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Sample records for pcr-based plasmid typing

  1. PCR-based polymorphisms in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NFI)

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, P.S.; Chee, S.; Low, P.S.

    1994-09-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common genetic disorders in humans with an incidence of 1 in 3,000. The NF1 gene is located on chromosome 17q 11.2 and encodes an ubiquitously expressed transcript of about 13kb. Direct mutation detection is difficult in this disorder due to the large gene size, high mutation rate and variety of mutations. We have studied the allele frequencies of seven PCR-based polymorphisms. Six of the probes used flank the NF1 gene, namely p11.3C4.2/Msp I (proximal), pEW206/Msp I (distal), p2.f9.8/Rsa I (distal), pEW207/Bgl II (distal), pEW207/Hind III (distal) and pHHH202/Rsa I (proximal). An intragenic RFLP, pEvi 2B-B/Eco R1 polymorphism in intron 27, was also analyzed by PCR. Allele frequencies for 48 normal unrelated individuals were obtained as follows: A1 = 0.40, A2 = 0.6 (p11.3C4.2/Msp I), A1 = 0.44, A2 = 0.56 (pEW206/Msp I), A1 = 0.17, A2 = 0.83 (p2.F9.8/Rsa I), A1 = 0.64, A2 = 0.36 (pEW207/Bgl I), A1 = 0.45, A2 = 0.55 (pEvi 2B-B/Eco RI). Heterozygosity rates of the alleles ranged from 20.8% to 51.7%. Using a combination of these markers, seven local families with NF1 were studied. Normal Mendelian segregation of alleles was observed in these families and no recombination was detected so far. These PCR-based markers were found to be useful for linkage analysis in our families.

  2. Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli by Plasmid Replicon Typing and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Characterization of plasmids has particular clinical significance because genes encoding important traits such as antimicrobial resistance are frequently present in plasmids. Plasmid replicon typing is a multiplex PCR based method that can be used to classify 18 of the 26 known plasmid t...

  3. A PCR-BASED DETECTION OF BURKHOLDERIA PSEUDOMALLEI DIVERSITY USING MYOVIRIDAE PROPHAGE TYPING.

    PubMed

    Nakornpakdee, Yaowarin; Sermswan, Rasana W; Tattawasart, Unchalee; Yordpratum, Umaporn; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi

    2015-01-01

    PCR-based detection of Myoviridae lysogenic phages in Burkholderia pseudomallei was developed using primers targeting K96243 prophage GI2, phiE12-2 and phi52237/phiX216. Investigation of 50 clinical and 50 environmental (soil) isolates revealed that K96243 prophage GI2 was the most common (48%) among the isolates, followed by phiE12-2 (38%) and phi52237/phiX216 (35%), with K96243 prophage GI2 being significantly more frequent in soil (64%) than clinical (32%) samples. Twenty-four percent of soil isolates contained all three prophage types, while clinical isolates harbored no more than two types. Although B. pseudomallei isolates from soil were found to be more diverse based on prophage typing, all isolates were equally susceptible to a battery of lytic phages (although to different extents), suggesting the possibility of using lytic phages to control environmental B. pseudomallei. PMID:26513903

  4. Capsular typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated in an Algerian hospital using a new multiplex PCR-based scheme.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Hanifa; Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Bektache, Soumia; Tazir, Mohamed; Caniça, Manuela

    2015-12-01

    We developed a new sequential multiplex-PCR-based typing scheme (MPBTS) for pneumococcal capsular classification. The serogroup/type of 37 control isolates obtained by the Quellung reaction, MPBTS, and nucleotide sequencing, were fully concordant. The serogroups/types of 75 invasive isolates determined by MPBTS, presented 100% specificity and 96% sensitivity, when compared with the Quellung reaction. PMID:26546733

  5. Fluorescent detection of Southern blots and PCR-based genetic typing tests

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, E.S.; Worley, J.M.; Zimmerman, P.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Southern blot is used to study gene organization, to identify disease-causing genomic rearrangements, or for typing RFLP markers in forensic, paternity, or prenatal diagnostic testing. Fluorescence offers a much greater dynamic range and a more linear response than film used in radioactive or chemiluminescent detection of RFLPs. We therefore investigated using the Fluorimager{trademark} 575 (Molecular Dynamics, Inc.) for analyzing Southern blots. Using a single-locus probe to D2S44 (YNH24) (Promega Corp.), we detect as little as 100 ng (0.05 attomole) genomic DNA. The alkaline phosphatase-labeled probe is detected using AttoPhos (JBL Scientific), and the developed membrane is scanned with the Fluorimager. Biotinylated hybridization probes can also be developed using a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and AttoPhos. The instrument scan parameters can be adjusted to prevent overexposure and accompanying loss of resolution in images of blots, gels, or 96-well microplates. We have used these other sample formats in PCR-based genetic typing assays. We use FluorKit DQS (Molecular Dynamics) to accurately quantify PCR template DNA (1-500 ng) in 96-well microplates scanned using the same instrument. Mutation detection assays run include heteroduplex gels (5% polyacrylamide, 2.7 M urea), short tandem repeat (STR) markers, amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AmpFLP), competitive priming PCR, and allele-specific oligotyping. These assays are run using either 1- or 2-color labeling. We detect unlabeled PCR products, such as the AmpFLP marker D1S80 (Perkin-Elmer) by post-staining gels for 10 minutes with SYBR Green 1 (Molecular Probes) and scanning the wet gel. The Fluorimager scans a 20 x 25 cm sample within three minutes, allowing rapid optimization of fluorescent protocols and high sample throughput.

  6. Identification and structure of the mating-type locus and development of PCR-based markers for mating type in powdery mildew fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In fungi, mating compatibility is regulated by mating-type loci. The objectives of this study were to identify and sequence mating-type genes at the MAT1 locus in the grape powdery mildew fungus, Erysiphe necator, to develop a PCR-based marker for determining mating type in E. necator, and to devel...

  7. Replicon typing of plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-1 in Enterobacteriaceae of animal, environmental and human origin

    PubMed Central

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Jakobi, Gianna; Stephan, Roger; Hächler, Herbert; Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this work was to determine the plasmid replicon profiles of a collection of blaCTX-M-1-positive enterobacterial strains. The isolates originated from chicken in the production pyramid, healthy food-producing animals at slaughter (chicken, calves, and pigs), chicken retail meat, environmental isolates originating from water bodies, and isolates from humans. A selection of IncI and IncN plasmids were characterized by multilocus sequence typing in order to determine their epidemiological relatedness. Methods: Transconjugants of 74 blaCTX-M-1-positive isolates were analyzed by PCR-based replicon typing and by PCR-based plasmid multilocus sequence typing. Results: The incompatibility groups detected among the blaCTX-M-1-harboring plasmids included IncI1, IncN, IncHI1B, IncF, IncFIIS, IncFIB, and IncB/O, with plasmid lineage IncI1/ST3 predominating in isolates from chicken and from humans. Lineage IncN/ST1 was detected mainly in isolates from pigs. For the first time, blaCTX-M-1 genes encoded on IncHI1 plasmids were detected in isolates from cattle and from water bodies. Conclusions: This study identifies plasmid lineages that are contributing to the dissemination of blaCTX-M-1 genes in the food chain, the environment, and humans. PMID:25400623

  8. Characterization of toxin plasmids in Clostridium perfringens type C isolates.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, Abhijit; Li, Jihong; McClane, Bruce A

    2010-11-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C isolates cause enteritis necroticans in humans or necrotizing enteritis and enterotoxemia in domestic animals. Type C isolates always produce alpha toxin and beta toxin but often produce additional toxins, e.g., beta2 toxin or enterotoxin. Since plasmid carriage of toxin-encoding genes has not been systematically investigated for type C isolates, the current study used Southern blot hybridization of pulsed-field gels to test whether several toxin genes are plasmid borne among a collection of type C isolates. Those analyses revealed that the surveyed type C isolates carry their beta toxin-encoding gene (cpb) on plasmids ranging in size from ∼65 to ∼110 kb. When present in these type C isolates, the beta2 toxin gene localized to plasmids distinct from the cpb plasmid. However, some enterotoxin-positive type C isolates appeared to carry their enterotoxin-encoding cpe gene on a cpb plasmid. The tpeL gene encoding the large clostridial cytotoxin was localized to the cpb plasmids of some cpe-negative type C isolates. The cpb plasmids in most surveyed isolates were found to carry both IS1151 sequences and the tcp genes, which can mediate conjugative C. perfringens plasmid transfer. A dcm gene, which is often present near C. perfringens plasmid-borne toxin genes, was identified upstream of the cpb gene in many type C isolates. Overlapping PCR analyses suggested that the toxin-encoding plasmids of the surveyed type C isolates differ from the cpe plasmids of type A isolates. These findings provide new insight into plasmids of proven or potential importance for type C virulence. PMID:20823204

  9. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae Serotypes by Standard Slide Agglutination Serotyping and PCR-Based Capsule Typing

    PubMed Central

    LaClaire, Leslye L.; Tondella, Maria Lucia C.; Beall, David S.; Noble, Corie A.; Raghunathan, Pratima L.; Rosenstein, Nancy E.; Popovic, Tanja

    2003-01-01

    To resolve discrepancies in slide agglutination serotyping (SAST) results from state health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), we characterized 141 of 751 invasive Haemophilus influenzae isolates that were identified in the United States from January 1998 to December 1999 through an active, laboratory-based, surveillance program coordinated by the CDC. We found discrepancies between the results of SAST performed at state health departments and those of PCR capsule typing performed at the CDC for 56 (40%) of the isolates characterized: 54 isolates that were identified as a particular serotype by SAST were shown to be unencapsulated by PCR, and two isolates that were reported as serotypes b and f were found to be serotypes f and e, respectively, by PCR. The laboratory error most likely to affect the perceived efficacy of the conjugate H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine was the misidentification of isolates as serotype b: of 40 isolates identified as serotype b by SAST, 27 (68%) did not contain the correlating capsule type genes. The frequency of errors fell substantially when standardized reagents and routine quality control of SAST were used during a study involving three laboratories. An overall 94% agreement between SAST and PCR results showed that slide agglutination could be a valid and reliable method for serotyping H. influenzae if the test was performed correctly, in accordance with standardized and recommended procedures. An ongoing prospective analysis of all H. influenzae surveillance isolates associated with invasive disease in children less than 5 years old will provide more accurate national figures for the burden of invasive disease caused by Hib and other H. influenzae serotypes. PMID:12517878

  10. Plasmid replicon typing of commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Wannemuehler, Yvonne M; Johnson, Sara J; Logue, Catherine M; White, David G; Doetkott, Curt; Nolan, Lisa K

    2007-03-01

    Despite the critical role of plasmids in horizontal gene transfer, few studies have characterized plasmid relatedness among different bacterial populations. Recently, a multiplex PCR replicon typing protocol was developed for classification of plasmids occurring in members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Here, a simplified version of this replicon typing procedure which requires only three multiplex panels to identify 18 plasmid replicons is described. This method was used to screen 1,015 Escherichia coli isolates of avian, human, and poultry meat origin for plasmid replicon types. Additionally, the isolates were assessed for their content of several colicin-associated genes. Overall, a high degree of plasmid variability was observed, with 221 different profiles occurring among the 1,015 isolates examined. IncFIB plasmids were the most common type identified, regardless of the source type of E. coli. IncFIB plasmids occurred significantly more often in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) and retail poultry E. coli (RPEC) than in uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and avian and human fecal commensal E. coli isolates (AFEC and HFEC, respectively). APEC and RPEC were also significantly more likely than UPEC, HFEC, and AFEC to possess the colicin-associated genes cvaC, cbi, and/or cma in conjunction with one or more plasmid replicons. The results suggest that E. coli isolates contaminating retail poultry are notably similar to APEC with regard to plasmid profiles, with both generally containing multiple plasmid replicon types in conjunction with colicin-related genes. In contrast, UPEC and human and avian commensal E. coli isolates generally lack the plasmid replicons and colicin-related genes seen in APEC and RPEC, suggesting limited dissemination of such plasmids among these bacterial populations. PMID:17277222

  11. In vivo visualization of type II plasmid segregation: bacterial actin filaments pushing plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Christopher S.; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2007-01-01

