related to identifying these needs and assessing whether they have been met is determining whether families explicitly report satisfaction with the care that both they and their loved ones have received. The objective of this study was to explore family satisfaction with care in an academic neuro-ICU and compare results with concurrent data from the same hospital's medical ICU (MICU). Over 38 days, we administered the Family Satisfaction-ICU instrument to neuro-ICU and MICU patients' families at the time of ICU discharge. Those whose loved ones passed away during ICU admission were excluded. When asked about the respect and compassion that they received from staff, 76.3% (95% CI [66.5, 86.1]) of neuro-ICU families were completely satisfied, as opposed to 92.7% in the MICU (95% CI [84.4, 101.0], p = .04). Respondents were less likely to be completely satisfied with the courtesy of staff if they reported participation in zero formal family meeting. Less than 60% of neuro-ICU families were completely satisfied by (1) frequency of physician communication, (2) inclusion and (3) support during decision making, and (4) control over the care of their loved ones. Parents of patients were more likely than other relatives to feel very included and supported in the decision-making process. Future studies may focus on evaluating strategies for neuro-ICU nurses and physicians to provide better decision-making support and to implement more frequent family meetings even for those patients who may not seem medically or socially complicated to the team. Determining satisfaction with care for those families whose loved ones passed away during their neuro-ICU admission is another potential avenue for future investigation. PMID:24556658

  10. Al-Anon Family Groups’ Newcomers and Members: Concerns about the Drinkers in their Lives

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Christine; Cronkite, Ruth; Laudet, Alexandre; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Roth, Jeffrey; Moos, Rudolf H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Despite Al-Anon’s widespread availability and use, knowledge is lacking about the drinkers in attendees’ lives. We filled this gap by describing and comparing Al-Anon newcomers’ and members’ reports about their “main drinker” (main person prompting initial attendance). Methods Al-Anon’s World Service Office mailed a random sample of groups, yielding completed surveys from newcomers (N = 362) and stable members (N = 265). Results Newcomers’ and members’ drinkers generally were comparable. They had known their drinker for an average of 22 years and been concerned about his or her’s drinking for 9 years; about 50% had daily contact with the drinker. Most reported negative relationship aspects (drinker gets on your nerves; you disagree about important things). Newcomers had more concern about the drinker’s alcohol use than members did, and were more likely to report their drinkers’ driving under the influence. Drinkers’ most frequent problem due to drinking was family arguments, and most common source of help was 12-step groups, with lower rates among drinkers of newcomers. Concerns spurring initial Al-Anon attendance were the drinker’s poor quality of life, relationships, and psychological status; goals for initial attendance reflected these concerns. Discussion and Conclusions The drinker’s alcohol use was of less concern in prompting initial Al-Anon attendance, and, accordingly, the drinker’s reduced drinking was a less frequently endorsed goal of attendance. Scientific Significance Family treatments for substance use problems might expand interventions and outcome domains beyond abstinence and relationship satisfaction to include the drinker’s quality of life and psychological symptoms and in turn relieve concerns of family members. PMID:24628725

  11. Cloning and characterization of a second member of the mouse mdr gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Gros, P; Raymond, M; Bell, J; Housman, D

    1988-01-01

    The mammalian mdr gene family comprises a small number of closely related genes. Previously, we have shown that one member, mdr1, has the capacity to convey multidrug resistance to drug-sensitive recipient cells in a gene transfer protocol. However, the functional characteristics of other members of this gene family have not been examined. In this report, we characterize a second member of the mdr gene family which we designated mdr2. We determined the nucleotide sequence corresponding to the complete coding region of this mdr2 transcript. The predicted amino acid sequence of this protein (1,276 amino acids) showed that it is a membrane glycoprotein highly homologous to mdr1 (85%), strongly suggesting that both genes originate from a common ancestor. Regions of divergence between mdr1 and mdr2 proteins are concentrated in two discrete segments of the predicted polypeptides, each approximately 100 residues in length. The mdr2 protein appears to be formed by the duplication of a structural unit which encodes three putative transmembrane loops and a predicted nucleotide-binding fold and is highly homologous to bacterial transport proteins such as hlyB. This strong homology suggests that mdr2 also participates in an energy-dependent membrane transport process. However, the direct relationship, if any, of this new member of the mdr family to multidrug resistance remains to be established. Knowledge of the complete nucleotide sequence and predicted amino acid sequence of the mdr2 gene product will enable the preparation of gene-specific probes and antibodies necessary to study the functional role of this gene in multidrug resistance and normal physiological processes. PMID:3405218

  12. Regulation of expression of Bcl2 protein family member Bim by T cell receptor triggering

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elena Sandalova; Cheng-Hong Wei; Maria G. Masucci; Victor Levitsky

    2004-01-01

    Bim, a proapoptotic BH3-only member of the Bcl-2 protein family, is required for central and peripheral deletion of T lymphocytes. Mechanisms regulating Bim activity in T cells remain poorly understood. We show that expression of Bim is up-regulated in human T cells after polyclonal or specific T cell receptor triggering. Induction of Bim was affected by the agonistic potency of

  13. B18(2-): a quasi-planar bowl member of the Wankel motor family.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Diego; Pan, Sudip; Zeonjuk, Lei Liu; Islas, Rafael; Osorio, Edison; Martínez-Guajardo, Gerardo; Chattaraj, Pratim K; Heine, Thomas; Merino, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    A quasi-planar member of the so-called 'Wankel motor' family, B18(2-), is found. This boron cluster is an electronically stable dianion and a concentric doubly ?- and ?-aromatic system. The inner B6 unit in B18(2-) undergoes quasi-free rotation inside the perimeter of the B12 ring. The absence of any localized ?-bond between the inner ring and the peripheral boron atoms makes the system fluxional. PMID:24807809

  14. Reticulon family members modulate BACE1 activity and amyloid-? peptide generation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wanxia He; Yifeng Lu; Isam Qahwash; Xiang-You Hu; Ansi Chang; Riqiang Yan

    2004-01-01

    Inhibiting the activity of the ?-amyloid converting enzyme 1 (BACE1) or reducing levels of BACE1 in vivo decreases the production of amyloid-?. The reticulon family of proteins has four members, RTN1, RTN2, RTN3 and RTN4 (also known as Nogo), the last of which is well known for its role in inhibiting neuritic outgrowth after injury. Here we show that reticulon

  15. Characterization of three members of the ACC synthase gene family in Solanum tuberosum L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis J. C. Destéfano-Beltrán; Wim Caeneghem; Jan Gielen; Luc Richard; Marc Montagu; Dominique Straeten

    1995-01-01

    Two genomic clones corresponding to three members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase gene family in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) have been isolated and sequenced. Two highly homologous genes, ST-ACS1 A and ST-ACS1 B, transcribed in opposite directions were found in an 8.9 kb region. Their coding sequences are interrupted by two introns at identical positions. Their closest relative in

  16. The Effect of Family Member Migration on Education and Work Among Nonmigrant Youth in Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Halpern-Manners

    2011-01-01

    While academic and policy circles have given much attention to the assimilatory experiences of Mexican immigrants in the United\\u000a States, less is known about those who stay behind—an especially unfortunate oversight given the increasing number of Mexican\\u000a youth with migrant family members. Of the studies on this topic, most have sought to identify the effect that migration has\\u000a on youths’

  17. Nonionic Detergents Induce Dimerization among Members of the Bcl2 Family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi-Te Hsu; Richard J. Youle

    1997-01-01

    Members of the Bcl-2 family (including Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and Bax) play key roles in the regulation of apoptosis. These proteins are believed to be membrane-associated and have been proposed to regulate apoptosis through both homodimerization and heterodimerization. We have found that whereas Bcl-2 is predominantly mem- brane-associated as previously reported, significant amounts of Bcl-XL and most of the Bax proteins

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Family Member RANK Mediates Osteoclast Differentiation and Activation Induced by Osteoprotegerin Ligand

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hailing Hsu; David L. Lacey; Colin R. Dunstan; Irina Solovyev; Anne Colombero; Emma Timms; Hong-Lin Tan; Gary Elliott; Michael J. Kelley; Ildiko Sarosi; Ling Wang; Xing-Zhong Xia; Robin Elliott; Laura Chiu; Tabitha Black; Sheila Scully; Casey Capparelli; Sean Morony; Grant Shimamoto; Michael B. Bass; William J. Boyle

    1999-01-01

    A receptor that mediates osteoprotegerin ligand (OPGL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and activation has been identified via genomic analysis of a primary osteoclast precursor cell cDNA library and is identical to the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family member RANK. The RANK mRNA was highly expressed by isolated bone marrow-derived osteoclast progenitors and by mature osteoclasts in vivo. Recombinant OPGL binds specifically

  19. Confirmation From Family Members: Parent and Sibling Contributions to Adolescent Psychosocial Adjustment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    René M. Dailey

    2009-01-01

    Two studies examined the relationship between confirmation (i.e., validation, acceptance) by family members and adolescent psychosocial adjustment (i.e., self-esteem, strength of self-concept, and autonomy). Study 1 showed confirmation by parents was positively related to mid-adolescents' psychosocial adjustment. Study 2 showed that although late-adolescents perceived mothers as exhibiting greater confirmation than both fathers and siblings, a simultaneous assessment of mother, father,

  20. CD40 and its crucial role as a member of the TNFR family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura A. Vogel; Randolph J. Noelle

    1998-01-01

    The cell surface molecule CD40 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) family and plays a pivotal role in the immune system due in part to its wide tissue distribution. Early studies focused on CD40 in B cell biology, but recent work demonstrates a broader role for CD40 in the immune system contributing to cell–mediated as well

  1. IL-36 a new member of the IL-1 family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, D; Conti, F; Rosati, M; Maccauro, G; Saggini, A; Cianchetti, E; Angelucci, D; Fulcheri, M; Tetè, S; Salini, V; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Toniato, E; Castellani, M L; Conti, P; Theoharides, T C

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-36 (IL-36) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which plays an important role in innate and adaptive immunity. IL-36 activates MAPK and NF-kB pathways and is produced by many different cells. This cytokine is a family member of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Here we summarise and review the new aspects of this important pro-inflammatory cytokine. PMID:22475093

  2. Isolation and characterization of a cellulase gene family member expressed during avocado fruit ripening

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura G. Cass; Kathleen A. Kirven; Rolf E. Christoffersen

    1990-01-01

    We present in this paper the structural analysis of two members of a small cellulase gene family, designated cel1 and cel2, from avocado. These genes were isolated by screening a ? EMBL3 genomic library with a ripening-induced cellulase cDNA. Restriction endonuclease and Southern blot analyses showed that the cel1 gene is highly homologous to the cellulase cDNA and thus represents

  3. Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) family members bend membranes in cells.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Allison; Ueno, Tasuku; Huebner, Robert; McCaffery, J Michael; Inoue, Takanari

    2014-01-01

    We provide direct evidence that Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) family members bend the steady state membrane architecture of organelles in intact cells. In response to inducible BAR molecular actuators, organelles exhibit distinct changes to the orientation and degree of their membrane curvature. This rapidly inducible system may offer a mechanism by which to better understand the structure-function relationship of intracellular organelles. PMID:24796975

  4. This data sheet is to be completed by the foreign scholar in your department with family members. This form must be typed. Please complete all sections regarding family members who will be accompanying

    E-print Network

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    This data sheet is to be completed by the foreign scholar in your department with family members of Dependent Data Sheet. Please return the completed form to the Harvard International Office. Dependent Data Sheet FAMILY INFORMATION Revised 1/04 FullnameofStudentorScholar: Family/Last Given/First Middle (if

  5. Sources of hope: Perception of Iranian family members of patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Gaeeni, Mina; Farahani, Mansoureh A; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Seyedfatemi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Admission to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is recognized as a situation with emotional strain, uncertainty, and fear of losing the patient. In such stressful situations, it is hope that can promote psychological stability in the patient's family members. Related literature revealed that sources of hope in this situation have still not been discussed well in studies. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the sources of hope from the perspective of families of ICU patients in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study that was carried out adopting the conventional qualitative content analysis approach, 19 family members of 13 patients hospitalized in the ICU from three teaching hospitals were selected, through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using conventional content analysis, through the process of data reduction and condensation, coding, and also generating categories and subcategories. Results: Analysis of the data revealed sources of hope in families of ICU patients. These sources appeared as two main categories- internal sources and external sources. The internal sources had two subcategories consisting of ’religious-spirituality beliefs’ and ’positive attitude’. The external sources had four subcategories consisting of healthcare professionals’ interactions, empathy of families and friends, patient's condition, and participation in care. Conclusions: The results of this study showed the sources of hope in the families of the patients in the ICU. These sources, as moderating factors, could reduce physical and psychological damages caused to the families. In the present study, the categorizations of the participants’ in-depth experience could develop a new horizon for healthcare professionals, especially nurses, on the sources of hope, based on culture. PMID:25558262

  6. Deprescribing psychotropic medications in aged care facilities: the potential role of family members.

    PubMed

    Plakiotis, Christos; Bell, J Simon; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Pond, Dimity; O'Connor, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    There is widespread concern in Australia and internationally at the high prevalence of psychotropic medication use in residential aged care facilities. It is difficult for nurses and general practitioners in aged care facilities to cease new residents' psychotropic medications when they often have no information about why residents were started on the treatment, when and by whom and with what result. Most existing interventions have had a limited and temporary effect and there is a need to test different strategies to overcome the structural and practical barriers to psychotropic medication cessation or deprescribing. In this chapter, we review the literature regarding psychotropic medication deprescribing in aged care facilities and present the protocol of a novel study that will examine the potential role of family members in facilitating deprescribing. This project will help determine if family members can contribute information that will prove useful to clinicians and thereby overcome one of the barriers to deprescribing medications whose harmful effects often outweigh their benefits. We wish to understand the knowledge and attitudes of family members regarding the prescribing and deprescribing of psychotropic medications to newly admitted residents of aged care facilities with a view to developing and testing a range of clinical interventions that will result in better, safer prescribing practices. PMID:25416108

  7. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with treatment status in family members with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Bernadette; Samuels, Jack F; Pinto, Anthony; Fyer, Abby J; McCracken, James T; Rauch, Scott L; Murphy, Dennis L; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Knowles, James A; Piacentini, John; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Grados, Marco A; Riddle, Mark A; Rasmussen, Steven A; Pauls, David L; Willour, Virginia L; Shugart, Yin Y; Liang, Kung-Yee; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Nestadt, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the demographic and clinical factors that influence treatment status in family members with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Six hundred and two subjects from the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) to diagnose Axis I disorders, and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) for assessment of OCD symptoms. The demographic and clinical data were compared between subjects who had received treatment and those who had not. A precipitous onset of symptoms, severe illness, multiple obsessions and compulsions, and co-morbid affective disorders were all positively associated with receiving treatment. Older age and the presence of obsessive compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) or OCPD traits were negatively associated with treatment. Gender and age at onset of symptoms did not predict treatment history. The mean duration from onset of symptoms to receiving treatment was 13.8+/-SD 11.9 years, but there was a direct relationship between current age and time to treatment, with younger subjects receiving treatment sooner. Clinical factors are predominant in predicting treatment status in family members with OCD. Although the mean duration from onset of symptoms to treatment was long, younger family members appear to receive treatment sooner. PMID:17345603

  8. Protecting the health of employees caring for family members with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Earle, Alison; Heymann, Jody

    2011-07-01

    Over half of American workers are holding a paid job while also providing unpaid assistance and support to a family member. Research shows that family members who provide care to children or adults with special health care needs are themselves at risk of physical and mental health problems. Yet, little research has explored how the work environment mediates the effects of caregiving on caregivers' mental and physical health. With a sample of 2455 currently employed U.S. adults from the Work, Family, Community Nexus (WFCN) survey, a random-digit dial, nationally representative survey of Americans aged 18-69, we examine whether paid leave and flexibility policies mediate the relationship between caregiving and health. In Ordinary Least Squares regression models, we find that paid leave to address family members' health was associated with better mental health status as measured by the 5-item Mental Health Inventory and paid sick leave with better physical health status as measured by self-rated overall health status. A supportive supervisor was also associated with improvements in mental and physical health. For both men and women, paid leave and a supervisor's support offset some or all of the negative effects of caregiving, but for women, the buffering effects of working conditions are slightly larger. Enhancing the unpaid leave guaranteed in the U.S. Family and Medical Leave Act so that it is paid and passing national paid sick days legislation will help ensure that employed caregivers can retain their jobs, receive needed income, and meet their own mental and physical health needs. PMID:21669484

  9. The Influence of Family Therapy on Flexibility and Cohesion among Family Members Seeking Male Residential Treatment for Adolescent and Young Adult Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated within a substance abuse treatment center the influence of family therapy on flexibility and cohesion among family members. Past studies have suggested adolescents who abuse substances exist in families who have a lack of balance of flexibility and cohesion. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the influence of…

  10. Understanding Family-Centered Care in the Mental Health System: Perspectives From Family Members Caring for Relatives With Mental Health Issues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandy McNeil

    2012-01-01

    A recent focus on Family-Centered Care (FCC) in mental health has resulted in a variety of recommendations designed to increase family involvement in caring for relatives with mental health issues. Studies indicate that family members require collaboration, information, and support from the mental health system and its providers, but confidentiality concerns, funding limitations, and discrimination often prevent such needs from

  11. Family Quality of Life among Families with a Member Who Has an Intellectual Disability: An Exploratory Examination of Key Domains and Dimensions of the Revised FQOL Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, S.; Edwards, M.; Baum, N.; Brown, I.; Brown, R. I.; Isaacs, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Family Quality of Life Survey (FQOLS-2006) was developed as the result of increased interest in family quality of life (FQOL) among families with a member who has an intellectual disability (ID). The instrument includes nine life domains and six dimensions reflecting the main areas and characteristics of FQOL. The aim of the…

  12. The Importance of Older Family Members in Providing Social Resources and Promoting Cancer Screening in Families with a Hereditary Cancer Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W.; Goergen, Andrea F.; Skapinsky, Kaley F.; Devlin, Hillary C.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Design and Methods: Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network…

  13. Multiple recombination events maintain sequence identity among members of the nitrogenase multigene family in Rhizobium etli.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, C; Romero, D

    1998-01-01

    A distinctive characteristic of the Rhizobium genome is the frequent finding of reiterated sequences, which often constitute multigene families. Interestingly, these families usually maintain a high degree of nucleotide sequence identity. It is commonly assumed that apparent gene conversion between reiterated elements might lead to concerted variation among members of a multigene family. However, the operation of this mechanism has not yet been demonstrated in the Rhizobiaceae. In this work, we employed different genetic constructions to address the role of apparent gene conversion as a homogenizing mechanism between members of the plasmid-located nitrogenase multigene family in Rhizobium etli. Our results show that a 28-bp insertion into one of the nitrogenase reiterations can be corrected by multiple recombination events, including apparent gene conversion. The correction process was dependent on the presence of both a wild-type recA gene and wild-type copies of the nitrogenase reiterations. Frequencies of apparent gene conversion to the wild-type nitrogenase reiterations were the same when the insertion to be corrected was located either in cis or in trans, indicating that this event frequently occurs through intermolecular interactions. Interestingly, a high frequency of multiple crossovers was observed, suggesting that these large plasmid molecules are engaging repeatedly in recombination events, in a situation akin to phage recombination or recombination among small, high-copy number plasmids. PMID:9611191

  14. Anoctamin/TMEM16 family members are Ca2+-activated Cl? channels

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, H Criss; Yu, Kuai; Xiao, Qinhuan; Chien, Li-Ting; Qu, Zhiqiang

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl? channels (CaCCs) perform many important functions in cell physiology including secretion of fluids from acinar cells of secretory glands, amplification of olfactory transduction, regulation of cardiac and neuronal excitability, mediation of the fast block to polyspermy in amphibian oocytes, and regulation of vascular tone. Although a number of proteins have been proposed to be responsible for CaCC currents, the anoctamin family (ANO, also known as TMEM16) exhibits characteristics most similar to those expected for the classical CaCC. Interestingly, this family of proteins has previously attracted the interest of both developmental and cancer biologists. Some members of this family are up-regulated in a number of tumours and functional deficiency in others is linked to developmental defects. PMID:19015192

  15. PE-1, a novel ETS oncogene family member, localizes to chromosome 1q21-q23

    SciTech Connect

    Klemsz, M.; Hromas, R.; Bruno, E.; Hoffman, R. (Indiana Univ., Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Raskind, W. (Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1994-03-15

    The v-ets oncogene family shares a conserved peptide motif called the ETS domain that mediates sequence-specific DNA binding. This motif is unique among transcription factor families. Using partially degenerate oligonucleotides from conserved regions of the ETS domain and the polymerase chain reaction, the authors isolated a new member of v-ets family designated PE-1 from HL60 cells. PE-1 was expressed as an approximately 7.5-kb transcript in most cell lines tested. In the hairy cell leukemia line Eskol, there was an additional 1.8-kb transcript observed. PE-1 was the most common ETS domain gene found in CD34[sup +]HLA-DR[sup [minus

  16. Informing family members of individuals with Lynch syndrome: a guideline for clinical geneticists.

    PubMed

    Menko, Fred H; Aalfs, Cora M; Henneman, Lidewij; Stol, Yrrah; Wijdenes, Miranda; Otten, Ellen; Ploegmakers, Marleen M J; Legemaate, Johan; Smets, Ellen M A; de Wert, Guido M W R; Tibben, Aad

    2013-06-01

    The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can lead to the prevention of colorectal cancer through periodic colonoscopies and removal of premalignant lesions in susceptible individuals. Therefore, predisposed individuals identified by mutation analysis are advised to inform their at-risk relatives about the options of predictive DNA testing and preventive measures. However, it has now been established that more than half of these relatives do not receive the necessary information. Barriers in conveying information include family communication problems and variable attitudes and practice among clinical geneticists. In this complex field, both medical, psychological, ethical and juridical aspects deserve consideration. Here we summarize the development of a revised guideline for clinical geneticists that allows a more active role of the geneticist, aimed at improving procedures to inform family members in Lynch syndrome and other hereditary and familial cancer syndromes. PMID:23535968

  17. Turnover of Amyloid Precursor Protein Family Members Determines Their Nuclear Signaling Capability

    PubMed Central

    Trutzel, Annette; Bundschuh, Diana; Nitsch, Roger M.; Konietzko, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as its homologues, APP-like protein 1 and 2 (APLP1 and APLP2), are cleaved by ?-, ?-, and ?-secretases, resulting in the release of their intracellular domains (ICDs). We have shown that the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is transported to the nucleus by Fe65 where they jointly bind the histone acetyltransferase Tip60 and localize to spherical nuclear complexes (AFT complexes), which are thought to be sites of transcription. We have now analyzed the subcellular localization and turnover of the APP family members. Similarly to AICD, the ICD of APLP2 localizes to spherical nuclear complexes together with Fe65 and Tip60. In contrast, the ICD of APLP1, despite binding to Fe65, does not translocate to the nucleus. In addition, APLP1 predominantly localizes to the plasma membrane, whereas APP and APLP2 are detected in vesicular structures. APLP1 also demonstrates a much slower turnover of the full-length protein compared to APP and APLP2. We further show that the ICDs of all APP family members are degraded by the proteasome and that the N-terminal amino acids of ICDs determine ICD degradation rate. Together, our results suggest that different nuclear signaling capabilities of APP family members are due to different rates of full-length protein processing and ICD proteasomal degradation. Our results provide evidence in support of a common nuclear signaling function for APP and APLP2 that is absent in APLP1, but suggest that APLP1 has a regulatory role in the nuclear translocation of APP family ICDs due to the sequestration of Fe65. PMID:23874953

  18. Turnover of amyloid precursor protein family members determines their nuclear signaling capability.

    PubMed

    Gersbacher, Manuel T; Goodger, Zoë V; Trutzel, Annette; Bundschuh, Diana; Nitsch, Roger M; Konietzko, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) as well as its homologues, APP-like protein 1 and 2 (APLP1 and APLP2), are cleaved by ?-, ?-, and ?-secretases, resulting in the release of their intracellular domains (ICDs). We have shown that the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is transported to the nucleus by Fe65 where they jointly bind the histone acetyltransferase Tip60 and localize to spherical nuclear complexes (AFT complexes), which are thought to be sites of transcription. We have now analyzed the subcellular localization and turnover of the APP family members. Similarly to AICD, the ICD of APLP2 localizes to spherical nuclear complexes together with Fe65 and Tip60. In contrast, the ICD of APLP1, despite binding to Fe65, does not translocate to the nucleus. In addition, APLP1 predominantly localizes to the plasma membrane, whereas APP and APLP2 are detected in vesicular structures. APLP1 also demonstrates a much slower turnover of the full-length protein compared to APP and APLP2. We further show that the ICDs of all APP family members are degraded by the proteasome and that the N-terminal amino acids of ICDs determine ICD degradation rate. Together, our results suggest that different nuclear signaling capabilities of APP family members are due to different rates of full-length protein processing and ICD proteasomal degradation. Our results provide evidence in support of a common nuclear signaling function for APP and APLP2 that is absent in APLP1, but suggest that APLP1 has a regulatory role in the nuclear translocation of APP family ICDs due to the sequestration of Fe65. PMID:23874953

  19. Race-related differences in the experiences of family members of persons with mental illness participating in the NAMI Family to Family Education Program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Melissa Edmondson; Lindsey, Michael A; Williams, Crystal D; Medoff, Deborah R; Lucksted, Alicia; Fang, Li Juan; Schiffman, Jason; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Dixon, Lisa B

    2014-12-01

    Families play an important role in the lives of individuals with mental illness. Coping with the strain of shifting roles and multiple challenges of caregiving can have a huge impact. Limited information exists regarding race-related differences in families' caregiving experiences, their abilities to cope with the mental illness of a loved one, or their interactions with mental health service systems. This study examined race-related differences in the experiences of adults seeking to participate in the National Alliance on Mental Illness Family-to-Family Education Program due to mental illness of a loved one. Participants were 293 White and 107 African American family members who completed measures of problem- and emotion-focused coping, knowledge about mental illness, subjective illness burden, psychological distress, and family functioning. Multiple regression analyses were used to determine race-related differences. African American caregivers reported higher levels of negative caregiving experiences, less knowledge of mental illness, and higher levels of both problem-solving coping and emotion-focused coping, than White caregivers. Mental health programs serving African American families should consider targeting specific strategies to address caregiving challenges, support their use of existing coping mechanisms and support networks, and increase their knowledge of mental illness. PMID:25213395

  20. Merkel cell carcinoma dependence on bcl-2 family members for survival.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Monique E; Mangelberger, Doris; Weick, Jack W; Vozheiko, Tracy D; Harms, Paul W; Nash, Kevin T; Quintana, Elsa; Baciu, Paul; Johnson, Timothy M; Bichakjian, Christopher K; Dlugosz, Andrzej A

    2014-08-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a rare but aggressive cutaneous neoplasm with high metastatic potential, has a poor prognosis at late stages of disease with no proven chemotherapeutic regimens. Using an enriched culture medium, we established and characterized 11 MCC cell lines for Bcl-2 family profiling and functional studies. Immunoblot analysis revealed collectively high protein levels of prosurvival Bcl-2 members in cell lines and a panel of MCC tumors. Downregulation of individual Bcl-2 proteins by RNAi promoted death in a subset of MCC cell lines, whereas simultaneous inhibition of multiple family members by using the small-molecule antagonist ABT-263 led to a marked induction of cell death in 10 of 11 lines. ABT-263 induced Bax-dependent apoptosis with rapid cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, regardless of Bcl-2 family profile or the presence of Merkel cell polyomavirus. Furthermore, ABT-263 treatment led to rapid and sustained growth suppression of MCC xenografts from a representative cell line, accompanied by a striking increase in apoptosis. Our results establish that concurrent inhibition of multiple prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins leads to effective induction of apoptosis, and strongly support the concept that targeting MCC dependence on these molecules may be useful therapeutically by reversing an intrinsic resistance to cell death. PMID:24614157

  1. Operator recognition by the ROK transcription factor family members, NagC and Mlc.

    PubMed

    Bréchemier-Baey, Dominique; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Oberto, Jacques; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    NagC and Mlc, paralogous members of the ROK family of proteins with almost identical helix-turn-helix DNA binding motifs, specifically regulate genes for transport and utilization of N-acetylglucosamine and glucose. We previously showed that two amino acids in a linker region outside the canonical helix-turn-helix motif are responsible for Mlc site specificity. In this work we identify four amino acids in the linker, which are required for recognition of NagC targets. These amino acids allow Mlc and NagC to distinguish between a C/G and an A/T bp at positions ±11 of the operators. One linker position, glycine in NagC and arginine in Mlc, corresponds to the major specificity determinant for the two proteins. In certain contexts it is possible to switch repression from Mlc-style to NagC-style, by interchanging this glycine and arginine. Secondary determinants are supplied by other linker positions or the helix-turn-helix motif. A wide genomic survey of unique ROK proteins shows that glycine- and arginine-rich sequences are present in the linkers of nearly all ROK family repressors. Conserved short sequence motifs, within the branches of the ROK evolutionary tree, suggest that these sequences could also be involved in operator recognition in other ROK family members. PMID:25452338

  2. Operator recognition by the ROK transcription factor family members, NagC and Mlc

    PubMed Central

    Bréchemier-Baey, Dominique; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Oberto, Jacques; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    NagC and Mlc, paralogous members of the ROK family of proteins with almost identical helix-turn-helix DNA binding motifs, specifically regulate genes for transport and utilization of N-acetylglucosamine and glucose. We previously showed that two amino acids in a linker region outside the canonical helix-turn-helix motif are responsible for Mlc site specificity. In this work we identify four amino acids in the linker, which are required for recognition of NagC targets. These amino acids allow Mlc and NagC to distinguish between a C/G and an A/T bp at positions ±11 of the operators. One linker position, glycine in NagC and arginine in Mlc, corresponds to the major specificity determinant for the two proteins. In certain contexts it is possible to switch repression from Mlc-style to NagC-style, by interchanging this glycine and arginine. Secondary determinants are supplied by other linker positions or the helix-turn-helix motif. A wide genomic survey of unique ROK proteins shows that glycine- and arginine-rich sequences are present in the linkers of nearly all ROK family repressors. Conserved short sequence motifs, within the branches of the ROK evolutionary tree, suggest that these sequences could also be involved in operator recognition in other ROK family members. PMID:25452338

  3. Members of protein O-mannosyltransferase family in Aspergillus fumigatus differentially affect growth, morphogenesis and viability.

