Science.gov

Sample records for pch family members

  1. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the urine. PCH has been linked to secondary syphilis, tertiary syphilis, and other viral or bacterial infections. Sometimes the ... help. For example, if PCH is caused by syphilis, symptoms may get better when the syphilis is ...

  2. Principal Components of Heritability From Neurocognitive Domains Differ Between Families With Schizophrenia and Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Howard; Klei, Lambertus; Calkins, Monica; Wood, Joel; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Gur, Ruben; Bradford, L. DiAnne; Richard, Jan; Edwards, Neil; Savage, Robert; Kwentus, Joseph; Allen, Trina; McEvoy, Joseph; Santos, Alberto; Gur, Raquel; Devlin, Bernie; Go, Rodney

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Various measures of neurocognitive function show mean differences among individuals with schizophrenia (SZ), their relatives, and population controls. We use eigenvector transformations that maximize heritability of multiple neurocognitive measures, namely principal components of heritability (PCH), and evaluate how they distribute in SZ families and controls. Methods: African-Americans with SZ or schizoaffective disorder (SZA) (n = 514), their relatives (n = 1092), and adult controls (n = 300) completed diagnostic interviews and computerized neurocognitive tests. PCH were estimated from 9 neurocognitive domains. Three PCH, PCH1–PCH3, were modeled to determine if status (SZ, relative, and control), other psychiatric covariates, and education were significant predictors of mean values. A small-scale linkage analysis was also conducted in a subset of the sample. Results: PCH1, PCH2, and PCH3 account for 72% of the genetic variance. PCH1 represents 8 of 9 neurocognitive domains, is most highly correlated with spatial processing and emotion recognition, and has unadjusted heritability of 68%. The means for PCH1 differ significantly among SZ, their relatives, and controls. PCH2, orthogonal to PCH1, is most closely correlated with working memory and has an unadjusted heritability of 45%. Mean PCH2 is different only between SZ families and controls. PCH3 apparently represents a heritable component of neurocognition similar across the 3 diagnostic groups. No significant linkage evidence to PCH1–PCH3 or individual neurocognitive measures was discovered. Conclusions: PCH1 is highly heritable and genetically correlated with SZ. It should prove useful in future genetic analyses. Mean PCH2 differentiates SZ families and controls but not SZ and unaffected family members. PMID:22234486

  3. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  4. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  5. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  6. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  7. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  8. PCH-2 regulates Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Hong; Xu, Xiangru; Niklason, Laura E

    2015-01-01

    Components or downstream targets of many signaling pathways such as Insulin/IGF-1 and TOR, as well as genes involved in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics can extend worm lifespan 20% or more. The C. elegans gene pch-2 and its homologs, including TRIP13 in humans, have been studied for their functions in cell mitosis and meiosis, but have never been implicated in lifespan regulation. Here we show that over-expression of TRIP13 in human fibroblasts confers resistance to environmental stressors such as UV radiation and oxidative stress. Furthermore, pch-2 overexpression in C. elegans extends worm lifespan, and enhances worm survival in response to various stressors. Conversely, reducing pch-2 expression with RNAi shortens worm lifespan. Additional genetic epistasis analysis indicates that the molecular mechanism of pch-2 in worm longevity is tied to functions of the sirtuin family, implying that pch-2 is another chromatin regulator for worm longevity. These findings suggest a novel function of the pch-2 gene involved in lifespan determination. PMID:25635513

  9. Family Members Responding to a Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Dean W.

    1986-01-01

    A literature review regarding family adjustment to a visually impaired family member considered the stages of denial, withdrawal, acceptance, depression, reaffirmation, coping, mobilization, and self-acceptance. (CB)

  10. Helping Older Family Members Become More Active

    MedlinePlus

    ... Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Helping Older Family Members Become More Active Physical activity is a ... ideas to help get Mom, Dad, or other older family members up off the couch . There are all ...

  11. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  12. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  13. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  14. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  15. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  16. Family Member Involvement in Hastened Death

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Helene; Back, Anthony L.; Pearlman, Robert A.; Koenig, Barbara A.; Hsu, Clarissa; Gordon, Judith R.; Bharucha, Ashok J.

    2007-01-01

    When patients pursue a hastened death, how is the labor of family caregiving affected? The authors examined this question in a qualitative study of 35 families. Four cases reveal the main themes: "taking care" included mutual protection between patients and family members; "midwifing the death" without professional support left families unprepared…

  17. Conducting a multi family member interview study.

    PubMed

    Reczek, Corinne

    2014-06-01

    Family researchers have long recognized the utility of incorporating interview data from multiple family members. Yet, relatively few contemporary scholars utilize such an approach due to methodological underdevelopment. This article contributes to family scholarship by providing a roadmap for developing and executing in-depth interview studies that include more than one family member. Specifically, it outlines the epistemological frames that most commonly underlie this approach, illustrates thematic research questions that it best addresses, and critically reviews the best methodological practices of conducting research with this approach. The three most common approaches are addressed in depth: separate interviews with each family member, dyadic or group interviews with multiple family members, and a combined approach that uses separate and dyadic or group interviews. This article speaks to family scholars who are at the beginning stages of their research project but are unsure of the best qualitative approach to answer a given research question. PMID:24410452

  18. Methods of Assessment for Affected Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Velleman, Richard; Copello, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The article begins by making the point that a good assessment of the needs and circumstances of family members is important if previous neglect of affected family members is to be reversed. The methods we have used in research studies are then described. They include a lengthy semi-structured interview covering seven topic areas and standard…

  19. Understanding family member suicide narratives by investigating family history.

    PubMed

    Ratnarajah, Dorothy; Maple, Myfanwy; Minichiello, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The complex family environments in which a suicide death had previously occurred were explored in a qualitative study of narratives of suicide-bereaved participants. The participants searched for reasons why the suicide occurred in their family. Family patterning stories and the context of the environment in which the suicide death occurred provided an additional depth of meaning into the relational aspects of the family. Fractured families emerged as an important theme. Shared in the narratives were stories of conditions within the family that may have contributed to vulnerability towards persistent negative feelings about their lives, their family, and their future. The study also identifies the strengths of family culture that led to resilience in the suicide bereaved. These stories highlight the importance of support for those bereaved by the suicide of a close family member and the issues that places people in vulnerable situations that perhaps may explain the increased risk of suicide for those bereaved family members. PMID:25084708

  20. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119... Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 435.116 of...

  1. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119... Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 435.116 of...

  2. 42 CFR 435.119 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualified family members. 435.119 Section 435.119... Family Members § 435.119 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under § 435.116 of...

  3. Metabolic Regulation by p53 Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Berkers, Celia R.; Maddocks, Oliver D.K.; Cheung, Eric C.; Mor, Inbal; Vousden, Karen H.

    2013-01-01

    The function of p53 is best understood in response to genotoxic stress, but increasing evidence suggests that p53 also plays a key role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis. p53 and its family members directly influence various metabolic pathways, enabling cells to respond to metabolic stress. These functions are likely to be important for restraining the development of cancer but could also have a profound effect on the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. A better understanding of the metabolic functions of p53 family members may aid in the identification of therapeutic targets and reveal novel uses for p53-modulating drugs. PMID:23954639

  4. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on

  5. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  6. Grief elaboration in families with handicapped member.

    PubMed

    Calandra, C; Finocchiaro, G; Raciti, L; Alberti, A

    1992-01-01

    Families with handicapped member seem to follow the same five stages (rejection and isolation, anger, dealing with the problem, depression, acceptance) of Kubler-Ross grief elaboration theory while dealing with the narcissistic wound of a handicapped child. Some of these families show a block in one of the stages. The effort of psychotherapy is to remove the block and let them reach the last stage. In this paper families under systemic psychotherapeutic treatment are analyzed, who had in common the birth of a child with low or modest invalidating signs and psychotic or autistic features. The families structure did not show the characteristics of a psychotic family. Nevertheless either one or both parents ignored the evidence of their child disease and they built a "disease-incongrous" wait around the child, trying to push away the painful reality. The authors explain the importance of this approach for the improvement of the autistic traits. PMID:1476349

  7. Lysine221 is the general base residue of the isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) in a reaction that is diffusion limited

    PubMed Central

    Meneely, Kathleen M.; Luo, Qianyi; Dhar, Prajnaparamita; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, which is subsequently converted by a second enzyme (PchB) to salicylate for incorporation into the salicylate-capped siderophore pyochelin. PchA is a member of the MST family of enzymes, which includes the structurally homologous isochorismate synthases from E. coli (EntC and MenF) and salicylate synthases from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp9) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MbtI). The latter enzymes generate isochorismate as an intermediate before generating salicylate and pyruvate. General acid – general base catalysis has been proposed for isochorismate synthesis in all five enzymes, but the residues required for the isomerization are a matter of debate, with both lysine221 and glutamate313 proposed as the general base (PchA numbering). This work includes a classical characterization of PchA with steady state kinetic analysis, solvent kinetic isotope effect analysis and by measuring the effect of viscosogens on catalysis. The results suggest that isochorismate production from chorismate by the MST enzymes is the result of general acid – general base catalysis with a lysine as the base and a glutamic acid as the acid, in reverse protonation states. Chemistry is determined to not be rate limiting, favoring the hypothesis of a conformational or binding step as the slow step. PMID:23942051

  8. Lysine221 is the general base residue of the isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) in a reaction that is diffusion limited.

    PubMed

    Meneely, Kathleen M; Luo, Qianyi; Dhar, Prajnaparamita; Lamb, Audrey L

    2013-10-01

    The isochorismate synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PchA) catalyzes the conversion of chorismate to isochorismate, which is subsequently converted by a second enzyme (PchB) to salicylate for incorporation into the salicylate-capped siderophore pyochelin. PchA is a member of the MST family of enzymes, which includes the structurally homologous isochorismate synthases from Escherichia coli (EntC and MenF) and salicylate synthases from Yersinia enterocolitica (Irp9) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MbtI). The latter enzymes generate isochorismate as an intermediate before generating salicylate and pyruvate. General acid-general base catalysis has been proposed for isochorismate synthesis in all five enzymes, but the residues required for the isomerization are a matter of debate, with both lysine221 and glutamate313 proposed as the general base (PchA numbering). This work includes a classical characterization of PchA with steady state kinetic analysis, solvent kinetic isotope effect analysis and by measuring the effect of viscosogens on catalysis. The results suggest that isochorismate production from chorismate by the MST enzymes is the result of general acid-general base catalysis with a lysine as the base and a glutamic acid as the acid, in reverse protonation states. Chemistry is determined to not be rate limiting, favoring the hypothesis of a conformational or binding step as the slow step. PMID:23942051

  9. 20 CFR 653.104 - Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services to MSFW family members, farm labor... Farmworkers (MSFWs) § 653.104 Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members. (a... for services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors and crew members. Except as provided...

  10. 20 CFR 653.104 - Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Services to MSFW family members, farm labor... Farmworkers (MSFWs) 653.104 Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members. (a... for services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors and crew members. Except as provided...

  11. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under §...

  12. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under §...

  13. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under §...

  14. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under §...

  15. 42 CFR 436.121 - Qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Qualified family members. 436.121 Section 436.121... Coverage of the Categorically Needy § 436.121 Qualified family members. (a) Definition. A qualified family member is any member of a family, including pregnant women and children eligible for Medicaid under §...

  16. The dying child and surviving family members.

    PubMed

    Shrier, D K

    1980-12-01

    This overview of death and dying focuses on the dying child and surviving family members. Children's concepts of death at different developmental stages are reviewed. These range from an inability to distinguish death from other forms of separation prior to age 3, through partial concepts of death until, by age 10 to 15 years, children are able to conceptualize death as universal, inevitable and final. The importance of adults assisting in the child's growing comprehension of death is stressed. The stages of grief and mourning, as outlined by Kubler-Ross, are reviewed from the perspective of the child and family: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Recognition is given to the variations in coping styles among different family members. The special circumstances related to the death of an infant and the impact of the death of a child on the surviving siblings are discussed. Specific helpful interventions to assist families in coping with mourning are described. The death of a child remains one of the most painful and difficult events for a family and its physician to accept. PMID:7251875

  17. Apollo 15 Crew and Family Members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The three Apollo 15 crew receive a welcome on their arrival at Ellington Air Force Base, Houston, Texas, after en eight-hour flight aboard a U.S. Air Force C-141 jet aircraft from Hawaii. Left to right are: Astronauts David R. Scott, Alfred M. Worden and James B. Irwin. Members of the astronaut's families identified in picture are left to right: Scott's daughter, Tracy; Worden's father, Merrill Worden; Worden's daughter, Merrill; and Irwin's two daughters, Joy and Jill.

  18. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Coverage of family members. 890.302... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family members. (a)(1) An enrollment for self and family includes all family members who are eligible to...

  19. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Coverage of family members. 890.302... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family members. (a)(1) An enrollment for self and family includes all family members who are eligible to...

  20. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Coverage of family members. 890.302... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family members. (a)(1) An enrollment for self and family includes all family members who are eligible to...

  1. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage of family members. 890.302... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family members. (a)(1) An enrollment for self and family includes all family members who are eligible to...

  2. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned...

  3. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned...

  4. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned...

  5. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned...

  6. 42 CFR 31.9 - Dependent members of families; treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dependent members of families; treatment. 31.9... Public Health Service § 31.9 Dependent members of families; treatment. To the extent and under the... the dependent members of families of the following persons: (a) Coast Guard. Commissioned...

  7. Increasing family members' appreciation of family caregiving stress.

    PubMed

    Gopalan, Neena; Brannon, Laura A

    2006-03-01

    Participants read a message discussing the duties of a typical family caregiver (for example, a woman taking care of her elderly mother) and the associated psychological, physical, social, and financial stresses. The message was accompanied by an appeal that was either a control or was altruistic (other-oriented: focusing on the mother/caregiver's well-being) or egoistic (self-oriented: focusing on the child of the caregiver's needs and feelings). Participants who received an altruistic appeal were more appreciative of caregiving stresses than were those given an egoistic or a control appeal. Increasing family members' awareness of the stress involved in family caregiving is a first step in encouraging them to personally intervene on behalf of the caregiver. PMID:16770936

  8. Family members' influence on family meal vegetable choices

    PubMed Central

    Wenrich, Tionni R.; Brown, J. Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J.; Lengerich, Eugene J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and past experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Design Eight focus groups, two with each segment (men/women vegetable-likers/dislikers based on a screening form). Participants completed a vegetable intake form. Setting Rural Appalachian Pennsylvania. Participants 61 low-income, married/cohabiting men (n=28) and women (n=33). Analysis Thematic analysis within Exchange Theory framework for qualitative data. Descriptive analysis, t-tests and chi-square tests for quantitative data. Results Exchange Theory proved useful for understanding that regardless of sex or vegetable-liker/disliker status, meal preparers see more costs than rewards to serving vegetables. Past experience plus expectations of food preparer role and of deference to family member preferences supported a family norm of serving only vegetables acceptable to everyone. Emphasized vegetables are largely ignored due to unfamiliarity; family norms prevented experimentation and learning through exposure. Conclusions and Implications Interventions to increase vegetable consumption of this audience could 1) alter family norms about vegetables served, 2) change perceptions of past experiences, 3) reduce social and personal costs of serving vegetables and 4) increase tangible and social rewards of serving vegetables. PMID:20452288

  9. Family Members' Reports of the Technology Use of Family Members with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, S. B.; Wehmeyer, M. L.; Davies, D. K.; Stock, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A nationwide survey of family members of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities ranging in age from birth through adulthood was conducted to replicate a similar effort by Wehmeyer and update the knowledge base concerning technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Method: Survey responses…

  10. Comparative integromics on Angiopoietin family members.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-06-01

    Angiopoietin-1 (ANGPT1), Angiopoietin-4 (ANGPT4), VEGF, FGF2, FGF4, HGF, Ephrin, IL8 and CXCL12 (SFD1) are pro-angiogenic factors (angiogenic activators), while Angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2), Angiostatin, Endostatin, Tumstatin, Canstatin, THBS1, THBS2, TNFSF15 (VEGI) and Vasohibin (VASH1) are anti-angiogenic factors (angiogenic inhibitors). ANGPT1 and ANGPT2 are ligands for TIE family receptor tyrosine kinases, TIE1 and TIE2 (TEK). Angiopoietin family consists of ANGPT1, ANGPT2, ANGPT4, ANGPTL1 (ANGPT3), ANGPTL2, ANGPTL3 (ANGPT5), ANGPTL4, ANGPTL5, ANGPTL6 and ANGPTL7. TCF/LEF binding sites within the promoter region of human Angiopoietin family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). Because four TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the human ANGPTL7 promoter, comparative genomics analyses on ANGPTL7 orthologs were further performed. ANGPTL7 gene at human chromosome 1p36.22 was located within intron 28 of FRAP1 gene encoding mTOR protein. Chimpanzee ANGPTL7 gene, consisting of five exons, was located within NW_101546.1 genome sequence. Chimpanzee ANGPTL7 showed 99.4% and 86.1% total-amino-acid identity with human ANGPTL7 and mouse Angptl7, respectively. Human ANGPTL7 mRNA was expressed in neural tissues, keratoconus cornea, trabecular meshwork, melanotic melanoma and uterus endometrial cancer, while mouse Angptl7 mRNA was expressed in four-cell embryo, synovial fibroblasts, thymus, uterus and testis. Four TCF/LEF-binding sites within human ANGPTL7 promoter were conserved in chimpanzee ANGPTL7 promoter; however, only an unrelated TCF/LEF-binding site occurred in mouse and rat Angptl7 promoters. Human ANGPTL7, characterized as potent target gene of WNT/ beta-catenin signaling pathway, is a pharmacogenomics target in the fields of oncology and regenerative medicine. PMID:16685428

  11. Developmental roles of tribbles protein family members.

    PubMed

    Dobens, Leonard L; Bouyain, Samuel

    2012-08-01

    The gene tribbles (trbl), identified 12 years ago in genetic screens for mutations that control both cell division and cell migration during embryonic Drosophila development, is the founding member of the Tribbles (Trib) family of kinase-like proteins that have diverse roles in cell signaling, tissue homeostasis, and cancer. Trib proteins share three motifs: (1) a divergent kinase region (Trib domain) with undetermined catalytic activity, (2) a COP1 site used to direct key target proteins to the proteosome for degradation, and (3) a MEK1 site that binds and modulates MAPKK kinase activity. The notion that Tribs act as scaffolding proteins to balance signaling levels in multiple pathways retains an attractive simplicity, but given recent data showing that divergent kinases act by means of novel catalytic mechanisms, the enzymatic activity of Tribs remains untested. Here, we focus on the role of Tribs during development. Developmental analysis of Drosophila trbl phenotypes reveals tissue-specific, sometimes contradictory roles. In mammals, multiple Trib isoforms exhibit overlapping and tissue-specific functions. Recent data indicate the mechanism of Trib activity is conserved and requires the Trib domain. Finally, we discuss the connections between Tribs in disease and cancer that have implications for their normal roles during organogenesis. PMID:22711497

  12. Perceived Family Resources Based on Number of Members with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Melinda; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how the number of family members with ADHD affects other family members' perceived resources. Method: A total of 40 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD and their mothers, fathers, and adolescent siblings living in the household participated. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze family-level data from a total

  13. Perceived Family Resources Based on Number of Members with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Melinda; Mulsow, Miriam; Feng, Du

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study examines how the number of family members with ADHD affects other family members' perceived resources. Method: A total of 40 adolescents diagnosed with ADHD and their mothers, fathers, and adolescent siblings living in the household participated. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to analyze family-level data from a total…

  14. Comparative integromics on VEGF family members.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Yuriko; Katoh, Masaru

    2006-06-01

    VEGF, Hedgehog, FGF, Notch, and WNT signaling pathways network together for vascular remodeling during embryogenesis, tissue regeneration, and carcinogenesis. VEGFA (VEGF), VEGFB, VEGFC, VEGFD (FIGF) and PGF (PlGF) are VEGF family ligands for receptor tyrosine kinases, including VEGFR1 (FLT1), VEGFR2 (KDR) and VEGFR3 (FLT4). Bevacizumab (Avastin), Sunitinib (Sutent) and Sorafenib (Nexavar) are anti-cancer drugs targeted to VEGF signaling pathway. TCF/LEF binding sites within the promoter region of human VEGF family members were searched for by using bioinformatics and human intelligence (Humint). Because four TCF/LEF-binding sites were identified within the 5'-promoter region of human VEGFD gene within AC095351.5 genome sequence, comparative genomics analyses on VEGFD orthologs were further performed. ASB9-ASB11-VEGFD locus at human chromosome Xp22.2 and ASB5-VEGFC locus at human chromosome 4q34 were paralogous regions within the human genome. Human VEGFD mRNA was expressed in lung, small intestine, uterus, breast, neural tissues, and neuroblastoma. Mouse Vegfd mRNA was expressed in kidney, pregnant oviduct, and neural tissues. Chimpanzee VEGFD promoter, cow Vegfd promoter, mouse Vegfd promoter and rat Vegfd promoter were identified within NW_121675.1, AC161065.2, AL732475.6 and AC130036.3 genome sequences, respectively. Three out of four TCF/LEF-binding sites within human VEGFD promoter were conserved in chimpanzee VEGFD promoter, and one in cow Vegfd promoter. TCF/LEF-binding site, not conserved in human VEGFD promoter, occurred in cow, mouse and rat Vegfd promoters. At least five out of six bHLH-binding sites within human VEGFD proximal promoter region were conserved in chimpanzee VEGFD proximal promoter region, while only one in cow Vegfd proximal promoter region. Together these facts indicate that relatively significant promoter evolution occurred among mammalian VEGFD orthologs. Human VEGFD was characterized as a potent target gene of WNT/beta-catenin signaling pathway. VEGFD, implicated in angiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, is a pharmacogenomics target in the field of oncology. PMID:16685460

  15. Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members By Helen Fitzgerald, CT Introduction With heart ... but also to address the needs of the families and co-workers involved. Few responsibilities are more ...

  16. Family Members' Experience With Hospice in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Gage, L Ashley; Washington, Karla; Oliver, Debra Parker; Kruse, Robin; Lewis, Alexandra; Demiris, George

    2016-05-01

    Research has documented numerous benefits and challenges associated with receipt of hospice care in nursing homes; however, study of this partnership from the perspective of residents' family members has been limited. The purpose of this qualitative investigation was to explore family members' experience with hospice services received in the nursing home setting. Researchers conducted a secondary data analysis of 175 family member interviews using a thematic analytic approach. Findings highlighted the critical role of communication in supporting residents and their family members. Care coordination, support and oversight, and role confusion also impacted family members' experience of hospice care in the nursing home. Efforts directed at enhancing communication and more clearly articulating the roles of members of the health care team are indicated. PMID:25422516

  17. GATA family members as inducers for cellular reprogramming to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jian; Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Minjie; Yao, Anzhi; Shao, Sida; Du, Fengxia; Yang, Caiyun; Chen, Wenhan; Wu, Chen; Yang, Weifeng; Sun, Yingli; Deng, Hongkui

    2015-02-01

    Members of the GATA protein family play important roles in lineage specification and transdifferentiation. Previous reports show that some members of the GATA protein family can also induce pluripotency in somatic cells by substituting for Oct4, a key pluripotency-associated factor. However, the mechanism linking lineage-specifying cues and the activation of pluripotency remains elusive. Here, we report that all GATA family members can substitute for Oct4 to induce pluripotency. We found that all members of the GATA family could inhibit the overrepresented ectodermal-lineage genes, which is consistent with previous reports indicating that a balance of different lineage-specifying forces is important for the restoration of pluripotency. A conserved zinc-finger DNA-binding domain in the C-terminus is critical for the GATA family to induce pluripotency. Using RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, we determined that the pluripotency-related gene Sall4 is a direct target of GATA family members during reprogramming and serves as a bridge linking the lineage-specifying GATA family to the pluripotency circuit. Thus, the GATA family is the first protein family of which all members can function as inducers of the reprogramming process and can substitute for Oct4. Our results suggest that the role of GATA family in reprogramming has been underestimated and that the GATA family may serve as an important mediator of cell fate conversion. PMID:25591928

  18. The After-Death Call to Family Members: Academic Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoboPrabhu, Sheila; Molinari, Victor; Pate, Jennifer; Lomax, James

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss clinical and teaching aspects of a telephone call by the treating clinician to family members after a patient dies. Methods: A MEDLINE search was conducted for references to an after-death call made by the treating clinician to family members. A review of this literature is summarized. Results: A clinical application…

  19. Interventions for Family Members of Adolescents with Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Draucker, Claire; Alkhattab, Halima; Knopf, Amy; Mazurcyk, Jill

    2014-01-01

    PROBLEM The family members of adolescents diagnosed with Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBD) experience profound stress and burden. Despite the need for empirically supported interventions that address the challenges faced by these family members, few such interventions are available. METHODS In this qualitative descriptive study, we conducted in-depth interviews with 15 families of adolescents diagnosed with DBD. We asked the family members to identify what types of mental health services they needed and to describe the ‘ideal” program that would best address their concerns. FINDINGS Family members identified several intervention modalities that would fit their needs including multi-family groups, family therapy, individual therapy, and community-based hotlines. They indicated that programs should address the following topics: family communication, conflict resolution, education about DBD, and strategies to improve interactions with child service agencies. CONCLUSIONS Clinicians should recognize that all family members may need support to manage the stressors associated with caring for or living with adolescents with DBD. When working with families, clinicians should provide information about the etiology and management of DBD, help navigate interactions with child service agencies, and employ strategies to improve family communication and functioning. PMID:24934181

  20. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  1. Lineage Affect Similarity and Health of Older Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troll, Lillian E.

    Interviews with same-sex adult members of three-generation family lines can dramatize similarities and differences by age and generation in ways of thinking and feeling. An analysis of interviews with 157 families examined the health of the grandparent, the happiness of each of the three generational representatives, and family salience. Twelve…

  2. Coping with stigma by association and family burden among family members of people with mental illness.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, Remko L M; Stutterheim, Sarah E; Pryor, John B; Kok, Gerjo; Bos, Arjan E R

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we explored stigma by association, family burden, and their impact on the family members of people with mental illness. We also studied the ways in which family members coped with these phenomena. We conducted semistructured interviews with 23 immediate family members of people with mental illness. Participants reported various experiences of stigma by association and family burden. Social exclusion, being blamed, not being taken seriously, time-consuming caregiving activities, and exhaustion appeared to be the predominant forms of stigma by association and family burden experienced by the participants. The participants used problem-focused and emotion-focused coping strategies, separately or simultaneously, to cope with the negative impact of stigma by association and family burden. The results suggest that family members should have access to services to address these problems. Social, instrumental, and emotional support should be given to family members by community members and mental health professionals. PMID:25198703

  3. Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grief at Work Working Through Grief About Us Death at the Worksite: Helping Grieving Family Members By ... fatal heart attacks occur in the workplace. Other deaths — from accidents, for example — can also happen during ...

  4. Space weathering of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Cristina A.; Rivkin, Andrew S.; Trilling, David E.; Enga, Marie-therese; Grier, Jennifer A.

    2011-03-01

    The space weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites is an often debated topic in asteroid science. Q-type asteroids have been shown to display the best spectral match to ordinary chondrites (McFadden, L.A., Gaffey, M.J., McCord, T.B. [1985]. Science 229, 160-163). While the Q-types and ordinary chondrites share some spectral features with S-type asteroids, the S-types have significantly redder spectral slopes than the Q-types in visible and near-infrared wavelengths. This reddening of spectral slope is attributed to the effects of space weathering on the observed surface composition. The analysis by Binzel et al. (Binzel, R.P., Rivkin, A.S., Stuart, J.S., Harris, A.W., Bus, S.J., Burbine, T.H. [2004]. Icarus 170, 259-294) provided a missing link between the Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to a transition from Q-type to S-type asteroid spectra, implying that size, and therefore surface age, is related to the relationship between S- and Q-types. The existence of Q-type asteroids in the main-belt was not confirmed until Mothé-Diniz and Nesvorny (Mothé-Diniz, T., Nesvorny, D. [2008]. Astron. Astrophys. 486, L9-L12) found them in young S-type clusters. The young age of these families suggest that the unweathered surface could date to the formation of the family. This leads to the question of whether older S-type main-belt families can contain Q-type objects and display evidence of a transition from Q- to S-type. To answer this question we have carried out a photometric survey of the Koronis family using the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope. This provides a unique opportunity to compare the effects of the space weathering process on potentially ordinary chondrite-like bodies within a population of identical initial conditions. We find a trend in spectral slope for objects 1-5 km that shows the transition from Q- to S-type in the main-belt. This data set will prove crucial to our understanding of the space weathering process and its relevant timescales.

  5. Myocardin Family Members Drive Formation of Caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Katarzyna K.; Yao Mattisson, Ingrid; Ekman, Mari; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Grantinge, Rebecka; Kotowska, Dorota; Olde, Björn; Hansson, Ola; Albinsson, Sebastian; Miano, Joseph M.; Rippe, Catarina; Swärd, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Caveolae are membrane organelles that play roles in glucose and lipid metabolism and in vascular function. Formation of caveolae requires caveolins and cavins. The make-up of caveolae and their density is considered to reflect cell-specific transcriptional control mechanisms for caveolins and cavins, but knowledge regarding regulation of caveolae genes is incomplete. Myocardin (MYOCD) and its relative MRTF-A (MKL1) are transcriptional coactivators that control genes which promote smooth muscle differentiation. MRTF-A communicates changes in actin polymerization to nuclear gene transcription. Here we tested if myocardin family proteins control biogenesis of caveolae via activation of caveolin and cavin transcription. Using human coronary artery smooth muscle cells we found that jasplakinolide and latrunculin B (LatB), substances that promote and inhibit actin polymerization, increased and decreased protein levels of caveolins and cavins, respectively. The effect of LatB was associated with reduced mRNA levels for these genes and this was replicated by the MRTF inhibitor CCG-1423 which was non-additive with LatB. Overexpression of myocardin and MRTF-A caused 5-10-fold induction of caveolins whereas cavin-1 and cavin-2 were induced 2-3-fold. PACSIN2 also increased, establishing positive regulation of caveolae genes from three families. Full regulation of CAV1 was retained in its proximal promoter. Knock down of the serum response factor (SRF), which mediates many of the effects of myocardin, decreased cavin-1 but increased caveolin-1 and -2 mRNAs. Viral transduction of myocardin increased the density of caveolae 5-fold in vitro. A decrease of CAV1 was observed concomitant with a decrease of the smooth muscle marker calponin in aortic aneurysms from mice (C57Bl/6) infused with angiotensin II. Human expression data disclosed correlations of MYOCD with CAV1 in a majority of human tissues and in the heart, correlation with MKL2 (MRTF-B) was observed. The myocardin family of transcriptional coactivators therefore drives formation of caveolae and this effect is largely independent of SRF. PMID:26244347

  6. 20 CFR 653.104 - Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members. 653.104 Section 653.104 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SERVICES OF THE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Services for Migrant and...

  7. 20 CFR 653.104 - Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members. 653.104 Section 653.104 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SERVICES OF THE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Services for Migrant and...

  8. 20 CFR 653.104 - Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members. 653.104 Section 653.104 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SERVICES OF THE EMPLOYMENT SERVICE SYSTEM Services for Migrant and...

  9. Spectra of small Koronis family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, C.; Rivkin, A.; Trilling, D.; Moskovitz, N.

    2014-07-01

    The space-weathering process and its implications for the relationships between S- and Q-type asteroids and ordinary chondrite meteorites are long-standing problems in asteroid science. Although the visible and near-infrared spectra of S- and Q-type objects qualitatively show the same absorption features and quantitatively show evidence of the same minerals, the S types display increased spectral slopes and muted absorption features compared to the Q types. This spectral mismatch is consistent with the effects of the space weathering process. Binzel et al. provided the missing link between Q- and S-type bodies in near-Earth space by showing a reddening of spectral slope in objects from 0.1 to 5 km that corresponded to the transition from Q- to S-type spectra. This result implied that size, and therefore age, is related to the relationship between Q- and S-type. The existence of Q-type objects in the main belt was not confirmed until Mothe-Diniz and Nesvorny (2008) found them in young S-type clusters. To investigate the trend from Q to S in the main belt, we examined space weathering within the old main-belt Koronis family using a spectrophotometric survey (Rivkin et al. 2011, Thomas et al. 2011). Rivkin et al. (2011) identified several potential Q-type objects within the Koronis family. Our Q-type candidates were identified using broad-band spectrophotometry and could not be taxonomically classified on that basis alone. We obtained follow-up visible and near-infrared spectral observations of our potential Q-type objects, (26970) Elias, (45610) 2000 DJ_{48}, and (37411) 2001 XF_{152}, using Gemini and Magellan. We will present the results of these spectral follow-up observations. Observations of (26970) Elias demonstrate that the object is more consistent with the average Q-type spectrum than the average S-type spectrum.

  10. Family Members' Influence on Family Meal Vegetable Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenrich, Tionni R.; Brown, J. Lynne; Miller-Day, Michelle; Kelley, Kevin J.; Lengerich, Eugene J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Characterize the process of family vegetable selection (especially cruciferous, deep orange, and dark green leafy vegetables); demonstrate the usefulness of Exchange Theory (how family norms and experiences interact with rewards and costs) for interpreting the data. Design: Eight focus groups, 2 with each segment (men/women vegetable…

  11. Evolution of secretin family GPCR members in the metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, João CR; Pinto, Vanda C; Vieira, Florbela A; Clark, Melody S; Power, Deborah M

    2006-01-01

    Background Comparative approaches using protostome and deuterostome data have greatly contributed to understanding gene function and organismal complexity. The family 2 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are one of the largest and best studied hormone and neuropeptide receptor families. They are suggested to have arisen from a single ancestral gene via duplication events. Despite the recent identification of receptor members in protostome and early deuterostome genomes, relatively little is known about their function or origin during metazoan divergence. In this study a comprehensive description of family 2 GPCR evolution is given based on in silico and expression analyses of the invertebrate receptor genes. Results Family 2 GPCR members were identified in the invertebrate genomes of the nematodes C. elegans and C. briggsae, the arthropods D. melanogaster and A. gambiae (mosquito) and in the tunicate C. intestinalis. This suggests that they are of ancient origin and have evolved through gene/genome duplication events. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses have demonstrated that the immediate gene environment, with regard to gene content, is conserved between the protostome and deuterostome receptor genomic regions. Also that the protostome genes are more like the deuterostome Corticotrophin Releasing Factor (CRF) and Calcitonin/Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (CAL/CGRP) receptors members than the other family 2 GPCR members. The evolution of family 2 GPCRs in deuterostomes is characterised by acquisition of new family members, with SCT (Secretin) receptors only present in tetrapods. Gene structure is characterised by an increase in intron number with organismal complexity with the exception of the vertebrate CAL/CGRP receptors. Conclusion The family 2 GPCR members provide a good example of gene duplication events occurring in tandem with increasing organismal complexity during metazoan evolution. The putative ancestral receptors are proposed to be more like the deuterostome CAL/CGRP and CRF receptors and this may be associated with their fundamental role in calcium regulation and the stress response, both of which are essential for survival. PMID:17166275

  12. New Insights in the Immunobiology of IL-1 Family Members.

    PubMed

    van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Netea, Mihai G

    2013-01-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL 1) family of ligands is associated with acute and chronic inflammation, and plays an essential role in the non-specific innate response to infection. The biological properties of IL 1 family ligands are typically pro-inflammatory. The IL 1 family has 11 family members and can be categorized into subfamilies according to the length of their precursor and the length of the propiece for each precursor (Figure 1). The IL 1 subfamily consists of IL 1?, IL 1?, and IL 33, with the longest propieces of the IL 1 family. IL 18 and IL 37 belong to the IL 18 subfamily and contain smaller propieces than IL 1 and IL-33. Since IL 37 binds to the IL 18R? chain it is part of the IL 18 subfamily, however it remains to be elucidated how the propiece of IL 37 is removed. IL 36?, ?, and ? as well as IL 36 Ra belong to the IL 36 subfamily. In addition, IL 38 likely belongs to this family since it has the ability to bind to the IL 36R. The IL 36 subfamily has the shortest propiece. The one member of the IL 1 family that cannot be categorized in these subfamilies is IL 1 receptor antagonist (IL 1Ra), which has a signal peptide and is readily secreted. In the present review we will describe the biological functions of the IL-1F members and new insights in their biology. PMID:23847614

  13. Trauma Patients' Family Members' Perceptions of Nurses' Caring Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Nantz, Sarah; Hines, Annette

    2015-01-01

    A mixed methods study was conducted to identify trauma patients' family members' perceptions of nurses' caring behaviors on a trauma step-down unit at a level I trauma center. Family members completed Caring Behaviors Inventory-Short Form 24 and a qualitative section. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. On a scale of 1 to 6, the mean score for individual items was 5.2 (median = 5.3). Participants considered the nurses' behaviors to be indicative of caring in each of the 4 areas measured-assurance, knowledge/skills, respectfulness, and connectedness. Four themes were identified-technical, nonverbal, personal connections, and addressing comfort. PMID:26352655

  14. [Psychoeducation of patients and their family members during episode psychosis].

    PubMed

    Hodé, Y

    2013-09-01

    The concept of psychoeducation is close to the concept of therapeutic education and refers to a kind of education intervention targeting people with a mental health condition. In the framework of psychosis, psychoeducation can be offered to patients, family members or both. The efficacy of patient psychoeducation on treatment adherence or social functioning is well-established but only if the family benefits of a joint psychoeducational intervention. Family psychoeducation, even without patient psychoeducation has proven efficacy in reducing relapse rate. This reduction is of the same order of magnitude as that obtained with an antipsychotic medication. PMID:24084420

  15. Working with Black Families Having Mentally Retarded Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utley, Cheryl A.; Marion, Robert

    The paper examines culture as an influential variable in the shaping of the value system within the sturcture of black families specifically those with mentally retarded members. Typical negative views of the black culture included such characteristics as matriarchal, unstable, and pathological. More recent views have focused on strengths,

  16. Family Members' Perceptions of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Device Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Rita L.; Parette, Howard P., Jr.; Stoner, Julia B.; Angell, Maureen E.; Carroll, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Although advancements in technology have expanded the use of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) devices for children with disabilities, the use of AAC devices in school and home settings is often inconsistent. The purpose of this study was to examine family members' perceptions regarding the use of AAC devices. Factors that…

  17. Family Decision Making: Benefits to Persons with Developmental Disabilities and Their Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely-Barnes, Susan; Graff, J. Carolyn; Marcenko, Maureen; Weber, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Family involvement in planning and choosing services has become a key intervention concept in developmental disability services. This study (N = 547) modeled patterns of family decision making and assessed benefits to persons with developmental disabilities (DDs) and their family members. A latent profile analysis identified 4 classes that were…

  18. Being Socialised into Language Shift: The Impact of Extended Family Members on Family Language Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Christmas, Cassie

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a family language policy (FLP) in the context of an extended bilingual Gaelic-English family on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. It demonstrates how certain family members (namely, the children's mother and paternal grandmother) negotiate and reify a strongly Gaelic-centred FLP. It then discusses how other extended family…

  19. Identification of members of the P-glycoprotein multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, W.F.; Sarangi, F.; Zastawny, R.L.; Veinot-Drebot, L.; Ling, V. )

    1989-03-01

    Overproduction of P-glycoprotein is intimately associated with multidrug resistance. This protein appears to be encoded by a multigene family. Thus, differential expression of different members of this family may contribute to the complexity of the multidrug resistance phenotype. Three lambda genomic clones isolated from a hamster genomic library represent different members of the hamster P-glycoprotein gene family. Using a highly conserved exon probe, the authors found that the hamster P-glycoprotein gene family consists of three genes. They also found that the P-glycoprotein gene family consists of three genes in mice but has only two genes in humans and rhesus monkeys. The hamster P-glycoprotein genes have similar exon-intron organizations within the 3' region encoding the cytoplasmic domains. The propose that the hamster P-glycoprotein gene family arose from gene duplication. The hamster pgpl and pgp2 genes appear to be more closely related to each other than either gene is to the pgp3 gene. They speculate that the hamster pgpl and pgp2 genes arose from a recent gene duplication event and that primates did not undergo this duplication and therefore contain only two P-glycoprotein genes.

  20. The serendipitous origin of chordate secretin peptide family members

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The secretin family is a pleotropic group of brain-gut peptides with affinity for class 2 G-protein coupled receptors (secretin family GPCRs) proposed to have emerged early in the metazoan radiation via gene or genome duplications. In human, 10 members exist and sequence and functional homologues and ligand-receptor pairs have been characterised in representatives of most vertebrate classes. Secretin-like family GPCR homologues have also been isolated in non-vertebrate genomes however their corresponding ligands have not been convincingly identified and their evolution remains enigmatic. Results In silico sequence comparisons failed to retrieve a non-vertebrate (porifera, cnidaria, protostome and early deuterostome) secretin family homologue. In contrast, secretin family members were identified in lamprey, several teleosts and tetrapods and comparative studies revealed that sequence and structure is in general maintained. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis revealed that PACAP, VIP and GCG are the most highly conserved members and two major peptide subfamilies exist; i) PACAP-like which includes PACAP, PRP, VIP, PH, GHRH, SCT and ii) GCG-like which includes GCG, GLP1, GLP2 and GIP. Conserved regions flanking secretin family members were established by comparative analysis of the Takifugu, Xenopus, chicken and human genomes and gene homologues were identified in nematode, Drosophila and Ciona genomes but no gene linkage occurred. However, in Drosophila and nematode genes which flank vertebrate secretin family members were identified in the same chromosome. Conclusions Receptors of the secretin-like family GPCRs are present in protostomes but no sequence homologues of the vertebrate cognate ligands have been identified. It has not been possible to determine when the ligands evolved but it seems likely that it was after the protostome-deuterostome divergence from an exon that was part of an existing gene or gene fragment by rounds of gene/genome duplication. The duplicate exon under different evolutionary pressures originated the chordate PACAP-like and GCG-like subfamily groups. This event occurred after the emergence of the metazoan secretin GPCRs and led to the establishment of novel peptide-receptor interactions that contributed to the generation of novel physiological functions in the chordate lineage. PMID:20459630

  1. 76 FR 67363 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 31 and 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA...)(3) (concerning individuals who work for certain family members), 3127 (concerning members of...) to extend the FICA and FUTA exceptions for family members and religious sect members to...

  2. Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection among Family Members in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Yvonne; Montoya, Jose G.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated 32 families of persons with acute toxoplasmosis in which >1 other family member was tested for Toxoplasma gondii infection; 18 (56%) families had >1 additional family member with acute infection. Family members of persons with acute toxoplasmosis should be screened for infection, especially pregnant women and immunocompromised persons. PMID:24274896

  3. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are foster children eligible as family....306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children may be eligible for coverage as family members under FEDVIP....

  4. Genochondromatosis type I: A clinicoradiological study of four family members.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Atul; D'souza, Maria M; Reddy, Kanakeya Bachha; Kanojia, Rajesh Kumar; Kumar, Ajay

    2015-11-01

    Genochondromatosis is an extremely rare autosomal dominant disorder, which manifests during childhood and tends to regress in adult life. The bony lesions are symmetrically distributed with characteristic localization at the metaphysis of proximal humerus and distal femur. Two types have been described based on the involvement of clavicle. Usually asymptomatic, sometimes patients may present with pathological fractures. In this communication, we describe four members of a family with Genochondromatosis type I, with some additional clinical and radiological findings not reported previously. PMID:26174433

  5. Distinct Functions of Egr Gene Family Members in Cognitive Processes

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Roseline; Cheval, Hélène; Mailhes, Caroline; Garel, Sonia; Charnay, Patrick; Davis, Sabrina; Laroche, Serge

    2008-01-01

    The different gene members of the Egr family of transcriptional regulators have often been considered to have related functions in brain, based on their co-expression in many cell-types and structures, the relatively high homology of the translated proteins and their ability to bind to the same consensus DNA binding sequence. Recent research, however, suggest this might not be the case. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of the functional roles of the different Egr family members in learning and memory. We briefly outline evidence from mutant mice that Egr1 is required specifically for the consolidation of long-term memory, while Egr3 is primarily essential for short-term memory. We also review our own recent findings from newly generated forebrain-specific conditional Egr2 mutant mice, which revealed that Egr2, as opposed to Egr1 and Egr3, is dispensable for several forms of learning and memory and on the contrary can act as an inhibitory constraint for certain cognitive functions. The studies reviewed here highlight the fact that Egr family members may have different, and in certain circumstances antagonistic functions in the adult brain. PMID:18982106

  6. Organ Donation Campaigns: Perspective of Dialysis Patient's Family Members

    PubMed Central

    TUMIN, Makmor; RAJA ARIFFIN, Raja Noriza; MOHD SATAR, NurulHuda; NG, Kok-Peng; LIM, Soo-Kun; CHONG, Chin-Sieng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Solving the dilemma of the organ shortage in Malaysia requires educating Malaysians about organ donation and transplantation. This paper aims at exploring the average Malaysian households ’ preferred channels of campaigns and the preferred campaigners in a family setting, targeting at the dialysis family members. Methods We analyzed the responses of 350 respondents regarding organ donation campaigns. The respondents are 2 family members of 175 dialysis patients from 3 different institutions. The information on respondents’ willingness to donate and preferred method and channel of organ donation campaign were collected through questionnaire. Results Malaysian families have a good tendency to welcome campaigns in both the public and private (their homes) spheres. We also found that campaigns facilitated by the electronic media (Television and Radio) and executed by experienced doctors are expected to optimize the outcomes of organ donation, in general. Chi-square tests show that there are no significant differences in welcoming campaigns among ethnics. However, ethnics preferences over the campaign methods and campaigners are significantly different (P <0.05). Conclusion Ethnic differences imply that necessary modifications on the campaign channels and campaigners should also be taken under consideration. By identifying the preferred channel and campaigners, this study hopes to shed some light on the ways to overcome the problem of organ shortage in Malaysia. PMID:25909060

  7. 78 FR 76529 - Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing CBP Family Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ...) in the Federal Register (77 FR 18143) proposing to amend title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations... published in the Federal Register (77 FR 18143) on March 27, 2012. Executive Order 12866 and Executive Order... Members of a Family for Purpose of Filing CBP Family Declaration AGENCY: U.S. Customs and...

  8. The Lost Boys of Sudan: Ambiguous Loss, Search for Family, and Reestablishing Relationships with Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luster, Tom; Qin, Desiree B.; Bates, Laura; Johnson, Deborah J.; Rana, Meenal

    2008-01-01

    The "Lost Boys of Sudan" were separated from their families by civil war and subsequently lived in 3 other countries--Ethiopia, Kenya, and the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 refugees who located surviving family members in Sudan after an average separation of 13.7 years. The interviews probed their experiences of…

  9. Predictors of the Decision to Place Developmentally Disabled Family Members in Residential Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Barry R.

    1988-01-01

    Comparison of 154 families who placed developmentally disabled family members in residential programs and 377 families who cared for family members at home suggested increased incidence of family problems as well as more severe impairment among families who placed the developmentally disabled. (Author/DB)

  10. Moderating the covariance between family member's substance use behavior.

    PubMed

    Verhulst, Brad; Eaves, Lindon J; Neale, Michael C

    2014-07-01

    Twin and family studies implicitly assume that the covariation between family members remains constant across differences in age between the members of the family. However, age-specificity in gene expression for shared environmental factors could generate higher correlations between family members who are more similar in age. Cohort effects (cohort × genotype or cohort × common environment) could have the same effects, and both potentially reduce effect sizes estimated in genome-wide association studies where the subjects are heterogeneous in age. In this paper we describe a model in which the covariance between twins and non-twin siblings is moderated as a function of age difference. We describe the details of the model and simulate data using a variety of different parameter values to demonstrate that model fitting returns unbiased parameter estimates. Power analyses are then conducted to estimate the sample sizes required to detect the effects of moderation in a design of twins and siblings. Finally, the model is applied to data on cigarette smoking. We find that (1) the model effectively recovers the simulated parameters, (2) the power is relatively low and therefore requires large sample sizes before small to moderate effect sizes can be found reliably, and (3) the genetic covariance between siblings for smoking behavior decays very rapidly. Result 3 implies that, e.g., genome-wide studies of smoking behavior that use individuals assessed at different ages, or belonging to different birth-year cohorts may have had substantially reduced power to detect effects of genotype on cigarette use. It also implies that significant special twin environmental effects can be explained by age-moderation in some cases. This effect likely contributes to the missing heritability paradox. PMID:24647834

  11. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under one... return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under one service agreement? No, you cannot claim reimbursement for the return of your immediate family member(s) or household...

  12. Asteroid (90) Antiope: Another icy member of the Themis family?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, Kelsey D.; Emery, Joshua P.; Campins, Humberto; Kelley, Michael S. P.

    2015-07-01

    Many members of the Themis family show evidence of hydration in the form of oxidized iron in phyllosilicates (Florczak, M. et al. [1999]. Astron. Astrophys. Suppl. Ser. 134, 463-471), and OH-bearing minerals (Takir, D., Emery, J.P. [2012]. Icarus 219, 641-654). The largest member, (24) Themis, has H2O ice covering its surface (Campins, H. et al. [2010]. Nature 464, 1320-1321; Rivkin, A.S., Emery, J.P. [2010]. Nature 464, 1322-1323). We have investigated the second largest Themis-family asteroid, (90) Antiope, which Castillo-Rogez and Schmidt (Castillo-Rogez, J.C., Schmidt, B.E. [2010]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 37, L10202) predict to have a composition that includes water ice and organics. We obtained 2-4-μm spectroscopy of (90) Antiope in 2006 and 2008, and we find an absorption in the 3-μm region clearly present in our 2008 spectrum and likely in our 2006 spectrum. Both spectra have rounded, bowl-shaped absorptions consistent with those ascribed to water ice as in the spectrum of Asteroid (24) Themis. We also present and compare Spitzer 8-12-μm mid-infrared spectra of (24) Themis and (90) Antiope. We find that (90) Antiope is lacking a "fairy castle" dusty surface, which is in contrast to (24) Themis, other Themis family members (Licandro, J. et al. [2012]. Astron. Astrophys. 537, A73), and Jupiter Trojans (e.g. Emery, J.P., Cruikshank, D.P., Van Cleve, J. [2006]. Icarus 182, 496-512). We conclude that the surface structure of (90) Antiope is most similar to Cybele Asteroid (121) Hermione (Hargrove, K.D. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 453-455).

  13. Characterization of Lamprey IL-17 Family Members and Their Receptors.

    PubMed

    Han, Qifeng; Das, Sabyasachi; Hirano, Masayuki; Holland, Stephen J; McCurley, Nathanael; Guo, Peng; Rosenberg, Charles S; Boehm, Thomas; Cooper, Max D

    2015-12-01

    IL-17 is an ancient cytokine implicated in a variety of immune defense reactions. We identified five members of the sea lamprey IL-17 family (IL-17D.1, IL-17D.2, IL-17E, IL-17B, and IL-17C) and six IL-17R genes (IL-17RA.1, IL-17RA.2, IL-17RA.3, IL-17RF, IL-17RE/RC, and IL-17RD), determined their relationship with mammalian orthologs, and examined their expression patterns and potential interactions to explore their roles in innate and adaptive immunity. The most highly expressed IL-17 family member is IL-17D.1 (mammalian IL-17D like), which was found to be preferentially expressed by epithelial cells of skin, intestine, and gills and by the two types of lamprey T-like cells. IL-17D.1 binding to rIL-17RA.1 and to the surface of IL-17RA.1-expressing B-like cells and monocytes of lamprey larvae was demonstrated, and treatment of lamprey blood cells with rIL-17D.1 protein enhanced transcription of genes expressed by the B-like cells. These findings suggest a potential role for IL-17 in coordinating the interactions between T-like cells and other cells of the adaptive and innate immune systems in jawless vertebrates. PMID:26491201

  14. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for the family member or covered servicemember. (c) An employee's intermittent leave or a reduced... situation where the condition of the family member or covered servicemember itself is intermittent, but also... governing the use of intermittent or reduced schedule leave....