    Type II par operons harness polymerization of the dynamically unstable actin-like protein ParM to segregate low-copy plasmids in rod-shaped bacteria. In this study, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy to follow plasmid dynamics and ParM assembly in Escherichia coli. Plasmids lacking a par operon undergo confined diffusion with a diffusion constant of 5 × 10−5 μm2/s and a confinement radius of 0.28 μm. Single par-containing plasmids also move diffusively but with a larger diffusion constant (4 × 10−4 μm2/s) and confinement radius (0.42 μm). ParM filaments are dynamically unstable in vivo and form spindles that link pairs of par-containing plasmids and drive them rapidly (3.1 μm/min) toward opposite poles of the cell. After reaching the poles, ParM filaments rapidly and completely depolymerize. After ParM disassembly, segregated plasmids resume diffusive motion, often encountering each other many times and undergoing multiple rounds of ParM-dependent segregation in a single cell cycle. We propose that in addition to driving segregation, the par operon enables plasmids to search space and find sister plasmids more effectively. PMID:18039937

  12. A PCR-based genotyping method to distinguish between wild-type and ornamental varieties of Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Cseke, Leland J; Talley, Sharon M

    2012-01-01

    viable wind-dispersed seeds that spread cogongrass over wide distances(5-7). JBG has a slightly different genotype than cogongrass and may be able to form viable hybrids with cogongrass. To add to the problem, JBG is more cold and shade tolerant than cogongrass(8-10), and gene flow between these two varieties is likely to generate hybrids that are more aggressive, shade tolerant, and cold hardy than wild-type cogongrass. While wild-type cogongrass currently infests over 490 million hectares worldwide, in the Southeast U.S. it infests over 500,000 hectares and is capable of occupying most of the U.S. as it rapidly spreads northward due to its broad niche and geographic potential(3,7,11). The potential of a genetic crossing is a serious concern for the USDA-APHIS Federal Noxious Week Program. Currently, the USDA-APHIS prohibits JBG in states where there are major cogongrass infestations (e.g., Florida, Alabama, Mississippi). However, preventing the two varieties from combining can prove more difficult as cogongrass and JBG expand their distributions. Furthermore, the distribution of the JBG revert is currently unknown and without the ability to identify these varieties through morphology, some cogongrass infestations may be the result of JBG reverts. Unfortunately, current molecular methods of identification typically rely on AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms) and DNA sequencing, both of which are time consuming and costly. Here, we present the first cost-effective and reliable PCR-based molecular genotyping method to accurately distinguish between cogongrass and JBG revert. PMID:22370715

  13. New PCR-Based Open Reading Frame Typing Method for Easy, Rapid, and Reliable Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii International Epidemic Clones without Performing Multilocus Sequence Typing

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Hosoba, Eriko; Matsui, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance issues have become a global health concern. The rapid identification of multidrug-resistant microbes, which depends on microbial genomic information, is essential for overcoming growing antimicrobial resistance challenges. However, genotyping methods, such as multilocus sequence typing (MLST), for identifying international epidemic clones of Acinetobacter baumannii are not easily performed as routine tests in ordinary clinical laboratories. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel genotyping method that can be performed in ordinary microbiology laboratories. Several open reading frames (ORFs) specific to certain bacterial genetic lineages or species, together with their unique distribution patterns on the chromosomes showing a good correlation with the results of MLST, were selected in A. baumannii and other Acinetobacter spp. by comparing their genomic data. The distribution patterns of the ORFs were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis after multiplex PCR amplification and digitized. A. baumannii sequence types (STs) corresponding to international clones I and II were successfully discriminated from other STs and Acinetobacter species by detecting the distribution patterns of their ORFs using the multiplex PCR developed here. Since bacterial STs can be easily expressed as digitized numeric data with plus (+) expressed as 1 and minus (−) expressed as 0, the results of the method can be easily compared with those obtained by different tests or laboratories. This PCR-based ORF typing (POT) method can easily and rapidly identify international epidemic clones of A. baumannii and differentiate this microbe from other Acinetobacter spp. Since this POT method is easy enough to be performed even in ordinary clinical laboratories, it would also contribute to daily infection control measures and surveillance. PMID:24899031

  14. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  15. MOLECULAR TAGGING AND SELECTION FOR SUGAR-TYPE IN CARROT ROOTS USING CO-DOMINANT, PCR-BASED MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carrots storage roots accumulate free sugars. The type of sugar accumulated is conditioned by the Rs locus so that typical carrot roots (Rs/-) accumulate predominantly glucose and fructose while rs/rs plants accumulate predominantly sucrose. We recently have found rs/rs plants in one inbred line har...

  16. A PCR-based assay for the wild-type dystrophin gene transferred into the mdx mouse.

    PubMed

    Shrager, J B; Naji, A; Kelly, A M; Stedman, H H

    1992-10-01

    Myoblast transfer has emerged as a promising treatment for inherited myopathies such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Further development of the technique's therapeutic potential requires an experimental system in which issues of graft rejection can be clearly discriminated from those related to myoblast biology. Here we report the development and initial application of a quantitative assay for myogenic cells bearing a wild-type dystrophin gene following transfer into the mdx mouse. The technique relies upon the ability of a mutagenizing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer to create a new restriction site in the amplification production of the wild-type, but not the mdx dystrophin gene. The ratio of host to donor cells can be determined from muscle biopsies as small as 1 mg, regardless of donor H-2 background. This simple technique should allow a number of basic questions related to myoblast and direct gene transfer to be addressed using the mdx mouse model. PMID:1357549

  17. Conjugative transferability of the A/C plasmids from Salmonella enterica isolates that possess or lack blaCMY in the A/C plasmid backbone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of the conjugative transfer of antimicrobial resistance plasmids from 205 Salmonella enterica strains, isolated from cattle to E. coli or Salmonella recipients. PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT) was used to type incompatibility plasmid r...

  18. Prevalence of mip virulence gene and PCR-base sequence typing of Legionella pneumophila from cooling water systems of two cities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ahmadrajabi, Roya; Shakibaie, Mohammad Reza; Iranmanesh, Zahra; Mollaei, Hamid Reza; Sobhanipoor, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-07-01

    Legionella pneumophila is the primary respiratory pathogen and mostly transmitted to human through water cooling systems and cause mild to severe pneumonia with high mortality rate especially in elderly both in hospitals and community. However, current Legionella risk assessments may be compromised by uncertainties in Legionella detection methods. Here, we investigated the presence of L. pneumophila mip gene in water samples collected from different hospitals cooling towers, nursing homes and building/hotels water coolants from two geographical locations of Iran (Kerman and Bam cities) during summer season of 2015 by both nested and real-time PCR methods. Analysis of the 128 water samples for presence of the mip gene by nested-PCR revealed, 18 (23%) positive cases in Kerman and 7(14%) in Bam. However, when samples were tested by real-time PCR, we identified 4 more new cases of L. pneumophila in the hospitals as well as nursing homes water systems that were missed by nested-PCR. The highest rate of contamination was detected in water obtained from hospitals cooling towers in both the cities (p≤0.05). Dendrogram analysis and clonal relationship by PCR-base sequence typing (SBT) of the L. pneumophila genomic DNAs in Kerman water samples showed close clonal similarities among the isolates, in contrast, isolates identified from Bam city demonstrated two fingerprint patterns. The clones from hospital water samples were more related to the L. pneumophila serogroup- 1. PMID:27028760

  19. Plasmid analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 isolates obtained from widely scattered geographical locations.

    PubMed Central

    Haider, K; Kay, B A; Talukder, K A; Huq, M I

    1988-01-01

    Plasmid profiles and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of 343 strains of Shigella dysenteriae type 1, obtained from 18 different geographical locations, were analyzed. Three plasmids, with molecular sizes of 140, 6, and 2 megadaltons (MDa), were present in 94, 98, and 96%, respectively, of the 343 strains isolated during either epidemic or nonepidemic periods from 1965 to 1987. In addition to these plasmids, 83% of the strains harbored a 4-MDa plasmid and 25% harbored a 20-MDa plasmid. Various plasmid profiles were observed in which the 140-, 6-, and 2-MDa plasmids occurred commonly, irrespective of the place of isolation and drug resistance pattern of the strains. Certain profiles showed significant association with drug resistance patterns. These findings suggest that three plasmids, of molecular sizes 140, 6, and 2 MDa, are unique to S. dysenteriae type 1 strains and may indicate the global spread of a pathogenic bacterial clone. Additionally, these core plasmids, plus plasmids of various other sizes, could be used to identify emerging subclones which are causing both epidemic and sporadic disease. Thus, plasmid profiles of S. dysenteriae type 1 strains can be used to monitor possible pandemic strains as well as individual epidemic strains. Images PMID:3053762

  20. Rapid and Accurate Determination of Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Types in Klebsiella pneumoniae with a Novel PCR-Based O-Genotyping Method

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yun-Jui; Cheong, Cheng-Man; Yi, Wen-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a Gram-negative bacillus that causes life-threatening infections in both hospitalized patients and ambulatory persons, can be classified into nine lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O-antigen serotypes. The O-antigen type has important clinical and epidemiological significance. However, K. pneumoniae O serotyping is cumbersome, and the reagents are not commercially available. To overcome the limitations of conventional serotyping methods, we aimed to create a rapid and accurate PCR method for K. pneumoniae O genotyping. We sequenced the genetic determinants of LPS O antigen from serotypes O1, O2a, O2ac, O3, O4, O5, O8, O9, and O12. We established a two-step genotyping scheme, based on the two genomic regions associated with O-antigen biosynthesis. The first set of PCR primers, which detects alleles at the wzm-wzt loci of the wb gene cluster, distinguishes between O1/O2, O3, O4, O5, O8, O9, and O12. The second set of PCR primers, which detects alleles at the wbbY region, further differentiates between O1, O2a, and O2ac. We verified the specificity of O genotyping against the O-serotype reference strains. We then tested the sensitivity and specificity of O genotyping in K. pneumoniae, using the 56 K-serotype reference strains with known O serotypes determined by an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA). There is a very good correlation between the O genotypes and classical O serotypes. Three discrepancies were observed and resolved by nucleotide sequencing—all in favor of O genotyping. The PCR-based O genotyping, which can be easily performed in clinical and research microbiology laboratories, is a rapid and accurate method for determining the LPS O-antigen types of K. pneumoniae isolates. PMID:26719438

  1. Separate F-Type Plasmids Have Shaped the Evolution of the H30 Subclone of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Youmans, Bonnie; Case, Kyle; Llop, Katharine; Munoz-Aguayo, Jeannette; Flores-Figueroa, Cristian; Aziz, Maliha; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Price, Lance B.; Johnson, James R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) H30 subclone of sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) has emerged abruptly as a dominant lineage of ExPEC responsible for human disease. The ST131-H30 lineage has been well described phylogenetically, yet its plasmid complement is not fully understood. Here, single-molecule, real-time sequencing was used to generate the complete plasmid sequences of ST131-H30 isolates and those belonging to other ST131 clades. Comparative analyses revealed separate F-type plasmids that have shaped the evolution of the main fluoroquinolone-resistant ST131-H30 clades. Specifically, an F1:A2:B20 plasmid is strongly associated with the H30R/C1 clade, whereas an F2:A1:B− plasmid is associated with the H30Rx/C2 clade. A series of plasmid gene losses, gains, and rearrangements involving IS26 likely led to the current plasmid complements within each ST131-H30 sublineage, which contain several overlapping gene clusters with putative functions in virulence and fitness, suggesting plasmid-mediated convergent evolution. Evidence suggests that the H30Rx/C2-associated F2:A1:B− plasmid type was present in strains ancestral to the acquisition of fluoroquinolone resistance and prior to the introduction of a multidrug resistance-encoding gene cassette harboring blaCTX-M-15. In vitro experiments indicated a host strain-independent low frequency of plasmid transfer, differential levels of plasmid stability even between closely related ST131-H30 strains, and possible epistasis for carriage of these plasmids within the H30R/Rx lineages. IMPORTANCE A clonal lineage of Escherichia coli known as ST131 has emerged as a dominating strain type causing extraintestinal infections in humans. The evolutionary history of ST131 E. coli is now well understood. However, the role of plasmids in ST131’s evolutionary history is poorly defined. This study utilized real-time, single-molecule sequencing to compare plasmids from various current and historical

  2. Separate F-Type Plasmids Have Shaped the Evolution of the H30 Subclone of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Danzeisen, Jessica L; Youmans, Bonnie; Case, Kyle; Llop, Katharine; Munoz-Aguayo, Jeannette; Flores-Figueroa, Cristian; Aziz, Maliha; Stoesser, Nicole; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Price, Lance B; Johnson, James R