    PubMed

    Mouyna, Isabelle; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Jank, Thomas; Loussert, Céline; Mellado, Emilia; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Beauvais, Anne; Wartenberg, Dirk; Sarfati, Jacqueline; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Prévost, Marie-Christine; Brakhage, Axel A; Strahl, Sabine; Huerre, Michel; Latgé, Jean-Paul

    2010-06-01

    O-mannosylation is an essential protein modification in eukaryotes. It is initiated at the endoplasmic reticulum by O-mannosyltransferases (PMT) that are evolutionary conserved from yeast to humans. The PMT family is phylogenetically classified into PMT1, PMT2 and PMT4 subfamilies, which differ in protein substrate specificity and number of genes per subfamily. In this study, we characterized for the first time the whole PMT family of a pathogenic filamentous fungus, Aspergillus fumigatus. Genome analysis showed that only one member of each subfamily is present in A. fumigatus, PMT1, PMT2 and PMT4. Despite the fact that all PMTs are transmembrane proteins with conserved peptide motifs, the phenotype of each PMT deletion mutant was very different in A. fumigatus. If disruption of PMT1 did not reveal any phenotype, deletion of PMT2 was lethal. Disruption of PMT4 resulted in abnormal mycelial growth and highly reduced conidiation associated to significant proteomic changes. The double pmt1pmt4 mutant was lethal. The single pmt4 mutant exhibited an exquisite sensitivity to echinocandins that is associated to major changes in the expression of signal transduction cascade genes. These results indicate that the PMT family members play a major role in growth, morphogenesis and viability of A. fumigatus. PMID:20398215

  4. Decision-making factors affecting different family members regarding the placement of relatives in long-term care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this research was to investigate factors affecting different family members’ decisions regarding the placement of relatives in long-term car (LTC) facilities in Taiwan. The objective was to investigate the correlations between family members’ personal traits, the living conditions of residents in the LTC facilities, and family members’ experiences with LTC facilities. Methods This study selected family members visiting residents in LTC facilities as research subjects and used a structured questionnaire to perform face-to-face interviews. This study used nonlinear canonical correlation analysis (OVERALS) to categorize the decision-making factors affecting family members’ choices of LTC facilities. Results The results showed that when making decisions about the placement of family members, spouses chose facilities according to their own life experiences, children considered medical treatment convenience, grandchildren preferred to collect relevant information on facilities, and other relatives preferred to decide based on introductions from government departments. Conclusions These results help clarify how different family roles affect decision-making processes regarding the choice of LTC facilities. In particular, spouses and female relatives require an interventional service mechanism that provides consultation or referral information. PMID:24438495

  5. Apple procyanidins affect several members of the ErbB receptor tyrosine kinase family in vitro.

    PubMed

    Teller, Nicole; Roth, Matthias; Esselen, Melanie; Fridrich, Diana; Boettler, Ute; Blust, Volker; Will, Frank; Dietrich, Helmut; Raul, Francis; Hümmer, Wolfgang; Richling, Elke; Schreier, Peter; Marko, Doris

    2013-04-30

    Complex polyphenol-rich extracts from apples are known to inhibit the activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in vitro. The aim of the present study was to identify the bioactive constituents of the apple juice extract which contribute substantially to this potentially chemopreventive effect and to address the question whether the effect is specific to the EGFR or whether other members of the ErbB-receptor family might also be affected. Apple-derived dihydrochalcones and their respective glycosides were found to decrease EGFR activity under cell-free conditions with IC50-values ranging from 0.4 ± 0.1 to 267.0 ± 50.0 ?M but showed no activity on human cancer cells. The concentration of quercetin or its glycosides in the extract was too low to contribute substantially to the EGFR-inhibitory properties. In contrast, fractions derived from the apple juice extract comprising ?86% oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs) suppressed the activity of the EGFR in cell culture with an IC50 ? 100 ?g mL(-1). In addition, the activity of further members of the ErbB-receptor family was potently inhibited, with ErbB3 receptor activity being most potently decreased (IC50 ? 10 ?g mL(-1)). From the apple polyphenols identified so far OPCs were found to add the highest contribution to the inhibitory effects towards members of the ErbB-receptor family. Considering the crucial role of the ErbB-receptors in carcinogenesis, these results support the hypothesis that apple-derived OPCs as well as OPC-rich apple preparations might be of interest with respect to chemoprevention. PMID:23403595

  6. Comparative transcriptome profiling of amyloid precursor protein family members in the adult cortex

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ?-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and the related ?-amyloid precursor-like proteins (APLPs) undergo complex proteolytic processing giving rise to several fragments. Whereas it is well established that A? accumulation is a central trigger for Alzheimer's disease, the physiological role of APP family members and their diverse proteolytic products is still largely unknown. The secreted APPs? ectodomain has been shown to be involved in neuroprotection and synaptic plasticity. The ?-secretase-generated APP intracellular domain (AICD) functions as a transcriptional regulator in heterologous reporter assays although its role for endogenous gene regulation has remained controversial. Results To gain further insight into the molecular changes associated with knockout phenotypes and to elucidate the physiological functions of APP family members including their proposed role as transcriptional regulators, we performed DNA microarray transcriptome profiling of prefrontal cortex of adult wild-type (WT), APP knockout (APP-/-), APLP2 knockout (APLP2-/-) and APPs? knockin mice (APP?/?) expressing solely the secreted APPs? ectodomain. Biological pathways affected by the lack of APP family members included neurogenesis, transcription, and kinase activity. Comparative analysis of transcriptome changes between mutant and wild-type mice, followed by qPCR validation, identified co-regulated gene sets. Interestingly, these included heat shock proteins and plasticity-related genes that were both down-regulated in knockout cortices. In contrast, we failed to detect significant differences in expression of previously proposed AICD target genes including Bace1, Kai1, Gsk3b, p53, Tip60, and Vglut2. Only Egfr was slightly up-regulated in APLP2-/- mice. Comparison of APP-/- and APP?/? with wild-type mice revealed a high proportion of co-regulated genes indicating an important role of the C-terminus for cellular signaling. Finally, comparison of APLP2-/- on different genetic backgrounds revealed that background-related transcriptome changes may dominate over changes due to the knockout of a single gene. Conclusion Shared transcriptome profiles corroborated closely related physiological functions of APP family members in the adult central nervous system. As expression of proposed AICD target genes was not altered in adult cortex, this may indicate that these genes are not affected by lack of APP under resting conditions or only in a small subset of cells. PMID:21435241

  7. Suicide in a mental health setting: caring for staff, clients, and family members.

    PubMed

    Soukoreff, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    This is a reflection article presenting insights gained by a spiritual and religious caregiver through her experience of supporting and comforting individuals as they struggled with the societal, emotional, and spiritual issues resulting from a death by suicide, through her education in crisis management, and through her review of the relevant literature. The article outlines the needs of psychiatric patients, hospital staff, and family members when a suicide has occurred. The author's point of view is that open non-judgmental dialogue is essential for healing the intense grief often associated with suicide. PMID:19227039

  8. Niakha virus: A novel member of the family Rhabdoviridae isolated from phlebotomine sandflies in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Vasilakis, Nikos; Widen, Steven; Mayer, Sandra V.; Seymour, Robert; Wood, Thomas G.; Popov, Vsevolov; Guzman, Hilda; da Rosa, Amelia P.A. Travassos; Ghedin, Elodie; Holmes, Edward C.; Walker, Peter J.; Tesh, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae have been assigned to eight genera but many remain unassigned. Rhabdoviruses have a remarkably diverse host range that includes terrestrial and marine animals, invertebrates and plants. Transmission of some rhabdoviruses often requires an arthropod vector, such as mosquitoes, midges, sandflies, ticks, aphids and leafhoppers, in which they replicate. Herein we characterize Niakha virus (NIAV), a previously uncharacterized rhabdovirus isolated from phebotomine sandflies in Senegal. Analysis of the 11,124 nt genome sequence indicates that it encodes the five common rhabdovirus proteins with alternative ORFs in the M, G and L genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the L protein indicate that NIAV’s closest relative is Oak Vale rhabdovirus, although in this analysis NIAV is still so phylogenetically distinct that it might be classified as distinct from the eight currently recognized Rhabdoviridae genera. This observation highlights the vast, and yet not fully recognized diversity, of this family. PMID:23773405

  9. The Aging-Associated Enzyme CLK-1 is a Member of the Carboxylate-Bridged Diiron Family of Proteins

    E-print Network

    Behan, Rachel K.

    The aging-associated enzyme CLK-1 is proposed to be a member of the carboxylate-bridged diiron family of proteins. To evaluate this hypothesis and characterize the protein, we expressed soluble mouse CLK-1 (MCLK1) in ...

  10. Your Child or Family Member May Have Dengue Fever According to Their Clinical History and Physical Examination

    MedlinePLUS

    Your child or family member may have dengue fever according to their clinical history and physical examination. ... to come back. DO WHILE THE PATIENT HAS FEVER DO WHEN FEVER GOING AWAY CS205910 How to ...

  11. AXR2 Encodes a Member of the Aux/IAA Protein Family1 Punita Nagpal, Loni M. Walker2

    E-print Network

    Estelle, Mark

    AXR2 Encodes a Member of the Aux/IAA Protein Family1 Punita Nagpal, Loni M. Walker2 , Jeff C. Young, and find that it is the same as IAA7, a member of the IAA (indole-3-acetic acid) family of auxin-inducible genes. The axr2-1 mutation changes a single amino acid in conserved domain II of AXR2/IAA7. We isolated

  12. 41 CFR 302-3.202 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station, may we both claim...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...allowances for the same non-employee family member? 302-3.202 Section 302-3...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.202 If my...

  13. 41 CFR 302-3.200 - When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring to the same...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... false When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.200 When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are...

  14. 41 CFR 303-70.302 - When an immediate family member, residing with the employee, dies while the employee is stationed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false When an immediate family member, residing with the employee...WITH THE DEATH OF CERTAIN EMPLOYEES AND FAMILY MEMBERS Allowances for Preparation and Transportation of the Remains of Immediate Family Members § 303-70.302 When an...

  15. 41 CFR 303-70.301 - When an immediate family member, residing with the employee, dies while the employee is stationed...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false When an immediate family member, residing with the employee...WITH THE DEATH OF CERTAIN EMPLOYEES AND FAMILY MEMBERS Allowances for Preparation and Transportation of the Remains of Immediate Family Members § 303-70.301 When an...

  16. 41 CFR 302-3.200 - When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring to the same...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... false When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.200 When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are...

  17. 41 CFR 302-3.202 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station, may we both claim...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 false If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...allowances for the same non-employee family member? 302-3.202 Section 302-3...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.202 If my...

  18. 41 CFR 302-3.202 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station, may we both claim...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 false If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...allowances for the same non-employee family member? 302-3.202 Section 302-3...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.202 If my...

  19. 41 CFR 302-3.200 - When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring to the same...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... false When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.200 When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are...

  20. 41 CFR 302-3.200 - When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring to the same...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... false When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.200 When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are...

  1. 41 CFR 302-3.200 - When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring to the same...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... true When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are transferring...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.200 When a member of my immediate family who is also an employee and I are...

  2. 41 CFR 302-3.202 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station, may we both claim...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...allowances for the same non-employee family member? 302-3.202 Section 302-3...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.202 If my...

  3. 41 CFR 302-3.202 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station, may we both claim...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...allowances for the same non-employee family member? 302-3.202 Section 302-3...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.202 If my...

  4. 41 CFR 302-3.201 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station in the interest of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.201 If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the...

  5. 41 CFR 302-3.201 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station in the interest of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.201 If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the...

  6. 41 CFR 302-3.201 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station in the interest of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.201 If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the...

  7. 41 CFR 302-3.201 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station in the interest of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.201 If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the...

  8. 41 CFR 302-3.201 - If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same official station in the interest of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the same...Relocation of Two Or More Employed Immediate Family Members § 302-3.201 If my immediate family member and I both transfer to the...

  9. Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home.

    PubMed

    Fex, Angelika; Flensner, Gullvi; Ek, Anna-Christina; Söderhamn, Olle

    2011-12-01

    Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home An increased number of chronically ill adults perform self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home. This hermeneutical study aimed to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home. Eleven next of kin to adults performing self-care at home, either using long-term oxygen from a cylinder or ventilator, or performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. The qualitative interviews were analysed using a Gadamerian methodology. The main interpretation explained the meaning as rhythmical patterns of connectedness versus separation, and of sorrow versus reconciliation. Dependence on others was shown in the need for support from healthcare professionals and significant others. In conclusion, next of kin took considerable responsibility for dependent-care. All next of kin were positive to the idea of bringing the technology home, even though their own needs receded into the background, while focusing on the best for the patient. The results were discussed in relation to dependent-care and transition, which may have an influence on the self-care of next of kin and patients. The study revealed a need for further nursing attention to next of kin in this context. PMID:22050619

  10. Piscidin 4, a novel member of the piscidin family of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Noga, Edward J; Silphaduang, Uma; Park, Nam Gyu; Seo, Jung Kil; Stephenson, Jeana; Kozlowicz, Shannon

    2009-04-01

    Piscidins are linear, amphipathic, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with broad, potent, activity spectrum. Piscidins and other members of the piscidin family appear to comprise the most common group of AMPs in teleost fish. All piscidins and related members of the piscidin family described to date are 18-26 amino acids long.We report here the isolation of a novel 5329.25 Da, 44-residue (FFRHLFRGAKAIFRGARQGXRAHKVVSRYRNRDVPETDNNQEEP) antimicrobial peptide from hybrid striped bass (Morone chrysops female x M. saxatilis male).We have named this peptide "piscidin 4" since it has considerable (to >65%) N-terminal sequence homology to piscidins 1-3 and this distinctive, 10 to 11-residue, N-terminus is characteristic of piscidins. The native peptide has a modified amino acid at position 20 that, based upon mass spectrometry data, is probably a hydroxylated tryptophan. Synthetic piscidin 4 (with an unmodified tryptophan at position 20) has similar antibacterial activity to that of the native peptide. Piscidin 4 demonstrates potent, broad-spectrum, antibacterial activity against a number of fish and human pathogens, including multi-drug resistant bacteria. Its potent antimicrobial activity suggests that piscidin 4 plays a significant role in the innate defense system of hybrid striped bass. PMID:19266617

  11. ESCRT-III family members stimulate Vps4 ATPase activity directly or via Vta1.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Ishara F; Davies, Brian A; Xiao, Junyu; Babst, Markus; Xu, Zhaohui; Katzmann, David J

    2008-01-01

    The AAA-ATPase Vps4 is critical for function of the MVB sorting pathway, which in turn impacts cellular phenomena ranging from receptor downregulation to viral budding to cytokinesis. Vps4 dissociates ESCRTs from endosomal membranes during MVB sorting, but it is unclear how Vps4 ATPase activity is synchronized with ESCRT release. Vta1 potentiates Vps4 activity and interacts with ESCRT-III family members. We have investigated the impact of Vta1 and ESCRT-III family members on Vps4 ATPase activity. Two distinct mechanisms of Vps4 stimulation are described: Vps2 can directly stimulate Vps4 via its MIT domain, whereas Vps60 stimulates via Vta1. Moreover, Did2 can stimulate Vps4 by both mechanisms in distinct contexts. Recent structural determination of the ESCRT-III-binding region of Vta1 unexpectedly revealed a MIT-like region. These data support a model wherein a network of MIT and MIT-like domain interactions with ESCRT-III subunits contributes to the regulation of Vps4 activity during MVB sorting. PMID:18194652

  12. Prosurvival Bcl-2 family members reveal a distinct apoptotic identity between conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Emma M; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Sutherland, Robyn M; Vikstrom, Ingela B; Brady, Jamie L; Soo, Priscilla; Vremec, David; Allison, Cody; Lee, Erinna F; Fairlie, W Douglas; Bouillet, Philippe; Grabow, Stephanie; Ottina, Eleonora; Herold, Marco J; Pellegrini, Marc; Huang, David C S; Tarlinton, David M; Strasser, Andreas; Lew, Andrew M; Zhan, Yifan

    2015-03-31

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous, comprising subsets with functional specializations that play distinct roles in immunity as well as immunopathology. We investigated the molecular control of cell survival of two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and conventional DCs (cDCs) and their dependence on individual antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members. Compared with cDCs, pDCs had higher expression of BCL-2, lower A1, and similar levels of MCL-1 and BCL-XL. Transgenic overexpression of BCL-2 increased the pDC pool size in vivo with only minor impact on cDCs. With a view to immune intervention, we tested BCL-2 inhibitors and found that ABT-199 (the BCL-2 specific inhibitor) selectively killed pDCs but not cDCs. Conversely, genetic knockdown of A1 profoundly reduced the proportion of cDCs but not pDCs. We also found that conditional ablation of MCL-1 significantly reduced the size of both DC populations in mice and impeded DC-mediated immune responses. Thus, we revealed that the two DC types have different cell survival requirements. The molecular basis of survival of different DC subsets thus advocates the antagonism of selective BCL-2 family members for treating diseases pertaining to distinct DC subsets. PMID:25775525

  13. Members of several gene families influence survival of rat motoneurons in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hughes, R A; Sendtner, M; Thoenen, H

    1993-12-15

    The survival and functional maintenance of spinal motoneurons, both during the period of developmental cell death and in adulthood, have been shown to be dependent on trophic factors. In vitro experiments have previously been used to identify several survival factors for motoneurons, including CNTF, LIF, and members of the neurotrophin, FGF, and IGF gene families. Some of these factors have also been shown to be active in vivo, either on chick motoneurons during embryonic development or on lesioned facial and spinal motoneurons of the newborn rat. Here we demonstrate that lesioned newborn rat facial motoneurons can be rescued by NT-4/5, IGF-I, and LIF. Furthermore, in contrast to chick motoneurons, the survival of isolated embryonic rat motoneurons can be maintained by the neurotrophins BDNF, NT-3, and NT-4/5. IGF-I and FGF-5 were also active in this system, each supporting more than 50% of the originally plated neurons. The responsiveness of motoneurons to multiple factors in vitro and in vivo suggests that motoneuron survival and function are regulated by the coordinated actions of members of different gene families. PMID:8145295

  14. Association Analysis of Member RAS Oncogene Family Gene Polymorphisms with Aspirin Intolerance in Asthmatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Sook; Heo, Jeong-Seok; Chang, Hun Soo; Choi, Inseon S.; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jong-Uk; Park, Byung Lae; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2014-01-01

    Member RAS oncogene family (RAB1A), a member of the RAS oncogene family, cycles between inactive GDP-bound and active GTP-bound forms regulating vesicle transport in exocytosis. Thus, functional alterations of the RAB1A gene may contribute to aspirin intolerance in asthmatic sufferers. To investigate the relationship between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RAB1A gene and aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), asthmatics (n=1197) were categorized into AERD and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA). All subjects were diagnosed as asthma on the basis of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines. AERD was defined as asthmatics showing 15% or greater decreases in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or naso-ocular reactions by the oral acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) challenge (OAC) test. In total, eight SNPs were genotyped. Logistic regression analysis identified that the minor allele frequency of +14444 T>G and +41170 C>G was significantly higher in the AERD group (n=181) than in the ATA group (n=1016) (p=0.0003?0.03). Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between the SNPs and the aspirin-induced decrease in FEV1 (p=0.0004?0.004). The RAB1A gene may play a role in the development of AERD in asthmatics and the genetic polymorphisms of the gene have the potential to be used as an indicator of this disease. PMID:24555545

  15. The role of lysyl oxidase family members in the stabilization of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Remus, Ebony Washington; O'Donnell, Robert E; Rafferty, Kathryn; Weiss, Daiana; Joseph, Giji; Csiszar, Katalin; Fong, Sheri F T; Taylor, W Robert

    2012-10-15

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States today. We employed a model for AAA development using apolipoprotein E knock out mice fed a high-fat diet and treated with ANG II and ?-aminopropionitrile (?-APN) for 4 wk. ANG II induces hypertension and atherosclerotic disease, whereas ?-APN inhibits the activity of the lysyl oxidase/ lysyl oxidase-like protein (LOX/LOXL) family members. LOX/LOXL family members crosslink collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix and therefore contribute to the integrity and stabilization of a healthy vessel wall. In this model, cotreatment with ANG II and ?-APN caused a 90% AAA incidence and increased atherosclerotic lesion formation from less than 5% to greater than 25% after 4 wk. In more atheroprotected mouse strains (C57BL/6 and BalbC), cotreatment with ANG II and ?-APN caused 50% and 40% AAA incidence, respectively. These data demonstrate the importance of LOX/LOXL to the stability of the vessel wall. Therapeutic strategies to overexpress LOX/LOXL enzymes or to support the crosslinking of soluble matrix proteins in a polymeric scaffold are a promising opportunity to achieve stabilization of AAAs. PMID:22904155

  16. Chryseoglobus frigidaquae gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel member of the family Microbacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Baik, Keun Sik; Park, Seong Chan; Kim, Ho Jun; Lee, Kang Hyun; Seong, Chi Nam

    2010-06-01

    A motile, rod-shaped, yellow-pigmented bacterium, designated strain CW1(T), was isolated from a water-cooling system in the Republic of Korea. Cells were Gram-stain-positive, aerobic, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative. Strain CW1(T) formed slender rods with unusual bulbous protuberances. The major fatty acids were iso-C(16 : 1) (33.7 %), anteiso-C(15 : 0) (27.2 %), iso-C(14 : 0) (13.3 %) and C(16 : 0) (10.8 %). The cell-wall peptidoglycan was of type B2beta, containing lysine as the diamino acid. The respiratory quinones were menaquinones with 12, 13 and 14 isoprene units. A phylogenetic tree based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that strain CW1(T) formed an evolutionary lineage within the radiation enclosing members of the family Microbacteriaceae and was related to, but distant from, members of the genera Microcella and Yonghaparkia. On the basis of the evidence presented, strain CW1(T) is considered to represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Microbacteriaceae, for which the name Chryseoglobus frigidaquae gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Chryseoglobus frigidaquae is CW1(T) (=KCTC 13142(T) =JCM 14730(T)). PMID:19667371

  17. Bim: a novel member of the Bcl-2 family that promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, L; Strasser, A; O'Reilly, L A; Hausmann, G; Adams, J M; Cory, S; Huang, D C

    1998-01-01

    Certain members of the Bcl-2 family inhibit apoptosis while others facilitate this physiological process of cell death. An expression screen for proteins that bind to Bcl-2 yielded a small novel protein, denoted Bim, whose only similarity to any known protein is the short (nine amino acid) BH3 motif shared by most Bcl-2 homologues. Bim provokes apoptosis, and the BH3 region is required for Bcl-2 binding and for most of its cytotoxicity. Like Bcl-2, Bim possesses a hydrophobic C-terminus and localizes to intracytoplasmic membranes. Three Bim isoforms, probably generated by alternative splicing, all induce apoptosis, the shortest being the most potent. Wild-type Bcl-2 associates with Bim in vivo and modulates its death function, whereas Bcl-2 mutants that lack survival function do neither. Significantly, Bcl-xL and Bcl-w, the two closest homologues of Bcl-2, also bind to Bim and inhibit its activity, but more distant viral homologues, adenovirus E1B19K and Epstein-Barr virus BHRF-1, can do neither. Hence, Bim appears to act as a 'death ligand' which can only neutralize certain members of the pro-survival Bcl-2 sub-family. PMID:9430630

  18. Correlates of Caregiver Burden among Family Members of Patients with Schizophrenia in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeosun, Increase Ibukun

    2013-01-01

    Family members of patients with schizophrenia have enormous roles in the care of their patients, which could negatively impact their well being. Development of interventions targeted at alleviating the burden of informal care giving is hinged on the recognition of the factors associated with the various dimensions of burden. This study determined the correlates of caregiver burden among family members of patients with schizophrenia in Lagos, Nigeria. The study instruments included the Zarit burden interview (ZBI) and the positive and negative syndrome scale for schizophrenia (PANSS). Exploratory factor analysis of the ZBI produced a five-factor structure with “financial/physical strain”, “time/dependence strain”, “emotional strain”, “uncertainty”, and “self-criticism” domains. On multiple regression analyses, total PANSS scores, poor social support, and lower educational levels of caregivers were predictive of higher burden scores on the “financial/physical strain”, “time/dependence”, and “emotional strain” domains. Longer duration of illness, shorter patient-caregiver contact time, and being a female caregiver were predictive of higher burden scores on the “uncertainty”, “self-criticism”, and “emotional strain” domains, respectively. There is need for interventions to alleviate the burden on caregivers of patients with schizophrenia in Nigeria. These strategies must include comprehensive social support and improve access to services for patients and their caregivers. PMID:24222848

  19. Striving to be prepared for the painful: Management strategies following a family member's diagnosis of advanced cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer has consequences not only for the sick person but also for those who have a close relationship with that person. Greater knowledge about how family members manage the situation in the period immediately following the diagnosis means greater opportunity to provide the best possible support for the family. The purpose of this study was to explore management strategies that family members use when the patient is in the early stage of treatment for advanced cancer. Methods Twenty family members of cancer patients were included in the study shortly after the diagnosis. The patients had been diagnosed 8-14 weeks earlier with advanced lung cancer or gastrointestinal cancer. The data were collected in interviews with family members and subjected to qualitative latent content analysis. Through the identification of similarities and dissimilarities in the units of meaning, abstraction into codes and sub-themes became possible. The sub-themes were then brought together in one overarching theme. Results The overall function of management strategies is expressed in the theme Striving to be prepared for the painful. The family members prepare themselves mentally for the anticipated tragedy. Family relationships become increasingly important, and family members want to spend all their time together. They try to banish thoughts of the impending death and want to live as normal a life as possible. It becomes important to family members to live in the present and save their energy for the time when they will need it the most. How participants handle their worries, anxiety and sadness can be categorized into seven sub-themes or management strategies: Making things easier in everyday life, Banishing thoughts about the approaching loss, Living in the present, Adjusting to the sick person's situation, Distracting oneself by being with others, Shielding the family from grief, and Attempting to maintain hope. Conclusions The findings revealed that the family members have their own resources for handling the early stage of the cancer trajectory in an acceptable way. There is a need for longitudinal studies to generate knowledge for designing evidence-based intervention programmes that can prevent future ill-health in these vulnerable family members. PMID:21970836

  20. Greetings Titan Parents and Family Members! I would like to welcome you once more to the Titan

    E-print Network

    de Lijser, Peter

    Greetings Titan Parents and Family Members! I would like to welcome you once more to the Titan with helpful information and useful tools, we have developed our first parent newsletter, Titan Parent to support your student, and more ways YOU can be involved here at CSUF. Family and parental support

  1. PAP IB, a new member of the Reg gene family: cloning, expression, structural properties, and evolution by gene duplication

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 PAP IB, a new member of the Reg gene family: cloning, expression, structural properties-type lectin-like domain but possess additional highly conserved amino acids. By studying human databases and FII families, respectively. REG I and PAP IB share 50% sequence identity. After cloning PAP IB

  2. *note that your family member will be required to show evidence of funds to support their time in the UK

    E-print Network

    Mottram, Nigel

    in securing the necessary approval for my family to travel to the UK for this period of time. I would be happy*note that your family member will be required to show evidence of funds to support their time months*] to [insert reason for visit, e.g. attend my graduation, visit me]. I would like my [first

  3. All Members of the MHC Multigene Family Respond to Thyroid Hormone in a Highly Tissue-Specific Manner

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seigo Izumo; Bernardo Nadal-Ginard; Vijak Mahdavi

    1986-01-01

    In mammals different isoforms of myosin heavy chain are encoded by the members of a multigene family. The expression of each gene of this family is regulated in a tissue-and developmental stage-specific manner as well as by hormonal and various pathological stimuli. In this study the molecular basis of isoform switches induced in myosin heavy chain by thyroid hormone was

  4. Transport properties for members of the ZIP family in plants and their role in Zn and Mn homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A better understanding of the role of the Arabidopsis ZIP family of micronutrient transporters is necessary in order to advance our understanding of plant Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu homeostasis. In the current study, the eleven Arabidopsis ZIP family members not yet well characterized were studied for thei...