  15. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for the family member or covered servicemember. (c) An employee's intermittent leave or a reduced... situation where the condition of the family member or covered servicemember itself is intermittent, but also... governing the use of intermittent or reduced schedule leave....

  16. 75 FR 5870 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the HCTC Medicare Family Member Registration Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the HCTC Medicare Family Member... Medicare Family Member Registration Form. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before April 5...: HCTC Medicare Family Member Registration Form. OMB Number: 1545-2162. Form Number: 14117....

  17. 75 FR 5873 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the HCTC Family Member Eligibility Form

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for the HCTC Family Member Eligibility Form..., HCTC Family Member Eligibility Form. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before April 5...: HCTC Family Member Eligibility Form. OMB Number: 1545-2163. Form Number: 14116. Abstract: This...

  18. 5 CFR 734.405 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... and Positions § 734.405 Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, or...

  19. "You Needed to Rehab...Families as Well": Family Members' Own Goals for Aphasia Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Tami; Davidson, Bronwyn; Worrall, Linda; Hersh, Deborah; Ferguson, Alison; Sherratt, Sue; Gilbert, Jocelyn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aphasia affects family members in addition to the individuals with the communication disorder. In order to develop appropriate services for the relatives of people with aphasia post-stroke, their rehabilitation goals need to be identified. Aim: The aim of the current investigation was to identify the rehabilitation goals that family…

  20. Correlated Outcomes of a Pilot Intervention for People Injecting Drugs and Their Family Members in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Liang, Li-Jung; Lin, Chunqing; Tuan, Nguyen Anh

    2013-01-01

    Background The interrelationship between the well-being of injecting drug users (IDUs) and their family environment has been widely documented. However, few intervention programs have addressed the needs of both IDUs and their family members. Methods This study describes a randomized intervention pilot targeting 83 IDUs and 83 of their family members from four communes in Phú Thọ province, Vietnam. The IDUs and family members in the intervention condition received multiple group sessions, with the intent to improve psychological well-being and family relationships. The intervention outcomes (depressive symptoms and family relations) were evaluated at baseline, 3-month and 6-month follow-up assessments. Results Depressive symptoms and family relations reported by IDUs were found to be correlated to those reported by their family members. Overall, significant intervention effects on depressive symptoms and family relations were observed for both IDUs and family members. A similar improvement pattern in family relations emerged for both the IDU and family member samples, although the intervention effect of reducing depressive symptoms was more sustainable for family members at the 6-month assessment when compared to the IDU sample. Conclusion The intervention pilot addressed challenges faced by IDUs and their family members and revealed correlated outcomes for the two groups. Findings suggest a vital need to include family members in future drug prevention and harm reduction intervention efforts. PMID:24305572

  1. Muscarinic Toxicity Among Family Members After Consumption of Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    George, Peter; Hegde, Narasimha

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are commercially cultivated over the world and safe for human consumption, except in those with known allergies. Among the thousands of mushroom species identified, few are considered to be edible. Mushroom hunting has emerged as an adventure and recreational activity in recent decades. Wild forms of mushrooms are often poisonous and visually mimic the edible ones, thus leading to mistaken harvesting, consumption, and toxicities. In literature, various systemic toxic syndromes associated with mushroom poisoning have been described. We report four members of a family with muscarinic manifestations after accidental consumption of poisonous mushrooms. The Clitocybe species of mushrooms they consumed resulted in their muscarinic toxicity. Patients with muscarinic mushroom toxicity have early onset of symptoms and they respond well to atropine and symptomatic supportive care. PMID:23833447

  2. Muscarinic toxicity among family members after consumption of mushrooms.

    PubMed

    George, Peter; Hegde, Narasimha

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are commercially cultivated over the world and safe for human consumption, except in those with known allergies. Among the thousands of mushroom species identified, few are considered to be edible. Mushroom hunting has emerged as an adventure and recreational activity in recent decades. Wild forms of mushrooms are often poisonous and visually mimic the edible ones, thus leading to mistaken harvesting, consumption, and toxicities. In literature, various systemic toxic syndromes associated with mushroom poisoning have been described. We report four members of a family with muscarinic manifestations after accidental consumption of poisonous mushrooms. The Clitocybe species of mushrooms they consumed resulted in their muscarinic toxicity. Patients with muscarinic mushroom toxicity have early onset of symptoms and they respond well to atropine and symptomatic supportive care. PMID:23833447

  3. A member of the wedding? Heterosexism and family ritual.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Ramona Faith

    2003-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterosexism as an interpersonal dynamic at weddings was examined using feminist critical science. Data were collected from 45 gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people who attended focus groups. Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender participants described multiple interactions in which they were devalued or hidden while het-erosexuality was elevated, as well as interactions in which they or another family member resisted heterosexism. Weddings were perceived to be difficult, and participation in them was questioned. As part of their critique of weddings, participants offered a vision of relationships that was based on commitment, rather than heterosexuality or material benefits. Results of this study were used to create a brochure and Website for educating heterosexual people planning weddings. PMID:24815897

  4. The TNF family member APRIL promotes colorectal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lascano, V; Zabalegui, L F; Cameron, K; Guadagnoli, M; Jansen, M; Burggraaf, M; Versloot, M; Rodermond, H; van der Loos, C; Carvalho-Pinto, C E; Kalthoff, H; Medema, J P; Hahne, M

    2012-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family member APRIL (A proliferation inducing ligand) is a disease promoter in B-cell malignancies. APRIL has also been associated with a wide range of solid malignancies, including colorectal cancer (CRC). As evidence for a supportive role of APRIL in solid tumor formation was still lacking, we studied the involvement of APRIL in CRC. We observed that ectopic APRIL expression exacerbates the number and size of adenomas in ApcMin mice and in a mouse model for colitis-associated colon carcinogenesis. Furthermore, knockdown of APRIL in primary spheroid cultures of colon cancer cells and both mouse and human CRC cell lines reduced tumor clonogenicity and in vivo outgrowth. Taken together, our data therefore indicate that both tumor-derived APRIL and APRIL produced by non-tumor cells is supportive in colorectal tumorigenesis. PMID:22705846

  5. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S. before I complete my service... member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S. before I complete my service agreement? Yes, your agency may pay for your immediate family member(s) and your household goods to be returned to...

  6. Functional and cancer genomics of ASXL family members

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, M

    2013-01-01

    Additional sex combs-like (ASXL)1, ASXL2 and ASXL3 are human homologues of the Drosophila Asx gene that are involved in the regulation or recruitment of the Polycomb-group repressor complex (PRC) and trithorax-group (trxG) activator complex. ASXL proteins consist of ASXN, ASXH, ASXM1, ASXM2 and PHD domains. ASXL1 directly interacts with BAP1, KDM1A (LSD1), NCOA1 and nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs), such as retinoic acid receptors, oestrogen receptor and androgen receptor. ASXL family members are epigenetic scaffolding proteins that assemble epigenetic regulators and transcription factors to specific genomic loci with histone modifications. ASXL1 is involved in transcriptional repression through an interaction with PRC2 and also contributes to transcriptional regulation through interactions with BAP1 and/or NHR complexes. Germ-line mutations of human ASXL1 and ASXL3 occur in Bohring-Opitz and related syndromes. Amplification and overexpression of ASXL1 occur in cervical cancer. Truncation mutations of ASXL1 occur in colorectal cancers with microsatellite instability (MSI), malignant myeloid diseases, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and liver, prostate and breast cancers; those of ASXL2 occur in prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer and breast cancer and those of ASXL3 are observed in melanoma. EPC1-ASXL2 gene fusion occurs in adult T-cell leukaemia/lymphoma. The prognosis of myeloid malignancies with misregulating truncation mutations of ASXL1 is poor. ASXL family members are assumed to be tumour suppressive or oncogenic in a context-dependent manner. PMID:23736028

  7. 5 CFR 734.307 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family... candidate for partisan political office may appear in a family photograph which is printed in a...

  8. Interaction between nucleosome assembly protein 1-like family members.

    PubMed

    Attia, Mikaël; Förster, Andreas; Rachez, Christophe; Freemont, Paul; Avner, Philip; Rogner, Ute Christine

    2011-04-15

    Mammals possess five nucleosome assembly protein 1-like (NAP1L) proteins, with three of them being expressed exclusively in the nervous system. The biological importance of the neuron-specific NAP1L2 protein is demonstrated by the neural tube defects occurring during the embryonic development of Nap1l2 mutant mice, which are associated with an overproliferation of neural stem cells and decreased neuronal differentiation. NAP1L2 controls the expression of its target genes, such as the cell cycle regulator Cdkn1c, at least in part via an effect on histone acetylation. Using a two-hybrid analysis, we have identified several proteins interacting with NAP1L2, including the ubiquitously expressed members of the nucleosome assembly protein family, NAP1L1 and NAP1L4. Structural studies further predict that all five NAP1-like proteins are able to interact directly via their highly conserved α-helices. These elements, in conjunction with the coexpression of all the NAP1-like proteins in neurons and the finding that deletion of Nap1l2 affects the cytoplasmic-nuclear distribution patterns of both NAP1L1 and NAP1L4 and their recruitment to target genes, suggest that combinatorial variation within the NAP family may ensure adaptation to the specific requirements for neuronal differentiation such as intercellular repartition, chromatin modification, transcriptional regulation, or the recruitment of specific transcription factors. PMID:21333655

  9. Faustoviruses: Comparative Genomics of New Megavirales Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Benamar, Samia; Reteno, Dorine G. I.; Bandaly, Victor; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    An emerging interest for the giant virus discovery process, genome sequencing and analysis has allowed an expansion of the number of known Megavirales members. Using the protist Vermamoeba sp. as cell support, a new giant virus named Faustovirus has been isolated. In this study, we describe the genome sequences of nine Faustoviruses and build a genomic comparison in order to have a comprehensive overview of genomic composition and diversity among this new virus family. The average sequence length of these viruses is 467,592.44 bp (ranging from 455,803 to 491,024 bp), making them the fourth largest Megavirales genome after Mimiviruses, Pandoraviruses, and Pithovirus sibericum. Faustovirus genomes displayed an average G+C content of 37.14 % (ranging from 36.22 to 39.59%) which is close to the G+C content range of the Asfarviridae genomes (38%). The proportion of best matches and the phylogenetic analysis suggest a shared origin with Asfarviridae without belonging to the same family. The core-gene-based phylogeny of Faustoviruses study has identified four lineages. These results were confirmed by the analysis of amino acids and COGs category distribution. The diversity of the gene composition of these lineages is mainly explained by gene deletion or acquisition and some exceptions for gene duplications. The high proportion of best matches from Bacteria and Phycodnaviridae on the pan-genome and unique genes may be explained by an interaction occurring after the separation of the lineages. The Faustovirus core-genome appears to consolidate the surrounding of 207 genes whereas the pan-genome is described as an open pan-genome, its enrichment via the discovery of new Faustoviruses is required to better seize all the genomic diversity of this family. PMID:26903952

  10. Faustoviruses: Comparative Genomics of New Megavirales Family Members.

    PubMed

    Benamar, Samia; Reteno, Dorine G I; Bandaly, Victor; Labas, Noémie; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    An emerging interest for the giant virus discovery process, genome sequencing and analysis has allowed an expansion of the number of known Megavirales members. Using the protist Vermamoeba sp. as cell support, a new giant virus named Faustovirus has been isolated. In this study, we describe the genome sequences of nine Faustoviruses and build a genomic comparison in order to have a comprehensive overview of genomic composition and diversity among this new virus family. The average sequence length of these viruses is 467,592.44 bp (ranging from 455,803 to 491,024 bp), making them the fourth largest Megavirales genome after Mimiviruses, Pandoraviruses, and Pithovirus sibericum. Faustovirus genomes displayed an average G+C content of 37.14 % (ranging from 36.22 to 39.59%) which is close to the G+C content range of the Asfarviridae genomes (38%). The proportion of best matches and the phylogenetic analysis suggest a shared origin with Asfarviridae without belonging to the same family. The core-gene-based phylogeny of Faustoviruses study has identified four lineages. These results were confirmed by the analysis of amino acids and COGs category distribution. The diversity of the gene composition of these lineages is mainly explained by gene deletion or acquisition and some exceptions for gene duplications. The high proportion of best matches from Bacteria and Phycodnaviridae on the pan-genome and unique genes may be explained by an interaction occurring after the separation of the lineages. The Faustovirus core-genome appears to consolidate the surrounding of 207 genes whereas the pan-genome is described as an open pan-genome, its enrichment via the discovery of new Faustoviruses is required to better seize all the genomic diversity of this family. PMID:26903952

  11. Informational Support to Family Members of Intensive Care Unit Patients: The Perspectives of Families and Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Gaeeni, Mina; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Seyedfatemi, Naima; Mohammadi, Nooredin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The receiving information about the patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is classified among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. Meeting the informational needs of families is a major goal for intensive care workers. Delivering honest, intelligible and effective information raises specific challenges in the stressful setting of the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this qualitative study was to explain perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. Method: Using a conventional content analysis approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants to explore their perspectives of providing informational support to families of ICU patients. A purposeful sampling method was used to recruit nineteen family members of thirteen patients hospitalized in the ICU and twelve nurses from three teaching hospitals. In general, 31 persons participated in this study. Data collection continued to achieve data saturation. Findings: A conventional content analysis of the data produced three categories and seven sub-categories. The three main categories were as followed, a) providing information, b) handling information and c) using information. Providing information had three sub-categories consisting of “receiving admission news”, “receiving truthful and complete information” and receiving general information. Handling information had two sub-categories consisting ‘keeping information” and “gradual revelation”. Lastly, using information has two sub-categories consisting of “support of patient” and “support of family members”. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed perspectives of families of Intensive Care Unit patients and nurses about informational support. It also determines the nurses’ need to know more about the influence of their supportive role on family’s ICU patients informing. In addition, the results of present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering guidelines about informational support to the families of the patients hospitalized in the ICU. PMID:25716373

  12. Syncope in genotype-negative long QT syndrome family members.

    PubMed

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Ruwald, Martin H; Goldenberg, Ilan; Wieling, Wouter; McNitt, Scott; Polonsky, Bronislava; Wilde, Arthur A M; van Dijk, Nynke; Moss, Arthur J

    2014-10-15

    Unaffected long-QT syndrome family members (FMs) frequently experience syncope. The aims of this study were to test the hypothesis that syncope events in FMs are benign events and to compare clinical characteristics, triggers eliciting the syncope events, and long-term outcomes between FMs and those with LQT1 or LQT2 mutations from the international Long QT Syndrome Registry. A total of 679 FMs, 864 LQT1 patients, and 782 LQT2 patients were included. Seventy-eight FMs (11%) experienced cardiovascular events. Almost all cardiovascular events were nonfatal syncope; only 1 FM, with an additional mitral valve prolapse, experienced aborted cardiac arrest during exercise. The mean age at first syncope in FMs was 17 years, and female FMs experienced syncope more frequently than male FMs (14% vs 9%, p = 0.027). Syncope was more frequently triggered by exercise in LQT1 patients (43% in LQT1 patients vs 5% in FMs, p <0.001), while syncope triggered by a variety of other triggers was more frequent in FMs (54% in FMs vs 22% in LQT1 patients and 30% in LQT2 patients, p <0.001 for both). None of the FMs experienced aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death after the first syncopal episode. In conclusion, syncope is frequently present in FMs, and these syncopal events occurred more frequently in female than in male FMs, with an increased incidence in midadolescence. Triggers eliciting the syncopal events were different between FMs and patients with long-QT syndrome mutations. Hence, the type of trigger is useful in distinguishing between high- and low-risk syncope. These data indicate that FMs from families with LQTS have a benign form of syncope, most likely related to vasovagal syncope and not ventricular tachyarrhythmic syncope. PMID:25173441

  13. Discovery of a Satellite to Asteroid Family Member (702) Alauda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margot, Jean-Luc; Rojo, P.

    2007-10-01

    Rojo and Margot [1] reported the discovery of a satellite to (702) Alauda from adaptive-optics imaging with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) 8-m Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Cerro Paranal, Chile. (702) Alauda (a = 3.2 AU, e = 0.02, i = 21 deg) has been identified as the largest member of a dynamical family [2,3], suggesting a possible origin of the satellite in the family formation event. The diameter of (702) Alauda is given in the IRAS Minor Planet Survey (IMPS) as 194.73 +/- 3.2 km [4]. If the primary and secondary have similar albedoes, the diameter of the satellite is about 5.5 km. This is based on the measured flux ratio between primary and secondary of 1250, possibly the largest ever observed for solar system binaries with adaptive optics. This is the first satellite discovered to a large minor planet of type B in the SMASSII taxonomy, which is defined by a linear featureless spectrum with bluish to neutral slope [5]. B-types are carbonaceous asteroids that are not well characterized. The mass and density estimates of B-type (2) Pallas vary by 50% [6,7]. Our ongoing determination of the satellite orbit will provide mass and density estimates for (702) Alauda. [1] Rojo and Margot, CBET 1016, 2007. [2] Foglia and Masi 2004, Minor Planet Bull. 41, 100. [3] Gil-Hutton 2006, Icarus 183, 93. [4] Tedesco 2002, AJ 123, 1056. [5] Bus and Binzel 2002, Icarus 158, 146. [6] Hilton 2002, Asteroids III, 103. [7] Britt et al. 2002, Asteroids III, 485.

  14. 76 FR 71259 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... Register on Tuesday, November 1, 2011 (76 FR 67363). DATES: This correction is effective on November 17... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA... for certain family members), 3127 (concerning members of religious faiths), and 3306(c)(5)...

  15. 76 FR 76037 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Register on Tuesday, November 1, 2011 (76 FR 67363). DATES: This correction is effective on December 6... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA... for certain family members), 3127 (concerning members of religious faiths), and 3306(c)(5)...

  16. Mental health outcomes of family members of Oregonians who request physician aid in dying.

    PubMed

    Ganzini, Linda; Goy, Elizabeth R; Dobscha, Steven K; Prigerson, Holly

    2009-12-01

    Oregon legalized physician aid in dying over 10 years ago but little is known about the effects of this choice on family members' mental health. We surveyed 95 family members of decedent Oregonians who had explicitly requested aid in dying, including 59 whose loved one received a lethal prescription and 36 whose loved one died by lethal ingestion. For comparison purposes, family members of Oregonians who died of cancer or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also were surveyed. A mean of 14 months after death, 11% of family members whose loved one requested aid in dying had major depressive disorder, 2% had prolonged grief, and 38% had received mental health care. Among those whose family member requested aid in dying, whether or not the patient accessed a lethal prescription had no influence on subsequent depression, grief, or mental health services use; however, family members of Oregonians who received a lethal prescription were more likely to believe that their loved one's choices were honored and less likely to have regrets about how the loved one died. Comparing family members of those who requested aid in dying to those who did not revealed no differences in primary mental health outcomes of depression, grief, or mental health services use. Family members of Oregonians who requested aid in dying felt more prepared and accepting of the death than comparison family members. In summary, pursuit of aid in dying does not have negative effects on surviving family members and may be associated with greater preparation and acceptance of death. PMID:19783401

  17. Emotional Disorders in Pairs of Patients and Their Family Members during and after ICU Stay

    PubMed Central

    Fumis, Renata Rego Lins; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Martins, Paulo Sérgio; Schettino, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients and family members undergo different experiences of suffering from emotional disorders during ICU stay and after ICU discharge. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in pairs (patient and respective family member), during stay at an open visit ICU and at 30 and 90-days post-ICU discharge. We hypothesized that there was a positive correlation with the severity of symptoms among pairs and different patterns of suffering over time. Methods A prospective study was conducted in a 22-bed adult general ICU including patients with >48 hours stay. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was completed by the pairs (patients/respective family member). Interviews were made by phone at 30 and 90-days post-ICU discharge using the Impact of Event Scale (IES) and the HADS. Multivariate models were constructed to predict IES score at 30 days for patients and family members. Results Four hundred and seventy one family members and 289 patients were interviewed in the ICU forming 184 pairs for analysis. Regarding HADS score, patients presented less symptoms than family members of patients who survived and who deceased at 30 and 90-days (p<0.001). However, family members of patients who deceased scored higher anxiety and depression symptoms (p = 0.048) at 90-days when compared with family members of patients who survived. Patients and family members at 30-days had a similar IES score, but it was higher in family members at 90-days (p = 0.019). For both family members and patients, age and symptoms of anxiety and depression during ICU were the major determinants for PTSD at 30-days. Conclusions Anxiety, depression and PTSD symptoms were higher in family members than in the patients. Furthermore, these symptoms in family members persisted at 3 months, while they decreased in patients. PMID:25616059

  18. Post-Genomic Analysis of Members of the Family Vibrionaceae.

    PubMed

    Boyd, E Fidelma; Carpenter, Megan R; Chowdhury, Nityananda; Cohen, Analuisa L; Haines-Menges, Brandy L; Kalburge, Sai S; Kingston, Joseph J; Lubin, J B; Ongagna-Yhombi, Serge Y; Whitaker, W Brian

    2015-10-01

    Similar to other genera and species of bacteria, whole genomic sequencing has revolutionized how we think about and address questions of basic Vibrio biology. In this review we examined 36 completely sequenced and annotated members of the Vibrionaceae family, encompassing 12 different species of the genera Vibrio, Aliivibrio, and Photobacterium. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships among representatives of this group of bacteria by using three housekeeping genes and 16S rRNA sequences. With an evolutionary framework in place, we describe the occurrence and distribution of primary and alternative sigma factors, global regulators present in all bacteria. Among Vibrio we show that the number and function of many of these sigma factors differs from species to species. We also describe the role of the Vibrio-specific regulator ToxRS in fitness and survival. Examination of the biochemical capabilities was and still is the foundation of classifying and identifying new Vibrio species. Using comparative genomics, we examine the distribution of carbon utilization patterns among Vibrio species as a possible marker for understanding bacteria-host interactions. Finally, we discuss the significant role that horizontal gene transfer, specifically, the distribution and structure of integrons, has played in Vibrio evolution. PMID:26542048

  19. STS-106 crew gathers to greet family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    While meeting with family on the day before launch, the STS-106 crew poses for a photo. Waving, left to right, are Mission Specialist Richard A. Mastracchio, Commander Terrence W. Wilcutt, Pilot Scott D. Altman, and Mission Specialists Edward T. Lu, Yuri I. Malenchenko, Boris V. Morukov and Daniel C. Burbank. Malenchenko and Morukov are with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency. In the background (left) is Launch Pad 39B and Space Shuttle Atlantis, with the Rotating Service Structure still in place. STS-106 is scheduled to launch Sept. 8, 2000, at 8:45 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39B. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed '''Expedition One,''' is due to arrive at the Station in late fall. Landing is targeted for Sept. 19 at 4:59 a.m. EDT at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility.

  20. New Members of the Mammalian Glycerophosphodiester Phosphodiesterase Family

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Noriyasu; Kudo, Takahiro; Yamashita, Yosuke; Mariggi, Stefania; Araki, Mari; Honda, Ayako; Nagano, Tomomi; Isaji, Chiaki; Kato, Norihisa; Corda, Daniela; Izumi, Takashi; Yanaka, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    The known mammalian glycerophosphodiester phosphodiesterases (GP-PDEs) hydrolyze glycerophosphodiesters. In this study, two novel members of the mammalian GP-PDE family, GDE4 and GDE7, were isolated, and the molecular basis of mammalian GP-PDEs was further explored. The GDE4 and GDE7 sequences are highly homologous and evolutionarily close. GDE4 is expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, spermatids, and macrophages, whereas GDE7 is particularly expressed in gastro-esophageal epithelial cells. Unlike other mammalian GP-PDEs, GDE4 and GDE7 cannot hydrolyze either glycerophosphoinositol or glycerophosphocholine. Unexpectedly, both GDE4 and GDE7 show a lysophospholipase D activity toward lysophosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC). We purified the recombinant GDE4 and GDE7 proteins and show that these enzymes can hydrolyze lyso-PC to produce lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Further characterization of purified recombinant GDE4 showed that it can also convert lyso-platelet-activating factor (1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine; lyso-PAF) to alkyl-LPA. These data contribute to our current understanding of mammalian GP-PDEs and of their physiological roles via the control of lyso-PC and lyso-PAF metabolism in gastrointestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. PMID:25528375

  1. Experiences of the families concerning organ donation of a family member with brain death

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Hojatollah; Roshani, Asieh; Nazari, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: In recent years, the lack of organ for transplantation has resulted in health planners and authorities in all countries, including Iran, paying serious attention to the issue. Despite the above-mentioned fact, families with a member affected by brain death are not interested in organ donation. Objective: This study is aimed at making an investigation into the decision-making process of organ donation in families with brain death. Also, the research is aimed at investigating how the deterrent and facilitating factors in the process of organ donation can be made. Materials and Methods: The current research is a qualitative study with descriptive exploratory approach. Data were collected through unstructured interviews with 10 family members who gave consent to organ donation of their family members in 2012. Purposeful sampling processes began in March 2012 and lasted up to June 2012. Simultaneously, thematic approach was used in analyzing the data. Results: Data analysis led to finding 24 categories and 11 themes, which fell into two categories: facilitating and deterrent factors. The five main deterrent themes included the five themes of prohibiting factors that were shock, hope for recovery, unknown process, and conflict of opinions, and worrying association. The six main facilitating themes included humanistic desires, immortality, culture making, satisfaction of the deceased, assurance, and eternal honor. Conclusion: The findings indicated that there is ambiguity and different interpretations on brain death. The research also showed that using the experiences of donator families can provide practical and applied solutions to facilitate the process of organ donation and solve the problems faced by the health care system. PMID:24949074

  2. Studying the Effect Dialogic Reading Has on Family Members' Verbal Interactions during Shared Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Diana; Dauksas, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The effect dialogic reading training has on the verbal interactions of family members and their "at risk" preschool children was studied. There were significant differences at the time of the post-test between family members who received dialogic reading training and the group that participated in the preschool's traditional family time. Family…

  3. Family Members as Case Managers: Partnership Between the Formal and Informal Support Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Marsha Mailick; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Randomly assigned elderly persons to either experimental group (N=81) in which family members participated in case management training program, or to control group (N=76). Following training, family members in experimental group performed significantly greater number of case management tasks on behalf of elderly relatives than did family members…

  4. The Role of Family Members in the Treatment of Women Alcoholics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavarone, Antonia R.

    Alcoholism is frequently called a family disease; encouraging and even insisting that family members participate in the treatment of alcoholics has become routine practice in almost every treatment setting. This study examined the relationship between treatment participation by a family member and two measures of recovery for three birth cohorts…

  5. Essential PchG-Dependent Reduction in Pyochelin Biosynthesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Reimmann, Cornelia; Patel, Hiten M.; Serino, Laura; Barone, Mario; Walsh, Christopher T.; Haas, Dieter

    2001-01-01

    The biosynthetic genes pchDCBA and pchEF, which are known to be required for the formation of the siderophore pyochelin and its precursors salicylate and dihydroaeruginoate (Dha), are clustered with the pchR regulatory gene on the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The 4.6-kb region located downstream of the pchEF genes was found to contain three additional, contiguous genes, pchG, pchH, and pchI, probably forming a pchEFGHI operon. The deduced amino acid sequences of PchH and PchI are similar to those of ATP binding cassette transport proteins with an export function. PchG is a homolog of the Yersinia pestis and Y. enterocolitica proteins YbtU and Irp3, which are involved in the biosynthesis of yersiniabactin. A null mutation in pchG abolished pyochelin formation, whereas mutations in pchH and pchI did not affect the amounts of salicylate, Dha, and pyochelin produced. The pyochelin biosynthetic genes were expressed from a vector promoter, uncoupling them from Fur-mediated repression by iron and PchR-dependent induction by pyochelin. In a P. aeruginosa mutant lacking the entire pyochelin biosynthetic gene cluster, the expressed pchDCBA and pchEFG genes were sufficient for salicylate, Dha, and pyochelin production. Pyochelin formation was also obtained in the heterologous host Escherichia coli expressing pchDCBA and pchEFG together with the E. coli entD gene, which provides a phosphopantetheinyl transferase necessary for PchE and PchF activation. The PchG protein was purified and used in combination with PchD and phosphopantetheinylated PchE and PchF in vitro to produce pyochelin from salicylate, l-cysteine, ATP, NADPH, and S-adenosylmethionine. Based on this assay, a reductase function was attributed to PchG. In summary, this study completes the identification of the biosynthetic genes required for pyochelin formation from chorismate in P. aeruginosa. PMID:11208777

  6. The Role of IL-1 Family Members and Kupffer Cells in Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Quanhui; Hu, Jianjun; Yu, Xiaolan; Guan, Wen; Lu, Huili; Yu, Yan; Yu, Yongsheng; Zang, Guoqiang; Tang, Zhenghao

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) family and Kupffer cells are linked with liver regeneration, but their precise roles remain unclear. IL-1 family members are pleiotropic factors with a range of biological roles in liver diseases, inducing hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, as well as liver regeneration. Kupffer cells are the main source of IL-1 and IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), the key members of IL-1 family. This systemic review highlights a close association of IL-1 family members and Kupffer cells with liver regeneration, although their specific roles are inconclusive. Moreover, IL-1 members are proposed to induce effects on liver regeneration through Kupffer cells. PMID:27092311

  7. IL-17 family member cytokines: regulation, and function in innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Joseph M.; Angkasekwinai, Pornpimon; Dong, Chen

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the IL-17 family member cytokines have become prominent subjects of investigation. IL-17 (IL-17A) is the best-described member of this family where its production has been mainly attributed to a specialized T helper subset of the adaptive immune response termed Th17. However, recent research on this and other Th17 cytokines has revealed new sources and functions of IL-17 family members in the innate immune response. This review will highlight recent advances in the field of IL-17 family member cytokines and will predominately focus on the innate regulation and function of IL-17, IL-17F, and IL-25. PMID:21074482

  8. Racial disparity in capital punishment and its impact on family members of capital defendants.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    A review of the literature was conducted to explore the continuing racial disparity in capital punishment and its effects on family members of African American capital defendants. Statistical studies conducted on both the state and national level conclude that racial bias influences all stages of the death penalty process, with race of the victim being one of the most significant factors. This racial bias places an added burden on family members of African American capital defendants. While research has explored the impact of capital punishment on family members of capital defendants, the unique experiences of family members of African American defendants has not been addressed in the research literature. PMID:23581803

  9. Everyday Living with Diabetes Described by Family Members of Adult People with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Paavilainen, Eija; Åstedt-Kurki, Päivi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore family members' experiences of everyday life in families with adult people living with type 1 diabetes. The grounded theory method was used to gather and analyse data from the interviews of nineteen family members. Six concepts describing the family members' views on everyday living with diabetes were generated on the basis of the data. Everyday life with diabetes is described as being intertwined with hypoglycemia. Becoming acquainted with diabetes takes place little by little. Being involved in the management and watching self-management from the sidelines are concepts describing family members' participation in the daily management of diabetes. The family members are also integrating diabetes into everyday life. Living on an emotional roller-coaster tells about the thoughts and feelings that family members experience. Family members of adult people with diabetes are involved in the management of the diabetes in many ways and experience many concerns. The family members' point of view is important to take into consideration when developing education for adults with diabetes. PMID:24455251

  10. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for the family member or covered servicemember. (c) An employee's intermittent leave or a reduced... situation where the condition of the family member or covered servicemember itself is intermittent, but also... rules governing the use of intermittent or reduced schedule leave....

  11. Measuring Resident and Family Member Determinants of Satisfaction with Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Perry; Guihan, Marylou; Bryant, Fred B.; Munroe, Donna J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study developed measures of satisfaction with assisted living from residents' and family members' perspectives. Design and Methods: We collected survey data from 204 residents and 232 family members associated with 11 assisted living facilities. We used confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate the goodness of fit of a priori…

  12. 5 CFR 9001.106 - Restrictions resulting from employment of family and household members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... participate in the matter using the standard set forth in 5 CFR 2635.502(d). (b) Reporting certain... family and household members. 9001.106 Section 9001.106 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE... § 9001.106 Restrictions resulting from employment of family and household members. (a)...

  13. 77 FR 27542 - Agency Information Collection Activities (Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activities (Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey) Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10- 21081(NR). OMB Control Number: 2900-0701. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approve collection. Abstract: The data collected...

  14. 77 FR 12109 - Proposed Information Collection (Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey) Activity: Comment.... Title: Bereaved Family Member Satisfaction Survey, VA Form 10- 21081(NR). OMB Control Number: 2900-0701. Type of Review: Extension of a currently approved collection. Abstract: The data collected on VA...

  15. Caregiving for Dementia in Family Members: Caregiving Burden and Prospects for Effective Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Robert J.; And Others

    Caring for a family member with dementia is a major source of stress for the caregiver. To assess the impact of caring for an impaired family member and to evaluate the effectiveness of intervention programs, 34 caregivers of relatives with dementia completed an amended form of the Philadelphia Geriatric Center's Caregiver Survey and two…

  16. Effective doses to family members of patients treated with radioiodine-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdraveska Kocovska, M.; Vaskova, O.; Majstorov, V.; Kuzmanovska, S.; Pop Gjorceva, D.; Spasic Jokic, V.

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective dose to family members of thyroid cancer and hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine-131, and also to compare the results with dose constraints proposed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). For the estimation of the effective doses, sixty family members of sixty patients, treated with radioiodine-131, and thermoluminiscent dosimeters (Model TLD 100) were used. Thyroid cancer patients were hospitalized for three days, while hyperthyroid patients were treated on out-patient basis. The family members wore TLD in front of the torso for seven days. The radiation doses to family members of thyroid cancer patients were well below the recommended dose constraint of 1 mSv. The mean value of effective dose was 0.21 mSv (min 0.02 - max 0.51 mSv). Effective doses, higher than 1 mSv, were detected for 11 family members of hyperthyroid patients. The mean value of effective dose of family members of hyperthyroid patients was 0.87 mSv (min 0.12 - max 6.79). The estimated effective doses to family members of hyperthyroid patients were higher than the effective doses to family members of thyroid carcinoma patients. These findings may be considered when establishing new national guidelines concerning radiation protection and release of patients after a treatment with radioiodine therapy.

  17. The Effect of Home Caregiving Program for Family Members Providing Care for Chronically Ill Relative Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Hussein Jassim; Kamel, Andaleeb Abu

    2015-01-01

    Health care systems in many countries are moving towards outpatient care in which family members are central in providing care for patients with life-threatening illness. Family members and friends haven't knowledge and skills to become caregivers as many studies found that, the need to involve in such program to enhance their ability to be…

  18. Catapulting Shifts in Images, Understandings, and Actions for Family Members through Research-Based Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Sherry L.; Gillies, Jennifer; Mitchell, Gail J.; Jonas-Simpson, Christine; Whyte, Colleen; Carson, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This article examined how images, understandings, and actions change for family members of persons with dementia after the introduction of a research-based drama called I'm Still Here. Guided by interpretivist phenomenology, a set of seven pre- and post-performance focus groups were conducted with family members (n = 48) in four cities. Findings…

  19. Experiences of Military Youth during a Family Member's Deployment: Changes, Challenges, and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knobloch, Leanne K.; Pusateri, Kimberly B.; Ebata, Aaron T.; McGlaughlin, Patricia C.

    2015-01-01

    The deployment of a family member can be very distressing for military children, but it also can supply opportunities for growth. This study addresses calls for research on the changes, challenges, and opportunities facing youth during a family member's tour of duty. It uses the relational turbulence model to frame research questions about how…

  20. Catapulting Shifts in Images, Understandings, and Actions for Family Members through Research-Based Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Sherry L.; Gillies, Jennifer; Mitchell, Gail J.; Jonas-Simpson, Christine; Whyte, Colleen; Carson, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This article examined how images, understandings, and actions change for family members of persons with dementia after the introduction of a research-based drama called I'm Still Here. Guided by interpretivist phenomenology, a set of seven pre- and post-performance focus groups were conducted with family members (n = 48) in four cities. Findings

  1. Dementia Management Strategies and Adjustment of Family Members of Older Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichsen, Gregory A.; Niederehe, George

    1994-01-01

    Examined how strategies to manage dementia problems in 152 older people were associated with adjustment of family members while providing assistance to relative. Identified three dementia management strategies (criticism, encouragement, and active management) that were associated with three indices of family members' emotional adjustment (burden,…

  2. Television in Indian Adolescents' Lives: A Member of the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Suman; Larson, Reed W.

    2002-01-01

    Studied the context in which eighth graders in India watch television through an experience sampling study of 100 urban middle-class Indian families. As a whole, findings indicate that the television viewing of middle-class Indian youth is typically a relaxed antidote to the stresses of the day that they share with their families. (SLD)

  3. Accommodating family life: mentoring future female faculty members.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-03-01

    The demands of family life are crucial factors in successfully retaining women in science. Retention efforts should focus on creating a family-friendly environment within the laboratory and the institute. Based on my own experiences, I suggest ways to attract top young scientists and support their development into leading researchers. PMID:25601644

  4. Coping with colorectal cancer: a qualitative exploration with patients and their family members

    PubMed Central

    Asiedu, Gladys B; Eustace, Rosemary W; Eton, David T

    2014-01-01

    Background. Extensive family coping research has been conducted among breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma with lesser emphasis on the coping experiences of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and their family members. Objective. To examine ways in which patients and their family members cope with the diagnosis of CRC. Methods. A total of 73 participants (21 patients, 52 family members) from 23 families described their experiences during and after a CRC diagnosis, including their coping experiences with the diagnosis. Data from semi-structured interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed utilizing content analysis with inductive coding methods. Results. Eight major themes were identified: positive reframing, holding on to a sense of normalcy, religion and spirituality, joining a group, creating awareness of CRC, lifestyle change, seeking information and alternative treatments. Maintaining an emotional sense of normalcy through positive thinking, engaging in activities to take one’s mind off the diagnosis and believing that there is a higher authority which has control over the diagnosis and life were vital for the patients and their family members. Patients and family members used similar coping strategies. Conclusion. Findings from this study have implications for understanding how families blend emotion-based and problem-focused coping strategies in the face of a CRC diagnosis. Further developing evidence-based interventions that target coping and well-being in cancer patients and extending them to family members is necessary and holds great promise for providers who care for patients with familial cancers. PMID:25080507

  5. Does palliative care improve quality? A survey of bereaved family members.

    PubMed

    Gelfman, Laura P; Meier, Diane E; Morrison, R Sean

    2008-07-01

    Palliative care is the interdisciplinary specialty that aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of care for patients with serious illness and their families. Although palliative care programs are becoming increasingly prevalent in U.S. hospitals, the impact of hospital palliative care consultation programs on the quality of care received by family members is not well understood. We conducted prospective quantitative telephonic interviews of family members of patients who died at Mount Sinai Medical Center between April and December 2005 using the validated "After-Death Bereaved Family Member Interview," to assess quality of medical care at the end of life. Multivariable techniques were used to compare family satisfaction of palliative care patients vs. usual care patients controlling for age, race (white vs. nonwhite), diagnosis (cancer vs. noncancer), socioeconomic status (Medicaid vs. non-Medicaid), and functional status (number of dependent activities of daily living). One hundred ninety eligible subjects were contacted and successful interviews were completed with 149 (78.4%) family members (54 palliative care and 95 usual care patients). Palliative care showed benefit, with 65% of palliative care patients' family members reporting that their emotional or spiritual needs were met, as compared to 35% of usual care patients' family members (P=0.004). Sixty-seven percent of palliative care patients' family members reported confidence in one or more self-efficacy domains, as compared to 44% of usual care patients' family members (P=0.03). Our study shows that palliative care consultation is associated with improved satisfaction, with attention to family and enhanced self-efficacy. Palliative care offers a unique approach by integrating the needs of the family into the care of the patient. PMID:18411019

  6. Empowerment in outpatient care for patients with chronic kidney disease - from the family member's perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Family members of persons with pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease may experience feelings of vulnerability and insecurity as the disease follows its course. Against this background, the aim of the present study was to explore empowerment in outpatient care as experienced by these family members. Methods An inductive approach for qualitative data analysis was chosen. The study sample comprised 12 family members of pre-dialysis patients at an outpatient kidney clinic. Two interviews with each family member were subjected to content analysis to gain an understanding of empowerment from the family members' perspective. Results Having strength to assume the responsibility was the main theme that emerged from the following five sub-themes: Being an involved participant, Having confirming encounters, Trusting in health-care staff, Comprehending through knowledge, and Feeling left out. Four of these five sub-themes were positive. The fifth subtheme illuminated negative experience, indicating the absence of empowerment. Conclusions Family members' experience of empowerment is dependent on their ability to assume the responsibility for a relative with chronic kidney disease when needed. The findings emphasise the need for a family perspective and the significance of a supportive environment for family members of persons in outpatient care. PMID:22035275

  7. Time travel: the lived experience of providing feeding assistance to a family member with dementia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Ruth Palan; Amella, Elaine J

    2011-04-01

    A major concern facing family members of people with advanced dementia is deciding how to provide food and water. Nurses play a significant role in supporting mealtimes, yet little is known about the meaning of mealtime for family caregivers of people with dementia. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore the experience of providing feeding assistance to a family member with dementia from the perspective of community and nursing home family caregivers. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with 16 family caregivers of individuals with advanced dementia. Analysis revealed that the experience was likened to living in a time warp whereby family caregivers were propelled from pleasant memories of the past, to the stark reality of the present, to a foreboding and uncertain future. Findings can guide nurses to dialogue with family members and to ensure that the full spectrum of mealtime is preserved. PMID:20795582

  8. Response to hepatitis B vaccine in relation to the hepatitis B status of family members.

    PubMed

    Inskip, H M; Hall, A J; Temple, I K; Loik, F; Herbage, E; Chotard, J; Whittle, H

    1991-09-01

    The influence of the hepatitis B status of family members on the response to hepatitis B vaccine of an infant has been examined in 395 families. The presence of one or more HBsAg-positive family members did not appear to have any effect on the vaccine response. This is an encouraging finding as children born into carrier families are at an increased risk of becoming carriers themselves. That the vaccine response of such children is as good as for those born into non-carrier families means that they are likely to be protected against the carrier state by the vaccine. PMID:1835453

  9. The psychosocial status of the family members of rheumatoid arthritis patients in Korea.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sang Wan; Ha, You Jung; Kang, Eun Ha; Lee, Yun Jong; Song, Yeong Wook

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the psychosocial aspect of the family members of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a population-based analysis to examine the psychosocial characteristics of family members of RA patients in comparison with the general population. From the Fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey dataset (KNHANES V) (2010-2012), we identified 363 RA patients and selected family members of these patients who were aged 20 years or older (n = 367). The control group was randomly sampled from members of families without RA patients and matched for sex and age (n = 1101). We compared the psychosocial characteristics of family members of RA patients with the control group. Additionally, serial conditional logistic regression models were performed to evaluate the factors that affect psychosocial status of the RA family members, after adjusting for covariates. No significant differences were found in socioeconomic status between the two groups. For psychological factors, stress (85.8 vs 74.7 %, p < 0.001) and depression (7.9 vs 3.3 %, p < 0.001) were more common in the family members of RA patients. The presence of a RA patient in the family showed a positive association with stress [odds ratio (OR) 2.07; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.48-2.88, p < 0.001] and depression (OR 2.59, CI 1.55-4.32, p < 0.001), after adjusting for socioeconomic status. Our data show that the family members of RA patients have an increased prevalence of stress and depression. Physicians who treat RA patients should also consider the needs and the burden of family members. PMID:26748994

  10. 29 CFR 825.124 - Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Needed to care for a family member or covered servicemember. 825.124 Section 825.124 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OTHER LAWS THE FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and...

  11. Family Members Affected by a Close Relative's Addiction: The Stress-Strain-Coping-Support Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Templeton, Lorna

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the stress-strain-coping-support (SSCS) model which underpins the whole programme of work described in this supplement. The need for such a model is explained: previous models of substance misuse and the family have attributed dysfunction or deficiency to families or family members. In contrast, the SSCS model assumes that…

  12. Redefinition of Family Style in Response to the Reality of a Handicapped Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellhase, Leslie J.; Shellhase, Fern K.

    This paper utilizes coordinated practice and research observations of the personal and familial accommodations made to disability of an adult member. No assets accrue from disability; a family has only those potentials it had earlier which may be abandoned or poorly used by a family in its coping endeavors, or utilized fully in making needed…

  13. 76 FR 67384 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions To Disregard Entities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 31 and 301 RIN 1545-BJ06 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA... and addition read as follows: Sec. 31.3121(b)(3)-1 Family Employment. * * * * * (c) [The text of the...)(5)-1 Family Employment. * * * * * (c) [The text of the proposed amendment to Sec....

  14. Patients' and family members' experiences of a psychoeducational family intervention after a first episode psychosis: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Liv; Frich, Jan C; Friis, Svein; Rssberg, Jan Ivar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore patients' and family members' experiences of the different elements of a psychoeducational family intervention. A qualitative, explorative study was performed based on digitally recorded in-depth interviews with 12 patients and 14 family members. The interview data were transcribed in a slightly modified verbatim mode and analysed using systematic text condensation. Six themes that both patients and family members experienced as important in the family intervention were identified: alliance, support, anxiety and tension, knowledge and learning, time, and structure. A good relationship between the group leaders and participants was essential in preventing dropout. Meeting with other people in the same situation reduced feelings of shame and increased hope for the future. Hearing real life stories was experienced as being more important for gaining new knowledge about psychosis than lectures and workshops. However, many patients experienced anxiety and tension during the meetings. The group format could be demanding for patients immediately after a psychotic episode and for those still struggling with distressing psychotic symptoms. Group leaders need to recognise patients' levels of anxiety before, and during, the intervention, and consider the different needs of patients and family members in regards to when the intervention starts, the group format, and the patients' level of psychotic symptoms. The findings in the present study may help to tailor family work to better meet the needs of both patients and family members. PMID:24350752

  15. Using focus groups to design a psychoeducation program for patients with schizophrenia and their family members

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yan; Liu, Dan; Chen, Yuxiang; He, Guoping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine what factors to be considered in planning a psychoeducation program to better meet the needs of patients with schizophrenia and their family members. Methods: Three focus group sessions were conducted and recorded, transcribed, and analyzed by members of the research team. Results: Patients hoped to grasp the fullest possible knowledge about schizophrenia, whereas the factors influencing the efficacy of the schizophrenia health education curriculum included: discrimination, non-understanding of family members, easy to forget, unreasonable timetable. Health education was mainly in the form of classroom teaching. Conclusions: 1. At present, there are a few psychiatric education courses in China; 2. Patients and their family members are eager to acquire knowledge about the contents of schizophrenia; 3. Misconceptions would hinder the rehabilitation of patients; 4. Worry about being discriminated; 5. There is a different knowledge demand between the patients and their family members. PMID:24482705

  16. Nursing Strategies to Support Family Members of ICU Patients at High Risk of Dying

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Judith A.; Anderson, Ruth A.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Tulsky, James A.; Steinhauser, Karen E.; Bailey, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To explore how family members of ICU patients at high risk of dying respond to nursing communication strategies. Background: Family members of ICU patients may face difficult decisions. Nurses are in a position to provide support. Evidence of specific strategies that nurses use to support decision-making and how family members respond to these strategies is lacking. Methods: This is a prospective, qualitative descriptive study involving the family members of ICU patients identified as being at high risk of dying. Results: Family members described five nursing approaches: Demonstrating concern, building rapport, demonstrating professionalism, providing factual information, and supporting decision-making. This study provides evidence that when using these approaches, nurses helped family members to cope; to have hope, confidence, and trust; to prepare for and accept impending death; and to make decisions. Conclusion: Knowledge lays a foundation for interventions targeting the areas important to family members and most likely to improve their ability to make decisions and their well-being. PMID:24655938

  17. A unified nomenclature of NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER family members in plants.

    PubMed

    Lran, Sophie; Varala, Kranthi; Boyer, Jean-Christophe; Chiurazzi, Maurizio; Crawford, Nigel; Daniel-Vedele, Franoise; David, Laure; Dickstein, Rebecca; Fernandez, Emilio; Forde, Brian; Gassmann, Walter; Geiger, Dietmar; Gojon, Alain; Gong, Ji-Ming; Halkier, Barbara A; Harris, Jeanne M; Hedrich, Rainer; Limami, Anis M; Rentsch, Doris; Seo, Mitsunori; Tsay, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Mingyong; Coruzzi, Gloria; Lacombe, Benot

    2014-01-01

    Members of the plant NITRATE TRANSPORTER 1/PEPTIDE TRANSPORTER (NRT1/PTR) family display protein sequence homology with the SLC15/PepT/PTR/POT family of peptide transporters in animals. In comparison to their animal and bacterial counterparts, these plant proteins transport a wide variety of substrates: nitrate, peptides, amino acids, dicarboxylates, glucosinolates, IAA, and ABA. The phylogenetic relationship of the members of the NRT1/PTR family in 31 fully sequenced plant genomes allowed the identification of unambiguous clades, defining eight subfamilies. The phylogenetic tree was used to determine a unified nomenclature of this family named NPF, for NRT1/PTR FAMILY. We propose that the members should be named accordingly: NPFX.Y, where X denotes the subfamily and Y the individual member within the species. PMID:24055139

  18. To tell or not to tell: HIV disclosure to family members in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Wu, Zunyou; Lord, Lynwood; Wu, Sheng

    2008-12-01

    Laws in China relating to HIV disclosure are inconsistent. After a patient has tested HIV-positive, service providers struggle to decide who should be informed first: patients, family members, or both. To understand service providers' attitudes and practices regarding the HIV notification process in China, 1101 service providers from a southwestern province of China were surveyed. Opinions were gathered from providers at five different levels of health care facilities (provincial, city, county, township and village). A mixed methods approach was used to analyze perceptions of informing family members of a patient's HIV status. Quantitative analysis was used to examine whether providers held a favorable attitude toward notifying family members first and qualitative analysis was used to explore the reasons and consequences of notifying family members first. Nearly half of service providers felt family members should be informed of a patient's HIV status first. Providers who were older, had contact with HIV patients, or had less medical education were more likely to agree with a family-first notification practice. Psychological pressure, concern about protecting family members, the need for family support, and consideration for local regulations were cited as the main reasons for this practice. There is an immediate need to re-examine HIV notification policies so that there are consistent guidelines and procedures for providers throughout China. PMID:18370936

  19. Potential phylogenetic utility of WRKY gene family members

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single and low copy nuclear genes represent a source of multiple, unlinked and independently-evolving loci, the ideal data set for molecular phylogenetic inference due to their high rate of synonymous substitution compared to chloroplast or mitochondrial genes. The WRKY gene family of transcription ...

  20. Play Interactions of Family Members towards Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Ghoroury, Nabil Hassan; Romanczyk, Raymond G.

    1999-01-01

    Siblings, mothers, and fathers in nine families of a child with autism were observed in dyadic play interactions with the autistic child. Parents exhibited more play behaviors toward children than siblings, but the autistic children initiated more interactions toward siblings than toward parents. Vineland Adaptive Behavior scale scores correlated…

  1. The Psychological Effects of a Stillbirth on Surviving Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFrain, John; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Interview and written testimony from over 300 mothers and fathers who had experienced a stillbirth suggest themes common to these bereaved families: shock, blame, guilt and hardship; desperate need to remember; utility of autopsies and funerals; irrational and terrifying thoughts; need for support systems; issues surrounding surviving siblings and…

  2. [The phenomenon of families who are involved in decision making about life support withdrawal in family members].