    2016-01-01

    The extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) H30 subclone of sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) has emerged abruptly as a dominant lineage of ExPEC responsible for human disease. The ST131-H30 lineage has been well described phylogenetically, yet its plasmid complement is not fully understood. Here, single-molecule, real-time sequencing was used to generate the complete plasmid sequences of ST131-H30 isolates and those belonging to other ST131 clades. Comparative analyses revealed separate F-type plasmids that have shaped the evolution of the main fluoroquinolone-resistant ST131-H30 clades. Specifically, an F1:A2:B20 plasmid is strongly associated with the H30R/C1 clade, whereas an F2:A1:B- plasmid is associated with the H30Rx/C2 clade. A series of plasmid gene losses, gains, and rearrangements involving IS26 likely led to the current plasmid complements within each ST131-H30 sublineage, which contain several overlapping gene clusters with putative functions in virulence and fitness, suggesting plasmid-mediated convergent evolution. Evidence suggests that the H30Rx/C2-associated F2:A1:B- plasmid type was present in strains ancestral to the acquisition of fluoroquinolone resistance and prior to the introduction of a multidrug resistance-encoding gene cassette harboring bla CTX-M-15. In vitro experiments indicated a host strain-independent low frequency of plasmid transfer, differential levels of plasmid stability even between closely related ST131-H30 strains, and possible epistasis for carriage of these plasmids within the H30R/Rx lineages. IMPORTANCE A clonal lineage of Escherichia coli known as ST131 has emerged as a dominating strain type causing extraintestinal infections in humans. The evolutionary history of ST131 E. coli is now well understood. However, the role of plasmids in ST131's evolutionary history is poorly defined. This study utilized real-time, single-molecule sequencing to compare plasmids from various current and historical lineages of ST

  3. Replicon typing of plasmids encoding resistance to newer beta-lactams.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  4. Replicon Typing of Plasmids Encoding Resistance to Newer β-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M.; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction–based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  5. Replicon typing of virulence plasmids of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from cattle.

    PubMed Central

    Mainil, J G; Bex, F; Dreze, P; Kaeckenbeeck, A; Couturier, M

    1992-01-01

    Plasmid DNA hybridization with probes for virulence factors used for basic replicons of plasmids was used to identify the virulence plasmids of a collection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from cattle. The virulence probes were derived from the genes coding for the heat-stable enterotoxin STaP and for the F5 (K99) and F41 fimbrial adhesins. The replicon probes were derived from 16 different basic replicons of plasmids (probes repFIA, repFIB, repFIC, repFIIA, repI1, repHI1, repHI2, repL/M, repN, repP, repQ, repT, repU, repW, repX, and repY). The virulence genes coding for the STaP enterotoxin and for the F5 adhesin were located on a single plasmid band in each isolate. The sizes of most of these virulence plasmids were from 65 to 95 MDa. The F41 probe failed to hybridize with any plasmid band. The virulence plasmids had multireplicon types typical of plasmids of the IncF groups. The most common basic replicon association was the triple RepFIA-RepFIB-RepFIC family association. Images PMID:1639505

  6. Molecular epidemiology of plasmid patterns in Shigella flexneri types 1-6.

    PubMed Central

    Gebre-Yohannes, A.; Drasar, B. S.

    1991-01-01

    A total of 123 drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Shigella flexneri types 1-6, and their Escherichia coli K12 transconjugants were used for plasmid profile analysis by agarose gel electrophoresis. Resistance factors (R-factors) were further characterized by incompatibility testing. The overall distribution of small plasmids in S. flexneri showed that a cryptic plasmid of about 4.6 Kb was found in all serotypes, and a plasmid of about 4.2 Kb was found in serotypes 1-4. Shigella flexneri types 2, 4 and 6 showed a 6.5 Kb plasmid which correlated with SSu-resistance. All S. flexneri serotypes harboured large plasmids of about 217 Kb. Plasmid profile analysis of S. flexneri in Ethiopia showed a high degree of uniformity within individual serotypes. However, there was a limited variability which, at times, could be useful for epidemiological investigation. Shigella flexneri serotypes 1-6 harboured resistance plasmids with diverse molecular weights but mostly belonging to incompatibility groups N and X. PMID:1936154

  7. Curing Both Virulent Mega-Plasmids from Bacillus anthracis Wild-Type Strain A16 Simultaneously Using Plasmid Incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongshu; Gao, Zhiqi; Wang, Huagui; Feng, Erling; Zhu, Li; Liu, Xiankai; Wang, Hengliang

    2015-10-28

    Plasmid-cured derivative strains of Bacillus anthracis are frequently used in laboratory studies. Plasmid incompatibility, which does not increase the risk of chromosomal mutation, is a useful method for plasmid curing. However, in bacteria containing multiple plasmids, it often requires the sequential introduction of multiple, specific incompatibility plasmids. This lengthy process renders the traditional plasmid incompatibility method inefficient and mutation-prone. In this study, we successfully cured plasmids pXO1 and pXO2 from B. anthracis A16 simultaneously using only one recombinant incompatible plasmid, pKORT, to obtain a plasmid-free strain, designated A16DD. This method may also be useful for the simultaneous, one-step curing of multiple plasmids from other bacteria, including Bacillus thuringiensis and Yersinia pestis. PMID:26059513

  8. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Plasmid Replicon Typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates recovered from Broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella Kentucky has become the predominate serotype recovered from broiler slaughter in the United States and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has increased dramatically in this serotype. Relationships between AMR, genotype, and plasmid replicon types were characterized for 600 ...

  9. The Coxiella burnetii Cryptic Plasmid Is Enriched in Genes Encoding Type IV Secretion System Substrates▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Voth, Daniel E.; Beare, Paul A.; Howe, Dale; Sharma, Uma M.; Samoilis, Georgios; Cockrell, Diane C.; Omsland, Anders; Heinzen, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii directs biogenesis of a phagolysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV), in which it replicates. The organism encodes a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) predicted to deliver to the host cytosol effector proteins that mediate PV formation and other cellular events. All C. burnetii isolates carry a large, autonomously replicating plasmid or have chromosomally integrated plasmid-like sequences (IPS), suggesting that plasmid and IPS genes are critical for infection. Bioinformatic analyses revealed two candidate Dot/Icm substrates with eukaryotic-like motifs uniquely encoded by the QpH1 plasmid from the Nine Mile reference isolate. CpeC, containing an F-box domain, and CpeD, possessing kinesin-related and coiled-coil regions, were secreted by the closely related Legionella pneumophila Dot/Icm T4SS. An additional QpH1-specific gene, cpeE, situated in a predicted operon with cpeD, also encoded a secreted effector. Further screening revealed that three hypothetical proteins (CpeA, CpeB, and CpeF) encoded by all C. burnetii plasmids and IPS are Dot/Icm substrates. By use of new genetic tools, secretion of plasmid effectors by C. burnetii during host cell infection was confirmed using β-lactamase and adenylate cyclase translocation assays, and a C-terminal secretion signal was identified. When ectopically expressed in HeLa cells, plasmid effectors trafficked to different subcellular sites, including autophagosomes (CpeB), ubiquitin-rich compartments (CpeC), and the endoplasmic reticulum (CpeD). Collectively, these results suggest that C. burnetii plasmid-encoded T4SS substrates play important roles in subversion of host cell functions, providing a plausible explanation for the absolute maintenance of plasmid genes by this pathogen. PMID:21216993

  10. Antibiotic resistance due to an unusual ColE1-type replicon plasmid in Aeromonas salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Antony T; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Barbeau, Xavier; Attéré, Sabrina A; Frenette, Michel; Lagüe, Patrick; Charette, Steve J

    2016-06-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is a fish pathogen known to have a rich plasmidome. In the present study, we discovered an isolate of this bacterium bearing an additional unidentified small plasmid. After having sequenced the DNA of that isolate by next-generation sequencing, it appeared that the new small plasmid is a ColE1-type replicon plasmid, named here pAsa7. This plasmid bears a functional chloramphenicol-acetyltransferase-encoding gene (cat-pAsa7) previously unknown in A. salmonicida and responsible for resistance to chloramphenicol. A comparison of pAsa7 with pAsa2, the only known ColE1-type replicon plasmid usually found in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, revealed that even if both plasmids share a high structural similarity, it is still unclear if pAsa7 is a derivative of pAsa2 since they showed several mutations at the nucleotide level. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that the cat-pAsa4 gene, another chloramphenicol-acetyltransferase-encoding gene, found on the large plasmid pAsa4, was significantly more transcribed than cat-pAsa7. This was correlated with a higher chloramphenicol resistance for isolates bearing pAsa4 compared with the one having pAsa7. Finally, a phylogenetic analysis showed that both CAT-pAsa4 and CAT-pAsa7 proteins were in different clusters. The clustering was supported by the identity of residues involved in the catalytic site. In addition, to give a better understanding of the large drug-resistance panel of A. salmonicida, this study reinforces the hypothesis that A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is a considerable reservoir for mobile genetic elements such as plasmids. PMID:27028891

  11. Antibiotic resistance and molecular typing among cockle (Anadara granosa) strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahilah, A M; Laila, R A S; Sallehuddin, H Mohd; Osman, H; Aminah, A; Ahmad Azuhairi, A

    2014-02-01

    Genomic DNA of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were characterized by antibiotic resistance, enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) and random amplified polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR) analysis. These isolates originated from 3 distantly locations of Selangor, Negeri Sembilan and Melaka (East coastal areas), Malaysia. A total of 44 (n = 44) of tentatively V. parahaemolyticus were also examined for the presence of toxR, tdh and trh gene. Of 44 isolates, 37 were positive towards toxR gene; while, none were positive to tdh and trh gene. Antibiotic resistance analysis showed the V. parahaemolyticus isolates were highly resistant to bacitracin (92%, 34/37) and penicillin (89%, 33/37) followed by resistance towards ampicillin (68%, 25/37), cefuroxime (38%, 14/37), amikacin (6%, 2/37) and ceftazidime (14%, 5/37). None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates were resistant towards chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, streptomycin and vancomycin. Antibiogram patterns exhibited, 9 patterns and phenotypically less heterogenous when compared to PCR-based techniques using ERIC- and RAPD-PCR. The results of the ERIC- and RAPD-PCR were analyzed using GelCompare software. ERIC-PCR with primers ERIC1R and ERIC2 discriminated the V. parahaemolyticus isolates into 6 clusters and 21 single isolates at a similarity level of 80%. While, RAPD-PCR with primer Gen8 discriminated the V. parahaemolyticus isolates into 11 clusters and 10 single isolates and Gen9 into 8 clusters and 16 single isolates at the same similarity level examined. Results in the presence study demonstrated combination of phenotypically and genotypically methods show a wide heterogeneity among cockle isolates of V. parahaemolyticus. PMID:24068534

  12. Epidemiology of PPNG infections in Amsterdam: analysis by auxanographic typing and plasmid characterisation.

    PubMed Central

    Ansink-Schipper, M C; Huikeshoven, M H; Woudstra, R K; van Klingeren, B; de Koning, G A; Tio, D; Schoonhoven, F J; Coutinho, R A

    1984-01-01

    In January 1981 the incidence of penicillinase producing Neisseria gonorrhoeae (PPNG) strains in Amsterdam had increased to 18% of all new cases of gonorrhoea. Auxanographic typing in combination with plasmid determination of 729 PPNG strains showed that in 1981 the predominant and endemic types were those with the Africa plasmid and transfer factor which were non-requiring and inhibited by phenylalanine. In 1982 proline requiring strains with the Asia plasmid and transfer factor increased after being imported and spread by prostitution. Four different plasmid patterns and 12 auxotypes were distinguishable. Unusual auxotypes of both African and Asian plasmid types are frequently imported, some disappearing soon after their introduction into Holland but others providing an opportunity to trace sources and contacts. Prostitution and the biological properties of PPNG strains seem to play an important role in their spread. Only 2.6% of them were isolated from homosexual men. In areas where PPNG strains are prevalent, auxotyping is an important tool in their surveillance. PMID:6421450