  5. Gallin; an antimicrobial peptide member of a new avian defensin family, the ovodefensins, has been subject to recent gene duplication

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daoqing Gong; Peter W Wilson; Maureen M Bain; Karina McDade; Jiri Kalina; Virginie Hervé-Grépinet; Yves Nys; Ian C Dunn

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Egg white must provide nutrients and protection to the developing avian embryo. One way in which this is achieved is an arsenal of antimicrobial proteins and peptides which are essentially extensions of the innate immune system. Gallin is a recently identified member of a family of peptides that are found in egg white. The function of this peptide family

  6. Characterization of three members of the ACC synthase gene family in Solanum tuberosum L.

    PubMed

    Destéfano-Beltrán, L J; van Caeneghem, W; Gielen, J; Richard, L; van Montagu, M; van der Straeten, D

    1995-02-20

    Two genomic clones corresponding to three members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase gene family in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) have been isolated and sequenced. Two highly homologous genes, ST-ACS1A and ST-ACS1B, transcribed in opposite directions were found in an 8.9 kb region. Their coding sequences are interrupted by two introns at identical positions. Their closest relative in tomato is the LE-ACS3 gene. The third gene in potato, ST-ACS2, was found in a 4 kb region and shows a gene structure similar to that of the tomato LE-ACS4 gene and to the mung bean VR-ACS4 and VR-ACS5 genes. Based on its lack of significant homology to the tomato gene family and its closeness to the VR-ACS4 and VR-ACS5 genes, we propose that LE-ACS7 represents an additional isoform in the tomato genome. Moreover, in a phylogenetic comparison of known ACC synthases, the ST-ACS2 isoform was grouped in a separate lineage together with the mung bean VR-ACS4 and VR-ACS5, and the moth orchid DS-ACS1A and DS-ACS1B gene products. Expression of the three potato genes was studied by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction on total RNA. The twin genes are positively regulated by indole-3-acetic acid in hypocotyls and expression is modulated by wounding in the leaves. The third gene is responsive to ethylene and wounding mainly in tubers. The roles of these three genes and of other members of the ACC synthase gene family in vegetative processes of potato such as tuberization, dormancy, and sprouting have yet to be determined. PMID:7891663

  7. An Evolutionary-Conserved Function of Mammalian Notch Family Members as Cell Adhesion Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Yoshino, Miya; Hikosaka, Mari; Okuyama, Kazuki; Zhou, Lan; Sakano, Seiji; Yagita, Hideo; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Notch family members were first identified as cell adhesion molecules by cell aggregation assays in Drosophila studies. However, they are generally recognized as signaling molecules, and it was unclear if their adhesion function was restricted to Drosophila. We previously demonstrated that a mouse Notch ligand, Delta-like 1 (Dll1) functioned as a cell adhesion molecule. We here investigated whether this adhesion function was conserved in the diversified mammalian Notch ligands consisted of two families, Delta-like (Dll1, Dll3 and Dll4) and Jagged (Jag1 and Jag2). The forced expression of mouse Dll1, Dll4, Jag1, and Jag2, but not Dll3, on stromal cells induced the rapid and enhanced adhesion of cultured mast cells (MCs). This was attributed to the binding of Notch1 and Notch2 on MCs to each Notch ligand on the stromal cells themselves, and not the activation of Notch signaling. Notch receptor-ligand binding strongly supported the tethering of MCs to stromal cells, the first step of cell adhesion. However, the Jag2-mediated adhesion of MCs was weaker and unlike other ligands appeared to require additional factor(s) in addition to the receptor-ligand binding. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the function of cell adhesion was conserved in mammalian as well as Drosophila Notch family members. Since Notch receptor-ligand interaction plays important roles in a broad spectrum of biological processes ranging from embryogenesis to disorders, our finding will provide a new perspective on these issues from the aspect of cell adhesion. PMID:25255288

  8. Tropicihabitans flavus gen. nov., sp. nov., a new member of the family Cellulomonadaceae.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Moriyuki; Shibata, Chiyo; Nurkanto, Arif; Ratnakomala, Shanti; Lisdiyanti, Puspita; Tamura, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro

    2015-05-01

    Two novel Gram-stain positive actinobacteria, designated PS-14-16(T) and RS-7-1, were isolated from the rhizosphere of a mangrove and sea sediment, respectively, and their taxonomic positions were investigated by a polyphasic approach. Both strains were observed to form vegetative hyphae in the early phase of growth but the hyphae eventually fragment into short rods to coccoid cells. The peptidoglycan type of both strains was found to be A4?. Their predominant menaquinone was identified as MK-9(H4) and the major fatty acid as anteiso-C15:0. The DNA G+C content was determined to be 68.4-68.5 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that strains PS-14-16(T) and RS-7-1 were related to members of the family Cellulomonadaceae. Their nearest phylogenetic neighbour was found to be Sediminihabitans luteus, which is currently the only species of the genus Sediminihabitans, with a similarity of 97.94 %. However, strains PS-14-16(T) and RS-7-1 were distinguishable from the members of the genus Sediminihabitans and the other genera within the family Cellulomonadaceae in terms of chemotaxonomic characteristics and phylogenetic relationship. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments indicated that strains PS-14-16(T) and RS-7-1 belong to the same species. Strains PS-14-16(T) and RS-7-1 are concluded to represent a novel genus and species of the family Cellulomonadaceae, for which the name Tropicihabitans flavus gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of T. flavus is PS-14-16(T) (=NBRC 110109(T) = IanCC A 516(T)). PMID:25761861

  9. Retroelements versus APOBEC3 family members: No great escape from the magnificent seven

    PubMed Central

    Arias, Juan F.; Koyama, Takayoshi; Kinomoto, Masanobu; Tokunaga, Kenzo

    2012-01-01

    Retroelements comprise a large and successful family of transposable genetic elements that, through intensive infiltration, have shaped the genomes of humans and other mammals over millions of years. In fact, retrotransposons now account for approximately 45% of the human genome. Because of their genomic mobility called retrotransposition, some retroelements can cause genetic diseases; such retrotransposition events occur not only in germ cells but also in somatic cells, posing a threat to genomic stability throughout all cellular populations. In response, mammals have developed intrinsic immunity mechanisms that provide resistance against the deleterious effects of retrotransposition. Among these, seven members of the APOBEC3 (A3) family of cytidine deaminases serve as highly active, intrinsic, antiretroviral host factors. Certain A3 proteins effectively counteract infections of retroviruses such as HIV-1, as well as those of other virus families, while also blocking the transposition of retroelements. Based on their preferential expression in the germ cells, in which retrotransposons may be active, it is likely that A3 proteins were acquired through mammalian evolution primarily to inhibit retrotransposition and thereby maintain genomic stability in these cells. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of the interplay between the retroelements currently active in the human genome and the anti-retroelement A3 proteins. PMID:22912627

  10. Zhihengliuella halotolerans gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel member of the family Micrococcaceae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Qin; Schumann, Peter; Yu, Li-Yan; Liu, Hong-Yu; Zhang, Yue-Qin; Xu, Li-Hua; Stackebrandt, Erko; Jiang, Cheng-Lin; Li, Wen-Jun

    2007-05-01

    The actinobacterial strain YIM 70185(T) was isolated from a saline soil sample collected from Qinghai province, north-west China, and subjected to a taxonomic investigation. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed 93.5-96.4 % similarity to members of related genera in the family Micrococcaceae. In the phylogenetic dendrogram based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain YIM 70185(T) formed a separate clade next to the genera Micrococcus and Citricoccus within the family Micrococcaceae. The peptidoglycan type was A4alpha, l-lys-l-ala-l-Glu. Cell-wall sugars contained glucose and tyvelose. The polar lipids were phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, an unknown phospholipid and an unknown glycolipid. The menaquinones were MK-9, MK-10 and MK-8 (molar ratio 5 : 2 : 1). The major fatty acids were ai-C(15 : 0) and i-C(15 : 0) and the DNA G+C content was 66.5 mol%. These chemotaxonomic profiles supported the assignment of strain YIM 70185(T) to a novel genus within the family Micrococcaceae. The name Zhihengliuella halotolerans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Zhihengliuella halotolerans is YIM 70185(T) (=DSM 17364(T)=KCTC 19085(T)). PMID:17473251

  11. Impacts of Parasites in Early Life: Contrasting Effects on Juvenile Growth for Different Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Thomas E.; Daunt, Francis; Kiploks, Adam J.; Burthe, Sarah J.; Granroth-Wilding, Hanna M. V.; Takahashi, Emi A.; Newell, Mark; Wanless, Sarah; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitism experienced early in ontogeny can have a major impact on host growth, development and future fitness, but whether siblings are affected equally by parasitism is poorly understood. In birds, hatching asynchrony induced by hormonal or behavioural mechanisms largely under parental control might predispose young to respond to infection in different ways. Here we show that parasites can have different consequences for offspring depending on their position in the family hierarchy. We experimentally treated European Shag (Phalacrocorax aristoteli) nestlings with the broad-spectrum anti-parasite drug ivermectin and compared their growth rates with nestlings from control broods. Average growth rates measured over the period of linear growth (10 days to 30 days of age) and survival did not differ for nestlings from treated and control broods. However, when considering individuals within broods, parasite treatment reversed the patterns of growth for individual family members: last-hatched nestlings grew significantly slower than their siblings in control nests but grew faster in treated nests. This was at the expense of their earlier-hatched brood-mates, who showed an overall growth rate reduction relative to last-hatched nestlings in treated nests. These results highlight the importance of exploring individual variation in the costs of infection and suggest that parasites could be a key factor modulating within-family dynamics, sibling competition and developmental trajectories from an early age. PMID:22384190

  12. Consumption and sources of dietary salt in family members in beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Zhang, Puhong; Zhang, Lu; Niu, Wenyi; Gao, Jianmei; Lu, Lixin; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Xian

    2015-01-01

    In China, few people are aware of the amount and source of their salt intake. We conducted a survey to investigate the consumption and sources of dietary salt using the "one-week salt estimation method" by weighing cooking salt and major salt-containing food, and estimating salt intake during dining out based on established evidence. Nine hundred and three families (1981 adults and 971 children) with students in eight primary or junior high schools in urban and suburban Beijing were recruited. On average, the daily dietary salt intake of family members in Beijing was 11.0 (standard deviation: 6.2) g for children and adolescents (under 18 years old), 15.2 (9.1) g for adults (18 to 59 years old), and 10.2 (4.8) g for senior citizens (60 years old and over), respectively. Overall, 60.5% of dietary salt was consumed at home, and 39.5% consumed outside the home. Approximately 90% of the salt intake came from cooking (household cooking and cafeteria or restaurant cooking), while less than 10% came from processed food. In conclusion, the dietary salt intake in Beijing families far surpassed the recommended amounts by World Health Organization, with both household cooking and dining-out as main sources of salt consumption. More targeted interventions, especially education about major sources of salt and corresponding methods for salt reduction should be taken to reduce the risks associated with a high salt diet. PMID:25867952

  13. Keepers of the secret: desires to conceal a family member's HIV-positive status in Namibia, Africa.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rachel A; Niedermyer, Angela J

    2009-07-01

    When people learn that they have tested positive for HIV, they may share their news with a family member; and this family listener may want them to keep their diagnosis a secret. This study extends privacy management research (e.g., Petronio, 2002) by investigating variables related to family members' desires to keep HIV-status secrets. Two studies, 2 years apart, included adult-respondents (N = 1,358) in northern Namibia, where HIV is prevalent. Two factors predicted potential co-owners' desires to keep a family member's HIV-positive status secret: (a) the sense of an environment inappropriate for disclosure, and (b) a lack of efficacy to oppose it. These findings suggest that many factors translated from disclosers to co-owners and from (primarily) Western studies of disclosure to southern Africa. From this investigation, one might consider the contexts that redistribute power so that confidants may limit discloser's rights to share his or her own information. PMID:19657828

  14. Stress, needs, and quality of life of family members caring for adults living with HIV/AIDS in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ming-Chu; Feng, Jui-Ying; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lu, Po-Liang; Ko, Nai-Ying; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2009-04-01

    The stress, needs and quality of life (QoL) of family members of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) are critical to explore in Taiwan where home care projects are not available to help the PLWHA families. We examined the extent of stress, needs, QoL and its correlates that family caregivers of PLWHA experienced with structural questionnaires survey. A total of 50 family caregivers of PLWHA visiting a medical center in Taiwan participated in the study from October 2005 to August 2006. Family caregivers felt most stressful on disclosure and stigma issues, and most worried about patients' interpersonal relationships. The most important needs were care-related needs including knowledge of the disease progression, methods of examination and treatment, and the related side effects. The level of stress significantly positively correlated with needs, and negatively correlated with QoL. Availability of alternative manpower to care PLWHA and being PLWHA's parents were two significant factors affecting family caregivers' QoL. In conclusion, family members of PLWHA experienced high level of stress, enormous caring needs, and poor QoL. A family-centered care for PLWHA and their families in the community is crucial to improve quality of care and to prevent family's overload, particularly for families with no alternative manpower and for those being PLWHA's parents. PMID:19266410

  15. In silico identification and characterization of the MAPK family members of unicellular model eukaryote Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Y?ld?z, Mehmet Taha; Arslanyolu, Muhittin

    2014-10-01

    The biological function and evolutionary diversity of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family have mostly been studied in fungi, animals and plants, with very limited information from lower eukaryotes. This study aimed to describe the MAPKs of unicellular Tetrahymena thermophila. Eight members of the T. thermophila MAPK (TtMPK) gene family, in addition to previously reported TtMPK1, TtMPK2 and TtMPK3, were identified bioinformatically using a T. thermophila genome database. Phylogenetic analysis assigned the TtMPKs into two major groups, ERK1/2-like (TtMPK1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9) as stress-responsive MAPKs for biotic and abiotic stresses, and ERK7/8-like (TtMPK4, 10, and 11) as cell-cycle-associated protein kinases for biotic factors. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the TtMPKs showed high mRNA expression at 30°C; however, only TtMPK5 and TtMPK6 showed high expression at 37°C. Osmotic shock by 100mM NaCl only increased the expression of TtMPK2, whereas 20mM NaCl reduced the expression of all MPKs to almost zero. The results suggested that T. thermophila MAPKs are among the closest representatives of the ancestors of the eukaryotic MAPK family. Although no functional characterization of MPKs was performed, this study is the first report of the genome-wide MAPK family in T. thermophila. PMID:25286252

  16. Youth’s narratives about family members smoking: parenting the parent- it’s not fair!

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Successful cancer prevention policies and programming for youth must be based on a solid understanding of youth’s conceptualization of cancer and cancer prevention. Accordingly, a qualitative study examining youth’s perspectives of cancer and its prevention was undertaken. Not surprisingly, smoking (i.e., tobacco cigarette smoking) was one of the dominant lines of discourse in the youth’s narratives. This paper reports findings of how youth conceptualize smoking with attention to their perspectives on parental and family-related smoking issues and experiences. Methods Seventy-five Canadian youth ranging in age from 11–19 years participated in the study. Six of the 75 youth had a history of smoking and 29 had parents with a history of smoking. Youth were involved in traditional ethnographic methods of interviewing and photovoice. Data analysis involved multiple levels of analysis congruent with ethnography. Results Youth’s perspectives of parents and other family members’ cigarette smoking around them was salient as represented by the theme: It’s not fair. Youth struggled to make sense of why parents would smoke around their children and perceived their smoking as an unjust act. The theme was supported by four subthemes: 1) parenting the parent about the dangers of smoking; 2) the good/bad parent; 3) distancing family relationships; and 4) the prisoner. Instead of being talked to about smoking it was more common for youth to share stories of talking to their parents about the dangers of smoking. Parents who did not smoke were seen by youth as the good parent, as opposed to the bad parent who smoked. Smoking was an agent that altered relationships with parents and other family members. Youth who lived in homes where they were exposed to cigarette smoke felt like a trapped prisoner. Conclusions Further research is needed to investigate youth’s perceptions about parental cigarette smoking as well as possible linkages between youth exposed to second hand smoke in their home environment and emotional and lifestyle-related health difficulties. Results emphasize the relational impact of smoking when developing anti-tobacco and cancer prevention campaigns. Recognizing the potential toll that second-hand smoke can have on youth’s emotional well-being, health care professionals are encouraged to give youth positive messages in coping with their parents’ smoking behaviour. PMID:23140551

  17. Identifying and characterizing a member of the RhopH1/Clag family in Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Perez, Darwin A; Mongui, Alvaro; Soler, Laura N; Sanchez-Ladino, Milena; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2011-07-15

    Plasmodium vivax malaria caused is a public health problem that produces very high morbidity worldwide. During invasion of red blood cells the parasite requires the intervention of high molecular weight complex rhoptry proteins that are also essential for cytoadherence. PfClag9, a member of the RhopH multigene family, has been identified as being critical during Plasmodium falciparum infection. This study describes identifying and characterizing the pfclag9 ortholog in P. vivax (hereinafter named pvclag7). The pvclag7 gene is transcribed at the end of the intraerythrocytic cycle and is recognized by sera from humans who have been infected by P. vivax. PvClag7 subcellular localization has been also determined and, similar to what occurs with PfClag9, it co-localize with other proteins from the Rhoptry high molecular weight complex. PMID:21513780

  18. UNC study finds cancer gene family member functions key to cell adhesion and migration

    Cancer.gov

    While cancer researchers are learning more of WTX and how its loss contributes to cancer formation, virtually nothing is known of FAM123C or FAM123A, the latter of which is a highly abundant protein within neurons, cells that receive and send messages from the body to the brain and back to the body. A UNC-led team of scientists used sophisticated technologies to identify and describe the protein interactions that distinguish each member of the WTX family. They found that unlike WTX and FAM123C, FAM123A interacts with a specific set of proteins that regulates cell adhesion and migration, processes essential to normal cell functioning and which, when mutated, contribute to human diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer’s.

  19. Sphinganase, a new endoglycanase that cleaves specific members of the gellan family of polysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Mikolajczak, M J; Thorne, L; Pollock, T J; Armentrout, R W

    1994-01-01

    A sporeforming gram-positive aerobic bacterium was isolated from soil and shown to secrete an endoglycanase that cleaves the tetrasaccharide backbone structure of specific members within the gellan family of related bacterial exopolysaccharides. We refer to these polysaccharides as sphingans. The structures of the sphingans differ by the type and position of side groups that are attached to the backbone. The new enzyme named sphinganase degrades welan, gellan, deacylated gellan, and polysaccharides S-88, S-7, and S-198. However, the enzyme does not attack rhamsan or polysaccharide NW11. Methods for growing the bacteria, isolating the enzyme, and assaying sphinganase activity are presented, and uses for the enzyme are proposed. Images PMID:8135511

  20. Diagnostic value of interactions between members of the family Neisseriaceae and lectins.

    PubMed

    Doyle, R J; Nedjat-Haiem, F; Keller, K F; Frasch, C E

    1984-03-01

    The lectin slide agglutination test for Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been modified and improved. Results show that wheat germ agglutinin and soybean lectin agglutinate 100% (193 of 193 tested) of clinical isolates of N. gonorrhoeae. Lectin-reactive meningococci can be readily identified by the hydrolysis of gamma-glutamyl-beta-naphthylamide. Branhamella catarrhalis, Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria sicca, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria perflava, and meningococcal serogroups A, B, C, X, Y, and Z do not interfere with the positive identification of N. gonorrhoeae. The frequently encountered problem of autoagglutination of members of the family Neisseriaceae may be circumvented by a short treatment of cellular suspensions with DNase. Based on agglutination assays, the enzyme treatment did not result in a loss of wheat germ agglutinin receptors from the bacteria. The lectin agglutination test, coupled with the gamma-glutamyl aminopeptidase assay, is proposed as a rapid and accurate means of identifying clinical isolates of gonococci. PMID:6546936

  1. STS-95 crew members greet families at Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 crew members greet their families from Launch Pad 39B. From left, they are Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, with the European Space Agency (ESA). The crew were making final preparations for launch, targeted for liftoff at 2 p.m. on Oct. 29. The mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, returning to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  2. Understanding the perspectives of family members on telephone intervention for individuals with schizophrenia: results of a focus group.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Lora Humphrey; Schuman, David W

    2015-03-01

    The current study explored the perspectives of family members of individuals with schizophrenia to identify family needs. Six family members from the National Alliance on Mental Illness participated in a 90-minute focus group to share their perspectives on treatment needs and delivery options and to provide suggestions on needs that might be met using telephone-based treatment. Traditional atheoretical content analysis was performed. Five major themes emerged from the data: (a) isolation, (b) negative emotions, (c) recognition of illness, (d) communication with providers, and (e) problem solving. Findings indicate that families perceive needs that could potentially be met using telephone-based treatments. More research is needed to determine family responses to telephone-based treatment initiatives. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(3), 32-38.]. PMID:25751827

  3. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Duangtum, Natapol [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand) [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)] [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)] [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Limjindaporn, Thawornchai, E-mail: limjindaporn@yahoo.com [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)] [Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand); Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai, E-mail: grpye@mahidol.ac.th [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)] [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 (Thailand)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Impaired trafficking of kAE1 causes distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). {yields} The interaction between kAE1 and kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) is reported. {yields} The co-localization between kAE and KIF3B was detected in human kidney tissues. {yields} A marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane was observed when KIF3B was knockdown. {yields} KFI3B plays an important role in trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Impaired trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the basolateral membrane of {alpha}-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct leads to the defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange and the failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane of these cells, causing distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). In the sorting process, kAE1 interacts with AP-1 mu1A, a subunit of AP-1A adaptor complex. However, it is not known whether kAE1 interacts with motor proteins in its trafficking process to the plasma membrane or not. We report here that kAE1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) in kidney cells and a dileucine motif at the carboxyl terminus of kAE1 contributes to this interaction. We have also demonstrated that kAE1 co-localizes with KIF3B in human kidney tissues and the suppression of endogenous KIF3B in HEK293T cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases membrane localization of kAE1 but increases its intracellular accumulation. All results suggest that KIF3B is involved in the trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane of human kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells.

  4. Interprofessional collaboration and family member involvement in intensive care units: emerging themes from a multi-sited ethnography.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Scott; McMillan, Sarah E; Kachan, Natasha; Paradis, Elise; Leslie, Myles; Kitto, Simon

    2014-09-19

    Abstract This article presents emerging findings from the first year of a two-year study, which employed ethnographic methods to explore the culture of interprofessional collaboration (IPC) and family member involvement in eight North American intensive care units (ICUs). The study utilized a comparative ethnographic approach - gathering observation, interview and documentary data relating to the behaviors and attitudes of healthcare providers and family members across several sites. In total, 504 hours of ICU-based observational data were gathered over a 12-month period in four ICUs based in two US cities. In addition, 56 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a range of ICU staff (e.g. nurses, doctors and pharmacists) and family members. Documentary data (e.g. clinical guidelines and unit policies) were also collected to help develop an insight into how the different sites engaged organizationally with IPC and family member involvement. Directed content analysis enabled the identification and categorization of major themes within the data. An interprofessional conceptual framework was utilized to help frame the coding for the analysis. The preliminary findings presented in this paper illuminate a number of issues related to the nature of IPC and family member involvement within an ICU context. These findings are discussed in relation to the wider interprofessional and health services literature. PMID:25238573

  5. What constitutes quality of family experience at the end of life? Perspectives from family members of patients who died in the hospital.

    PubMed

    Steinhauser, Karen E; Voils, Corrine I; Bosworth, Hayden; Tulsky, James A

    2014-07-01

    Objective: Most palliative care efforts focus on assessing and improving the quality of life and quality of care for patients. Palliative care views the family as the unit of care; therefore, excellent comprehensive palliative care should also address the needs of the family and the caregiver(s). While the recent literature has offered detailed descriptions of caregiving needs in the home setting, it is crucial to describe the needs of family members who provide care for patients with advanced illness in an inpatient setting, where family members serve as the key intermediaries and decision makers. Therefore, we sought to define the relevant aspects of quality of experience for families of hospitalized patients. Method: We convened a series of focus groups to identify the domains important for the quality of experience of dying patients' family members. Participants included bereaved family members of patients who had died at a Veterans Administration (VA) or private academic medical center. We conducted four in-depth follow-up interviews to probe for additional details and validate our interpretation of the focus group findings. Results: Participants (n = 14) ranged in age from 46 to 83, with a mean of 62. All were female; 64% were Caucasian, 21% African American, and 14% did not report their ethnicity. Content analysis yielded 64 attributes of quality of family experience constituting eight domains: completion, symptom impact, decision making, preparation, relationship with healthcare providers, affirmation of the whole person, post-death care, and supportive services. Significance of results: Our data have implications for clinical guidance in assisting family members in the inpatient palliative setting, which often includes patient incapacity for communication and decision making. They suggest the importance of developing corresponding methods to assist families with the tasks involved with life completion, being prepared for a crisis and imminent death, and post-death care. Provider communications and relationships are central to the processes of meeting the clinical needs of family members. Our findings should inform the development of measures to assess family experience. PMID:25003541

  6. [Disclosure of aids diagnosis to children from the family members' perspective].

    PubMed

    Schaurich, Diego

    2011-04-01

    This phenomenological study aimed at understanding how the care-giving family sees the disclosure of the AIDS diagnosis to the infected child, founded on the philosophy of Martin Buber. This study was performed at a teaching hospital in Porto Alegre, with seven family members of children with AIDS. Data collection was performed through phenomenological interviews and interpreted guided by hermeneutics. The dialogues for disclosing of the diagnosis to YOU child with AIDS show that this situation occurs in the experience lived by those caregivers and interferes in their existentiality, as it when they establish relationships with the other, in the world. The disclosing of the AIDS diagnosis to the child is a complex phenomenon that generates dialogues related to the everyday situations shared by the caregivers and the children. Further studies are needed on this theme that is constantly increasing in health services, which would take into consideration the dynamicity and singularity of the rumors taken by this epidemics in the Brazilian context. PMID:21655801

  7. Expressed emotion and interdependence in White and Latino/Hispanic family members of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Weisman de Mamani, Amy G; Kymalainen, Jennifer A; Rosales, Grace A; Armesto, Jorge C

    2007-05-30

    This study examined associations among ethnicity, expressed emotion (EE) and interdependence in a sample of 41 Latino/Hispanic and White family members of patients with schizophrenia. EE was assessed using both the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI) and the Five Minute Speech Sample (FMSS). These measures were found to be highly concordant for rating EE. However, the CFI appears to identify high EE more often than does the FMSS. Whites were designated as high EE significantly more often than were Latinos/Hispanics, regardless of assessment method. Using the interdependence subscale of the Self-Construal Scale, we found a strong trend for Latino/Hispanics to report a more interdependent self-construal than did Whites. However, contrary to expectations, interdependence was not found to mediate the relationship between ethnicity and EE. EE and interdependence may both play a role in the better course of illness observed for patients from traditional cultures. However, these two constructs may relate to patient functioning through different mechanisms. PMID:17391775

  8. Expressed emotion and interdependence in White and Latino/Hispanic family members of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Weisman d Mamani, Amy G.; Kymalainen, Jennifer A.; Rosales, Grace A.; Armesto, Jorge C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined associations among ethnicity, expressed emotion (EE) and interdependence in a sample of 41 Latino/Hispanic and White family members of patients with schizophrenia. EE was assessed using both the Camberwell Family Interview (CFI) and the Five Minute Speech sample (FMSS). These measures were found to be highly concordant for rating EE. However, the CFI appears to identify high EE more often than does the FMSS. Whites were designated as high EE significantly more often than were Latinos/Hispanics, regardless of assessment method. Using the interdependence subscale of the Self Construal Scale, we found a strong trend for Latino/Hispanics to report a more interdependent self-construal than did Whites. However, contrary to expectations, interdependence was not found to mediate the relationship between ethnicity and EE. EE and interdependence may both play a role in the better course of illness observed for patients from traditional cultures. However, these two constructs may relate to patient functioning through different mechanisms. PMID:17391775

  9. Phenotypic Variation Among Seven Members of One Family with Deficiency of Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Augé, Franck; Fu, Rong; Olivier-Bandini, Anne; Cahu, Julie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Aral, Bernard; de Martinville, Bérengère; Lecain, Jean-Paul; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a family of seven boys affected by Lesch-Nyhan disease with various phenotypes. Further investigations revealed a mutation c.203T>C in the gene encoding HGprt of all members, with substitution of leucine to proline at residue 68 (p.Leu68Pro). Thus patients from this family display a wide variety of symptoms although sharing the same mutation. Mutant HGprt enzyme was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of the enzyme revealed that the catalytic activity of the mutant was reduced, in association with marked reductions in the affinity towards phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Its Km for PRPP was increased 215-fold with hypoxanthine as substrate and 40-fold with guanine as substrate with associated reduced catalytic potential. Molecular modeling confirmed that the most prominent defect was the dramatically reduced affinity towards PRPP. Our studies suggest that the p.Leu68Pro mutation has a strong impact on PRPP binding and on stability of the active conformation. This suggests that factors other than HGprt activity per se may influence the phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan patients. PMID:24075303

  10. Organic anion transporter (Slc22a) family members as mediators of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Douglas H. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, 280 Calhoun Street (Room QE218), PO Box 250140, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)]. E-mail: sweetd@musc.edu

    2005-05-01

    Exposure of the body to toxic organic anions is unavoidable and occurs from both intentional and unintentional sources. Many hormones, neurotransmitters, and waste products of cellular metabolism, or their metabolites, are organic anions. The same is true for a wide variety of medications, herbicides, pesticides, plant and animal toxins, and industrial chemicals and solvents. Rapid and efficient elimination of these substances is often the body's best defense for limiting both systemic exposure and the duration of their pharmacological or toxicological effects. For organic anions, active transepithelial transport across the renal proximal tubule followed by elimination via the urine is a major pathway in this detoxification process. Accordingly, a large number of organic anion transport proteins belonging to several different gene families have been identified and found to be expressed in the proximal nephron. The function of these transporters, in combination with the high volume of renal blood flow, predisposes the kidney to increased toxic susceptibility. Understanding how the kidney mediates the transport of organic anions is integral to achieving desired therapeutic outcomes in response to drug interactions and chemical exposures, to understanding the progression of some disease states, and to predicting the influence of genetic variation upon these processes. This review will focus on the organic anion transporter (OAT) family and discuss the known members, their mechanisms of action, subcellular localization, and current evidence implicating their function as a determinant of the toxicity of certain endogenous and xenobiotic agents.