    PubMed

    Oberholster, M; Gmeiner, A; Poggenpoel, M

    1998-12-01

    The overall objective of this study was to explore and describe the phenomenon of families who are involved in deciding about withdrawal of life-support treatment of a family member. A phenomenon analysis was undertaken in two phases. During the first phase, secondary analysis of primary data was done on the family used in Burger's study (1996: 1-175) and was followed up by phenomenological interviews with families used as member checking from the same circumstances and according to the same criteria that Burger (1996: 1-185) used in her study. Data were analysed in collaboration with an independent coder. The family used as member checking in this study is also used as data control. A literature control was conducted as part of data control. The themes that were identified included were: physical and bodily experiences of families; defence mechanisms used by families to cope with grief; emotional experiences of families; need of knowledge/perceptions/outlook on life/internal conflict/feelings of guilt/ability to make decisions/respect of patient wishes/the effect of time and prior experiences; support needed by an given to families; spiritual and supernatural experiences/hope/acceptance/ability to 'let go' of the patient. In phase two, guidelines were described for psychiatric nurse specialists to mobilise resources for families to promote, maintain and restore their mental health as an integral part of health. PMID:11040598

  3. Psychological Symptoms in Family Members of Brain Death Patients in Intensive Care Unit in Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinrezaei, Hakimeh; Pilevarzadeh, Motahareh; Amiri, Masoud; Rafiei, Hossein; Taghati, Sedigheh; Naderi, Mosadegheh; Moradalizadeh, Mohammad; Askarpoor, Milad

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Having patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) remains an extremely stressful live event for family members, especially for those having to confront with brain death patients. The aim of present study was to determine the prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress among relatives of brain dead patients in ICU in Kerman, Iran. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, using DASS- 42 questionnaire, the symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress of family members of brain death patients were explored in Kerman, Iran. Results: Of 244 eligible family members, 224 participated in this study (response rate of 91%). Generally, 76.8%, 75% and 70.1% of family members reported some levels of anxiety, depression and stress, respectively. More specifically, the rate of severe levels of anxiety, depression and stress among the participants were 48.7%, 33%, and 20.1% respectively. Conclusion: Prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress in family members of brain death patients in ICU remains high. Health care team members, especially nurses, should be aware and could consider this issue in the caring of family members of brain death patients. PMID:24576382

  4. Perceived Intrafamilial Connectedness and Autonomy in Families with and without an Anxious Family Member: A Multiple Informant Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Albuquerque, Jiske E. G.; Schneider, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Perceived intrafamilial "emotional connectedness" and "autonomy" were investigated within families with and without an anxious family member using a multiple informant approach. The sample consisted of 32 mothers with a current anxiety disorder and 56 controls, their partners, and their anxious and nonanxious teenage children. No differences were

  5. Perceived Intrafamilial Connectedness and Autonomy in Families with and without an Anxious Family Member: A Multiple Informant Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Albuquerque, Jiske E. G.; Schneider, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Perceived intrafamilial "emotional connectedness" and "autonomy" were investigated within families with and without an anxious family member using a multiple informant approach. The sample consisted of 32 mothers with a current anxiety disorder and 56 controls, their partners, and their anxious and nonanxious teenage children. No differences were…

  6. Factors associated with the emotional distress of women family members of adults with serious mental illness.

    PubMed

    Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Bekhet, Abir K

    2014-04-01

    Women family members of adults with serious mental illness are at great risk for emotional distress. This study examined associations between characteristics of 60 women (age, race, and education), their relatives with mental illness (age, diagnosis, and years since diagnosis), and the family situation (relationship, living arrangements, and care provided) and symptoms of emotional distress. Depressive symptoms were greater among those with younger, non-sibling relatives. Anxiety was greater among Caucasians and those with a recently diagnosed family member, particularly bipolar disorder. Anger was associated with providing direct care. The findings are informative for tailoring interventions to minimize emotional distress in future family caregivers. PMID:24673783

  7. Associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients in Flanders: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Catthoor, Kirsten; Schrijvers, Didier; Hutsebaut, Joost; Feenstra, Dineke; Persoons, Philippe; De Hert, Marc; Peuskens, Jozef; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess presence and severity of associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients and factors for higher associative stigma. METHODS: Standardized semi-structured interview of 150 family members of psychotic patients receiving full time treatment. This study on associative stigma in family members of psychotic patients was part of a larger research program on the burden of the family, using “Interview for the Burden of the Family” and the chapters stigma, treatment and attribution from the “Family interview Schedule”. The respondents were relatives, one per patient, either partner or parent. The patients had been diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizo-affective disorder. All contacts with patients and relatives were in Dutch. Relatives were deemed suitable to participate in this research if they saw the patient at least once a week. Recruitment took place in a standardized way: after obtaining the patient’s consent, the relatives were approached to participate. The results were analyzed using SPSS Version 18.0. RESULTS: The prevalence of associative stigma in this sample is 86%. Feelings of depression in the majority of family members are prominent. Twenty-one point three percent experienced guilt more or less frequent, while shame was less pronounced. Also, 18.6% of all respondents indicated that they tried to hide the illness of their family member for others regularly or more. Three six point seven percent really kept secret about it in certain circumstances and 29.3% made efforts to explain what the situation or psychiatric condition of their family member really is like. Factors with marked significance towards higher associative stigma are a worsened relationship between the patient and the family member, conduct problems to family members, the patients’ residence in a residential care setting, and hereditary attributional factors like genetic hereditability and character. The level of associative stigma has significantly been predicted by the burden of aggressive disruptions to family housemates of the psychotic patient. CONCLUSION: Family members of psychotic patients in Flanders experience higher associative stigma compared to previous international research. Disruptive behavior by the patient towards in-housing family members is the most accurate predictor of higher associative stigma. PMID:25815261

  8. Support for traumatic brain injury patients' family members in neurosurgical nursing: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Coco, Kirsi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Jääskeläinen, Juha Erik; Turunen, Hannele

    2011-12-01

    This systematic literature review describes how adult traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients' family members received support. The research question was "What in healthcare constitutes support for a TBI patient's family members?" The data for this review were based on 22 empirical studies published in scientific journals in 2004-2010, which were found in the Cinahl, PsychINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases. The review includes the study design, sample, method, and main results. The data were analyzed using content analysis. Social support for brain injury patients' family members was divided into 3 main categories: informational, emotional, and practical support. The subcategories of informational support were information about the patient's symptoms, information about care, quality of information, and information about the prognosis. The subcategories of emotional support were taking emotions into account, caring, listening, and respecting. The subcategories of practical support were support in decision making, promoting the welfare of the family, encouraging family members to participate in care, cooperation with the family members, and counseling services. The results are available for nurses in practical work. The review offers nurses a structure for supporting TBI patients' families, and according to this review, supporting TBI patients' families appears to have many dimensions. The results suggest that nurses should be informed that it is important for family members to know the facts about TBI to understand the condition and to receive practical advice on how to help their significant other with TBI with daily activities. In addition, the results provide a basis for further research and development of interventions that support brain injury patients and their family members. PMID:22089411

  9. Family Quality of Life before and after Out-of-Home Placement of a Family Member with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Shirli; Edwards, Meaghan; Baum, Nehama T.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of out-of-home residential placement on families has been previously studied. However, no study has examined this issue through the lens of "family quality of life" (FQoL). The aim of this study was to produce a picture of FQoL among families with a member with an intellectual disability (ID) who has multiple diagnoses (i.e., an

  10. Complete nucleotide sequence of rose yellow mosaic virus, a novel member of the family Potyviridae.

    PubMed

    Mollov, Dimitre; Lockhart, Ben; Zlesak, David

    2013-09-01

    The complete genomic sequence of rose yellow mosaic virus (RoYMV) was determined and found to have all the features that are characteristic of members of the family Potyviridae. The RoYMV genome is 9508 nucleotides long excluding the 3'-poly-(A) tail and contains a single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3067 amino acids. The RoYMV P3 and CI cistrons are shorter than those of other members of the family Potyviridae, and the 6K1 cistron is completely absent. Comparative sequence analysis revealed that RoYMV had highest amino acid sequence identity across the entire genome sequence to brome streak mosaic virus (33%) and to turnip mosaic virus (30%) at the coat protein level. Based on its low sequence similarity to known members of the family Potyviridae and phylogenetic analysis, RoYMV appears to be a distinct, previously undescribed, member of this family. PMID:23553457

  11. Motives for residential mobility in later life: post-move perspectives of elders and family members.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Julie F; Ekerdt, David J

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were grouped into four themes and eleven issues that influenced the move decision. These themes parallel the ecological context of individual health and functioning, beliefs and attitudes, physical environment, and social pressures. Late-life mobility is a significant life transition that is the outcome of an ongoing appraisal and reappraisal of housing fit with individual functioning, needs, and aspirations. Family members are an integral part of these decision and residential mobility processes. PMID:18453180

  12. TRPV3: time to decipher a poorly understood family member!

    PubMed Central

    Nilius, Bernd; Br, Tams; Owsianik, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    The vanilloid transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 differs in several aspects from other members of the TRPV subfamily. This Ca2+-, ATP- and calmodulin-regulated channel constitutes a target for many natural compounds and has a unique expression pattern as the most prominent and important TRP channel in keratinocytes of the skin. Although TRPV3 is considered as a thermosensitive channel, its function as a thermosensor in the skin is challenged. Nevertheless, it plays important roles in other skin functions such as cutaneous sensations, hair development and barrier function. More recently, mutations in TRPV3 were linked with a rare genodermatosis known as the Olmsted syndrome. This review gives an overview on properties of TRPV3 and its functions in the skin and skin diseases. PMID:23836684

  13. Psychiatric Worker and Family Members: Pathways Towards Co-Operation Networks within Psychiatric Assistance Services

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The family’s role in patient care was greatly altered by Law 180. This law, introduced in Italy in 1978, led to a gradual phasing out of custodial treatment for psychiatric patients. This different mindset, which views the family as an alternative to institutionalization, leads to it being seen as an essential entity in the setting up of community service dynamics. We interviewed health professionals in order to understand obstacles of collaboration between family members and mental health care workers. The goal was to uncover actions that promote collaboration and help build alliances between families and psychiatric workers. Results showed that health professionals view the family as a therapeutic resource. Despite this view, family members were rarely included in patient treatment. The reasons is: the structures have a theoretical orientation of collaboration with the family but, for nurses not are organized a few meeting spaces with family members. Services should create moments, such as multi-family groups or groups of information, managed by nurses and not only by doctors. These occasions it might facilitate the knowledge between professionals and family members. PMID:25478137

  14. The Many Faces of Military Families: Unique Features of the Lives of Female Service Members.

    PubMed

    Southwell, Kenona H; MacDermid Wadsworth, Shelley M

    2016-01-01

    Female service members' family structures differ from the traditional male service member-female spouse composition of military families. Consequently, this mixed-methods study reviewed demographic data, empirical evidence, and presented findings from secondary analyses of the 2010 wave of the Military Family Life Project regarding structural differences in male and female service members' families and perceptions and experiences of military spouses. In addition, to gain an understanding of the influence of women's service on their family functioning, we conducted in-depth telephone interviews with 20 civilian husbands residing in 11 states around the United States. Empirical evidence suggests service women had higher rates or remarriage and divorce than service men. Women were also more likely than men to be part of nontraditional family forms. Civilian husbands of female service members, however, reported lower marital satisfaction, less support from the community, and less satisfaction with the military lifestyle than military wives. Husbands' accounts indicated that their families experienced both benefits and challenges from wives' service. Integration in the military community and separation presented major challenges for women's families. Implications of benefits and challenges of women's service for their families are discussed. PMID:26741904

  15. Establishing the surgical nurse liaison role to improve patient and family member communication.

    PubMed

    Herd, Hope A; Rieben, Melissa A

    2014-05-01

    Having clear personal communication with a surgical patient's family members decreases the anxiety and increases patient and family member satisfaction. Perioperative team members at one East Coast community hospital implemented a new approach to communication in the perioperative area to address patient satisfaction after patient survey scores declined in the areas of communication and calming fears. An additional consideration was the facility's plan to move to a new facility in which the surgical department would be split across two floors. A literature review revealed that adding a surgical nurse liaison can increase patient, family member, and staff member satisfaction. The administration approved creation of the position, with duties that included managing the waiting area, facilitating interaction between physicians and patients' family members, and assisting with family visits to the perianesthesia unit. After implementation of this position, results of surveys showed increases in patient satisfaction. One year after the position was established, staff members reported they were happy with the position as well. PMID:24766921

  16. Anterior Urethral Stricture Disease Negatively Impacts the Quality of Life of Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Weese, Jonathan R.; Eswara, Jairam R.; Marshall, Stephen D.; Chang, Andrew J.; Vetter, Joel; Brandes, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To quantify the quality of life (QoL) distress experienced by immediate family members of patients with urethral stricture via a questionnaire given prior to definitive urethroplasty. The emotional, social, and physical effects of urethral stricture disease on the QoL of family members have not been previously described. Materials and Methods. A questionnaire was administered prospectively to an immediate family member of 51 patients undergoing anterior urethroplasty by a single surgeon (SBB). The survey was comprised of twelve questions that addressed the emotional, social, and physical consequences experienced as a result of their loved one. Results. Of the 51 surveyed family members, most were female (92.2%), lived in the same household (86.3%), and slept in the same room as the patient (70.6%). Respondents experienced sleep disturbances (56.9%) and diminished social lives (43.1%). 82.4% felt stressed by the patient's surgical treatment, and 83.9% (26/31) felt that their intimacy was negatively impacted. Conclusions. Urethral stricture disease has a significant impact on the family members of those affected. These effects may last decades and include sleep disturbance, decreased social interactions, emotional stress, and impaired sexual intimacy. Treatment of urethral stricture disease should attempt to mitigate the impact of the disease on family members as well as the patient. PMID:27034658

  17. Grief among Surviving Family Members of Homicide Victims: A Causal Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprang, M. Virginia; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Proposed causal model to delineate predictors of self-reported grief among surviving family members of homicide victims. Evaluated model using data from survey of members of "Victims of Violence" support groups. Results generally supported model and indicated that correlates of grief differed across gender-specific subgroups in terms of their…

  18. Supporting conversations between individuals with dementia and their family members.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Eva; Axelsson, Karin; Zingmark, Karin; Fahlander, Kjell; Sävenstedt, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    Remembrance of recent events is a major problem for individuals with dementia. Consequently, this article explores the process of acceptance and integration of a digital photograph diary (DPD) as a tool for remembrance of and conversations about daily life events. A design for multiple case studies was used. Seven couples, in which one individual in the couple had Alzheimer's disease, tested the DPD for 6 months. Data were collected in three sequences with interviews, observations, and screening instruments. In the analysis, all data were integrated to find common patterns of content. Some couples became regular users, while others used the DPD more sporadically. Factors contributing to regular use were how the DPD matched expectations, actual use, support, experienced usefulness, and reactions from family and friends. For those couples who became regular users, the DPD facilitated their conversation about recent daily activities. PMID:24066788

  19. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Commander James D. Halsell Jr. waves as he stands with his wife Kathy during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  20. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The STS-101 crew gather during a meeting with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. From left, Mission Specialist Susan J. Helms, Commander James D. Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber, Pilot Scott J. Horowitz and Mission Specialists Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev, Jeffery N. Williams and James S. Voss. In the background is the Space Shuttle Atlantis on the pad. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  1. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber and her husband Jerome Elkind during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  2. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A light-hearted moment during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. From left, Commander James D. Halsell Jr., Mission Specialist Mary Ellen Weber and Pilot Scott J. Horowitz. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  3. STS-101 crew members meet family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    STS-101 Mission Specialist Yuri Vladimirovich Usachev, a Russian cosmonaut, and his wife Vera Sergeevna Usacheva during a meeting of the STS-101 crew with family and friends at Launch Pad 39A. Mission STS-101 will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies, plus prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. The crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station as well. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 24 at about 4:15 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

  4. Strange Stars : An interesting member of the compact object family

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Manjari; Ray, Subharthi; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira

    2008-01-10

    We have studied strange star properties both at zero temperature and at finite temperatures and searched signatures of strange stars in gamma-ray, x-ray and radio astronomy. We have a set of Equations of State (EoS) for strange quark matter (SQM) and solving the TOV equations, we get the structure of strange stars. The maximum mass for a strange star decreases with the increase of temperature, because at high temperatures, the EoS become softer. One important aspect of strange star is that, surface tension depends on the size and structure of the star and is significantly larger than the conventional values. Moment of inertia is another important parameter for compact stars as by comparing theoretical values with observed estimate, it is possible to constrain the dense matter Equation of State. We hope that this approach will help us to decide whether the members of the double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039 are neutron stars or strange stars.

  5. Marfan syndrome in a large family: response of family members to a screening programme.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, A B; Faed, M; Boxer, M; Gray, J R; Bundy, C; Murray, A

    1992-01-01

    Reaction to medical, social, and genetic implications of Marfan syndrome was evaluated by means of two questionnaires, the first after various tests before discussion of the diagnosis, the second after full discussion of the patient's diagnosis. Thirty-seven members of a family known to be at risk for Marfan syndrome attended for both questionnaires. All patients claimed to be satisfied with the way they were informed of the results of screening; 41% of patients were more worried about their health and 48% were more worried about the future after diagnosis. Apart from 50% of the smokers reducing or stopping their intake of cigarettes there were only very minor changes in lifestyle over the first month despite the increased level of expressed anxiety. If a definitive screening test was available, 96% of patients claimed they would have chosen it, 45% felt it would have an influence on their future plans, and 78% would choose to use a method of prenatal diagnosis for Marfan syndrome if it were available. PMID:1613770

  6. Pch2 is a hexameric ring ATPase that remodels the chromosome axis protein Hop1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Jomaa, Ahmad; Ortega, Joaquin; Alani, Eric E

    2014-01-01

    In budding yeast the pachytene checkpoint 2 (Pch2) protein regulates meiotic chromosome axis structure by maintaining the domain-like organization of the synaptonemal complex proteins homolog pairing 1 (Hop1) and molecular zipper 1 (Zip1). Pch2 has also been shown to modulate meiotic double-strand break repair outcomes to favor recombination between homologs, play an important role in the progression of meiotic recombination, and maintain ribosomal DNA stability. Pch2 homologs are present in fruit flies, worms, and mammals, however the molecular mechanism of Pch2 function is unknown. In this study we provide a unique and detailed biochemical analysis of Pch2. We find that purified Pch2 is an AAA+ (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) protein that oligomerizes into single hexameric rings in the presence of nucleotides. In addition, we show Pch2 binds to Hop1, a critical axial component of the synaptonemal complex that establishes interhomolog repair bias, in a nucleotide-dependent fashion. Importantly, we demonstrate that Pch2 displaces Hop1 from large DNA substrates and that both ATP binding and hydrolysis by Pch2 are required for Pch2-Hop1 transactions. Based on these and previous cell biological observations, we suggest that Pch2 impacts meiotic chromosome function by directly regulating Hop1 localization. PMID:24367111

  7. 38 CFR 71.50 - Provision of certain counseling, training, and mental health services to certain family members...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... counseling, training, and mental health services to certain family members of veterans. 71.50 Section 71.50..., training, and mental health services to certain family members of veterans. (a) Benefits provided under..., training, and mental health services to a family member when necessary in connection with the treatment...

  8. 38 CFR 71.50 - Provision of certain counseling, training, and mental health services to certain family members...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... counseling, training, and mental health services to certain family members of veterans. 71.50 Section 71.50..., training, and mental health services to certain family members of veterans. (a) Benefits provided under..., training, and mental health services to a family member when necessary in connection with the treatment...

  9. 38 CFR 71.50 - Provision of certain counseling, training, and mental health services to certain family members...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... counseling, training, and mental health services to certain family members of veterans. 71.50 Section 71.50..., training, and mental health services to certain family members of veterans. (a) Benefits provided under..., training, and mental health services to a family member when necessary in connection with the treatment...

  10. 38 CFR 71.50 - Provision of certain counseling, training, and mental health services to certain family members...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... counseling, training, and mental health services to certain family members of veterans. 71.50 Section 71.50..., training, and mental health services to certain family members of veterans. (a) Benefits provided under..., training, and mental health services to a family member when necessary in connection with the treatment...

  11. 5 CFR 894.202 - If I enroll for self plus one, may I decide which family member to cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... decide which family member to cover? 894.202 Section 894.202 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... family member to cover? Yes, if you enroll for self plus one, you must state at the time you enroll which eligible family member you want to cover under your enrollment....

  12. The Relationship Between the Perceived Risk of Harm by a Family Member with Mental Illness and the Family Experience.

    PubMed

    Katz, Judith; Medoff, Deborah; Fang, Li Juan; Dixon, Lisa B

    2015-10-01

    Family members of people with serious mental illness (SMI) at times report that they act to stop their ill relative from self harm or harming others. This study examines the relationship between the perception of risk of harm and family distress, burden, empowerment, coping, physical and mental health, appraisal of the caregiving experience, family communication, and family functioning. The study is a secondary analysis of baseline data collected for a randomized study of the family-to-family peer driven education program (FTF). Four hundred thirty-four enrolled individuals who were seeking to participate in FTF completed survey items that asked if they had tried to stop or prevent their ill family member from harming themselves or others in the last 30 days. Participants who perceived a recent risk of harm by their ill relative reported more negative appraisals of caregiving, greater psychological distress, poorer mental health and greater objective burden compared with those who did not perceive a recent risk of harm. The results suggest that families of persons with SMI should be asked about perceived risk of harm to self and others, and the presence of perceived risk of harm should serve as a red flag indicating the need for further evaluation of the family experience and additional support for the family. PMID:25535047

  13. Family Information Service Participation Increases the Rates of Mutation Testing among Members of Families with BRCA1/2 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Henry T.; Snyder, Carrie L.; Lynch, Jane F.; Ghate, Sumedha; Narod, Steven A.; Gong, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Background Some members of hereditary breast-ovarian cancer families may not participate in BRCA testing to determine their mutation status in part because they are unaware of their cancer risk and the availability of BRCA testing. Participation in a family information service, of which we have provided more than 100 sessions during the past thirty years, has been seen to effectively allow family members to be educated regarding their cancer genetic risk and potential benefits from cancer control. measures such as mutation testing. However, the effect of the family information service on the rate of mutation testing has not been studied. Method One thousand five hundred seventy-four (1,574) eligible (> 18 years old, at a 25% or higher pedigree risk) members from 60 extended hereditary breast-ovarian cancer families with BRCA1/2 mutations were invited to attend a family information service to learn about their risk and undergo genetic testing. The rates of mutation testing were compared between those who had attended an FIS and those who had not with chi square test and logistic regression analysis. Results Seventy five percent (334/444) of family information service attendees had undergone mutation testing following or during an FIS which was significantly higher than the 33.8% ( 382/1130) rate among non-attendees (p<0.0001). Logistic regression analysis showed that family information service attendance, breast-ovarian cancer history, gender, and age were significant variables for undertaking a mutation test. Conclusion Family information service attendance significantly increased the rate of mutation testing among high-risk family members. PMID:19775326

  14. Using Picture Books to Help Children Cope with a Family Member's Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Marna

    2005-01-01

    A diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the resulting behavioral changes in a loved one can cause intense emotional reactions from all family members, including children. Sharing and discussing relevant picture books can be an effective strategy to help the children in such families understand and deal with their emotions. Picture books can…

  15. Counseling Family Members of Addicts/Alcoholics: The Stages of Change Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wormer, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    This article adapts the stages of change model, a model in which specific interventions of harm reduction are directed toward the client's readiness for treatment, as a guiding framework for counseling family members of alcoholics/addicts. Interventions at each stage of the family's readiness for change, from precontemplation to action, are…

  16. 5 CFR 734.405 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, or a candidate for political party office, may appear in photographs of the candidate's family which might appear... SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) POLITICAL ACTIVITIES OF FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Employees in Certain...

  17. 22 CFR 42.68 - Informal evaluation of family members if principal applicant precedes them.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... principal applicant precedes them. 42.68 Section 42.68 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS... Visas § 42.68 Informal evaluation of family members if principal applicant precedes them. (a) Preliminary determination of visa eligibility. If a principal applicant proposes to precede the family to...

  18. 22 CFR 42.68 - Informal evaluation of family members if principal applicant precedes them.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... principal applicant precedes them. 42.68 Section 42.68 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS... Visas § 42.68 Informal evaluation of family members if principal applicant precedes them. (a) Preliminary determination of visa eligibility. If a principal applicant proposes to precede the family to...

  19. Family Members Providing Home-Based Palliative Care to Older Adults: The Enactment of Multiple Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemmer, Sarah J.; Ward-Griffin, Catherine; Forbes, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Canadians are experiencing increased life expectancy and chronic illness requiring end-of-life care. There is limited research on the multiple roles for family members providing home-based palliative care. Based on a larger ethnographic study of client-family-provider relationships in home-based palliative care, this qualitative secondary analysis…

  20. Strengthening Family Members of Incarcerated Youth: A Productive Role for Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Dorothy P.; Wilson, Constance; Carter, Jannie; Johnson, LaKeisha

    2014-01-01

    The challenge to provide incarcerated youth the skills needed to succeed and avoid recidivism has prompted the use of family-systems approaches in juvenile detention centers. A quasi-experimental study was conducted in northern Alabama to determine the impact of a conflict resolution workshop on the family members of incarcerated youth. Results…

  1. Using Picture Books to Help Children Cope with a Family Member's Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Marna

    2005-01-01

    A diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the resulting behavioral changes in a loved one can cause intense emotional reactions from all family members, including children. Sharing and discussing relevant picture books can be an effective strategy to help the children in such families understand and deal with their emotions. Picture books can

  2. Cyclic beta-glucans of members of the family Rhizobiaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Breedveld, M W; Miller, K J

    1994-01-01

    Cyclic beta-glucans are low-molecular-weight cell surface carbohydrates that are found almost exclusively in bacteria of the Rhizobiaceae family. These glucans are major cellular constituents, and under certain culture conditions their levels may reach up to 20% of the total cellular dry weight. In Agrobacterium and Rhizobium species, these molecules contain between 17 and 40 glucose residues linked solely by beta-(1,2) glycosidic bonds. In Bradyrhizobium species, the cyclic beta-glucans are smaller (10 to 13 glucose residues) and contain glucose linked by both beta-(1,6) and beta-(1,3) glycosidic bonds. In some rhizobial strains, the cyclic beta-glucans are unsubstituted, whereas in other rhizobia these molecules may become highly substituted with moieties such as sn-1-phosphoglycerol. To date, two genetic loci specifically associated with cyclic beta-glucan biosynthesis have been identified in Rhizobium (ndvA and ndvB) and Agrobacterium (chvA and chvB) species. Mutants with mutations at these loci have been shown to be impaired in their ability to grow in hypoosmotic media, have numerous alterations in their cell surface properties, and are also impaired in their ability to infect plants. The present review will examine the structure and occurrence of the cyclic beta-glucans in a variety of species of the Rhizobiaceae. The possible functions of these unique molecules in the free-living bacteria as well as during plant infection will be discussed. PMID:8078434

  3. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Commander Kevin Kregel enjoys a reunion with his wife, Jeanne, near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  4. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Mission Specialist Gerhard Thiele enjoys a reunion with his wife near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  5. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Pilot Dominic Gorie enjoys a reunion with his wife, Wendy, near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  6. STS-99 crew members meet with family and friends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The day before the expected launch of STS-99, Mission Specialist Janet Lynn Kavandi poses for photographers near Launch Pad 39A where family and friends have gathered to greet the crew. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), is scheduled to lift off 12:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m.

  7. Leiomodins: larger members of the tropomodulin (Tmod) gene family

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, C. A.; Fritz-Six, K. L.; Almenar-Queralt, A.; Fowler, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    The 64-kDa autoantigen D1 or 1D, first identified as a potential autoantigen in Graves' disease, is similar to the tropomodulin (Tmod) family of actin filament pointed end-capping proteins. A novel gene with significant similarity to the 64-kDa human autoantigen D1 has been cloned from both humans and mice, and the genomic sequences of both genes have been identified. These genes form a subfamily closely related to the Tmods and are here named the Leiomodins (Lmods). Both Lmod genes display a conserved intron-exon structure, as do three Tmod genes, but the intron-exon structure of the Lmods and the Tmods is divergent. mRNA expression analysis indicates that the gene formerly known as the 64-kDa autoantigen D1 is most highly expressed in a variety of human tissues that contain smooth muscle, earning it the name smooth muscle Leiomodin (SM-Lmod; HGMW-approved symbol LMOD1). Transcripts encoding the novel Lmod gene are present exclusively in fetal and adult heart and adult skeletal muscle, and it is here named cardiac Leiomodin (C-Lmod; HGMW-approved symbol LMOD2). Human C-Lmod is located near the hypertrophic cardiomyopathy locus CMH6 on human chromosome 7q3, potentially implicating it in this disease. Our data demonstrate that the Lmods are evolutionarily related and display tissue-specific patterns of expression distinct from, but overlapping with, the expression of Tmod isoforms. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. An unusual member of the Cdk family: Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Dhariwala, Fatema A; Rajadhyaksha, Medha S

    2008-05-01

    The proline-directed serine threonine kinase, Cdk5, is an unusual molecule that belongs to the well-known large family of proteins, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). While it has significant homology with the mammalian Cdk2 and yeast cdc2, unlike the other Cdks, it has little role to play in cell cycle regulation and is activated by non-cyclin proteins, p35 and p39. It phosphorylates a spectrum of proteins, most of them associated with cell morphology and motility. A majority of known substrates of Cdk5 are cytoskeletal elements, signalling molecules or regulatory proteins. It also appears to be an important player in cell-cell communication. Highly conserved, Cdk5 is most abundant in the nervous system and is of special interest to neuroscientists as it appears to be indispensable for normal neural development and function. In normal cells, transcription and activity of Cdk5 is tightly regulated. Present essentially in post-mitotic neurons, its normal activity is obligatory for migration and differentiation of neurons in developing brain. Deregulation of Cdk5 has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and acute neuronal injury. Regulators of Cdk5 activity are considered as potential therapeutic molecules for degenerative diseases. This review focuses on the role of Cdk5 in neural cells as regulator of cytoskeletal elements, axonal guidance, membrane transport, synaptogenesis and cell survival in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:18183483

  9. Personal attributions for melanoma risk in melanoma-affected patients and family members

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Jennifer; DiBonaventura, Marco; Baser, Raymond; Press, Nancy; Shoveller, Jeanne; Bowen, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Personal attributions for cancer risk involve factors that individuals believe contribute to their risk for developing cancer. Understanding personal risk attributions for melanoma may dictate gene-environment melanoma risk communication strategies. We examined attributions for melanoma risk in a population-based sample of melanoma survivors, first degree family members, and family members who are also parents (N=939). We conducted qualitative examination of open-ended risk attributions and logistic regression examining predictors (demographics, family member type, perceived risk) of the attributions reported (ultraviolet radiation [UVR] exposure, heredity/genetics, phenotype, personal melanoma history, miscellaneous). We found a predominance of risk attributions to UVR and heredity/genetics (80% and 45% of the sample, respectively). Those reporting higher education levels were more likely to endorse attributions to heredity/genetics, as well as to phenotype, than those of lower education levels. First-degree relatives and parent family members were more likely to endorse heredity/genetic attributions than melanoma survivors; melanoma survivors were more likely to endorse personal history of melanoma attributions compared to first-degree relatives and parent family members. These findings inform the development of risk communication interventions for melanoma families. PMID:20809355

  10. How family members manage risk around functional decline: The autonomy management process in households facing dementia

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Brandon; Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina; Gomez, Yarin

    2015-01-01

    Most dementia research investigates the social context of declining ability through studies of decision-making around medical treatment and end-of-life care. This study seeks to fill an important gap in research about how family members manage the risks of functional decline at home. Drawing on three waves of retrospective interviewing in 2012–2014, it investigates how family members in US households manage decline in an affected individual’s natural range of daily activities over time. The findings show that early on in the study period affected individuals were perceived to have awareness of their decline and routinely drew on family members for support. Support transformed when family members detected that the individual’s deficit awareness had diminished, creating a corresponding increase in risk of self-harm around everyday activities. With a loss of confidence in the individual’s ability to regulate his or her own activities to avoid these risks, family members employed unilateral practices to manage the individual’s autonomy around his or her activity involvements. These practices typically involved various deceits and ruses to discourage elders from engaging in activities perceived as potentially dangerous. The study concludes by discussing the implications that the social context of interpretive work around awareness and risk plays an important role in how families perceive an elder’s functional ability and manage his or her activity involvements. PMID:25697634

  11. A Brazilian Marseillevirus Is the Founding Member of a Lineage in Family Marseilleviridae

    PubMed Central

    Dornas, Fábio P.; Assis, Felipe L.; Aherfi, Sarah; Arantes, Thalita; Abrahão, Jônatas S.; Colson, Philippe; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In 2003, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV) was discovered as parasitizing Acanthamoeba. It was revealed to exhibit remarkable features, especially odd genomic characteristics, and founded viral family Mimiviridae. Subsequently, a second family of giant amoebal viruses was described, Marseilleviridae, whose prototype member is Marseillevirus, discovered in 2009. Currently, the genomes of seven different members of this family have been fully sequenced. Previous phylogenetic analysis suggested the existence of three Marseilleviridae lineages: A, B and C. Here, we describe a new member of this family, Brazilian Marseillevirus (BrMV), which was isolated from a Brazilian sample and whose genome was fully sequenced and analyzed. Surprisingly, data from phylogenetic analyses and comparative genomics, including mean amino acid identity between BrMV and other Marseilleviridae members and the analyses of the core genome and pan-genome of marseilleviruses, indicated that this virus can be assigned to a new Marseilleviridae lineage. Even if the BrMV genome is one of the smallest among Marseilleviridae members, it harbors the second largest gene content into this family. In addition, the BrMV genome encodes 29 ORFans. Here, we describe the isolation and genome analyses of the BrMV strain, and propose its classification as the prototype virus of a new lineage D within the family Marseilleviridae. PMID:26978387

  12. A Brazilian Marseillevirus Is the Founding Member of a Lineage in Family Marseilleviridae.

    PubMed

    Dornas, Fábio P; Assis, Felipe L; Aherfi, Sarah; Arantes, Thalita; Abrahão, Jônatas S; Colson, Philippe; La Scola, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In 2003, Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus (APMV) was discovered as parasitizing Acanthamoeba. It was revealed to exhibit remarkable features, especially odd genomic characteristics, and founded viral family Mimiviridae. Subsequently, a second family of giant amoebal viruses was described, Marseilleviridae, whose prototype member is Marseillevirus, discovered in 2009. Currently, the genomes of seven different members of this family have been fully sequenced. Previous phylogenetic analysis suggested the existence of three Marseilleviridae lineages: A, B and C. Here, we describe a new member of this family, Brazilian Marseillevirus (BrMV), which was isolated from a Brazilian sample and whose genome was fully sequenced and analyzed. Surprisingly, data from phylogenetic analyses and comparative genomics, including mean amino acid identity between BrMV and other Marseilleviridae members and the analyses of the core genome and pan-genome of marseilleviruses, indicated that this virus can be assigned to a new Marseilleviridae lineage. Even if the BrMV genome is one of the smallest among Marseilleviridae members, it harbors the second largest gene content into this family. In addition, the BrMV genome encodes 29 ORFans. Here, we describe the isolation and genome analyses of the BrMV strain, and propose its classification as the prototype virus of a new lineage D within the family Marseilleviridae. PMID:26978387

  13. How family members manage risk around functional decline: the autonomy management process in households facing dementia.

    PubMed

    Berry, Brandon; Apesoa-Varano, Ester Carolina; Gomez, Yarin

    2015-04-01

    Most dementia research investigates the social context of declining ability through studies of decision-making around medical treatment and end-of-life care. This study seeks to fill an important gap in research about how family members manage the risks of functional decline at home. Drawing on three waves of in-depth interviewing in 2012-2014, it investigates how family members in US households manage decline in an affected individual's natural range of daily activities over time. The findings show that early on in the study period affected individuals were perceived to have awareness of their decline and routinely drew on family members for support. Support transformed when family members detected that the individual's deficit awareness had diminished, creating a corresponding increase in risk of self-harm around everyday activities. With a loss of confidence in the individual's ability to regulate his or her own activities to avoid these risks, family members employed unilateral practices to manage the individual's autonomy around his or her activity involvements. These practices typically involved various deceits and ruses to discourage elders from engaging in activities perceived as potentially dangerous. The study concludes by discussing the implications that the social context of interpretive work around awareness and risk plays an important role in how families perceive an elder's functional ability and manage his or her activity involvements. PMID:25697634

  14. Fulfilment of knowledge expectations among family members of patients undergoing arthroplasty: a European perspective.

    PubMed

    Sigurdardottir, Arun K; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Charalambous, Andreas; Katajisto, Jouko; Stark, Åsa Johansson; Sourtzi, Panayota; Zabalegui, Adelaida; Valkeapää, Kirsi

    2015-12-01

    In the recovery process of arthroplasty patients, their family members play an important role due to short hospital stay and increased age of patients. Family members need to have knowledge to be able to support the patient. The aim of this study was to explore expected and received knowledge in family members of arthroplasty patients and describe the relationships between the differences in received and expected knowledge and background factors, country, information and control preferences and access to knowledge. The study was conducted in six European countries (Cyprus, Greece, Finland, Iceland, Spain and Sweden). The study design was cross-cultural, prospective and comparative with two measurement points: pre-operative and at discharge from hospital. Knowledge Expectations of significant other-scale and Krantz Health Opinion Survey were used before surgery and Received Knowledge of significant other-scale and Access to Knowledge at discharge. Patients undergoing elective hip or knee arthroplasty in seventeen hospitals were asked to identify one family member. The sample size was decided by power calculation. A total of 615 participants answered the questionnaires at both measurements. Family members perceived to receive less knowledge than they expected to have, most unfulfilled knowledge expectations were in the financial, social and experiential dimensions of knowledge. Seventy-four per cent of participants had unfulfilled knowledge expectations. Increased access to information from healthcare providers decreased the difference between received and expected knowledge. Compared to family members in southern Europe, those in the Nordic countries had more unfulfilled knowledge expectations and less access to information from healthcare providers. The evidence from this study highlights the need to involve the family members in the educational approach. PMID:25648518

  15. Holding blame at bay? ‘Gene talk' in family members' accounts of schizophrenia aetiology

    PubMed Central

    Callard, Felicity; Rose, Diana; Hanif, Emma-Louise; Quigley, Jody; Greenwood, Kathryn; Wykes, Til

    2012-01-01

    We provide the first detailed analysis of how, for what purposes and with what consequences people related to someone with a diagnosis of schizophrenia use ‘gene talk'. The article analyses findings from a qualitative interview study conducted in London and involving 19 participants (mostly women). We transcribed the interviews verbatim and analysed them using grounded theory methods. We analyse how and for what purposes participants mobilized ‘gene talk' in their affectively freighted encounter with an unknown interviewer. Gene talk served to (re)position blame and guilt, and was simultaneously used imaginatively to forge family history narratives. Family members used ‘gene talk' to recruit forebears with no psychiatric diagnosis into a family history of mental illness, and presented the origins of the diagnosed family member's schizophrenia as lying temporally before, and hence beyond the agency of the immediate family. Gene talk was also used in attempts to dislodge the distressing figure of the schizophrenia-inducing mother. ‘Gene talk', however, ultimately displaced, rather than resolved, the (self-)blame of many family members, particularly mothers. Our article challenges the commonly expressed view that genetic accounts will absolve family members' sense of (self-)blame in relation to their relative's/relatives' diagnosis. PMID:23227107

  16. Perceptions of barriers in managing diabetes: perspectives of Hispanic immigrant patients and family members

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jie; Amirehsani, Karen; Wallace, Debra; Letvak, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Hispanics show poorer self-management of type 2 diabetes than non-Hispanic Whites. Although previous studies have reported socioeconomic and cultural barriers to diabetes self-management by Hispanics, little is known about perceived barriers to diabetes self-management from the perspectives of both Hispanics and their family members. Purpose The purpose of the study was to explore perceived barriers among Hispanic immigrants with diabetes and their family members. Methods A qualitative study using five focus groups was conducted. A total of 73 Hispanic immigrants with type 2 diabetes (n=36) and family members (n=37) were recruited in the southeastern United States for a family-based intervention study of diabetes-self management. Participants were asked to describe their perceptions of barriers to self-management. The five sessions were audiotaped and transcribed, translated from Spanish into English, and analyzed using standard content analysis. Demographics, hemoglobin A1C levels, blood pressure and BMI were obtained both for participants with diabetes and for their family members. Results Barriers to diabetes self-management themes identified by participants with diabetes were in three major themes categorize: suffering from diabetes, difficulties in managing the disease, and lack of resources/support. Two key themes emerged pertaining to family members: we can provide support and we lack knowledge. Conclusions Perceived barriers to diabetes self-management described by Hispanic immigrants with diabetes and family members indicate a lack of intervention strategies to meet their needs. Interventions should include culturally relevant resources, family support, and diabetes self-management skills education. PMID:23640301

  17. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when I return? 302-3.225 Section 302-3.225 Public... for transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when...

  18. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when I return? 302-3.225 Section 302-3.225...

  19. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when I return? 302-3.225 Section 302-3.225...

  20. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when I return? 302-3.225 Section 302-3.225...

  1. Rotational properties of the Haumea family members and candidates: Short-term variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirouin, Audrey; Sheppard, Scott S.; Noll, Keith S.; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Doressoundiram, Alain

    2015-11-01

    Haumea is one of the largest known Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) with several anomalous characteristics. It is a fast rotator with a double-peak period of 3.92 h. Its spectrum is dominated by water ice features and the high albedo suggests nearly pure water ice on the surface. It has two known satellites and a family of at least ten TNOs with very similar proper orbital parameters and spectral properties. The formation of this peculiar family (Haumea, its two moons and, dynamically related bodies) is not well understood despite various models that have been proposed during the past few years.In order to improve our understanding of the formation of this family, we have examined the rotational properties of the family members and candidates (i.e. objects with similar proper orbital elements to the family members but without water ice on their surface or without observations to detect surface water). We report new short-term variability for 5 family members and 7 candidates from data collected over the past five years using multiple ground-based facilities. Thanks to our study, all the Haumea family members have a short-term variability study.From rotational data, assuming fluid-like rubble-pile structure, we constrain ellipsoidal axis ratios for individual objects and set a lower limit to densities. We also compared lightcurve amplitude and rotational frequency distributions for the family members, candidates, and unrelated TNOs to search for additional clues to the progenitor and the formation of this family.

  2. Parents and Children Only? Acculturation and the Influence of Extended Family Members among Vietnamese Refugees.

    PubMed

    Tingvold, Laila; Middelthon, Anne-Lise; Allen, James; Hauff, Edvard

    2012-03-01

    The nuclear family is often the point of departure in much of the existing acculturation research on refugee youth and children of refugees. The influence of other extended family members appears to receive less attention in understanding acculturation processes and intergenerational perspectives. This qualitative study explores the influence of extended family members upon a small sample of Vietnamese refugee parents and their adolescents while they undergo acculturation through their long-term resettlement process in Norway. With repeated interviews over a time span of 3 years, we identified situations and processes in family life in which extended kin become particularly activated and influential. Vietnamese refugee families in Norway keep close contact with extended kin even in the face of geographical distance to kin remaining in Vietnam, or globally dispersed. Aunts, uncles, and cousins are experienced as significant persons in the lives of many adolescents. Additionally, birth order of parents can often influence relationship dynamics among siblings and siblings children. Extended kin surfaced as especially important and influential at critical stages and crisis situations in family life. Extended family, and in particular, parental siblings play important roles in the acculturation experience and family functioning of Vietnamese refugee families in Norway. This has important implications for the study of Vietnamese and other refugee and immigrant families in acculturation research. PMID:24510190

  3. Parents and Children Only? Acculturation and the Influence of Extended Family Members among Vietnamese Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Tingvold, Laila; Middelthon, Anne-Lise; Allen, James; Hauff, Edvard

    2012-01-01

    The nuclear family is often the point of departure in much of the existing acculturation research on refugee youth and children of refugees. The influence of other extended family members appears to receive less attention in understanding acculturation processes and intergenerational perspectives. This qualitative study explores the influence of extended family members upon a small sample of Vietnamese refugee parents and their adolescents while they undergo acculturation through their long-term resettlement process in Norway. With repeated interviews over a time span of 3 years, we identified situations and processes in family life in which extended kin become particularly activated and influential. Vietnamese refugee families in Norway keep close contact with extended kin even in the face of geographical distance to kin remaining in Vietnam, or globally dispersed. Aunts, uncles, and cousins are experienced as significant persons in the lives of many adolescents. Additionally, birth order of parents can often influence relationship dynamics among siblings and siblings children. Extended kin surfaced as especially important and influential at critical stages and crisis situations in family life. Extended family, and in particular, parental siblings play important roles in the acculturation experience and family functioning of Vietnamese refugee families in Norway. This has important implications for the study of Vietnamese and other refugee and immigrant families in acculturation research. PMID:24510190

  4. Migrant and minority family members in the intensive care unit. A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Quindemil, KettyElena; Anderson, Kathryn Hoehn; Mayer, Hanna

    2013-01-01

    Statistics show that people with migrant and minority background as patients are significant in numbers in the intensive care unit. This also puts family members in the perspective of nursing because family members are an inherent part of the intensive care unit. Family-centered care is perhaps most applicable to vulnerable populations like migrant family in the intensive care unit to meet family member’s needs. But very little is known about the situation of migrant and minority family members in the intensive care unit. The aim of the study was to explore the state of the science regarding family-centered care in the intensive care unit of patients with migration background in general and with a possible focus on major migrant populations in Austria—Former Yugoslavian und Turkish origin. A literature review investigated research articles that contained information on migrant and minority family members in the intensive care unit. Key points in the relevant articles were identified and categorized into themes with an explanation of findings at the end. Seventeen articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. No article was found regarding groups of major migrant population groups in Austria. The included articles uncovered five predominant themes: importance of cultural norms, communication, family dynamics, universal caring, and nursing/provider deficit in culturally competent care. In order to provide adequate nursing care a more cohesive body of information on more specific geographic and cultural populations is recommended. Because of the complete lack of research regarding migrant families of Former Yugoslavian and Turkish origin into Austria, an exploration of this population is recommended. PMID:24860716

  5. Family Quality of Life of Australian Families with a Member with an Intellectual/Developmental Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillotta, F.; Kirby, N.; Shearer, J.; Nettelbeck, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Family quality of life (FQOL) is a recent concept in intellectual/developmental disability research. Outcomes for the family are important to the provision of services because families, rather than institutions, are increasingly considered the primary support unit. This article presents Australian findings using the international…

  6. Children exposed to the arrest of a family member: Associations with mental health

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Frank J.; Kaufman, Joy S.; Finley, Meghan K.; Griffin, Amy; Anderson, Janet; Marshall, Tim; Radway, Susan; Stack, Virginia; Crusto, Cindy A.