  13. Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Austin, John W.; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Peck, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of more than 150 Clostridium botulinum Group II type E genomes identified a small fraction (6%) where neurotoxin-encoding genes were located on plasmids. Seven closely related (134–144 kb) neurotoxigenic plasmids of subtypes E1, E3, and E10 were characterized; all carried genes associated with plasmid mobility via conjugation. Each plasmid contained the same 24-kb neurotoxin cluster cassette (six neurotoxin cluster and six flanking genes) that had split a helicase gene, rather than the more common chromosomal rarA. The neurotoxin cluster cassettes had evolved as separate genetic units which had either exited their chromosomal rarA locus in a series of parallel events, inserting into the plasmid-borne helicase gene, or vice versa. A single intact version of the helicase gene was discovered on a nonneurotoxigenic form of this plasmid. The observed low frequency for the plasmid location may reflect one or more of the following: 1) Less efficient recombination mechanism for the helicase gene target, 2) lack of suitable target plasmids, and 3) loss of neurotoxigenic plasmids. Type E1 and E10 plasmids possessed a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus with spacers that recognized C. botulinum Group II plasmids, but not C. botulinum Group I plasmids, demonstrating their long-term separation. Clostridium botulinum Group II type E strains also carry nonneurotoxigenic plasmids closely related to C. botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. PMID:26936890

  14. Evolution of Chromosomal Clostridium botulinum Type E Neurotoxin Gene Clusters: Evidence Provided by Their Rare Plasmid-Borne Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew T; Austin, John W; Weedmark, Kelly A; Peck, Michael W

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of more than 150 Clostridium botulinum Group II type E genomes identified a small fraction (6%) where neurotoxin-encoding genes were located on plasmids. Seven closely related (134-144 kb) neurotoxigenic plasmids of subtypes E1, E3, and E10 were characterized; all carried genes associated with plasmid mobility via conjugation. Each plasmid contained the same 24-kb neurotoxin cluster cassette (six neurotoxin cluster and six flanking genes) that had split a helicase gene, rather than the more common chromosomal rarA. The neurotoxin cluster cassettes had evolved as separate genetic units which had either exited their chromosomal rarA locus in a series of parallel events, inserting into the plasmid-borne helicase gene, or vice versa. A single intact version of the helicase gene was discovered on a nonneurotoxigenic form of this plasmid. The observed low frequency for the plasmid location may reflect one or more of the following: 1) Less efficient recombination mechanism for the helicase gene target, 2) lack of suitable target plasmids, and 3) loss of neurotoxigenic plasmids. Type E1 and E10 plasmids possessed a Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats locus with spacers that recognized C. botulinum Group II plasmids, but not C. botulinum Group I plasmids, demonstrating their long-term separation. Clostridium botulinum Group II type E strains also carry nonneurotoxigenic plasmids closely related to C. botulinum Group II types B and F plasmids. Here, the absence of neurotoxin cassettes may be because recombination requires both a specific mechanism and specific target sequence, which are rarely found together. PMID:26936890

  15. Plasmid studies of Salmonella typhimurium phage type 179 resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline, sulphonamides and trimethoprim.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    Sixteen strains of Salmonella typhimurium phage type 179 were referred to the National Health Institute, Wellington, New Zealand, from 1977 to 1979. This phage type had not been observed here before 1977. All strains were resistant to ampicillin, several were also resistant to tetracycline, and several were resistant to ampicillin, tetracycline, sulphafurazole and trimethoprim. All resistances could be transferred to Escherichia coli K 12. Plasmids from these strains and their transconjugants were characterized by agarose gel electrophoresis. It appears that resistance to sulphafurazole and trimethoprim is carried on a plasmid with a molecular weight of 5 . 2 Mdal and that resistance to ampicillin and tetracycline is carried on a plasmid with a molecular weight of approximately 60 Mdal. Images Plate 1 PMID:7005330

  16. Three Classes of Plasmid (47–63 kb) Carry the Type B Neurotoxin Gene Cluster of Group II Clostridium botulinum

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Andrew T.; Austin, John W.; Weedmark, Kelly A.; Corbett, Cindi; Peck, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis of 26 strains of Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B4 showed that 23 strains carried their neurotoxin gene cluster on a 47–63 kb plasmid (three strains lacked any hybridization signal for the neurotoxin gene, presumably having lost their plasmid). Unexpectedly, no neurotoxin genes were found on the chromosome. This apparent constraint on neurotoxin gene transfer to the chromosome stands in marked contrast to Group I C. botulinum, in which neurotoxin gene clusters are routinely found in both locations. The three main classes of type B4 plasmid identified in this study shared different regions of homology, but were unrelated to any Group I or Group III plasmid. An important evolutionary aspect firmly links plasmid class to geographical origin, with one class apparently dominant in marine environments, whereas a second class is dominant in European terrestrial environments. A third class of plasmid is a hybrid between the other two other classes, providing evidence for contact between these seemingly geographically separated populations. Mobility via conjugation has been previously demonstrated for the type B4 plasmid of strain Eklund 17B, and similar genes associated with conjugation are present in all type B4 plasmids now described. A plasmid toxin–antitoxin system pemI gene located close to the neurotoxin gene cluster and conserved in each type B4 plasmid class may be important in understanding the mechanism which regulates this unique and unexpected bias toward plasmid-borne neurotoxin genes in Group II C. botulinum type B4. PMID:25079343

  17. Association between β-Lactamase-Encoding blaOXA-51 Variants and DiversiLab Rep-PCR-Based Typing of Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Zander, Esther; Nemec, Alexandr; Seifert, Harald

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between blaOXA-51 variants and Acinetobacter baumannii worldwide clonal lineages 1 to 8 (WW1 to -8). The blaOXA-51-like genes of 102 A. baumannii isolates were sequenced. Using DiversiLab repetitive-sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) typing, 92 of these isolates had previously been assigned to WW1 to -8 and 10 were unclustered. Clustering of DNA sequences was performed using the neighbor-joining method and the Jukes-Cantor phylogenetic correction. blaOXA-51 variants were in good correlation with DiversiLab-defined clonal lineages. Sequence-based typing of blaOXA-51 variants has the potential to be applied for epidemiologic characterization of A. baumannii and to identify worldwide clonal lineages 1 to 8. PMID:22422849

  18. A Degenerate Primer MOB Typing (DPMT) Method to Classify Gamma-Proteobacterial Plasmids in Clinical and Environmental Settings

    PubMed Central

    de la Cruz, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Transmissible plasmids are responsible for the spread of genetic determinants, such as antibiotic resistance or virulence traits, causing a large ecological and epidemiological impact. Transmissible plasmids, either conjugative or mobilizable, have in common the presence of a relaxase gene. Relaxases were previously classified in six protein families according to their phylogeny. Degenerate primers hybridizing to coding sequences of conserved amino acid motifs were designed to amplify related relaxase genes from γ-Proteobacterial plasmids. Specificity and sensitivity of a selected set of 19 primer pairs were first tested using a collection of 33 reference relaxases, representing the diversity of γ-Proteobacterial plasmids. The validated set was then applied to the analysis of two plasmid collections obtained from clinical isolates. The relaxase screening method, which we call “Degenerate Primer MOB Typing” or DPMT, detected not only most known Inc/Rep groups, but also a plethora of plasmids not previously assigned to any Inc group or Rep-type. PMID:22792321

  19. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Plasmid Replicon Typing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky Isolates Recovered from Broilers.

    PubMed

    Ladely, Scott R; Meinersmann, Richard J; Ball, Takiyah A; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella Kentucky has become the predominant serovar recovered from broilers slaughtered in the United States, and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has increased dramatically in this serovar. Relationships between AMR, genotype, and plasmid replicon types were characterized for 600 Salmonella Kentucky isolates recovered from chicken carcasses from 2004 to 2013. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis cluster analysis revealed 112 unique types sharing 79% similarity. Over half of the isolates studies were assigned to two large clusters (unique restriction patterns) consisting of 190 (A) and 151 (B) isolates. The remaining (n = 259) more diverse isolates (110 unique patterns) shall be designated cluster C for discussion. Clusters A had significantly more (p < 0.05) isolates resistant to streptomycin (68.4%) and tetracycline (91.6%) compared to cluster C (50.6% and 40.9% to streptomycin and tetracycline, respectively) or cluster B, which had the least (p < 0.05) resistance (11.9% and 13.2% to streptomycin and tetracycline, respectively). In addition, there was segregation of plasmid replicon types among clusters. Cluster A had significantly more (p < 0.05) replicon type FIB (90.5%) compared to cluster C (37.1%), which had significantly more compared to cluster B (10.6%). Cluster B had significantly more (p < 0.05) replicon type I1 (87.4%) compared to cluster C (68.7%), which had significantly more (p < 0.05) compared to cluster A (32.6%). Cluster C harbored significantly more (p < 0.05) HI2 replicon type (18.1%) compared to clonal clusters A (1.6%) or B (1.3%). The prevalence of plasmid replicon type A/C did not differ among clusters (A, 0.5%; B, 2.0%; C, 0.4%). Both streptomycin and tetracycline resistance were significantly linked (p < 0.05) to plasmid replicon type FIB. In addition, replicon type HI2 was also significantly linked (p < 0.05) to streptomycin resistance. We conclude that the dramatic increase in

  20. Quick identification of Type I restriction enzyme isoschizomers using newly developed pTypeI and reference plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Junichi; Rowsell, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Although DNA-recognition sequences are among the most important characteristics of restriction enzymes and their corresponding methylases, determination of the recognition sequence of a Type-I restriction enzyme is a complicated procedure. To facilitate this process we have previously developed plasmid R-M tests and the computer program RM search. To specifically identify Type-I isoschizomers, we engineered a pUC19 derivative plasmid, pTypeI, which contains all of the 27 Type-I recognition sequences in a 248-bp DNA fragment. Furthermore, a series of 27 plasmids (designated ‘reference plasmids’), each containing a unique Type-I recognition sequence, were also constructed using pMECA, a derivative of pUC vectors. In this study, we tried those vectors on 108 clinical E. coli strains and found that 48 strains produced isoschizomers of Type I enzymes. A detailed study of 26 strains using these ‘reference plasmids’ revealed that they produce seven different isoschizomers of the prototypes: EcoAI, EcoBI, EcoKI, Eco377I, Eco646I, Eco777I and Eco826I. One strain EC1344 produces two Type I enzymes (EcoKI and Eco377I). PMID:18562466

  1. Plasmid profiles of antibiotic-resistant Shigella dysenteriae types 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7 isolated in Ethiopia during 1976-85.

    PubMed Central

    Gebre-Yohannes, A.; Drasar, B. S.

    1990-01-01

    Plasmid profile analysis by agarose gel electrophoresis was carried out on 37 drug-resistant strains of Shigella dysenteriae types 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7. These strains were collected between 1976 and 1985 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The plasmid profile of S. dysenteriae type 2 strains with R-type CSSuT did not show middle-sized plasmids likely to code for CSSuT resistance. All strains contained a large plasmid of about 120 megadaltons (MDa), and a cryptic plasmid of about 2.2 MDa. The plasmid profiles of S. dysenteriae type 3 with R-types ACSSuT, SSuT and SSu showed a 4.2 MDa SSu-determinant, which was demonstrated in Escherichia coli K12 recipients resulting from triparental crosses. The ACT determinant in S. dysenteriae type 3 with R-type ACSSuT is probably chromosomally mediated. Cryptic plasmids of about 3.0 and 2.2 MDa were found in all S. dysenteriae type 3 isolates. The 4.2 MDa plasmid featured prominently in the plasmid profiles of S. dysenteriae types 4, 6 and 7 with R-types SSuT and SSu. However, this plasmid was not mobilizable by triparental crosses. There was a relative paucity of transferable plasmids in non-Shiga bacillus isolates. However, incompatibility group N plasmids, coding for tetracycline resistance, were detected. PMID:2200703

  2. Bovine papillomavirus type 1 3' early region transformation and plasmid maintenance functions.

    PubMed Central

    Rabson, M S; Yee, C; Yang, Y C; Howley, P M

    1986-01-01

    We examined bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) DNAs mutated in the E2 open reading frame (ORF) to determine their ability (i) to transform C127 cells and (ii) to remain extrachromosomal in transfected cells. Results obtained with deletion mutants and insertion mutants containing a linker with translational termination codons in all possible reading frames indicated that an E2 ORF gene product(s) is necessary for efficient transformation, as well as viral plasmid replication and maintenance in the context of the full BPV-1 genome. Complementation assays in which mutant BPV-1 DNAs were transfected into cell lines expressing some viral functions from integrated BPV-1 cDNAs demonstrated that the E2 ORF product, when provided in trans, could allow BPV-1 E2 mutants to remain extrachromosomal. The E2 function could also augment transformation of some, but not all, BPV-1 E2 mutants, allowing identification of another region of BPV-1 involved in cellular transformation. It is likely that the role of the BPV-1 E2 product(s) in transformation and plasmid maintenance is indirect. A BPV-1 mutant altered in the E5 ORF is transformation defective and unable to replicate as a stable plasmid in C127 cells. Images PMID:3021996