  11. Two molluscan BCL-2 family members from Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum: molecular characterization and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngdeuk; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Sukkyoung; Menike, Udeni; Oh, Chulhong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Heo, Gang-Joon; Lee, Jehee; De Zoysa, Mahanama

    2013-06-01

    Apoptosis based immune responses are important component of host defense in mollusks. In this study, we have identified two novel molluscan BCL-2 cDNAs from Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum and named as RpBCL-2A and RpBCL-2B. There were four and three highly conserved BCL-2 homology (BH) regions in RpBCL-2A and RpBCL-2B, respectively suggesting these two genes could be different isoforms of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family. Phylogenetic results revealed that Manila clam BCL-2 genes were clustered closely with invertebrate BCL-2 members. It gives evidence of their common origin and conserved features of invertebrate BCL-2 family. RpBCL-2A and 2B were expressed in tissue-specific manner showing the highest and lowest level of expression in gills and hemocytes, respectively. However there was no clear expression profile difference between two genes. After Vibrio tapetis challenge, transcriptional responses of RpBCL-2A and RpBCL-2B were induced in gills and hemocytes with high variation that could be due to effects of immune reactions of other host defense molecules. PMID:23558058

  12. Phenotypic variation among seven members of one family with deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Augé, Franck; Fu, Rong; Olivier-Bandini, Anne; Cahu, Julie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Aral, Bernard; de Martinville, Bérengère; Lecain, Jean-Paul; Jinnah, H A

    2013-11-01

    We describe a family of seven boys affected by Lesch-Nyhan disease with various phenotypes. Further investigations revealed a mutation c.203T>C in the gene encoding HGprt of all members, with substitution of leucine to proline at residue 68 (p.Leu68Pro). Thus patients from this family display a wide variety of symptoms although sharing the same mutation. Mutant HGprt enzyme was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of the enzyme revealed that the catalytic activity of the mutant was reduced, in association with marked reductions in the affinity towards phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Its Km for PRPP was increased 215-fold with hypoxanthine as substrate and 40-fold with guanine as substrate with associated reduced catalytic potential. Molecular modeling confirmed that the most prominent defect was the dramatically reduced affinity towards PRPP. Our studies suggest that the p.Leu68Pro mutation has a strong impact on PRPP binding and on stability of the active conformation. This suggests that factors other than HGprt activity per se may influence the phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan patients. PMID:24075303

  13. Organic anion transporter (Slc22a) family members as mediators of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Douglas H

    2005-05-01

    Exposure of the body to toxic organic anions is unavoidable and occurs from both intentional and unintentional sources. Many hormones, neurotransmitters, and waste products of cellular metabolism, or their metabolites, are organic anions. The same is true for a wide variety of medications, herbicides, pesticides, plant and animal toxins, and industrial chemicals and solvents. Rapid and efficient elimination of these substances is often the body's best defense for limiting both systemic exposure and the duration of their pharmacological or toxicological effects. For organic anions, active transepithelial transport across the renal proximal tubule followed by elimination via the urine is a major pathway in this detoxification process. Accordingly, a large number of organic anion transport proteins belonging to several different gene families have been identified and found to be expressed in the proximal nephron. The function of these transporters, in combination with the high volume of renal blood flow, predisposes the kidney to increased toxic susceptibility. Understanding how the kidney mediates the transport of organic anions is integral to achieving desired therapeutic outcomes in response to drug interactions and chemical exposures, to understanding the progression of some disease states, and to predicting the influence of genetic variation upon these processes. This review will focus on the organic anion transporter (OAT) family and discuss the known members, their mechanisms of action, subcellular localization, and current evidence implicating their function as a determinant of the toxicity of certain endogenous and xenobiotic agents. PMID:15845414

  14. Sinibacillus soli gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately thermotolerant member of the family Bacillaceae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guiqin; Zhou, Shungui

    2014-05-01

    Two Gram-staining-positive, rod-shaped and endospore-forming bacteria that represent a single species, designated strains GD05T and GD051, were isolated from a tropical forest soil and a hot spring sediment, respectively. Cells of both strains were facultatively anaerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, and could grow optimally at 50 °C, pH 8.0 and with 1?% (w/v) NaCl. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that these two isolates belonged to the family Bacillaceae, but did not show sequence similarities of more than 95% to members of other related genera. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 43.7-44.1 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0 and anteiso-C17:0. The main polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol, and the major menaquinone was MK-7. The peptidoglycan type was A1? (meso-diaminopimelic acid direct). On the basis of this polyphasic taxonomic analysis, the novel strains represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Bacillaceae, order Bacillales, for which the name Sinibacillus soli gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GD05T (=CCTCC AB 2013105T=KCTC 33117T). PMID:24510979

  15. Ultrastructural analysis of the rugose cell envelope of a member of the Pasteurellaceae family.

    PubMed

    Azari, Fereshteh; Nyland, Lori; Yu, Chunxiao; Radermacher, Michael; Mintz, Keith P; Ruiz, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Bacterial membranes serve as selective environmental barriers and contain determinants required for bacterial colonization and survival. Cell envelopes of Gram-negative bacteria consist of an outer and an inner membrane separated by a periplasmic space. Most Gram-negative bacteria display a smooth outer surface (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), whereas members of the Pasteurellaceae and Moraxellaceae families show convoluted surfaces. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral pathogen representative of the Pasteurellaceae family, displays a convoluted membrane morphology. This phenotype is associated with the presence of morphogenesis protein C (MorC). Inactivation of the morC gene results in a smooth membrane appearance when visualized by two-dimensional (2D) electron microscopy. In this study, 3D electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy of whole-mount bacterial preparations as well as 3D electron microscopy of ultrathin sections of high-pressure frozen and freeze-substituted specimens were used to characterize the membranes of both wild-type and morC mutant strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Our results show that the mutant strain contains fewer convolutions than the wild-type bacterium, which exhibits a higher curvature of the outer membrane and a periplasmic space with 2-fold larger volume/area ratio than the mutant bacterium. The inner membrane of both strains has a smooth appearance and shows connections with the outer membrane, as revealed by visualization and segmentation of 3D tomograms. The present studies and the availability of genetically modified organisms with altered outer membrane morphology make A. actinomycetemcomitans a model organism for examining membrane remodeling and its implications in antibiotic resistance and virulence in the Pasteurellaceae and Moraxellaceae bacterial families. PMID:23378507

  16. Ultrastructural Analysis of the Rugose Cell Envelope of a Member of the Pasteurellaceae Family

    PubMed Central

    Azari, Fereshteh; Nyland, Lori; Yu, Chunxiao; Radermacher, Michael; Mintz, Keith P.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial membranes serve as selective environmental barriers and contain determinants required for bacterial colonization and survival. Cell envelopes of Gram-negative bacteria consist of an outer and an inner membrane separated by a periplasmic space. Most Gram-negative bacteria display a smooth outer surface (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), whereas members of the Pasteurellaceae and Moraxellaceae families show convoluted surfaces. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, an oral pathogen representative of the Pasteurellaceae family, displays a convoluted membrane morphology. This phenotype is associated with the presence of morphogenesis protein C (MorC). Inactivation of the morC gene results in a smooth membrane appearance when visualized by two-dimensional (2D) electron microscopy. In this study, 3D electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy of whole-mount bacterial preparations as well as 3D electron microscopy of ultrathin sections of high-pressure frozen and freeze-substituted specimens were used to characterize the membranes of both wild-type and morC mutant strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Our results show that the mutant strain contains fewer convolutions than the wild-type bacterium, which exhibits a higher curvature of the outer membrane and a periplasmic space with 2-fold larger volume/area ratio than the mutant bacterium. The inner membrane of both strains has a smooth appearance and shows connections with the outer membrane, as revealed by visualization and segmentation of 3D tomograms. The present studies and the availability of genetically modified organisms with altered outer membrane morphology make A. actinomycetemcomitans a model organism for examining membrane remodeling and its implications in antibiotic resistance and virulence in the Pasteurellaceae and Moraxellaceae bacterial families. PMID:23378507

  17. Human protein arginine methyltransferases in vivo--distinct properties of eight canonical members of the PRMT family.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Frank; Pably, Peter; Eckerich, Carmen; Bedford, Mark T; Fackelmayer, Frank O

    2009-03-01

    Methylation of arginine residues is a widespread post-translational modification of proteins catalyzed by a small family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). Functionally, the modification appears to regulate protein functions and interactions that affect gene regulation, signalling and subcellular localization of proteins and nucleic acids. All members have been, to different degrees, characterized individually and their implication in cellular processes has been inferred from characterizing substrates and interactions. Here, we report the first comprehensive comparison of all eight canonical members of the human PRMT family with respect to subcellular localization and dynamics in living cells. We show that the individual family members differ significantly in their properties, as well as in their substrate specificities, suggesting that they fulfil distinctive, non-redundant functions in vivo. In addition, certain PRMTs display different subcellular localization in different cell types, implicating cell- and tissue-specific mechanisms for regulating PRMT functions. PMID:19208762

  18. The Diabetes Social Support Questionnaire-Family Version: Evaluating Adolescents' Diabetes-Specific Support From Family Members

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annette M. La Greca; Karen J. Bearman

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To develop and evaluate the Diabetes Social Support Questionnaire-Family Version (DSSQ-Family) for adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Methods: Normative and individualized approaches to scoring were examined. Also examined were associations between diabetes-specific family support and adolescents' age, disease duration, gender, emotional support from family and friends, and treatment adherence. The most supportive family behaviors were identified as well. Adolescents

  19. Concerns regarding the financial aspects of kidney transplantation: perspectives of pre-transplant patients and their family members

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Sumitha; Ephraim, Patti L.; Ameling, Jessica M.; Purnell, Tanjala S.; Lewis-Boyer, LaPricia L.; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2015-01-01

    Background African American and non-African American pre-transplant patients’ and their families’ concerns about the financial costs of kidney transplantation have not been well studied. Methods We conducted structured group interviews among pre-transplant patients (seven African American, five non-African American) and their family members (six African American, five non-African American) to identify their concerns about transplant health insurance coverage, out-of-pocket expenses, and living donor expenses. We reviewed transcribed group audio recordings and identified common discussion themes. Results African American and non-African American patients and family members expressed uncertainty about which transplant-related costs were covered by health insurance and wanted information about how to choose insurance policies accordingly. Patients were particularly concerned about the impact of pre-existing illness on securing optimal health insurance, while family members wanted information about non-insurance-based financial resources. Both patients and family members expressed concern about paying for immunosuppressant medications and about gradual loss of insurance benefits after transplantation. Both patients and family members also expressed concern about potential financial hardships for living donors. Conclusion African American and non-African American pre-transplant patients and families expressed a broad range of concerns about transplant health insurance policies, out-of-pocket expenses, non-insurance-based financial resources, and resources to address donors’ financial burden. Efforts to improve education and develop more comprehensive transplant insurance policies are needed to facilitate informed decision-making for potential transplant recipients and donors. PMID:25066730

  20. When do next-of-kin opt-in? Anticipated regret, affective attitudes and donating deceased family member's organs.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Lee; O'Carroll, Ronan E

    2014-12-01

    This research assessed whether affective factors promote and prevent family members from donating their loved one's organs. Participants (N = 191) imagined that a family member had died and that they had to decide whether or not to donate their organs and body parts for transplantation purposes. The least organs and body parts were donated when the deceased opposed donation. Moreover, participants who were not registered organ donors donated fewer organs than registered donors. This effect was mediated by anticipated regret, disgust and the perceived benefits of donation. Organ donation campaigns should target such factors to increase donor rates. PMID:23864075

  1. Fourteen novel human members of mitochondrial solute carrier family 25 (SLC25) widely expressed in the central nervous system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatjana Haitina; Jonas Lindblom; Thomas Renström; Robert Fredriksson

    2006-01-01

    Members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25) are known to transport molecules over the mitochondrial membrane. In this paper we present 14 novel members of SLC25 family in human. These were provided with following gene symbols by the HGNC: SLC25A32, SLC25A33, SLC25A34, SLC25A35, SLC25A37, SLC25A38, SLC25A39, SLC25A40, SLC25A41, SLC25A42, SLC25A43, SLC25A44, SLC25A45, and SLC25A46. We also identified the orthologues

  2. Members of the syndecan family of heparan sulfate proteoglycans are expressed in distinct cell-, tissue-, and development-specific patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, C W; Goldberger, O A; Gallo, R L; Bernfield, M

    1994-01-01

    The syndecans are a gene family of four transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans that bind, via their HS chains, diverse components of the cellular microenvironment. To evaluate the expression of the individual syndecans, we prepared cDNA probes to compare mRNA levels in various adult mouse tissues and cultured mouse cells representing various epithelial, fibroblastic, endothelial, and neural cell types and B cells at various stages of differentiation. We also prepared antibody probes to assess whether the extracellular domains of the individual syndecans are shed into the conditioned media of cultured cells. Our results show that all cells and tissues studied, except B-stem cells, express at least one syndecan family member; most cells and tissues express multiple syndecans. However, each syndecan family member is expressed selectively in cell-, tissue-, and development-specific patterns. The extracellular domain of all syndecan family members is shed as an intact proteoglycan. Thus, most, if not all, cells acquire a distinctive repertoire of the four syndecan family members as they differentiate, resulting in selective patterns of expression that likely reflect distinct functions. Images PMID:7812048

  3. Pch2 Links Chromosome Axis Remodeling at Future Crossover Sites and Crossover Distribution during Yeast Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Jamison, Christine; Börner, G. Valentin

    2009-01-01

    Segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I depends on appropriately positioned crossovers/chiasmata. Crossover assurance ensures at least one crossover per homolog pair, while interference reduces double crossovers. Here, we have investigated the interplay between chromosome axis morphogenesis and non-random crossover placement. We demonstrate that chromosome axes are structurally modified at future crossover sites as indicated by correspondence between crossover designation marker Zip3 and domains enriched for axis ensemble Hop1/Red1. This association is first detected at the zygotene stage, persists until double Holliday junction resolution, and is controlled by the conserved AAA+ ATPase Pch2. Pch2 further mediates crossover interference, although it is dispensable for crossover formation at normal levels. Thus, interference appears to be superimposed on underlying mechanisms of crossover formation. When recombination-initiating DSBs are reduced, Pch2 is also required for viable spore formation, consistent with further functions in chiasma formation. pch2? mutant defects in crossover interference and spore viability at reduced DSB levels are oppositely modulated by temperature, suggesting contributions of two separable pathways to crossover control. Roles of Pch2 in controlling both chromosome axis morphogenesis and crossover placement suggest linkage between these processes. Pch2 is proposed to reorganize chromosome axes into a tiling array of long-range crossover control modules, resulting in chiasma formation at minimum levels and with maximum spacing. PMID:19629172

  4. Pch2 links chromosome axis remodeling at future crossover sites and crossover distribution during yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Neeraj; Barot, Aekam; Jamison, Christine; Börner, G Valentin

    2009-07-01

    Segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I depends on appropriately positioned crossovers/chiasmata. Crossover assurance ensures at least one crossover per homolog pair, while interference reduces double crossovers. Here, we have investigated the interplay between chromosome axis morphogenesis and non-random crossover placement. We demonstrate that chromosome axes are structurally modified at future crossover sites as indicated by correspondence between crossover designation marker Zip3 and domains enriched for axis ensemble Hop1/Red1. This association is first detected at the zygotene stage, persists until double Holliday junction resolution, and is controlled by the conserved AAA+ ATPase Pch2. Pch2 further mediates crossover interference, although it is dispensable for crossover formation at normal levels. Thus, interference appears to be superimposed on underlying mechanisms of crossover formation. When recombination-initiating DSBs are reduced, Pch2 is also required for viable spore formation, consistent with further functions in chiasma formation. pch2Delta mutant defects in crossover interference and spore viability at reduced DSB levels are oppositely modulated by temperature, suggesting contributions of two separable pathways to crossover control. Roles of Pch2 in controlling both chromosome axis morphogenesis and crossover placement suggest linkage between these processes. Pch2 is proposed to reorganize chromosome axes into a tiling array of long-range crossover control modules, resulting in chiasma formation at minimum levels and with maximum spacing. PMID:19629172

  5. The gene involved in X-linked agammaglobulinaemia is a member of the src family of protein-tyrosine kinases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Vetrie; Igor Vorechovský; Paschalis Sideras; Jill Holland; Angela Davies; Frances Flinter; Lennart Hammarström; Christine Kinnon; Roland Levinsky; Martin Bobrow; C. I. Edvard Smith; David R. Bentley

    1993-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) is a human immunodeficiency caused by failure of pre-B cells in the bone marrow to develop into circulating mature B cells. A novel gene has been isolated which maps to the XLA locus, is expressed in B cells, and shows mutations in families with the disorder. The gene is a member of the src family of proto-oncogenes

  6. Functional analysis of Xa3\\/Xa26 family members in rice resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yinglong Cao; Liu Duan; Hongjing Li; Xinli Sun; Yu Zhao; Caiguo Xu; Xianghua Li; Shiping Wang

    2007-01-01

    Plant disease resistant (R) genes are frequently clustered in the genome. The diversity of members in a complex R-gene family may provide variation in resistance specificity. Rice Xa3\\/Xa26, conferring resistance to Xanthomonas\\u000a oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) encodes a leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinase-type protein and belongs to a multigene family, consisting of Xa3\\/Xa26, MRKa, MRKc and MRKd in rice cultivar

  7. Stress processes in caring for an end-of-life family member: Application of a theoretical model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daryl Bainbridge; Paul Krueger; Lynne Lohfeld; Kevin Brazil

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Family caregivers play a vital role in maintaining the lives of individuals with advanced illness living in the community. However, the responsibility of caregiving for an end-of-life family member can have profound consequences on the psychological, physical and financial well-being of the caregiver. While the literature has identified caregiver stress or strain as a complex process with multiple contributing

  8. A specific gene conversion of an Alu family member in the LDL-receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Deininger, P.L.; Kass, D.H.; Batzer, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    There are about 500,000 Alu family members dispersed throughout the human genome. Each of these elements is about 300 bp long and they are spread through an RNA-mediated transposition process termed retroposition. The Alu elements are not identical in sequence, but instead seem to be randomly diverged from several subfamily consensus sequences. These subfamilies can be roughly divided, based on diagnostic nucleotide positions, into groups of Alu sequences inserted during different stages in primate evolution. A PCR-based assay in which we amplify a specific Alu-containing site in the genomes of different primates allows us to detect the time of insertion of that individual Alu element in the primate genome. In studying members of one of the youngest Alu subfamilies, Sb2, we detected one element that had apparently inserted over 25 million years ago, much earlier than any other Sb2 element tested. Upon sequencing the amplified PCR products, we found that an Alu was in that precise location for 25 million years, but only in the human genome was it an Sb2 element. Its sequence was consistent with the oldest (PS) Alu subfamily in the other primates. This element evolves as expected throughout primates with the exception of the human, where it has suddenly acquired 16 separate diagnostic subfamily mutations. Although the exact mechanism is unknown, this Alu element has been specifically gene converted by an Alu element from this newer subfamily, without affecting the flanking sequences at all. It is clear that the majority of Alu subfamily evolution is dominated by insertion processes. However, this event shows that some of the details of Alu subfamily evolution may also be affected by gene conservation. Studies on several humans also show that this locus continued to accumulate mutations at an exceptionally high level after the conversion, making it useful as a polymorphic marker for the LDL-receptor locus.

  9. Entamoeba histolytica: a unicellular organism containing two active genes encoding for members of the TBP family.

    PubMed

    Castañon-Sanchez, Carlos Alberto; Luna-Arias, Juan Pedro; de Dios-Bravo, Ma Guadalupe; Herrera-Aguirre, Maria Esther; Olivares-Trejo, Jose J; Orozco, Esther; Hernandez, Jose Manuel

    2010-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite which causes human amoebiasis. In this parasite, few encoding genes for transcription factors have been cloned and characterized. The E. histolytica TATA-box binding protein (EhTBP) is the first basal transcription factor that has been studied. To continue with the identification of other members of the basal transcription machinery, we performed an in silico analysis of the E. histolytica genome and found three loci encoding for polypeptides with similarity to EhTBP. One locus has a 100% identity to the previously Ehtbp gene reported by our group. The second locus encodes for a 212 aa polypeptide that is 100% identical to residues 23-234 from EhTBP. The third one encodes for a 216 aa polypeptide of 24kDa that showed 42.6% identity and 73.7% similarity to EhTBP. This protein was named E. histolytica TBP-related factor 1 (EhTRF1). Ehtrf1 gene was expressed in bacteria and the purified 28kDa recombinant polypeptide showed the capacity to bind to TATTTAAA-box by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. K(D) values for rEhTBP and rEhTRF1 were (1.71+/-2.90)x10(-12)M and (1.12+/-0.160)x10(-11)M, respectively. Homology modeling of EhTRF1 and EhTBP revealed that, although they were very similar, they showed some differences on their surfaces. Thus, E. histolytica is a unicellular organism having two members of the TBP family. PMID:20026212

  10. Practical Opportunities to Improve Early Detection and Prevention of Colorectal Cancer (CRC) in Members of High-Risk Families.

    PubMed

    Patel, S G; Lowery, J T; Gatof, D; Ahnen, D J

    2015-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality are steadily declining and CRC screening rates are increasing in the United States. Although this a very good news, several definable groups still have very low screening rates including younger (under age 50) members of high-risk CRC families. This opinion piece describes five strategies that could be incorporated into routine practice to improve identification and guideline-based screening in members of high-risk families. Routine incorporation of a simple family history screening tool and outreach to high-risk family members could substantially improve guideline-based screening in this population. Identification of CRCs and advanced adenomas in the endoscopy suite defines another group of high-risk families for similar outreach. Lynch syndrome families can be identified by testing CRCs and selected adenomas for microsatellite instability or loss of DNA repair protein expression. Finally, selective addition of aspirin to surveillance endoscopy can decrease the risk of new adenomas and CRCs. The rationale for these strategies as well as mechanisms for their implementation and evaluation in clinical practice is described. PMID:25698379

  11. Family Matters: Co-enrollment of Family Members Into Care Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for HIV-Infected Women Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Elaine J.; Zhang, Yuan; Duong, Jimmy; El-Sadr, Wafaa M.; Carter, Rosalind J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although there is widespread interest in understanding how models of care for delivering antiretroviral therapy (ART) may influence patient outcomes, family-focused approaches have received little attention. In particular, there have been few investigations of whether the co-enrollment of HIV-infected family members may improve adult ART outcomes over time. Methods: We examined the association between co-enrollment of HIV-infected family members into care and outcomes of women initiating ART in 12 HIV care and treatment programs across sub-Saharan Africa. Using data from the mother-to-child transmission-(MTCT) Plus Initiative, women starting ART were categorized according to the co-enrollment of an HIV-infected partner and/or HIV-infected child within the same program. Mortality and loss to follow-up were assessed for up to 5 years after women's ART initiation. Results: Of the 2877 women initiating ART included in the analysis, 31% (n = 880) had at least 1 HIV-infected family member enrolled into care at the same program, including 24% (n = 689) who had an HIV-infected male partner, and 10% (n = 295) who had an HIV-infected child co-enrolled. There was no significant difference in the risk of death of women by family co-enrollment status (P = 0.286). However, the risk of loss to follow-up was greatest among women who did not have an HIV-infected family member co-enrolled (19% after 36 months on ART) compared with women who had an HIV-infected family member co-enrolled (3%–8% after 36 months on ART) (P < 0.001). These associations persisted after adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates and were consistent across countries and care programs. Discussion: These data provide novel evidence for the association between adult outcomes on ART and co-enrollment of HIV-infected family members into care at the same program. Interventions that build on women's family contexts warrant further consideration in both research and policies to promote retention in ART services across sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25436824

  12. Multiple members of the UDP-GalNAc: polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase family are essential for viability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tran, Duy T; Zhang, Liping; Zhang, Ying; Tian, E; Earl, Lesley A; Ten Hagen, Kelly G

    2012-02-17

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation represents a major form of post-translational modification that is conserved across most eukaryotic species. This type of glycosylation is initiated by a family of enzymes (GalNAc-Ts in mammals and PGANTs in Drosophila) whose members are expressed in distinct spatial and temporal patterns during development. Previous work from our group demonstrated that one member of this family is essential for viability and another member modulates extracellular matrix composition and integrin-mediated cell adhesion during development. To investigate whether other members of this family are essential, we employed RNA interference (RNAi) to each gene in vivo. Using this approach, we identified 4 additional pgant genes that are required for viability. Ubiquitous RNAi to pgant4, pgant5, pgant7, or the putative glycosyltransferase CG30463 resulted in lethality. Tissue-specific RNAi was also used to define the specific organ systems and tissues in which each essential family member is required. Interestingly, each essential pgant had a unique complement of tissues in which it was required. Additionally, certain tissues (mesoderm, digestive system, and tracheal system) required more than one pgant, suggesting unique functions for specific enzymes in these tissues. Expanding upon our RNAi results, we found that conventional mutations in pgant5 resulted in lethality and specific defects in specialized cells of the digestive tract, resulting in loss of proper digestive system acidification. In summary, our results highlight essential roles for O-glycosylation and specific members of the pgant family in many aspects of development and organogenesis. PMID:22157008

  13. Identification of four new members of the internalin multigene family of Listeria monocytogenes EGD.

    PubMed Central

    Dramsi, S; Dehoux, P; Lebrun, M; Goossens, P L; Cossart, P

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen that is able to invade nonphagocytic cells. Two surface proteins, internalin, the inlA gene product, and InlB, play important roles in the entry into cultured mammalian cells. These proteins also have extensive sequence similarities. Previously, Southern hybridization predicted the existence of an internalin multigene family. Recently, InlC, a secreted protein of 30 kDa homologous to InlA and InlB, was identified. In this work, we identified and characterized four new members of the internalin multigene family, inlC2, inlD, inlE, and inlF which encode proteins of 548, 567, 499, and 821 amino acids respectively. inlC2, inlD, and inlE are contiguous on the chromosome of L. monocytogenes EGD, whereas inlF is located in a different chromosomal region. These four inl gene products display the principal features of internalin, namely, a signal sequence, two regions of repeats (or LRR and B repeats), and a putative cell wall anchor sequence containing the sorting motif LPXTG. The four inl genes were maximally expressed albeit at a low level during early exponential growth in bacterial medium at 37 degrees C. The role of these inl genes in L. monocytogenes invasion was assessed by constructing isogenic chromosomal deletion mutants and testing them for entry into various nonphagocytic cells. Unexpectedly, the inlC2, inlD, inlE, and inlF null mutants were not affected for entry into any of the cell lines tested, raising the possibility that these genes are needed for an aspect of pathogenicity other than invasion. The identity of such an aspect remains to be determined. PMID:9125538

  14. Members of the chloride intracellular ion channel protein family demonstrate glutaredoxin-like enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J; Hossain, Khondker R; Hudson, Amanda L; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L; Hare, Joanna E; Cornell, Bruce A; Curmi, Paul M G; Davey, Mary W; Valenzuela, Stella M

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function. PMID:25581026

  15. Identification and Characterization of Genetically Divergent Members of the Newly Established Family Mesoniviridae

    PubMed Central

    Zirkel, Florian; Roth, Hanna; Kurth, Andreas; Drosten, Christian; Ziebuhr, John

    2013-01-01

    The recently established family Mesoniviridae (order Nidovirales) contains a single species represented by two closely related viruses, Cavally virus (CavV) and Nam Dinh virus (NDiV), which were isolated from mosquitoes collected in Côte d'Ivoire and Vietnam, respectively. They represent the first nidoviruses to be discovered in insects. Here, we report the molecular characterization of four novel mesoniviruses, Hana virus, Méno virus, Nsé virus, and Moumo virus, all of which were identified in a geographical region in Côte d'Ivoire with high CavV prevalence. The viruses were found with prevalences between 0.5 and 2.8%, and genome sequence analyses and phylogenetic studies suggest that they represent at least three novel species. Electron microscopy revealed prominent club-shaped surface projections protruding from spherical, enveloped virions of about 120 nm. Northern blot data show that the four mesoniviruses analyzed in this study produce two major 3?-coterminal subgenomic mRNAs containing two types of 5? leader sequences resulting from the use of different pairs of leader and body transcription-regulating sequences that are conserved among mesoniviruses. Protein sequencing, mass spectroscopy, and Western blot data show that mesonivirus particles contain eight major structural protein species, including the putative nucleocapsid protein (25 kDa), differentially glycosylated forms of the putative membrane protein (20, 19, 18, and 17 kDa), and the putative spike (S) protein (77 kDa), which is proteolytically cleaved at a conserved site to produce S protein subunits of 23 and 57 kDa. The data provide fundamental new insight into common and distinguishing biological properties of members of this newly identified virus family. PMID:23536661