    2013-01-01

    The arrest of a parent or other family member can be detrimental to children’s health. To study the impact of exposure to the arrest of a family member on children’s mental health and how said association may change across developmental periods, we examined baseline data for children (birth through 11 years) entering family-based systems of care (SOC). Children exposed to the arrest of a family member had experienced significantly more 5.38 (SD = 2.59) different types of potentially traumatic events (PTE) than children not exposed to arrest 2.84 (SD = 2.56). Multiple regression model results showed that arrest exposure was significantly associated with greater behavioral and emotional challenges after controlling for children’s age, gender, race/ethnicity, household income, caregiver’s education, parenting factors, and other PTE exposure. Further analyses revealed differences in internalizing and externalizing behaviors associated with arrest exposure across developmental levels. This study highlights some of the mental health challenges for children exposed to the arrest of a family member, while adding to our knowledge of how such an event affects children across different developmental periods. More trauma-informed, developmentally appropriate systems need to be in place at all levels to assist children and families experiencing arrest. PMID:24829537

  7. [Experiences and ethical questions of family members of patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    González Paniagua, M Cruz

    2012-01-01

    There are many decisions that family members of sufferers of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia are forced to take to guarantee the well-being and quality of life of their loved ones and, of course, themselves. A little more than 12 years ago in Medina del Campo, Valladolid, there arose the need to inform and, what's more, to support a large number of people whose family members had been diagnosed with a devastating type of dementia that was practically unknown. The illness presented these families with a growing number of difficult-to-resolve ethical dilemmas. This was the genesis of the Asociación de Familiares de enfermos de Alzheimer (Association of Family Members of Sufferers of Alzheimer's), where baffled family members searching for responsible answers came looking for help to their practical problems that they felt unable to solve using only common sense. What follows are the details of several real situations, the most delicate of which, as the Association psychologist, I shared with the affected families. The cases below involved a dilemma when applying the basic principles of bioethics: non-maleficence, beneficence and respect for the autonomy of the diseased. PMID:22548668

  8. Disclosing Genetic Information to Family Members About Inherited Cardiac Arrhythmias: An Obligation or a Choice?

    PubMed

    Vavolizza, Rick D; Kalia, Isha; Erskine Aaron, Kathleen; Silverstein, Louise B; Barlevy, Dorit; Wasserman, David; Walsh, Christine; Marion, Robert W; Dolan, Siobhan M

    2015-08-01

    Inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome and Brugada syndrome, present clinical as well as ethical, legal, and social challenges. Many individuals who carry a deleterious mutation are largely asymptomatic and therefore may not be diagnosed until after the occurrence of a personal or family member's cardiac event. The familial nature of inherited genetic information raises numerous ethical, legal, and social issues regarding the sharing of genetic information, particularly when an individual found to carry a deleterious mutation refuses to disclose his or her results to at-risk family members who could benefit from life-saving treatments. This qualitative study sought to understand the experiences with genetic testing for individuals (n = 50) with a personal or family history of cardiac events or sudden death. Unstructured in-person focus groups or interviews were conducted for each participant in the study. The recordings of these interviews were transcribed verbatim and subsequently analyzed and coded. Participants' comments regarding sharing of genetic information centered around four main themes: (1) motivation to disclose; (2) extent of disclosure; (3) effect of disclosure on family dynamics; and (4) reasons for not sharing genetic information. The majority of individuals believed that affected individuals are obligated to disclose genetic information to family members. In the era of personalized medicine, the disclosure of genetic information provides individuals the opportunities to learn about the genetics, disease characteristics, and treatment options in order to reduce morbidity and mortality in themselves and their family members. Further research is necessary to identify and explore the barriers to sharing genetic information with at-risk family members. PMID:25400212

  9. [Knowledge of family members on the rights of individuals affected by mental illness].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Vania; Barbosa, Guilherme Correa

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this investigation was to understand what family members know about the rights of individuals affected by mental illness. To this end, a qualitative exploratory study was conducted. A semi-structured interview was used for data collection. Eighteen family members were interviewed at a psychosocial care center (CAPS) and a civil society organization (CSO) located in a municipality in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, between March and September 2013. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis and the following categories were constructed: mental health services and the rights of individuals affected by mental illness. We were able to infer that in addition to drug-based therapy, mental health services must provide therapeutic activities. Family members of those affected by mental illness were unaware of the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform Law and mentioned the following rights: welfare benefits, free public transport, basic food basket and medications. PMID:26098801

  10. Payment or reimbursement for certain medical expenses for Camp Lejeune family members. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-09-24

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is promulgating regulations to implement statutory authority to provide payment or reimbursement for hospital care and medical services provided to certain veterans' family members who resided at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, for at least 30 days during the period beginning on January 1, 1957, and ending on December 31, 1987. Under this rule, VA will reimburse family members, or pay providers, for medical expenses incurred as a result of certain illnesses and conditions that may be attributed to exposure to contaminated drinking water at Camp Lejeune during this time period. Payment or reimbursement will be made within the limitations set forth in statute and Camp Lejeune family members will receive hospital care and medical services that are consistent with the manner in which we provide hospital care and medical services to Camp Lejeune veterans. PMID:25255501

  11. The role and experiences of family members during the rehabilitation of mentally ill offenders.

    PubMed

    Rowaert, Sara; Vandevelde, Stijn; Lemmens, Gilbert; Vanderplasschen, Wouter; Vander Beken, Tom; Vander Laenen, Freya; Audenaert, Kurt

    2016-03-01

    Taking care of a family member with a mental illness imposes a burden on various aspects of family life. This burden may be enhanced if the mentally ill individual has a criminal history. This paper aims to summarize the scientific literature dealing with the experiences, needs and burdens of families of mentally ill offenders. We aim to explore the roles that family members play in the rehabilitation of their relative and review the families' needs and burdens. Finally, we aim to investigate whether or not the family strengths are considered in the literature. A literature search in line with the PRISMA statement for systematic reviews and with the recommendations for an integrative review was performed in the ISI Web of Science, PubMed, Elsevier Science Direct and ProQuest databases. Limited research has been carried out into the experiences, needs and burdens of families of mentally ill offenders, with only eight studies fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Families of mentally ill offenders experience more stress than those of mentally ill individuals with no judicial involvement. This is because of the fact that these family members have to deal with both mental health services and judicial systems. The eight retrieved studies focus on needs and burdens, with little reference to strengths or capabilities. The review has highlighted the need for further research into the needs and burdens of families with mentally ill offenders, with a focus on strengths rather than an exclusively problem-oriented perspective. It is important that families become more involved in the health and social care of their relatives to avoid being considered 'second patients'. PMID:26756851

  12. Triticum mosaic virus: a distinct member of the family potyviridae with an unusually long leader sequence.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Ziems, Amy D; Wegulo, Stephen N; French, Roy

    2009-08-01

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides (nt) excluding the 3' polyadenylated tail. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the "hall-mark proteins" of potyviruses, including a small overlapping gene, PIPO, in the P3 cistron. The genome of TriMV has an unusually long 5' nontranslated region of 739 nt with 12 translation initiation codons and three small open reading frames, which resemble those of the internal ribosome entry site containing 5' leader sequences of the members of Picornaviridae. Pairwise comparison of 10 putative mature proteins of TriMV with those of representative members of genera in the family Potyviridae revealed 33 to 44% amino acid identity within the highly conserved NIb protein sequence and 15 to 29% amino acid identity within the least conserved P1 protein, suggesting that TriMV is a distinct member in the family Potyviridae. In contrast, TriMV displayed 47 to 65% amino acid sequence identity with available sequences of mature proteins of Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV), an unassigned member of the Potyviridae. Phylogenetic analyses of the complete polyprotein, NIa-Pro, NIb, and coat protein sequences of representative species of six genera and unassigned members of the family Potyviridae suggested that TriMV and SCSMV are sister taxa and share a most recent common ancestor with tritimoviruses or ipomoviruses. These results suggest that TriMV and SCSMV should be classified in a new genus, and we propose the genus Poacevirus in the family Potyviridae, with TriMV as the type member. PMID:19594313

  13. Opposing Functions of Classic and Novel IL-1 Family Members in Gut Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Lopetuso, Loris R; Chowdhry, Saleem; Pizarro, Theresa T

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their well-established role(s) in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI)-related inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and inflammation-associated colorectal cancer (CRC), emerging evidence confirms the critical involvement of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family and their ligands in the maintenance of normal gut homeostasis. In fact, the paradigm that IBD occurs in two distinct phases is substantiated by the observation that classic IL-1 family members, such as IL-1, the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-18, possess dichotomous functions depending on the phase of disease, as well as on their role in initiating vs. sustaining chronic gut inflammation. Another recently characterized IL-1 family member, IL-33, also possesses dual functions in the gut. IL-33 is upregulated in IBD and potently induces Th2 immune responses, while also amplifying Th1-mediated inflammation. Neutralization studies in acute colitis models, however, have yielded controversial results and recent reports suggest a protective role of IL-33 in epithelial regeneration and mucosal wound healing. Finally, although little is currently known regarding the potential contribution of IL-36 family members in GI inflammation/homeostasis, another IL-1 family member, IL-37, is emerging as a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine with the ability to down-regulate colitis. This new body of information has important translational implications for both the prevention and treatment of patients suffering from IBD and inflammation-associated CRC. PMID:23847622

  14. Opposing Functions of Classic and Novel IL-1 Family Members in Gut Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopetuso, Loris R.; Chowdhry, Saleem; Pizarro, Theresa T.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their well-established role(s) in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal (GI)-related inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and inflammation-associated colorectal cancer (CRC), emerging evidence confirms the critical involvement of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) cytokine family and their ligands in the maintenance of normal gut homeostasis. In fact, the paradigm that IBD occurs in two distinct phases is substantiated by the observation that classic IL-1 family members, such as IL-1, the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), and IL-18, possess dichotomous functions depending on the phase of disease, as well as on their role in initiating vs. sustaining chronic gut inflammation. Another recently characterized IL-1 family member, IL-33, also possesses dual functions in the gut. IL-33 is upregulated in IBD and potently induces Th2 immune responses, while also amplifying Th1-mediated inflammation. Neutralization studies in acute colitis models, however, have yielded controversial results and recent reports suggest a protective role of IL-33 in epithelial regeneration and mucosal wound healing. Finally, although little is currently known regarding the potential contribution of IL-36 family members in GI inflammation/homeostasis, another IL-1 family member, IL-37, is emerging as a potent anti-inflammatory cytokine with the ability to down-regulate colitis. This new body of information has important translational implications for both the prevention and treatment of patients suffering from IBD and inflammation-associated CRC. PMID:23847622

  15. Understanding bereaved family members' dissatisfaction with end-of-life care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Genevieve N; McClement, Susan E; Menec, Verena H; Chochinov, Harvey M

    2012-10-01

    With increasing numbers of older adults identifying a nursing home (NH) as their final place of care, it is important to assess the quality of dying in this setting and understand factors that impact family members' dissatisfaction with end-of-life care. A retrospective bereaved family member survey (N = 208) was conducted in 21 NHs located in urban areas of central Canada. Bereaved family members who were dissatisfied with care identified significantly more concerns in all domains assessed and were more likely to have problems with: (a) receiving confusing information from nursing staff about the resident's care, including medical treatments; (b) receiving inadequate information from nursing staff; and (c) feeling that end-of-life care was different than they had expected. Since the quality of communication between nurses, residents, and family members is the main factor that determines families' dissatisfaction with care, strategies and interventions aimed at reducing unmet information needs will be vital to improving end-of-life care in NHs. PMID:22998093

  16. Allergic contact dermatitis beyond IL-1? role of additional family members.

    PubMed

    Worm, Margitta

    2014-03-01

    Contact dermatitis is one of the most frequent pathological manifestations of the skin and plays a central role in clinical dermatology. The IL-1 family consists a large group of cytokines, which currently contains 11 members with different pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. Among the more pro-inflammatory-acting cytokines from the IL-1 family, IL-1?, IL-18, IL-33 and IL-36 have been shown to be upregulated in different inflammatory mouse experimental models or skin diseases. The article by Mattii et al. represents a thorough analysis of the expression of IL-1 family members including IL-33 in skin samples from patients with allergic contact dermatitis. Although a lot of research is performed in this area, data from human samples are rather scarce. Therefore, Mattii et al. support the development of novel therapeutic concepts, which might include the use of antagonistic molecules targeting the IL-1 family network. PMID:24372765

  17. Religious Coping Among Adults Caring for Family Members with Serious Mental Illness.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Michelle J; Medoff, Deborah; Lawrence, Ryan E; Dixon, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the use of religious coping strategies among family members of adults with serious mental illness. A sample of 436 individuals caring for a family member with serious mental illness were recruited into a randomized clinical trial for the National Alliance on Mental Illness Family to Family Education Program. Relationships are reported between religious coping and caregiving, care recipient, and mental health services outcomes. Religious coping was associated with more objective caregiving burden, greater care recipient need, less mental health knowledge, and less receipt of mental health services after adjusting for non-religious types of coping. At the same time, religious coping was associated with a positive caregiving experience and greater religious support. Religious coping plays an important role for many caregivers of persons with serious mental illness. Caregivers who use more religious coping may have an especially high need for mental health education and mental health services. PMID:25895855

  18. Dependents' Education. Educational Assistance and Opportunities Information for Army Family Members. Department of the Army Pamphlet No. 352-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    Information on educational assistance and opportunities for family members of active duty, retired, or deceased Army service members is provided. Eligibility and types of benefits and programs described are grouped in the following categories: educational financial aid for family members of veterans; educational opportunities for active duty

  19. Genetic aspects of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in a family with multiple affected members: a research article

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The etiology of idiopathic scoliosis remains unknown and different factors have been suggested as causal. Hereditary factors can also determine the etiology of the disease; however, the pattern of inheritance remains unknown. Autosomal dominant, X-linked and multifactorial patterns of inheritances have been reported. Other studies have suggested possible chromosome regions related to the etiology of idiopathic scoliosis. We report the genetic aspects of and investigate chromosome regions for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in a Brazilian family. Methods Evaluation of 57 family members, distributed over 4 generations of a Brazilian family, with 9 carriers of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The proband presented a scoliotic curve of 75 degrees, as determined by the Cobb method. Genomic DNA from family members was genotyped. Results Locating a chromosome region linked to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis was not possible in the family studied. Conclusion While it was not possible to determine a chromosome region responsible for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis by investigation of genetic linkage using microsatellites markers during analysis of four generations of a Brazilian family with multiple affected members, analysis including other types of genomic variations, like single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could contribute to the continuity of this study. PMID:20374654

  20. Members of the PpaA/AerR Antirepressor Family Bind Cobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Vermeulen, Arjan J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT PpaA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is a member of a family of proteins that are thought to function as antirepressors of PpsR, a widely disseminated repressor of photosystem genes in purple photosynthetic bacteria. PpaA family members exhibit sequence similarity to a previously defined SCHIC (sensor containing heme instead of cobalamin) domain; however, the tetrapyrrole-binding specificity of PpaA family members has been unclear, as R. sphaeroides PpaA has been reported to bind heme while the Rhodobacter capsulatus homolog has been reported to bind cobalamin. In this study, we reinvestigated tetrapyrrole binding of PpaA from R. sphaeroides and show that it is not a heme-binding protein but is instead a cobalamin-binding protein. We also use bacterial two-hybrid analysis to show that PpaA is able to interact with PpsR and activate the expression of photosynthesis genes in vivo. Mutations in PpaA that cause loss of cobalamin binding also disrupt PpaA antirepressor activity in vivo. We also tested a number of PpaA homologs from other purple bacterial species and found that cobalamin binding is a conserved feature among members of this family of proteins. IMPORTANCE Cobalamin (vitamin B12) has only recently been recognized as a cofactor that affects gene expression by interacting in a light-dependent manner with transcription factors. A group of related antirepressors known as the AppA/PpaA/AerR family are known to control the expression of photosynthesis genes in part by interacting with either heme or cobalamin. The specificity of which tetrapyrroles that members of this family interact with has, however, remained cloudy. In this study, we address the tetrapyrrole-binding specificity of the PpaA/AerR subgroup and establish that it preferentially binds cobalamin over heme. PMID:26055116

  1. Promoter Methylation Status of Ras-Association Domain Family Members in Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Antje M.; Zimmermann, Tobias; Haag, Tanja; Walesch, Sara K.; Dammann, Reinhard H.

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas (PCCs) are rare neuroendocrine tumors that arise from the medulla of the adrenal gland or the sympathetic ganglia and are characterized by the secretion of catecholamines. In 30–40% of patients, PCCs are genetically determined by susceptibility genes as various as RET, VHL, and NF1. We have analyzed the Ras-association domain family members (RASSFs) in PCCs regarding their inactivating promoter hypermethylation status. Previously, we reported a promoter methylation in PCC for the first family member RASSF1A. Promoter hypermethylation of CpG islands leads to the silencing of the according transcript and is a common mechanism for inactivation of tumor suppressors. In this study, we observed inactivating DNA modifications for the RASSF members RASSF2, RASSF5A, RASSF9, and RASSF10, but not for the members RASSF3, RASSF4, RASSF5C, RASSF6, RASSF7, and RASSF8. The degree of promoter methylation was 19% for RASSF2, 67% for RASSF5A, 18% for RASSF9, and 74% for RASSF10. Interestingly, the degree of hypermethylation for RASSF10 in hereditary PCCs was 89 vs. 60% in sporadic PCCs. A similar but less dramatic effect was observed in RASSF5A and RASSF9. Including all RASSF members, we found that of 25 PCCs, 92% show promoter methylation in at least in one RASSF member. In 75% of the hereditary PCC samples, we found two or more methylated RASSF promoters, whereas in sporadic PCCs only 46% were observed. In summary, we could show that in PCC several RASSF members are strongly hypermethylated in their promoter regions and methylation of more than one RASSF member occurs in the majority of PCCs. This adds the inactivation of genes of the RASSF tumor suppressor family to the already known deregulated genes of PCC. PMID:25750636

  2. Characterization of poplar ZIP family members ZIP1 and ZNT1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A plant must regulate heavy metals to maintain adequate resources for plant processes while protecting against excess metal damage. Regulation of heavy metals such as zinc (Zn) has been attributed to the Zn transporter ZNT1 gene and other members of its larger ZIP transporter family. However, these ...

  3. Working with Teams and Organizations to Help Them Involve Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Ibanga, Akanidomo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe our work in trying to influence whole service teams to move their practice towards greater involvement of affected family members. Work with five teams is described. The process varied but in all cases it included recruitment of the team, training, continued support and evaluation of results. Use of a standard

  4. Differential expression of sirtuin family members in the developing, adult, and aged rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Sidorova-Darmos, Elena; Wither, Robert G.; Shulyakova, Natalya; Fisher, Carl; Ratnam, Melanie; Aarts, Michelle; Lilge, Lothar; Monnier, Philippe P.; Eubanks, James H.

    2014-01-01

    The sirtuins are NAD+-dependent protein deacetylases and/or ADP-ribosyltransferases that play roles in metabolic homeostasis, stress response and potentially aging. This enzyme family resides in different subcellular compartments, and acts on a number of different targets in the nucleus, cytoplasm and in the mitochondria. Despite their recognized ability to regulate metabolic processes, the roles played by specific sirtuins in the brain—the most energy demanding tissue in the body—remains less well investigated and understood. In the present study, we examined the regional mRNA and protein expression patterns of individual sirtuin family members in the developing, adult, and aged rat brain. Our results show that while each sirtuin is expressed in the brain at each of these different stages, they display unique spatial and temporal expression patterns within the brain. Further, for specific members of the family, the protein expression profile did not coincide with their respective mRNA expression profile. Moreover, using primary cultures enriched for neurons and astrocytes respectively, we found that specific sirtuin members display preferential neural lineage expression. Collectively, these results provide the first composite illustration that sirtuin family members display differential expression patterns in the brain, and provide evidence that specific sirtuins could potentially be targeted to achieve cell-type selective effects within the brain. PMID:25566066

  5. Posttraumatic Symptoms in Japanese Bereaved Family Members with Special Regard to Suicide and Homicide Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n =…

  6. Study of Essential Living Skills for Members of Families in Multiple Roles. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    A study was performed to identify empirically those essential living skills (ELS) perceived as important by men and women in their roles as a family member, an individual, and as an employee. Data was collected on a voluntary basis from 4,929 employed persons contacted through businesses, and 124 homemakers surveyed door-to-door. The ELS

  7. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member of the Family Potyviridae with an Unusually Long Leader Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides excluding the 3’-polyadenylated tail. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the ‘hall-mark proteins’ of potyviruses including a s...

  8. 41 CFR 302-3.510 - When must we pay return travel for immediate family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When must we pay return travel for immediate family members? 302-3.510 Section 302-3.510 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES RELOCATION ALLOWANCES 3-RELOCATION ALLOWANCE BY SPECIFIC TYPE Agency...

  9. Self-Concept and Depression among Children Who Experienced the Death of a Family Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Hong T.; Scott, Amy N.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the moderating effects of physical and academic self-concept on depression among children who experienced the death of a family member. Data from Phase III of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care was used in the present study. Having a higher physical self-concept

  10. Posttraumatic Symptoms in Japanese Bereaved Family Members with Special Regard to Suicide and Homicide Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n =

  11. 42 CFR 436.120 - Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members. 436.120 Section 436.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN GUAM,...

  12. 42 CFR 436.120 - Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members. 436.120 Section 436.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN GUAM,...

  13. 42 CFR 436.120 - Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members. 436.120 Section 436.120 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN GUAM,...

  14. 42 CFR 435.116 - Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members. 435.116 Section 435.116 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS ELIGIBILITY IN THE...

  15. 42 CFR 436.120 - Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Qualified pregnant women and children who are not... women and children who are not qualified family members. (a) The Medicaid agency must provide Medicaid to a pregnant woman whose pregnancy has been medically verified and who (1) Would be eligible for...

  16. America Goes Back to School: Get Involved! Stay Involved! Information for Families and Community Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    This brochure provides several tips for families and for community members to help them encourage student achievement and success. The tips are grouped into three categories: (1) "Help our children read well and independently by the end of third grade"; (2) "Help our children learn to meet high math and science standards and take challenging math…

  17. Communication Education as Social Support: Teaching Families with a Dying Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Steven D.

    Teaching communication skills to families with a dying member presents unique challenges. As M. R. Parks' critique of interpersonal communication literature suggests, it is important to keep in mind the larger social context surrounding the person dying and to maintain a balanced perspective of information exchange (e.g., self-disclosure) and…

  18. Aggressive Behavior Directed at Nursing Home Personnel by Residents' Family Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinton, Linda; Mazza, Nicholas

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed administrators from 70 Florida nursing homes. Administrators reported 1,193 acts of verbal aggression and 13 acts of physical aggression directed at nursing home personnel by residents' family members over 6-month period. Dissatisfaction over how specific and overall care needs of residents were being met was most frequently cited as…

  19. Self-Concept and Depression among Children Who Experienced the Death of a Family Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Hong T.; Scott, Amy N.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the moderating effects of physical and academic self-concept on depression among children who experienced the death of a family member. Data from Phase III of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care was used in the present study. Having a higher physical self-concept…

  20. Photo of family members of STS-5 commander, Vance D. Brand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Erik Brand and his mother Beverly are seen in a photo of family members of STS-5 commander Vance D. Brand. Erik holds a small model of the space shuttle with its solid rocket boosters and external fuel tank still attached.

  1. 76 FR 70057 - Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and FUTA Exceptions to Disregarded Entities; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... were published in the Federal Register on Tuesday, November 1, 2011 (76 FR 67363). DATES: This... publication of final and temporary regulations (TD 9554), which was the subject of FR Doc. 2011-28176, is... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 301 RIN 1545-BJ07 Extending Religious and Family Member FICA and...

  2. Developing and Maintaining Mutual Aid Groups for Parents and Other Family Members: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuntzner-Gibson, Denise; And Others

    This 60-item bibliography, a compilation of abstracts of books, articles, handbooks, conference proceedings, and newsletters published from 1978 through 1989, addresses various aspects of groups, programs and other self-help resources for parents and other family members of people with disabilities. Literature in the first section provides…

  3. College Adjustment and Subjective Well-Being when Coping with a Family Member's Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Christa K.; Welsh, Anne C.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals coping with the chronic or terminal illness of a family member are presented with a unique challenge that may influence their adjustment and overall well-being. This study investigated variables that relate to college adjustment and subjective well-being, including attachment, social support, coping, and illness-related constructs, in…

  4. Factors Affecting Burden of South Koreans Providing Care to Disabled Older Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Minhong; Yoon, Eunkyung; Kropf, Nancy P.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the determinants of caregiving burden among South Koreans who care for their disabled older family members. A sample of 1,000 primary caregivers taken from the Comprehensive Study for Elderly Welfare Policy in Seoul, South Korea was analyzed. Independent variables included the demographic characteristics of caregivers and care…

  5. Two members of the Ustilago maydis velvet family influence teliospore development and virulence on maize seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the fungal-specific velvet protein family regulate sexual and asexual spore production in the Ascomycota. We predicted, therefore, that velvet homologs in the basidiomycetous plant pathogen Ustilago maydis would regulate sexual spore development, which is also associated with plant disea...

  6. College Adjustment and Subjective Well-Being when Coping with a Family Member's Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Christa K.; Welsh, Anne C.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals coping with the chronic or terminal illness of a family member are presented with a unique challenge that may influence their adjustment and overall well-being. This study investigated variables that relate to college adjustment and subjective well-being, including attachment, social support, coping, and illness-related constructs, in

  7. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member of the Family Potyviridae with an Unusually Long Leader Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides (nt) excluding the polyadenylated tail at the 3’ end. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the ‘hall-mark proteins’ of potyvirus...

  8. The Experiences of Affected Family Members: A Summary of Two Decades of Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Velleman, Richard; Copello, Alex; Templeton, Lorna; Ibanga, Akanidomo

    2010-01-01

    This article is based upon the collective findings of a number of studies conducted in a number of countries during the past 20 years. Female partners and mothers are the family members who have been most represented in the study samples, but the latter also included sizeable numbers of male partners, fathers, sisters, brothers and adult sons and…

  9. Working with Teams and Organizations to Help Them Involve Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Copello, Alex; Velleman, Richard; Ibanga, Akanidomo

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe our work in trying to influence whole service teams to move their practice towards greater involvement of affected family members. Work with five teams is described. The process varied but in all cases it included recruitment of the team, training, continued support and evaluation of results. Use of a standard…

  10. 42 CFR 436.120 - Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AFDC cash payment (or would be eligible for an AFDC cash payment if coverage under the State's AFDC plan included the AFDC-unemployed parents program) if her child had been born and was living with her in the month of payment; (2) Is a member of a family that would be eligible for an AFDC cash...

  11. 42 CFR 435.116 - Qualified pregnant women and children who are not qualified family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... an AFDC cash payment (or would be eligible for an AFDC cash payment if coverage under the State's AFDC plan included an AFDC-unemployed parents program) if her child had been born and was living with her in the month of payment; (2) Is a member of a family that would be eligible for an AFDC...

  12. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are foster children eligible as family members? 894.306 Section 894.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  13. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? 894.307 Section 894.307 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE...

  14. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? 894.307 Section 894.307 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE...

  15. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Are foster children eligible as family members? 894.306 Section 894.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  16. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? 894.307 Section 894.307 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE...

  17. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? 894.307 Section 894.307 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE...

  18. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Are foster children eligible as family members? 894.306 Section 894.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  19. 5 CFR 894.307 - Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Are disabled children age 22 or over eligible as family members? 894.307 Section 894.307 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE...

  20. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Are foster children eligible as family members? 894.306 Section 894.306 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  1. 9 CFR 306.4 - Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment; procuring product from official establishments. 306.4 Section 306.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. 9 CFR 306.4 - Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment; procuring product from official establishments. 306.4 Section 306.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 9 CFR 306.4 - Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment; procuring product from official establishments. 306.4 Section 306.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 9 CFR 306.4 - Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment; procuring product from official establishments. 306.4 Section 306.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. 9 CFR 306.4 - Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Assignment of Program employees where members of family employed; soliciting employment; procuring product from official establishments. 306.4 Section 306.4 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. Motives for Residential Mobility in Later Life: Post-Move Perspectives of Elders and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sergeant, Julie F.; Ekerdt, David J.

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move…

  7. Experiences of family members of patients with colostomies and expectations about professional intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-Umpiérrez, Augusto; Fort-Fort, Zoraida

    2014-01-01

    Objective the objective was to understand the experience of a group of family members of patients with colostomies, revealing their expectations regarding the intervention of health professionals. Method qualitative research, with the social phenomenological approach of Alfred Schütz, conducted in Montevideo in 2012; twelve family members of patients with colostomies participated, from an ostomy service of a health institution. Results the following categories were identified: family ties, trust in the health care team, the nurse as the articulator of the process, the desire to humanize care, and adaptation to new family life. Conclusions knowing the experience and expectations of the families of colostomy patients was achieved, emphasizing the previous family relationships to build upon them, and the trust in the health team, emphasizing the nurse as articulator of the process. Expectations focused on the desire for humanized care, enhancing adaptation of the nuclear family to the new way of life, restoring and enhancing its strengths, and collaborating in overcoming its weaknesses. PMID:26107831

  8. Relationship of service members' deployment trauma, PTSD symptoms, and experiential avoidance to postdeployment family reengagement.

    PubMed

    Brockman, Callie; Snyder, James; Gewirtz, Abigail; Gird, Suzanne R; Quattlebaum, Jamie; Schmidt, Nicole; Pauldine, Michael R; Elish, Katie; Schrepferman, Lynn; Hayes, Charles; Zettle, Robert; DeGarmo, David

    2016-02-01

    This research examined whether military service members' deployment-related trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and experiential avoidance are associated with their observed levels of positive social engagement, social withdrawal, reactivity-coercion, and distress avoidance during postdeployment family interaction. Self reports of deployment related trauma, postdeployment PTSD symptoms, and experiential avoidance were collected from 184 men who were deployed to the Middle East conflicts, were partnered, and had a child between 4 and 13 years of age. Video samples of parent-child and partner problem solving and conversations about deployment issues were collected, and were rated by trained observers to assess service members' positive engagement, social withdrawal, reactivity-coercion, and distress avoidance, as well as spouse and child negative affect and behavior. Service members' experiential avoidance was reliably associated with less observed positive engagement and more observed withdrawal and distress avoidance after controlling for spouse and child negative affect and behavior during ongoing interaction. Service members' experiential avoidance also diminished significant associations between service members' PTSD symptoms and their observed behavior. The results are discussed in terms of how service members' psychological acceptance promotes family resilience and adaption to the multiple contextual challenges and role transitions associated with military deployment. Implications for parenting and marital interventions are described. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26437144

  9. Isolation of a member of ets gene family in the polychaete annelid Perinereis cultrifera.

    PubMed

    Bocquet-Muchembled, B; Leroux, R; Chotteau-Lelièvre, A; Fontaine, F

    2001-01-01

    Numerous genes belonging to the ets gene family have been described for a few years. The founder of this family is the v-ets proto-oncogene, which is the viral counterpart of the chicken c-ets-1 proto-oncogene. Main research was carried out both on Vertebrates, Drosophila and the nematod Caenorhabditis elegans. Previously, two genes of this family named Nd ets and Nd erg, were isolated in the polychaete annelid Hediste (Nereis) diversicolor. Here we have described the isolation of one gene from the ets family in another polychaete annelid named Perinereis cultrifera. By polymerase chain reaction using degenerated primers, we have amplified an approximatively 515 pb genomic region encoding the ETS domain and another domain designed as "R" domain by Qi et al. (1992) and which can mediate transactivation. By using this method for isolating members of the ets gene family, we are going to realize a phylogenetic study of the phylum of polychaete annelids. PMID:11761710

  10. Signaling by epithelial members of the CEACAM family – mucosal docking sites for pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) comprise a group of immunoglobulin-related vertebrate glycoproteins. Several family members, including CEACAM1, CEA, and CEACAM6, are found on epithelial tissues throughout the human body. As they modulate diverse cellular functions, their signaling capacity is in the focus of current research. In this review we will summarize the knowledge about common signaling processes initiated by epithelial CEACAMs and suggest a model of signal transduction by CEACAM family members lacking significant cytoplasmic domains. As pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria exploit these receptors during mucosal colonization, we try to highlight the connection between CEACAMs, microbes, and cellular responses. Special emphasis in this context is placed on the functional interplay between CEACAMs and integrins that influences matrix adhesion of epithelial cells. The cooperation between these two receptor families provides an intriguing example of the fine tuning of cellular responses and their manipulation by specialized microorganisms. PMID:24735478

  11. 41 CFR 302-3.225 - If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If my immediate family member(s) return to the U.S. before me, will I be reimbursed for transporting part of my household goods with my family and the rest of my household goods when I return? 302-3.225 Section 302-3.225 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  12. 41 CFR 302-4.101 - Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at the new official station? 302-4.101 Section 302-4.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation...

  13. 41 CFR 302-4.101 - Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Must my immediate family member(s) and I begin PCS travel at the old official station and end at the new official station? 302-4.101 Section 302-4.101 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation...

  14. 41 CFR 302-3.511 - What must we consider when determining return travel for immediate family member(s) for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must we consider when determining return travel for immediate family member(s) for compassionate reasons prior to completion of the service agreement? 302-3.511 Section 302-3.511 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System...

  15. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S. before I complete my service agreement? 302-3.302 Section 302-3.302 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION...

  16. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under one service agreement? 302-3.303 Section 302-3.303 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System RELOCATION ALLOWANCES...

  17. 41 CFR 302-3.203 - If I am transferring in the interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false If I am transferring in the interest of the Government and my employed immediate family member(s) transfer is not in the interest of the Government, will he/she receive relocation allowances? 302-3.203 Section 302-3.203 Public Contracts and Property Management...

  18. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under one service agreement? 302-3.303 Section 302-3.303 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  19. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S. before I complete my service agreement? 302-3.302 Section 302-3.302 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...

  20. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under one service agreement? 302-3.303 Section 302-3.303 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...

  1. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S. before I complete my service agreement? 302-3.302 Section 302-3.302 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...

  2. 41 CFR 302-3.302 - May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May my agency pay for my immediate family member(s) and my household goods to be returned to the U.S. before I complete my service agreement? 302-3.302 Section 302-3.302 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel...

  3. 41 CFR 302-3.303 - May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May I claim reimbursement for the return of my immediate family member(s) or household goods more than once under one service agreement? 302-3.303 Section 302-3.303 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...

  4. Mutations and polymorphic BRCA variants transmission in breast cancer familial members.

    PubMed

    Pilato, Brunella; Martinucci, Marianna; Danza, Katia; Pinto, Rosamaria; Petriella, Daniela; Lacalamita, Rosanna; Bruno, Michele; Lambo, Rossana; D'Amico, Cosimo; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2011-02-01

    We previously showed that about 80% of breast cancer patients at high risk to carry mutation in BRCA genes presented at least one polymorphism in these genes which resulted potentially harmful by in silico analysis. In the present paper, the genealogic transmission of those polymorphic coding and noncoding variants of BRCA genes in family's members has been investigated. Thirty families, enrolled within the Genetic Counselling Program of our Institute, with probands and at least one-first degree relative (n = 67 family members) available, have been studied for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathological mutation and polymorphic variants' transmission. Ten and 6 probands carried Mendelian transmitted mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, respectively. Polymorphic coding and noncoding variants were transmitted in each family's relatives with a frequency ranging from 42 to 100%, with similar rate for each SNP in mutated and nonmutated families with the only exception of BRCA1 K1183R significantly more frequent in mutated families (P = 0.004); conversely, this SNP and BRCA2 N372H, were more frequently present in breast cancer relatives belonging to families in which pathological BRCA mutations were not present. Furthermore, specific haplotypes were transmitted in all relatives as BRCA1 871Leu-1038Gly, present in both BRCA mutated and nonmutated families, while BRCA2 289His-991Asp-IVS14+53 C>T present only in BRCAX families suggesting the harmful role of these SNPs. In conclusion, analysis of SNPs maps and modality of their transmission could identify further susceptibility markers and provide a basis for a better DNA-based cancer classification. PMID:20352487

  5. Cancer in the Family: Review of the Psychosocial Perspectives of Patients and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitschke, Diane B.

    2008-01-01

    As advances in cancer care have led to more treatment options and longer survival for cancer patients, a focus on quality of life for patients and their families has gained importance. This review provides a discussion of stress and coping theory, documents the relevance of this topic area for social work practice, and illuminates the results of a…

  6. Redefining Residential: Family-Driven Care in Residential Treatment--Family Members Speak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Residential Treatment for Children & Youth, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This is the sixth in a series of papers issued by the American Association of Children's Residential Centers (AACRC) regarding emerging and best practices in the field of residential treatment for children, youth, and families. AACRC is a long standing national association focused exclusively on practice and policy issues related to the provision…

  7. Cancer in the Family: Review of the Psychosocial Perspectives of Patients and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitschke, Diane B.

    2008-01-01

    As advances in cancer care have led to more treatment options and longer survival for cancer patients, a focus on quality of life for patients and their families has gained importance. This review provides a discussion of stress and coping theory, documents the relevance of this topic area for social work practice, and illuminates the results of a

  8. Distinctive expression pattern of interleukin-17 cytokine family members in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Moossavi, Shirin; Salem, Abdelhakim; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Tuovinen, Sarianna M; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Salo, Tuula; Bishehsari, Faraz

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in both genders. Even though interleukin (IL)-17A was shown to play an important role in intestinal tumourigenesis and CRC, other IL-17 family members were not studied well. We therefore studied the expression of IL-17 cytokine family members in CRC. Ten healthy colons and ten CRC mucosa were immunostained for IL-17B, IL-17C, IL-17E, and IL-17F, and their receptors IL-17RA, IL-17RB, and IL-17RC. Double immunofluorescence staining of the CRC mucosa was done for IL-17B with markers of neutrophils, endothelial cells, macrophages, T cells, mast cells, or fibroblasts. While IL-17B was increased in CRC with a strong presence both in the epithelial and stromal compartments, IL-17C showed different expression depending on the grade of differentiation and IL-17E remained unchanged. In contrast, IL-17F was decreased in CRC compared to healthy control. Colon epithelial cells stained positive for IL-17RA, IL-17RB, and IL-17RC in both healthy control and CRC. Neutrophils were the main source of IL-17B in the stroma. IL-17 family members demonstrated distinct expression patterns in CRC, suggesting a differential role exerted by each member in colon carcinogenesis. PMID:26304506

  9. Neuropathology of two members of a German-American kindred (Family C) with late onset parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Wszolek, Z K; Gwinn-Hardy, K; Wszolek, E K; Muenter, M D; Pfeiffer, R F; Rodnitzky, R L; Uitti, R J; McComb, R D; Gasser, T; Dickson, D W

    2002-04-01

    We present genealogical and longitudinal clinical observations and autopsy findings of a previously reported kindred, Family C (German-American), with late-onset autosomal dominant parkinsonism with evidence for linkage on chromosome 2p13. The clinical phenotype includes the cardinal features of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. In addition, postural tremor and dementia are detected in some individuals. Two members of the kindred, one affected and one unaffected have recently come to autopsy. The unaffected family member was an 82-year-old woman whose brain showed only mild age-related pathology and no evidence of subclinical Lewy body disease. In contrast, the affected family member was an 83-year-old man whose brain had neuronal loss, gliosis and Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra and other monoaminergic brain stem nuclei, as well as the basal forebrain and amygdala. Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites had a distribution typical of cases of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Thus, the clinical and pathological findings in this family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism are similar to those of sporadic Parkinson's disease. PMID:11904753

  10. Activation of HER family members in gastric carcinoma cells mediates resistance to MET inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The receptor tyrosine kinase MET is constitutively activated in many gastric cancers and its expression is strictly required for survival of some gastric cancer cells. Thus, MET is considered a good candidate for targeted therapeutic intervention in this type of tumor, and MET inhibitors recently entered clinical trials. One of the major problems of therapies targeting tyrosine kinases is that many tumors are not responsive to treatment or eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Perspective studies are thus mandatory to identify the molecular mechanisms that could cause resistance to these therapies. Results Our in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that, in MET-addicted gastric cancer cells, the activation of HER (Human Epidermal Receptor) family members induces resistance to MET silencing or inhibition by PHA-665752 (a selective kinase inhibitor). We provide molecular evidences highlighting the role of EGFR, HER3, and downstream signaling pathways common to MET and HER family in resistance to MET inhibitors. Moreover, we show that an in vitro generated gastric cancer cell line resistant to MET-inhibition displays overexpression of HER family members, whose activation contributes to maintenance of resistance. Conclusions Our findings predict that gastric cancer tumors bearing constitutive activation of HER family members are poorly responsive to MET inhibition, even if this receptor is constitutively active. Moreover, the appearance of these alterations might also be responsible for the onset of resistance in initially responsive tumors. PMID:20500904

  11. Challenges Facing a Deaf Family Member Concerning a Loved One’s Dying

    PubMed Central

    Kehl, Karen A.; Gartner, Constance M.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals who are Deaf face challenges both similar and unique from those faced by hearing individuals when a family member is dying. This study was guided by the question “What are the challenges faced by a Deaf family member when a loved one is dying?” Methods - This qualitative study is guided by critical theory and an interpretive perspective. Robert, a college-educated older adult who has been Deaf from birth was interviewed in American Sign Language using a death history format. Results – There are challenges for Deaf family members that affect communication with both the dying person and health care professionals. Patient-family communication issues included physical challenges and financial challenges. Lack of cultural competence concerning the Deaf community created challenges communicating with professionals. Decision-making was also a challenge. Conclusions These findings provide a framework for future research concerning the needs of Deaf individuals facing the end of life and provide guidance for clinicians. PMID:19910395

  12. Four Members of Heat Shock Protein 70 Family in Korean Rose Bitterling (Rhodeus uyekii)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hyun; Dong, Chun Mae; Kim, Julan; An, Cheul Min; Baek, Hae Ja; Kong, Hee Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 70, the highly conserved stress protein families, plays important roles in protecting cells against heat and other stresses in most animal species. In the present study, we identified and characterized four Hsp70 (RuHSP4, RuHSC70, RuHSP12A, RuGRP78) family proteins based on the expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis of the Korean rose bitterling R. uyekii cDNA library. The deduced RuHSP70 family has high amino acid identities of 72-99% with those of other species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that RuHsp70 family clustered with fish groups (HSP4, HSC70, HSP12A, GRP78) proteins. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed the specific expression patterns of RuHsp70 family members in the early developmental stages and several tissues in Korean rose bitterling. The expression of 4 groups of Hsp70 family was detected in all tested tissue. Particularly, Hsp70 family of Korean rose bitterling is highly expressed in hepatopancreas and sexual gonad (testis and ovary). The expression of Hsp70 family was differentially regulated in accordance with early development stage of Rhodeus uyekii. PMID:27004270

  13. Prosurvival Bcl-2 family members affect autophagy only indirectly, by inhibiting Bax and Bak

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, Lisa M.; Heinlein, Melanie; Huang, David C. S.; Vaux, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family members such as Bcl-2, myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), and B-cell lymphoma-X large (Bcl-xL) are proposed to inhibit autophagy by directly binding to the BH3 domain of Beclin 1/Atg6. However, these Bcl-2 family proteins also block the proapoptotic activity of Bcl-2–associated X (Bax) and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak), and many inducers of autophagy also cause cell death. Therefore, when the mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis pathway is functional, interpretation of such experiments is complicated. To directly test the impact of the endogenous antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members on autophagy in the absence of apoptosis, we inhibited their activity in cells lacking the essential cell death mediators Bax and Bak. We also used inducible lentiviral vectors to overexpress Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, or Mcl-1 in cells and subjected them to treatments that promote autophagy. In the absence of Bax and Bak, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, and Mcl-1 had no detectable effect on autophagy or cell death in myeloid or fibroblast cell lines. On the other hand, when Bax and Bak were present, inhibiting the prosurvival Bcl-2 family members stimulated autophagy, but this correlated with increased cell death. In addition, inhibition of autophagy induced by amino acid starvation, etoposide, or interleukin-3 withdrawal did not affect cell death in the absence of Bax and Bak. These results demonstrate that the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members do not directly inhibit components of the autophagic pathway but instead affect autophagy indirectly, owing to their inhibition of Bax and Bak. PMID:24912196

  14. Tubulin polyglutamylase enzymes are members of the TTL domain protein family.

    PubMed

    Janke, Carsten; Rogowski, Krzysztof; Wloga, Dorota; Regnard, Catherine; Kajava, Andrey V; Strub, Jean-Marc; Temurak, Nevzat; van Dijk, Juliette; Boucher, Dominique; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Suryavanshi, Swati; Gaertig, Jacek; Eddé, Bernard

    2005-06-17

    Polyglutamylation of tubulin has been implicated in several functions of microtubules, but the identification of the responsible enzyme(s) has been challenging. We found that the neuronal tubulin polyglutamylase is a protein complex containing a tubulin tyrosine ligase-like (TTLL) protein, TTLL1. TTLL1 is a member of a large family of proteins with a TTL homology domain, whose members could catalyze ligations of diverse amino acids to tubulins or other substrates. In the model protist Tetrahymena thermophila, two conserved types of polyglutamylases were characterized that differ in substrate preference and subcellular localization. PMID:15890843

  15. Quality of powdered substitutes for breast milk with regard to members of the family Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Muytjens, H L; Roelofs-Willemse, H; Jaspar, G H

    1988-01-01

    Members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were cultured from 52.5% of 141 milk substitute infant formulas which were obtained in 35 countries. The concentration did not exceed a level of 1 CFU/g in any product. The species which were isolated most frequently were Enterobacter agglomerans, cloacae, Enterobacter sakazakii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. If infections due to these organisms occur, it can be useful to include a check of the hygienic precautions which are taken during the preparation and storage of the formula. Milk powders without members of the Enterobacteriaceae might offer extra protection to the newborn if some multiplication does occur in the formula. PMID:3284901

  16. A Quick Test on Rotation Period Clustering for the Small Members of the Koronis Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chan-Kao; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Ip, Wing-Huen

    2016-01-01

    Rotation period clustering in prograde/retrograde rotators might be the preliminary indication of the Slivan state in the Koronis family as a result of the Yarkovsky-OKeefe-Radzievskii-Paddack effect. We follow the general scenario of dispersion in the semimajor axis of the asteroid family members to separate prograde and retrograde rotators in the Koronis family. From the available rotation periods obtained from PTF/iPTF, we were unable to find the rotation period clustering of objects with H ? 12 mag in the Koronis family. This could be the result of the intermittent collisional process of small asteroids (D ? 20 km) which leads to astray Yarkovsky drifting. Measurement of the pole orientations of our sample will verify our preliminary result and validate our method.

  17. Giving information to family members of patients in the intensive care unit: Iranian nurses' ethical approaches.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Mansoureh A; Gaeeni, Mina; Mohammadi, Nooreddin; Seyedfatemi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Receiving information related to patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. When health care professionals should decide whether to be honest or to give hope, giving information becomes an ethical challenge We conducted a research to study the ethical approaches of Iranian nurses to giving information to the family members of patients in the intensive care units. This research was conducted in the intensive care units of three teaching hospitals in Iran. It employed a qualitative approach involving semi-structured and in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 12 nurses to identify the ethical approaches to giving information to family members of the intensive care unit patients. A conventional content analysis of the data produced two categories and five subcategories. The two categories were as follows: a) informational support, and b) emotional support. Informational support had 2 subcategories consisting of being honest in giving information, and providing complete and understandable information. Emotional support in giving information had 3 sub-categories consisting of gradual revelation, empathy and assurance. Findings of the study indicated that ethical approaches to giving information can be in the form of either informational support or emotional support, based on patients' conditions and prognoses, their families' emotional state, the necessity of providing a calm atmosphere in the ICU and the hospital, and other patients and their families' peace. Findings of the present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering ethical guidelines in giving information to the families of patients hospitalized in the ICU. PMID:25512830

  18. Family Quality of Life from the Perspectives of Individual Family Members: A Korean-American Family and Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Joo Young; Turnbull, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s, the focus on individual quality of life expanded to family quality of life (FQOL) in the field of intellectual disabilities. However, few studies examined FQOL for families who have children with hearing loss. Furthermore, most studies focused on mothers' perceptions of FQOL. The purpose of this study is to…

  19. Lentivirus-Mediated knockdown of tectonic family member 1 inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Junjie; Wang, Chengfeng; Liang, Qinchuan; Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Qingshuang; Wang, Shousen; Ma, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Tectonic family member 1 (TCTN1) encodes a member of the tectonic family which are evolutionarily conserved secreted and transmembrane proteins, involving in a diverse variety of developmental processes. It has been demonstrated that tectonics expressed in regions that participate in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during mouse embryonic development and was imperative for Hh-mediated patterning of the ventral neural tube. However, the expression and regulation of tectonics in human tumor is still not clear. In this study, shRNA-expressing lentivirus was constructed to knockdown TCTN1 in medulloblastoma cell line Daoy. The results showed that knockdown of TCTN1 inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in Daoy cell line, also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M boundary. Taken all together, our data suggest that TCTN1 might play an important role in the progression of medulloblastoma. PMID:26550235

  20. Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 1 (PHLDA1) and cancer

    PubMed Central

    NAGAI, MARIA APARECIDA

    2016-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 1 (PHLDA1) encodes a member of an evolutionarily conserved pleckstrin homology-related domain protein family. It was first identified as a potential transcription factor required for Fas expression and activation-induced apoptosis in mouse T cell hybridomas. The exact molecular and biological functions of PHLDA1 remain to be elucidated. However, its expression is induced by a variety of external stimuli and there is evidence that it may function as a transcriptional activator that acts as a mediator of apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation and cell migration dependent on the cellular type and context. Recently, PHLDA1 has received attention due to its association with cancer. In the present review, the current knowledge of PHLDA1 protein structure, expression regulation and function is summarized. In addition, the current data in the literature is reviewed with regards to the role of PHLDA1 in cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26998263

  1. Lentivirus-Mediated knockdown of tectonic family member 1 inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Junjie; Wang, Chengfeng; Liang, Qinchuan; Zhao, Yang; Zhao, Qingshuang; Wang, Shousen; Ma, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Tectonic family member 1 (TCTN1) encodes a member of the tectonic family which are evolutionarily conserved secreted and transmembrane proteins, involving in a diverse variety of developmental processes. It has been demonstrated that tectonics expressed in regions that participate in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling during mouse embryonic development and was imperative for Hh-mediated patterning of the ventral neural tube. However, the expression and regulation of tectonics in human tumor is still not clear. In this study, shRNA-expressing lentivirus was constructed to knockdown TCTN1 in medulloblastoma cell line Daoy. The results showed that knockdown of TCTN1 inhibited cell proliferation and colony formation in Daoy cell line, also caused cell cycle arrest at the G2/M boundary. Taken all together, our data suggest that TCTN1 might play an important role in the progression of medulloblastoma. PMID:26550235

  2. Marriage and family therapy faculty members' balance of work and personal life.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Jennifer L; Rosen, Karen H

    2012-04-01

    A sense of imbalance is common among both professors and therapists, though few studies have been published examining the work and personal life balance of those who work in both professions simultaneously. Using in-depth telephone interviews, this study examined the work and personal life balance of 16 marriage and family therapy (MFT) faculty members. Results showed that six were satisfied with their balance, six were dissatisfied, and four were "middle of the road." Men, older participants, and those who were in their career longer were more likely to report feeling satisfied with their balance. Internal indicators of their balance included family and workplace messages, health indicators, feelings of contentment, and congruence with personal values. Child and relationship status, tenure status, and gender issues also impacted their sense of balance. Specific balance enhancers and reducers were highlighted, and participants discussed coping strategies and recommendations for other MFT faculty members. Clinical, training, and career implications are discussed. PMID:22512300

  3. Reconstructing meaning through occupation after the death of a family member: accommodation, assimilation, and continuing bonds.

    PubMed

    Hoppes, Steve; Segal, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Reactions to death have been studied extensively from psychological, behavioral, and physiological perspectives. Occupational adaptation to loss has received scant attention. Qualitative research was undertaken to identify and describe occupational responses in bereavement. The constant comparative approach was used to analyze and interpret the occupational responses. Adaptive strategies of occupational accommodation and assimilation were used after the death of a family member. Desire to sustain bonds with the deceased motivated specific occupational engagements. These occupational responses served to reconstruct meaning after the death of a family member. These findings contribute to understanding adaptation after death by adding an occupational perspective to previous theories. Occupational therapists' abilities to support clients after loss can be enhanced through appreciation of occupational accommodation and assimilation and the role of continuing occupational bonds after the death of a loved one. PMID:20131573

  4. Al-Anon Family Groups Newcomers and Members: Concerns about the Drinkers in their Lives

    PubMed Central

    Timko, Christine; Cronkite, Ruth; Laudet, Alexandre; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Roth, Jeffrey; Moos, Rudolf H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Despite Al-Anons widespread availability and use, knowledge is lacking about the drinkers in attendees lives. We filled this gap by describing and comparing Al-Anon newcomers and members reports about their main drinker (main person prompting initial attendance). Methods Al-Anons World Service Office mailed a random sample of groups, yielding completed surveys from newcomers (N = 362) and stable members (N = 265). Results Newcomers and members drinkers generally were comparable. They had known their drinker for an average of 22 years and been concerned about his or hers drinking for 9 years; about 50% had daily contact with the drinker. Most reported negative relationship aspects (drinker gets on your nerves; you disagree about important things). Newcomers had more concern about the drinkers alcohol use than members did, and were more likely to report their drinkers driving under the influence. Drinkers most frequent problem due to drinking was family arguments, and most common source of help was 12-step groups, with lower rates among drinkers of newcomers. Concerns spurring initial Al-Anon attendance were the drinkers poor quality of life, relationships, and psychological status; goals for initial attendance reflected these concerns. Discussion and Conclusions The drinkers alcohol use was of less concern in prompting initial Al-Anon attendance, and, accordingly, the drinkers reduced drinking was a less frequently endorsed goal of attendance. Scientific Significance Family treatments for substance use problems might expand interventions and outcome domains beyond abstinence and relationship satisfaction to include the drinkers quality of life and psychological symptoms and in turn relieve concerns of family members. PMID:24628725

  5. Expression of activator protein-1 (AP-1) family members in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor is believed to be important in tumorigenesis and altered AP-1 activity was associated with cell transformation. We aimed to assess the potential role of AP-1 family members as novel biomarkers in breast cancer. Methods We studied the expression of AP-1 members at the mRNA level in 72 primary breast tumors and 37 adjacent non-tumor tissues and evaluated its correlation with clinicopathological parameters including estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2/neu status. Expression levels of Ubiquitin C (UBC) were used for normalization. Protein expression of AP-1 members was assessed using Western blot analysis in a subset of tumors. We used student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, logistic regression and Pearson’s correlation coefficient for statistical analyses. Results We found significant differences in the expression of AP-1 family members between tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues for all AP-1 family members except Fos B. Fra-1, Fra-2, Jun-B and Jun-D mRNA levels were significantly higher in tumors compared to adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001), whilst c-Fos and c-Jun mRNA levels were significantly lower in tumors compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001). In addition, Jun-B overexpression had outstanding discrimination ability to differentiate tumor tissues from adjacent non-tumor tissues as determined by ROC curve analysis. Moreover, Fra-1 was significantly overexpressed in the tumors biochemically classified as ERα negative (p = 0.012) and PR negative (p = 0.037). Interestingly, Fra-1 expression was significantly higher in triple-negative tumors compared with luminal carcinomas (p = 0.01). Conclusions Expression levels of Fra-1 and Jun-B might be possible biomarkers for prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:24073962

  6. Those Who Are Left behind: An Estimate of the Number of Family Members of Suicide Victims in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Joe; Choi, Yun Jeong; Mori, Kohta; Sawada, Yasuyuki; Sugano, Saki

    2009-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature of suicide studies by presenting procedures and its estimates of the number of family members who lose their loved ones to suicide. Using Japanese aggregate level data, three main findings emerge: first, there are approximately five bereaved family members per suicide; second, in 2006, there were about…

  7. GASA4, One of the 14-Member Arabidopsis GASA Family of Small Polypeptides, Regulates Flowering and Seed Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Members of the plant-specific gibberellic acid-stimulated Arabidopsis (GASA) gene family play roles in hormone response, defense and development. We have identified six new Arabidopsis GASA genes, bringing the total number of family members to 14. Here we show that these genes all encode small polyp...