  3. Genomes of sequence type 121 Listeria monocytogenes strains harbor highly conserved plasmids and prophages

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Müller, Anneliese; Stessl, Beatrix; Wagner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The food-borne pathogen Listeria (L.) monocytogenes is often found in food production environments. Thus, controlling the occurrence of L. monocytogenes in food production is a great challenge for food safety. Among a great diversity of L. monocytogenes strains from food production, particularly strains belonging to sequence type (ST)121 are prevalent. The molecular reasons for the abundance of ST121 strains are however currently unknown. We therefore determined the genome sequences of three L. monocytogenes ST121 strains: 6179 and 4423, which persisted for up to 8 years in food production plants in Ireland and Austria, and of the strain 3253 and compared them with available L. monocytogenes ST121 genomes. Our results show that the ST121 genomes are highly similar to each other and show a tremendously high degree of conservation among some of their prophages and particularly among their plasmids. This remarkably high level of conservation among prophages and plasmids suggests that strong selective pressure is acting on them. We thus hypothesize that plasmids and prophages are providing important adaptations for survival in food production environments. In addition, the ST121 genomes share common adaptations which might be related to their persistence in food production environments such as the presence of Tn6188, a transposon responsible for increased tolerance against quaternary ammonium compounds, a yet undescribed insertion harboring recombination hotspot (RHS) repeat proteins, which are most likely involved in competition against other bacteria, and presence of homologs of the L. innocua genes lin0464 and lin0465. PMID:25972859

  4. Mycobacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Suggests Important Role of Plasmids in the Radiation of Type VII Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Emilie; Christina Boritsch, Eva; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C.; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Caro, Valerie; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Brosch, Roland; Sapriel, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    In mycobacteria, various type VII secretion systems corresponding to different ESX (ESAT-6 secretory) types, are contributing to pathogenicity, iron acquisition, and/or conjugation. In addition to the known chromosomal ESX loci, the existence of plasmid-encoded ESX systems was recently reported. To investigate the potential role of ESX-encoding plasmids on mycobacterial evolution, we analyzed a large representative collection of mycobacterial genomes, including both chromosomal and plasmid-borne sequences. Data obtained for chromosomal ESX loci confirmed the previous five classical ESX types and identified a novel mycobacterial ESX-4-like type, termed ESX-4-bis. Moreover, analysis of the plasmid-encoded ESX loci showed extensive diversification, with at least seven new ESX profiles, identified. Three of them (ESX-P clusters 1–3) were found in multiple plasmids, while four corresponded to singletons. Our phylogenetic and gene-order-analyses revealed two main groups of ESX types: 1) ancestral types, including ESX-4 and ESX-4-like systems from mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial actinobacteria and 2) mycobacteria-specific ESX systems, including ESX-1-2-3-5 systems and the plasmid-encoded ESX types. Synteny analysis revealed that ESX-P systems are part of phylogenetic groups that derived from a common ancestor, which diversified and resulted in the different ESX types through extensive gene rearrangements. A converging body of evidence, derived from composition bias-, phylogenetic-, and synteny analyses points to a scenario in which ESX-encoding plasmids have been a major driving force for acquisition and diversification of type VII systems in mycobacteria, which likely played (and possibly still play) important roles in the adaptation to new environments and hosts during evolution of mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26748339

  5. Mycobacterial Pan-Genome Analysis Suggests Important Role of Plasmids in the Radiation of Type VII Secretion Systems.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Emilie; Christina Boritsch, Eva; Vandenbogaert, Mathias; Rodríguez de la Vega, Ricardo C; Thiberge, Jean-Michel; Caro, Valerie; Gaillard, Jean-Louis; Heym, Beate; Girard-Misguich, Fabienne; Brosch, Roland; Sapriel, Guillaume

    2016-02-01

    In mycobacteria, various type VII secretion systems corresponding to different ESX (ESAT-6 secretory) types, are contributing to pathogenicity, iron acquisition, and/or conjugation. In addition to the known chromosomal ESX loci, the existence of plasmid-encoded ESX systems was recently reported. To investigate the potential role of ESX-encoding plasmids on mycobacterial evolution, we analyzed a large representative collection of mycobacterial genomes, including both chromosomal and plasmid-borne sequences. Data obtained for chromosomal ESX loci confirmed the previous five classical ESX types and identified a novel mycobacterial ESX-4-like type, termed ESX-4-bis. Moreover, analysis of the plasmid-encoded ESX loci showed extensive diversification, with at least seven new ESX profiles, identified. Three of them (ESX-P clusters 1-3) were found in multiple plasmids, while four corresponded to singletons. Our phylogenetic and gene-order-analyses revealed two main groups of ESX types: 1) ancestral types, including ESX-4 and ESX-4-like systems from mycobacterial and non-mycobacterial actinobacteria and 2) mycobacteria-specific ESX systems, including ESX-1-2-3-5 systems and the plasmid-encoded ESX types. Synteny analysis revealed that ESX-P systems are part of phylogenetic groups that derived from a common ancestor, which diversified and resulted in the different ESX types through extensive gene rearrangements. A converging body of evidence, derived from composition bias-, phylogenetic-, and synteny analyses points to a scenario in which ESX-encoding plasmids have been a major driving force for acquisition and diversification of type VII systems in mycobacteria, which likely played (and possibly still play) important roles in the adaptation to new environments and hosts during evolution of mycobacterial pathogenesis. PMID:26748339

  6. Campylobacter fetus Subspecies Contain Conserved Type IV Secretion Systems on Multiple Genomic Islands and Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    van der Graaf–van Bloois, Linda; Miller, William G.; Yee, Emma; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Forbes, Ken J.; Zomer, Aldert L.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Duim, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    The features contributing to differences in pathogenicity of the Campylobacter fetus subspecies are unknown. Putative factors involved in pathogenesis are located in genomic islands that encode a type IV secretion system (T4SS) and fic domain (filamentation induced by cyclic AMP) proteins, which may disrupt host cell processes. In the genomes of 27 C. fetus strains, three phylogenetically-different T4SS-encoding regions (T4SSs) were identified: one was located in both the chromosome and in extra-chromosomal plasmids; one was located exclusively in the chromosome; and one exclusively in extra-chromosomal plasmids. We observed that C. fetus strains can contain multiple T4SSs and that homologous T4SSs can be present both in chromosomal genomic islands (GI) and on plasmids in the C. fetus strains. The GIs of the chromosomally located T4SS differed mainly by the presence of fic genes, insertion sequence elements and phage-related or hypothetical proteins. Comparative analysis showed that T4SS sequences, inserted in the same locations, were conserved in the studied C. fetus genomes. Using phylogenetic analysis of the T4SSs, it was shown that C. fetus may have acquired the T4SS regions from other Campylobacter species by horizontal gene transfer. The identified T4SSs and fic genes were found in Cff and Cfv strains, although the presence of T4SSs and fic genes were significantly associated with Cfv strains. The T4SSs and fic genes could not be associated with S-layer serotypes or geographical origin of the strains. PMID:27049518

  7. Experimental research on wild-type p53 plasmid transfected into retinoblastoma cells and tissues using an ultrasound microbubble intensifier.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Zhou, X; Diao, L; Wang, Z

    2010-01-01

    The transfection efficiency of wild-type p53 (wtp53) was investigated in retinoblastoma (RB) Y79 cells using an ultrasound microbubble technique. A human RB nude mouse xenograft tumour model was also used to investigate whether this technique could deliver wtp53 into solid tumours. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) demonstrated that wtp53 was successfully transfected into Y79 cells in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group and in the plasmid with liposomes group, but not in the plasmid with ultrasound group or in the untreated control group. Flow cytometry showed that apoptosis was highest in the microbubbles and ultrasound group (25.58%) compared with the plasmid with liposomes group (19.50%), and the other two groups (< 10%). RT-PCR also showed that the wtp53 gene was successfully transfected into solid tumours in the plasmid with microbubbles and ultrasound group. This study provides preliminary evidence in support of a potential new approach to RB gene therapy. PMID:20819437

  8. Complete nucleotide sequences of two NDM-1-encoding plasmids from the same sequence type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae strain.

    PubMed

    Studentova, V; Dobiasova, H; Hedlova, D; Dolejska, M; Papagiannitsis, C C; Hrabak, J

    2015-02-01

    The sequence type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae strain Kpn-3002cz was confirmed to harbor two NDM-1-encoding plasmids, pB-3002cz and pS-3002cz. pB-3002cz (97,649 bp) displayed extensive sequence similarity with the blaNDM-1-carrying plasmid pKPX-1. pS-3002cz (73,581 bp) was found to consist of an IncR-related sequence (13,535 bp) and a mosaic region (60,046 bp). A 40,233-bp sequence of pS-3002cz was identical to the mosaic region of pB-3002cz, indicating the en bloc acquisition of the NDM-1-encoding region from one plasmid by the other. PMID:25421477

  9. Complete Nucleotide Sequences of Two NDM-1-Encoding Plasmids from the Same Sequence Type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain

    PubMed Central

    Studentova, V.; Dobiasova, H.; Hedlova, D.; Dolejska, M.; Hrabak, J.

    2014-01-01

    The sequence type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae strain Kpn-3002cz was confirmed to harbor two NDM-1-encoding plasmids, pB-3002cz and pS-3002cz. pB-3002cz (97,649 bp) displayed extensive sequence similarity with the blaNDM-1-carrying plasmid pKPX-1. pS-3002cz (73,581 bp) was found to consist of an IncR-related sequence (13,535 bp) and a mosaic region (60,046 bp). A 40,233-bp sequence of pS-3002cz was identical to the mosaic region of pB-3002cz, indicating the en bloc acquisition of the NDM-1-encoding region from one plasmid by the other. PMID:25421477

  10. Plasmid profiles of drug resistant Shigella boydii types 1-5, 8, 10, 12-14 from Ethiopia (1974-85).

    PubMed Central

    Gebre-Yohannes, A.; Drasar, B. S.

    1997-01-01

    Plasmid profile analysis by agarose gel electrophoresis was performed on 42 drug resistant strains of Shigella boydii serotypes 1-5, 8, 10, 12-14, collected between 1974 and 1985 from endemic cases of shigellosis in Ethiopia, and their Escherichia coli K12 transconjugants. Resistance factors (R factors) were further characterized by incompatibility testing. Patterns of small plasmids, less than 15 kb, were similar within each of the individual S. boydii serotypes. Plasmids of about 3.3-3.7 kb were found in all strains of serotypes 2 and 4. Plasmids of about 4.3-4.6 kb were found in about 86% of strains. Serotypes 1, 2 and 3 were characterized by plasmids of about 5.6-5.7 kb. The 6.4-6.7 kb plasmid was found consistently in serotypes 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 12 and 13 which were resistant to SSu or had an SSu resistance component in their phenotypes. Large plasmids (155-186 kb) were found in most S. boydii strains. Conjugative drug resistance plasmids, most often coding for three or less drugs, were found in about 26% of drug resistant strains. R-factors, coding for AT resistance (in types 2 and 8), and ASSuT resistance (in type 4), were compatible with all reference plasmids tested. Plasmids belonging to incompatibility groups X and N were found in serotypes 5 and 10, respectively. PMID:9440431

  11. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of IncP-1β Plasmid pDTC28 Reveals a Non-Functional Variant of the blaGES-Type Gene

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Bingjun; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid pDTC28 was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River using E. coli CV601 (gfp-tagged) as recipient and indigenous bacteria from the sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole. The complete sequence of plasmid pDTC28 was 61,503 bp in length with an average G+C content of 64.09%. Plasmid pDTC28 belongs to the IncP-1β group by phylogenetic analysis. The backbones of plasmid pDTC28 and other IncP-1β plasmids are very classical and conserved, whereas the accessory regions of these plasmids are diverse. A blaGES-5-like gene was found on the accessory region, and this blaGES-5-like gene contained 18 silent mutations and 7 missense mutations compared with the blaGES-5 gene. The mutations resulted in 7 amino acid substitutions in GES-5 carbapenemase, causing the loss of function of the blaGES-5-like gene on plasmid pDTC28 against carbapenems and even β-lactams. The enzyme produced by the blaGES-5-like gene cassette may be a new variant of GES-type enzymes. Thus, the plasmid sequenced in this study will expand our understanding of GES-type β-lactamases and provide insights into the genetic platforms used for the dissemination of GES-type genes. PMID:27152950