  16. Sinomicrobium oceani gen. nov., sp. nov., a member of the family Flavobacteriaceae isolated from marine sediment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Tian, Xin-Peng; Liu, Yu-Juan; Li, Jie; Kim, Chang-Jin; Yin, Hao; Li, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Si

    2013-03-01

    A marine bacterium, designated SCSIO 03483(T), was isolated from a marine sediment sample collected from the Nansha Islands in the South China Sea. The strain produced roundish colonies with diffusible yellow-coloured pigment on nutrient agar medium or marine agar 2216. Optimal growth occurred in the presence of 0-4?% (w/v) NaCl, at pH 7.0 and a temperature range of 28-37 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the isolate belonged to the family Flavobacteriaceae and showed relatively high sequence similarity with Imtechella halotolerans K1(T) (92.7?%). Phylogenetic analysis based on nearly complete 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the isolate shared a lineage with members of the genera Imtechella, Joostella and Zhouia. Phospholipids were phosphatidylethanolamine, two unidentified aminolipids and three unknown polar lipids. The major respiratory quinone was MK-6 and the major fatty acids were iso-C15?:?0, iso-C17?:?0 3-OH and summed feature 3 (C16?:?1?6c/C16?:?1?7c). The DNA G+C content of strain SCSIO 03483(T) was 38.4 mol%. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular data, strain SCSIO 03483(T) represents a novel species in a new genus in the family Flavobacteriaceae, for which the name Sinomicrobium oceani gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of Sinobacterium oceani is SCSIO 03483(T) (?=?KCTC 23994(T)?=?CGMCC 1.12145(T)). PMID:22707529

  17. Comparative analysis of three hyperthermophilic GH1 and GH3 family members with industrial potential.

    PubMed

    Cota, Junio; Corrêa, Thamy L R; Damásio, André R L; Diogo, José A; Hoffmam, Zaira B; Garcia, Wanius; Oliveira, Leandro C; Prade, Rolf A; Squina, Fabio M

    2015-01-25

    Beta-glucosidases (BGLs) are enzymes of great potential for several industrial processes, since they catalyze the cleavage of glucosidic bonds in cellobiose and other short cellooligosaccharides. However, features such as good stability to temperature, pH, ions and chemicals are required characteristics for industrial applications. This work aimed to provide a comparative biochemical analysis of three thermostable BGLs from Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermotoga petrophila. The genes PfBgl1 (GH1 from P. furiosus), TpBgl1 (GH1 from T. petrophila) and TpBgl3 (GH3 from T. petrophila) were cloned and proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes are hyperthermophilic, showing highest activity at temperatures above 80°C at acidic (TpBgl3 and PfBgl1) and neutral (TpBgl1) pHs. The BGLs showed greatest stability to temperature mainly at pH 6.0. Activities using a set of different substrates suggested that TpBgl3 (GH3) is more specific than GH1 family members. In addition, the influence of six monosaccharides on BGL catalysis was assayed. While PfBgl1 and TpBgl3 seemed to be weakly inhibited by monosaccharides, TpBgl1 was activated, with xylose showing the strongest activation. Under the conditions tested, TpBgl1 showed the highest inhibition constant (Ki=1100.00mM) when compared with several BGLs previously characterized. The BGLs studied have potential for industrial use, specifically the enzymes belonging to the GH1 family, due to its broad substrate specificity and weak inhibition by glucose and other saccharides. PMID:25102284

  18. Members of the Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel Protein Family Demonstrate Glutaredoxin-Like Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J.; Hossain, Khondker R.; Hudson, Amanda L.; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A.; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L.; Hare, Joanna E.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Davey, Mary W.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function. PMID:25581026

  19. The Millennium Cohort Family Study: a prospective evaluation of the health and well-being of military service members and their families.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Fairbank, John A; Marmar, Charlie R; Schlenger, William

    2014-09-01

    The need to understand the impact of war on military families has never been greater than during the past decade, with more than three million military spouses and children affected by deployments to Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom. Understanding the impact of the recent conflicts on families is a national priority, however, most studies have examined spouses and children individually, rather than concurrently as families. The Department of Defense (DoD) has recently initiated the largest study of military families in US military history (the Millennium Cohort Family Study), which includes dyads of military service members and their spouses (n?>?10,000). This study includes US military families across the globe with planned follow-up for 21+ years to evaluate the impact of military experiences on families, including both during and after military service time. This review provides a comprehensive description of this landmark study including details on the research objectives, methodology, survey instrument, ancillary data sets, and analytic plans. The Millennium Cohort Family Study offers a unique opportunity to define the challenges that military families experience, and to advance the understanding of protective and vulnerability factors for designing training and treatment programs that will benefit military families today and into the future. PMID:24912670

  20. An Investigation of Violent and Nonviolent Adolescents' Family Functioning, Problems Concerning Family Members, Anger and Anger Expression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avci, Rasit; Gucray, Songul Sonay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to (a) investigate the families of violent and nonviolent adolescents in terms of family functioning, trait anger and anger expression, and (b) compare incidence of psychological problems, alcohol usage and delinquent behaviors. The sample consisted of families of both violent (n = 54) and nonviolent adolescents (n =…

  1. Molecular homology among members of the R gene family in maize.

    PubMed

    Consonni, G; Geuna, F; Gavazzi, G; Tonelli, C

    1993-02-01

    The R gene family determines the timing, distribution and amount of anthocyanin pigmentation in maize. This family comprises a set of regulatory genes, consisting of a cluster of several elements at the R locus, on chromosome 10, the Lc and Sn gene lying about two units R distal and B on chromosome 2. Each gene determines a tissue-specific pigmentation of different parts of the seed and plant. The proposed duplicated function of R, Sn, Lc and B loci is reflected in cDNA sequence similarity. In this paper an extensive analysis of the predicted proteins of the R, Sn, Lc and B genes together with a search for putative sites of post-translational modification is reported. A comparison with the prosite database discloses several N-glycosylation and phosphorylation sites, as well as the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (HLH) domain of transcriptional activators. Sn, Lc, and R-S show a high conservation of these sites, while B is more divergent. Analysis of the 5' leader of mRNA sequences discloses the presence of five ATG triplets with two upstream open reading frames (uORFs) of 38 and 15 amino acids and a loop structure indicating a possible mechanism of control at the translational level. It is conceivable that possible mechanisms acting at the translational and post-translational level could modulate the expression and the activation of these transcription factors. Northern analysis of various tissues of different R alleles highlights a strict correlation between pigment accumulation in different tissues and the expression of the regulatory and structural genes suggesting that the pattern of pigmentation relies on a mechanism of differential expression of the members of the R family. Analysis of the Sn promoter discloses the presence of several sequences resembling binding sites of known transcription factors (as GAGA and GT) that might be responsible for the spatial and light-induced expression of this gene. Two regions include a short sequence homologous to the consensus binding site of the B-HLH domain suggesting a self-regulatory control of the Sn gene. PMID:8220447

  2. Functional Specialization Among Members Of Knickkopf Family Of Proteins In Insect Cuticle Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Moussian, Bernard; Specht, Charles A.; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Kramer, Karl J.; Beeman, Richard W.; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2014-01-01

    Our recent study on the functional analysis of the Knickkopf protein from T. castaneum (TcKnk), indicated a novel role for this protein in protection of chitin from degradation by chitinases. Knk is also required for the laminar organization of chitin in the procuticle. During a bioinformatics search using this protein sequence as the query, we discovered the existence of a small family of three Knk-like genes (including the prototypical TcKnk) in the T. castaneum genome as well as in all insects with completed genome assemblies. The two additional Knk-like genes have been named TcKnk2 and TcKnk3. Further complexity arises as a result of alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation of transcripts of TcKnk3, leading to the production of three transcripts (and by inference, three proteins) from this gene. These transcripts are named TcKnk3-Full Length (TcKnk3-FL), TcKnk3-5? and TcKnk3-3?. All three Knk-family genes appear to have essential and non-redundant functions. RNAi for TcKnk led to developmental arrest at every molt, while down-regulation of either TcKnk2 or one of the three TcKnk3 transcripts (TcKnk3-3?) resulted in specific molting arrest only at the pharate adult stage. All three Knk genes appear to influence the total chitin content at the pharate adult stage, but to variable extents. While TcKnk contributes mostly to the stability and laminar organization of chitin in the elytral and body wall procuticles, proteins encoded by TcKnk2 and TcKnk3-3? transcripts appear to be required for the integrity of the body wall denticles and tracheal taenidia, but not the elytral and body wall procuticles. Thus, the three members of the Knk-family of proteins perform different essential functions in cuticle formation at different developmental stages and in different parts of the insect anatomy. PMID:25144557

  3. Spatial expression of claudin family members in various organs of mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Inho; Yang, Hyun; Kang, Hong-Seok; Ahn, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Geun-Shik; Hong, Eui-Ju; An, Beum-Soo; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2014-05-01

    Claudins (CLDNs) are tetraspan transmembrane proteins, which are components of tight junctions. The CLDN family is composed of 27 members that are responsible for paracellular transport and certain CLDNs form charge-selective ion channels. CLDNs have two extracellular loops, and the charge of the first extracellular loop determines the ion selectivity of each CLDN. Although the expression and function of each CLDN have been previously investigated, the distribution of CLDNs in various target organs remains to be determined. In the present study, the tissue-specific mRNA distribution of CLDNs (1-5, 7-8, 10a and b, 11-12, 14-17 and 19) in the duodenum, ileum, colon, kidney, liver and lung were defined. Among the tested CLDNs, CLDN1, 2, 12 and 16 were selected for further investiagtion. It was observed that CLDN1, CLDN2 and CLDN12 transcripts and proteins were particularly abundant in the investigated organs. Notably, immune-reactive CLDN16 was detected in a tissue-specific manner and shown in the renal tubules and portal vein. The tested CLDNs were localized to intercellular apical junctions in the epithelium of the intestine, renal tubule and bronchus. Based on this novel information, the presence of several types of CLDNs is of interest as CLDNs may promote or dampen the paracellular diffusion of specific ions. PMID:24626855

  4. Development of a Simple and Rapid Fluorogenic Procedure for Identification of Vibrionaceae Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Gary P.; Watson, Michael A.; Parveen, Salina

    2005-01-01

    We describe a simple colony overlay procedure for peptidases (COPP) for the rapid fluorogenic detection and quantification of Vibrionaceae from seawater, shellfish, sewage, and clinical samples. The assay detects phosphoglucose isomerase with a lysyl aminopeptidase activity that is produced by Vibrionaceae family members. Overnight cultures are overlaid for 10 min with membranes containing a synthetic substrate, and the membranes are examined for fluorescent foci under UV illumination. Fluorescent foci were produced by all the Vibrionaceae tested, including Vibrio spp., Aeromonas spp., and Plesiomonas spp. Fluorescence was not produced by non-Vibrionaceae pathogens. Vibrio cholerae strains O1, O139, O22, and O155 were strongly positive. Seawater and oysters were assayed, and 87 of 93 (93.5%) of the positive isolates were identified biochemically as Vibrionaceae, principally Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Photobacterium damselae, and Shewanella putrefaciens. None of 50 nonfluorescent isolates were Vibrionaceae. No Vibrionaceae were detected in soil, and only A. hydrophila was detected in sewage. The COPP technique may be particularly valuable in environmental and food-testing laboratories and for monitoring water quality in the aquaculture industry. PMID:16000757

  5. Xhe2 is a member of the astacin family of metalloproteases that promotes Xenopus hatching.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang-Soo; Saint-Jeannet, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    Transcription factors Pax3 and Zic1 are among the earliest genes activated at the neural plate border. In Xenopus, they are necessary and sufficient to promote the formation of multiple neural plate border cell types, including the neural crest, cranial placodes, and hatching gland. Pax3 is especially critical for the formation of the hatching gland, a group of cells that produce proteolytic enzymes essential to digest the egg vitelline envelope and jelly coat in order to release the tadpole into the environment. In a screen designed to identify downstream targets of Pax3, we isolated a member of the astacin family of metalloproteases, related to Xenopus hatching enzyme (Xhe), that we named Xhe2. Xhe2 is exclusively expressed in hatching gland cells as they first emerge at the lateral edge of the anterior neural plate, and persists in this tissue up to the tadpole stage. Knockdown experiments show that Xhe2 expression depends entirely on Pax3 function. Gain-of-function studies demonstrate that Pax3 can induce premature hatching through the upregulation of several proteolytic enzymes including Xhe2. Interestingly, Xhe2 overexpression is sufficient to induce early hatching, indicating that Xhe2 is one of the key components of the degradation mechanism responsible for breaking down the vitelline membrane. PMID:25399671

  6. View of Mexican family members on the autonomy of adolescents and adults with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Allen-Leigh, Betania; Katz, Gregorio; Rangel-Eudave, Guillermina; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    This study aims to describe the ways in which Mexican adolescents and adults with intellectual disability exercise autonomy. Two focus groups were carried out with family members who are the legal guardians of people with intellectual disability who have received independent living training at the Center for Integral Training and Development (CADI, per its abbreviation in Spansh). Focus group transcripts were analyzed with codes defined a priori, based on an existing theoretical framework on autonomy and quality of life among intellectually disabled persons. Autonomy is exercised by the intellectually disabled in the personal, social, sexual and economic spheres of life. Empowered autonomy implies that the person is taught the necessary skills and then allowed to act upon his or her own interests. Negotiated autonomy includes guidance, explanation and negotiation; it constitutes a learning process. Interpreted autonomy is the most limited type described, and implies protection, interpretation and may involve decision-making by others. These types of autonomy constitute a complex phenomenon and the divisions between them are indistinct. PMID:18470350

  7. A Novel Role of the Mad Family Member Mad3 in Cerebellar Granule Neuron Precursor Proliferation?

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jun-Soo; Rust, Jennifer M.; Ishimaru, Tatsuto; Díaz, Elva

    2007-01-01

    During development, Sonic hedgehog (Shh) regulates the proliferation of cerebellar granule neuron precursors (GNPs) in part via expression of Nmyc. We present evidence supporting a novel role for the Mad family member Mad3 in the Shh pathway to regulate Nmyc expression and GNP proliferation. Mad3 mRNA is transiently expressed in GNPs during proliferation. Cultured GNPs express Mad3 in response to Shh stimulation in a cyclopamine-dependent manner. Mad3 is necessary for Shh-dependent GNP proliferation as measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and Nmyc expression. Furthermore, Mad3 overexpression, but not that of other Mad proteins, is sufficient to induce GNP proliferation in the absence of Shh. Structure-function analysis revealed that Max dimerization and recruitment of the mSin3 corepressor are required for Mad3-mediated GNP proliferation. Surprisingly, basic-domain-dependent DNA binding of Mad3 is not required, suggesting that Mad3 interacts with other DNA binding proteins to repress transcription. Interestingly, cerebellar tumors and pretumor cells derived from patched heterozygous mice express high levels of Mad3 compared with adjacent normal cerebellar tissue. Our studies support a novel role for Mad3 in cerebellar GNP proliferation and possibly tumorigenesis, and they challenge the current paradigm that Mad3 should antagonize Nmyc by competition for direct DNA binding via Max dimerization. PMID:17893326

  8. Associations between violent video gaming, empathic concern, and prosocial behavior toward strangers, friends, and family members.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ashley M; Padilla-Walker, Laura M; Coyne, Sarah M; Nelson, Larry J; Stockdale, Laura A

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to media violence, including violent video gaming, can have a cognitive desensitization effect, lowering empathic concern for others in need. Since emerging adulthood offers increased opportunities to volunteer, strengthen relationships, and initiate new relationships, decreases in empathic concern and prosocial behavior may prove inhibitive to optimal development during this time. For these reasons, the current study investigated associations between violent video gaming, empathic responding, and prosocial behavior enacted toward strangers, friends, and family members. Participants consisted of 780 emerging adults (M age = 19.60, SD = 1.86, range = 18–29, 69% female, 69% Caucasian) from four universities in the United States. Results showed small to moderate effects between playing violent video gaming and lowered empathic concern for both males and females. In addition, lowered empathic concern partially mediated the pathways between violent video gaming and prosocial behavior toward all three targets (at the level of a trend for females), but was most strongly associated with lower prosocial behavior toward strangers. Discussion highlights how violent video gaming is associated with lower levels of prosocial behavior through the mechanism of decreased empathic concern, how this association can affect prosocial behavior differently across target, and finally what implications this might have for development during emerging adulthood. PMID:22302216

  9. Three Members of the Arabidopsis Glycosyltransferase Family 8 Are Xylan Glucuronosyltransferases1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Emilie A.; Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Baidoo, Edward E.K.; Hadi, Masood Z.; Keasling, Jay D.; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2012-01-01

    Xylan is a major component of the plant cell wall and the most abundant noncellulosic component in the secondary cell walls that constitute the largest part of plant biomass. Dicot glucuronoxylan consists of a linear backbone of ?(1,4)-linked xylose residues substituted with ?(1,2)-linked glucuronic acid (GlcA). Although several genes have been implicated in xylan synthesis through mutant analyses, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for synthesizing xylan are largely unknown. Here, we show evidence for biochemical activity of GUX1 (for GlcA substitution of xylan 1), a member of Glycosyltransferase Family 8 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that is responsible for adding the glucuronosyl substitutions onto the xylan backbone. GUX1 has characteristics typical of Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases and a Km for UDP-GlcA of 165 ?m. GUX1 strongly favors xylohexaose as an acceptor over shorter xylooligosaccharides, and with xylohexaose as an acceptor, GlcA is almost exclusively added to the fifth xylose residue from the nonreducing end. We also show that several related proteins, GUX2 to GUX5 and Plant Glycogenin-like Starch Initiation Protein6, are Golgi localized and that only two of these proteins, GUX2 and GUX4, have activity as xylan ?-glucuronosyltransferases. PMID:22706449

  10. Three members of the Arabidopsis glycosyltransferase family 8 are xylan glucuronosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Rennie, Emilie A; Hansen, Sara Fasmer; Baidoo, Edward E K; Hadi, Masood Z; Keasling, Jay D; Scheller, Henrik Vibe

    2012-08-01

    Xylan is a major component of the plant cell wall and the most abundant noncellulosic component in the secondary cell walls that constitute the largest part of plant biomass. Dicot glucuronoxylan consists of a linear backbone of ?(1,4)-linked xylose residues substituted with ?(1,2)-linked glucuronic acid (GlcA). Although several genes have been implicated in xylan synthesis through mutant analyses, the biochemical mechanisms responsible for synthesizing xylan are largely unknown. Here, we show evidence for biochemical activity of GUX1 (for GlcA substitution of xylan 1), a member of Glycosyltransferase Family 8 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that is responsible for adding the glucuronosyl substitutions onto the xylan backbone. GUX1 has characteristics typical of Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases and a K(m) for UDP-GlcA of 165 ?m. GUX1 strongly favors xylohexaose as an acceptor over shorter xylooligosaccharides, and with xylohexaose as an acceptor, GlcA is almost exclusively added to the fifth xylose residue from the nonreducing end. We also show that several related proteins, GUX2 to GUX5 and Plant Glycogenin-like Starch Initiation Protein6, are Golgi localized and that only two of these proteins, GUX2 and GUX4, have activity as xylan ?-glucuronosyltransferases. PMID:22706449

  11. Asian prunus viruses: New related members of the family Flexiviridae in Prunus germplasm of Asian origin.

    PubMed

    Marais, A; Svanella-Dumas, L; Foissac, X; Gentit, P; Candresse, T

    2006-09-01

    Serological reactivity to Plum pox virus (PPV) antisera has been described in several Prunus sources of Asian origin that are free of PPV infection. Using polyvalent or specific PCR assays, the presence of three closely related agents in two of these sources, Prunus mume cv. Bungo and P. persica cv. Ku Chu'a Hung, was demonstrated. Similarities in genome organization and sequence comparisons indicate that these agents should be regarded as members of the genus Foveavirus, their only singular trait being a very large (>800 nt) 3' non-coding region (NCR), as compared to the ca. 130-180 nt 3' NCR observed in other Foveaviruses. The three agents are very divergent from known Foveaviruses but are also significantly removed one from the others, with overall nucleotide sequence identity levels in the sequenced region of ca. 74-76% and of only 60.8-67.5% in their complete CP gene (61.9-71.3% amino acid sequence identity). Given the species discrimination criteria in the family Flexiviridae, these three agents should be regarded as three related yet distinct new viruses belonging to the Foveavirus genus, for which the names Asian prunus virus 1, 2 and 3 are proposed. Evidence is provided for the presence of variants of these new viruses in other Prunus germplasm of Asian origin. PMID:16621102

  12. STS-103 crew members and their families pose for a portrait before DEPARTing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The STS-103 crew pose for a group portrait with their families and loved ones on the runway at Patrick Air Force Base in Cocoa Beach, Fla. They are preparing to board an airplane that will return them to their home base at the Johnson Space Center in Houston following the successful completion of their mission. From left to right, the crew members are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, Jean-Frangois Clervoy of France, and Steven L. Smith; Pilot Scott J. Kelly; and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. Discovery landed in darkness the previous evening, Dec. 27, on runway 33 at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility at 7:00:47 p.m. EST. This was the first time that a Shuttle crew spent the Christmas holiday in space. The STS-103 mission accomplished outfitting the Hubble Space Telescope with six new gyroscopes, six new voltage/temperature improvement kits, a new onboard computer, a new solid state recorder and new data transmitter, a new fine guidance sensor along with new insulation on parts of the orbiting telescope. This was the 96th flight in the Space Shuttle program and the 27th for the orbiter Discovery.

  13. Impact of conditional deletion of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BIM in mice

    PubMed Central

    Herold, M J; Stuchbery, R; Mérino, D; Willson, T; Strasser, A; Hildeman, D; Bouillet, P

    2014-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only BCL-2 family member BIM is a critical determinant of hematopoietic cell development and homeostasis. It has been argued that the striking hematopoietic abnormalities of BIM-deficient mice (accumulation of lymphocytes and granulocytes) may be the result of the loss of the protein throughout the whole animal rather than a consequence intrinsic to the loss of BIM in hematopoietic cells. To address this issue and allow the deletion of BIM in specific cell types in future studies, we have developed a mouse strain with a conditional Bim allele as well as a new Cre transgenic strain, Vav-CreER, in which the tamoxifen-inducible CreER recombinase (fusion protein) is predominantly expressed in the hematopoietic system. We show that acute loss of BIM in the adult mouse rapidly results in the hematopoietic phenotypes previously observed in mice lacking BIM in all tissues. This includes changes in thymocyte subpopulations, increased white blood cell counts and resistance of lymphocytes to BIM-dependent apoptotic stimuli, such as cytokine deprivation. We have validated this novel conditional Bim knockout mouse model using established and newly developed CreER strains (Rosa26-CreER and Vav-CreER) and will make these exciting new tools for studies on cell death and cancer available. PMID:25299771

  14. Plant members of a family of sulfate transporters reveal functional subtypes.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, F W; Ealing, P M; Hawkesford, M J; Clarkson, D T

    1995-01-01

    Three plant sulfate transporter cDNAs have been isolated by complementation of a yeast mutant with a cDNA library derived from the tropical forage legume Stylosanthes hamata. Two of these cDNAs, shst1 and shst2, encode high-affinity H+/sulfate cotransporters that mediate the uptake of sulfate by plant roots from low concentrations of sulfate in the soil solution. The third, shst3, represents a different subtype encoding a lower affinity H+/sulfate cotransporter, which may be involved in the internal transport of sulfate between cellular or subcellular compartments within the plant. The steady-state level of mRNA corresponding to both subtypes is subject to regulation by signals that ultimately respond to the external sulfate supply. These cDNAs represent the identification of plant members of a family of related sulfate transporter proteins whose sequences exhibit significant amino acid conservation in filamentous fungi, yeast, plants, and mammals. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:7568135

  15. Cohabiting family members share microbiota with one another and with their dogs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Se Jin; Lauber, Christian; Costello, Elizabeth K; Lozupone, Catherine A; Humphrey, Gregory; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Caporaso, J Gregory; Knights, Dan; Clemente, Jose C; Nakielny, Sara; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Fierer, Noah; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Human-associated microbial communities vary across individuals: possible contributing factors include (genetic) relatedness, diet, and age. However, our surroundings, including individuals with whom we interact, also likely shape our microbial communities. To quantify this microbial exchange, we surveyed fecal, oral, and skin microbiota from 60 families (spousal units with children, dogs, both, or neither). Household members, particularly couples, shared more of their microbiota than individuals from different households, with stronger effects of co-habitation on skin than oral or fecal microbiota. Dog ownership significantly increased the shared skin microbiota in cohabiting adults, and dog-owning adults shared more ‘skin’ microbiota with their own dogs than with other dogs. Although the degree to which these shared microbes have a true niche on the human body, vs transient detection after direct contact, is unknown, these results suggest that direct and frequent contact with our cohabitants may significantly shape the composition of our microbial communities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00458.001 PMID:23599893

  16. Evolutionary study of vertebrate and invertebrate members of the dystrophin and utrophin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.G.; Nicholson, L.; Bobrow, M. [Paediatric Research Unit, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Vertebrates express two members of the dystrophin gene family. The prototype, dystrophin, is expressed in muscle and neural tissue, and is defective in the human disorders Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD). The dystrophin homologue utrophin is more generally expressed but has not yet been associated with a genetic disorder. The function of neither protein is clear. A comparison of human utrophin with the known dystrophins (human, mouse, chicken, Torpedo) suggests that dystrophin and utrophin diverged before the vertebrate radiation. We have used reverse-transcript PCR (RT-PCR) directed by degenerate primers to characterize dystrophin and utrophin transcripts from a range of vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Our results suggest that the duplication leading to distinct dystrophin and utrophin genes occurred close to the point of divergence of urochordates from the cephalochordate-vertebrate lineage. This divergence may have occurred to fulfill a novel role which arose at this point, or may reflect a need for separate regulation of the neuromuscular and other functions of the ancient dystrophin. Our data include sequences of the first non-human utrophins to be characterized, and show these to be substantially more divergent than their cognate dystrophins. In addition, our results provide a large body of information regarding the tolerance of amino acid positions in the cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains to substitution. This will aid the interpretations of DMD and BMD missense mutations in these regions.

  17. The tubulin cofactor C family member TBCCD1 orchestrates cytoskeletal filament formation.

    PubMed

    André, Jane; Harrison, Stephanie; Towers, Katie; Qi, Xin; Vaughan, Sue; McKean, Paul G; Ginger, Michael L

    2013-12-01

    TBCCD1 is an enigmatic member of the tubulin-binding cofactor C (TBCC) family of proteins required for mother-daughter centriole linkage in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and nucleus-centrosome-Golgi linkage in mammalian cells. Loss of these linkages has severe morphogenetic consequences, but the mechanism(s) through which TBCCD1 contributes to cell organisation is unknown. In the African sleeping sickness parasite Trypanosoma brucei a microtubule-dominant cytoskeleton dictates cell shape, influencing strongly the positioning and inheritance patterns of key intracellular organelles. Here, we show the trypanosome orthologue of TBCCD1 is found at multiple locations: centrioles, the centriole-associated Golgi 'bi-lobe', and the anterior end of the cell body. Loss of Trypanosoma brucei TBCCD1 results in disorganisation of the structurally complex bi-lobe architecture and loss of centriole linkage to the single unit-copy mitochondrial genome (or kinetoplast) of the parasite. We therefore identify TBCCD1 as an essential protein associated with at least two filament-based structures in the trypanosome cytoskeleton. The last common ancestor of trypanosomes, animals and green algae was arguably the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes. On the basis of our observations, and interpretation of published data, we argue for an unexpected co-option of the TBCC domain for an essential non-tubulin-related function at an early point during evolution of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. PMID:24101722

  18. Differential Expression of Two Novel Members of the Tomato Ethylene-Receptor Family

    PubMed Central

    Tieman, Denise M.; Klee, Harry J.