  8. Assessment of Satisfaction with Care Among Family Members of Survivors in a Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, David Y.; Yagoda, Daniel; Perrey, Hilary M.; Tehan, Tara M.; Guanci, Mary; Ananian, Lillian; Currier, Paul F.; Cobb, J. Perren; Rosand, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Many prior nursing studies regarding family members specifically of neuroscience intensive care unit (Neuro ICU) patients have focused on identifying their primary needs. A concept related to identifying these needs and assessing whether they have been met is determining whether families explicitly report satisfaction with the care that both they and their loved ones have received. The objective of this study was to explore family satisfaction with care in an academic Neuro ICU and compare results with concurrent data from same hospitals medical ICU (MICU). Over 38 days, we administered the Family Satisfaction-ICU instrument to Neuro ICU and MICU patients families at time of ICU discharge. Those whose loved ones passed away during ICU admission were excluded. When asked about the respect and compassion that they received from staff, 76.3% (95% CI 66.586.1) of Neuro ICU families were completely satisfied, as opposed to 92.7% in the MICU (84.4101.0, p = 0.04). Respondents were less likely to be completely satisfied with the courtesy of staff if they reported participation in zero formal family meetings. Less than 60% of Neuro ICU families were completely satisfied by: (1) frequency of physician communication, (2) inclusion and (3) support during decision making, and (4) control over the care of their loved ones. Parents of patients were more likely than other relatives to feel very included and supported in the decision-making process. Future studies may focus on evaluating strategies for Neuro ICU nurses and physicians to provide better decision-making support and to implement more frequent family meetings even for those patients who may not seem medically or socially complicated to the team. Determining satisfaction with care for those families whose loved ones passed away during their Neuro ICU admission is another potential avenue for future investigation. PMID:24556658

  9. IL-36 a new member of the IL-1 family cytokines.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, D; Conti, F; Rosati, M; Maccauro, G; Saggini, A; Cianchetti, E; Angelucci, D; Fulcheri, M; Tet, S; Salini, V; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Toniato, E; Castellani, M L; Conti, P; Theoharides, T C

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-36 (IL-36) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which plays an important role in innate and adaptive immunity. IL-36 activates MAPK and NF-kB pathways and is produced by many different cells. This cytokine is a family member of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several diseases. Here we summarise and review the new aspects of this important pro-inflammatory cytokine. PMID:22475093

  10. Sources of hope: Perception of Iranian family members of patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Gaeeni, Mina; Farahani, Mansoureh A; Mohammadi, Nooredin; Seyedfatemi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Background: Admission to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is recognized as a situation with emotional strain, uncertainty, and fear of losing the patient. In such stressful situations, it is hope that can promote psychological stability in the patient's family members. Related literature revealed that sources of hope in this situation have still not been discussed well in studies. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the sources of hope from the perspective of families of ICU patients in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative study that was carried out adopting the conventional qualitative content analysis approach, 19 family members of 13 patients hospitalized in the ICU from three teaching hospitals were selected, through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using conventional content analysis, through the process of data reduction and condensation, coding, and also generating categories and subcategories. Results: Analysis of the data revealed sources of hope in families of ICU patients. These sources appeared as two main categories- internal sources and external sources. The internal sources had two subcategories consisting of ’religious-spirituality beliefs’ and ’positive attitude’. The external sources had four subcategories consisting of healthcare professionals’ interactions, empathy of families and friends, patient's condition, and participation in care. Conclusions: The results of this study showed the sources of hope in the families of the patients in the ICU. These sources, as moderating factors, could reduce physical and psychological damages caused to the families. In the present study, the categorizations of the participants’ in-depth experience could develop a new horizon for healthcare professionals, especially nurses, on the sources of hope, based on culture. PMID:25558262

  11. Evolutionary Pattern and Regulation Analysis to Support Why Diversity Functions Existed within PPAR Gene Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xiping; Wang, Guosong; Liu, Hehe; Gan, Xiang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Jiwen; Li, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR) gene family members exhibit distinct patterns of distribution in tissues and differ in functions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the evolutionary impacts on diversity functions of PPAR members and the regulatory differences on gene expression patterns. 63 homology sequences of PPAR genes from 31 species were collected and analyzed. The results showed that three isolated types of PPAR gene family may emerge from twice times of gene duplication events. The conserved domains of HOLI (ligand binding domain of hormone receptors) domain and ZnF_C4 (C4 zinc finger in nuclear in hormone receptors) are essential for keeping basic roles of PPAR gene family, and the variant domains of LCRs may be responsible for their divergence in functions. The positive selection sites in HOLI domain are benefit for PPARs to evolve towards diversity functions. The evolutionary variants in the promoter regions and 3′ UTR regions of PPARs result into differential transcription factors and miRNAs involved in regulating PPAR members, which may eventually affect their expressions and tissues distributions. These results indicate that gene duplication event, selection pressure on HOLI domain, and the variants on promoter and 3′ UTR are essential for PPARs evolution and diversity functions acquired. PMID:25961030

  12. Analysis of the key active subsites of glycoside hydrolase 13 family members.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikash

    2010-05-01

    alpha-Amylase, pullulanase, neopullulanase, cyclomaltodextrinase (CDase), cyclomaltodextin glucanotransferase (CGTase), etc. are some of the amylolytic enzymes that act on polysaccharides. These enzymes differ from each other with respect to substrate and linkage specificities. These enzymes have been grouped into the GH13 (GH, Glycoside Hydrolase) family in the CAZy database on the basis of similarity in amino acid sequence. Members of this family share three domains viz., A, B, and C, which have several binding subsites to accommodate monomeric units of the polysaccharide substrate. Among these subsites, -2, -1, +1, and +2 subsites are the most critical subsites for catalytic activity. In the present study, the substrate analog-, inhibitor-, or product-bound 3-D structures of 24 members of GH13 family have been analyzed to identify the features of the -2, -1, +1, and +2 subsites shared by all the members for recognition of the common substrate. It is found that neither the number nor the nature of the potential hydrogen bond-forming residues is conserved with the exception of the presence of tyrosine as a stacking residue in the -1 subsite. The relative spatial disposition of the conserved subsite residues are conserved as judged by distance matrices. The backbone of the -2, -1, +1, and +2 subsites does not undergo conformational change for the recognition of the substrate. This analysis suggests that these enzymes recognize their substrate on the basis of shape of the substrate rather than on the basis of specific interactions within the binding site. PMID:20227065

  13. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with treatment status in family members with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Bernadette; Samuels, Jack F; Pinto, Anthony; Fyer, Abby J; McCracken, James T; Rauch, Scott L; Murphy, Dennis L; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Knowles, James A; Piacentini, John; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Grados, Marco A; Riddle, Mark A; Rasmussen, Steven A; Pauls, David L; Willour, Virginia L; Shugart, Yin Y; Liang, Kung-Yee; Hoehn-Saric, Rudolf; Nestadt, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the demographic and clinical factors that influence treatment status in family members with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). Six hundred and two subjects from the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) to diagnose Axis I disorders, and the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) for assessment of OCD symptoms. The demographic and clinical data were compared between subjects who had received treatment and those who had not. A precipitous onset of symptoms, severe illness, multiple obsessions and compulsions, and co-morbid affective disorders were all positively associated with receiving treatment. Older age and the presence of obsessive compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) or OCPD traits were negatively associated with treatment. Gender and age at onset of symptoms did not predict treatment history. The mean duration from onset of symptoms to receiving treatment was 13.8+/-SD 11.9 years, but there was a direct relationship between current age and time to treatment, with younger subjects receiving treatment sooner. Clinical factors are predominant in predicting treatment status in family members with OCD. Although the mean duration from onset of symptoms to treatment was long, younger family members appear to receive treatment sooner. PMID:17345603

  14. Exposure of Phosphatidylserine by Xk-related Protein Family Members during Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Imanishi, Eiichi; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cells expose phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) on their surface as an “eat me” signal. Mammalian Xk-related (Xkr) protein 8, which is predicted to contain six transmembrane regions, and its Caenorhabditis elegans homolog CED-8 promote apoptotic PtdSer exposure. The mouse and human Xkr families consist of eight and nine members, respectively. Here, we found that mouse Xkr family members, with the exception of Xkr2, are localized to the plasma membrane. When Xkr8-deficient cells, which do not expose PtdSer during apoptosis, were transformed by Xkr family members, the transformants expressing Xkr4, Xkr8, or Xkr9 responded to apoptotic stimuli by exposing cell surface PtdSer and were efficiently engulfed by macrophages. Like Xkr8, Xkr4 and Xkr9 were found to possess a caspase recognition site in the C-terminal region and to require its direct cleavage by caspases for their function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the amino acid residues conserved among CED-8, Xkr4, Xkr8, and Xkr9 identified several essential residues in the second transmembrane and second cytoplasmic regions. Real time PCR analysis indicated that unlike Xkr8, which is ubiquitously expressed, Xkr4 and Xkr9 expression is tissue-specific. PMID:25231987

  15. What's at stake? Genetic information from the perspective of people with epilepsy and their family members.

    PubMed

    Shostak, Sara; Zarhin, Dana; Ottman, Ruth

    2011-09-01

    Substantial progress has been made in identifying genes that raise risk for epilepsy, and genetic testing for some of these genes is increasingly being used in clinical practice. However, almost no empirical data are available from the perspective of people with epilepsy and their family members about the impact of genetic information and potential benefits and harms of genetic testing. To address this gap we conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 40 individuals (22 with epilepsy, 18 unaffected) in the USA from families containing multiple affected individuals who had participated in epilepsy genetics research. The interviews were coded and analyzed using the principles of grounded theory. Several major themes emerged from these interviews. Participants expressed "personal theories of inheritance" that emphasized commonalities among relatives and the idea that disease risk is most shared by family members who share physical or personality traits. Most participants said they would have genetic testing if it were offered. They cited many potential benefits, including learning what caused epilepsy in their family, being better able to care and advocate for children at risk, reducing guilt and blame, providing an increased sense of control, and relieving anxiety in unaffected individuals who test negative. The influence of genetic information on reproduction was a particularly salient theme. Although respondents believed genetic testing would be useful for informing their reproductive choices, they also expressed fear that it could lead to external pressures to modify these choices. Other concerns about the potential negative impact of genetic information included increased blame and guilt, increased stigma and discrimination in employment and insurance, self-imposed limitations on life goals, and alterations in fundamental conceptions of "what epilepsy is." Consideration of the perspectives of people with epilepsy and their family members is critical to understanding the implications of contemporary epilepsy genetic research and testing. PMID:21831495

  16. The effect of family member migration on education and work among nonmigrant youth in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Halpern-Manners, Andrew

    2011-02-01

    While academic and policy circles have given much attention to the assimilatory experiences of Mexican immigrants in the United States, less is known about those who stay behind-an especially unfortunate oversight given the increasing number of Mexican youth with migrant family members. Of the studies on this topic, most have sought to identify the effect that migration has on youths' migratory and educational aspirations, often using qualitative methods in individual sending communities. The present article supplements this research in two ways: (1) in addition to assessing educational outcomes, the scope of the analysis is expanded to include nonmigrant' interaction with another homeland institution of upward mobility: the labor market; and (2) using a large demographic data set, statistical techniques are employed to adjust for unobserved selectivity into the migrant family-member population, thus accounting for a potentially serious source of bias. The results suggest that youth in migrant-sending families are less likely to complete the educational transitions leading up to postsecondary school and have a lower probability of participating in the local economy. The results also indicate that unobserved factors play a "nonignorable" role in sorting youth into migrant and nonmigrant families. PMID:21347807

  17. Elucidation of the structures of all members of the Avsunviroidae family.

    PubMed

    Gigure, Tamara; Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Bolduc, Franois; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Viroids are small single-stranded RNA pathogens which cause significant damage to plants. As their nucleic acids do not encode for any proteins, they are dependant solely on their structure for their propagation. The elucidation of the secondary structures of viroids has been limited because of the exhaustive and time consuming nature of classic approaches. Here, the method of high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (hSHAPE) has been adapted to probe the viroid structure. The data obtained using this method were then used as input for computer-assisted structure prediction using RNA structure software in order to determine the secondary structures of the RNA strands of both (+) and () polarities of all Avsunviroidae members, one of the two families of viroids. The resolution of the structures of all of the members of the family provides a global view of the complexity of these RNAs. The structural differences between the two polarities, and any plausible tertiary interactions, were also analysed. Interestingly, the structures of the (+) and () strands were found to be different for each viroid species. The structures of the recently isolated grapevine hammerhead viroid-like RNA strands were also solved. This species shares several structural features with the Avsunviroidae family, although its infectious potential remains to be determined.To our knowledge, this article represents the first report of the structural elucidation of a complete family of viroids. PMID:25346967

  18. Teleocortin: A Novel Member of the CRH Family in Teleost Fish.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Kohei; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Miyanishi, Hiroshi; Hiraki-Kajiyama, Towako; Takeuchi, Akio; Nakasone, Kiyoshi; Maehiro, Sayaka; Okubo, Kataaki

    2015-08-01

    The CRH family of neuropeptides, including CRH and urocortins, plays pivotal roles in the regulation of physiological and behavioral stress responses in vertebrates. In this study, we identified a previously undescribed member of the CRH family of peptides in a teleost fish species (medaka; Oryzias latipes) and named this peptide teleocortin (Tcn). Medaka Tcn is a 41-amino acid polypeptide derived from the C terminus of a larger precursor protein that is encoded by a 2-exon gene, thus sharing common structural features with known CRH family peptides. tcn was found exclusively in teleost fish. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that tcn probably has an ancient origin but was lost from the tetrapod lineage shortly after the divergence of the teleost and tetrapod lineages. In the medaka brain, tcn was expressed in nuclei of the telencephalon, preoptic area, hypothalamus, tegmentum, and isthmic region. Because none of these nuclei have been implicated in the control of ACTH secretion from the pituitary, Tcn may exert its effects centrally in the brain rather than via stimulation of the pituitary-adrenal/interrenal axis. Most, if not all, tcn-expressing neurons also expressed crh, suggesting that Tcn and Crh share common physiological functions. Moreover, Tcn activated Crh receptors 1 and 2 with equivalent or slightly higher potency than Crh, further suggesting that these peptides share common functions. Taken together, these data identified Tcn as a novel, teleost-specific member of the CRH family of peptides that may act centrally with Crh to regulate physiological and behavioral stress responses. PMID:26030477

  19. The Effect of Family Member Migration on Education and Work among Nonmigrant Youth in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Halpern-Manners, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    While academic and policy circles have given much attention to the assimilatory experiences of Mexican immigrants in the United States, less is known about those who stay behind—an especially unfortunate oversight given the increasing number of Mexican youth with migrant family members. Of the studies that do exist, most have sought to identify the effect migration has on youths’ migratory and educational aspirations, often using qualitative methods in single sending communities. The present article supplements this research in two ways: (1) in addition to assessing educational outcomes, the scope of the analysis is expanded to include nonmigrants’ interaction with another homeland institution of upward mobility—the labor market; and (2) using a large demographic data set, statistical techniques are employed to adjust for unobserved selectivity into the migrant family-member population, thus accounting for a potentially serious source of bias. The results suggest that youth in migrant-sending families are less likely to complete the educational transitions leading up to post-secondary school, and have a lower probability of participating in the local economy. The results also indicate that unobserved factors play a “nonignorable” role in sorting youth into migrant and nonmigrant families. PMID:21347807

  20. The transition to caregiving: the experience of family members embarking on the dementia caregiving career.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kathryn Betts

    2006-01-01

    Although there is an extensive literature on dementia caregiving, research on family members' adjustment to the onset of dementia and on the early stage of caregiving is limited. This article describes a phenomenological study based on twenty semi-structured interviews with spouses and adult daughters of someone with early/mild dementia or mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Participants were asked to describe the earliest changes in the parent or spouse and the changes to their everyday lives and in their relationships brought by cognitive impairment. These family members reported taking on many new responsibilities in a highly interactive caregiving process consisting primarily of decision-making and supervision. Many participants reported experiencing frustration, resentment, grief, and relational deprivation, along with increased protectiveness and tenderness towards the person with dementia. Most of the participants were ambivalent about seeking or accepting help from others and seemed to want to maintain the status quo as long as possible. Social workers meeting with families in the context of disclosure of a dementia diagnosis or the early adjustment period may help by identifying their losses, normalizing negative feelings, and helping families envision ways they could use outside help. PMID:17062520

  1. Anoctamin/TMEM16 family members are Ca2+-activated Cl− channels

    PubMed Central

    Hartzell, H Criss; Yu, Kuai; Xiao, Qinhuan; Chien, Li-Ting; Qu, Zhiqiang

    2009-01-01

    Ca2+-activated Cl− channels (CaCCs) perform many important functions in cell physiology including secretion of fluids from acinar cells of secretory glands, amplification of olfactory transduction, regulation of cardiac and neuronal excitability, mediation of the fast block to polyspermy in amphibian oocytes, and regulation of vascular tone. Although a number of proteins have been proposed to be responsible for CaCC currents, the anoctamin family (ANO, also known as TMEM16) exhibits characteristics most similar to those expected for the classical CaCC. Interestingly, this family of proteins has previously attracted the interest of both developmental and cancer biologists. Some members of this family are up-regulated in a number of tumours and functional deficiency in others is linked to developmental defects. PMID:19015192

  2. Informing family members of individuals with Lynch syndrome: a guideline for clinical geneticists.

    PubMed

    Menko, Fred H; Aalfs, Cora M; Henneman, Lidewij; Stol, Yrrah; Wijdenes, Miranda; Otten, Ellen; Ploegmakers, Marleen M J; Legemaate, Johan; Smets, Ellen M A; de Wert, Guido M W R; Tibben, Aad

    2013-06-01

    The diagnosis of Lynch syndrome can lead to the prevention of colorectal cancer through periodic colonoscopies and removal of premalignant lesions in susceptible individuals. Therefore, predisposed individuals identified by mutation analysis are advised to inform their at-risk relatives about the options of predictive DNA testing and preventive measures. However, it has now been established that more than half of these relatives do not receive the necessary information. Barriers in conveying information include family communication problems and variable attitudes and practice among clinical geneticists. In this complex field, both medical, psychological, ethical and juridical aspects deserve consideration. Here we summarize the development of a revised guideline for clinical geneticists that allows a more active role of the geneticist, aimed at improving procedures to inform family members in Lynch syndrome and other hereditary and familial cancer syndromes. PMID:23535968

  3. Redetermination of the space weathering rate using spectra of Iannini asteroid family members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willman, Mark; Jedicke, Robert; Nesvorný, David; Moskovitz, Nicholas; Ivezić, Željko; Fevig, Ronald

    2008-06-01

    We have obtained moderate S/N (˜85) spectra at a realized resolution of R˜100 for 11 members of the Iannini family, until recently the youngest known family at under 5 million years of age [Nesvorný, D., Bottke, W.F., Levison, H.F., Dones, L., 2003. Astrophys. J. 591, 486-497, 720-771]. The spectra were acquired using the Echellette Spectrograph and Imager in its low-resolution prism mode on the Keck II telescope. The family members belong to the S-complex of asteroids with perhaps some K class members. The Iannini family members' average spectral slope, defined as the slope of the best-fit line constrained to pivot about 1 at 550 nm, is (0.30±0.04)/μm, matching the (0.26±0.03)/μm reported by Jedicke et al. [Jedicke, R., Nesvorný, D., Whiteley, R.J., Ivezić, Ž., Jurić, M., 2004. Nature 429, 275-277] using SDSS [Ivezić, Ž., Jurić, M., Lupton, R.H., Tabachnik, S., Quinn, T., 2002. In: Tyson, J.A., Wolff, S. (Eds.), Survey and Other Telescope Technologies and Discoveries. In: Proc. SPIE, vol. 4836. SPIE, Bellingham, pp. 98-103] color photometry. Using our spectra for this family as well as new observations of Karin family members [Vernazza, P., Birlan, M., Rossi, A., Dotto, E., Nesvorný, D., Brunetto, R., Fornasier, S., Fulchignoni, M., Renner, S., 2006. Astron. Astrophys. 460, 945-951] and new classifications of some older families we have revised the space weathering rate of S-complex asteroids originally determined by Jedicke et al. [Jedicke, R., Nesvorný, D., Whiteley, R.J., Ivezić, Ž., Jurić, M., 2004. Nature 429, 275-277]. Following Jedicke et al. [Jedicke, R., Nesvorný, D., Whiteley, R.J., Ivezić, Ž., Jurić, M., 2004. Nature 429, 275-277] we parameterize the space weathering rate of the principal component color of the spectrum ( PC), which is correlated with the spectral slope, as PC(t)=PC(0)+ΔPC[1-exp]. Our revised rate suggests that the characteristic time scale for space weathering is τ=570±220 Myr and that new S-complex clusters will have an initial color of PC(0)=0.31±0.04. The revised time scale is in better agreement with lab measurements and our measurements support the use of space weathering as a dating method. Under the assumption that all the spectra should be identical, since the members all derive from the same parent body and are presumably covered with similar regolith, we combined them to obtain a high-S/N composite spectrum for the family. The combined spectrum is within the S-complex.

  4. Psychosocial outcome following genetic risk counselling for familial colorectal cancer. A comparison of affected patients and family members.

    PubMed

    Keller, M; Jost, R; Haunstetter, C M; Sattel, H; Schroeter, C; Bertsch, U; Cremer, F; Kienle, P; Tariverdian, M; Kloor, M; Gebert, J; Brechtel, A

    2008-11-01

    Few studies have reported prospective data on psychosocial outcomes after genetic counselling in families with suspected hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). This prospective study examines the impact of multidisciplinary risk counselling on the psychosocial outcome of 139 affected cancer patients and 233 family members without cancer at risk for HNPCC. Participants completed questionnaires specific to HNPCC before and 8 weeks after attending the familial cancer clinic. Affected patients' levels of distress were closely related to their health status and exceeded that of unaffected individuals, as did worry regarding their relatives' risk. A significant reduction in general anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), distress specific to familial CRC (Impact of Events Scale) and general cancer worry (Distress Hereditary Disorder) was demonstrated after counselling in both affected patients and unaffected individuals. Reduction in distress was more pronounced in affected patients given a high risk of HNPCC compared with those at intermediate risk. Among unaffected individuals, distress declined regardless of what clinical risk they were assigned. Their perceptions of risk and cancer-related threat declined, while confidence in effective surveillance increased. These results suggest the beneficial effects of multidisciplinary counselling even when high-risk information is conveyed. A patient's previous cancer experience is likely to contribute to clinically relevant distress (15% of those patients), indicating the need for appropriate counselling. PMID:18954412

  5. The Ras-association domain family (RASSF) members and their role in human tumourigenesis

    PubMed Central

    van der Weyden, Louise; Adams, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Ras proteins play a direct causal role in human cancer with activating mutations in Ras occurring in ?30% of tumours. Ras effectors also contribute to cancer, as mutations occur in Ras effectors, notably B-Raf and PI3-K, and drugs blocking elements of these pathways are in clinical development. In 2000, a new Ras effector was identified, RAS-association domain family 1 (RASSF1), and expression of the RASSF1A isoform of this gene is silenced in tumours by methylation of its promoter. Since methylation is reversible and demethylating agents are currently being used in clinical trials, detection of RASSF1A silencing by promoter hypermethylation has potential clinical uses in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. RASSF1A belongs to a new family of RAS effectors, of which there are currently 8 members (RASSF18). RASSF16 each contain a variable N-terminal segment followed by a Ras-association (RA) domain of the Ral-GDS/AF6 type, and a specialised coiled-coil structure known as a SARAH domain extending to the C-terminus. RASSF78 contain an N-terminal RA domain and a variable C-terminus. Members of the RASSF family are thought to function as tumour suppressors by regulating the cell cycle and apoptosis. This review will summarise our current knowledge of each member of the RASSF family and in particular what role they play in tumourigenesis, with a special focus on RASSF1A, whose promoter methylation is one of the most frequent alterations found in human tumours. PMID:17692468

  6. Identification and partial characterisation of new members of the Ixodes ricinus defensin family.

    PubMed

    Tonk, Miray; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Valdés, James J; Rego, Ryan O M; Rudenko, Nataliia; Golovchenko, Maryna; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley; de la Fuente, José; Grubhoffer, Libor

    2014-05-01

    The hard-bodied tick Ixodes ricinus (castor bean tick) is the most common tick species in Europe. I. ricinus is a vector of the causative agents of diseases that affect humans and animals including tick-borne encephalitis, borreliosis, tick-borne fever and babesiosis. The innate immune system provides ticks with quite an efficient defence against some pathogenic microorganisms in the event of their penetration into the tick body or through the blood meal. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) constitute an important feature of the tick immune system. Defensins are a well-known class of AMPs. Members of the defensin family of proteins have been reported in several tick species. So far, only two defensins had been identified from I. ricinus. In this study, we report the identification of six novel putative defensins from I. ricinus at the genomic and transcriptional levels. At the genomic level they show differences with one being intronless, while others contain two introns. The expression pattern of these molecules in the salivary glands, midgut, ovary, Malpighian tubules, haemolymph and the tick cell line IRE/CTVM19 was determined. Some of them are tissue specific while others seem to be ubiquitous. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses show that these novel members of the I. ricinus defensin family differ phylogenetically and structurally; nevertheless, the cysteine pattern is highly conserved among the family members. Finally, antimicrobial-peptide prediction tools were used to predict putative antimicrobial activity of our defensins. They show putative antimicrobial activity mainly against Gram-positive bacteria. This study displays the diversity of the defensin family in the tick I. ricinus. PMID:24607035

  7. Giving information to family members of patients in the intensive care unit: Iranian nurses’ ethical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Mansoureh A; Gaeeni, Mina; Mohammadi, Nooreddin; Seyedfatemi, Naima

    2014-01-01

    Receiving information related to patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit is among the most important needs of the family members of such patients. When health care professionals should decide whether to be honest or to give hope, giving information becomes an ethical challenge We conducted a research to study the ethical approaches of Iranian nurses to giving information to the family members of patients in the intensive care units. This research was conducted in the intensive care units of three teaching hospitals in Iran. It employed a qualitative approach involving semi-structured and in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 12 nurses to identify the ethical approaches to giving information to family members of the intensive care unit patients. A conventional content analysis of the data produced two categories and five subcategories. The two categories were as follows: a) informational support, and b) emotional support. Informational support had 2 subcategories consisting of being honest in giving information, and providing complete and understandable information. Emotional support in giving information had 3 sub-categories consisting of gradual revelation, empathy and assurance. Findings of the study indicated that ethical approaches to giving information can be in the form of either informational support or emotional support, based on patients’ conditions and prognoses, their families’ emotional state, the necessity of providing a calm atmosphere in the ICU and the hospital, and other patients and their families’ peace. Findings of the present study can be used as a basis for further studies and for offering ethical guidelines in giving information to the families of patients hospitalized in the ICU. PMID:25512830

  8. 41 CFR 302-11.104 - When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When must I and/or a member(s) of my immediate family have acquired title interest in my residence to be eligible for the allowance for expenses incurred in connection with the sale of my residence? 302-11.104 Section 302-11.104 Public Contracts and Property...

  9. 41 CFR 302-3.226 - Will the Government reimburse me if I am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Will the Government reimburse me if I am not eligible to return with my immediate family member(s) to the U.S. and choose to send them at my own expense? 302-3.226 Section 302-3.226 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System...

  10. The Importance of Older Family Members in Providing Social Resources and Promoting Cancer Screening in Families with a Hereditary Cancer Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W.; Goergen, Andrea F.; Skapinsky, Kaley F.; Devlin, Hillary C.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Design and Methods: Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network

  11. The Importance of Older Family Members in Providing Social Resources and Promoting Cancer Screening in Families with a Hereditary Cancer Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashida, Sato; Hadley, Donald W.; Goergen, Andrea F.; Skapinsky, Kaley F.; Devlin, Hillary C.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study evaluates the role of older family members as providers of social resources within familial network systems affected by an inherited cancer susceptibility syndrome. Design and Methods: Respondents who previously participated in a study that involved genetic counseling and testing for Lynch syndrome and their family network…

  12. The Influence of Family Therapy on Flexibility and Cohesion among Family Members Seeking Male Residential Treatment for Adolescent and Young Adult Substance Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlowe, Stephanie L.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated within a substance abuse treatment center the influence of family therapy on flexibility and cohesion among family members. Past studies have suggested adolescents who abuse substances exist in families who have a lack of balance of flexibility and cohesion. Unfortunately, few studies have examined the influence of…

  13. Functional redundancy between trans-Golgi network SNARE family members in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vesicle fusion is an essential process for maintaining the structure and function of the endomembrane system. Fusion is mediated by t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) fusion proteins on the target membrane and v-SNAREs on the vesicle membrane; v-and t-SNAREs interact with each other, driving vesicle fusion with the target membrane. The Arabidopsis thaliana trans-Golgi network resident SNAREs SYP41 and VTI12, along with YKT61/62, have been shown to function in vesicle fusion in vitro, consistent with immunoprecipitation results showing their interaction in Arabidopsis cell extracts. Conflicting published results have indicated that SYP4 family members are either functionally redundant or have distinct and essential functions; the reason for this discrepancy is unclear. Results Here we used a proteoliposome fusion assay to demonstrate that SYP42 and SYP43 can substitute for SYP41 in driving lipid mixing, providing support for functional overlap between family members. Previous reports have also suggested that VTI11 and VTI12 SNAREs show partial overlap in function, despite having mostly distinct localizations and binding partners. We show that VTI11 can substitute for VTI12 in in vitro lipid mixing reactions, providing molecular support for the genetic evidence for partial functional redundancy in vivo. Conclusions Our data provide biochemical evidence for functional overlap in membrane fusion between members of the SYP4 or VTI1 SNARE groups, supporting previous genetic data suggesting redundancy. PMID:24021022

  14. Calcium-dependent Phospholipid Scramblase Activity of TMEM16 Protein Family Members*

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Jun; Fujii, Toshihiro; Imao, Takeshi; Ishihara, Kenji; Kuba, Hiroshi; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetrical distribution of phospholipids between the inner and outer plasma membrane leaflets is disrupted in various biological processes. We recently identified TMEM16F, an eight-transmembrane protein, as a Ca2+-dependent phospholipid scramblase that exposes phosphatidylserine (PS) to the cell surface. In this study, we established a mouse lymphocyte cell line with a floxed allele in the TMEM16F gene. When TMEM16F was deleted, these cells failed to expose PS in response to Ca2+ ionophore, but PS exposure was elicited by Fas ligand treatment. We expressed other TMEM16 proteins in the TMEM16F−/− cells and found that not only TMEM16F, but also 16C, 16D, 16G, and 16J work as lipid scramblases with different preference to lipid substrates. On the other hand, a patch clamp analysis in 293T cells indicated that TMEM16A and 16B, but not other family members, acted as Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels. These results indicated that among 10 TMEM16 family members, 7 members could be divided into two subfamilies, Ca2+-dependent Cl− channels (16A and 16B) and Ca2+-dependent lipid scramblases (16C, 16D, 16F, 16G, and 16J). PMID:23532839

  15. A family study of atopic dermatitis. Clinical and genetic characteristics of 188 patients and 2,151 family members.

    PubMed

    Küster, W; Petersen, M; Christophers, E; Goos, M; Sterry, W

    1990-01-01

    The history of 188 caucasian patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and of 2,151 family members has been analyzed. Of the AD patients 48% suffered from respiratory atopy (36% rhinitis, 28% asthma, and 15% both). AD showed by far the earliest onset of all atopic diseases: 50% of our patients had skin lesions before the age of 2 years and 60% before the age of 5 years. In contrast, symptoms of allergic asthma developed in 40% of AD patients before the age of 5 years in comparison with only 25% who had allergic rhinitis. AD affects females more frequently than males (male to female ratio 1:1.5), regardless of whether additional respiratory atopies are present or not. In contrast, respiratory atopies develop more frequently in males than in females (male to female ratio 1.5:1). Mothers with respiratory atopy more often have atopic children (26%) than do fathers with respiratory atopy (13%). Finally, risk figures for genetic counselling are given. In short, the general risk of developing AD (3%) and atopy (7%) increases by a factor of two with each first-degree family member already suffering from atopy. PMID:2353830

  16. Protein-protein interactions of PDE4 family members - Functions, interactions and therapeutic value.

    PubMed

    Klussmann, Enno

    2016-07-01

    The second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is ubiquitous and directs a plethora of functions in all cells. Although theoretically freely diffusible through the cell from the site of its synthesis it is not evenly distributed. It rather is shaped into gradients and these gradients are established by phospodiesterases (PDEs), the only enzymes that hydrolyse cAMP and thereby terminate cAMP signalling upstream of cAMP's effector systems. Miles D. Houslay has devoted most of his scientific life highly successfully to a particular family of PDEs, the PDE4 family. The family is encoded by four genes and gives rise to around 20 enzymes, all with different functions. M. Houslay has discovered many of these functions and realised early on that PDE4 family enzymes are attractive drug targets in a variety of human diseases, but not their catalytic activity as that is encoded in conserved domains in all family members. He postulated that targeting the intracellular location would provide the specificity that modern innovative drugs require to improve disease conditions with fewer side effects than conventional drugs. Due to the wealth of M. Houslay's work, this article can only summarize some of his discoveries and, therefore, focuses on protein-protein interactions of PDE4. The aim is to discuss functions of selected protein-protein interactions and peptide spot technology, which M. Houslay introduced into the PDE4 field for identifying interacting domains. The therapeutic potential of PDE4 interactions will also be discussed. PMID:26498857

  17. Occurrence and expression of members of the ferritin gene family in cowpeas.

    PubMed Central

    Wardrop, A J; Wicks, R E; Entsch, B

    1999-01-01

    Ferritin gene expression has been demonstrated in a variety of plants including maize, Arabidopsis, cowpeas, soybeans, beans and peas. Most available evidence shows that the mature protein is located in plastids and its production is under gene transcriptional control. In maize, two different ferritin genes have been identified; they were found to express protein under different physiological conditions. Only single gene products have been found until now in the other plants, with the exception of cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata). Our previous work with cowpeas [Wicks and Entsch (1993) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 192, 813-819] showed the existence of a family of at least three ferritin genes, each coding for a protein subunit with a unique amino acid sequence. Here we report the discovery of a fourth active gene in cowpeas and present the full cDNA sequences for two of the four known members of the cowpea gene family. We also provide preliminary evidence for a family of ferritin genes in soybeans (Glycine max) related to that in cowpeas. We conclude that a family of genes is probably present in all higher plants. We have used quantitative reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR to show that each of the four members of the cowpea ferritin gene family expresses mRNA in leaves and roots under normal growth with a complete nutrient supply. The results clearly show a marked differential pattern of mRNA levels formed during development from the four genes. We conclude that the composition of plant ferritin molecules from plant leaf extracts is probably a complex mixture of subunits, which might be different in roots and in leaves. PMID:9895297

  18. Osteopenia in 37 members of seven families: analysis based on a model of dominant inheritance.

    PubMed Central

    Spotila, L. D.; Caminis, J.; Devoto, M.; Shimoya, K.; Sereda, L.; Ott, J.; Whyte, M. P.; Tenenhouse, A.; Prockop, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The genetic factors involved in determining bone mineral density (BMD) have not been fully elucidated. We have begun genetic linkage analysis of seven families in which many members are osteopenic, in order to identify chromosomal loci that are potentially involved in determining BMD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Spine BMD was measured in 143 members of seven kindred with familial osteopenia. The absolute BMD values for the spine (L2-L4) were converted to the age-, gender-, and weight-adjusted Z scores, and this corrected value was used as the quantitative trait on which to base subsequent genetic analyses. Simulations of linkage were performed in order to determine the information content of the pedigree set, and actual linkage analysis was conducted using polymorphic markers either within or near three candidate loci: COL1A1, COL1A2, and vitamin D receptor (VDR). RESULTS: The distribution of the corrected Z scores was bimodal (p = 0.001) suggesting a monogenic mode of inheritance of the low BMD trait. Simulation of linkage analysis suggested that the family data set was sufficient to detect linkage under a single major gene model. Actual linkage analysis did not support linkage to the three candidate loci. In addition, the VDR genotype was not statistically associated with low bone density at the spine. CONCLUSIONS: Loci other than COL1A1, COL1A2 and VDR are very likely responsible for the low BMD trait observed in these families. These families are suitable for a genome-wide screen using microsatellite repeats in order to identify the loci that are involved in osteopenia. PMID:8784784

  19. [Difficult news: meanings attributed by family members of children with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Afonso, Selene Beviláqua Chaves; Mitre, Rosa Maria de Araujo

    2013-09-01

    This article studied some of the meanings that difficult news assumes when transmitted by health professionals to relatives of young cystic fibrosis patients undergoing treatment at a public hospital located in the south zone of the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It is the result of qualitative research and analysis of ten narratives collected during two months in 2010. These meanings are not understood by professionals and interfere with the evolution of the illness, the coping process and the care given to the children. It has been observed that the content of the news is perceived differently depending on: The clarity with which it is transmitted to each family member; The forthright way it is conveyed without the preparation of the listener; The consideration of the context in which people live and the consequences involved; The presence of a family member when the news is delivered; and the fragmentation of information. Results indicate the need to make professionals aware of the importance of communication aspects in clinical meetings and the inclusion of this training process in the medical curriculum as well as during physicians' professional lives. It seems that in delivery of the news the family expects a balance between technical efficiency and conversational tact from professionals. PMID:23989567

  20. Identification and Functional Analysis of Light-Responsive Unique Genes and Gene Family Members in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ki-Hong; Lee, Jinwon; Dardick, Chris; Seo, Young-Su; Cao, Peijian; Canlas, Patrick; Phetsom, Jirapa; Xu, Xia; Ouyang, Shu; An, Kyungsook; Cho, Yun-Ja; Lee, Geun-Cheol; Lee, Yoosook; An, Gynheung; Ronald, Pamela C.

    2008-01-01

    Functional redundancy limits detailed analysis of genes in many organisms. Here, we report a method to efficiently overcome this obstacle by combining gene expression data with analysis of gene-indexed mutants. Using a rice NSF45K oligo-microarray to compare 2-week-old light- and dark-grown rice leaf tissue, we identified 365 genes that showed significant 8-fold or greater induction in the light relative to dark conditions. We then screened collections of rice T-DNA insertional mutants to identify rice lines with mutations in the strongly light-induced genes. From this analysis, we identified 74 different lines comprising two independent mutant lines for each of 37 light-induced genes. This list was further refined by mining gene expression data to exclude genes that had potential functional redundancy due to co-expressed family members (12 genes) and genes that had inconsistent light responses across other publicly available microarray datasets (five genes). We next characterized the phenotypes of rice lines carrying mutations in ten of the remaining candidate genes and then carried out co-expression analysis associated with these genes. This analysis effectively provided candidate functions for two genes of previously unknown function and for one gene not directly linked to the tested biochemical pathways. These data demonstrate the efficiency of combining gene family-based expression profiles with analyses of insertional mutants to identify novel genes and their functions, even among members of multi-gene families. PMID:18725934

  1. Identification of novel members of the bacterial azoreductase family in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Crescente, Vincenzo; Holland, Sinead M; Kashyap, Sapna; Polycarpou, Elena; Sim, Edith; Ryan, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Azoreductases are a family of diverse enzymes found in many pathogenic bacteria as well as distant homologues being present in eukarya. In addition to having azoreductase activity, these enzymes are also suggested to have NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity which leads to a proposed role in plant pathogenesis. Azoreductases have also been suggested to play a role in the mammalian pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In view of the importance of P. aeruginosa as a pathogen, we therefore characterized recombinant enzymes following expression of a group of putative azoreductase genes from P. aeruginosa expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes include members of the arsenic-resistance protein H (ArsH), tryptophan repressor-binding protein A (WrbA), modulator of drug activity B (MdaB) and YieF families. The ArsH, MdaB and YieF family members all show azoreductase and NQO activities. In contrast, WrbA is the first enzyme to show NQO activity but does not reduce any of the 11 azo compounds tested under a wide range of conditions. These studies will allow further investigation of the possible role of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26621870

  2. Structural organization, mapping, characterization and evolutionary relationships of CDKN2 gene family members in Xiphophorus fishes.

    PubMed

    Kazianis, Steven; Khanolkar, Vandeeta A; Nairn, Rodney S; Rains, J Douglas; Trono, David; Garcia, Rachel; Williams, Earlanda L; Walter, Ronald B

    2004-07-01

    Xiphophorus fishes and their hybrids are used as models for the study of melanoma and other diseases. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene family in humans is comprised of four members, including CDKN2A (P16), and dysregulation of this gene is implicated in numerous neoplasms including melanomas. We have investigated the status of the gene family in the southern platyfish X. maculatus. Xiphophorus harbors at least two such loci, which we now term CDKN2A/B and CDKN2D. Both loci map to Xiphophorus linkage group 5, a genomic area that has long been known to harbor the DIFF tumor suppressor locus. Within this report, we report on the complete cloning, genomic exon/intron boundary delineation, linkage mapping and expressional characteristics of Xiphophorus CDKN2D. We also compare and contrast this expression to that of the previously isolated CDKN2AB locus in normal and neoplastic tissues derived from non-hybrid and hybrid fishes. The hypothetical evolutionary relationships of gene family members and their involvement in melanoma is evaluated. In comparison to CDKN2A/B, the RNA expression of Xiphophorus CDKN2D differs in normal tissues and is not associated with melanotic/pathologic tissues, confirming functional divergence between obvious homologues. PMID:15533787

  3. Sun protection and sunbathing practices among at-risk family members of patients with melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the increased level of familial risk, research indicates that family members of patients with melanoma engage in relatively low levels of sun protection and high levels of sun exposure. The goal of this study was to evaluate a broad range of demographic, medical, psychological, knowledge, and social influence correlates of sun protection and sunbathing practices among first-degree relatives (FDRs) of melanoma patients and to determine if correlates of sun protection and sunbathing were unique. Methods We evaluated correlates of sun protection and sunbathing among FDRs of melanoma patients who were at increased disease risk due to low compliance with sun protection and skin surveillance behaviors. Participants (N = 545) completed a phone survey. Results FDRs who reported higher sun protection had a higher education level, lower benefits of sunbathing, greater sunscreen self-efficacy, greater concerns about photo-aging and greater sun protection norms. FDRs who reported higher sunbathing were younger, more likely to be female, endorsed fewer sunscreen barriers, perceived more benefits of sunbathing, had lower image norms for tanness, and endorsed higher sunbathing norms. Conclusion Interventions for family members at risk for melanoma might benefit from improving sun protection self-efficacy, reducing perceived sunbathing benefits, and targeting normative influences to sunbathe. PMID:21338483

  4. Influence of posttraumatic stress disorder of the fathers on other family members.

    PubMed

    Zalihić, Amra; Zalihić, Dino; Pivić, Gordana

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to analyze the frequency of depression and anxiety and children behaviour in families whose heads of the family (father) suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The study was conducted from September 2005 until July 2006, with patients living in Mostar. The frequency of depression and anxiety in family members older than 18 years, and changes of the behaviour in children younger than 18 years of age were measured. The data were collected from 60 men and their families who had been diagnosed with PTSD by their psychiatrist. The control group was formed using matching criteria (age of the head of the family, his education, religion, family income and number of children). In this study, three questionnaires were used: one specially designed for this study, covering general information about family members, and a personal opinion of each family member about the family situation and relations within the family; Hopkins symptoms checklist - 25 (HSCL-25) for evaluation of depression and anxiety for subjects older than 18; and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) for children 5 to 18 years of age, which was completed by their mothers. More wives from the PTSD families had depression than wives from the controlled group (chi2=21,099; df=1; P<0,050). There was no difference between groups in frequency of depression and anxiety (chi2=0,003; df=1; P=0,959) for children older than 18 years. No difference in answers between groups of children younger than 18 years were found in the General Health Questionnaire. However, we found significant differences in separate questions. Mothers, who filled the questionnaire form, reported that children from fathers who had PTSD experienced stomach pain more often (chi2=10,474;df=2; P=0,005), eating problems (chi2=14,204;df=2; P=0,001) and breathing problems (chi2=9,748;df=2; P=0,008), than children from fathers who did not have PTSD. Children from fathers with PTSD were more easily upset (chi2=7,586; df=2; P=0,023) and worried more often (chi2=12,093; df=2; P=0,002), they were also more aggressive towards other children (chi2=6,156; df=1; P=0,013). The controlled group of children who wanted to help with the house work was larger than the tested group (chi2=10,383; df=2; P=0,006). More children from the controlled group missed school than from the other group of surveyed children (chi2=6,056; df=2; P=0,048). A significantly larger number of women, whose husbands had PTSD, were depressed, unlike women whose husbands were not ill. There was no significant difference in depression manifestation in a group of children older than 18, as well as in behaviour of a group of children younger than 18, but significant differences in some provided answers were found, that indicate the differences between controlled and tested groups. PMID:18318667

  5. Crystal structure of methylesterase family member 16 (MES16) from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei; Pu, Hua

    2016-05-20

    Methylesterase family member 16 (MES16) is an integral component of chlorophyll breakdown. It catalyzes the demethylation of fluorescent chlorophyll catabolite (FCC) and pheophorbide in vitro, and specifically demethylates FCC in vivo. Here we report the crystal structure of MES16 from Arabidopsis thaliana at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure confirm that MES16 is a member of the α/β-hydrolase superfamily with Ser-87, His-239, and Asp-211 as the catalytic triad. Our biochemical studies reveal that MES16 has esterase activity with methyl-indole acetic acid as the substrate, and the catalytically essential role of Ser-87 has been demonstrated. PMID:27109476

  6. Sequencing and molecular modeling identifies candidate members of Caliciviridae family in bats.

    PubMed

    Kemenesi, Gábor; Gellért, Ákos; Dallos, Bianka; Görföl, Tamás; Boldogh, Sándor; Estók, Péter; Marton, Szilvia; Oldal, Miklós; Martella, Vito; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2016-07-01

    Emerging viral diseases represent an ongoing challenge for globalized world and bats constitute an immense, partially explored, reservoir of potentially zoonotic viruses. Caliciviruses are important human and animal pathogens and, as observed for human noroviruses, they may impact on human health on a global scale. By screening fecal samples of bats in Hungary, calicivirus RNA was identified in the samples of Myotis daubentonii and Eptesicus serotinus bats. In order to characterize more in detail the bat caliciviruses, large portions of the genome sequence of the viruses were determined. Phylogenetic analyses and molecular modeling identified firmly the two viruses as candidate members within the Caliciviridae family, with one calicivirus strain resembling members of the Sapovirus genus and the other bat calicivirus being more related to porcine caliciviruses of the proposed genus Valovirus. This data serves the effort for detecting reservoir hosts for potential emerging viruses and recognize important evolutionary relationships. PMID:27085289

  7. Family members' obstructive behaviors appear to be more harmful among adults with type 2 diabetes and limited health literacy.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Lindsay S; Rothman, Russell L; Osborn, Chandra Y

    2014-01-01

    Family members' diabetes-specific obstructive behaviors (e.g., nagging/arguing or getting in the way of patients' self-care) are associated with adults having worse glycemic control (HbA1C), with diabetes-specific supportive family behaviors protecting against this detrimental effect. Given the role of family members in helping patients with limited health literacy, patients' health literacy status may moderate these relations. The authors tested this hypothesis with 192 adults with type 2 diabetes. Twenty-six percent had limited health literacy, and limited health literacy was associated with more supportive family behaviors (p<.05), but not with obstructive family behaviors or with patients' HbA1C. Adjusted stratified analyses indicated obstructive family behaviors were more strongly associated with worse HbA1C among participants with limited health literacy and low supportive family behaviors than for participants with adequate health literacy and low supportive family behaviors (adjusted simple slopes β=0.70, p=.05 vs. β=0.36, p=.009). However, there was no association between obstructive family behaviors and HbA1C in the context of high supportive family behaviors, regardless of health literacy status. Involving family members in adults' self-care without teaching them to avoid obstructive behaviors may be particularly harmful for patients with limited health literacy. Future research should identify intervention content to reduce obstructive family behaviors and identify which supportive family behaviors may be protective. PMID:25315589

  8. Negative Regulation of Phagocytosis in Murine Macrophages by the Src Kinase Family Member, Fgr

    PubMed Central

    Gresham, Hattie D.; Dale, Benjamin M.; Potter, Jeffrey W.; Chang, Peter W.; Vines, Charlotte M.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Lagenaur, Carl F.; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2000-01-01

    Ingestion of opsonized pathogens by professional phagocytes results in the generation and release of microbicidal products that are essential for normal host defense. Because these products can result in significant tissue injury, phagocytosis must be regulated to limit damage to the host while allowing for optimal clearance and destruction of opsonized pathogens. To pursue negative regulation of phagocytosis, we assessed the effect of the Src kinase family member, Fgr, on opsonin-dependent phagocytosis by mouse macrophages. We chose Fgr because it is present in high concentrations in circulating phagocytes but is not essential for Fcγ receptor–mediated ingestion by mouse macrophages. Although expression of Fgr both in a macrophage cell line and in primary macrophages significantly attenuates ingestion mediated by Fcγ receptors and CR3, it does not affect macropinocytosis or receptor-mediated endocytosis. This selective effect of Fgr is independent of its tyrosine kinase function. After Fcγ receptor cross-linking, Fgr becomes associated with the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)–containing receptor, SIRPα (a member of the signal-regulatory protein family, also known as Src homology 2 domain–containing protein tyrosine phosphatase [SHP] substrate 1 [SHPS-1], brain immunoglobulin-like molecule with tyrosine-based activation motifs [BIT], and P84) and potentiates the association of the phosphatase SHP-1 with SIRPα. This association is responsible, at least in part, for decreasing positive signaling essential for optimal phagocytosis. These data demonstrate an important negative regulatory role for this Src kinase family member and suggest that this homeostatic function must be overcome for optimal uptake and clearance of opsonized pathogens. PMID:10662797

  9. [The development of an instrument for the "evaluation of hospices from the bereaved family members perspective"].