  12. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of IncP-1β Plasmid pDTC28 Reveals a Non-Functional Variant of the blaGES-Type Gene.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid pDTC28 was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River using E. coli CV601 (gfp-tagged) as recipient and indigenous bacteria from the sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole. The complete sequence of plasmid pDTC28 was 61,503 bp in length with an average G+C content of 64.09%. Plasmid pDTC28 belongs to the IncP-1β group by phylogenetic analysis. The backbones of plasmid pDTC28 and other IncP-1β plasmids are very classical and conserved, whereas the accessory regions of these plasmids are diverse. A blaGES-5-like gene was found on the accessory region, and this blaGES-5-like gene contained 18 silent mutations and 7 missense mutations compared with the blaGES-5 gene. The mutations resulted in 7 amino acid substitutions in GES-5 carbapenemase, causing the loss of function of the blaGES-5-like gene on plasmid pDTC28 against carbapenems and even β-lactams. The enzyme produced by the blaGES-5-like gene cassette may be a new variant of GES-type enzymes. Thus, the plasmid sequenced in this study will expand our understanding of GES-type β-lactamases and provide insights into the genetic platforms used for the dissemination of GES-type genes. PMID:27152950

  13. IncF plasmid diversity in multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli strains from animals in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiu-E.; Sun, Jian; Li, Liang; Deng, Hui; Liu, Bao-Tao; Fang, Liang-Xing; Liao, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize a collection of 103 multidrug resistance IncF plasmids recovered from Escherichia coli of food producing and companion animals between 2003 and 2012. A total of 103 incF plasmids were characterized using an established PCR-based IncF replicon sequence typing (RST) system to identify FII, FIA, and FIB (FAB) groups. Plasmids were also analyzed using-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Antibiotic Resistance determinants blaCTX-M, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and rmtB and plasmid addiction systems (PAS) were identified by PCR screening. A total of 20 different RSTs from 103 IncF plasmids were identified. The groups F2 and F33 with the RST formulae A-: B- were the most frequently encountered types (63.1%). The antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) blaCTX-M, rmtB, and oqxB were carried by 82, 37, and 34 IncF plasmids, respectively. Most of these plasmids carried more than one resistance gene (59.2%, 61/103). The IncF plasmids also had a high frequency of addiction systems (mean 2.54) and two antisense RNA-regulated systems (hok–sok and srnBC) and a protein antitoxin-regulated system (pemKI) were the most prevalent. Not surprisingly, RFLP profiles among the IncF plasmids were diverse even though some shared identical IncF-RSTs. This is the first extensive study of IncF plasmid-positive E. coli isolates from animals in China. Our results demonstrate that IncF is the most prevalent plasmid family in E. coli plasmids and they commonly carry multiple resistance determinants that render them resistant to different antibiotic classes simultaneously. IncF plasmids also harbor addiction systems, promoting their stability and maintenance in the bacterial host, under changing environmental conditions. PMID:26441898

  14. A versatile PCR-based tandem epitope tagging system for Streptomyces coelicolor genome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Nu; Yi, Jeong Sang; Lee, Bo-Rahm; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Min Woo; Song, Yoseb; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Kim, Byung-Gee

    2012-07-20

    Epitope tagging approaches have been widely used for the analysis of functions, interactions and subcellular distributions of proteins. However, incorporating epitope sequence into protein loci in Streptomyces is time-consuming procedure due to the absence of the versatile tagging methods. Here, we developed a versatile PCR-based tandem epitope tagging tool for the Streptomyces genome engineering. We constructed a series of template plasmids that carry repeated sequence of c-myc epitope, Flp recombinase target (FRT) sites, and apramycin resistance marker to insert epitope tags into any desired spot of the chromosomal loci. A DNA module which includes the tandem epitope-encoding sequence and a selectable marker was amplified by PCR with primers that carry homologous extensions to the last portion and downstream region of the targeted gene. We fused the epitope tags at the 3' region of global transcription factors of Streptomyces coelicolor to test the validity of this system. The proper insertion of the epitope tag was confirmed by PCR and western blot analysis. The recombinants showed the identical phenotype to the wild-type that proved the conservation of in vivo function of the tagged proteins. Finally, the direct binding targets were successfully detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation with the increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. The epitope tagging system describes here would provide wide applications to study the protein functions in S. coelicolor. PMID:22704935

  15. A Plasmid Bearing the bla(CTX-M-15) Gene and Phage P1-Like Sequences from a Sequence Type 11 Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolate.

    PubMed

    Shin, Juyoun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-10-01

    Plasmid pKP12226 was extracted and analyzed from a CTX-M-15-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 11 (ST11) isolate collected in South Korea. The plasmid represents chimeric characteristics consisting of a pIP1206-like backbone and lysogenized phage P1-like sequences. It bears a resistance region that includes resistance genes to several antibiotics and is different from previously characterized plasmids from South Korea bearing blaCTX-M-15. It may have resulted from recombination between an Escherichia coli plasmid backbone, a blaCTX-M-15-bearing resistance region, and lysogenized phage P1-like sequences. PMID:26195513

  16. Induction of Type I and Type III Interferons by Borrelia burgdorferi Correlates with Pathogenesis and Requires Linear Plasmid 36

    PubMed Central

    Krupna-Gaylord, Michelle A.; Liveris, Dionysios; Love, Andrea C.; Wormser, Gary P.; Schwartz, Ira; Petzke, Mary M.

    2014-01-01

    The capacity for Borrelia burgdorferi to cause disseminated infection in humans or mice is associated with the genotype of the infecting strain. The cytokine profiles elicited by B. burgdorferi clinical isolates of different genotype (ribosomal spacer type) groups were assessed in a human PBMC co-incubation model. RST1 isolates, which are more frequently associated with disseminated Lyme disease in humans and mice, induced significantly higher levels of IFN-α and IFN-λ1/IL29 relative to RST3 isolates, which are less frequently associated with disseminated infection. No differences in the protein concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 or TNF-α were observed between isolates of differing genotype. The ability of B. burgdorferi to induce type I and type III IFNs was completely dependent on the presence of linear plasmid (lp) 36. An lp36-deficient B. burgdorferi mutant adhered to, and was internalized by, PBMCs and specific dendritic cell (DC) subsets less efficiently than its isogenic B31 parent strain. The association defect with mDC1s and pDCs could be restored by complementation of the mutant with the complete lp36. The RST1 clinical isolates studied were found to contain a 2.5-kB region, located in the distal one-third of lp36, which was not present in any of the RST3 isolates tested. This divergent region of lp36 may encode one or more factors required for optimal spirochetal recognition and the production of type I and type III IFNs by human DCs, thus suggesting a potential role for DCs in the pathogenesis of B. burgdorferi infection. PMID:24945497

  17. Natural plasmids of filamentous fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, A J

    1995-01-01

    Among eukaryotes, plasmids have been found in fungi and plants but not in animals. Most plasmids are mitochondrial. In filamentous fungi, plasmids are commonly encountered in isolates from natural populations. Individual populations may show a predominance of one type, but some plasmids have a global distribution, often crossing species boundaries. Surveys have shown that strains can contain more than one type of plasmid and that different types appear to be distributed independently. In crosses, plasmids are generally inherited maternally. Horizontal transmission is by cell contact. Circular plasmids are common only in Neurospora spp., but linear plasmids have been found in many fungi. Circular plasmids have one open reading frame (ORF) coding for a DNA polymerase or a reverse transcriptase. Linear plasmids generally have two ORFs, coding for presumptive DNA and RNA polymerases with amino acid motifs showing homology to viral polymerases. Plasmids often attain a high copy number, in excess of that of mitochondrial DNA. Linear plasmids have a protein attached to their 5' end, and this is presumed to act as a replication primer. Most plasmids are neutral passengers, but several linear plasmids integrate into mitochondrial DNA, causing death of the host culture. Inferred amino acid sequences of linear plasmid ORFs have been used to plot phylogenetic trees, which show a fair concordance with conventional trees. The circular Neurospora plasmids have replication systems that seem to be evolutionary intermediates between the RNA and the DNA worlds. PMID:8531891

  18. Evaluating quantitative methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Shay; Paulsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The life of plasmids is a constant battle against fluctuations: failing to correct copy number fluctuations can increase the plasmid loss rate by many orders of magnitude, as can a failure to more evenly divide the copies between daughters at cell division. Plasmids are therefore long-standing model systems for stochastic processes in cells, much thanks to the efforts of Kurt Nordström to whose memory this issue is dedicated. Here we analyze a range of experimental methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells, focusing on challenges, trade-offs and necessary experimental controls. In particular we analyze published and unpublished strategies to infer copy numbers from expression of plasmid-encoded reporters, direct labeling of plasmids with fluorescent probes or DNA binding proteins fused to fluorescent reporters, PCR based methods applied to single cell lysates, and plasmid-specific replication arrest. We conclude that no method currently exists to measure plasmid copy numbers in single cells, and that most methods instead inadvertently measure various types of experimental noise. We also discuss how accurate methods can be developed. PMID:22305922

  19. Cefotaxime Resistant Escherichia coli Collected from a Healthy Volunteer; Characterisation and the Effect of Plasmid Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Miranda; AbuOun, Manal; Mafura, Muriel; Bagnall, Mary; Hunt, Theresa; Thomas, Christopher; Weile, Jan; Anjum, Muna F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study 6 CTX-M positive E. coli isolates collected during a clinical study examining the effect of antibiotic use in a human trial were analysed. The aim of the study was to analyse these isolates and assess the effect of full or partial loss of plasmid genes on bacterial fitness and pathogenicity. A DNA array was utilised to assess resistance and virulence gene carriage. Plasmids were characterised by PCR-based replicon typing and addiction system multiplex PCR. A phenotypic array and insect virulence model were utilised to assess the effect of plasmid-loss in E. coli of a large multi-resistance plasmid. All six E. coli carrying blaCTX-M-14 were detected from a single participant and were identical by pulse field gel electrophoresis and MLST. Plasmid profiling and arrays indicated absence of a large multi-drug resistance (MDR) F-replicon plasmid carrying blaTEM, aadA4, strA, strB, dfrA17/19, sul1, and tetB from one isolate. Although this isolate partially retained the plasmid it showed altered fitness characteristics e.g. inability to respire in presence of antiseptics, similar to a plasmid-cured strain. However, unlike the plasmid-cured or plasmid harbouring strains, the survival rate for Galleria mellonella infected by the former strain was approximately 5-times lower, indicating other possible changes accompanying partial plasmid loss. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that an apparently healthy individual can harbour blaCTX-M-14 E. coli strains. In one such strain, isolated from the same individual, partial absence of a large MDR plasmid resulted in altered fitness and virulence characteristics, which may have implications in the ability of this strain to infect and any subsequent treatment. PMID:24386342

  20. Changing plasmid types responsible for extended spectrum cephalosporin resistance in Escherichia coli O157:H7 in the United States, 1996–2009

    PubMed Central

    Folster, J. P.; Pecic, G.; Stroika, S.; Rickert, R.; Whichard, J.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157 is a major cause of foodborne illness. Plasmids are genetic elements that mobilize antimicrobial resistance determinants including blaCMY β-lactamases that confer resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESC). ESCs are important for treating a variety of infections. IncA/C plasmids are found among diverse sources, including cattle, the principal source of E. coli O157 infections in humans. IncI1 plasmids are common among E. coli and Salmonella from poultry and other avian sources. To broaden our understanding of reservoirs of blaCMY, we determined the types of plasmids carrying blaCMY among E. coli O157. From 1996 to 2009, 3742 E. coli O157 isolates were tested. Eleven (0.29%) were ceftriaxone resistant and had a blaCMY-2-containing plasmid. All four isolates submitted before 2001 and a single 2001 isolate had blaCMY encoded on IncA/C plasmids, while all five isolates submitted after 2001 and a single 2001 isolate had blaCMY carried on IncI1 plasmids. The IncI1 plasmids were ST2, ST20, and ST23. We conclude that cephalosporin resistance among E. coli O157:H7 is due to plasmid-encoded blaCMY genes and that plasmid types appear to have shifted from IncA/C to IncI1. This shift suggests either a change in plasmid type among animal reservoirs or that the organism has expanded into avian reservoirs. More analysis of human, retail meat, and food animal isolates is necessary to broaden our understanding of the antimicrobial resistance determinants of ESC resistance among E. coli O157. PMID:26478858