    1999-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene regulates many aspects of plant growth, development, and environmental responses. Much of the developmental regulation of ethylene responses in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) occurs at the level of hormone sensitivity. In an effort to understand the regulation of ethylene responses, we isolated and characterized tomato genes with sequence similarity to the Arabidopsis ETR1 (ethylene response 1) ethylene receptor. Previously, we isolated three genes that exhibit high similarity to ETR1 and to each other. Here we report the isolation of two additional genes, LeETR4 and LeETR5, that are only 42% and 40% identical to ETR1, respectively. Although the amino acids known to be involved in ethylene binding are conserved, LeETR5 lacks the histidine within the kinase domain that is predicted to be phosphorylated. This suggests that histidine kinase activity is not necessary for an ethylene response, because mutated forms of both LeETR4 and LeETR5 confer dominant ethylene insensitivity in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. Expression analysis indicates that LeETR4 accounts for most of the putative ethylene-receptor mRNA present in reproductive tissues, but, like LeETR5, it is less abundant in vegetative tissues. Taken together, ethylene perception in tomato is potentially quite complex, with at least five structurally divergent, putative receptor family members exhibiting significant variation in expression levels throughout development. PMID:10318694

  19. Mice Lacking the SLAM Family Member CD84 Display Unaltered Platelet Function in Hemostasis and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sebastian; Braun, Attila; Pozgaj, Rastislav; Morowski, Martina; Vögtle, Timo; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelets are anuclear cell fragments derived from bone marrow megakaryocytes that safeguard vascular integrity by forming thrombi at sites of vascular injury. Although the early events of thrombus formation—platelet adhesion and aggregation—have been intensively studied, less is known about the mechanisms and receptors that stabilize platelet-platelet interactions once a thrombus has formed. One receptor that has been implicated in this process is the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family member CD84, which can undergo homophilic interactions and becomes phosphorylated upon platelet aggregation. Objective The role of CD84 in platelet physiology and thrombus formation was investigated in CD84-deficient mice. Methods and Results We generated CD84-deficient mice and analyzed their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Cd84?/? platelets exhibited normal activation and aggregation responses to classical platelet agonists. Furthermore, CD84 deficiency did not affect integrin-mediated clot retraction and spreading of activated platelets on fibrinogen. Notably, also the formation of stable three-dimensional thrombi on collagen-coated surfaces under flow ex vivo was unaltered in the blood of Cd84?/? mice. In vivo, Cd84?/? mice exhibited unaltered hemostatic function and arterial thrombus formation. Conclusion These results show that CD84 is dispensable for thrombus formation and stabilization, indicating that its deficiency may be functionally compensated by other receptors or that it may be important for platelet functions different from platelet-platelet interactions. PMID:25551754

  20. Characterization of an M28 metalloprotease family member residing in the yeast vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Karen A.; Wytiaz, Victoria A.; Ast, Tslil; Schuldiner, Maya; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The systematic and complete characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome and proteome has been stalled in some cases by misannotated genes. One such gene is YBR074W, which was initially annotated as two independent open reading frames (ORFs). We now report on Ybr074, a metalloprotease family member that was initially predicted to reside in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Ybr074 may be an ER quality control protease. Instead, indirect immunofluorescence images indicate that Ybr074 is a vacuolar protein, and by employing protease protection assays, we demonstrate that a conserved M28 metalloprotease domain is oriented within the lumen. Involvement of Ybr074 in ER protein quality control was ruled out by examining the stabilities of several well-characterized substrates in strains lacking Ybr074. Finally, using a proteomic approach, we show that disrupting Ybr074 function affects the levels of select factors implicated in vacuolar trafficking and osmoregulation. Together, our data indicate that Ybr074 is the only multi-spanning vacuolar membrane protease found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23679341

  1. TALL-1 is a novel member of the TNF family that is down-regulated by mitogens

    E-print Network

    Hu, Wen-Hui

    and FasL/ApoL. This search identified multiple EST clones that encode two different human genes. We have the identification and cloning of a novel TNF family member that has been designated as TALL-1. TALL-1 is a 285-aminoBank EST database with the TBLASTN program for genes homologous to the extracellular domains of human TNF

  2. Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of signaling proteins control cell fates and proliferation during animal development in

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    450 Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of signaling proteins control cell fates and proliferation cell nevus syndrome CBP CREB-binding protein Ci Cubitus interruptus Cos2 Costal 2 Fu Fused Hh Hedgehog NP-C Niemann­Pick Type C disease PKA protein kinase A Ptc Patched Shh Sonic hedgehog Smo Smoothened

  3. The process of recovery of people with mental illness: The perspectives of patients, family members and care providers: Part 1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sylvie Noiseux; Denise Tribble St-Cyr; Ellen Corin; Pierre-Luc St-Hilaire; Raymond Morissette; Claude Leclerc; Danielle Fleury; Luc Vigneault; Francine Gagnier

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is a qualitative design study that examines points of divergence and convergence in the perspectives on recovery of 36 participants or 12 triads. Each triad comprising a patient, a family member\\/friend, a care provider and documents the procedural, analytic of triangulating perspectives as a means of understanding the recovery process which is illustrated by four case studies. Variations

  4. Nucleotide sequence and genome organization of Dweet mottle virus and its relationship to members of the family Betaflexiviridae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nucleotide sequence of Dweet mottle virus (DMV) was determined and compared to sequences of members of the family Alpha- and Beta-flexiviridae. The DMV genome has 8747 nucleotides (nt) excluding the poly-(A) tail at the 3’ end of the genome. The overall G+C content of DMV genomic RNA is 40%. D...

  5. Molecular Cell, Vol. 2, 163171, August, 1998, Copyright 1998 by Cell Press Direct Binding of CDC20 Protein Family Members

    E-print Network

    Fang, Guowei

    20 Protein Family Members Activates the Anaphase-Promoting Complex in Mitosis and G1 Biochemical further ubiquitins to the ubiquiti-mitosis. We show that APC is activated during mitosis nated substrate as mediated destruction of anaphase inhibitors, Pds1p inwell as its bindingto APC peak in mitosis and decrease

  6. Evolutionary relationship of the members of the sulphur-rich hordein family revealed by common antigenic determinants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. B. Rechinger; O. V. Bougri; V. Cameron-Mills

    1993-01-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies raised against an enriched C hordein fraction have been characterized in detail and were found to be specific for the members of the sulphur-rich hordein family. Two antibodies specific for B hordein polypeptides were identified, one of which reacted predominantly with CNBr cleavage class III polypeptides. ?1 hordein was recognized by two antibodies, of which one also

  7. Fathers' Forgiveness as a Moderator between Perceived Unfair Treatment by a Family of Origin Member and Anger with Own Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yu-Rim; Enright, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how forgiveness mediates and moderates between fathers' perceived unfair treatment (PUT) from a family of origin member and anger with the child (AWC). Eighty married fathers who have at least one child between the ages of 2 and 7 years individually completed the Opening Questionnaire, the Enright Forgiveness Inventory, the…

  8. Growing Sweet Potatoes in New Sweetpotatoes (Ipomea batatas) are members of the morning glory (Convolvulaceae) family. The sweet-

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    glory (Convolvulaceae) family. The sweet- potato is not related to the Irish potato, which belongs Irish potatoes. Slips can be purchased from many seed companies or other plant suppliers. You can startGrowing Sweet Potatoes in New Hampshire Sweetpotatoes (Ipomea batatas) are members of the morning

  9. Long-Term Outcomes of War-Related Death of Family Members in Kosovar Civilian War Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morina, Nexhmedin; Reschke, Konrad; Hofmann, Stefan G.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to war-related experiences can comprise a broad variety of experiences and the very nature of certain war-related events has generally been neglected. To examine the long-term outcomes of war-related death of family members, the authors investigated the prevalence rates of major depressive episode (MDE), anxiety disorders, and quality of…

  10. Differential expression of three members of the multidomain adhesion CCp family in babesia bigemina, babesia bovis and theileria equi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the CCp protein family have been previously described to be expressed on gametocytes of apicomplexan Plasmodium parasites. Knocking out Plasmodium CCp genes blocks the development of the parasite in the mosquito vector, making the CCp proteins potential targets for the development of a tr...

  11. Members of the tomato LeEIL (EIN3-like) gene family are functionally redundant and regulate ethylene responses

    E-print Network

    Klee, Harry J.

    Members of the tomato LeEIL (EIN3-like) gene family are functionally redundant and regulate. * For correspondence (fax +1 352 846 2063; e-mail hjklee@mail.ifas.u¯.edu). Summary The plant hormone ethylene regulates many aspects of growth, development and responses to the environment. The Arabidopsis ETHYLENE

  12. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A NOVEL WHITEFLY-TRANSMITTED MEMBER OF THE FAMILY POTYVIRIDAE ISOLATED FROM CUCURBITS IN FLORIDA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel whitefly-transmitted member of the family Potyviridae was isolated from a squash plant (Cucurbita pepo) with vein yellowing symptoms in Florida. The virus, for which the name Squash vein yellowing virus (SqVYV) is proposed, has flexuous rod-shaped particles of ~840 nm in length. Koch’s pos...

  13. How to Help Your Family Member or Friend Be an Alcohol-Free Mother-to-Be

    MedlinePLUS

    ... r t n e r s / HTB.01.04_Fe DHHS Publication No. (SMA)-3978 Printed 2004 PHD1085 ... your family member or friend HTB.01.04_Fe 12/13/04 11:45 AM Page 1 ... about having a healthy baby. HTB.01.04_Fe 12/13/04 11:45 AM Page 2

  14. The pain experience of cognitively impaired nursing home residents: Perceptions of family members and certified nursing assistants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet C. Mentes; Julie Teer; Mary P. Cadogan

    2004-01-01

    Pain in cognitively impaired nursing home (NH) elders is difficult to detect. We report the results of the qualitative interview portion of a larger study that characterized the pain experience of cognitively impaired NH residents. Interviews were conducted with 16 family members or friends and 11 certified nursing assistants (CNAs) of 20 cognitively impaired NH residents experiencing pain. Analysis of

  15. Applying the 5-Step Method to Children and Affected Family Members: Opportunities and Challenges within Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwin, Judith

    2010-01-01

    The main aim of this article is to consider how the 5-Step Method could be developed to meet the needs of affected family members (AFMs) with children under the age of 18. This would be an entirely new development. This article examines opportunities and challenges within practice and policy and makes suggestions on how the Method could be taken…

  16. Heterodimerization and functional interaction between EGF receptor family members: a new signaling paradigm with implications for breast cancer research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Shelton Earp; Thomas L. Dawson; Xiong Li; Hong Yu

    1995-01-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) and HER2 are members of a growth factor receptor family. Overexpression of either protein in advanced breast cancer correlates with poor prognosis. EGF stimulates growth by binding to EGFR, activating the receptor's intracellular tyrosine kinase. The initial consequence is phosphorylation of specific tyrosine-containing sequences in the receptor's carboxyl terminus. These phosphotyrosines serve as high affinity recognition

  17. New Constraints on the Asteroid 298 Baptistina, the Alleged Family Member of the K/T Impactor

    E-print Network

    Daniel J. Majaess; David Higgins; Larry A. Molnar; Melissa J. Haegert; David J. Lane; David G. Turner; Inga Nielsen

    2008-11-02

    In their study Bottke et al. (2007) suggest that a member of the Baptistina asteroid family was the probable source of the K/T impactor which ended the reign of the Dinosaurs 65 Myr ago. Knowledge of the physical and material properties pertaining to the Baptistina asteroid family are, however, not well constrained. In an effort to begin addressing the situation, data from an international collaboration of observatories were synthesized to determine the rotational period of the family's largest member, asteroid 298 Baptistina (P_r = 16.23+-0.02 hrs). Discussed here are aspects of the terrestrial impact delivery system, implications arising from the new constraints, and prospects for future work.

  18. Leukotoxicity of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans in generalized aggressive periodontitis in Brazilians and their family members

    PubMed Central

    SILVEIRA, Virginia Régia Souza; NOGUEIRA, Márcia Viana Bessa; NOGUEIRA, Nádia Accioly Pinto; LIMA, Vilma; FURLANETO, Flávia Aparecida Chaves; REGO, Rodrigo Otávio

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the leukotoxin promoter types of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans clones in subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) and in their family members (FM). Material and Methods Thirty-five patients with GAgP (33.9±7.1 years), 33 of their FM (22.8±11.4 years), and 41 patients with chronic periodontitis (CP) (44.1±9.4 years) were clinically analyzed using the plaque index, gingival index, probing depth (PD), and clinical attachment level (CAL). Subgingival biofilm samples were collected from four interproximal periodontal sites (>PD and >CAL) of each patient. The presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans and its leukotoxic clone was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results A. actinomycetemcomitans was observed in 23 (51.1%) GAgP patients and 16 (30.1%) CP patients. Thirty-seven (94.8%) patients showed minimally leukotoxic strains and 2 (5.1%) showed highly leukotoxic strains. In the FM group, 10 (30.3%) had aggressive periodontitis (AgP), 12 (36.3%) had CP, 11 (33.3%) were periodontally healthy or had gingivitis, and 12.2% were A. actinomycetemcomitans positive. Greater full mouth PD and CAL were observed in GAgP patients positive for the bacteria than those negative for it (p<;0.05), and the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans positively correlated with GAgP (Odds ratio, 3.1; confidence interval, 1.4-7.0; p=0.009). Conclusions The presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans was associated with the clinical condition of GAgP, with most patients exhibiting a generalized form of the disease and minimally leukotoxic clones. Most of the relatives of GAgP patients presented either CP or AgP. PMID:24212989

  19. Expression of the ammonia transporter family member, Rh B Glycoprotein, in the human kidney.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Handlogten, Mary E; Whitehill, Florence; Osis, Gunars; Croker, Byron P; Clapp, William L; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2013-04-01

    The ammonia transporter family member, Rh B Glycoprotein (RhBG/Rhbg), is essential for ammonia transport by the rodent kidney, but in the human kidney mRNA but not protein expression has been reported. Because ammonia transport is fundamental for acid-base homeostasis, the current study addressed RhBG expression in the human kidney. Two distinct RhBG mRNA sequences have been reported, with different numbers of consecutive cytosines at nt1265 and thus encoding different carboxy-tails. Sequencing the region of difference in both human kidney and liver mRNA showed eight sequential cytosines, not seven as in some reports. Knowing the correct mRNA sequence for RhBG, we then assessed RhBG protein expression using antibodies against the correct amino acid sequence. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated RhBG protein expression in human kidney and immunohistochemistry identified basolateral RhBG in connecting segment (CNT) and the cortical and outer medullary collecting ducts. Colocalization of RhBG with multiple cell-specific markers demonstrated that that CNT cells and collecting duct type A intercalated cells express high levels of RhBG, and type B intercalated cells and principal cells do not express detectable RhBG. Thus, these studies identify the correct mRNA and thus protein sequence for human RhBG and show that the human kidney expresses basolateral RhBG protein in CNT, type A intercalated cells, and non-A, non-B cells. We conclude that RhBG can mediate an important role in human renal ammonia transport. PMID:23324176

  20. Crystal structure of Aspergillus niger isopullulanase, a member of glycoside hydrolase family 49.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Masahiro; Koide, Atsushi; Yamamura, Akihiro; Akeboshi, Hiromi; Yoshida, Hiromi; Kamitori, Shigehiro; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Tonozuka, Takashi

    2008-02-01

    An isopullulanase (IPU) from Aspergillus niger ATCC9642 hydrolyzes alpha-1,4-glucosidic linkages of pullulan to produce isopanose. Although IPU does not hydrolyze dextran, it is classified into glycoside hydrolase family 49 (GH49), major members of which are dextran-hydrolyzing enzymes. IPU is highly glycosylated, making it difficult to obtain its crystal. We used endoglycosidase H(f) to cleave the N-linked oligosaccharides of IPU, and we here determined the unliganded and isopanose-complexed forms of IPU, both solved at 1.7-A resolution. IPU is composed of domains N and C joined by a short linker, with electron density maps for 11 or 12 N-acetylglucosamine residues per molecule. Domain N consists of 13 beta-strands and forms a beta-sandwich. Domain C, where the active site is located, forms a right-handed beta-helix, and the lengths of the pitches of each coil of the beta-helix are similar to those of GH49 dextranase and GH28 polygalacturonase. The entire structure of IPU resembles that of a GH49 enzyme, Penicillium minioluteum dextranase (Dex49A), despite a difference in substrate specificity. Compared with the active sites of IPU and Dex49A, the amino acid residues participating in subsites +2 and +3 are not conserved, and the glucose residues of isopanose bound to IPU completely differ in orientation from the corresponding glucose residues of isomaltose bound to Dex49A. The shape of the catalytic cleft characterized by the seventh coil of the beta-helix and a loop from domain N appears to be critical in determining the specificity of IPU for pullulan. PMID:18155243

  1. Trichinella spiralis: genome database searches for the presence and immunolocalization of protein disulphide isomerase family members.

    PubMed

    Freitas, C P; Clemente, I; Mendes, T; Novo, C

    2014-12-01

    The formation of nurse cells in host muscle cells during Trichinella spiralis infection is a key step in the infective mechanism. Collagen trimerization is set up via disulphide bond formation, catalysed by protein disulphide isomerase (PDI). In T. spiralis, some PDI family members have been identified but no localization is described and no antibodies specific for T. spiralis PDIs are available. In this work, computational approaches were used to search for non-described PDIs in the T. spiralis genome database and to check the cross-reactivity of commercial anti-human antibodies with T. spiralis orthologues. In addition to a previously described PDI (PDIA2), endoplasmic reticulum protein (ERp57/PDIA3), ERp72/PDIA4, and the molecular chaperones calreticulin (CRT), calnexin (CNX) and immunoglobulin-binding protein/glucose-regulated protein (BIP/GRP78), we identified orthologues of the human thioredoxin-related-transmembrane proteins (TMX1, TMX2 and TMX3) in the genome protein database, as well as ERp44 (PDIA10) and endoplasmic reticulum disulphide reductase (ERdj5/PDIA19). Immunocytochemical staining of paraffin sections of muscle infected by T. spiralis enabled us to localize some orthologues of the human PDIs (PDIA3 and TMX1) and the chaperone GRP78. A theoretical three-dimensional model for T. spiralis PDIA3 was constructed. The localization and characteristics of the predicted linear B-cell epitopes and amino acid sequence of the immunogens used for commercial production of anti-human PDIA3 antibodies validated the use of these antibodies for the immunolocalization of T. spiralis PDIA3 orthologues. These results suggest that further study of the role of the PDIs and chaperones during nurse cell formation is desirable. PMID:25475092

  2. NG2, a member of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans family mediates the inflammatory response of activated microglia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Q; Lu, J; Huo, Y; Baby, N; Ling, E A; Dheen, S T

    2010-01-20

    Activation of microglial cells, the resident immune cells of the CNS causes neurotoxicity through the release of a wide array of inflammatory mediators including proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen species. In this study, we have investigated the expression of NG2 (also known as CSPG4), one of the members of transmembrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans family, in microglial cells and its role on inflammatory reaction of microglia by analyzing the expression of the proinflammation cytokines (interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)), chemokines (stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha and monocyte chemotactic protein-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). NG2 expression was not detectable in microglial cells expressing OX-42 in the brains of 1-day old postnatal rat pups and adult rats; it was, however, induced in activated microglial cells in pups and adult rats injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In vitro analysis further confirmed that LPS induced the expression of NG2 in primary microglial cells and this was inhibited by dexamethasone. It has been well demonstrated that LPS induces the expression of iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines in microglia. However in this study, LPS did not induce the mRNA expression of iNOS and cytokines including IL-1beta, and TNF-alpha in microglial cells transfected with CSPG4 siRNA. On the contrary, mRNA expression of chemokines such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1alpha) was significantly increased in LPS-activated microglial cells after CSPG4 siRNA transfection in comparison with the control. The above results indicate that NG2 mediates the induction of iNOS and inflammatory cytokine expression, but not the chemokine expression in activated microglia. PMID:19878709

  3. A Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein with a high activity against members of the family Noctuidae.

    PubMed

    Lambert, B; Buysse, L; Decock, C; Jansens, S; Piens, C; Saey, B; Seurinck, J; Van Audenhove, K; Van Rie, J; Van Vliet, A; Peferoen, M

    1996-01-01

    The full characterization of a novel insecticidal crystal protein, named Cry9Ca1 according to the revised nomenclature for Cry proteins, from Bacillus thuringiensis serovar tolworthi is reported. The crystal protein has 1,157 amino acids and a molecular mass of 129.8 kDa. It has the typical features of the Lepidoptera-active crystal proteins such as five conserved sequence blocks. Also, it is truncated upon trypsin digestion to a toxic fragment of 68.7 kDa by removal of 43 amino acids at the N terminus and the complete C-terminal half after conserved sequence block 5. The 68.7-kDa fragment is further degraded to a nontoxic 55-kDa fragment. The crystal protein has a fairly broad spectrum of activity against lepidopteran insects, including members of the families Pyralidae, Plutellidae, Sphingidae, and Noctuidae. A 50% lethal concentration of less than 100 ng/cm2 of diet agar was found for diamondback moth, European corn borer, cotton bollworm, and beet armyworm. It is the first insecticidal crystal protein with activity against cutworms. No activity was observed against some beetles, such as Colorado potato beetle. The protein recognizes a receptor different from that recognized by Cry1Ab5 in Ostrinia nubilalis and Plutella xylostella. In Spodoptera exigua and P. xylostella, it binds to a receptor which is also recognized by Cry1Cax but with a lower affinity. In these insects, Cry1Cax probably binds with a higher affinity to an additional receptor which is not recognized by Cry9Ca1. Elimination of a trypsin cleavage site which is responsible for the degradation to a nontoxic fragment did result in protease resistance but not in increased toxicity against O. nubilalis. PMID:8572715

  4. Geothermomicrobium terrae gen. nov., sp. nov., a novel member of the family Thermoactinomycetaceae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, En-Min; Yu, Tian-Tian; Liu, Lan; Ming, Hong; Yin, Yi-Rui; Dong, Lei; Tseng, Min; Nie, Guo-Xing; Li, Wen-Jun

    2014-09-01

    Strains YIM 77562(T) and YIM 77580, two novel Gram-staining-positive, filamentous bacterial isolates, were recovered from the Rehai geothermal field, Tengchong, Yunnan province, south-west China. Good growth was observed at 50-55 °C and pH 7.0. Aerial mycelium was absent on all media tested. Substrate mycelium was well-developed, long and moderately flexuous, and formed abundant, single, warty, ornamented endospores. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains indicated that they belong to the family Thermoactinomycetaceae. Similarity levels between the 16S rRNA gene sequences of the two strains and those of type strains of members of the Thermoactinomycetaceae were 88.33-93.24?%; the highest sequence similarity was with Hazenella coriacea DSM 45707(T). In both strains, the predominant menaquinone was MK-7, the diagnostic diamino acid was meso-diaminopimelic acid and the major cellular fatty acids were iso-C14?:?0, iso-C15?:?0 and iso-C16?:?0. The major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmethylethanolamine, unidentified polar lipids and unidentified phospholipids. The genomic DNA G+C contents of strains YIM 77562(T) and YIM 77580 were 45.5 and 44.2 mol%, respectively. DNA-DNA relatedness data suggest that the two isolates represent a single species. Based on phylogenetic analyses and physiological and biochemical characteristics, it is proposed that the two strains represent a single novel species in a new genus, Geothermomicrobium terrae gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of Geothermomicrobium terrae is YIM 77562(T) (?=?CCTCC AA 2011022(T)?=?JCM 18057(T)). PMID:24907264

  5. In[IO3](OH)2 - New member of hydrous and anhydrous iodate family with indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belokoneva, E. L.; Dimitrova, O. V.; Volkov, A. S.

    2014-08-01

    A new indium iodate hydrate In[IO3](OH)2 was synthesized by the hydrothermal methods. Single crystal X-ray diffraction revealed centrosymmetric Pnma space group. [IO3]-groups have typical umbrella-like configuration: iodine atom and three oxygens with I-O distances ?1.8 Å. In-octahedra have 4 equatorial OH-groups and 2 apical O-atoms of 2 [IO3]-groups and are connected into the layers via OH-groups. It is found that indium iodate family without any other metals is a regular row of compounds: anhydrous In[IO3]3, one hydrated In[IO3]2(OH)·H2O, new two hydrated In[IO3](OH)2 and “end member” represented by three hydrated hydroxide In(OH)3. Chemical relations are parallel to the structural: In-octahedral framework in In-hydroxide, In-octahedral layer as a fragment of the framework, In-octahedral chain as a fragment of the layer, isolated In-octahedra as a fragment of the chain with no In-octahedral condensation via vertices but only via [IO3]-groups in anhydrous In-iodate. If alkali metals are introduced in anhydrous In-iodates, their influence is different. Large metals as K, Rb, Cs hinder condensation of {In[IO3]6}3- blocks which are isolated in the structures whereas smaller Li, Na metals allows condensation up to bands {In[IO3]4}1-?. Octahedral chains selected in hydrated In-iodates are similar to chains in nonlinear optical compound TiO[IO3]2. The reasons of polarity or non-polarity and possible elements substitutions promising for properties are discussed.

  6. Claudin 13, a Member of the Claudin Family Regulated in Mouse Stress Induced Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Brass, Andy; Noyes, Harry; Kemp, Steve; Naessens, Jan; Tassabehji, May

    2010-01-01

    Mammals are able to rapidly produce red blood cells in response to stress. The molecular pathways used in this process are important in understanding responses to anaemia in multiple biological settings. Here we characterise the novel gene Claudin 13 (Cldn13), a member of the Claudin family of tight junction proteins using RNA expression, microarray and phylogenetic analysis. We present evidence that Cldn13 appears to be co-ordinately regulated as part of a stress induced erythropoiesis pathway and is a mouse-specific gene mainly expressed in tissues associated with haematopoietic function. CLDN13 phylogenetically groups with its genomic neighbour CLDN4, a conserved tight junction protein with a putative role in epithelial to mesenchymal transition, suggesting a recent duplication event. Mechanisms of mammalian stress erythropoiesis are of importance in anaemic responses and expression microarray analyses demonstrate that Cldn13 is the most abundant Claudin in spleen from mice infected with Trypanosoma congolense. In mice prone to anaemia (C57BL/6), its expression is reduced compared to strains which display a less severe anaemic response (A/J and BALB/c) and is differentially regulated in spleen during disease progression. Genes clustering with Cldn13 on microarrays are key regulators of erythropoiesis (Tal1, Trim10, E2f2), erythrocyte membrane proteins (Rhd and Gypa), associated with red cell volume (Tmcc2) and indirectly associated with erythropoietic pathways (Cdca8, Cdkn2d, Cenpk). Relationships between genes appearing co-ordinately regulated with Cldn13 post-infection suggest new insights into the molecular regulation and pathways involved in stress induced erythropoiesis and suggest a novel, previously unreported role for claudins in correct cell polarisation and protein partitioning prior to erythroblast enucleation. PMID:20844758

  7. Stigma: a Unique Source of Distress for Family Members of Individuals with Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Anjana; Lucksted, Alicia; Medoff, Deborah; Fang, Li Juan; Dixon, Lisa

    2014-08-29

    To distinguish the impact of mental illness stigma from that of other negative caregiving experiences, this study examined the unique relationships between stigma and caregiver/family functioning. Adult relatives (n?=?437) of individuals with mental illness completed questionnaires regarding caregiving experiences, distress, empowerment, and family functioning, as part of a larger study. Regression analyses examined the relationship between stigma and caregiver/family variables, while controlling for other negative caregiving experiences. Stigma was uniquely associated with caregiver distress, empowerment, and family functioning. Mental illness stigma is a potent source of distress for families and an important target of family services. PMID:25168187

  8. Seawi—a sea urchin piwi/argonaute family member is a component of MT-RNP complexes

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUEZ, ALEXIS J.; SEIPEL, SUSAN A.; HAMILL, DANIELLE R.; ROMANCINO, DANIELE P.; DI CARLO, MARTA; SUPRENANT, KATHY A.; BONDER, EDWARD M.

    2005-01-01

    The piwi/argonaute family of proteins is involved in key developmental processes such as stem cell maintenance and axis specification through molecular mechanisms that may involve RNA silencing. Here we report on the cloning and characterization of the sea urchin piwi/argonaute family member seawi. Seawi is a major component of microtubule-ribonucleoprotein (MT-RNP) complexes isolated from two different species of sea urchin, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Paracentrotus lividus. Seawi co-isolates with purified ribosomes, cosediments with 80S ribosomes in sucrose density gradients, and binds microtubules. Seawi possesses the RNA binding motif common to piwi family members and binds P. lividus bep4 mRNA, a transcript that co-isolates with MT-RNP complexes and whose translation product has been shown to play a role in patterning the animal–vegetal axis. Indirect immunofluorescence studies localized seawi to the cortex of unfertilized eggs within granule-like particles, the mitotic spindle during cell division, and the small micromeres where its levels were enriched during the early cleavage stage. Lastly, we discuss how seawi, as a piwi/argonaute family member, may play a fundamentally important role in sea urchin animal–vegetal axis formation and stem cell maintenance. PMID:15840816

  9. Afamin is a new member of the albumin, alpha-fetoprotein, and vitamin D-binding protein gene family.

    PubMed

    Lichenstein, H S; Lyons, D E; Wurfel, M M; Johnson, D A; McGinley, M D; Leidli, J C; Trollinger, D B; Mayer, J P; Wright, S D; Zukowski, M M

    1994-07-01

    A novel human serum protein with a molecular mass of 87,000 daltons was purified to homogeneity and subjected to amino acid sequence analyses. These sequences were used to design oligonucleotide primers and to isolate a full-length cDNA. The amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA shares strong similarity to albumin family members and shares the characteristic pattern of Cys residues observed in this family. In addition, the gene maps to chromosome 4 as do other members of the albumin gene family. Based upon these observations, we conclude that the 87,000-dalton protein, which we designate afamin (AFM), is the fourth member of the albumin family of proteins. Afamin cDNA was stably transfected into Chinese hamster ovary cells and recombinant protein (rAFM) was purified from conditioned medium. Both rAFM and AFM purified from human serum react with a polyclonal antibody that was raised against a synthetic peptide derived from the deduced amino acid sequence of AFM. PMID:7517938

  10. As the planning for a memorial to Eisenhower moves forward, members of his family raise concerns

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Grinnell, Max

    2012-02-10

    Eisenhower as a Barefoot Boy? Family Objects to a Memorial http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/07/arts/design/eisenhower-memorial-by-frank-gehry-draws-objections-from-family.htmlGehry's design for Eisenhower memorial misses the markhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/realestate/gehrys-design-for-eisenhower-memorial-misses-the-mark/2012/01/23/gIQAy22jVQ_story.htmlA Q&A With Susan Eisenhower About the Fight Over Her Grandfather's Memorialhttp://www.washingtonian.com/blogarticles/people/capitalcomment/22381.htmlIn Defense of Frank Gehryhttp://www.washingtonian.com/blogarticles/people/capitalcomment/22617.htmlDwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commissionhttp://eisenhowermemorial.org/U.S. Commission of Fine Artshttp://www.cfa.gov/Memorials to great men and women can be controversial affairs, and the recent dispute over the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in Washington, DC serves as a reminder of such issues. Another planned memorial is coming under close scrutiny, and once again, the proverbial battleground is in the United States capital. Over the past couple of years, the noted designer and architect Frank Gehry has been working on the design for the memorial to President Dwight D. Eisenhower, and the groundbreaking is scheduled to take place this year on the Washington Mall. The current design features Eisenhower as a young boy in Kansas looking at some of his later accomplishments, with a backdrop of the plains of the Sunflower State. These proposed plans do not sit well with some, including his granddaughter, Susan Eisenhower, and the National Civic Art Society, which remarked that "The statue of Ike as a Kansas farmer-boy mocks the president as cornpone in chief, the supreme allied bumpkin." In January, members of the Eisenhower family made their concerns about the design public, and it remains to be seen whether there might be an extension of the comment period regarding the memorial. The preliminary design has already been approved by the United States Commission of Fine Arts, but it must also be approved by the National Capital Planning Commission. As of this writing, Frank Gehry had yet to offer comment on this recent turn of events and public discussion. The first link leads to a nice article from this Tuesday's New York Times about the proposed memorial to President Eisenhower. The second link will take users to a piece of architectural criticism by Roger K. Lewis, published in the Washington Post. Moving on, the third link will take interested parties to an interview with Susan Eisenhower about the memorial to her grandfather. The fourth link leads to follow-up exchange with Daniel J. Feil, the executive architect for the Eisenhower Memorial Commission over the past six years. The fifth link leads to the website of the Eisenhower Memorial Commission. Here visitors can learn about the commission, the designs for the proposed memorial, and also read press releases. The final link will take visitors to the homepage of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts, where they can learn about the work of the Commission and the ways in which the Commission gives expert advice on "matters of design and aesthetics."