    PubMed

    Lohe, Mandy; Zimmermann, Manja; Luderer, Christiane; Sadowski, Katharina

    2011-06-01

    Inpatient hospice settings as facilities of health services are obliged to the quality assurance and internal quality development in Germany. The meaning of the patient's satisfaction as one of the indirect indicators for the judgement of nursing and care quality is indisputable by now. However, a subjective evaluation of the hospices by guests is practically and ethically problematic. An alternative approach is to investigate the views of bereaved relatives and close friends after the guest's death. The present article describes the development of an inventory for the evaluation of inpatient hospice settings from the bereaved relatives' point of view in order to examine the satisfaction of family members with the end-of-life care their loved ones received. With help of the inventory the question should be answered how family members judge the end-of-life care which was given to them and their late family members by the hospice. The construction of the questions results from the basis of existing concepts to the assessment of the end-of-life care and an analysis of all identified instruments to the evaluation of inpatient hospice settings from the perspective of bereaved relatives. The development of the questionnaire enclosed the formation of an item pool, the item choice, the critical discussion of the questions in the body of experts as well as a standardised and cognitive pretest beside a comprehensive literature research. A five-dimension questionnaire was developed that integrates physical, psychological, social, spiritual, and organisational aspects of the care at the end of life. The instrument encompasses 53 items, predominantly closed questions. PMID:21638257

  10. Mortality among displaced former UNITA members and their families in Angola: a retrospective cluster survey

    PubMed Central

    Grein, Thomas; Checchi, Francesco; Escribà, Josep M; Tamrat, Abiy; Karunakara, Unni; Stokes, Christopher; Brown, Vincent; Legros, Dominique

    2003-01-01

    Objective To measure retrospectively mortality among a previously inaccessible population of former UNITA members and their families displaced within Angola, before and after their arrival in resettlement camps after ceasefire of 4 April 2002. Design Three stage cluster sampling for interviews. Recall period for mortality assessment was from 21 June 2001 to 15-31 August 2002. Setting Eleven resettlement camps over four provinces of Angola (Bié, Cuando Cubango, Huila, and Malange) housing 149 000 former UNITA members and their families. Participants 900 consenting family heads of households, or most senior household members, corresponding to an intended sample size of 4500 individuals. Main outcome measures Crude mortality and proportional mortality, overall and by period (monthly, and before and after arrival in camps). Results Final sample included 6599 people. The 390 deaths reported during the recall period corresponded to an average crude mortality of 1.5/10 000/day (95% confidence interval 1.3 to 1.8), and, among children under 5 years old, to 4.1/10 000/day (3.3 to 5.2). Monthly crude mortality rose gradually to a peak in March 2002 and remained above emergency thresholds thereafter. Malnutrition was the leading cause of death (34%), followed by fever or malaria (24%) and war or violence (18%). Most war victims and people who had disappeared were women and children. Conclusions This population of displaced Angolans experienced global and child mortality greatly in excess of normal levels, both before and after the 2002 ceasefire. Malnutrition deaths reflect the extent of the food crisis affecting this population. Timely humanitarian assistance must be made available to all populations in such conflicts. PMID:14500436

  11. Tailored versus Generic Interventions for Skin Cancer Risk Reduction for Family Members of Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Ming, Michael; Winkel, Gary; Dessureault, Sophie; Lessin, Stuart R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Improving strategies for risk reduction among family members of patients with melanoma may reduce their risk for melanoma. Objective To evaluate the effects of two behavioral interventions designed to improve the frequency of total cutaneous skin examination by a health provider (TCE), skin self-examination (SSE), and sun protection practices among first degree relatives of patients with melanoma and to evaluate whether increased behavioral intentions, increased benefits, decreased barriers, and improved sunscreen self-efficacy mediated the effects of the tailored intervention as compared with the generic intervention on TCE, SSE, or sun protection. Methods Four hundred forty-three family members (56 parents, 248 siblings, 239 children) who were non-adherent with these practices were randomly assigned to either a generic (N= 218) or a tailored intervention (N = 225) which included 3 print mailings sent monthly and one telephone counseling session. Participants completed measures of TCE, SSE, and sun protections at baseline, six months, and one year. Participants completed measures of intentions, benefits, barriers, and self-efficacy. The retention rate at the one year follow-up was 86.7%. Results Those enrolled in the tailored intervention had almost a twofold increased probability of having a TCE (p < .0001). Treatment effects in favor of the tailored intervention were also noted for sun protection habits (p < .02). Increases in TCE intentions mediated the tailored intervention’s effects on TCE uptake. Increases in sun protection intentions mediated effects of the tailored intervention’s effect on sun protection habits. Conclusions Tailored interventions may improve risk reduction practices among family members of patients with melanoma and support a role of such interventions in melanoma prevention. PMID:21090893

  12. Genomic sequence and organization of two members of a human lectin gene family

    SciTech Connect

    Gitt, M.A.; Barondes, S.H. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have isolated and sequenced the genomic DNA encoding a human dimeric soluble lactose-binding lectin. The gene has four exons, and its upstream region contains sequences that suggest control by glucocorticoids, heat (environmental) shock, metals, and other factors. They have also isolated and sequenced three exons of the gene encoding another human putative lectin, the existence of which was first indicated by isolation of its cDNA. Comparisons suggest a general pattern of genomic organization of members of this lectin gene family.

  13. Aggressive behavior directed at nursing home personnel by residents' family members.

    PubMed

    Vinton, L; Mazza, N

    1994-08-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests there is a significant amount of aggressive behavior directed at nursing home personnel by residents' family members. This exploratory study describes a random sample survey of 70 Florida nursing homes. Administrators reported 1,193 acts of verbal aggression and 13 acts of physical aggression for a 6-month period. Dissatisfaction over how the specific and overall care needs of residents were being met was most frequently cited as the contributing factor. Social work staff and directors of nursing were most often called on to resolve these conflicts. The authors conclude with recommendations for research and conflict resolution. PMID:7959112

  14. Roles of nurse aides and family members in acute patient care in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2004-01-01

    To improve the nursing care quality in acute care hospitals in Taiwan after the 2003 SARS epidemic, the Taipei City Government Department of Health has allocated about US dollars 6 million for nurse aides' salaries and costs for recruitment, training, and administration of this program. Yet, there have been no corresponding changes in payments for nursing services by the National Health Insurance system in Taiwan such as increasing nurse fees for inpatient services. This article examines the roles of nurse aides and family members in providing acute patient care in Taiwan and discusses issues of nursing care quality as related to nurse staffing in acute care hospitals. PMID:15077835

  15. Interspecific Interactions Among Members of Family Halobacteriaceae from Natural Solar Salterns.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, Bhakti B; Mani, Kabilan; Nair, Anjana; Gangadharan, Sowmya; Braganca, Judith M

    2012-06-01

    Solar salterns are crystallizer ponds with highly diverse extremophilic microbial flora living individually or in consortium. Twenty-four culturable haloarchaeal isolates were obtained from solar salterns of Goa, which were grouped under Halococcus, Haloferax, Haloarcula and Halorubrum. Cell-free supernatants of different isolates were checked against each other by pour plate technique combined with agar well diffusion method. This resulted in a zone of growth inhibition or stimulation around wells, indicating that some isolates had antagonistic and/or a beneficial effect on the other genera. Thus, members of family Halobacteriaceae were found to secrete extracellular metabolites, which can act as growth enhancers or repressors. PMID:26781851

  16. Evaluation of new medium with chromogenic substrates for members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in urine samples.

    PubMed Central

    Kodaka, H; Ishikawa, M; Iwata, M; Kashitani, F; Mizuochi, S; Yamaguchi, K

    1995-01-01

    A new medium containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-glucuronide cyclohexylammonium salt (Glu agar) for Escherichia coli and a new medium containing 5-bromo-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside (Gal agar) for beta-galactosidase-positive members of the family Enterobacteriaceae were compared with MacConkey agar in a diagnostic trial with 3,562 urine specimens. The isolation rates of E. coli and beta-galactosidase-positive Enterobacteriaceae were increased 8.4 and 19.5%, respectively. The sensitivities and specificities of Glu agar and Gal agar were 98.5 and 100% and 99.2 and 99.5%, respectively. PMID:7699041

  17. The impact of childhood experiences and family members outside the household on residential environment choices.

    PubMed

    Blaauboer, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    Choices of urban, suburban or rural residential environments have often been studied from a life-course perspective. In this paper, an examination is made of the influence of childhood experiences and of residential environment choices of family members outside the household. It is argued that socialisation, location-specific capital and the wish to maintain close family ties may result in living in a similar residential environment later in life and in similar environments to siblings and parents. Results of multinomial logistic regression analyses of data from the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study show that the residential environment during childhood is indeed strongly associated with the current residential environment. Moreover, individuals show a strong similarity to their parents and siblings in their residential environment, even after accounting for residential inertia and return migration. PMID:21954484

  18. Niakha virus: A novel member of the family Rhabdoviridae isolated from phlebotomine sandflies in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Vasilakis, Nikos; Widen, Steven; Mayer, Sandra V.; Seymour, Robert; Wood, Thomas G.; Popov, Vsevolov; Guzman, Hilda; da Rosa, Amelia P.A. Travassos; Ghedin, Elodie; Holmes, Edward C.; Walker, Peter J.; Tesh, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae have been assigned to eight genera but many remain unassigned. Rhabdoviruses have a remarkably diverse host range that includes terrestrial and marine animals, invertebrates and plants. Transmission of some rhabdoviruses often requires an arthropod vector, such as mosquitoes, midges, sandflies, ticks, aphids and leafhoppers, in which they replicate. Herein we characterize Niakha virus (NIAV), a previously uncharacterized rhabdovirus isolated from phebotomine sandflies in Senegal. Analysis of the 11,124 nt genome sequence indicates that it encodes the five common rhabdovirus proteins with alternative ORFs in the M, G and L genes. Phylogenetic analysis of the L protein indicate that NIAV’s closest relative is Oak Vale rhabdovirus, although in this analysis NIAV is still so phylogenetically distinct that it might be classified as distinct from the eight currently recognized Rhabdoviridae genera. This observation highlights the vast, and yet not fully recognized diversity, of this family. PMID:23773405

  19. Six members of the mouse forkhead gene family are developmentally regulated.

    PubMed Central

    Kaestner, K H; Lee, K H; Schlöndorff, J; Hiemisch, H; Monaghan, A P; Schütz, G

    1993-01-01

    The 110-aa forkhead domain defines a class of transcription factors that have been shown to be developmentally regulated in Drosophila melanogaster and Xenopus laevis. The forkhead domain is necessary and sufficient for target DNA binding as shown for the rat hepatic nuclear factor 3 (HNF3) gene family. We have cloned six forkhead gene family members from a mouse genomic library in addition to the mouse equivalents of the genes for HNF3 alpha, -beta, and -gamma. The six genes, termed fkh-1 to fkh-6, share a high degree of similarity with the Drosophila forkhead gene, having 57-67% amino acid identity within the forkhead domain. fkh-1 seems to be the mammalian homologue of the Drosophila FD1 gene, as the sequences are 86% identical. fkh-1 to fkh-6 show distinct spatial patterns of expression in adult tissues and are expressed during embryogenesis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7689224

  20. Posttraumatic symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members with special regard to suicide and homicide cases.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Kohske; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Nishi, Yuko; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2011-07-01

    The authors investigated posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in Japanese bereaved family members using a questionnaire. Participants were bereaved as a result of suicide and homicide (n = 51 and 49, respectively), with natural death (n = 56) as a control; and their relationships to the deceased were parent-child (n = 79), conjugal (n = 42), and others (n = 35). With regard to the 3 main PTSD-related criteria, (a) re-experiencing symptoms were not dependent on the manner of death or the relationship to the deceased; (b) avoidance behaviors were more highly related to homicide than natural death for relatives other than parent-child and conjugal relationships; and (c) hyperarousal and maladaptation symptoms were more serious for conjugal loss. These findings suggest that avoidance behaviors in homicidal cases are more closely associated with a distant family relationship, whereas conjugal loss is traumatic, irrespective of the manner of death, often causing hyperarousal and maladaptation symptoms. PMID:24501828

  1. Isolation of an additional member of the fibroblast growth factor receptor family, FGFR-3

    SciTech Connect

    Keegan, K.; Hayman, M.J. ); Johnson, D.E.; Williams, L.T. )

    1991-02-15

    The fibroblast growth factors are a family of polypeptide growth factors involved in a variety of activities including mitogenesis, angiogenesis, and wound healing. Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) have previously been identified in chicken, mouse, and human and have been shown to contain an extracellular domain with either two or three immunoglobulin-like domains, a transmembrane domain, and a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase domain. The authors have isolated a human cDNA for another tyrosine kinase receptor that is highly homologous to the previously described FGFR. Expression of this receptor cDNA in COS cells directs the expression of a 125-kDa glycoprotein. They demonstrate that this cDNA encodes a biologically active receptor by showing that human acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors activate this receptor as measured by {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux assays. These data establish the existence of an additional member of the FGFR family that they have named FGFR-3.

  2. Race-related differences in the experiences of family members of persons with mental illness participating in the NAMI Family to Family Education Program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Melissa Edmondson; Lindsey, Michael A; Williams, Crystal D; Medoff, Deborah R; Lucksted, Alicia; Fang, Li Juan; Schiffman, Jason; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Dixon, Lisa B

    2014-12-01

    Families play an important role in the lives of individuals with mental illness. Coping with the strain of shifting roles and multiple challenges of caregiving can have a huge impact. Limited information exists regarding race-related differences in families' caregiving experiences, their abilities to cope with the mental illness of a loved one, or their interactions with mental health service systems. This study examined race-related differences in the experiences of adults seeking to participate in the National Alliance on Mental Illness Family-to-Family Education Program due to mental illness of a loved one. Participants were 293 White and 107 African American family members who completed measures of problem- and emotion-focused coping, knowledge about mental illness, subjective illness burden, psychological distress, and family functioning. Multiple regression analyses were used to determine race-related differences. African American caregivers reported higher levels of negative caregiving experiences, less knowledge of mental illness, and higher levels of both problem-solving coping and emotion-focused coping, than White caregivers. Mental health programs serving African American families should consider targeting specific strategies to address caregiving challenges, support their use of existing coping mechanisms and support networks, and increase their knowledge of mental illness. PMID:25213395

  3. Regulation of the ovarian reserve by members of the transforming growth factor beta family

    PubMed Central

    Pangas, Stephanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic or environmental factors that affect the endowment of oocytes, their assembly nto primordial follicles, or their subsequent entry into the growing follicle pool can disrupt reproductive function and may underlie disorders such as primary ovarian insufficiency. Mouse models have been instrumental in identifying genes important in ovarian development, and a number of genes now associated with ovarian dysfunction in women were first identified as causing reproductive defects in knockout mice. The transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) family consists of developmentally important growth factors that include the TGFBs, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), activins, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), and growth and differentiation factor 9 (GDF9). The ovarian primordial follicle pool is the source of oocytes in adults. Development of this pool can be grossly divided into three key processes: (1) establishment of oocytes during embryogenesis followed by (2) assembly and (3) activation of the primordial follicle. Disruptions in any of these processes may cause reproductive dysfunction. Most members of the TGFB family show pivotal roles in each of these areas. Understanding the phenotypes of various mouse models for this protein family will be directly relevant to understanding how disruptions in TGFB family signaling result in reproductive diseases in women and will present new areas for development of tailored diagnostics and interventions for infertility. PMID:22847922

  4. TWIK-2, a new weak inward rectifying member of the tandem pore domain potassium channel family.

    PubMed

    Chavez, R A; Gray, A T; Zhao, B B; Kindler, C H; Mazurek, M J; Mehta, Y; Forsayeth, J R; Yost, C S

    1999-03-19

    Potassium channels are found in all mammalian cell types, and they perform many distinct functions in both excitable and non-excitable cells. These functions are subserved by several different families of potassium channels distinguishable by primary sequence features as well as by physiological characteristics. Of these families, the tandem pore domain potassium channels are a new and distinct class, primarily distinguished by the presence of two pore-forming domains within a single polypeptide chain. We have cloned a new member of this family, TWIK-2, from a human brain cDNA library. Primary sequence analysis of TWIK-2 shows that it is most closely related to TWIK-1, especially in the pore-forming domains. Northern blot analysis reveals the expression of TWIK-2 in all human tissues assayed except skeletal muscle. Human TWIK-2 expressed heterologously in Xenopus oocytes is a non-inactivating weak inward rectifier with channel properties similar to TWIK-1. Pharmacologically, TWIK-2 channels are distinct from TWIK-1 channels in their response to quinidine, quinine, and barium. TWIK-2 is inhibited by intracellular, but not extracellular, acidification. This new clone reveals the existence of a subfamily in the tandem pore domain potassium channel family with weak inward rectification properties. PMID:10075682

  5. Exploitation and characterization of three versatile amidase super family members from Delftia tsuruhatensis ZJB-05174.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe-Ming; Zheng, Ren-Chao; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-05-01

    Amidases can be assigned into two families according to their amino acid sequences. Three amidases (Dt-Amis) were mined and identified from genome of Delftia tsuruhatensis. Homology analysis demonstrated that Dt-Ami 2 and Dt-Ami 6 belonged to amidase signature (AS) family, while Dt-Ami 7 belonged to nitrilase superfamily. AS amidases were shown to hydrolyze a wide spectrum of amides. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the extension of chain length of aliphatic amides considerably decreased the Km values, and the turnover numbers (kcat) were high with linear aliphatic amides as substrates. Dt-Ami 2 showed maximum activity near a quite alkaline pH (11.0) and exhibited opposite enantioselectivity to Dt-Ami 6. Furthermore, a novel bioprocess for hydrolysis of 1-cyanocyclohexaneacetamide was developed using Dt-Ami 6 as biocatalyst, resulting in >99% conversion within 1.5h at a substrate loading of 100g/L by 0.5g/L of Escherichia coli cells. On the other hand, nitrilase superfamily amidase only hydrolyzed aliphatic amides. The Km values of Dt-Ami 7 were considerably increased with the extension of chain length of aliphatic amides. The characterized enzymes from different families showed distinct biochemical characteristics and catalytic properties, leading to a better understanding of the two super amidase family members. PMID:26992798

  6. The anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family are attractive tumor-associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Mads Hald

    2010-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family (Bcl-2, Bcl-X(L) and Mcl-2) are pivotal regulators of apoptotic cell death. They are all highly overexpressed in cancers of different origin in which they enhance the survival of the cancer cells. Consequently, they represent prime candidates for anti-cancer therapy and specific antisense oligonucleotides or small molecule inhibitors have shown broad anti-cancer activities in pre-clinical models and are currently tested in clinical trials. In addition, immune-mediated tumor destruction is emerging as an interesting modality to treat cancer patients. Notably, spontaneous cellular immune responses against the Bcl-2 family proteins have been identified as frequent features in cancer patients underscoring that these proteins are natural targets for the immune system. Thus, Bcl-2 family may serve as an important and widely applicable target for anti-cancer immunotherapeutic strategies, alone or in the combination with conventional therapy. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of Bcl-2 family proteins as T-cell antigens, which has set the stage for the first explorative trial using these antigens in therapeutic vaccinations against cancer, and discuss future opportunities. PMID:21304176

  7. Living and dying with heart failure in long-term care: experiences of residents and their family members.

    PubMed

    Kaasalainen, Sharon; Strachan, Patricia H; Heckman, George A; D'Elia, Teresa; McKelvie, Robert S; McAiney, Carrie; Stolee, Paul; van der Horst, Mary Lou; Kelley, Mary Lou; Demers, Catherine

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of long-term care (LTC) residents living and dying with heart failure (HF)and their family members. An exploratory descriptive design was used to collect data from seven LTC residents and seven family members. The data was analysed using thematic content analysis. The main themes that emerged from the data were: limited understanding of the HF diagnosis, living with restrictions and other comorbidities, making decisions about transitioning to end-of-life care, and learning and negotiating the lines of communication. Residents and family members communicated with many health-care providers about managing the HF symptoms but most often worked through the nurse when problems arose or decisions about care needed to be made. The findings from this study contribute to our understanding of residents' and family members' experiences in managing residents' HF in LTC. PMID:23970293

  8. Prosurvival Bcl-2 family members reveal a distinct apoptotic identity between conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Carrington, Emma M.; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Sutherland, Robyn M.; Vikstrom, Ingela B.; Brady, Jamie L.; Soo, Priscilla; Vremec, David; Allison, Cody; Lee, Erinna F.; Fairlie, W. Douglas; Bouillet, Philippe; Grabow, Stephanie; Ottina, Eleonora; Herold, Marco J.; Pellegrini, Marc; Huang, David C. S.; Tarlinton, David M.; Strasser, Andreas; Lew, Andrew M.; Zhan, Yifan

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are heterogeneous, comprising subsets with functional specializations that play distinct roles in immunity as well as immunopathology. We investigated the molecular control of cell survival of two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and conventional DCs (cDCs) and their dependence on individual antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members. Compared with cDCs, pDCs had higher expression of BCL-2, lower A1, and similar levels of MCL-1 and BCL-XL. Transgenic overexpression of BCL-2 increased the pDC pool size in vivo with only minor impact on cDCs. With a view to immune intervention, we tested BCL-2 inhibitors and found that ABT-199 (the BCL-2 specific inhibitor) selectively killed pDCs but not cDCs. Conversely, genetic knockdown of A1 profoundly reduced the proportion of cDCs but not pDCs. We also found that conditional ablation of MCL-1 significantly reduced the size of both DC populations in mice and impeded DC-mediated immune responses. Thus, we revealed that the two DC types have different cell survival requirements. The molecular basis of survival of different DC subsets thus advocates the antagonism of selective BCL-2 family members for treating diseases pertaining to distinct DC subsets. PMID:25775525

  9. Pip, a novel IRF family member, is a lymphoid-specific, PU.1-dependent transcriptional activator.

    PubMed

    Eisenbeis, C F; Singh, H; Storb, U

    1995-06-01

    The immunoglobulin light-chain gene enhancers E kappa 3', E lambda 2-4, and E lambda 3-1 contain a conserved cell type-specific composite element essential for their activities. This element binds a B cell-specific heterodimeric protein complex that consists of the Ets family member PU.1 and a second factor (NF-EM5), whose participation in the formation of the complex is dependent on the presence of DNA-bound PU.1. In this report we describe the cloning and characterization of Pip (PU.1 interaction partner), a lymphoid-specific protein that is most likely NF-EM5. As expected, the Pip protein binds the composite element only in the presence of PU.1; furthermore, the formation of this ternary complex is critically dependent on phosphorylation of PU.1 at serine-148. The Pip gene is expressed specifically in lymphoid tissues in both B- and T-cell lines. When coexpressed in NIH-3T3 cells, Pip and PU.1 function as mutually dependent transcription activators of the composite element. The amino-terminal DNA-binding domain of Pip exhibits a high degree of homology to the DNA-binding domains of members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, which includes IRF-1, IRF-2, ICSBP, and ISGF3 gamma. PMID:7797077

  10. Evidence for Distinct Substrate Specificities of Importin α Family Members in Nuclear Protein Import

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Matthias; Speck, Christian; Christiansen, Marret; Bischoff, F. Ralf; Prehn, Siegfried; Haller, Hermann; Görlich, Dirk; Hartmann, Enno

    1999-01-01

    Importin α plays a pivotal role in the classical nuclear protein import pathway. Importin α shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm, binds nuclear localization signal-bearing proteins, and functions as an adapter to access the importin β-dependent import pathway. In contrast to what is found for importin β, several isoforms of importin α, which can be grouped into three subfamilies, exist in higher eucaryotes. We describe here a novel member of the human family, importin α7. To analyze specific functions of the distinct importin α proteins, we recombinantly expressed and purified five human importin α’s along with importin α from Xenopus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Binding affinity studies showed that all importin α proteins from humans or Xenopus bind their import receptor (importin β) and their export receptor (CAS) with only marginal differences. Using an in vitro import assay based on permeabilized HeLa cells, we compared the import substrate specificities of the various importin α proteins. When the substrates were tested singly, only the import of RCC1 showed a strong preference for one family member, importin α3, whereas most of the other substrates were imported by all importin α proteins with similar efficiencies. However, strikingly different substrate preferences of the various importin α proteins were revealed when two substrates were offered simultaneously. PMID:10523667

  11. Functional Relationship between Protein Disulfide Isomerase Family Members during the Oxidative Folding of Human Secretory Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rutkevich, Lori A.; Cohen-Doyle, Myrna F.; Brockmeier, Ulf

    2010-01-01

    To examine the relationship between protein disulfide isomerase family members within the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum, PDI, ERp57, ERp72, and P5 were depleted with high efficiency in human hepatoma cells, either singly or in combination. The impact was assessed on the oxidative folding of several well-characterized secretory proteins. We show that PDI plays a predominant role in oxidative folding because its depletion delayed disulfide formation in all secretory proteins tested. However, the phenotype was surprisingly modest suggesting that other family members are able to compensate for PDI depletion, albeit with reduced efficacy. ERp57 also exhibited broad specificity, overlapping with that of PDI, but with preference for glycosylated substrates. Depletion of both PDI and ERp57 revealed that some substrates require both enzymes for optimal folding and, furthermore, led to generalized protein misfolding, impaired export from the ER, and degradation. In contrast, depletion of ERp72 or P5, either alone or in combination with PDI or ERp57 had minimal impact, revealing a narrow substrate specificity for ERp72 and no detectable role for P5 in oxidative protein folding. PMID:20660153

  12. Molecular diversity in zebrafish NCAM family: three members with different VASE usage and distinct localization.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, T; Kawasaki, M; Nakahira, M; Kagamiyama, H; Kikuchi, Y; Okamoto, H; Mori, K; Yoshihara, Y

    2001-07-01

    NCAM in vertebrates and its related molecules, apCAM in Aplysia, fasciclin II in Drosophila, and OCAM in mammals, play key roles in various aspects of brain development and functions. In this study, we have identified and characterized three members of the NCAM gene family in zebrafish, designated as zNCAM, zOCAM, and zPCAM. Three molecules exhibit similar domain organization: an amino-terminal signal peptide, five immunoglobulin-like domains, two fibronectin type III-like domains, a transmembrane segment, and a carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic region. A novel molecule zPCAM is most closely related to zNCAM with 66% amino acid identity. Diversity in the extracellular region of zPCAM is generated by insertion of two different types of variable alternatively spliced exons. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that three molecules were specifically expressed by the central and peripheral nervous systems from early developmental stages in region-specific and cell-type-specific manners. For example, zPCAM showed a neuromere-specific segmental expression pattern, while zOCAM first appeared in specific clusters of secondary neurons in the forebrain. These results suggest that each member of the NCAM gene family plays distinct roles in the formation and maintenance of functional neuronal networks in the zebrafish nervous system. PMID:11461158

  13. A new member of the ETS family fused to EWS in Ewing tumors.

    PubMed

    Peter, M; Couturier, J; Pacquement, H; Michon, J; Thomas, G; Magdelenat, H; Delattre, O

    1997-03-13

    As a result of chromosome translocations, the EWS gene is fused to a variety of transcription factors in human solid neoplasia. In Ewing tumors EWS can be fused to four different members of the ETS family, namely FLI-1, ERG, ETV1 and E1AF. We have identified a new member of the ETS family, called FEV, which is fused to EWS in a subset of Ewing tumors. FEV encodes a 238 amino acid protein which contains an ETS DNA binding domain closely related to that of FLI-1 and ERG. However, the N-terminal portion of FEV is only 42 amino acids long which suggests that FEV is lacking important transcription regulatory domains contained in FLI-1 and ERG N-terminal parts. The C-terminal end of FEV is rich in alanine residues which may indicate that FEV is a transcription repressor. The FEV gene is encoded by three exons and is located on chromosome 2. FEV expression was only detected in adult prostate and small intestine but not in other adult nor in fetal tissues, thus indicating that FEV has a restricted expression pattern. Following a scheme similar to previously described translocations in Ewing tumors, a t(2;22) chromosome translocation fuses the N-terminal domain of EWS to the ETS DNA binding domain of FEV. PMID:9121764

  14. A novel fibroblast growth factor receptor family member promotes neuronal outgrowth and synaptic plasticity in aplysia.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Daniela D; Minh, Bui Quang; Cicvaric, Ana; Monje, Francisco J

    2014-11-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Receptors (FGFRs) regulate essential biological processes, including embryogenesis, angiogenesis, cellular growth and memory-related long-term synaptic plasticity. Whereas canonical FGFRs depend exclusively on extracellular Immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains for ligand binding, other receptor types, including members of the tropomyosin-receptor-kinase (Trk) family, use either Ig-like or Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) motifs, or both. Little is known, however, about the evolutionary events leading to the differential incorporation of LRR domains into Ig-containing tyrosine kinase receptors. Moreover, although FGFRs have been identified in many vertebrate species, few reports describe their existence in invertebrates. Information about the biological relevance of invertebrate FGFRs and evolutionary divergences between them and their vertebrate counterparts is therefore limited. Here, we characterized ApLRRTK, a neuronal cell-surface protein recently identified in Aplysia. We unveiled ApLRRTK as the first member of the FGFRs family deprived of Ig-like domains that instead contains extracellular LRR domains. We describe that ApLRRTK exhibits properties typical of canonical vertebrate FGFRs, including promotion of FGF activity, enhancement of neuritic outgrowth and signaling via MAPK and the transcription factor CREB. ApLRRTK also enhanced the synaptic efficiency of neurons known to mediate in vivo memory-related defensive behaviors. These data reveal a novel molecular regulator of neuronal function in invertebrates, provide the first evolutionary linkage between LRR proteins and FGFRs and unveil an unprecedented mechanism of FGFR gene diversification in primeval central nervous systems. PMID:25059541

  15. Association Analysis of Member RAS Oncogene Family Gene Polymorphisms with Aspirin Intolerance in Asthmatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Sook; Heo, Jeong-Seok; Chang, Hun Soo; Choi, Inseon S.; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Jong-Uk; Park, Byung Lae; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2014-01-01

    Member RAS oncogene family (RAB1A), a member of the RAS oncogene family, cycles between inactive GDP-bound and active GTP-bound forms regulating vesicle transport in exocytosis. Thus, functional alterations of the RAB1A gene may contribute to aspirin intolerance in asthmatic sufferers. To investigate the relationship between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the RAB1A gene and aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), asthmatics (n=1197) were categorized into AERD and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA). All subjects were diagnosed as asthma on the basis of the Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA) guidelines. AERD was defined as asthmatics showing 15% or greater decreases in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or naso-ocular reactions by the oral acetyl salicylic acid (ASA) challenge (OAC) test. In total, eight SNPs were genotyped. Logistic regression analysis identified that the minor allele frequency of +14444 T>G and +41170 C>G was significantly higher in the AERD group (n=181) than in the ATA group (n=1016) (p=0.0003−0.03). Linear regression analysis revealed a strong association between the SNPs and the aspirin-induced decrease in FEV1 (p=0.0004−0.004). The RAB1A gene may play a role in the development of AERD in asthmatics and the genetic polymorphisms of the gene have the potential to be used as an indicator of this disease. PMID:24555545

  16. [Experience of family members providing care for HIV-exposed children: beginning of the trajectory].

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Willyane De Andrade; Da Silva, Mariana Ramos; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Wernet, Monika; Oliveira, Fernanda Ferreira Damaceno; Dupas, Giselle

    2014-09-01

    During and after pregnancy, mothers with HIV can undergo treatment that is capable of preventing vertical transmission (VT) to their babies. The purpose of this study was to analyze the experience of family members that provide care for children whose mothers have HIV, to reduce the risk ofVT, with emphasis on the beginning of this trajectory. This study was based on the qualitative approach and Symbolic Interactionism was adopted as a theoretical framework. A total of 36 family members participated in the study, all of whom were carers of children aged up to 18 months and waiting for confirmation of the HIV diagnosis. Data were collected in a hospital in north-eastern Brazil, between December 2012 and February 2013, and examined by means of content analysis. Child care began during pregnancy, when the possibility of the child having HIV was expected. Some had previous experience in providing care for exposed children. Understanding the early trajectory of care will help find ways to provide better support for carers during the trajectory of diagnosis confirmation. PMID:25508622

  17. [Experience of family members providing care for HIV-exposed children: beginning of the trajectory].

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Willyane de Andrade; da Silva, Mariana Ramos; Nascimento, Lucila Castanheira; Wernet, Monika; Oliveira, Fernanda Ferreira Damaceno; Dupas, Giselle

    2014-09-01

    During and after pregnancy, mothers with HIV can undergo treatment that is capable of preventing vertical transmission (VT) to their babies. The purpose of this study was to analyze the experience of family members that provide care for children whose mothers have HIV, to reduce the risk ofVT, with emphasis on the beginning of this trajectory. This study was based on the qualitative approach and Symbolic Interactionism was adopted as a theoretical framework. A total of 36 family members participated in the study, all of whom were carers of children aged up to 18 months and waiting for confirmation of the HIV diagnosis. Data were collected in a hospital in north-eastern Brazil, between December 2012 and February 2013, and examined by means of content analysis. Child care began during pregnancy, when the possibility of the child having HIV was expected. Some had previous experience in providing care for exposed children. Understanding the early trajectory of care will help find ways to provide better support for carers during the trajectory of diagnosis confirmation. PMID:25474843

  18. Identification and characterization of three members of the human metallocarboxypeptidase gene family.

    PubMed

    Wei, Suwen; Segura, Sonia; Vendrell, Josep; Aviles, Francesc X; Lanoue, Edith; Day, Robert; Feng, Yun; Fricker, Lloyd D

    2002-04-26

    Amino acid homology searches of the human genome revealed three members of the metallocarboxypeptidase (metallo-CP) family that had not been described in the literature in addition to the 14 known genes. One of these three, named CPA5, is present in a gene cluster with CPA1, CPA2, and CPA4 on chromosome 7. The cDNA encoding a mouse homolog of human CPA5 was isolated from a testis library and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequence of human CPA5 has highest amino acid sequence identity (60%) to CPA1. Modeling analysis shows the overall structure to be very similar to that of other members of the A/B subfamily of metallocarboxypeptidases. The active site of CPA5 is predicted to cleave substrates with C-terminal hydrophobic residues, as do CPA1, -2, and -3. Using Northern blot analysis, CPA5 mRNA is detected in testis but not in kidney, liver, brain, or lung. In situ hybridization analysis shows that CPA5 is localized to testis germ cells. Mouse pro-CPA5 protein expressed in Sf9 cells using the baculovirus system was retained in the particulate fraction of the cells and was not secreted into the media. Pro-CPA5 was not enzymatically active toward standard CPA substrates, but after incubation with prohormone convertase 4 the resulting protein was able to cleave furylacryloyl-Gly-Leu, with 3-4-fold greater activity at pH 7.4 than at 5.6. Two additional members of the human CP gene family were also studied. Modeling analysis indicates that both contain the necessary amino acids required for enzymatic activity. The CP on chromosome 8 is predicted to have a CPA-like specificity for C-terminal hydrophobic residues and was named CPA6. The CP on chromosome 2 is predicted to cleave substrates with C-terminal acidic residues and was named CPO. PMID:11836249

  19. ROLE OF ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUB-FAMILY MEMBER 2 (ABCG2) IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    ATP binding cassette sub-family member 2 (ABCG2), is a member of the ABC transporter superfamily and a principal xenobiotic transporter. ABCG2 is also highly expressed in certain stem cell populations where it is thought to be related to stem cell plasticity, although the role o...

  20. Cloning, sequence characterization, and expression patterns of members of the porcine TSSK family.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Huo, H L; Wang, S Y; Miao, Y W; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Q L; Li, F Q; Liu, L X; Li, W Z; Zeng, Y Z; Huo, J L; Xiao, H

    2015-01-01

    Testis-specific serine kinases (TSSKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases highly expressed in the testes that are responsible for regulating many spermatogenesis-related protein activities. Mutations in this family have a positive relationship with oligospermia and azoospermia in human and mouse. Here, five members of the TSSK family from a Banna mini-pig inbred line (BMI) were cloned, sequenced, and characterized. The full-length coding sequences of BMI TSSKs varied from 807 (TSSK3) to 1095 bp (TSSK1) and encoded 268 to 364 amino acids with molecular weights in the range 30.11 to 41.34 kDa. Following comparison with TSSK4 genes in other species, BMI TSSK4 was found to contain three alternatively spliced variants, inform1, inform 3, and inform 4. BMI TSSK1 and TSSK2 are co-localized on the Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 14, and consist of a single exon; TSSK3, TSSK4, and TSSK6 are on SSC6, SSC7, and SSC2, and consist of two, four, and one exon, respectively. Multiple protein sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that the regions spanning the S_TKc domains were more conserved between pig and other animals: with TSSK1 and TSSK2 and TSSK3 and TSSK6 displaying the greatest degree of homology across species, and the TSSK4 protein clearly distinct from other members. Multi-tissue RT-PCR showed BMI TSSK1, TSSK3, and TSSK4 were only expressed in the testes and seminal vesicle, TSSK2 was confined to testes only, while TSSK6 was expressed widely in adult tissues but was highest in the testes. PMID:26600552

  1. Evolution of DUF1313 family members across plant species and their association with maize photoperiod sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Hu, Erliang; Chen, Xueying; Xu, Jie; Lan, Hai; Li, Chuan; Hu, Yaodong; Lu, Yanli

    2016-05-01

    Proteins of the DUF1313 family contain a highly conserved domain and are only found in plants; they play important roles in most plant functions. In this study, 269 DUF1313 genes from 81 photoautotrophic species were identified; they were classified into three major types based on the amino acid substitutions in the conserved region: IARV, I(S/T/F)(K/R)V, and IRRV. Phylogenic tree constructed from 51 DUF1313 genes from graminoids revealed three clades: A, B1, and B2. Clade B1 was found to have undergone episodic positive selection after a gene duplication event and included four amino acid sites under positive selection. The association between DUF1313 family members and traits investigated in maize indicated that three of four genes (GRMZM2G025646, GRMZM5G877647, GRMZM2G359322, and GRMZM2G382774) were associated with the target traits such as days to silking, days to tasselling, and plant height. The nucleotide diversity of the most primitive and highly conserved DUF1313 gene, ELF4-like4, was the highest in Tripsacum and the lowest in maize. Tajima's D and Fu and Li's D tests revealed that significant purifying selection had occurred in the coding sequence region of this DUF1313 gene in teosinte and maize. No significant signal was detected in the 5'-untranslated region of this gene in each of the three species (maize, teosinte, and Tripsacum) or in any gene regions of Tripsacum. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the 103 accessions of maize, teosinte, and Tripsacum can be grouped into four clades based on the ELF4-like4 gene sequence similarity. Thus, this gene can be used to determine the relationships between maize and its relatives, and the DUF1313 family members and alleles identified in this study might be valuable genetic resources for molecular marker-assisted breeding in maize. PMID:26772990

  2. CD93 and related family members: their role in innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, M C; Sullivan, S A; Bohlson, S S

    2008-02-01

    CD93 belongs to a newly described family of transmembrane glycoproteins which also includes endosialin and thrombomodulin. These cell surface proteins are grouped into a family based on similar ectodomain architecture consisting of a C-type lectin-like domain, a series of EGF-like repeats and a highly glycosylated mucin-like domain. However, recent studies suggest overlapping functions in the regulation of processes involving innate immunity and inflammation. CD93 regulates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells in vivo, a function critical to development, tissue repair and maintenance of tissue homeostasis. In addition, in vitro studies have demonstrated a role for CD93 in phagocytosis of antibody and complement opsonized particles and also in leukocyte and endothelial cell adhesion. Analysis of CD93 expression on endothelial cells in the developing mouse embryo correlates with the remodeling of blood vessels suggesting a role for CD93 in regulating angiogenesis, a process tightly linked to acute and chronic inflammation and also required for tumor metastasis. Endosialin has been characterized as a tumor specific antigen and functions in angiogenesis. Thrombomodulin is best characterized as a natural anticoagulant; however, more recent reports have illuminated the importance of thrombomodulin in the regulation of inflammation. This review discusses similarities and differences in the family members, and focuses on known and speculated functions in regulation of innate immunity. PMID:18288964

  3. Impacts of Parasites in Early Life: Contrasting Effects on Juvenile Growth for Different Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Thomas E.; Daunt, Francis; Kiploks, Adam J.; Burthe, Sarah J.; Granroth-Wilding, Hanna M. V.; Takahashi, Emi A.; Newell, Mark; Wanless, Sarah; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Parasitism experienced early in ontogeny can have a major impact on host growth, development and future fitness, but whether siblings are affected equally by parasitism is poorly understood. In birds, hatching asynchrony induced by hormonal or behavioural mechanisms largely under parental control might predispose young to respond to infection in different ways. Here we show that parasites can have different consequences for offspring depending on their position in the family hierarchy. We experimentally treated European Shag (Phalacrocorax aristoteli) nestlings with the broad-spectrum anti-parasite drug ivermectin and compared their growth rates with nestlings from control broods. Average growth rates measured over the period of linear growth (10 days to 30 days of age) and survival did not differ for nestlings from treated and control broods. However, when considering individuals within broods, parasite treatment reversed the patterns of growth for individual family members: last-hatched nestlings grew significantly slower than their siblings in control nests but grew faster in treated nests. This was at the expense of their earlier-hatched brood-mates, who showed an overall growth rate reduction relative to last-hatched nestlings in treated nests. These results highlight the importance of exploring individual variation in the costs of infection and suggest that parasites could be a key factor modulating within-family dynamics, sibling competition and developmental trajectories from an early age. PMID:22384190

  4. Consumption and sources of dietary salt in family members in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Zhang, Puhong; Zhang, Lu; Niu, Wenyi; Gao, Jianmei; Lu, Lixin; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Xian

    2015-04-01

    In China, few people are aware of the amount and source of their salt intake. We conducted a survey to investigate the consumption and sources of dietary salt using the "one-week salt estimation method" by weighing cooking salt and major salt-containing food, and estimating salt intake during dining out based on established evidence. Nine hundred and three families (1981 adults and 971 children) with students in eight primary or junior high schools in urban and suburban Beijing were recruited. On average, the daily dietary salt intake of family members in Beijing was 11.0 (standard deviation: 6.2) g for children and adolescents (under 18 years old), 15.2 (9.1) g for adults (18 to 59 years old), and 10.2 (4.8) g for senior citizens (60 years old and over), respectively. Overall, 60.5% of dietary salt was consumed at home, and 39.5% consumed outside the home. Approximately 90% of the salt intake came from cooking (household cooking and cafeteria or restaurant cooking), while less than 10% came from processed food. In conclusion, the dietary salt intake in Beijing families far surpassed the recommended amounts by World Health Organization, with both household cooking and dining-out as main sources of salt consumption. More targeted interventions, especially education about major sources of salt and corresponding methods for salt reduction should be taken to reduce the risks associated with a high salt diet. PMID:25867952

  5. Impacts of parasites in early life: contrasting effects on juvenile growth for different family members.

    PubMed

    Reed, Thomas E; Daunt, Francis; Kiploks, Adam J; Burthe, Sarah J; Granroth-Wilding, Hanna M V; Takahashi, Emi A; Newell, Mark; Wanless, Sarah; Cunningham, Emma J A

    2012-01-01

    Parasitism experienced early in ontogeny can have a major impact on host growth, development and future fitness, but whether siblings are affected equally by parasitism is poorly understood. In birds, hatching asynchrony induced by hormonal or behavioural mechanisms largely under parental control might predispose young to respond to infection in different ways. Here we show that parasites can have different consequences for offspring depending on their position in the family hierarchy. We experimentally treated European Shag (Phalacrocorax aristoteli) nestlings with the broad-spectrum anti-parasite drug ivermectin and compared their growth rates with nestlings from control broods. Average growth rates measured over the period of linear growth (10 days to 30 days of age) and survival did not differ for nestlings from treated and control broods. However, when considering individuals within broods, parasite treatment reversed the patterns of growth for individual family members: last-hatched nestlings grew significantly slower than their siblings in control nests but grew faster in treated nests. This was at the expense of their earlier-hatched brood-mates, who showed an overall growth rate reduction relative to last-hatched nestlings in treated nests. These results highlight the importance of exploring individual variation in the costs of infection and suggest that parasites could be a key factor modulating within-family dynamics, sibling competition and developmental trajectories from an early age. PMID:22384190

  6. Consumption and Sources of Dietary Salt in Family Members in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fang; Zhang, Puhong; Zhang, Lu; Niu, Wenyi; Gao, Jianmei; Lu, Lixin; liu, Caixia; Gao, Xian

    2015-01-01

    In China, few people are aware of the amount and source of their salt intake. We conducted a survey to investigate the consumption and sources of dietary salt using the “one-week salt estimation method” by weighing cooking salt and major salt-containing food, and estimating salt intake during dining out based on established evidence. Nine hundred and three families (1981 adults and 971 children) with students in eight primary or junior high schools in urban and suburban Beijing were recruited. On average, the daily dietary salt intake of family members in Beijing was 11.0 (standard deviation: 6.2) g for children and adolescents (under 18 years old), 15.2 (9.1) g for adults (18 to 59 years old), and 10.2 (4.8) g for senior citizens (60 years old and over), respectively. Overall, 60.5% of dietary salt was consumed at home, and 39.5% consumed outside the home. Approximately 90% of the salt intake came from cooking (household cooking and cafeteria or restaurant cooking), while less than 10% came from processed food. In conclusion, the dietary salt intake in Beijing families far surpassed the recommended amounts by World Health Organization, with both household cooking and dining-out as main sources of salt consumption. More targeted interventions, especially education about major sources of salt and corresponding methods for salt reduction should be taken to reduce the risks associated with a high salt diet. PMID:25867952

  7. Fetuin-B, a second member of the fetuin family in mammals.

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, E; Soury, E; Ruminy, P; Husson, A; Parmentier, F; Daveau, M; Salier, J P

    2000-01-01

    A set of orthologous plasma proteins found in human, sheep, pig, cow and rodents, now collectively designated fetuin-A, constitutes the fetuin family. Fetuin-A has been identified as a major protein during fetal life and is also involved in important functions such as inhibition of the insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity, protease inhibitory activities and development-associated regulation of calcium metabolism and osteogenesis. Furthermore, fetuin-A is a key partner in the recovery phase of an acute inflammatory response. We now describe a second protein of the fetuin family, called fetuin-B, which is found at least in human and rodents. On grounds of domain homology, overall conservation of cysteine residues and chromosomal assignments of the corresponding genes in these species, fetuin-B is unambiguously a paralogue of fetuin-A. Yet, fetuin-A and fetuin-B exhibit significant differences at the amino acid sequence level, notably including variations with respect to the archetypal fetuin-specific signature. Differences and similarities in terms of gene regulation were also observed. Indeed, studies performed during development in rat and mouse showed for the first time high expression of a member of the fetuin family in adulthood, as shown with the fetuin-B mRNA in rat. However, like its fetuin-A counterpart, the fetuin-B mRNA level is down-regulated during the acute phase of experimentally induced inflammation in rat. PMID:10947975

  8. 5 CFR 894.203 - If I have a self plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? 894.203 Section 894.203... plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? You may change your covered family member under a self plus one enrollment or change to self only...

  9. 5 CFR 894.203 - If I have a self plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? 894.203 Section 894.203... plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? You may change your covered family member under a self plus one enrollment or change to self only...

  10. 5 CFR 894.203 - If I have a self plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? 894.203 Section 894.203... plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? You may change your covered family member under a self plus one enrollment or change to self only...

  11. 5 CFR 894.203 - If I have a self plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? 894.203 Section 894.203... plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? You may change your covered family member under a self plus one enrollment or change to self only...

  12. 5 CFR 894.203 - If I have a self plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? 894.203 Section 894.203... plus one enrollment, when may I change which family member I want to cover or change to self only? You may change your covered family member under a self plus one enrollment or change to self only...

  13. Transport properties for members of the ZIP family in plants and their role in Zn and Mn homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A better understanding of the role of the Arabidopsis ZIP family of micronutrient transporters is necessary in order to advance our understanding of plant Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu homeostasis. In the current study, the eleven Arabidopsis ZIP family members not yet well characterized were studied for thei...