  1. A repeat sequence causes competition of ColE1-type plasmids.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mei-Hui; Fu, Jen-Fen; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid pSW200 from Pantoea stewartii contains 41 copies of 15-bp repeats and has a replicon that is homologous to that of ColE1. Although deleting the repeats (pSW207) does not change the copy number and stability of the plasmid. The plasmid becomes unstable and is rapidly lost from the host when a homoplasmid with the repeats (pSW201) is present. Deleting the repeats is found to reduce the transcriptional activity of RNAIp and RNAIIp by about 30%, indicating that the repeats promote the transcription of RNAI and RNAII, and how the RNAI that is synthesized by pSW201 inhibits the replication of pSW207. The immunoblot analysis herein demonstrates that RNA polymerase β subunit and σ(70) in the lysate from Escherichia coli MG1655 bind to a biotin-labeled DNA probe that contains the entire sequence of the repeat region. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay also reveals that purified RNA polymerase shifts a DNA probe that contains four copies of the repeats. These results thus obtained reveal that RNA polymerase holoenzyme binds to the repeats. The repeats also exchange RNA polymerase with RNAIp and RNAIIp in vitro, revealing the mechanism by which the transcription is promoted. This investigation elucidates a mechanism by which a plasmid prevents the invasion of an incompatible plasmid and maintains its stability in the host cell during evolution. PMID:23613898

  2. Targeting relaxase genes for classification of the predominant plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Compain, Fabrice; Poisson, Agathe; Le Hello, Simon; Branger, Catherine; Weill, François-Xavier; Arlet, Guillaume; Decré, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    Plasmids are the main vectors of antimicrobial drug resistance and virulence genes, especially in Enterobacteriaceae. Identification and classification of plasmids is essential for analysis of their distribution. The most widely used typing method is PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT). A new classification scheme based on relaxase gene typing has been described recently. We propose a practical application of this method, with the development of a multiplex PCR set targeting relaxase genes found on plasmids most frequently encountered in Enterobacteriaceae. This method, here called "plasmid relaxase gene typing" (PRaseT), was validated with 60 transconjugants and transformants harboring various replicon types. The method was tested with 39 multidrug-resistant clinical isolates including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica carrying 1-7 replicons as well as with 17 plasmids non-typeable using PBRT; all replicons were tested in parallel with PBRT for comparison. Six multiplex PCRs and one simplex PCR, including 24 pairs of primers, recognized plasmids of groups A/C, B/O, colE, FIA, FIB, FIC, FV, FIIk, HI1, HI2, I1, K, L/M, N, P1α, Q1, U, W, X1, X2, X3 and X4. There was perfect correlation between PRaseT and PBRT results in 31/39 (79.5%) clinical isolates. Moreover, 11/17 (64.7%) plasmids non-typeable by PBRT could be typed by PRaseT. Our set of multiplex PCRs showed high sensitivity and specificity for the classification of resistance plasmids. It has proved complementary to the widely used PBRT and will improve the monitoring of plasmid distribution in every-day practice. PMID:24342269

  3. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase and fluoroquinolone resistance genes and plasmids among Escherichia coli isolates from zoo animals, Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Dolejska, Monika; Jamborova, Ivana; Brhelova, Eva; Blazkova, Lucie; Papousek, Ivo; Kozlova, Marketa; Klimes, Jiri; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    Commensal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy zoo animals kept in Ostrava Zoological Garden, Czech Republic, were investigated to evaluate the dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. A total of 160 faecal samples of various animal species were inoculated onto MacConkey agar with cefotaxime (2 mg L(-1)) or ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg L(-1)) to obtain ESBL- or PMQR-positive E. coli isolates. Clonality of E. coli isolates was investigated by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Plasmids carrying ESBL or PMQR genes were typed by PCR-based replicon typing, plasmid multilocus sequence typing and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Forty-nine (71%, n = 69) cefotaxime-resistant and 15 (16%, n = 94) ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates harboured ESBL or PMQR genes. Isolates were assigned to 18 sequence types (ST) and 20 clusters according to their macrorestriction patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The genes blaCTX -M-1 and qnrS1 were detected on highly related IncI1 plasmids assigned to clonal complex 3 (ST3, ST38) and on non-related IncN plasmids of ST1 and ST3, respectively. The gene qnrS1 was located on related IncX1 plasmids. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance is associated with spreading of particular E. coli clones and plasmids of specific incompatibility groups among various animal species. PMID:23679004

  4. Profiling of antimicrobial resistance and plasmid replicon types in β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli isolated from Korean beef cattle

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 78 isolates of Escherichia coli isolated from Korean beef cattle farms were investigated for the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and/or AmpC β-lactamase. In the disc diffusion test with ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalothin, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and cefoxitin, 38.5% of the isolates showed resistance to all of ampicillin, amoxicillin, and cephalothin. The double disc synergy method revealed that none of the isolates produced ESBL or AmpC β-lactamases. DNA sequencing showed that all isolates encoded genes for TEM-1-type β-lactamase. Moreover, 78.2% of the isolates transferred the TEM-1-type β-lactamase gene via conjugation. In plasmid replicon typing of all donors, IncFIB and IncFIA were identified in 71.4% and 41.0% of plasmids, respectively. In transconjugants, IncFIB and IncFIA were the most frequent types detected (61.5% and 41.0%, respectively). Overall, the present study indicates that selection pressures of antimicrobials on β-lactamases in beef cattle may be low relative to other livestock animals in Korea. Moreover, to reduce selection pressure and dissemination of β-lactamase, the long-term surveillance of antimicrobial use in domestic beef cattle should be established. PMID:26119172

  5. Homemade Site Directed Mutagenesis of Whole Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Laible, Mark; Boonrod, Kajohn

    2009-01-01

    Site directed mutagenesis of whole plasmids is a simple way to create slightly different variations of an original plasmid. With this method the cloned target gene can be altered by substitution, deletion or insertion of a few bases directly into a plasmid. It works by simply amplifying the whole plasmid, in a non PCR-based thermocycling reaction. During the reaction mutagenic primers, carrying the desired mutation, are integrated into the newly synthesized plasmid. In this video tutorial we demonstrate an easy and cost effective way to introduce base substitutions into a plasmid. The protocol works with standard reagents and is independent from commercial kits, which often are very expensive. Applying this protocol can reduce the total cost of a reaction to an eighth of what it costs using some of the commercial kits. In this video we also comment on critical steps during the process and give detailed instructions on how to design the mutagenic primers. PMID:19488024

  6. First Report of cfr-Carrying Plasmids in the Pandemic Sequence Type 22 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type IV Clone

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Anna C.; Lazaris, Alexandros; Kinnevey, Peter M.; Brennan, Orla M.; Brennan, Gráinne I.; O'Connell, Brian; Feßler, Andrea T.; Schwarz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Linezolid is often the drug of last resort for serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Linezolid resistance is mediated by mutations in 23S rRNA and genes for ribosomal proteins; cfr, encoding phenicol, lincosamide, oxazolidinone, pleuromutilin, and streptogramin A (PhLOPSA) resistance; its homologue cfr(B); or optrA, conferring oxazolidinone and phenicol resistance. Linezolid resistance is rare in S. aureus, and cfr is even rarer. This study investigated the clonality and linezolid resistance mechanisms of two MRSA isolates from patients in separate Irish hospitals. Isolates were subjected to cfr PCR, PhLOPSA susceptibility testing, 23S rRNA PCR and sequencing, DNA microarray profiling, spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid curing, and conjugative transfer. Whole-genome sequencing was used for single-nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis, multilocus sequence typing, L protein mutation identification, cfr plasmid sequence analysis, and optrA and cfr(B) detection. Isolates M12/0145 and M13/0401 exhibited linezolid MICs of 64 and 16 mg/liter, respectively, and harbored identical 23S rRNA and L22 mutations, but M12/0145 exhibited the mutation in 2/6 23S rRNA alleles, compared to 1/5 in M13/0401. Both isolates were sequence type 22 MRSA staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV (ST22-MRSA-IV)/spa type t032 isolates, harbored cfr, exhibited the PhLOPSA phenotype, and lacked optrA and cfr(B). They differed by five PFGE bands and 603 SNVs. Isolate M12/0145 harbored cfr and fexA on a 41-kb conjugative pSCFS3-type plasmid, whereas M13/0401 harbored cfr and lsa(B) on a novel 27-kb plasmid. This is the first report of cfr in the pandemic ST22-MRSA-IV clone. Different cfr plasmids and mutations associated with linezolid resistance in genotypically distinct ST22-MRSA-IV isolates highlight that prudent management of linezolid use is essential. PMID:26953212

  7. First Report of cfr-Carrying Plasmids in the Pandemic Sequence Type 22 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Type IV Clone.

    PubMed

    Shore, Anna C; Lazaris, Alexandros; Kinnevey, Peter M; Brennan, Orla M; Brennan, Gráinne I; O'Connell, Brian; Feßler, Andrea T; Schwarz, Stefan; Coleman, David C

    2016-05-01

    Linezolid is often the drug of last resort for serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Linezolid resistance is mediated by mutations in 23S rRNA and genes for ribosomal proteins; cfr, encoding phenicol, lincosamide, oxazolidinone, pleuromutilin, and streptogramin A (PhLOPSA) resistance; its homologue cfr(B); or optrA, conferring oxazolidinone and phenicol resistance. Linezolid resistance is rare in S. aureus, and cfr is even rarer. This study investigated the clonality and linezolid resistance mechanisms of two MRSA isolates from patients in separate Irish hospitals. Isolates were subjected to cfr PCR, PhLOPSA susceptibility testing, 23S rRNA PCR and sequencing, DNA microarray profiling, spa typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), plasmid curing, and conjugative transfer. Whole-genome sequencing was used for single-nucleotide variant (SNV) analysis, multilocus sequence typing, L protein mutation identification, cfr plasmid sequence analysis, and optrA and cfr(B) detection. Isolates M12/0145 and M13/0401 exhibited linezolid MICs of 64 and 16 mg/liter, respectively, and harbored identical 23S rRNA and L22 mutations, but M12/0145 exhibited the mutation in 2/6 23S rRNA alleles, compared to 1/5 in M13/0401. Both isolates were sequence type 22 MRSA staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV (ST22-MRSA-IV)/spa type t032 isolates, harbored cfr, exhibited the PhLOPSA phenotype, and lacked optrA and cfr(B). They differed by five PFGE bands and 603 SNVs. Isolate M12/0145 harbored cfr and fexA on a 41-kb conjugative pSCFS3-type plasmid, whereas M13/0401 harbored cfr and lsa(B) on a novel 27-kb plasmid. This is the first report of cfr in the pandemic ST22-MRSA-IV clone. Different cfr plasmids and mutations associated with linezolid resistance in genotypically distinct ST22-MRSA-IV isolates highlight that prudent management of linezolid use is essential. PMID:26953212

  8. Modified live Edwardsiella ictaluri vaccine, AQUAVAC-ESC, lacks multidrug resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Lafrentz, Benjamin R; Welch, Timothy J; Shoemaker, Craig A; Drennan, John D; Klesius, Phillip H

    2011-12-01

    Plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance was first discovered in Edwardsiella ictaluri in the early 1990s, and in 2007 an E. ictaluri isolate harboring an IncA/C plasmid was recovered from a moribund channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus infected with the bacterium. Due to the identification of multidrug resistance plasmids in aquaculture and their potential clinical importance, we sought to determine whether the modified live E. ictaluri vaccine strain in AQUAVAC-ESC harbors such plasmids, so that the use of this vaccine will not directly contribute to the pool of bacteria carrying plasmid-borne resistance. Antimicrobial sensitivity testing of the E. ictaluri parent isolate and vaccine strain demonstrated that both were sensitive to 15 of the 16 antimicrobials tested. Total DNA from each isolate was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a set of 13 primer pairs specific for conserved regions of the IncA/C plasmid backbone, and no specific products were obtained. PCR-based replicon typing of the parent isolate and vaccine strain demonstrated the absence of the 18 commonly occurring plasmid incompatibility groups. These results demonstrate that the vaccine strain does not carry resistance to commonly used antimicrobials and provide strong support for the absence of IncA/C and other commonly occurring plasmid incompatibility groups. Therefore, its use should not directly contribute to the pool of bacteria carrying plasmid-borne resistance. This work highlights the importance of thoroughly investigating potential vaccine strains for the presence of plasmids or other transmissible elements that may encode resistance to antibiotics. PMID:22372247

  9. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli by antimicrobial resistance profiles, plasmid replicon typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: Plasmid characterization has particular clinical importance because genes encoding significant traits including antimicrobial resistance are frequently carried on plasmids. The objective of this study was to examine the distribution of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Escherichia coli in relation ...