  11. The sodium/iodide symporter NIS is a transcriptional target of the p53-family members in liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Guerrieri, F; Piconese, S; Lacoste, C; Schinzari, V; Testoni, B; Valogne, Y; Gerbal-Chaloin, S; Samuel, D; Bréchot, C; Faivre, J; Levrero, M

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid iodide accumulation via the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS; SLC5A5) has been the basis for the longtime use of radio-iodide in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancers. NIS is also expressed, but poorly functional, in some non-thyroid human cancers. In particular, it is much more strongly expressed in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines than in primary human hepatocytes (PHH). The transcription factors and signaling pathways that control NIS overexpression in these cancers is largely unknown. We identified two putative regulatory clusters of p53-responsive elements (p53REs) in the NIS core promoter, and investigated the regulation of NIS transcription by p53-family members in liver cancer cells. NIS promoter activity and endogenous NIS mRNA expression are stimulated by exogenously expressed p53-family members and significantly reduced by member-specific siRNAs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that the p53–REs clusters in the NIS promoter are differentially occupied by the p53-family members to regulate basal and DNA damage-induced NIS transcription. Doxorubicin strongly induces p53 and p73 binding to the NIS promoter, leading to an increased expression of endogenous NIS mRNA and protein in HCC and CCA cells, but not in PHH. Silencing NIS expression reduced doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in HCC cells, pointing to a possible role of a p53-family-dependent expression of NIS in apoptotic cell death. Altogether, these results indicate that the NIS gene is a direct target of the p53 family and suggests that the modulation of NIS by DNA-damaging agents is potentially exploitable to boost NIS upregulation in vivo. PMID:24052075

  12. Concerted evolution of members of the multisequence family chAB4 located on various nonhomologous chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Assum, G; Pasantes, J; Gläser, B; Schempp, W; Wöhr, G

    1998-01-01

    During the last years it became obvious that a lot of families of long-range repetitive DNA elements are located within the genomes of mammals. The principles underlying the evolution of such families, therefore, may have a greater impact than anticipated on the evolution of the mammalian genome as a whole. One of these families, called chAB4, is represented with about 50 copies within the human and the chimpanzee genomes and with only a few copies in the genomes of gorilla, orang-utan, and gibbon. Members of chAB4 are located on 10 different human chromosomes. FISH of chAB4-specific probes to chromosome preparations of the great apes showed that chAB4 is located, with only one exception, at orthologous places in the human and the chimpanzee genome. About half the copies in the human genome belong to two species-specific subfamilies that evolved after the divergence of the human and the chimpanzee lineages. The analysis of chAB4-specific PCR-products derived from DNA of rodent/human cell hybrids showed that members of the two human-specific subfamilies can be found on 9 of the 10 chAB4-carrying chromosomes. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the members of DNA sequence families can evolve as a unit despite their location at multiple sites on different chromosomes. The concerted evolution of the family members is a result of frequent exchanges of DNA sequences between copies located on different chromosomes. Interchromosomal exchanges apparently take place without greater alterations in chromosome structure. PMID:9434947

  13. Rwdd1, a thymus aging related molecule, is a new member of the intrinsically unstructured protein family.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ning; Chen, Dai; Wang, Li; Duan, Lian; Liu, Shirong; Tang, Long; Liu, Qingfeng; Cui, Lianxian; He, Wei

    2008-10-01

    We had previously identified a novel protein termed Rwdd1 whose expression in thymus is decreased in aged or oxidatively stressed mice. In the present study, we found that Rwdd1 expressed in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells showed a slower migration rate on SDS-PAGE gel. In addition, Rwdd1 was more sensitive to proteinase proteolysis. Furthermore, being a highly acidic protein which contains an RWD domain, Rwdd1 shared a high level of sequence similarity with Gir2, a member of the intrinsically unstructured protein (IUP). These findings suggest that Rwdd1 is a novel member of the IUP family. PMID:18954556

  14. Service and Support Needs of Australian Carers Supporting a Family Member with Disability at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton-Smith, Rosanne; McVilly, Keith R.; Yazbeck, Marie; Parmenter, Trevor R.; Tsutsui, Takako

    2009-01-01

    Background: As part of an international, multicentre project, the service and support needs of Australian family carers were investigated. Method: A sample of 1,390, 448 family carers completed a self-report survey, including an adaptation of the Family Needs Survey (FNS) and several open-ended questions. A mixed method design was used, employing…

  15. 41 CFR 303-70.403 - When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS, must...a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS,...

  16. 41 CFR 303-70.303 - When an immediate family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...immediate family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station OCONUS, must we...immediate family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station OCONUS, must...

  17. 41 CFR 303-70.403 - When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS, must...a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS,...

  18. 41 CFR 303-70.403 - When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS, must...a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS,...

  19. 41 CFR 303-70.403 - When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS, must...a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS,...

  20. 41 CFR 301-31.3 - Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation expense?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation...INVESTIGATIVE EMPLOYEES § 301-31.3 Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and...

  1. 41 CFR 301-31.3 - Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation expense?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation...INVESTIGATIVE EMPLOYEES § 301-31.3 Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and...

  2. 41 CFR 302-11.103 - How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...false How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for which...103 How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for...

  3. 41 CFR 302-11.103 - How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...false How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for which...103 How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for...

  4. 41 CFR 302-4.202 - Are there any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? 302-4.202 Section...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? Yes, per diem for...

  5. 41 CFR 302-11.103 - How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...false How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for which...103 How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for...

  6. 41 CFR 302-4.202 - Are there any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? 302-4.202 Section...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? Yes, per diem for...

  7. 41 CFR 301-31.3 - Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation expense?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation...INVESTIGATIVE EMPLOYEES § 301-31.3 Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and...

  8. 41 CFR 302-4.202 - Are there any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? 302-4.202 Section...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? Yes, per diem for...

  9. 41 CFR 301-31.3 - Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation expense?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation...INVESTIGATIVE EMPLOYEES § 301-31.3 Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and...

  10. 41 CFR 302-11.103 - How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...false How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for which...103 How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for...

  11. 41 CFR 302-4.202 - Are there any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? 302-4.202 Section...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? Yes, per diem for...

  12. 41 CFR 302-4.202 - Are there any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? 302-4.202 Section...any circumstances in which a per diem allowance for my immediate family members is not allowed? Yes, per diem for...

  13. 41 CFR 302-11.103 - How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...true How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for which...103 How will I be reimbursed if I or a member of my immediate family do not hold full title to the property for...

  14. 41 CFR 301-31.3 - Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation expense?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and transportation...INVESTIGATIVE EMPLOYEES § 301-31.3 Are members of my family and I eligible for payment of subsistence and...

  15. Identification of a Testis-Enriched Heat Shock Protein and Fourteen Members of Hsp70 Family in the Swamp Eel

    PubMed Central

    He, Yan; Luo, Majing; Yi, Minhan; Sheng, Yue; Cheng, Yibin; Zhou, Rongjia; Cheng, Hanhua

    2013-01-01

    Background Gonad differentiation is one of the most important developmental events in vertebrates. Some heat shock proteins are associated with gonad development. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the teleost fish and its roles in sex differentiation are poorly understood. Methods and Findings We have identified a testis-enriched heat shock protein Hspa8b2 in the swamp eel using Western blot analysis and Mass Spectrometry (MS). Fourteen Hsp70 family genes were further identified in this species based on transcriptome information. The phylogenetic tree of Hsp70 family was constructed using the Maximum Likelihood method and their expression patterns in the swamp eel gonads were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Conclusion There are fourteen gene members in the Hsp70 family in the swamp eel genome. Hsp70 family, particularly Hspa8, has expanded in the species. One of the family members Hspa8b2 is predominantly expressed in testis of the swamp eel. PMID:23750249

  16. Evolutionary Origin of the Scombridae (Tunas and Mackerels): Members of a Paleogene Adaptive Radiation with 14 Other Pelagic Fish Families

    PubMed Central

    Miya, Masaki; Friedman, Matt; Satoh, Takashi P.; Takeshima, Hirohiko; Sado, Tetsuya; Iwasaki, Wataru; Yamanoue, Yusuke; Nakatani, Masanori; Mabuchi, Kohji; Inoue, Jun G.; Poulsen, Jan Yde; Fukunaga, Tsukasa; Sato, Yukuto; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainties surrounding the evolutionary origin of the epipelagic fish family Scombridae (tunas and mackerels) are symptomatic of the difficulties in resolving suprafamilial relationships within Percomorpha, a hyperdiverse teleost radiation that contains approximately 17,000 species placed in 13 ill-defined orders and 269 families. Here we find that scombrids share a common ancestry with 14 families based on (i) bioinformatic analyses using partial mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences from all percomorphs deposited in GenBank (10,733 sequences) and (ii) subsequent mitogenomic analysis based on 57 species from those targeted 15 families and 67 outgroup taxa. Morphological heterogeneity among these 15 families is so extraordinary that they have been placed in six different perciform suborders. However, members of the 15 families are either coastal or oceanic pelagic in their ecology with diverse modes of life, suggesting that they represent a previously undetected adaptive radiation in the pelagic realm. Time-calibrated phylogenies imply that scombrids originated from a deep-ocean ancestor and began to radiate after the end-Cretaceous when large predatory epipelagic fishes were selective victims of the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction. We name this clade of open-ocean fishes containing Scombridae “Pelagia” in reference to the common habitat preference that links the 15 families. PMID:24023883

  17. Who knows, who cares? Dementia knowledge among nurses, care workers, and family members of people living with dementia.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Andrew; Eccleston, Claire; Annear, Michael; Elliott, Kate-Ellen; Andrews, Sharon; Stirling, Christine; Ashby, Michael; Donohue, Catherine; Banks, Susan; Toye, Christine; McInerney, Fran

    2014-01-01

    The number of people with dementia is increasing rapidly worldwide. Commensurate with population ageing, the use of nursing homes in Australia (known as residential aged care facilities) for individuals with dementia is growing. As a terminal condition, dementia is best managed by instituting a palliative approach to care. A good knowledge of dementia, including its progression and management, among staff and families of people living with dementia is essential for clear decision making and the provision of appropriate care. Yet there is limited information regarding relative levels of dementia knowledge. This paper reports the results of a study that assessed dementia knowledge among these two cohorts using the Dementia Knowledge Assessment Tool; the study surveyed 279 staff members and 164 family members of residents with dementia. Dementia knowledge deficits were evident in both cohorts across a range of areas. It is critical that dementia knowledge deficits are identified and addressed in order to support evidence-based dementia care. PMID:25265739

  18. A pilot study of adaptation of the transtheoretical model to narratives of bereaved family members in the bereavement life review.

    PubMed

    Ando, Michiyo; Tsuda, Akira; Morita, Tatsuya; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sanjo, Makiko; Shima, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to examine the possibility of adaptation of the transtheoretical model (TTM) to narratives from the Bereavement Life Review. Narratives from 19 bereaved family members were recorded, transcribed into sentences, and allocated into stages based on the TTM criteria. Those who lived in fantasy were allocated to the precontemplation stage and who recognized the patient's death but could not adjust to the death were allocated to the contemplation stage. Those who understood the need for changes and had new plans were allocated to the preparation stage, and those who were coping were allocated to the action stage, and those who had confidence to remember the loved one who died were allocated to the maintenance stage. These results provide deeper understanding of a bereaved family member and suggest that a different intervention method may be useful in each stage. PMID:23689366

  19. A novel member of the family Hepeviridae from cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batts, William; Yun, Susan; Hedrick, Ronald; Winton, James

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in 1988, the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line was used to isolate a novel virus from spawning adult trout in the state of California, USA. Termed the cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) virus (CTV), the small, round virus was not associated with disease, but was subsequently found to be present in an increasing number of trout populations in the western USA, likely by a combination of improved surveillance activities and the shipment of infected eggs to new locations. Here, we report that the full length genome of the 1988 Heenan Lake isolate of CTV consisted of 7269 nucleotides of positive-sense, single-stranded RNA beginning with a 5' untranslated region (UTR), followed by three open reading frames (ORFs), a 3' UTR and ending in a polyA tail. The genome of CTV was similar in size and organization to that of Hepatitis E virus (HEV) with which it shared the highest nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities. Similar to the genomes of human, rodent or avian hepeviruses, ORF 1 encoded a large, non-structural polyprotein that included conserved methyltransferase, protease, helicase and polymerase domains, while ORF 2 encoded the structural capsid protein and ORF 3 the phosphoprotein. Together, our data indicated that CTV was clearly a member of the family Hepeviridae, although the level of amino acid sequence identity with the ORFs of mammalian or avian hepeviruses (13-27%) may be sufficiently low to warrant the creation of a novel genus. We also performed a phylogenetic analysis using a 262. nt region within ORF 1 for 63 isolates of CTV obtained from seven species of trout reared in various geographic locations in the western USA. While the sequences fell into two genetic clades, the overall nucleotide diversity was low (less than 8.4%) and many isolates differed by only 1-2 nucleotides, suggesting an epidemiological link. Finally, we showed that CTV was able to form persistently infected cultures of the CHSE-214 cell line that may have use in research on the biology or treatment of hepevirus infections of humans or other animals.

  20. Kinesin Family member 4A: A Potential Predictor for Progression of Human Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Koike, Hirofumi; Higo, Morihiro; Nakashima, Dai; Kouzu, Yukinao; Sakamoto, Yosuke; Ogawara, Katsunori; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Background Kinesin family member 4A (KIF4A), a microtubule-based motor protein, was implicated in regulation of chromosomal structure and kinetochore microtubule dynamics. Considering the functions of KIF4A, we assumed that KIF4A is involved in progression of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) via activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). However, little is known about the relevance of KIF4A in the behavior of OSCC. We investigated the KIF4A expression status and its functional mechanisms in OSCC. Methods The KIF4A expression levels in seven OSCC-derived cells were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses. Using a KIF4A knockdown model, we assessed the expression of (SAC)-related molecules (BUB1, MAD2, CDC20, and cyclin B1), cell-cycle, and cellular proliferation. In addition to in vitro data, the clinical correlation between the KIF4A expression levels in primary OSCCs (n = 106 patients) and the clinicopathologic status by immunohistochemistry (IHC) also were evaluated. Results KIF4A mRNA and protein were up-regulated significantly (P < 0.05) in seven OSCC-derived cells compared with human normal oral keratinocytes. In the KIF4A knockdown cells, SAC activation was observed via increased BUB1 expression on the kinetochores, appropriate kinetochore localization of MAD2, down-regulation of CDC20, up-regulation of cyclin B1, and cell-cycle arrested at G2/M phase. The results showed that cellular proliferation of KIF4A knockdown cells decreased significantly (P < 0.05) compared with control cells. IHC showed that KIF4A expression in primary OSCCs was significantly (P < 0.05) greater than in the normal oral counterparts and that KIF4A-positive OSCCs were correlated closely (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Conclusions Our results proposed for the first time that KIF4A controls cellular proliferation via SAC activation. Therefore, KIF4A might be a key regulator for tumoral progression in OSCCs. PMID:24386490

  1. A new member of the aldo-keto reductase family from the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Rosselli, Luciana K; Oliveira, Cristiano L P; Azzoni, Adriano R; Tada, Susely F S; Catani, Cleide F; Saraiva, Antonio M; Soares, José Sérgio M; Medrano, Francisco J; Torriani, Iris L; Souza, Anete P

    2006-09-15

    The Xylella fastidiosa genome program generated a large number of gene sequences that belong to pathogenicity, virulence and adaptation categories from this important plant pathogen. One of these genes (XF1729) encodes a protein similar to a superfamily of aldo-keto reductase together with a number of structurally and functionally related NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases. In this work, the similar sequence XF1729 from X. fastidiosa was cloned onto the pET32Xa/LIC vector in order to overexpress a recombinant His-tag fusion protein in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The expressed protein in the soluble fraction was purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography (agarose-IDA-Ni resin). Secondary structure contents were verified by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements furnish general structural parameters and provide a strong indication that the protein has a monomeric form in solution. Also, ab initio calculations show that the protein has some similarities with a previously crystallized aldo-keto reductase protein. The recombinant XF1729 purified to homogeneity catalyzed the reduction of dl-glyceraldehyde (K(cat) 2.26s(-1), Km 8.20+/-0.98 mM) and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde (K(cat) 11.74 s(-1), Km 0.14+/-0.04 mM) in the presence of NADPH. The amino acid sequence deduced from XF1729 showed the highest identity (40% or higher) with several functional unknown proteins. Among the identified AKRs, we found approximately 29% of identity with YakC (AKR13), 30 and 28% with AKR11A and AKR11B, respectively. The results establish XF1729 as the new member of AKR family, AKR13B1. Finally, the first characterization by gel filtration chromatography assays indicates that the protein has an elongated shape, which generates an apparent higher molecular weight. The study of this protein is an effort to fight X. fastidiosa, which causes tremendous losses in many economically important plants. PMID:16919232

  2. Functional characterisation of three members of the Vitis vinifera L. carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase gene family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In plants, carotenoids serve as the precursors to C13-norisoprenoids, a group of apocarotenoid compounds with diverse biological functions. Enzymatic cleavage of carotenoids catalysed by members of the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD) family has been shown to produce a number of industrially important volatile flavour and aroma apocarotenoids including ?-ionone, geranylacetone, pseudoionone, ?-ionone and 3-hydroxy-?-ionone in a range of plant species. Apocarotenoids contribute to the floral and fruity attributes of many wine cultivars and are thereby, at least partly, responsible for the “varietal character”. Despite their importance in grapes and wine; carotenoid cleavage activity has only been described for VvCCD1 and the mechanism(s) and regulation of carotenoid catabolism remains largely unknown. Results Three grapevine-derived CCD-encoding genes have been isolated and shown to be functional with unique substrate cleavage capacities. Our results demonstrate that the VvCCD4a and VvCCD4b catalyse the cleavage of both linear and cyclic carotenoid substrates. The expression of VvCCD1, VvCCD4a and VvCCD4b was detected in leaf, flower and throughout berry development. VvCCD1 expression was constitutive, whereas VvCCD4a expression was predominant in leaves and VvCCD4b in berries. A transgenic population with a 12-fold range of VvCCD1 expression exhibited a lack of correlation between VvCCD1 expression and carotenoid substrates and/or apocarotenoid products in leaves, providing proof that the in planta function(s) of VvCCD1 in photosynthetically active tissue is distinct from the in vitro activities demonstrated. The isolation and functional characterisation of VvCCD4a and VvCCD4b identify two additional CCDs that are functional in grapevine. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that the three CCDs are under various levels of control that include gene expression (spatial and temporal), substrate specificity and compartmentalisation that act individually and/or co-ordinately to maintain carotenoid and volatile apocarotenoid levels in plants. Altering the expression of VvCCD1 in a transgenic grapevine population illustrated the divergence between the in vitro enzyme activity and the in planta activity of this enzyme, thereby contributing to the efforts to understand how enzymatic degradation of carotenoids involved in photosynthesis occurs. The identification and functional characterisation of VvCCD4a and VvCCD4b suggest that these enzymes are primarily responsible for catalysing the cleavage of plastidial carotenoids. PMID:24106789

  3. An Anti-Apoptotic Role for the p53 Family Member, p73, During Developmental Neuron Death

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christine D. Pozniak; Stevo Radinovic; Annie Yang; Frank McKeon; David R. Kaplan; Freda D. Miller

    2000-01-01

    p53 plays an essential pro-apoptotic role, a function thought to be shared with its family members p73 and p63. Here, we show that p73 is primarily present in developing neurons as a truncated isoform whose levels are dramatically decreased when sympathetic neurons apoptose after nerve growth factor (NGF) withdrawal. Increased expression of truncated p73 rescues these neurons from apoptosis induced

  4. Heat-Shock–Induced Assembly of Hsp30 Family Members into High Molecular Weight Aggregates in Xenopus laevis Cultured Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicholas W Ohan; Ying Tam; John J Heikkila

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we have examined whether members of the small heat shock protein family, hsp30, were capable of forming heat-induced aggregates in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells. Rate-zonal centrifugation coupled with immunoblot analysis demonstrated the presence of hsp30 aggregates with an estimated sedimentation coefficient of 10-16S. Also, pore exclusion limit electrophoretic analysis of labeled protein from heat-shocked A6

  5. ST2, an IL1R family member, attenuates inflammation and lethality after intestinal ischemia and reperfusion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caio T. Fagundes; Flavio A. Amaral; Adriano L. S. Souza; Angelica T. Vieira; Damo Xu; Foo Y. Liew; Danielle G. Souza; Mauro M. Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion injury is charac- terized by local and systemic inflammation leading to considerable mortality. Previously, we have re- ported that soluble T1\\/ST2 (sST2), a member of the IL-1 receptor gene family, inhibits LPS-in- duced macrophage proinflammatory cytokine pro- duction. Here, we report the therapeutic effect of sST2-Fc in a murine model of intestinal ischemia reperfusion-induced injury. Administration of sST2-Fc

  6. The Proapoptotic Activity of the Bcl2 Family Member Bim Is Regulated by Interaction with the Dynein Motor Complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hamsa Puthalakath; David C. S Huang; Lorraine A O’Reilly; Stephen M King; Andreas Strasser

    1999-01-01

    Bcl-2 family members that have only a single Bcl-2 homology domain, BH3, are potent inducers of apoptosis, and some appear to play a critical role in developmentally programmed cell death. We examined the regulation of the proapoptotic activity of the BH3-only protein Bim. In healthy cells, most Bim molecules were bound to LC8 cytoplasmic dynein light chain and thereby sequestered

  7. Concerns of South Korean Patients and Family Members Affected with Genetic Conditions: A Content Analysis of Internet Website Messages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heejung Kang; Patricia McCarthy Veach; Bonnie S. LeRoy

    2010-01-01

    The genetic counseling profession is expanding globally, and many countries, such as South Korea, are in the early stages\\u000a of developing programs to prepare healthcare professionals specifically trained as genetic counselors. However, little research\\u000a has investigated the concerns of South Korean patients and family members that have genetic conditions. The present study\\u000a assessed their concerns by accessing and analyzing messages

  8. Dickkopf-1 is a member of a new family of secreted proteins and functions in head induction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrei Glinka; Wei Wu; Hajo Delius; A. Paula Monaghan; Claudia Blumenstock; Christof Niehrs

    1998-01-01

    The Spemann organizer in amphibian embryos is a tissue with potent head-inducing activity, the molecular nature of which is unresolved. Here we describe dickkopf-1 (dkk-1), which encodes Dkk-1, a secreted inducer of Spemann's organizer in Xenopus and a member of a new protein family. Injections of mRNA and antibody indicate that dkk-1 is sufficient and necessary to cause head induction.

  9. Cowpox virus encodes a fifth member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family: A soluble, secreted CD30 homologue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne Fanelli Panus; Craig A. Smith; Caroline A. Ray; Terri Davis Smith; Dhavalkumar D. Patel; David J. Pickup

    2002-01-01

    Cowpox virus (Brighton Red strain) possesses one of the largest genomes in the Orthopoxvirus genus. Sequence analysis of a region of the genome that is type-specific for cowpox virus identified a gene, vCD30, encoding a soluble, secreted protein that is the fifth member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family known to be encoded by cowpox virus. The vCD30 protein

  10. Identification and Characterization of Novel Members of the CREG Family, Putative Secreted Glycoproteins Expressed Specifically in Brain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ryota Kunita; Asako Otomo; Joh-E Ikeda

    2002-01-01

    The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes, CREG, is a secreted glycoprotein that enhances differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. Here we report two novel members of the CREG family, human CREG2 and mouse Creg2 cDNAs. The predicted human and mouse protein sequences exhibit 35% identity with CREG protein. Northern blot analyses demonstrate specific CREG2 and Creg2 transcription in brain—in the case

  11. Long-Term Outcomes of War-Related Death of Family Members in Kosovar Civilian War Survivors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nexhmedin Morina; Konrad Reschke; Stefan G. Hofmann

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to war-related experiences can comprise a broad variety of experiences and the very nature of certain war-related events has generally been neglected. To examine the long-term outcomes of war-related death of family members, the authors investigated the prevalence rates of major depressive episode (MDE), anxiety disorders, and quality of life among civilian war survivors with or without war-related death

  12. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis XH/XS-domain proteins indicates overlapping and distinct functions for members of this gene family

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Haroon; Luschnig, Christian

    2014-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is essential for de novo DNA methylation in higher plants, and recent reports established novel elements of this silencing pathway in the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. INVOLVED IN DE NOVO DNA METHYLATION 2 (IDN2) and the closely related FACTOR OF DNA METHYLATION (FDM) are members of a plant-specific family of dsRNA-binding proteins characterized by conserved XH/XS domains and implicated in the regulation of RdDM at chromatin targets. Genetic analyses have suggested redundant as well as non-overlapping activities for different members of the gene family. However, detailed insights into the function of XH/XS-domain proteins are still elusive. By the generation and analysis of higher-order mutant combinations affected in IDN2 and further members of the gene family, we have provided additional evidence for their redundant activity. Distinct roles for members of the XH/XS-domain gene family were indicated by differences in their expression and subcellular localization. Fluorescent protein-tagged FDM genes were expressed either in nuclei or in the cytoplasm, suggestive of activities of XH/XS-domain proteins in association with chromatin as well as outside the nuclear compartment. In addition, we observed altered location of a functional FDM1–VENUS reporter from the nucleus into the cytoplasm under conditions when availability of further FDM proteins was limited. This is suggestive of a mechanism by which redistribution of XH/XS-domain proteins could compensate for the loss of closely related proteins. PMID:24574485

  13. The Combined Functions of Proapoptotic Bcl2 Family Members Bak and Bax Are Essential for Normal Development of Multiple Tissues

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tullia Lindsten; Andrea J Ross; Ayala King; Wei-Xing Zong; Jeffrey C Rathmell; Helena A Shiels; Eugen Ulrich; Katrina G Waymire; Patryce Mahar; Kenneth Frauwirth; Yifeng Chen; Michael Wei; Vicki M Eng; David M Adelman; M. Celeste Simon; Averil Ma; Jeffrey A Golden; Gerard Evan; Stanley J Korsmeyer; Grant R MacGregor; Craig B Thompson

    2000-01-01

    Proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members have been proposed to play a central role in regulating apoptosis. However, mice lacking bax display limited phenotypic abnormalities. As presented here, bak?\\/? mice were found to be developmentally normal and reproductively fit and failed to develop any age-related disorders. However, when Bak-deficient mice were mated to Bax-deficient mice to create mice lacking both genes, the

  14. Differential Involvement of Protein 4.1 Family Members DAL-1 and NF2 in Intracranial and Intraspinal Ependymomas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pratima K. Singh; David H. Gutmann; Christine E. Fuller; Irene F. Newsham; Arie Perry

    2002-01-01

    Ependymomas are malignant CNS neoplasms with highly variable biologic behavior, including a generally better prognosis for intraspinal tumors. Inactivation of the NF2 gene on 22q12 and loss of its protein product, merlin, have been well documented in subsets of meningiomas and ependymomas. DAL-1, a related tumor suppressor and protein 4.1 family member on 18p11.3, has also been recently implicated in

  15. Bcl2 Family Members as Sentinels of Cellular Integrity and Role of Mitochondrial Intermembrane Space Proteins in Apoptotic Cell Death

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nele Festjens; Marjan van Gurp; Geert van Loo; Xavier Saelens; Peter Vandenabeele

    2004-01-01

    In addition to their function as major energy-providing organelles of the cell, mitochondria accomplish a crucial role in apoptosis. The pro-apoptotic BH3-only members of the Bcl-2 family continuously sense the cellular integrity and well-being at various subcellular levels. If these sentinels are induced, released or activated, they converge on the release of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins such as cytochrome c,

  16. Proliferation-associated SNF2-like Gene (PASG): A SNF2 Family Member Altered in Leukemia1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David W. Lee; Kejian Zhang; Zhi-Qiang Ning; Eric H. Raabe; Suzanne Tintner; Regina Wieland; Benjamin J. Wilkins; Julia M. Kim; Ruthann I. Blough; Robert J. Arceci

    To identify genes involved in cell growth and\\/or apoptosis in leukemia, differential display was used to identify mRNAs that showed altered expression levels after cytokine withdrawal from the cytokine-dependent MO7e cell line. Sequence analysis of one transcript that showed a pro- found decrease in expression after cytokine withdrawal revealed it to be a member of the SNF2 family of chromatin

  17. Members of the Arabidopsis Dynamin-Like Gene Family, ADL1, Are Essential for Plant Cytokinesis and Polarized Cell Growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Byung-Ho Kang; James S. Busse; Sebastian Y. Bednarek

    2003-01-01

    Polarized membrane trafficking during plant cytokinesis and cell expansion are critical for plant morphogenesis, yet very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that guide this process. Dynamin and dynamin-related proteins are large GTP binding proteins that are involved in membrane trafficking. Here, we show that two functionally redundant members of the Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein family, ADL1A and ADL1E, are

  18. [Conditioning of community nurse duties towards the patient treated by family doctor--the opinion of family doctor staff members].