  14. One Family's Perspective of Their Experiences with School and District Personnel over Time Related to Inclusive Educational Services for a Family Member with Significant Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryndak, Diane Lea; Storch, Jill Frenchman; Hoppey, David

    2008-01-01

    This phenomenological case study examines one family's lived experience as they advocated for appropriate and effective services in inclusive classes for a member of their family who had significant disabilities. Findings suggest the need for effective professional development if school personnel are to effectively educate students with…

  15. In silico identification and characterization of the MAPK family members of unicellular model eukaryote Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Yıldız, Mehmet Taha; Arslanyolu, Muhittin

    2014-10-01

    The biological function and evolutionary diversity of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family have mostly been studied in fungi, animals and plants, with very limited information from lower eukaryotes. This study aimed to describe the MAPKs of unicellular Tetrahymena thermophila. Eight members of the T. thermophila MAPK (TtMPK) gene family, in addition to previously reported TtMPK1, TtMPK2 and TtMPK3, were identified bioinformatically using a T. thermophila genome database. Phylogenetic analysis assigned the TtMPKs into two major groups, ERK1/2-like (TtMPK1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9) as stress-responsive MAPKs for biotic and abiotic stresses, and ERK7/8-like (TtMPK4, 10, and 11) as cell-cycle-associated protein kinases for biotic factors. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the TtMPKs showed high mRNA expression at 30°C; however, only TtMPK5 and TtMPK6 showed high expression at 37°C. Osmotic shock by 100mM NaCl only increased the expression of TtMPK2, whereas 20mM NaCl reduced the expression of all MPKs to almost zero. The results suggested that T. thermophila MAPKs are among the closest representatives of the ancestors of the eukaryotic MAPK family. Although no functional characterization of MPKs was performed, this study is the first report of the genome-wide MAPK family in T. thermophila. PMID:25286252

  16. Developing an interactive website for adolescents with a mentally ill family member.

    PubMed

    Drost, Louisa M; Cuijpers, Pim; Schippers, Gerard M

    2011-07-01

    Adolescents with a mentally ill parent are at high risk for developing a disorder themselves. It is widely recommended that these adolescents be provided with preventive interventions designed especially for them, but their avoidance of professional help is a common problem. Because most teenagers in Western societies use the World Wide Web as a means of social interaction, use of the Internet for reaching these young people would appear to be a promising option. In this article, the authors describe the development of Survivalkid.nl, an interactive, Internet-delivered, preventive intervention for supporting adolescents with a mentally ill family member. Usage statistics with regard to frequency and duration of visits and amount of activity during visits suggest that: (a) the target group has been better served than before the site was launched; and (b) we have accomplished our goal of expanding the range of support. PMID:20980365

  17. Plant members of a family of sulfate transporters reveal functional subtypes.

    PubMed

    Smith, F W; Ealing, P M; Hawkesford, M J; Clarkson, D T

    1995-09-26

    Three plant sulfate transporter cDNAs have been isolated by complementation of a yeast mutant with a cDNA library derived from the tropical forage legume Stylosanthes hamata. Two of these cDNAs, shst1 and shst2, encode high-affinity H+/sulfate cotransporters that mediate the uptake of sulfate by plant roots from low concentrations of sulfate in the soil solution. The third, shst3, represents a different subtype encoding a lower affinity H+/sulfate cotransporter, which may be involved in the internal transport of sulfate between cellular or subcellular compartments within the plant. The steady-state level of mRNA corresponding to both subtypes is subject to regulation by signals that ultimately respond to the external sulfate supply. These cDNAs represent the identification of plant members of a family of related sulfate transporter proteins whose sequences exhibit significant amino acid conservation in filamentous fungi, yeast, plants, and mammals. PMID:7568135

  18. Yip1 domain family, member 6 (Yipf6) mutation induces spontaneous intestinal inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Katharina; Tomisato, Wataru; Li, Xiaohong; Neppl, Christina; Pirie, Elaine; Falk, Werner; Xia, Yu; Moresco, Eva Marie Y.; Baccala, Roberto; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.; Schnabl, Bernd; Beutler, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Using an environmentally sensitized genetic screen we identified mutations that cause inflammatory colitis in mice. The X-linked Klein-Zschocher (KLZ) mutation created a null allele of Yipf6, a member of a gene family believed to regulate vesicular transport in yeast, but without known functions in mammals. Yipf6 is a five transmembrane-spanning protein associated with Golgi compartments. Klein-Zschocher mutants were extremely sensitive to colitis induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) and developed spontaneous ileitis and colitis after 16 mo of age in specific pathogen-free housing conditions. Electron microscopy, gene expression, and immunocytochemistry analyses provided evidence that impaired intestinal homeostasis stemmed from defective formation and secretion of large secretory granules from Paneth and goblet cells. These studies support a tissue- and organ-specific function for Yipf6 in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis and implicate the orthologous human gene as a disease susceptibility locus. PMID:22802641

  19. Thalassaemia: a study on the perception of patients and family members.

    PubMed

    Wahab, I Abdul; Naznin, M; Nora, M Z; Suzanah, A R; Zulaiho, M; Faszrul, A R Aidl; Kamaruzaman, W S

    2011-10-01

    Marked improvement in the management of thalassaemia has not been matched by progress in psychosocial rehabilitation as thalassaemia continues to pose challenges to patients and their family members. Few studies have been carried out in Malaysia to look at such issues. This study is therefore to explore the concerns, beliefs and feelings about thalassaemia. It was conducted in the year 2009 over 7 months on "focus groups", in patients aged 8-22 years and parents attending Paediatric Clinic of Tengku Ampuan Afzan Hospital, Kuantan, Pahang. Results showed that concerns and adverse impact were related to lower grades in education, poor self-image, less chance of employment, marriage, financial burden and social integration. Compliance to subcutaneous iron chelator was poor. There were various concerns related to blood transfusion therapy. It is evident that thalassaemia greatly affects the psychosocial dimensions and a more structured long term psychosocial support is needed to improve quality of life of patients. PMID:22299552

  20. Multiple roles of TNF super family members in corpus luteum function.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Kiyoshi; Sakumoto, Ryosuke

    2003-11-10

    The main function of the corpus luteum (CL) is the production of progesterone. Adequate luteal progesterone is crucial for determining the physiological duration of the estrous cycle and for achieving a successful pregnancy. The CL is regulated not only by hypophyseal gonadotropin, but also by a number of cytokines that are locally produced. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and its specific receptors (TNFR) are present in the CL of many species. TNF plays multiple and likely important roles in CL function throughout the estrous cycle. TNF appears to have luteotropic and luteolytic roles in the CLs. In contrast, Fas ligand (Fas L), another member of TNF super family (TNF-SF), is primarily recognized for its apoptotic actions. Presumably, Fas L binds its cognate receptor (Fas) to induce structural luteolysis. This review is designed to focus on recent studies documenting the expression of TNF and Fas L, their receptors, and intracellular signaling mechanisms in the CL. PMID:14613529

  1. Multiple roles of TNF super family members in corpus luteum function

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Kiyoshi; Sakumoto, Ryosuke

    2003-01-01

    The main function of the corpus luteum (CL) is the production of progesterone. Adequate luteal progesterone is crucial for determining the physiological duration of the estrous cycle and for achieving a successful pregnancy. The CL is regulated not only by hypophyseal gonadotropin, but also by a number of cytokines that are locally produced. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and its specific receptors (TNFR) are present in the CL of many species. TNF plays multiple and likely important roles in CL function throughout the estrous cycle. TNF appears to have luteotropic and luteolytic roles in the CLs. In contrast, Fas ligand (Fas L), another member of TNF super family (TNF-SF), is primarily recognized for its apoptotic actions. Presumably, Fas L binds its cognate receptor (Fas) to induce structural luteolysis. This review is designed to focus on recent studies documenting the expression of TNF and Fas L, their receptors, and intracellular signaling mechanisms in the CL. PMID:14613529

  2. Emerging Roles for FCRL Family Members in Lymphocyte Biology and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, F.J.; Won, W.J.; Becker, E.J.; Easlick, J.L.; Tabengwa, E.; Li, R.; Shakhmatov, M.; Burrows, P.D.; Davis, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the extended Fc receptor-like (FCRL) family in humans and mice are preferentially expressed by B cells and possess tyrosine-based immunoregulatory function. Although the majority of these proteins repress B cell receptor-mediated activation, there is emerging evidence for their bifunctionality and capacity to counter-regulate adaptive and innate signaling pathways. In light of these findings, the recent discovery of ligands for several of these molecules has begun to reveal exciting potential for them in normal lymphocyte biology and is launching a new phase of FCRL investigation. Importantly, these fundamental developments are also setting the stage for defining their altered roles in the pathogenesis of a growing number of immune-mediated diseases. Here we review recent advances in the FCRL field and highlight the significance of these intriguing receptors in normal and perturbed immunobiology. PMID:25116094

  3. Travelers' diarrhea in Mexico. A prospective study of physicians and family members attending a congress.

    PubMed

    Merson, M H; Morris, G K; Sack, D A; Wells, J G; Feeley, J C; Sack, R B; Creech, W B; Kapikian, A Z; Gangarosa, E J

    1976-06-10

    We conducted a prospective study of travelers' diarrhea on 73 physicians and 48 family members attending a medical congress in Mexico City, in October, 1974. Fecal and blood specimens were collected before, during and after their visit and examined for enteric bacterial pathogens, viruses and parasites. In 59 (49 per cent) participants travelers' diarrhea developed. Median duration of illness was five days. Onset occurred a median of six days after arrival. An etiologic agent was found in 63 per cent of ill participants. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli of different, non-"enteropathogenic" serotypes was the most common cause; other responsible pathogens included salmonellae, invasive Esch. coli., shigellae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Giardia lamblia and the human reovirus-like agent. Consumption of salads containing raw vegetables was associated with enterotoxigenic Esch. coli infection (P = 0.014). Travelers' diarrhea in Mexico is a syndrome caused by a variety of pathogens, the most common of which is enterotoxigenic Esch. col. PMID:772435

  4. The collagenase gene family in humans consists of at least four members.

    PubMed Central

    Muller, D; Quantin, B; Gesnel, M C; Millon-Collard, R; Abecassis, J; Breathnach, R

    1988-01-01

    Stromelysin is a collagenase-related connective-tissue-degrading metalloproteinase. We have detected RNAs capable of hybridizing to a rat stromelysin cDNA in 11 of 69 human tumours tested. Molecular cloning of cDNAs to these RNAs has identified them as a mixture of stromelysin RNA and a transcript of a hitherto-undescribed related human gene, the stromelysin-2 gene. We have also isolated cDNAs corresponding to a more distantly related new human gene, the pump-1 gene. A comparison of the cDNA-derived amino acid sequences of stromelysin-2 and pump-1 with the known sequences of stromelysin and collagenase reveals significant similarities, with conservation of sequence motifs believed to have functional importance in metalloproteinase action. We conclude that the collagenase gene family in humans consists of at least four members, and speculate that expression of these genes plays a role in cancer. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2844164

  5. Utilization of Hospice Bereavement Support by At-Risk Family Members.

    PubMed

    Ghesquiere, Angela; Thomas, Julie; Bruce, Martha L

    2016-03-01

    Approximately 10% of the bereaved are at risk of bereavement-related mental health disorders. Hospices' bereavement services could potentially address needs of many at risk, but little is known about their service use. We analyzed data from 6160 bereaved family members of hospice patients. Risk of mental health problems was identified by hospice providers postloss. Of those characterized as "at-risk," 52% used services compared to 18% of the "low risk." Factors associated with service use among at-risk were female gender and younger age of death. Those who lost a child used services less than other bereaved. Although hospices appear to be skilled at identifying and providing bereavement services to the at-risk, services do not reach almost half. Results suggest the need to improve care access, especially among men and those losing a child. PMID:25326490

  6. Raver2, a new member of the hnRNP family.

    PubMed

    Kleinhenz, Berenike; Fabienke, Manuela; Swiniarski, Sascha; Wittenmayer, Nina; Kirsch, Joachim; Jockusch, Brigitte M; Arnold, Hans Henning; Illenberger, Susanne

    2005-08-15

    Raver2 was identified as a novel member of the hnRNP family based on sequence homology within three RNA recognition motifs and its general domain organization reminiscent of the previously described raver1 protein. Like raver1, raver2 contains two putative nuclear localization signals and a potential nuclear export sequence, and also displays nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling in a heterokaryon assay. In glia cells and neurons, raver2 localizes to the nucleus. Moreover, the protein interacts with polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) suggesting that it may participate in PTB-mediated nuclear functions. In contrast to ubiquitously expressed raver1, raver2 exerts a distinct spatio-temporal expression pattern during embryogenesis and is essentially restricted to brain, lung, and kidney in the adult mouse. PMID:16051233

  7. STS-95 crew members greet families at Launch Pad 39B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STS-95 crew members greet their families from Launch Pad 39B. From left, they are Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski, Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr., senator from Ohio, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., and Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain, with the European Space Agency (ESA). The crew were making final preparations for launch, targeted for liftoff at 2 p.m. on Oct. 29. The mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, returning to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7.

  8. Screening of a healthy newborn identifies three adult family members with symptomatic glutaric aciduria type I

    PubMed Central

    MCH, Janssen; LAJ, Kluijtmans; S.B., Wortmann

    2014-01-01

    We report three adult sibs (one female, two males) with symptomatic glutaric acidura type I, who were diagnosed after a low carnitine level was found by newborn screening in a healthy newborn of the women. All three adults had low plasma carnitine, elevated glutaric acid levels and pronounced 3-hydroxyglutaric aciduria. The diagnosis was confirmed by undetectable glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase activity in lymphocytes and two pathogenic heterozygous mutations in the GCDH gene (c.1060A > G, c.1154C > T). These results reinforce the notion that abnormal metabolite levels in newborns may lead to the diagnosis of adult metabolic disease in the mother and potentially other family members. PMID:26674492

  9. Analysis of potential expression of highly related members of the ribosomal protein L32 gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Jacks, C M; Biltz, R E; Hackett, P B

    1988-01-01

    The processed gene L32', a member of the mouse gene family for ribosomal protein L32, could encode a 135 amino acid protein nearly identical to L32. The 5'-flanking region of the gene contains CAAT and TATA sites at positions commonly found in expressed genes. The L32' gene lies within highly methylated, DNase I-insensitive chromatin of mouse L1210 cells. Although S1 nuclease digestion studies suggested that an L32' transcript might be produced, an oligonucleotide probe specific for L32' mRNA, and RNase digestion of a cRNA probe to L32', indicated fewer than 0.1 L32' transcripts/cell. These results demonstrate that extreme caution is required when measuring transcription from related genes. Images PMID:2462715

  10. Differential Inhibition of Signal Peptide Peptidase Family Members by Established ?-Secretase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ran, Yong; Ladd, Gabriela Z; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jung, Joo In; Greenbaum, Doron; Felsenstein, Kevin M; Golde, Todd E

    2015-01-01

    The signal peptide peptidases (SPPs) are biomedically important proteases implicated as therapeutic targets for hepatitis C (human SPP, (hSPP)), plasmodium (Plasmodium SPP (pSPP)), and B-cell immunomodulation and neoplasia (signal peptide peptidase like 2a, (SPPL2a)). To date, no drug-like, selective inhibitors have been reported. We use a recombinant substrate based on the amino-terminus of BRI2 fused to amyloid ? 1-25 (A?1-25) (FBA) to develop facile, cost-effective SPP/SPPL protease assays. Co-transfection of expression plasmids expressing the FBA substrate with SPP/SPPLs were conducted to evaluate cleavage, which was monitored by ELISA, Western Blot and immunoprecipitation/MALDI-TOF Mass spectrometry (IP/MS). No cleavage is detected in the absence of SPP/SPPL overexpression. Multiple ?-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and (Z-LL)2 ketone differentially inhibited SPP/SPPL activity; for example, IC50 of LY-411,575 varied from 5179 nM (on SPPL2a) to 5499122 nM (on SPPL2b), while Compound E showed inhibition only on hSPP with IC50 of 146593 nM. Data generated were predictive of effects observed for endogenous SPPL2a cleavage of CD74 in a murine B-Cell line. Thus, it is possible to differentially inhibit SPP family members. These SPP/SPPL cleavage assays will expedite the search for selective inhibitors. The data also reinforce similarities between SPP family member cleavage and cleavage catalyzed by ?-secretase. PMID:26046535

  11. Human kidney anion exchanger 1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B)

    SciTech Connect

    Duangtum, Natapol; Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10700 ; Junking, Mutita; Sawasdee, Nunghathai; Cheunsuchon, Boonyarit; Limjindaporn, Thawornchai; Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Impaired trafficking of kAE1 causes distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). {yields} The interaction between kAE1 and kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) is reported. {yields} The co-localization between kAE and KIF3B was detected in human kidney tissues. {yields} A marked reduction of kAE1 on the cell membrane was observed when KIF3B was knockdown. {yields} KFI3B plays an important role in trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane. -- Abstract: Impaired trafficking of human kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1) to the basolateral membrane of {alpha}-intercalated cells of the kidney collecting duct leads to the defect of the Cl{sup -}/HCO{sub 3}{sup -} exchange and the failure of proton (H{sup +}) secretion at the apical membrane of these cells, causing distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). In the sorting process, kAE1 interacts with AP-1 mu1A, a subunit of AP-1A adaptor complex. However, it is not known whether kAE1 interacts with motor proteins in its trafficking process to the plasma membrane or not. We report here that kAE1 interacts with kinesin family member 3B (KIF3B) in kidney cells and a dileucine motif at the carboxyl terminus of kAE1 contributes to this interaction. We have also demonstrated that kAE1 co-localizes with KIF3B in human kidney tissues and the suppression of endogenous KIF3B in HEK293T cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreases membrane localization of kAE1 but increases its intracellular accumulation. All results suggest that KIF3B is involved in the trafficking of kAE1 to the plasma membrane of human kidney {alpha}-intercalated cells.

  12. Agreement Between Stroke Patients and Family Members For Ascertaining Pre-Stroke Risk of Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Sarah L; Brown, Devin L; Chervin, Ronald D; Morgenstern, Lewis B; Smith, Melinda A; Lisabeth, Lynda D

    2014-01-01

    Background Ascertaining self-reported information about pre-stroke obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk in the acute stroke period is challenging as many stroke patients have deficits that hinder communication. We examined agreement between stroke patients without communication limitations and family members (proxy) with respect to pre-stroke risk of OSA. Methods Patient-proxy pairs (n = 42) were interviewed independently as part of the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi Project from May 2010 - April 2011. The Berlin questionnaire was used to measure a high risk of OSA defined as the presence of at least two of the following conditions: 1) snoring behaviors/witnessed apneas, 2) daytime sleepiness, and 3) hypertension or obesity. Patient-proxy agreement was assessed using a kappa coefficient. Results Forty-three percent of patients self-identified as high risk for sleep apnea, and 45% of proxies identified patients as high risk. Patient-proxy agreement for high risk of pre-stroke OSA was fair (kappa = 0.28) with better agreement for spouses and children proxies (kappa = 0.38) than for other family members. Agreement was also fair for most individual questions. Conclusions Spouse and child proxy use of the Berlin questionnaire may be an option to assess a patient's pre-stroke likelihood of sleep apnea. Whereas prospective studies of incident stroke in patients with and without objectively confirmed sleep apnea would require formidable resources, the present results suggest that an alternative strategy may involve proxy use of the Berlin in a retrospective study design. PMID:24238964

  13. Oncogenic Intra-p53 Family Member Interactions in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ferraiuolo, Maria; Di Agostino, Silvia; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    The p53 gene family members p53, p73, and p63 display several isoforms derived from the presence of internal promoters and alternative splicing events. They are structural homologs but hold peculiar functional properties. p53, p73, and p63 are tumor suppressor genes that promote differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis. p53, unlike p73 and p63, is frequently mutated in cancer often displaying oncogenic “gain of function” activities correlated with the induction of proliferation, invasion, chemoresistance, and genomic instability in cancer cells. These oncogenic functions are promoted either by the aberrant transcriptional cooperation of mutant p53 (mutp53) with transcription cofactors (e.g., NF-Y, E2F1, Vitamin D Receptor, Ets-1, NF-kB and YAP) or by the interaction with the p53 family members, p73 and p63, determining their functional inactivation. The instauration of these aberrant transcriptional networks leads to increased cell growth, low activation of DNA damage response pathways (DNA damage response and DNA double-strand breaks response), enhanced invasion, and high chemoresistance to different conventional chemotherapeutic treatments. Several studies have clearly shown that different cancers harboring mutant p53 proteins exhibit a poor prognosis when compared to those carrying wild-type p53 (wt-p53) protein. The interference of mutantp53/p73 and/or mutantp53/p63 interactions, thereby restoring p53, p73, and p63 tumor suppression functions, could be among the potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of mutant p53 human cancers. PMID:27066457

  14. Characterization of three novel members of the Arabidopsis SHAGGY-related protein kinase (ASK) multigene family.

    PubMed

    Dornelas, M C; Wittich, P; von Recklinghausen, I; van Lammeren, A; Kreis, M

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we report the characterization of three novel members of the Arabidopsis shaggy-related protein kinase (ASK) multigene family, named ASKdzeta (ASKzeta), ASKetha (ASKeta) and ASKiota (ASKiota). The proteins encoded by the ASK genes share a highly conserved catalytic protein kinase domain and show about 70% identity to SHAGGY (SGG) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) from Drosophila and rat respectively. SGG is an ubiquitous intracellular component of the wingless signalling pathway that establishes cell fate and/or pattern formation in Drosophila. At least ten different ASK genes are expected to be present per haploid genome of A. thaliana. Different amino- and carboxy-terminal extensions distinguish different ASK family members. Five ASK gene sequences were analysed and shown to be present as single-copy genes in the Arabidopsis genome. A comparison based on the highly conserved catalytic domain sequences of all known sequences of the GSK-3 subfamily of protein kinases demonstrated a clear distinction between the plant and the animal kinases. Furthermore, we established the presence of at least three distinct groups of plant homologues of SGG/GSK-3. These different groups probably reflect biochemical and/or biological properties of these kinases. The differential expression patterns of five ASK genes were accessed by northern and in situ hybridization experiments using gene-specific probes. While ASKzeta is expressed in the whole embryo during its development, ASKeta expression is limited to the suspensor cells. No signal was detected for ASKalpha, ASKgamma and ASKiota in developing embryos. PMID:10080716

  15. Differential Inhibition of Signal Peptide Peptidase Family Members by Established γ-Secretase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Yong; Ladd, Gabriela Z.; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Jung, Joo In; Greenbaum, Doron; Felsenstein, Kevin M.; Golde, Todd E.

    2015-01-01

    The signal peptide peptidases (SPPs) are biomedically important proteases implicated as therapeutic targets for hepatitis C (human SPP, (hSPP)), plasmodium (Plasmodium SPP (pSPP)), and B-cell immunomodulation and neoplasia (signal peptide peptidase like 2a, (SPPL2a)). To date, no drug-like, selective inhibitors have been reported. We use a recombinant substrate based on the amino-terminus of BRI2 fused to amyloid β 1-25 (Aβ1-25) (FBA) to develop facile, cost-effective SPP/SPPL protease assays. Co-transfection of expression plasmids expressing the FBA substrate with SPP/SPPLs were conducted to evaluate cleavage, which was monitored by ELISA, Western Blot and immunoprecipitation/MALDI-TOF Mass spectrometry (IP/MS). No cleavage is detected in the absence of SPP/SPPL overexpression. Multiple γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) and (Z-LL)2 ketone differentially inhibited SPP/SPPL activity; for example, IC50 of LY-411,575 varied from 51±79 nM (on SPPL2a) to 5499±122 nM (on SPPL2b), while Compound E showed inhibition only on hSPP with IC50 of 1465±93 nM. Data generated were predictive of effects observed for endogenous SPPL2a cleavage of CD74 in a murine B-Cell line. Thus, it is possible to differentially inhibit SPP family members. These SPP/SPPL cleavage assays will expedite the search for selective inhibitors. The data also reinforce similarities between SPP family member cleavage and cleavage catalyzed by γ-secretase. PMID:26046535

  16. Direct Observation of Treatment Provided by a Family Member as Compared to Non-Family Member among Children with New Tuberculosis: A Pragmatic, Non-Inferiority, Cluster-Randomized Trial in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Bhavesh B.; Pujara, Kirit R.; Patel, Pradip; Mehariya, Keshabhai; Rade, Kiran Vaman; Shekar, Soma; Sachdeva, Kuldeep S.; Oeltmann, John E.; Kumar, Ajay M. V.

    2016-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends direct observation of treatment (DOT) to support patients with tuberculosis (TB) and to ensure treatment completion. As per national programme guidelines in India, a DOT provider can be anyone who is acceptable and accessible to the patient and accountable to the health system, except a family member. This poses challenges among children with TB who may be more comfortable receiving medicines from their parents or family members than from unfamiliar DOT providers. We conducted a non-inferiority trial to assess the effect of family DOT on treatment success rates among children with newly diagnosed TB registered for treatment during June–September 2012. Methods We randomly assigned all districts (n = 30) in Gujarat to the intervention (n = 15) or usual-practice group (n = 15). Adult family members in the intervention districts were given the choice to become their child’s DOT provider. DOT was provided by a non-family member in the usual-practice districts. Using routinely collected clinic-based TB treatment cards, we compared treatment success rates (cured and treatment completed) between the two groups and the non-inferiority limit was kept at 5%. Results Of 624 children with newly diagnosed TB, 359 (58%) were from intervention districts and 265 (42%) were from usual-practice districts. The two groups were similar with respect to baseline characteristics including age, sex, type of TB, and initial body weight. The treatment success rates were 344 (95.8%) and 247 (93.2%) (p = 0.11) among the intervention and usual-practice groups respectively. Conclusion DOT provided by a family member is not inferior to DOT provided by a non-family member among new TB cases in children and can attain international targets for treatment success. Trial Registration Clinical Trials Registry–India, National Institute of Medical Statistics (Indian Council of Medical Research) CTRI/2015/09/006229 PMID:26849442

  17. Improved method for distinguishing the human source of mosquito blood meals between close family members.

    PubMed

    Ansell, J; Hu, J T; Gilbert, S C; Hamilton, K A; Hill, A V; Lindsay, S W

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a simple and relatively cheap method to distinguish the origin of mosquito blood meals between close family members, effective for both laboratory and field samples. Each blood meal was squashed on to filter paper and eluted overnight with 0.5 mL phosphate-buffered saline. Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was extracted using a chemical matrix (Insta-gene) which bound to everything from the blood meal except DNA, which remained in the supernatant. Following extractions, reference DNA samples taken directly from finger-prick blood of human subjects and those from blood meals of unknown origin were amplified with human microsatellite markers using a thermal cycler. Polymerase chain reaction products were then run on an ABI gel (Automated Biosystems) to obtain a genotype for each sample. The DNA from each mosquito blood meal was then matched to an individual host. With laboratory samples, human DNA which had been extracted from mosquito blood meals up to 12 h after feeding could be used. One important application of this method will be to identify which members of a community are most at risk from vector-borne diseases. It also has numerous potential applications in studies of insect biting behaviour in both human and veterinary science. PMID:11132392

  18. A nonpyrrolysine member of the widely distributed trimethylamine methyltransferase family is a glycine betaine methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ticak, Tomislav; Kountz, Duncan J.; Girosky, Kimberly E.; Krzycki, Joseph A.; Ferguson, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    COG5598 comprises a large number of proteins related to MttB, the trimethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase. MttB has a genetically encoded pyrrolysine residue proposed essential for catalysis. MttB is the only known trimethylamine methyltransferase, yet the great majority of members of COG5598 lack pyrrolysine, leaving the activity of these proteins an open question. Here, we describe the function of one of the nonpyrrolysine members of this large protein family. Three nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs are encoded in Desulfitobacterium hafniense, a Gram-positive strict anaerobe present in both the environment and human intestine. D. hafniense was found capable of growth on glycine betaine with electron acceptors such as nitrate or fumarate, producing dimethylglycine and CO2 as products. Examination of the genome revealed genes for tetrahydrofolate-linked oxidation of a methyl group originating from a methylated corrinoid protein, but no obvious means to carry out corrinoid methylation with glycine betaine. DSY3156, encoding one of the nonpyrrolysine MttB homologs, was up-regulated during growth on glycine betaine. The recombinant DSY3156 protein converts glycine betaine and cob(I)alamin to dimethylglycine and methylcobalamin. To our knowledge, DSY3156 is the first glycine betaine:corrinoid methyltransferase described, and a designation of MtgB is proposed. In addition, DSY3157, an adjacently encoded protein, was shown to be a methylcobalamin:tetrahydrofolate methyltransferase and is designated MtgA. Homologs of MtgB are widely distributed, especially in marine bacterioplankton and nitrogen-fixing plant symbionts. They are also found in multiple members of the human microbiome, and may play a beneficial role in trimethylamine homeostasis, which in recent years has been directly tied to human cardiovascular health. PMID:25313086

  19. Cloning and functional characterization of HDAC11, a novel member of the human histone deacetylase family.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Cueto, Maria A; Asselbergs, Fred; Atadja, Peter

    2002-07-12

    We have cloned and characterized a human cDNA that belongs to the histone deacetylase family, which we designate as HDAC11. The predicted HDAC11 amino acid sequence reveals an open reading frame of 347 residues with a corresponding molecular mass of 39 kDa. Sequence analyses of the putative HDAC11 protein indicate that it contains conserved residues in the catalytic core regions shared by both class I and II mammalian HDAC enzymes. Putative orthologues of HDAC11 exist in primate, mouse, Drosophila, and plant. Epitope-tagged HDAC11 protein expressed in mammalian cells displays histone deacetylase activity in vitro. Furthermore, HDAC11's enzymatic activity is inhibited by trapoxin, a known histone deacetylase inhibitor. Multiple tissue Northern blot and real-time PCR experiments show that the high expression level of HDAC11 transcripts is limited to kidney, heart, brain, skeletal muscle, and testis. Epitope-tagged HDAC11 protein localizes predominantly to the cell nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that HDAC11 may be present in protein complexes that also contain HDAC6. These results indicate that HDAC11 is a novel and unique member of the histone deacetylase family and it may have distinct physiological roles from those of the known HDACs. PMID:11948178

  20. Primary characterization of a putative novel TBC1 domain family member 13 from Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhancheng; Du, Junzheng; Gao, Shandian; Yang, Jifei; Luo, Jin; Xing, Shanshan; Du, Xiaoyue; Liu, Guangyuan; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2016-06-15

    A putative novel TBC1 domain family member 13 (HqTBC1D13) from Haemaphysalis qinghaiensis was cloned using rapid amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE), the HqTBC1D13 cDNA is 1702bp in length and encodes 396 amino acid residues with predicted molecular weight of 46.09kDa. The TBC-domain containing protein has a catalytic 'arginine finger' analogous to those of Ras and Rho family GAPs, which is critical determinants of GAP activity. The amino acid sequences of TBC domain were evolutionarily highly conserved across species. The partial coding sequence of HqTBC1D13 with the predicted molecular weight of 37.2kDa was expressed and purified in the PGEX-4T-1 vector. Real-time RT PCR analysis showed that the HqTBC1D13 was extensively expressed in the tested organs (salivary glands, midguts, ovaries and cuticles), and its transcriptional levels in salivary glands were significantly up-regulate induced by blood-feeding. The recombinant HqTBC1D13 protein vaccination in the rabbit model resulted in the extension of the duration of feeding and the reduction of 37% female engorgement and 14.8% oviposition compared to the control group. These results indicated that the HqTBC1D13 in ticks could be invovled in the regulation of feeding and oviposition. PMID:27198770

  1. Paying family members to provide home care: an evaluation of one program.

    PubMed

    Vinton, L; Kim, Y S

    1996-01-01

    Paying family members for caregiving has received mixed reviews, but most agree that elders tend to prefer community to institutional living. This study describes an evaluation of a program that paid family caregivers to provide home care to elders from the perspective of care receivers (n = 151), caregivers (n = 211), and case managers (n = 71). The care recipients were primarily older, low-income individuals who were assessed to be at medium to high risk with respect to psychosocial functioning. Results indicated that caregiver subsidies were primarily used to pay for basic necessities, but few caregivers would cease caregiving in the absence of subsidies. The vast majority of care receivers and caregivers were very satisfied with case management services, and 42% of the care receivers named their case manager when asked whom they would contact if they had a problem with their caregiver. Case managers stressed the importance of formal care providers making home visits and referrals to other resources in order to lessen isolation and prevent institutionalization. PMID:9257624

  2. Phenotypic Variation Among Seven Members of One Family with Deficiency of Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Augé, Franck; Fu, Rong; Olivier-Bandini, Anne; Cahu, Julie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Aral, Bernard; de Martinville, Bérengère; Lecain, Jean-Paul; Jinnah, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a family of seven boys affected by Lesch-Nyhan disease with various phenotypes. Further investigations revealed a mutation c.203T>C in the gene encoding HGprt of all members, with substitution of leucine to proline at residue 68 (p.Leu68Pro). Thus patients from this family display a wide variety of symptoms although sharing the same mutation. Mutant HGprt enzyme was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of the enzyme revealed that the catalytic activity of the mutant was reduced, in association with marked reductions in the affinity towards phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Its Km for PRPP was increased 215-fold with hypoxanthine as substrate and 40-fold with guanine as substrate with associated reduced catalytic potential. Molecular modeling confirmed that the most prominent defect was the dramatically reduced affinity towards PRPP. Our studies suggest that the p.Leu68Pro mutation has a strong impact on PRPP binding and on stability of the active conformation. This suggests that factors other than HGprt activity per se may influence the phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan patients. PMID:24075303

  3. Phenotypic variation among seven members of one family with deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ceballos-Picot, Irène; Augé, Franck; Fu, Rong; Olivier-Bandini, Anne; Cahu, Julie; Chabrol, Brigitte; Aral, Bernard; de Martinville, Bérengère; Lecain, Jean-Paul; Jinnah, H A

    2013-11-01

    We describe a family of seven boys affected by Lesch-Nyhan disease with various phenotypes. Further investigations revealed a mutation c.203T>C in the gene encoding HGprt of all members, with substitution of leucine to proline at residue 68 (p.Leu68Pro). Thus patients from this family display a wide variety of symptoms although sharing the same mutation. Mutant HGprt enzyme was prepared by site-directed mutagenesis and the kinetics of the enzyme revealed that the catalytic activity of the mutant was reduced, in association with marked reductions in the affinity towards phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP). Its Km for PRPP was increased 215-fold with hypoxanthine as substrate and 40-fold with guanine as substrate with associated reduced catalytic potential. Molecular modeling confirmed that the most prominent defect was the dramatically reduced affinity towards PRPP. Our studies suggest that the p.Leu68Pro mutation has a strong impact on PRPP binding and on stability of the active conformation. This suggests that factors other than HGprt activity per se may influence the phenotype of Lesch-Nyhan patients. PMID:24075303

  4. Exploring the nature of interprofessional collaboration and family member involvement in an intensive care context.

    PubMed

    Paradis, Elise; Reeves, Scott; Leslie, Myles; Aboumatar, Hanan; Chesluk, Ben; Clark, Philip; Courtenay, Molly; Franck, Linda; Lamb, Gerri; Lyndon, Audrey; Mesman, Jessica; Puntillo, Kathleen; Schmitt, Mattie; van Soeren, Mary; Wachter, Bob; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Gropper, Michael; Kitto, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of interprofessional collaboration on intensive care units (ICUs), despite its recognition as a key component of patient safety and quality improvement initiatives. This comparative ethnographic study addresses this gap in knowledge and explores the different factors that influence collaborative work in the ICU. It aims to develop an empirically grounded team diagnostic tool, and associated interventions to strengthen team-based care and patient family involvement. This iterative study is comprised of three phases: a scoping review, a multi-site ethnographic study in eight ICUs over 2 years; and the development of a diagnostic tool and associated interprofessional intervention-development. This study's multi-site design and the richness and breadth of its data maximize its potential to improve clinical outcomes through an enhanced understanding of interprofessional dynamics and how patient family members in ICU settings are best included in care processes. Our research dissemination strategy, as well as the diagnostic tool and associated educational interventions developed from this study will help transfer the study's findings to other settings. PMID:23672585

  5. Cloning and characterization of two members of the vertebrate Dlx gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, A; Acampora, D; Pannese, M; D'Esposito, M; Stornaiuolo, A; Gulisano, M; Mallamaci, A; Kastury, K; Druck, T; Huebner, K

    1994-01-01

    A number of vertebrate genes of the Dlx gene family have been cloned in mouse, frog, and zebrafish. These genes contain a homeobox related to that of Distalless, a gene expressed in the developing head and limbs of Drosophila embryos. We cloned and studied the expression of two members of this family, which we named Dlx5 and Dlx6, in human and mouse. The two human genes, DLX5 and DLX6, are closely linked in an inverted convergent configuration in a region of chromosome 7, at 7q22. Similarly, the two human genes DLX1 and DLX2 are closely linked in a convergent configuration at 2q32, near the HOXD (previously HOX4) locus. In situ hybridization experiments in mouse embryos revealed expression of Dlx5 and Dlx6 mRNA in restricted regions of ventral diencephalon and basal telencephalon, with a distribution very similar to that reported for Dlx1 and Dlx2 mRNA. A surprising feature of Dlx5 and Dlx6 is that they are also expressed in all skeletal structures of midgestation embryos after the first cartilage formation. The expression pattern of these genes, together with their chromosome localization, may provide useful cues for the study of congenital disorders in which there is a combination of craniofacial and limb defects. Images PMID:7907794

  6. Erythrocyte remodeling in Plasmodium berghei infection: the contribution of SEP family members.

    PubMed

    Currà, Chiara; Pace, Tomasino; Franke-Fayard, Blandine M D; Picci, Leonardo; Bertuccini, Lucia; Ponzi, Marta

    2012-03-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium largely modifies the infected erythrocyte through the export of proteins to multiple sites within the host cell. This remodeling is crucial for pathology and translocation of virulence factors to the erythrocyte surface. In this study, we investigated localization and export of small exported proteins/early transcribed membrane proteins (SEP/ETRAMPs), conserved within Plasmodium genus. This protein family is characterized by a predicted signal peptide, a short lysine-rich stretch, an internal transmembrane domain and a highly charged C-terminal region of variable length. We show here that members of the rodent Plasmodium berghei family are components of the parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), which surrounds the parasite throughout the erythrocytic cycle. During P. berghei development, vesicle-like structures containing these proteins detach from the PVM en route to the host cytosol. These SEP-containing vesicles remain associated with the infected erythrocyte ghosts most probably anchored to the membrane skeleton. Transgenic lines expressing the green fluorescent protein appended to different portions of sep-coding region allowed us to define motifs required for protein export. The highly charged terminal region appears to be involved in protein-protein interactions. PMID:22106924

  7. Human cysteine-proteinase inhibitors: nucleotide sequence analysis of three members of the cystatin gene family.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, E; Kim, H S; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    1987-01-01

    Three genes from the human cystatin gene family of cysteine-proteinase inhibitors have been isolated from a bacteriophage lambda library containing HindIII digests of human genomic DNA. Two of the genes code for salivary cystatin SN and SA, the third is a pseudogene. The cloned genes were identified with a probe made from a salivary cystatin cDNA. The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene that codes for the precursor form of the neutral salivary protein, cystatin SN, was determined. The gene, which we name CST1, contains three exons and two intervening sequences. The expected CAT and ATA boxes are present in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. Partial nucleotide sequence determination of a second gene revealed that it codes for the precursor form of the acidic salivary protein, cystatin SA. This gene, which we name CST2, has the same gene organization as CST1. The complete nucleotide sequence of a third gene was determined. It does not contain a typical ATA box, and in addition, a premature stop codon and a frameshift deletion mutation occur within the gene. These inactivation mutations show that this gene, which we name CSTP1, is a cystatin pseudogene. These data combined with our genomic Southern-blot analyses show that the cystatin genes form a multigene family with at least seven members. PMID:3446578

  8. Cloning and analysis of DnaJ family members in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinü; Bu, Cuiyu; Li, Tiantian; Wang, Shibao; Jiang, Feng; Yi, Yongzhu; Yang, Huipeng; Zhang, Zhifang

    2016-01-15

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are involved in a variety of critical biological functions, including protein folding, degradation, and translocation and macromolecule assembly, act as molecular chaperones during periods of stress by binding to other proteins. Using expressed sequence tag (EST) and silkworm (Bombyx mori) transcriptome databases, we identified 27 cDNA sequences encoding the conserved J domain, which is found in DnaJ-type Hsps. Of the 27 J domain-containing sequences, 25 were complete cDNA sequences. We divided them into three types according to the number and presence of conserved domains. By analyzing the gene structures, intron numbers, and conserved domains and constructing a phylogenetic tree, we found that the DnaJ family had undergone convergent evolution, obtaining new domains to expand the diversity of its family members. The acquisition of the new DnaJ domains most likely occurred prior to the evolutionary divergence of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The expression of DnaJ genes in the silkworm was generally higher in the fat body. The tissue distribution of DnaJ1 proteins was detected by western blotting, demonstrating that in the fifth-instar larvae, the DnaJ1 proteins were expressed at their highest levels in hemocytes, followed by the fat body and head. We also found that the DnaJ1 transcripts were likely differentially translated in different tissues. Using immunofluorescence cytochemistry, we revealed that in the blood cells, DnaJ1 was mainly localized in the cytoplasm. PMID:26434795

  9. BCL2DB: database of BCL-2 family members and BH3-only proteins.

    PubMed

    Rech de Laval, Valentine; Deléage, Gilbert; Aouacheria, Abdel; Combet, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    BCL2DB (http://bcl2db.ibcp.fr) is a database designed to integrate data on BCL-2 family members and BH3-only proteins. These proteins control the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and probably many other cellular processes as well. This large protein group is formed by a family of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic homologs that have phylogenetic relationships with BCL-2, and by a collection of evolutionarily and structurally unrelated proteins characterized by the presence of a region of local sequence similarity with BCL-2, termed the BH3 motif. BCL2DB is monthly built, thanks to an automated procedure relying on a set of homemade profile HMMs computed from seed reference sequences representative of the various BCL-2 homologs and BH3-only proteins. The BCL2DB entries integrate data from the Ensembl, Ensembl Genomes, European Nucleotide Archive and Protein Data Bank databases and are enriched with specific information like protein classification into orthology groups and distribution of BH motifs along the sequences. The Web interface allows for easy browsing of the site and fast access to data, as well as sequence analysis with generic and specific tools. BCL2DB provides a helpful and powerful tool to both 'BCL-2-ologists' and researchers working in the various fields of physiopathology. Database URL: http://bcl2db.ibcp.fr. PMID:24608034

  10. Sinibacillus soli gen. nov., sp. nov., a moderately thermotolerant member of the family Bacillaceae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guiqin; Zhou, Shungui

    2014-05-01

    Two Gram-staining-positive, rod-shaped and endospore-forming bacteria that represent a single species, designated strains GD05T and GD051, were isolated from a tropical forest soil and a hot spring sediment, respectively. Cells of both strains were facultatively anaerobic, catalase- and oxidase-positive, and could grow optimally at 50 °C, pH 8.0 and with 1 % (w/v) NaCl. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that these two isolates belonged to the family Bacillaceae, but did not show sequence similarities of more than 95% to members of other related genera. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 43.7-44.1 mol%. The major cellular fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0, iso-C15:0, iso-C16:0 and anteiso-C17:0. The main polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol, and the major menaquinone was MK-7. The peptidoglycan type was A1γ (meso-diaminopimelic acid direct). On the basis of this polyphasic taxonomic analysis, the novel strains represent a novel species of a new genus in the family Bacillaceae, order Bacillales, for which the name Sinibacillus soli gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GD05T (=CCTCC AB 2013105T=KCTC 33117T). PMID:24510979

  11. [Disclosure of aids diagnosis to children from the family members' perspective].

    PubMed

    Schaurich, Diego

    2011-04-01

    This phenomenological study aimed at understanding how the care-giving family sees the disclosure of the AIDS diagnosis to the infected child, founded on the philosophy of Martin Buber. This study was performed at a teaching hospital in Porto Alegre, with seven family members of children with AIDS. Data collection was performed through phenomenological interviews and interpreted guided by hermeneutics. The dialogues for disclosing of the diagnosis to YOU child with AIDS show that this situation occurs in the experience lived by those caregivers and interferes in their existentiality, as it when they establish relationships with the other, in the world. The disclosing of the AIDS diagnosis to the child is a complex phenomenon that generates dialogues related to the everyday situations shared by the caregivers and the children. Further studies are needed on this theme that is constantly increasing in health services, which would take into consideration the dynamicity and singularity of the rumors taken by this epidemics in the Brazilian context. PMID:21655801

  12. Organic anion transporter (Slc22a) family members as mediators of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, Douglas H. . E-mail: sweetd@musc.edu

    2005-05-01

    Exposure of the body to toxic organic anions is unavoidable and occurs from both intentional and unintentional sources. Many hormones, neurotransmitters, and waste products of cellular metabolism, or their metabolites, are organic anions. The same is true for a wide variety of medications, herbicides, pesticides, plant and animal toxins, and industrial chemicals and solvents. Rapid and efficient elimination of these substances is often the body's best defense for limiting both systemic exposure and the duration of their pharmacological or toxicological effects. For organic anions, active transepithelial transport across the renal proximal tubule followed by elimination via the urine is a major pathway in this detoxification process. Accordingly, a large number of organic anion transport proteins belonging to several different gene families have been identified and found to be expressed in the proximal nephron. The function of these transporters, in combination with the high volume of renal blood flow, predisposes the kidney to increased toxic susceptibility. Understanding how the kidney mediates the transport of organic anions is integral to achieving desired therapeutic outcomes in response to drug interactions and chemical exposures, to understanding the progression of some disease states, and to predicting the influence of genetic variation upon these processes. This review will focus on the organic anion transporter (OAT) family and discuss the known members, their mechanisms of action, subcellular localization, and current evidence implicating their function as a determinant of the toxicity of certain endogenous and xenobiotic agents.

  13. Plant, Animal, and Fungal Micronutrient Queuosine Is Salvaged by Members of the DUF2419 Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Queuosine (Q) is a modification found at the wobble position of tRNAs with GUN anticodons. Although Q is present in most eukaryotes and bacteria, only bacteria can synthesize Q de novo. Eukaryotes acquire queuine (q), the free base of Q, from diet and/or microflora, making q an important but under-recognized micronutrient for plants, animals, and fungi. Eukaryotic type tRNA-guanine transglycosylases (eTGTs) are composed of a catalytic subunit (QTRT1) and a homologous accessory subunit (QTRTD1) forming a complex that catalyzes q insertion into target tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of eTGT subunits revealed a patchy distribution pattern in which gene losses occurred independently in different clades. Searches for genes co-distributing with eTGT family members identified DUF2419 as a potential Q salvage protein family. This prediction was experimentally validated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe by confirming that Q was present by analyzing tRNAAsp with anticodon GUC purified from wild-type cells and by showing that Q was absent from strains carrying deletions in the QTRT1 or DUF2419 encoding genes. DUF2419 proteins occur in most Eukarya with a few possible cases of horizontal gene transfer to bacteria. The universality of the DUF2419 function was confirmed by complementing the S. pombe mutant with the Zea mays (maize), human, and Sphaerobacter thermophilus homologues. The enzymatic function of this family is yet to be determined, but structural similarity with DNA glycosidases suggests a ribonucleoside hydrolase activity. PMID:24911101

  14. Plant, animal, and fungal micronutrient queuosine is salvaged by members of the DUF2419 protein family.

    PubMed

    Zallot, Rémi; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Gaston, Kirk W; Forouhar, Farhad; Limbach, Patrick A; Hunt, John F; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2014-08-15

    Queuosine (Q) is a modification found at the wobble position of tRNAs with GUN anticodons. Although Q is present in most eukaryotes and bacteria, only bacteria can synthesize Q de novo. Eukaryotes acquire queuine (q), the free base of Q, from diet and/or microflora, making q an important but under-recognized micronutrient for plants, animals, and fungi. Eukaryotic type tRNA-guanine transglycosylases (eTGTs) are composed of a catalytic subunit (QTRT1) and a homologous accessory subunit (QTRTD1) forming a complex that catalyzes q insertion into target tRNAs. Phylogenetic analysis of eTGT subunits revealed a patchy distribution pattern in which gene losses occurred independently in different clades. Searches for genes co-distributing with eTGT family members identified DUF2419 as a potential Q salvage protein family. This prediction was experimentally validated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe by confirming that Q was present by analyzing tRNA(Asp) with anticodon GUC purified from wild-type cells and by showing that Q was absent from strains carrying deletions in the QTRT1 or DUF2419 encoding genes. DUF2419 proteins occur in most Eukarya with a few possible cases of horizontal gene transfer to bacteria. The universality of the DUF2419 function was confirmed by complementing the S. pombe mutant with the Zea mays (maize), human, and Sphaerobacter thermophilus homologues. The enzymatic function of this family is yet to be determined, but structural similarity with DNA glycosidases suggests a ribonucleoside hydrolase activity. PMID:24911101

  15. The experience of Chinese immigrant women in caring for a terminally ill family member in Australia.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Mary T; Koo, Fung Kuen; White, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese community, a heterogeneous, highly visible non-English speaking ethnic group in Australia, remains mostly hidden and underrepresented in palliative care service delivery along with participation in health research despite being the fastest growing such group in the country. There is a lack of Australian research information concerning the impact of migration on the caregiving experience of women carers within the Chinese cultural framework and the Australian palliative care context. This paper aims to explore the influence of Chinese cultural norms and immigration on the experience of immigrant women of Chinese ancestry caring for a terminally ill family member at home in Sydney. This study also seeks to identify factors that may present access barriers to palliative care support services. A qualitative approach was used in this study. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with five home-based Chinese women carers and were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings identified that the participants found being a carer is a lonely and isolating experience. Sources of isolation and loneliness included social isolation experienced as a solitary carer without meaningful family and social relationships; loss of familiar cultural understandings and family values; and emotional isolators expressed in response to the physical and emotional role commitment and other constraints. The study results suggest the need for palliative care educational programmes designed to help nurses to understand the impact of cultural background within the palliative care context. Results also indicate that health care professionals should provide culturally appropriate and competent palliative care services, sensitive to the diverse socio-cultural influences and individual needs of Chinese migrants. PMID:25632724

  16. Characterization of a novel β-L-arabinofuranosidase in Bifidobacterium longum: functional elucidation of a DUF1680 protein family member.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kiyotaka; Takashi, Yukari; Obuchi, Eriko; Kitahara, Kanefumi; Suganuma, Toshihiko

    2014-02-21

    Pfam DUF1680 (PF07944) is an uncharacterized protein family conserved in many species of bacteria, actinomycetes, fungi, and plants. Previously, we cloned and characterized the hypBA2 gene as a β-L-arabinobiosidase in Bifidobacterium longum JCM 1217. In this study, we cloned a DUF1680 family member, the hypBA1 gene, which constitutes a gene cluster with hypBA2. HypBA1 is a novel β-L-arabinofuranosidase that liberates L-arabinose from the L-arabinofuranose (Araf)-β1,2-Araf disaccharide. HypBA1 also transglycosylates 1-alkanols with retention of the anomeric configuration. Mutagenesis and azide rescue experiments indicated that Glu-338 is a critical residue for catalytic activity. This study provides the first characterization of a DUF1680 family member, which defines a new family of glycoside hydrolases, the glycoside hydrolase family 127. PMID:24385433

  17. TRIP13PCH-2 promotes Mad2 localization to unattached kinetochores in the spindle checkpoint response

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christian R.; Hwang, Tom; Chen, Pin-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The spindle checkpoint acts during cell division to prevent aneuploidy, a hallmark of cancer. During checkpoint activation, Mad1 recruits Mad2 to kinetochores to generate a signal that delays anaphase onset. Yet, whether additional factors contribute to Mad2’s kinetochore localization remains unclear. Here, we report that the conserved AAA+ ATPase TRIP13PCH-2 localizes to unattached kinetochores and is required for spindle checkpoint activation in Caenorhabditis elegans. pch-2 mutants effectively localized Mad1 to unattached kinetochores, but Mad2 recruitment was significantly reduced. Furthermore, we show that the C. elegans orthologue of the Mad2 inhibitor p31(comet)CMT-1 interacts with TRIP13PCH-2 and is required for its localization to unattached kinetochores. These factors also genetically interact, as loss of p31(comet)CMT-1 partially suppressed the requirement for TRIP13PCH-2 in Mad2 localization and spindle checkpoint signaling. These data support a model in which the ability of TRIP13PCH-2 to disassemble a p31(comet)/Mad2 complex, which has been well characterized in the context of checkpoint silencing, is also critical for spindle checkpoint activation. PMID:26527744

  18. Youth’s narratives about family members smoking: parenting the parent- it’s not fair!

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Successful cancer prevention policies and programming for youth must be based on a solid understanding of youth’s conceptualization of cancer and cancer prevention. Accordingly, a qualitative study examining youth’s perspectives of cancer and its prevention was undertaken. Not surprisingly, smoking (i.e., tobacco cigarette smoking) was one of the dominant lines of discourse in the youth’s narratives. This paper reports findings of how youth conceptualize smoking with attention to their perspectives on parental and family-related smoking issues and experiences. Methods Seventy-five Canadian youth ranging in age from 11–19 years participated in the study. Six of the 75 youth had a history of smoking and 29 had parents with a history of smoking. Youth were involved in traditional ethnographic methods of interviewing and photovoice. Data analysis involved multiple levels of analysis congruent with ethnography. Results Youth’s perspectives of parents and other family members’ cigarette smoking around them was salient as represented by the theme: It’s not fair. Youth struggled to make sense of why parents would smoke around their children and perceived their smoking as an unjust act. The theme was supported by four subthemes: 1) parenting the parent about the dangers of smoking; 2) the good/bad parent; 3) distancing family relationships; and 4) the prisoner. Instead of being talked to about smoking it was more common for youth to share stories of talking to their parents about the dangers of smoking. Parents who did not smoke were seen by youth as the good parent, as opposed to the bad parent who smoked. Smoking was an agent that altered relationships with parents and other family members. Youth who lived in homes where they were exposed to cigarette smoke felt like a trapped prisoner. Conclusions Further research is needed to investigate youth’s perceptions about parental cigarette smoking as well as possible linkages between youth exposed to second hand smoke in their home environment and emotional and lifestyle-related health difficulties. Results emphasize the relational impact of smoking when developing anti-tobacco and cancer prevention campaigns. Recognizing the potential toll that second-hand smoke can have on youth’s emotional well-being, health care professionals are encouraged to give youth positive messages in coping with their parents’ smoking behaviour. PMID:23140551

  19. Facebook as a tool for communication, collaboration, and informal knowledge exchange among members of a multisite family health team

    PubMed Central

    Lofters, Aisha K; Slater, Morgan B; Nicholas Angl, Emily; Leung, Fok-Han

    2016-01-01

    Objective To implement and evaluate a private Facebook group for members of a large Ontario multisite Family Health Team (FHT) to facilitate improved communication and collaboration. Design Program implementation and subsequent survey of team members. Setting A large multisite FHT in Toronto, Ontario. Participants Health professionals of the FHT. Main outcome measures Usage patterns and self-reported perceptions of the Facebook group by team members. Results At the time of the evaluation survey, the Facebook group had 43 members (37.4% of all FHT members). Activity in the group was never high, and posts by team members who were not among the researchers were infrequent throughout the study period. The content of posts fell into two broad categories: 1) information that might be useful to various team members and 2) questions posed by team members that others might be able to answer. Of the 26 team members (22.6%) who completed the evaluation survey, many reported that they never logged into the Facebook page (16 respondents), and never used it to communicate with team members outside of their own site of practice (19 respondents). Only six respondents reported no concerns with using Facebook as a professional communication tool; the most frequent concerns were regarding personal and patient privacy. Conclusion The use of social media by health care practitioners is becoming ubiquitous. However, the issues of privacy concerns and determining how to use social media without adding to provider workload must be addressed to make it a useful tool in health care. PMID:26869796

  20. Identification and characterization of a novel rat ov-serpin family member, trespin.

    PubMed

    Chipuk, Jerry E; Stewart, LaMonica V; Ranieri, Annalisa; Song, Kyung; Danielpour, David

    2002-07-19

    Serpins are responsible for regulating a variety of proteolytic processes through a unique irreversible suicide substrate mechanism. To discover novel genes regulated by transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta 1), we performed differential display reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis of NRP-152 rat prostatic epithelial cells and cloned a novel rat serpin that is transcriptionally down-regulated by TGF-beta and hence named trespin (TGF-beta-repressible serine proteinase inhibitor (trespin). Trespin is a 397-amino acid member of the ov-serpin clade with a calculated molecular mass of 45.2 kDa and 72% amino acid sequence homology to human bomapin; however, trespin exhibits different tissue expression, cellular localization, and proteinase specificity compared with bomapin. Trespin mRNA is expressed in many tissues, including brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, prostate, skin, spleen, and stomach. FLAG-trespin expressed in HEK293 cells is localized predominantly in the cytoplasm and is not constitutively secreted. The presence of an arginine at the P1 position of trespin's reactive site loop suggests that trespin inhibits trypsin-like proteinases. Accordingly, in vitro transcribed and translated trespin forms detergent-stable and thermostable complexes with plasmin and elastase but not subtilisin A, trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, or papain. Trespin interacts with plasmin at a near 1:1 stoichiometry, and immunopurified mammal-expressed trespin inhibits plasmin in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that trespin is a novel and functional member of the rat ov-serpin family. PMID:11986314

  1. A novel virus from Macrosiphum euphorbiae with similarities to members of the family Flaviviridae.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Marcella; Sela, Noa; Ng, James; Casteel, Clare L; Peng, Hsuan-Chieh; Bekal, Sadia; Girke, Thomas; Ghanim, Murad; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2016-05-01

    A virus with a large genome was identified in the transcriptome of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae) and was named Macrosiphum euphorbiae virus 1 (MeV-1). The MeV-1 genome is 22 780 nt in size, including 3' and 5' non-coding regions, with a single large ORF encoding a putative polyprotein of 7333 aa. The C-terminal region of the predicted MeV-1 polyprotein contained sequences with similarities to helicase, methyltransferase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) motifs, while the N-terminal region lacked any motifs including structural proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of the helicase placed MeV-1 close to pestiviruses, while the RdRp region placed it close to pestiviruses and flaviviruses, suggesting MeV-1 has a positive-polarity ssRNA genome and is a member of the family Flaviviridae. Since the MeV-1 genome is predicted to contain a methyltransferase, a gene present typically in flaviviruses but not pestiviruses, MeV-1 is likely a member of the genus Flavivirus. MeV-1 was present in nymphal and adult stages of the aphid, aphid saliva and plant tissues fed upon by aphids. However, the virus was unable to multiply and spread in tomato plants. In addition, dsRNA, the replication intermediate of RNA viruses, was isolated from virus-infected M. euphorbiae and not from tomato plants infested with the aphid. Furthermore, nymphs laid without exposure to infected plants harboured the virus, indicating that MeV-1 is an aphid-infecting virus likely transmitted transovarially. The virus was present in M. euphorbiae populations from Europe but not from North America and was absent in all other aphid species tested. PMID:26822322

  2. Which carers of family members at the end of life need more support from health services and why?

    PubMed

    McNamara, Beverley; Rosenwax, Lorna

    2010-04-01

    With end of life care a national priority in many countries, and the main place of care the family home, informal family carers are now considered the frontline of primary care. Yet we are insufficiently informed about the needs of carers, both during the time of caring and during bereavement. This study identifies which carers believed they did not get enough support from health services when caring for a terminally ill family member, what factors influenced perceptions of support, and whether inadequate support influenced the carer's health following the death of a family member. Unlike previous survey designs that explore end-of-life concerns, we were able to triangulate interview data from semi-structured telephone interviews (August 2005-June 2006) with a relatively large group of 1071 carers in Western Australia, with administrative records from death registrations, hospital morbidity and community care records from the 1071 deceased family members. The addition of administrative data allowed us to quantify hospital and community care service use. Data analysis consisted of summary statistics and logistic regressions for two groups of carers during the first few months of bereavement: those whose health got a bit/lot worse, and those who were not coping on most/all days. We found that carers were more likely to have poor health if they perceived they did not get enough support from health services and if the deceased family member did not die in the carer's preferred place of death. Additionally, carers were more likely to be not coping if they were aged 60 years or less, female, had lost a spouse/partner and the deceased family member did not die in the carer's preferred place. By identifying which carers are more vulnerable than others, carer education and practical support can be targeted to specific groups. Ideally resources for bereavement support should be extended into the months following the relative's death. PMID:20116158

  3. A new member of the cytokine receptor gene family maps on chromosome 21 at less than 35 kb from IFNAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lutfalla, G.; Uze, G.; Gardiner, K.