    PubMed

    Rogala-Pawelczyk, Grazyna

    2002-01-01

    The team of family doctor is the main link in the basic health care. It consists of community nurses who work according to the plan specifying the health needs of patients. Community nurses fulfil the needs of patients of various age and health conditions. The paper presents a part of studies on the area and activities of community nurses working in the team of family doctor. An attempt was made to answer the following questions: what are the duties of community nurse, what factors make it easy to fulfil the duties and what factors make the work more difficult? The study comprised a few dozen of community nurses and family doctors all over the country. It was carried out from January to April 2001. Two questionnaires were used for community nurses and for family doctors. Medical documentation was also analysed. It gave answers to problem questions: duties of community nurses include: co-operation in diagnosing and treatment, health promotion and education, fulfilment of therapeutic and nursing programme, factors which help to realise the programme include: qualifications, clearly stated duties, equipment, factors which make the work difficult comprise: lack of staff, poor salary, legislation problems, difficulties in self-development, lack of co-operation from patients and their families. No differences in the opinion of both groups on the duties of community nurses were noticed. PMID:17474614

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation of transcript abundance by a conserved member of the tristetraprolin family in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wells, Melissa L; Washington, Onica L; Hicks, Stephanie N; Nobile, Clarissa J; Hartooni, Nairi; Wilson, Gerald M; Zucconi, Beth E; Huang, Weichun; Li, Leping; Fargo, David C; Blackshear, Perry J

    2015-03-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins bind to AU-rich regions in target mRNAs, leading to their deadenylation and decay. Family members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae influence iron metabolism, whereas the single protein expressed in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, regulates cell-cell interactions. In the human pathogen Candida albicans, deep sequencing of mutants lacking the orthologous protein, Zfs1, revealed significant increases (>?1.5-fold) in 156 transcripts. Of these, 113 (72%) contained at least one predicted TTP family member binding site in their 3'UTR, compared with only 3 of 56 (5%) down-regulated transcripts. The zfs1?/? mutant was resistant to 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, perhaps because of increased expression of the potential target transcript encoded by HIS3. Sequences of the proteins encoded by the putative Zfs1 targets were highly conserved among other species within the fungal CTG clade, while the predicted Zfs1 binding sites in these mRNAs often 'disappeared' with increasing evolutionary distance from the parental species. C.?albicans?Zfs1 bound to the ideal mammalian TTP binding site with high affinity, and Zfs1 was associated with target transcripts after co-immunoprecipitation. Thus, the biochemical activities of these proteins in fungi are highly conserved, but Zfs1-like proteins may target different transcripts in each species. PMID:25524641

  20. The ETRAMP Family Member SEP2 Is Expressed throughout Plasmodium berghei Life Cycle and Is Released during Sporozoite Gliding Motility

    PubMed Central

    Currà, Chiara; Di Luca, Marco; Picci, Leonardo; de Sousa Silva Gomes dos Santos, Carina; Siden-Kiamos, Inga; Pace, Tomasino; Ponzi, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The early transcribed membrane proteins ETRAMPs belong to a family of small, transmembrane molecules unique to Plasmodium parasite, which share a signal peptide followed by a short lysine-rich stretch, a transmembrane domain and a variable, highly charged C-terminal region. ETRAMPs are usually expressed in a stage-specific manner. In the blood stages they localize to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane and, in described cases, to vesicle-like structures exported to the host erythrocyte cytosol. Two family members of the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei, uis3 and uis4, localize to secretory organelles of sporozoites and to the parasitophorous membrane vacuole of the liver stages. By the use of specific antibodies and the generation of transgenic lines, we showed that the P. berghei ETRAMP family member SEP2 is abundantly expressed in gametocytes as well as in mosquito and liver stages. In intracellular parasite stages, SEP2 is routed to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane while, in invasive ookinete and sporozoite stages, it localizes to the parasite surface. To date SEP2 is the only ETRAMP protein detected throughout the parasite life cycle. Furthermore, SEP2 is also released during gliding motility of salivary gland sporozoites. A limited number of proteins are known to be involved in this key function and the best characterized, the CSP and TRAP, are both promising transmission-blocking candidates. Our results suggest that ETRAMP members may be viewed as new potential candidates for malaria control. PMID:23840634

  1. RelAp43, a Member of the NF-?B Family Involved in Innate Immune Response against Lyssavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Tangy, Frédéric; Weil, Robert; Bourhy, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    NF-?B transcription factors are crucial for many cellular processes. NF-?B is activated by viral infections to induce expression of antiviral cytokines. Here, we identified a novel member of the human NF-?B family, denoted RelAp43, the nucleotide sequence of which contains several exons as well as an intron of the RelA gene. RelAp43 is expressed in all cell lines and tissues tested and exhibits all the properties of a NF-?B protein. Although its sequence does not include a transactivation domain, identifying it as a class I member of the NF-?B family, it is able to potentiate RelA-mediated transactivation and stabilize dimers comprising p50. Furthermore, RelAp43 stimulates the expression of HIAP1, IRF1, and IFN-? - three genes involved in cell immunity against viral infection. It is also targeted by the matrix protein of lyssaviruses, the agents of rabies, resulting in an inhibition of the NF-?B pathway. Taken together, our data provide the description of a novel functional member of the NF-?B family, which plays a key role in the induction of anti-viral innate immune response. PMID:23271966

  2. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli TdcF, a member of the highly conserved YjgF\\/YER057c\\/UK114 family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia D Burman; Clare EM Stevenson; R Gary Sawers; David M Lawson

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The YjgF\\/YER057c\\/UK114 family of proteins is widespread in nature, but has as yet no clearly defined biological role. Members of the family exist as homotrimers and are characterised by intersubunit clefts that are delineated by well-conserved residues; these sites are likely to be of functional significance, yet catalytic activity has never been detected for any member of this family.

  3. What’s at Stake? Genetic Information from the Perspective of People with Epilepsy and their Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Sara; Zarhin, Dana; Ottman, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that raise risk for epilepsy, and genetic testing for some of these genes is increasingly being used in clinical practice. However, almost no empirical data are available from the perspective of people with epilepsy and their family members about the impact of genetic information and potential benefits and harms of genetic testing. To address this gap we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 40 individuals (22 with epilepsy, 18 unaffected) in the USA from families containing multiple affected individuals who had participated in epilepsy genetics research. The interviews were coded and analyzed using the principles of grounded theory. Several major themes emerged from these interviews. Participants expressed “personal theories of inheritance” that emphasized commonalities among relatives and the idea that disease risk is most shared by family members who share physical or personality traits. Most participants said they would have genetic testing if it were offered. They cited many potential benefits, including learning what caused epilepsy in their family, being better able to care and advocate for children at risk, reducing guilt and blame, providing an increased sense of control, and relieving anxiety in unaffected individuals who test negative. The influence of genetic information on reproduction was a particularly salient theme. Although respondents believed genetic testing would be useful for informing their reproductive choices, they also expressed fear that it could lead to external pressures to modify these choices. Other concerns about the potential negative impact of genetic information included increased blame and guilt, increased stigma and discrimination in employment and insurance, self-imposed limitations on life goals, and alterations in fundamental conceptions of “what epilepsy is.” Consideration of the perspectives of people with epilepsy and their family members is critical to understanding the implications of contemporary epilepsy genetic research and testing. PMID:21831495

  4. Structure of a Complex between Nedd8 and the Ulp/Senp Protease Family Member Den1

    SciTech Connect

    Reverter, David; Wu, Kenneth; Erdene, Tudeviin Gan; Pan, Zhen-Qiang; Wilkinson, Keith D.; Lima, Christopher D. (Sinai); (MSKCC); (Emory)

    2010-07-20

    The Nedd8 conjugation pathway is conserved from yeast to humans and is essential in many organisms. Nedd8 is conjugated to cullin proteins in a process that alters SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, and it is presumed that Nedd8 deconjugation would reverse these effects. We now report the X-ray structures of the human Nedd8-specific protease, Den1, in a complex with the inhibitor Nedd8 aldehyde, thus revealing a model for the tetrahedral transition state intermediate generated during proteolysis. Although Den1 is closely related to the SUMO-specific protease family (Ulp/Senp family), structural analysis of the interface suggests determinants involved in Nedd8 selectivity by Den1 over other ubiquitin-like family members and suggests how the Ulp/Senp architecture has been modified to interact with different ubiquitin-like modifiers.

  5. Mutant Oocytic Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Family Member Causes Atherosclerosis and Female Sterility

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideaki Bujo; Tokuo Yamamoto; Kozo Hayashi; Marcela Hermann; Johannes Nimpf; Wolfgang Johann Schneider

    1995-01-01

    The so-called very low density lipoprotein receptors (VLDLRs) are related to the LDLR gene family. So far, naturally occurring mutations have only been described for the prototype LDLR; in humans, they cause familial hypercholesterolemia. Here we describe a naturally occurring mutation in a VLDLR that causes a dramatic abnormal phenotype. Hens of the mutant restricted-ovulator chicken strain carry a single

  6. Apollo asteroids (1566) Icarus and 2007 MK6: Icarus family members?

    E-print Network

    K. Ohtsuka; H. Arakida; T. Ito; T. Kasuga; J. Watanabe; D. Kinoshita; T. Sekiguchi; D. J. Asher; S. Nakano

    2007-08-22

    Although it is more complicated to search for near-Earth object (NEO) families than main belt asteroid (MBA) families, since differential orbital evolution within a NEO family can cause current orbital elements to drastically differ from each other, we have found that Apollo asteroids (1566) Icarus and the newly discovered 2007 MK6 are almost certainly related. Specifically, their orbital evolutions show a similar profile, time shifted by only ~1000 yr, based on our time-lag theory. The dynamical relationship between Icarus and 2007 MK6 along with a possible dust band, the Taurid-Perseid meteor swarm, implies the first detection of an asteroidal NEO family, namely the "Icarus asteroid family".

  7. Oncogenic KRAS provides a uniquely powerful and variable oncogenic contribution among RAS family members in the colonic epithelium.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jeffrey W; Franklin, Jeffrey L; Graves-Deal, Ramona; Friedman, David B; Whitwell, Corbin W; Coffey, Robert J

    2007-03-01

    Activating mutations of the RAS family of small GTPases are among the most common genetic events in human tumorigenesis. Constitutive activation of the three canonical family members, KRAS, NRAS, and HRAS segregate strongly by tissue type. Of these, KRAS mutations predominate in human tumors, including those arising from the colon and lung. We sought to compare the oncogenic contributions of different RAS isoforms in a comparable genetic setting and to explore downstream molecular changes that may explain the apparent differential oncogenic effects of the various RAS family members. We utilized colorectal cancer cell lines characterized by oncogenic KRAS in parallel with isogenically derived lines in which the mutant allele has been disrupted. We additionally attempted to reconstitute the isogenic derivatives with oncogenic forms of other RAS family members and analyze them in parallel. Pairwise analysis of HCT 116 and DLD-1 cell lines as well as their isogenic derivatives reveals distinct K-RAS(G13D) signatures despite the genetic similarities of these cell lines. In DLD-1, for example, oncogenic K-RAS enhances the motility of these cells by downregulation of Rap1 activity, yet is not associated with increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In HCT 116, however, ERK1/2 phosphorylation is elevated relative to the isogenic derivative, but Rap1 activity is unchanged. K-RAS is uniquely oncogenic in the colonic epithelium, though the molecular aspects of its oncogenic contribution are not necessarily conserved across cell lines. We therefore conclude that the oncogenic contribution of K-RAS is a function of its multifaceted functionality and is highly context-dependent. PMID:17133351

  8. Had my water gone bad? Family members have lived on our land

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    to find out. Hated to spend the money, but it gave me peace of mind. " " " We're protecting our family. We: Why? Coliform bacteria (germs) Key water quality test Nitrate Infant blood problems Nitrite Infant

  9. Identification of a new member of PBAN family of neuropeptides from the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptide hormones produced by neurosecretory cells in the central or peripheral nervous systems regulate various physiological and behavioral events during insect development and reproduction. Pyrokinin/Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) is a major neuropeptide family, chara...

  10. Chromosomal locations of members of a family of novel endogenous human retroviral genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, T.M.; Huebner, K.; Croce, C.; Callahan, R.

    1986-06-01

    Human cellular DNA contains two distinguishable families of retroviral related sequences. One family shares extensive nucleotide sequence homology with infectious mammalian type C retroviral genomes. The other family contains major regions of homology with the pol genes of infectious type A and B and avian type C and D retroviral genomes. Analysis of the human recombinant clone HLM-2 has shown that the pol gene in the latter family is located within an endogenous proviral genome. The authors show that the proviral genome in HLM-2 and the related recombinant clone HLM-25 are located, respectively, on human chromosomes 1 and 5. Other related proviral genomes are located on chromosomes 7, 8, 11, 14, and 17.

  11. Resistance to Oculimacula yallundae and Oculimacula acuformis is conferred by Pch2 in wheat

    E-print Network

    Murray, Timothy D.

    Resistance to Oculimacula yallundae and Oculimacula acuformis is conferred by Pch2 in wheat K. L University, Pullman, WA 99164-6430, USA The recent report of a differential response of wheat lines of resistance against both O. yallundae and O. acu- formis under these conditions. Keywords: eyespot of wheat

  12. The dispanins: a novel gene family of ancient origin that contains 14 human members.

    PubMed

    Sällman Almén, Markus; Bringeland, Nathalie; Fredriksson, Robert; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2012-01-01

    The Interferon induced transmembrane proteins (IFITM) are a family of transmembrane proteins that is known to inhibit cell invasion of viruses such as HIV-1 and influenza. We show that the IFITM genes are a subfamily in a larger family of transmembrane (TM) proteins that we call Dispanins, which refers to a common 2TM structure. We mined the Dispanins in 36 eukaryotic species, covering all major eukaryotic groups, and investigated their evolutionary history using Bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches to infer a phylogenetic tree. We identified ten human genes that together with the known IFITM genes form the Dispanin family. We show that the Dispanins first emerged in eukaryotes in a common ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoa, and that the family later expanded in vertebrates where it forms four subfamilies (A-D). Interestingly, we also find that the family is found in several different phyla of bacteria and propose that it was horizontally transferred to eukaryotes from bacteria in the common ancestor of choanoflagellates and metazoa. The bacterial and eukaryotic sequences have a considerably conserved protein structure. In conclusion, we introduce a novel family, the Dispanins, together with a nomenclature based on the evolutionary origin. PMID:22363774

  13. Fourteen novel human members of mitochondrial solute carrier family 25 (SLC25) widely expressed in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Haitina, Tatjana; Lindblom, Jonas; Renström, Thomas; Fredriksson, Robert

    2006-12-01

    Members of the solute carrier family 25 (SLC25) are known to transport molecules over the mitochondrial membrane. In this paper we present 14 novel members of SLC25 family in human. These were provided with following gene symbols by the HGNC: SLC25A32, SLC25A33, SLC25A34, SLC25A35, SLC25A37, SLC25A38, SLC25A39, SLC25A40, SLC25A41, SLC25A42, SLC25A43, SLC25A44, SLC25A45, and SLC25A46. We also identified the orthologues for these genes in rat and mouse. Moreover, we found yeast orthologues for 9 of these genes and show that the predicted substrate binding residues are highly conserved in the human and yeast proteins. We performed a comprehensive tissue localization study for 9 of these genes on a panel of 30 rat tissues with quantitative real-time polymerse chain reaction. We detected their mRNA in a wide number of tissues, both in brain and in periphery. This study provides an overall roadmap of the repertoire of the SLC25 family in mammals, showing that there are at least 46 genes in the human genome coding for mitochondrial transporters. PMID:16949250

  14. Perspectives of family members participating in cultural assessment of psychiatric disorders: Findings from the DSM-5 International Field Trial.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Ladson; Aggarwal, Neil; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Weiss, Mitchell; Paralikar, Vasudeo; Deshpande, Smita; Jadhav, Sushrut; Ndetei, David; Nicasio, Andel; Boiler, Marit; Lam, Peter; Avelar, Yesi; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto

    2015-02-01

    Abstract Despite the important roles families play in the lives of many individuals with mental illness across cultures, there is a dearth of data worldwide on how family members perceive the process of cultural assessment as well as to how to best include them. This study addresses this gap in our knowledge through analysis of data collected across six countries as part of a DSM-5 Field Trial of the Cultural Formulation Interview (CFI). At clinician discretion, individuals who accompanied patients to the clinic visit (i.e. patient companions) at the time the CFI was conducted were invited to participate in the cultural assessment and answer questions about their experience. The specific aims of this paper are (1) to describe patterns of participation of patient companions in the CFI across the six countries, and (2) to examine the comparative feasibility, acceptability, and clinical utility of the CFI from companion perspectives through analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data. Among the 321 patient interviews, only 86 (at four of 12 sites) included companions, all of whom were family members or other relatives. The utility, feasibility and acceptability of the CFI were rated favourably by relatives, supported by qualitative analyses of debriefing interviews. Cross-site differences in frequency of accompaniment merit further study. PMID:25738941

  15. Genetic analysis of an Indian family with members affected with Waardenburg syndrome and Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Saketh; Bindu, Parayil Sankaran; Taly, Arun B.; Sinha, Sanjib; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Rani, S. Vasantha; Chandak, Giriraj Ratan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects of the eye, skin, and hair. It is caused by mutations in one of the following genes: PAX3 (paired box 3), MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), EDN3 (endothelin 3), SNAI2 (snail homolog 2, Drosophila) and SOX10 (SRY-box containing gene 10). Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. The purpose of this study was to identify the genetic causes of WS and DMD in an Indian family with two patients: one affected with WS and DMD, and another one affected with only WS. Methods Blood samples were collected from individuals for genomic DNA isolation. To determine the linkage of this family to the eight known WS loci, microsatellite markers were selected from the candidate regions and used to genotype the family. Exon-specific intronic primers for EDN3 were used to amplify and sequence DNA samples from affected individuals to detect mutations. A mutation in DMD was identified by multiplex PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification method using exon-specific probes. Results Pedigree analysis suggested segregation of WS as an autosomal recessive trait in the family. Haplotype analysis suggested linkage of the family to the WS4B (EDN3) locus. DNA sequencing identified a novel missense mutation p.T98M in EDN3. A deletion mutation was identified in DMD. Conclusions This study reports a novel missense mutation in EDN3 and a deletion mutation in DMD in the same Indian family. The present study will be helpful in genetic diagnosis of this family and increases the mutation spectrum of EDN3. PMID:22876130

  16. Molecular and neuroimaging findings in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2 (PCH2): is prenatal diagnosis possible?

    PubMed

    Graham, John M; Spencer, Andrew H; Grinberg, Inessa; Niesen, Charles E; Platt, Lawrence D; Maya, Marcel; Namavar, Yasmin; Baas, Frank; Dobyns, William B

    2010-09-01

    The pontocerebellar hypoplasias (PCH) are a group of early-onset, autosomal recessive disorders resulting in abnormal growth and function of the brainstem and cerebellum. PCH type 2 (PCH2) is characterized by respiratory and feeding difficulties at birth, extrapyramidal dyskinesia, severe developmental impairment, progressive microcephaly and frequent death in childhood. Neuropathologic findings include diffuse cerebral gliosis with white matter changes, hypoplastic pons with depletion of neurons in the pontine nuclei, hypoplastic cerebellar hemispheres due to short cerebellar folia with poor branching, segmental loss of dentate, inferior olivary, and ventral pontine nuclei, and near absence of transverse pontine fibers with preservation of long fiber tracts and spinal anterior horn cells. On brain imaging, the cerebellar hemispheres appear very flat, and are more severely involved than the vermis. Most patients with PCH2 have mutations in TSEN54, with occasional mutations found in TSEN34 or TSEN2, genes that encode subunits of tRNA splicing endonuclease. Although this is a congenital disorder of pontocerebellar dysgenesis with fetal onset of neurodegeneration and symptoms at birth, prenatal imaging is unreliable in diagnosing this disorder in utero. We report on IVF dizygous twins with detailed prenatal imaging that failed to reveal any cerebellar abnormalities. Direct sequence analysis of TSEN54 showed homozygosity for c.919G>T, the common founder mutation in most PCH2 patients, and both parents were heterozygous for this mutation. We found no evidence of cerebellar dysgenesis on prenatal ultrasounds, but MRI tractography showed absence of pontine crossing fibers, a unique feature that might be useful for prenatal diagnosis of this condition. PMID:20803644

  17. MOLECULAR AND NEUROIMAGING FINDINGS IN PONTOCEREBELLAR HYPOPLASIA TYPE 2 (PCH2): IS PRENATAL DIAGNOSIS POSSIBLE?

    PubMed Central

    Graham, John M.; Spencer, Andrew H.; Grinberg, Inessa; Niesen, Charles E.; Platt, Lawrence D.; Maya, Marcel; Namavar, Yasmin; Baas, Frank; Dobyns, William B.

    2010-01-01

    The pontocerebellar hypoplasias (PCH) are a group of early-onset, autosomal recessive disorders resulting in abnormal growth and function of the brainstem and cerebellum. PCH type 2 (PCH2) is characterized by respiratory and feeding difficulties at birth, extrapyramidal dyskinesia, severe developmental impairment, progressive microcephaly and frequent death in childhood. Neuropathologic findings include diffuse cerebral gliosis with white matter changes, hypoplastic pons with depletion of neurons in the pontine nuclei, hypoplastic cerebellar hemispheres due to short cerebellar folia with poor branching, segmental loss of dentate, inferior olivary, and ventral pontine nuclei, and near absence of transverse pontine fibers with preservation of long fiber tracts and spinal anterior horn cells. On brain imaging, the cerebellar hemispheres appear very flat, and are more severely involved than the vermis. Most patients with PCH2 have mutations in TSEN54, with occasional mutations found in TSEN34 or TSEN2, genes that encode subunits of tRNA splicing endonuclease. Although this is a congenital disorder of pontocerebellar dysgenesis with fetal onset of neurodegeneration and symptoms at birth, prenatal imaging is unreliable in diagnosing this disorder in utero. We report on IVF dizygous twins with detailed prenatal imaging that failed to reveal any cerebellar abnormalities. Direct sequence analysis of TSEN54 showed homozygosity for c.919G>T, the common founder mutation in most PCH2 patients, and both parents were heterozygous for this mutation. We found no evidence of cerebellar dysgenesis on prenatal ultrasounds, but MRI tractography showed absence of pontine crossing fibers, a unique feature that might be useful for prenatal diagnosis of this condition. PMID:20803644

  18. Chryseomicrobium imtechense gen. nov., sp. nov., a new member of the family Planococcaceae.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar; Chauhan, Archana; Pant, Bhawana; Korpole, Suresh; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Jain, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-08-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, rod-shaped, yellow, non-motile, non-spore-forming, strictly aerobic bacterial strain, designated MW 10(T), was isolated from seawater of the Bay of Bengal, India, and was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain MW 10(T) showed highest similarity to the type strains of Psychrobacillus psychrodurans (96.15 %) and Psychrobacillus psychrotolerans (96.01 %) and showed less than 96 % similarity to members of the genera Paenisporosarcina, Planococcus, Sporosarcina and Planomicrobium. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence showed that strain MW 10(T) formed a clade separate from members of closely related genera. The morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain MW 10(T) differed from those of members of closely related genera. The major fatty acid in strain MW 10(T) was iso-C(15 : 0) and the menaquinones were MK-7 (48.4 %), MK-8 (32.3 %), MK-7(H(2)) (13.7 %) and MK-6 (5.6 %). The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, an unknown phospholipid, an unknown lipid and an unknown glycolipid. The cell-wall peptidoglycan type was l-Lys-d-Asp. The genomic DNA G+C content (53.4 mol%) of strain MW 10(T) was significantly different from those of members of closely related genera. On the basis of its morphological, physiological and chemotaxonomic characteristics as well as our phylogenetic analysis, we conclude that strain MW 10(T) is a member of a novel genus and species, for which the name Chryseomicrobium imtechense gen. nov., sp. nov., is proposed. The type strain of Chryseomicrobium imtechense is MW 10(T) (?= MTCC 10098(T) ?= JCM 16573(T)). PMID:20833890

  19. Crystal Structure of Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Reveals Targeting of TRIM Family Member PML via Coiled-Coil Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sevvana, Madhumati; Otto, Victoria; Schilling, Eva-Maria; Stump, Joachim D.; Müller, Regina; Reuter, Nina; Sticht, Heinrich; Muller, Yves A.; Stamminger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are enigmatic structures of the cell nucleus that act as key mediators of intrinsic immunity against viral pathogens. PML itself is a member of the E3-ligase TRIM family of proteins that regulates a variety of innate immune signaling pathways. Consequently, viruses have evolved effector proteins to modify PML-NBs; however, little is known concerning structure-function relationships of viral antagonists. The herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) expresses the abundant immediate-early protein IE1 that colocalizes with PML-NBs and induces their dispersal, which correlates with the antagonization of NB-mediated intrinsic immunity. Here, we delineate the molecular basis for this antagonization by presenting the first crystal structure for the evolutionary conserved primate cytomegalovirus IE1 proteins. We show that IE1 consists of a globular core (IE1CORE) flanked by intrinsically disordered regions. The 2.3 Å crystal structure of IE1CORE displays an all ?-helical, femur-shaped fold, which lacks overall fold similarity with known protein structures, but shares secondary structure features recently observed in the coiled-coil domain of TRIM proteins. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds efficiently to the TRIM family member PML, and is able to induce PML deSUMOylation. Intriguingly, this results in the release of NB-associated proteins into the nucleoplasm, but not of PML itself. Importantly, we show that PML deSUMOylation by IE1CORE is sufficient to antagonize PML-NB-instituted intrinsic immunity. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that IE1CORE binds via the coiled-coil domain to PML and also interacts with TRIM5? We propose that IE1CORE sequesters PML and possibly other TRIM family members via structural mimicry using an extended binding surface formed by the coiled-coil region. This mode of interaction might render the antagonizing activity less susceptible to mutational escape. PMID:25412268

  20. Differential temporal and spatial gene expression of fibroblast growth factor family members during mouse mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Coleman-Krnacik, S; Rosen, J M

    1994-02-01

    Mammary gland development is dependent upon local regulatory factors as well as systemic hormones to mediate gland morphogenesis and associated mesenchymal-epithelial interactions. FGF-3 (int-2) has been implicated as an oncogenic growth factor produced locally in mouse mammary tumor virus-induced mammary tumorigenesis. The observation that FGF-3 is not expressed during normal mammary development as well as the high degree of cellular proliferation and angiogenesis that accompany mammary gland growth suggest roles for other FGF family members in this process. In this study, we have examined expression of FGF family members at various stages of mouse mammary growth and tumorigenesis. FGF-1, FGF-2, FGF-4, and FGF-7 were expressed during the ductal stage of mammary development. The majority of FGF-1 gene expression was in the luminal epithelial cells, whereas FGF-2 expression was in the mammary stroma and possibly the myoepithelial cells. The presence of mammary epithelium induced the expression of both FGF-2 and FGF-7 in the stroma. FGF-1 and FGF-2 expression declined during pregnancy and dropped again during lactation, but quantitative analysis showed a much more dramatic decrease in FGF-2 expression. FGF-7 transcripts were also detected during pregnancy and lactation, but an alternate transcript size was observed at these stages. FGF-1, FGF-2, and FGF-7 transcripts were detected in mammary preneoplasias, tumors, and immortal cell lines, but at levels less than those seen during normal mammary growth. These results support the hypothesis that FGF family members play a role in local regulation of mammary development. The differential spatial and temporal pattern of FGF-1, FGF-2 and FGF-7 gene expression indicate that they each have unique functions in the gland. PMID:8170478