    1993-05-01

    A full-length cDNA corresponding to a gene mapping to the D21S58 locus was cloned. The encoded protein, called CRF2-4, was shown to be a typical class II member of the cytokine receptor family. The gene encoding CRF2-4 spans more than 30 kb. Its intron/exon structure was determined and shown to be conserved with all other members of the cytokine receptor family. The physical distance between the CRF2-4 gene and its IFNAR neighbor has been narrowed to less than 35 kb. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Complete sequence and genetic characterization of Raspberry latent virus, a novel member of the family Reoviridae.

    PubMed

    Quito-Avila, Diego F; Jelkmann, Wilhelm; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E; Keller, Karen; Martin, Robert R

    2011-02-01

    A new virus isolated from red raspberry plants and detected in the main production areas in northern Washington State, USA and British Columbia, Canada was fully sequenced and found to be a novel member of the family Reoviridae. The virus was designated as Raspberry latent virus (RpLV) based on the fact that it is symptomless when present in single infections in several Rubus virus indicators and commercial raspberry cultivars. RpLV genome is 26,128 nucleotides (nt) divided into 10 dsRNA segments. The length of the genomic segments (S) was similar to those of other reoviruses ranging from 3948 nt (S1) to 1141 nt (S10). All of the segments, except S8, have the conserved terminal sequences 5'-AGUU----GAAUAC-3'. A point mutation at each terminus of S8 resulted in the sequences 5'-AGUA----GAUUAC-3'. Inverted repeats adjacent to each conserved terminus as well as stem loops and extended pan handles were identified by analyses of secondary structures of the non-coding sequences. All segments, except S3 and S10, contained a single open reading frame (ORF) on the positive sense RNAs. Two out-of-frame overlapping ORFs were identified in segments S3 (ORF S3a and S3b) and S10 (ORF S10a and S10b). Amino acid (aa) alignments of the putative proteins encoded by the main ORF in each segment revealed a high identity to several proteins encoded by reoviruses from different genera including Oryzavirus, Cypovirus, and Dinovernavirus. Alignments of the polymerase, the most conserved protein among reoviruses, revealed a 36% aa identity between RpLV and Rice ragged stunt virus (RRSV), the type member of the genus Oryzavirus, indicating that these two viruses are closely related. Phylogenetic analyses showed that RpLV clusters with members of the genera Oryzavirus, Cypovirus, Dinovernavirus and Fijivirus. These genera belong to the subfamily Spinareovirinae which includes reoviruses with spiked core particles ('turreted' reoviruses). In addition, two nucleotide binding motifs, regarded as 'signature' sequences among turreted reoviruses, were also found in RpLV P8, suggesting that RpLV is a novel dicot-infecting reovirus in the subfamily Spinareovirinae. PMID:21144872

  5. The ts111 Mutation of Paramecium tetraurelia Affects a Member of the Protein Palmitoylation Family.

    PubMed

    Prajer, Małgorzata; Tarcz, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    The thermosensitive ts111 mutant of Parameciun tetraurelia carries a recessive mutation which causes cell death after 2-8 divisions at the restrictive temperature of 35 degrees C. Expression at 35 degrees C induces disassembly of the infraciliary lattice (ICL). In this study, we found that the ts111 mutation also results in significant abnormalities in the number and structure of contractile vacuole complexes (CVCs) and in their functioning at the restrictive temperature. In order to characterize the ts111 gene, the complementation cloning was performed by microinjection into the macronucleus of an indexed genomic DNA library. The mutation was complemented by a sequence of 852 bp, which differed from the mutant sequence by a single nucleotide substitution. The deduced protein sequence is 284 amino acids long. It contains a domain referred to as the DHHC domain, associated with 2 trans-membrane helices. The DHHC proteins belong to the Palmitoyl-Acyl Transferases (PATs) protein family, which is implicated in the protein palmitoylation process playing the role in protein addressing. The ts111 mutation induces the amino acid change, localized before the first membrane helix. Transformation of ts111 mutant cells with the TS111-GFP gene fusion showed the expected reparation restoring thermoresistance and also demonstrated a localization of the protein in contractile vacuoles, but not in the ICL. The entire gene silencing in wild type cells at restrictive temperature caused the same effect as the expression of a point mutation in ts111 mutant. The authors propose the following hypotheses: (i) function of CVCs at the restrictive temperature depends in Paramecium on the TS111 protein--a member of the PAT family, and the primary effect of the termosensitive ts111 mutation are morphological abnormalities and dysfunction of CVCs, (ii) disassembly of the ICL is a secondary effect of the ts111 mutation, which results from disturbed regulation of the intracellular concentration of Ca(+2) ions caused by the abnormal functioning of CVC. PMID:26462332

  6. Upolu virus and Aransas Bay virus, Two Presumptive Bunyaviruses, Are Novel Members of the Family Orthomyxoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhary, Rashmi; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia; Hutchison, Stephen K.; Popov, Vsevolod; Street, Craig; Tesh, Robert B.; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Emerging and zoonotic pathogens pose continuing threats to human health and ongoing challenges to diagnostics. As nucleic acid tests are playing increasingly prominent roles in diagnostics, the genetic characterization of molecularly uncharacterized agents is expected to significantly enhance detection and surveillance capabilities. We report the identification of two previously unrecognized members of the family Orthomyxoviridae, which includes the influenza viruses and the tick-transmitted Thogoto and Dhori viruses. We provide morphological, serologic, and genetic evidence that Upolu virus (UPOV) from Australia and Aransas Bay virus (ABV) from North America, both previously considered potential bunyaviruses based on electron microscopy and physicochemical features, are orthomyxoviruses instead. Their genomes show up to 68% nucleotide sequence identity to Thogoto virus (segment 2; ∼74% at the amino acid level) and a more distant relationship to Dhori virus, the two prototype viruses of the recognized species of the genus Thogotovirus. Despite sequence similarity, the coding potentials of UPOV and ABV differed from that of Thogoto virus, instead being like that of Dhori virus. Our findings suggest that the tick-transmitted viruses UPOV and ABV represent geographically distinct viruses in the genus Thogotovirus of the family Orthomyxoviridae that do not fit in the two currently recognized species of this genus. IMPORTANCE Upolu virus (UPOV) and Aransas Bay virus (ABV) are shown to be orthomyxoviruses instead of bunyaviruses, as previously thought. Genetic characterization and adequate classification of agents are paramount in this molecular age to devise appropriate surveillance and diagnostics. Although more closely related to Thogoto virus by sequence, UPOV and ABV differ in their coding potentials by lacking a proposed pathogenicity factor. In this respect, they are similar to Dhori virus, which, despite the lack of a pathogenicity factor, can cause disease. These findings enable further studies into the evolution and pathogenicity of orthomyxoviruses. PMID:24574415

  7. Members of the Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel Protein Family Demonstrate Glutaredoxin-Like Enzymatic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Al Khamici, Heba; Brown, Louise J.; Hossain, Khondker R.; Hudson, Amanda L.; Sinclair-Burton, Alxcia A.; Ng, Jane Phui Mun; Daniel, Elizabeth L.; Hare, Joanna E.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Davey, Mary W.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2015-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six evolutionarily conserved proteins in humans. Members of this family are unusual, existing as both monomeric soluble proteins and as integral membrane proteins where they function as chloride selective ion channels, however no function has previously been assigned to their soluble form. Structural studies have shown that in the soluble form, CLIC proteins adopt a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fold, however, they have an active site with a conserved glutaredoxin monothiol motif, similar to the omega class GSTs. We demonstrate that CLIC proteins have glutaredoxin-like glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymatic activity. CLICs 1, 2 and 4 demonstrate typical glutaredoxin-like activity using 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide as a substrate. Mutagenesis experiments identify cysteine 24 as the catalytic cysteine residue in CLIC1, which is consistent with its structure. CLIC1 was shown to reduce sodium selenite and dehydroascorbate in a glutathione-dependent manner. Previous electrophysiological studies have shown that the drugs IAA-94 and A9C specifically block CLIC channel activity. These same compounds inhibit CLIC1 oxidoreductase activity. This work for the first time assigns a functional activity to the soluble form of the CLIC proteins. Our results demonstrate that the soluble form of the CLIC proteins has an enzymatic activity that is distinct from the channel activity of their integral membrane form. This CLIC enzymatic activity may be important for protecting the intracellular environment against oxidation. It is also likely that this enzymatic activity regulates the CLIC ion channel function. PMID:25581026

  8. Identification and Characterization of Genetically Divergent Members of the Newly Established Family Mesoniviridae

    PubMed Central

    Zirkel, Florian; Roth, Hanna; Kurth, Andreas; Drosten, Christian; Ziebuhr, John

    2013-01-01

    The recently established family Mesoniviridae (order Nidovirales) contains a single species represented by two closely related viruses, Cavally virus (CavV) and Nam Dinh virus (NDiV), which were isolated from mosquitoes collected in Côte d'Ivoire and Vietnam, respectively. They represent the first nidoviruses to be discovered in insects. Here, we report the molecular characterization of four novel mesoniviruses, Hana virus, Méno virus, Nsé virus, and Moumo virus, all of which were identified in a geographical region in Côte d'Ivoire with high CavV prevalence. The viruses were found with prevalences between 0.5 and 2.8%, and genome sequence analyses and phylogenetic studies suggest that they represent at least three novel species. Electron microscopy revealed prominent club-shaped surface projections protruding from spherical, enveloped virions of about 120 nm. Northern blot data show that the four mesoniviruses analyzed in this study produce two major 3′-coterminal subgenomic mRNAs containing two types of 5′ leader sequences resulting from the use of different pairs of leader and body transcription-regulating sequences that are conserved among mesoniviruses. Protein sequencing, mass spectroscopy, and Western blot data show that mesonivirus particles contain eight major structural protein species, including the putative nucleocapsid protein (25 kDa), differentially glycosylated forms of the putative membrane protein (20, 19, 18, and 17 kDa), and the putative spike (S) protein (77 kDa), which is proteolytically cleaved at a conserved site to produce S protein subunits of 23 and 57 kDa. The data provide fundamental new insight into common and distinguishing biological properties of members of this newly identified virus family. PMID:23536661

  9. A comparative study of nucleostemin family members in zebrafish reveals specific roles in ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Essers, Paul B; Pereboom, Tamara C; Goos, Yvonne J; Paridaen, Judith T; Macinnes, Alyson W

    2014-01-15

    Nucleostemin (NS) is an essential protein for the growth and viability of developmental stem cells. Its functions are multi-faceted, including important roles in ribosome biogenesis and in the p53-induced apoptosis pathway. While NS has been well studied, the functions of its family members GNL2 and GNL3-like (GNL3L) remain relatively obscure despite a high degree of sequence and domain homology. Here, we use zebrafish lines carrying mutations in the ns family to compare and contrast their functions in vertebrates. We find the loss of zebrafish ns or gnl2 has a major impact on 60S large ribosomal subunit formation and/or function due to cleavage impairments at distinct sites of pre-rRNA transcript. In both cases this leads to a reduction of total protein synthesis. In contrast, gnl3l loss shows relatively minor rRNA processing delays that ultimately have no appreciable effects on ribosome biogenesis or protein synthesis. However, the loss of gnl3l still results in p53 stabilization, apoptosis, and lethality similarly to ns and gnl2 loss. The depletion of p53 in all three of the mutants led to partial rescues of the morphological phenotypes and surprisingly, a rescue of the 60S subunit collapse in the ns mutants. We show that this rescue is due to an unexpected effect of p53 loss that even in wild type embryos results in an increase of 60S subunits. Our study presents an in-depth description of the mechanisms through which ns and gnl2 function in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and shows that despite the high degree of sequence and domain homology, gnl3l has critical functions in development that are unrelated to the ribosome. PMID:24211311

  10. Identification of four new members of the internalin multigene family of Listeria monocytogenes EGD.

    PubMed Central

    Dramsi, S; Dehoux, P; Lebrun, M; Goossens, P L; Cossart, P

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen that is able to invade nonphagocytic cells. Two surface proteins, internalin, the inlA gene product, and InlB, play important roles in the entry into cultured mammalian cells. These proteins also have extensive sequence similarities. Previously, Southern hybridization predicted the existence of an internalin multigene family. Recently, InlC, a secreted protein of 30 kDa homologous to InlA and InlB, was identified. In this work, we identified and characterized four new members of the internalin multigene family, inlC2, inlD, inlE, and inlF which encode proteins of 548, 567, 499, and 821 amino acids respectively. inlC2, inlD, and inlE are contiguous on the chromosome of L. monocytogenes EGD, whereas inlF is located in a different chromosomal region. These four inl gene products display the principal features of internalin, namely, a signal sequence, two regions of repeats (or LRR and B repeats), and a putative cell wall anchor sequence containing the sorting motif LPXTG. The four inl genes were maximally expressed albeit at a low level during early exponential growth in bacterial medium at 37 degrees C. The role of these inl genes in L. monocytogenes invasion was assessed by constructing isogenic chromosomal deletion mutants and testing them for entry into various nonphagocytic cells. Unexpectedly, the inlC2, inlD, inlE, and inlF null mutants were not affected for entry into any of the cell lines tested, raising the possibility that these genes are needed for an aspect of pathogenicity other than invasion. The identity of such an aspect remains to be determined. PMID:9125538

  11. Smoking Pattern in Family Members of Smokers in Slums of Surat City, Western India

    PubMed Central

    Gharat, Vaibhav; Nayak, Sunil; Bansal, Rajkumar

    2012-01-01

    Background The relationship between becoming a smoker and having smoker parents, siblings, and relatives is still uncovered in India. The influences of a smoking role model in a family on smoking habits of individuals are yet to be revealed. This study aimed to understand the relationship of smoking abuse of a person with smoking of their family members. Methods This community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in the slums of 20 urban health centers (UHCs) of Surat city (India). A pretested semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect data. The data was analyzed using Epi-Info software. Findings Among 281 smoker participants, 168 (59.8%), 55 (19.6%), 95 (33.8%), and 50 (17.8%) had smoking fathers, grandparents, siblings, and other relatives, respectively. While 131 participants (44.6%) had correct information about the law of banned smoking, 249 participants (88.6%) were in favor of this law. The association of smoking abuse in fathers with smoking abuse in siblings came out to be odds ratio (OR) = 3.75 (95% CI: 2.11-6.63) and grandparents to be odds ratio 16.43 (95% CI: 4.98-54.17), respectively. The association between education and following the law of banned smoking was statistically significant OR = 2.98 (95% CI: 1.43-6.00). Conclusion Substance abuse in parents, siblings, and other relatives is likely to influence the behavior of the person towards it. Persons living in the same vicinity may also greatly influence the behavior of an individual. PMID:24494146

  12. Comparative analysis of three hyperthermophilic GH1 and GH3 family members with industrial potential.

    PubMed

    Cota, Junio; Corrêa, Thamy L R; Damásio, André R L; Diogo, José A; Hoffmam, Zaira B; Garcia, Wanius; Oliveira, Leandro C; Prade, Rolf A; Squina, Fabio M

    2015-01-25

    Beta-glucosidases (BGLs) are enzymes of great potential for several industrial processes, since they catalyze the cleavage of glucosidic bonds in cellobiose and other short cellooligosaccharides. However, features such as good stability to temperature, pH, ions and chemicals are required characteristics for industrial applications. This work aimed to provide a comparative biochemical analysis of three thermostable BGLs from Pyrococcus furiosus and Thermotoga petrophila. The genes PfBgl1 (GH1 from P. furiosus), TpBgl1 (GH1 from T. petrophila) and TpBgl3 (GH3 from T. petrophila) were cloned and proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzymes are hyperthermophilic, showing highest activity at temperatures above 80°C at acidic (TpBgl3 and PfBgl1) and neutral (TpBgl1) pHs. The BGLs showed greatest stability to temperature mainly at pH 6.0. Activities using a set of different substrates suggested that TpBgl3 (GH3) is more specific than GH1 family members. In addition, the influence of six monosaccharides on BGL catalysis was assayed. While PfBgl1 and TpBgl3 seemed to be weakly inhibited by monosaccharides, TpBgl1 was activated, with xylose showing the strongest activation. Under the conditions tested, TpBgl1 showed the highest inhibition constant (Ki=1100.00mM) when compared with several BGLs previously characterized. The BGLs studied have potential for industrial use, specifically the enzymes belonging to the GH1 family, due to its broad substrate specificity and weak inhibition by glucose and other saccharides. PMID:25102284

  13. Biosynthesis of pyochelin and dihydroaeruginoic acid requires the iron-regulated pchDCBA operon in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    Serino, L; Reimmann, C; Visca, P; Beyeler, M; Chiesa, V D; Haas, D

    1997-01-01

    The high-affinity siderophore salicylate is an intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of pyochelin, another siderophore and chelator of transition metal ions, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The 2.5-kb region upstream of the salicylate biosynthetic genes pchBA was sequenced and found to contain two additional, contiguous genes, pchD and pchC, having the same orientation. The deduced amino acid sequence of the 60-kDa PchD protein was similar to those of the EntE protein (2,3-dihydroxybenzoate-AMP ligase) of Escherichia coli and other adenylate-forming enzymes, suggesting that salicylate might be adenylated at the carboxyl group by PchD. The 28-kDa PchC protein showed similarities to thioesterases of prokaryotic and eukaryotic origin and might participate in the release of the product(s) formed from activated salicylate. One potential product, dihydroaeruginoate (Dha), was identified in culture supernatants of iron-limited P. aeruginosa cells. The antifungal antibiotic Dha is thought to arise from the reaction of salicylate with cysteine, followed by cyclization of cysteine. Inactivation of the chromosomal pchD gene by insertion of the transcription and translation stop element omega Sm/Sp abolished the production of Dha and pyochelin, implying that PchD-mediated activation of salicylate may be a common first step in the synthesis of both metabolites. Furthermore, the pchD::omega Sm/Sp mutation had a strong polar effect on the expression of the pchBA genes, i.e., on salicylate synthesis, indicating that the pchDCBA genes constitute a transcriptional unit. A full-length pchDCBA transcript of ca. 4.4 kb could be detected in iron-deprived, growing cells of P. aeruginosa. Transcription of pchD started at tandemly arranged promoters, which overlapped with two Fur boxes (binding sites for the ferric uptake regulator) and the promoter of the divergently transcribed pchR gene encoding an activator of pyochelin biosynthesis. This promoter arrangement allows tight iron-mediated repression of the pchDCBA operon. PMID:8982005

  14. Identification of an essential Caulobacter crescentus gene encoding a member of the Obg family of GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Maddock, J; Bhatt, A; Koch, M; Skidmore, J

    1997-01-01

    We have identified an essential Caulobacter crescentus gene (cgtA) that encodes a member of a recently identified subfamily of GTPases (the Obg family) conserved from Bacteria to Archaea to humans. This evolutionary conservation between distantly related species suggests that this family of GTP-binding proteins possesses a fundamental, yet unknown, cellular role. In this report, we describe the isolation and sequence of the cgtA gene. The predicted CgtA protein displays striking similarity to the Obg family of small, monomeric GTP-binding proteins, both in the conserved guanine nucleotide-binding domains and throughout the N-terminal glycine-rich domain that is found in many members of the Obg family. Disruption of the cgtA gene was lethal, demonstrating that this gene is essential for cell growth. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CgtA protein levels remained constant throughout the C. crescentus cell cycle. PMID:9335292

  15. 41 CFR 303-70.403 - When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS... Members § 303-70.403 When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or...

  16. 41 CFR 303-70.403 - When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS... Members § 303-70.403 When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or...

  17. 41 CFR 303-70.403 - When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS... Members § 303-70.403 When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or...

  18. 41 CFR 303-70.403 - When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or from the employee's duty station outside CONUS... Members § 303-70.403 When a family member, residing with the employee, dies while in transit to or...

  19. Functional Specialization Among Members Of Knickkopf Family Of Proteins In Insect Cuticle Organization

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Sujata S.; Moussian, Bernard; Specht, Charles A.; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Kramer, Karl J.; Beeman, Richard W.; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2014-01-01

    Our recent study on the functional analysis of the Knickkopf protein from T. castaneum (TcKnk), indicated a novel role for this protein in protection of chitin from degradation by chitinases. Knk is also required for the laminar organization of chitin in the procuticle. During a bioinformatics search using this protein sequence as the query, we discovered the existence of a small family of three Knk-like genes (including the prototypical TcKnk) in the T. castaneum genome as well as in all insects with completed genome assemblies. The two additional Knk-like genes have been named TcKnk2 and TcKnk3. Further complexity arises as a result of alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation of transcripts of TcKnk3, leading to the production of three transcripts (and by inference, three proteins) from this gene. These transcripts are named TcKnk3-Full Length (TcKnk3-FL), TcKnk3-5′ and TcKnk3-3′. All three Knk-family genes appear to have essential and non-redundant functions. RNAi for TcKnk led to developmental arrest at every molt, while down-regulation of either TcKnk2 or one of the three TcKnk3 transcripts (TcKnk3-3′) resulted in specific molting arrest only at the pharate adult stage. All three Knk genes appear to influence the total chitin content at the pharate adult stage, but to variable extents. While TcKnk contributes mostly to the stability and laminar organization of chitin in the elytral and body wall procuticles, proteins encoded by TcKnk2 and TcKnk3-3′ transcripts appear to be required for the integrity of the body wall denticles and tracheal taenidia, but not the elytral and body wall procuticles. Thus, the three members of the Knk-family of proteins perform different essential functions in cuticle formation at different developmental stages and in different parts of the insect anatomy. PMID:25144557

  20. Contribution by Steinway Family Members to the Technical and Acoustical Capabilities of the Steinway Grand Piano.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geczy, Charles K.

    The development of the piano throughout its history has been the instrument-maker's constant struggle to meet the demands of the performing artist. Although all improvements were gradual and many individuals and family establishments contributed to its present technical and acoustical make -up, the Steinway history became unique in the world of piano-making. Its rise to world prominence in the industry was meteoric, its influence upon standards of technology and quality pervasive. Within a few decades, the Steinway Family emigrated to America, transformed piano technology, establishing the essential features we use today, assumed the leadership of American industry and returned to Europe to conquer. The following pages attempt to examine how the innate technical talent and industry of the founder, the inventiveness of his sons, all contributed in turn to the Steinway success. But particular attention will be paid to William who--in the course of the constant struggle between labor and capital--, reluctantly reconciled the Steinway interest with the basic in commerce became the standard of the industry. His brother, Theodore's ever -searching scientific mind, inventiveness and determination to produce the best piano possible, never disregarding acceptable empirical discoveries that could be utilized, opened up new possibilities in piano construction and acoustics. His capacity to utilize the research-results of other scientists enabled the company to incorporate the most up-to-date scientific methods into numerous patents that have been imitated all over the world but could never be successfully duplicated. This study describes the evolution of the piano in general and the Steinway Grand in particular throughout the ages as an indispensable tool of the performing artist. It gives a detailed account of the seemingly insurmountable crises that were successfully overcome while constantly improving its technical and acoustical quality to an unprecedented degree. But since 1972, for the first time in its history the company has been taken over by several financial interests and it faces new challenges from world competition with no Steinway family member in sight to continue the tradition.

  1. Functional specialization among members of Knickkopf family of proteins in insect cuticle organization.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Sujata S; Moussian, Bernard; Specht, Charles A; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2014-08-01

    Our recent study on the functional analysis of the Knickkopf protein from T. castaneum (TcKnk), indicated a novel role for this protein in protection of chitin from degradation by chitinases. Knk is also required for the laminar organization of chitin in the procuticle. During a bioinformatics search using this protein sequence as the query, we discovered the existence of a small family of three Knk-like genes (including the prototypical TcKnk) in the T. castaneum genome as well as in all insects with completed genome assemblies. The two additional Knk-like genes have been named TcKnk2 and TcKnk3. Further complexity arises as a result of alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation of transcripts of TcKnk3, leading to the production of three transcripts (and by inference, three proteins) from this gene. These transcripts are named TcKnk3-Full Length (TcKnk3-FL), TcKnk3-5' and TcKnk3-3'. All three Knk-family genes appear to have essential and non-redundant functions. RNAi for TcKnk led to developmental arrest at every molt, while down-regulation of either TcKnk2 or one of the three TcKnk3 transcripts (TcKnk3-3') resulted in specific molting arrest only at the pharate adult stage. All three Knk genes appear to influence the total chitin content at the pharate adult stage, but to variable extents. While TcKnk contributes mostly to the stability and laminar organization of chitin in the elytral and body wall procuticles, proteins encoded by TcKnk2 and TcKnk3-3' transcripts appear to be required for the integrity of the body wall denticles and tracheal taenidia, but not the elytral and body wall procuticles. Thus, the three members of the Knk-family of proteins perform different essential functions in cuticle formation at different developmental stages and in different parts of the insect anatomy. PMID:25144557

  2. Cohabiting family members share microbiota with one another and with their dogs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Se Jin; Lauber, Christian; Costello, Elizabeth K; Lozupone, Catherine A; Humphrey, Gregory; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Caporaso, J Gregory; Knights, Dan; Clemente, Jose C; Nakielny, Sara; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Fierer, Noah; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Human-associated microbial communities vary across individuals: possible contributing factors include (genetic) relatedness, diet, and age. However, our surroundings, including individuals with whom we interact, also likely shape our microbial communities. To quantify this microbial exchange, we surveyed fecal, oral, and skin microbiota from 60 families (spousal units with children, dogs, both, or neither). Household members, particularly couples, shared more of their microbiota than individuals from different households, with stronger effects of co-habitation on skin than oral or fecal microbiota. Dog ownership significantly increased the shared skin microbiota in cohabiting adults, and dog-owning adults shared more ‘skin’ microbiota with their own dogs than with other dogs. Although the degree to which these shared microbes have a true niche on the human body, vs transient detection after direct contact, is unknown, these results suggest that direct and frequent contact with our cohabitants may significantly shape the composition of our microbial communities. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00458.001 PMID:23599893

  3. A Novel Member of GH16 Family Derived from Sugarcane Soil Metagenome.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Liberato, Marcelo Vizoná; Cairo, João Paulo L Franco; Paixão, Douglas A A; Campos, Bruna M; Ferreira, Marcel R; Almeida, Rodrigo F; Pereira, Isabela O; Bernardes, Amanda; Ematsu, Gabriela C G; Chinaglia, Mariana; Polikarpov, Igor; de Oliveira Neto, Mario; Squina, Fabio Marcio

    2015-09-01

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) are enzymes found in all living kingdoms that are involved in multiple physiological functions. Due to their multiple enzymatic activities, GHs are broadly applied in bioethanol, food, and paper industry. In order to increase the productivity of these industrial processes, a constant search for novel and efficient enzymes has been proved to be necessary. In this context, metagenomics is a powerful approach to achieve this demand. In the current study, we describe the discovery and characterization of a novel member of GH16 family derived from the sugarcane soil metagenome. The enzyme, named SCLam, has 286 amino acid residues and displays sequence homology and activity properties that resemble known laminarases. SCLam is active against barley beta-glucan, laminarin, and lichenan (72, 33, and 10 U mg(-1), respectively). The optimal reaction conditions were identified as 40 °C and pH 6.5. The low-resolution structure was determined using the small-angle X-ray scattering technique, revealing that SCLam is a monomer in solution with a radius of gyration equal to 19.6 Å. To the best of our knowledge, SCLam is the first nonspecific (1,3/1,3:1,4)-β-D-glucan endohydrolase (EC 3.2.1.6) recovered by metagenomic approach to be characterized. PMID:26242386

  4. Structure and Cancer Immunotherapy of the B7 Family Member B7x

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyungjun; Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Garrett-Thomson, Sarah C.; Janakiram, Murali; Ramagopal, Udupi A.; Abadi, Yael M.; Lee, Jun Sik; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Ohaegbulam, Kim C; Chinai, Jordan M; Zhao, Ruihua; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying; Sparano, Joseph A.; Almo, Steven C.; Zang, Xingxing

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY B7x (B7-H4 or B7S1) is a member of the B7 family that can inhibit T cell function. B7x protein is absent in most normal human tissues and immune cells, but is overexpressed in human cancers and often correlates with negative clinical outcome. The expression pattern and function of B7x suggest that it may be a potent immunosuppressive pathway in human cancers. Here we determined the crystal structure of human B7x IgV domain at 1.59Å resolution and mapped the epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies. We developed a new in vivo system to screen therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against B7x, and found that the clone 1H3 significantly inhibited growth of B7x-expressing tumor in vivo via multiple mechanisms. Furthermore, the surviving mice given 1H3 treatment were resistant to tumor re-challenge. Our data suggest that targeting B7x on tumors is a promising cancer immunotherapy and humanized 1H3 may be efficacious for immunotherapy of human cancers. PMID:25437562

  5. Identification and functional characterization of a solute carrier family 15, member 4 gene in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-Gui; Yuan, Kai; Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Weng, Shao-Ping; Yue, Hai-Tao; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2016-04-01

    Innate immunity in shrimp is important in resisting bacterial infection. The NF-κB pathway is pivotal in such an immune response. This study cloned and functionally characterized the solute carrier family (SLC) 15 member A 4 (LvSLC15A4) gene in Litopenaeus vannamei. The open reading frame of LvSLC15A4 is 1, 902 bp long and encodes a putative 633-amino acid protein, which is localized in the plasma membrane and intracellular vesicular compartments. Results of the reporter gene assay showed that LvSLC15A4 upregulated NF-κB target genes, including the immediate-early gene 1 of white spot syndrome virus, as well as several antimicrobial peptide genes, such as pen4, CecA, AttA, and Mtk in S2 cells. Moreover, knocked-down expression of LvSLC15A4 reduced pen4 expression in L. vannamei. LvSLC15A4 down-regulation also increased the cumulative mortality of Vibrio parahemolyticus-infected L. vannamei. Furthermore, LvSLC15A4 expression was induced by unfolded protein response (UPR) in L. vannamei hematocytes. These results suggest that LvSLC15A4 participates in L. vannamei innate immunity via the NF-κB pathway and thus may be related to UPR. PMID:26691577

  6. Capillary gas chromatographic analysis of carbohydrates of Legionella pneumophila and other members of the family Legionellaceae.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, A; Lau, P Y; Brown, A; Morgan, S L; Zhu, Z T; Lema, M; Walla, M D

    1984-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires disease, and related organisms have previously been characterized primarily by conventional bacteriological methods, DNA-DNA hybridization, antigenic analysis, and fatty acid analysis. By capillary gas chromatographic analysis for carbohydrates, we have shown that muramic acid and glucosamine, characteristic markers of bacterial cell walls, were present in samples of L. pneumophila and a group of legionella-like organisms. Some bacterial samples contained two unusual isomeric aminodideoxyhexoses (X1 and X2). L. pneumophila was characterized by the absence of fucose and the presence of the peak X1. Tatlockia micdadei (Legionella micdadei) was distinguishable by the presence of large amounts of rhamnose and fucose and by the absence of X1 and X2. Fluoribacter strains were much more variable in their carbohydrate composition. These data suggest that, in addition to other reported techniques, carbohydrate profiling by capillary gas chromatography can be a valuable diagnostic method in reference microbiology laboratories for differentiating members of the family Legionellaceae. PMID:6715510

  7. Caspase cleavage of members of the amyloid precursor family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Veronica; Chen, Sylvia; Lu, Daniel; Logvinova, Anna; Goldsmith, Paul; Koo, Edward H; Bredesen, Dale E

    2002-07-01

    The synapse loss and neuronal cell death characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are believed to result in large part from the neurotoxic effects of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta), a 40-42 amino acid peptide(s) derived proteolytically from beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP). However, APP is also cleaved intracellularly to generate a second cytotoxic peptide, C31, and this cleavage event occurs in vivo as well as in vitro and preferentially in the brains of AD patients (Lu et al. 2000). Here we show that APPC31 is toxic to neurons in primary culture, and that like APP, the APP family members APLP1 and possibly APLP2 are cleaved by caspases at their C-termini. The carboxy-terminal peptide derived from caspase cleavage of APLP1 shows a degree of neurotoxicity comparable to APPC31. Our results suggest that even though APLP1 and APLP2 cannot generate Abeta, they may potentially contribute to the pathology of AD by generating peptide fragments whose toxicity is comparable to that of APPC31. PMID:12124429

  8. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hulle, Severine Van; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J; Schepper, Jean De

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  9. Structure and cancer immunotherapy of the B7 family member B7x.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyungjun; Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Garrett-Thomson, Sarah C; Janakiram, Murali; Ramagopal, Udupi A; Abadi, Yael M; Lee, Jun Sik; Scandiuzzi, Lisa; Ohaegbulam, Kim C; Chinai, Jordan M; Zhao, Ruihua; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying; Sparano, Joseph A; Almo, Steven C; Zang, Xingxing

    2014-11-01

    B7x (B7-H4 or B7S1) is a member of the B7 family that can inhibit T cell function. B7x protein is absent in most normal human tissues and immune cells, but it is overexpressed in human cancers and often correlates with negative clinical outcome. The expression pattern and function of B7x suggest that it may be a potent immunosuppressive pathway in human cancers. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the human B7x immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain at 1.59 resolution and mapped the epitopes recognized by monoclonal antibodies. We developed an in vivo system to screen therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against B7x and found that the clone 1H3 significantly inhibited growth of B7x-expressing tumors in vivo via multiple mechanisms. Furthermore, the surviving mice given 1H3 treatment were resistant to tumor rechallenge. Our data suggest that targeting B7x on tumors is a promising cancer immunotherapy and humanized 1H3 may be efficacious for immunotherapy of human cancers. PMID:25437562

  10. All members in the sphingomyelin synthase gene family have ceramide phosphoethanolamine synthase activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Tingbo; Kabir, Inamul; Li, Yue; Lou, Caixia; Yazdanyar, Amirfarbod; Xu, Jiachen; Dong, Jibin; Zhou, Hongwen; Park, Taesik; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase-related protein (SMSr) synthesizes the sphingomyelin analog ceramide phosphoethanolamine (CPE) in cells. Previous cell studies indicated that SMSr is involved in ceramide homeostasis and is crucial for cell function. To further examine SMSr function in vivo, we generated Smsr KO mice that were fertile and had no obvious phenotypic alterations. Quantitative MS analyses of plasma, liver, and macrophages from the KO mice revealed only marginal changes in CPE and ceramide as well as other sphingolipid levels. Because SMS2 also has CPE synthase activity, we prepared Smsr/Sms2 double KO mice. We found that CPE levels were not significantly changed in macrophages, suggesting that CPE levels are not exclusively dependent on SMSr and SMS2 activities. We then measured CPE levels in Sms1 KO mice and found that Sms1 deficiency also reduced plasma CPE levels. Importantly, we found that expression of Sms1 or Sms2 in SF9 insect cells significantly increased not only SM but also CPE formation, indicating that SMS1 also has CPE synthase activity. Moreover, we measured CPE synthase Km and Vmax for SMS1, SMS2, and SMSr using different NBD ceramides. Our study reveals that all mouse SMS family members (SMSr, SMS1, and SMS2) have CPE synthase activity. However, neither CPE nor SMSr appears to be a critical regulator of ceramide levels in vivo. PMID:25605874

  11. Characterization of an M28 metalloprotease family member residing in the yeast vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Karen A.; Wytiaz, Victoria A.; Ast, Tslil; Schuldiner, Maya; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    The systematic and complete characterization of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome and proteome has been stalled in some cases by misannotated genes. One such gene is YBR074W, which was initially annotated as two independent open reading frames (ORFs). We now report on Ybr074, a metalloprotease family member that was initially predicted to reside in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Ybr074 may be an ER quality control protease. Instead, indirect immunofluorescence images indicate that Ybr074 is a vacuolar protein, and by employing protease protection assays, we demonstrate that a conserved M28 metalloprotease domain is oriented within the lumen. Involvement of Ybr074 in ER protein quality control was ruled out by examining the stabilities of several well-characterized substrates in strains lacking Ybr074. Finally, using a proteomic approach, we show that disrupting Ybr074 function affects the levels of select factors implicated in vacuolar trafficking and osmoregulation. Together, our data indicate that Ybr074 is the only multi-spanning vacuolar membrane protease found in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23679341

  12. Cohabiting family members share microbiota with one another and with their dogs.

    PubMed

    Song, Se Jin; Lauber, Christian; Costello, Elizabeth K; Lozupone, Catherine A; Humphrey, Gregory; Berg-Lyons, Donna; Caporaso, J Gregory; Knights, Dan; Clemente, Jose C; Nakielny, Sara; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Fierer, Noah; Knight, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Human-associated microbial communities vary across individuals: possible contributing factors include (genetic) relatedness, diet, and age. However, our surroundings, including individuals with whom we interact, also likely shape our microbial communities. To quantify this microbial exchange, we surveyed fecal, oral, and skin microbiota from 60 families (spousal units with children, dogs, both, or neither). Household members, particularly couples, shared more of their microbiota than individuals from different households, with stronger effects of co-habitation on skin than oral or fecal microbiota. Dog ownership significantly increased the shared skin microbiota in cohabiting adults, and dog-owning adults shared more 'skin' microbiota with their own dogs than with other dogs. Although the degree to which these shared microbes have a true niche on the human body, vs transient detection after direct contact, is unknown, these results suggest that direct and frequent contact with our cohabitants may significantly shape the composition of our microbial communities. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00458.001. PMID:23599893

  13. Cage-Like B41 (+) and B42 (2+) : New Chiral Members of the Borospherene Family.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Su-Yan; Bai, Hui; Tian, Wen-Juan; Gao, Ting; Li, Hai-Ru; Miao, Chang-Qing; Mu, Yue-Wen; Lu, Hai-Gang; Zhai, Hua-Jin; Li, Si-Dian

    2015-07-01

    The newly discovered borospherenes B40 (-/0) and B39 (-) mark the onset of a new class of boron nanostructures. Based on extensive first-principles calculations, we introduce herein two new chiral members to the borospherene family: the cage-like C1 B41 (+) (1) and C2 B42 (2+) (2), both of which are the global minima of the systems with degenerate enantiomers. These chiral borospherene cations are composed of twelve interwoven boron double chains with six hexagonal and heptagonal faces and may be viewed as the cuborenes analogous to cubane (C8 H8 ). Chemical bonding analyses show that there exists a three-center two-electron σ bond on each B3 triangle and twelve multicenter two-electron π bonds over the σ skeleton. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that C1 B41 (+) (1) fluctuates above 300 K, whereas C2 B42 (2+) (2) remains dynamically stable. The infrared and Raman spectra of these borospherene cations are predicted to facilitate their experimental characterizations. PMID:26014224

  14. [The forensic medical identification of the members of the Demidov family].

    PubMed

    Romanov, S V; Smolianitskiĭ, A G; Molin, Iu A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the genetic profiles of the biological materials taken from four graves in the Demidov family vault in order to establish kinship between its members. According to the archival documents, two graves contained the remains of Pyotr Grigor'evich Demidov, an adjutant-general for the emperor Aleksandr II, and his wife Elizaveta Nikolaevna Demidova (Bezobrazova). Also, it was supposed that two other graves contained the remains of Grigory Petrovich Demidov and Ekaterina Petrovna Demidova (married name princess Kudasheva), the son and the daughter of P.G. Demidov and E.N. Demidova. The bodies remained in the half-ruined crypt during approximately 150 years under conditions of enhanced humidity and seasonal temperature fluctuations which made their bone tissue virtually unsuitable for the genetic analysis. Genotyping was performed with the use of standard AmpF/STR Identifiler-TM and AmpF/STR Yfiler-TM kits ("Applied Biosystems", USA). As a result of the study, the skeletal remains of the boy from grave No2 were identified as actually belonging to the son of P.G. Demidov and E.N. Demidova with a probability of no less than 99.999999998%. whereas the girl buried in grave No4, was not the daughter of these parents. PMID:25796929

  15. Intracellular localization of the BCL-2 family member BOK and functional implications

    PubMed Central

    Echeverry, N; Bachmann, D; Ke, F; Strasser, A; Simon, H U; Kaufmann, T

    2013-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BOK is widely expressed and resembles the multi-BH domain proteins BAX and BAK based on its amino acid sequence. The genomic region encoding BOK was reported to be frequently deleted in human cancer and it has therefore been hypothesized that BOK functions as a tumor suppressor. However, little is known about the molecular functions of BOK. We show that enforced expression of BOK activates the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway in BAX/BAK-proficient cells but fails to kill cells lacking both BAX and BAK or sensitize them to cytotoxic insults. Interestingly, major portions of endogenous BOK are localized to and partially inserted into the membranes of the Golgi apparatus as well as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and associated membranes. The C-terminal transmembrane domain of BOK thereby constitutes a tail-anchor' specific for targeting to the Golgi and ER. Overexpression of full-length BOK causes early fragmentation of ER and Golgi compartments. A role for BOK on the Golgi apparatus and the ER is supported by an abnormal response of Bok-deficient cells to the Golgi/ER stressor brefeldin A. Based on these results, we propose that major functions of BOK are exerted at the Golgi and ER membranes and that BOK induces apoptosis in a manner dependent on BAX and BAK. PMID:23429263

  16. Drosophila Follistatin Exhibits Unique Structural Modifications and Interacts with Several TGF-Beta Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Daniela; Shah, Ripal; Gesualdi, Scott C.; Haerry, Theodor E.

    2008-01-01

    Follistatin (FS) is one of several secreted proteins that modulate the activity of TGF-β family members during development. The structural and functional analysis of Drosophila Follistatin (dFS) reveals important differences between dFS and its vertebrate orthologues: it is larger, more positively charged, and proteolytically processed. dFS primarily inhibits signaling of Drosophila Activin (dACT) but can also inhibit other ligands like Decapentaplegic (DPP). In contrast, the presence of dFS enhances signaling of the Activin-like protein Dawdle (DAW), indicating that dFS exhibits a dual function in facilitating and inhibiting signaling of TGF-β ligands. In addition, FS proteins may also function in facilitating ligand diffusion. We find that mutants of daw are rescued in significant numbers by expression of vertebrate FS proteins. Since two PiggyBac insertions in dfs are not lethal, it appears that the function of dFS is non-essential or functionally redundant. PMID:18077144

  17. Mice Lacking the SLAM Family Member CD84 Display Unaltered Platelet Function in Hemostasis and Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sebastian; Braun, Attila; Pozgaj, Rastislav; Morowski, Martina; Vögtle, Timo; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelets are anuclear cell fragments derived from bone marrow megakaryocytes that safeguard vascular integrity by forming thrombi at sites of vascular injury. Although the early events of thrombus formation—platelet adhesion and aggregation—have been intensively studied, less is known about the mechanisms and receptors that stabilize platelet-platelet interactions once a thrombus has formed. One receptor that has been implicated in this process is the signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family member CD84, which can undergo homophilic interactions and becomes phosphorylated upon platelet aggregation. Objective The role of CD84 in platelet physiology and thrombus formation was investigated in CD84-deficient mice. Methods and Results We generated CD84-deficient mice and analyzed their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Cd84−/− platelets exhibited normal activation and aggregation responses to classical platelet agonists. Furthermore, CD84 deficiency did not affect integrin-mediated clot retraction and spreading of activated platelets on fibrinogen. Notably, also the formation of stable three-dimensional thrombi on collagen-coated surfaces under flow ex vivo was unaltered in the blood of Cd84−/− mice. In vivo, Cd84−/− mice exhibited unaltered hemostatic function and arterial thrombus formation. Conclusion These results show that CD84 is dispensable for thrombus formation and stabilization, indicating that its deficiency may be functionally compensated by other receptors or that it may be important for platelet functions different from platelet-platelet interactions. PMID:25551754

  18. Delayed Adrenarche may be an Additional Feature of Immunoglobulin Super Family Member 1 Deficiency Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hulle, Severine Van; Craen, Margarita; Callewaert, Bert; Joustra, Sjoerd; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Wit, Jan Maarten; Turgeon, Marc Olivier; Bernard, Daniel J.; Schepper, Jean De

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin super family member 1 (IGSF1) deficiency syndrome is characterized by central hypothyroidism, delayed surge in testosterone during puberty, macro-orchidism, and in some cases, hypoprolactinemia and/or transient growth hormone (GH) deficiency. Our patient was a 19-year-old male adolescent who had been treated since the age of 9 years with GH and thyroxine for an idiopathic combined GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) deficiency. His GH deficiency proved to be transient, but deficiencies of TSH and PRL persisted, and he had developed macro-orchidism since the end of puberty. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and PROP1 and POU1F1 sequencing were normal. A disharmonious puberty (delayed genital and pubic hair development, bone maturation, and pubertal growth spurt, despite normal testicular growth) was observed as well as a delayed adrenarche, as reflected by very low dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and delayed pubarche. Direct sequencing of the IGSF1 gene revealed a novel hemizygous mutation, c.3127T>C, p.Cys1043Arg. Pathogenicity of the mutation was demonstrated in vitro. Male children with an idiopathic combined GH, PRL, and TSH deficiency, showing persistent central hypothyroidism but transient GH deficiency upon retesting at adult height, should be screened for mutations in the IGSF1 gene, especially when macro-orchidism and/or hypoprolactinemia are present. We suspect that delayed adrenarche, as a consequence of PRL deficiency, might be part of the clinical phenotype of patients with IGSF1 deficiency. PMID:26757742

  19. Associations between violent video gaming, empathic concern, and prosocial behavior toward strangers, friends, and family members.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Ashley M; Padilla-Walker, Laura M; Coyne, Sarah M; Nelson, Larry J; Stockdale, Laura A

    2012-05-01

    Exposure to media violence, including violent video gaming, can have a cognitive desensitization effect, lowering empathic concern for others in need. Since emerging adulthood offers increased opportunities to volunteer, strengthen relationships, and initiate new relationships, decreases in empathic concern and prosocial behavior may prove inhibitive to optimal development during this time. For these reasons, the current study investigated associations between violent video gaming, empathic responding, and prosocial behavior enacted toward strangers, friends, and family members. Participants consisted of 780 emerging adults (M age = 19.60, SD = 1.86, range = 18–29, 69% female, 69% Caucasian) from four universities in the United States. Results showed small to moderate effects between playing violent video gaming and lowered empathic concern for both males and females. In addition, lowered empathic concern partially mediated the pathways between violent video gaming and prosocial behavior toward all three targets (at the level of a trend for females), but was most strongly associated with lower prosocial behavior toward strangers. Discussion highlights how violent video gaming is associated with lower levels of prosocial behavior through the mechanism of decreased empathic concern, how this association can affect prosocial behavior differently across target, and finally what implications this might have for development during emerging adulthood. PMID:22302216

  20. Impact of conditional deletion of the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family member BIM in mice.

    PubMed

    Herold, M J; Stuchbery, R; Mérino, D; Willson, T; Strasser, A; Hildeman, D; Bouillet, P

    2014-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic BH3-only BCL-2 family member BIM is a critical determinant of hematopoietic cell development and homeostasis. It has been argued that the striking hematopoietic abnormalities of BIM-deficient mice (accumulation of lymphocytes and granulocytes) may be the result of the loss of the protein throughout the whole animal rather than a consequence intrinsic to the loss of BIM in hematopoietic cells. To address this issue and allow the deletion of BIM in specific cell types in future studies, we have developed a mouse strain with a conditional Bim allele as well as a new Cre transgenic strain, Vav-CreER, in which the tamoxifen-inducible CreER recombinase (fusion protein) is predominantly expressed in the hematopoietic system. We show that acute loss of BIM in the adult mouse rapidly results in the hematopoietic phenotypes previously observed in mice lacking BIM in all tissues. This includes changes in thymocyte subpopulations, increased white blood cell counts and resistance of lymphocytes to BIM-dependent apoptotic stimuli, such as cytokine deprivation. We have validated this novel conditional Bim knockout mouse model using established and newly developed CreER strains (Rosa26-CreER and Vav-CreER) and will make these exciting new tools for studies on cell death and cancer available. PMID:25299771