  10. Immune Responses of Piglets Immunized by a Recombinant Plasmid Containing Porcine Circovirus Type 2 and Porcine Interleukin-18 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Lei; Fu, Peng-Fei; Wang, Lin-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this study, two recombinant plasmids containing the ORF2 gene of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) with or without porcine interleukin-18 (IL-18) were constructed and evaluated for their ability to protect piglets against PCV2 challenge. Transient expression of the plasmids in PK-15 cells could be detected using Western blot. Piglets were given two intramuscular immunizations 3 weeks apart and were challenged with a virulent Wuzhi strain of PCV2 at 42 days after the initial immunization. All animals vaccinated with pBudCE4.1-ORF2 or with pBudCE4.1-ORF2/IL18 developed PCV2-specific antibody and T-lymphocyte proliferative responses. The levels of T-lymphocyte proliferation in piglets immunized with pBudCE4.1-ORF2/IL18 were significantly higher than in those immunized with pBudCE4.1-ORF2, and pBudCE4.1-ORF2/IL18 stimulated a significantly increased production of IFN-γ and IL-2. Furthermore, PCV2 challenge experiments showed that the DNA vaccine-immunized groups can partially prevent PCV2 viremia and significantly reduce the amount of PCV2 virus in the lymphoid tissues, and the piglets immunized by pBudCE4.1-ORF2/IL18 exhibit a marked inhibition of PCV2 replication compared to the pBudCE4.1-ORF2 group. These data demonstrate that the plasmid pBudCE4.1-ORF2/IL18 may be an effective approach for increasing PCV2 DNA vaccine immunogenicity. PMID:25268976

  11. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Niels B.; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O.; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment. PMID:25979887

  12. Dissemination of IncFII(K)-type plasmids in multiresistant CTX-M-15-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from children in hospital paediatric oncology wards.

    PubMed

    Dolejska, Monika; Brhelova, Eva; Dobiasova, Hana; Krivdova, Jana; Jurankova, Jana; Sevcikova, Alena; Dubska, Lenka; Literak, Ivan; Cizek, Alois; Vavrina, Martin; Kutnikova, Lucia; Sterba, Jaroslav

    2012-12-01

    In this study, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates in children with malignancies hospitalised at a paediatric oncology department in the Czech Republic were investigated. From June 2009 to January 2010, a total of 50 ESBL-producing faecal isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were obtained from 28 patients. These isolates were characterised with regard to ESBL enzymes, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and plasmids conferring resistance to cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones. ESBL-producing isolates included Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=36), Escherichia coli (n=7), Klebsiella oxytoca (n=3), Enterobacter cloacae (n=2) and Citrobacter freundii (n=2). Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates belonged to 7 MLST types, including sequence types ST280, ST321, ST323 and ST416 as well as the novel types ST626, ST627 and ST628. The multiresistant epidemic clone E. coli B2-O25b-ST131 was detected in one patient. The gene bla(CTX-M-15) was found on large conjugative IncFII(K) plasmids along with bla(TEM-1), bla(OXA-1), qnrB1, aac(6')-Ib-cr, strA, sul2, aac(3')-II and tet(A) genes in most isolates. Dissemination of IncFII(K) plasmids among various Enterobacteriaceae isolates was considered an important aspect of nosocomial colonisation in the wards by Enterobacteriaceae species producing ESBLs. This is the first study documenting multiple antibiotic resistance elements, including qnr genes, in IncFII(K) plasmids in various bacterial species isolated in a single hospital department. The results highlight the evolution of IncFII(K) plasmids into new variants containing novel antibiotic resistance elements and their important role in spreading ESBL-producing bacteria among hospitalised patients. PMID:23043911

  13. PCR-based identification of drowning: four case reports.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Evelin; Könczöl, Franciska; Tóth, Dénes; Patonai, Zoltán; Porpáczy, Zoltán; Kozma, Zsolt; Poór, Viktor S; Sipos, Katalin

    2016-09-01

    Proper diagnosis in drowning victims is often difficult due to the lack of signs specific to drowning. The diatom test is a widely used procedure for the diagnosis. Some types of water contain only minimal amounts of diatom cells which may provide false-negative results, while a negative diatom test result does not exclude drowning. In proving drowning, we used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based biological method in addition to the conventional methods. DNA was extracted from postmortem spleen tissues and water of the drowning site. Samples were tested with algae (diatoms and small green algae)- and cyanobacteria (blue-green algae)-specific primers. We present here multiple drowning cases in which diatom tests of the postmortem tissue samples and the water were negative. In each case, the presence of phytoplanktonic DNA strengthened the autopsy diagnosis of drowning even in the absence of visible diatoms. In the future, the PCR method may be of consideration as a possible supplement of the diatom test in the examination of presumed drowning cases. PMID:27080711

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain YU15 (Sequence Type 19) Harboring the Salmonella Genomic Island 1 and Virulence Plasmid pSTV

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Edmundo; Puente, José L.; Zaidi, Mussaret B.

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium sequence type 19 (ST19) strain YU15, isolated in Yucatán, Mexico, from a human baby stool culture, was determined using PacBio technology. The chromosome contains five intact prophages and the Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1). This strain carries the Salmonella virulence plasmid pSTV. PMID:27081132

  15. IncF Plasmids Are Commonly Carried by Antibiotic Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Drinking Water Sources in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Lyimo, Beatus; Buza, Joram; Subbiah, Murugan; Temba, Sylivester; Kipasika, Honest; Smith, Woutrina; Call, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the replicon types of plasmids, conjugation efficiencies, and the complement of antibiotic resistance genes for a panel of multidrug resistant E. coli isolates from surface waters in northern Tanzania. Standard membrane filtration was used to isolate and uidA PCR was used to confirm the identity of strains as E. coli. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by breakpoint assay and plasmid conjugation was determined by filter-mating experiments. PCR and sequencing were used to identify resistance genes and PCR-based replicon typing was used to determine plasmid types. Filter mating experiments indicated conjugation efficiencies ranged from 10(-1) to 10(-7). Over 80% of the donor cells successfully passed their resistance traits and eleven different replicon types were detected (IncI1, FIC, P, FIIA, A/C, FIB, FIA, H12, K/B B/O, and N). IncF plasmids were most commonly detected (49% of isolates), followed by types IncI1 and IncA/C. Detection of these public health-relevant conjugative plasmids and antibiotic resistant traits in Tanzanian water suggests the possible pollution of these water sources from human, livestock, and wild animal wastes and also shows the potential of these water sources in the maintenance and transmission of these resistance traits between environments, animals, and people. PMID:27110245

  16. IncF Plasmids Are Commonly Carried by Antibiotic Resistant Escherichia coli Isolated from Drinking Water Sources in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Lyimo, Beatus; Buza, Joram; Subbiah, Murugan; Temba, Sylivester; Kipasika, Honest; Smith, Woutrina; Call, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the replicon types of plasmids, conjugation efficiencies, and the complement of antibiotic resistance genes for a panel of multidrug resistant E. coli isolates from surface waters in northern Tanzania. Standard membrane filtration was used to isolate and uidA PCR was used to confirm the identity of strains as E. coli. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by breakpoint assay and plasmid conjugation was determined by filter-mating experiments. PCR and sequencing were used to identify resistance genes and PCR-based replicon typing was used to determine plasmid types. Filter mating experiments indicated conjugation efficiencies ranged from 10−1 to 10−7. Over 80% of the donor cells successfully passed their resistance traits and eleven different replicon types were detected (IncI1, FIC, P, FIIA, A/C, FIB, FIA, H12, K/B B/O, and N). IncF plasmids were most commonly detected (49% of isolates), followed by types IncI1 and IncA/C. Detection of these public health-relevant conjugative plasmids and antibiotic resistant traits in Tanzanian water suggests the possible pollution of these water sources from human, livestock, and wild animal wastes and also shows the potential of these water sources in the maintenance and transmission of these resistance traits between environments, animals, and people. PMID:27110245

  17. Stability of Penicillinase Plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, L. H.; Dyke, K. G. H.

    1971-01-01

    The isolation of mutants of Staphylococcus aureus that are affected in the stability of penicillinase plasmids is described. One mutation is plasmid borne and results in nonreplication of the plasmid at 42 C. A second type of mutation is host-borne and gives rise to instability of both mcrI and mcrII penicillinase plasmids but not a tetracycline-resistant plasmid. Images PMID:4105036

  18. Complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid containing the botulinum neurotoxin gene in Clostridium botulinum type B strain 111 isolated from an infant patient in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Koji; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Kohda, Tomoko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Umeda, Kaoru; Iida, Tetsuya; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi

    2014-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are highly potent toxins that are produced by Clostridium botulinum. We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of a plasmid containing the botulinum neurotoxin gene in C. botulinum type B strain 111 in order to obtain an insight into the toxigenicity and evolution of the bont gene in C. botulinum. Group I C. botulinum type B strain 111 was isolated from the first case of infant botulism in Japan in 1995. In previous studies, botulinum neurotoxin subtype B2 (BoNT/B2) produced by strain 111 exhibited different antigenic properties from those of authentic BoNT/B1 produced by strain Okra. We have recently shown that the isolates of strain 111 that lost toxigenicity were cured of the plasmid containing the bont/B2 gene. In the present study, the plasmid (named pCB111) was circular 265,575 bp double-stranded DNA and contained 332 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). 85 gene products of these ORFs could be functionally assigned on the basis of sequence homology to known proteins. The bont/B2 complex genes were located on pCB111 and some gene products may be involved in the conjugative plasmid transfer and horizontal transfer of bont genes. pCB111 was similar to previously identified plasmids containing bont/B1, /B5, or/A3 complex genes in other group I C. botulinum strains. It was suggested that these plasmids had been derived from a common ancestor and had played important roles for the bont gene transfer between C. botulinum. PMID:25149145

  19. Campylobacter fetus subspecies contain conserved type IV secretion systems on multiple genomic islands and plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The features contributing to the differences in pathogenicity of the C. fetus subspecies are unknown. Putative factors involved in pathogenesis are located in genomic islands that encode type IV secretion system (T4SS) and fic-domain (filamentation induced by cyclic AMP) proteins. In the genomes of ...

  20. Development of a transfer plasmid for expression of foreign genes in meleagrid herpesvirus type 1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current research indicates that meleagrid herpesvirus type 1 (MeHV-1) is an excellent vector for the expression of avian immunogens. Classical methods using marker rescue approaches are often time consuming and require the inclusion of undesirable additional genetic material (antibiotic resistant, g...

  1. pDGO100, a type 1 IncC plasmid from 1981 carrying ARI-A and a Tn1696-like transposon in a novel integrating element.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Partridge, Sally R; Hall, Ruth M

    2016-07-01

    Most A/C plasmids sequenced to date were recovered in the last two decades. To gain insight into the evolution of this group, the IncC plasmid pDGO100, found in a multiply antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli strain isolated in 1981, was sequenced. pDGO100 belongs to the type 1 lineage and carries an ARI-A antibiotic resistance island but not an ARI-B island. The A/C2 backbone of pDGO100 has a deletion in the rhs1 gene previously found in pRMH760 and differs by only six single base pair substitutions from pRMH760, recovered at the same hospital 16years later. This confirms that the separation of type 1 and type 2 IncC plasmids is long standing. The ARI-A islands are also closely related, but pRMH760 contains Tn4352B in tniA of Tn402, while in pDGO100, Tn4352 has inserted into merA of pDUmer. pDGO100 also carries an additional 46kb insertion that includes a Tn1696-like transposon with the dfrB3 gene cassette. This insertion was identified as a novel integrating element, with an int gene at one end, and also includes the fec iron uptake operon that has been acquired from the E. coli chromosome. Related integrating elements carrying the same int gene were found in A/C2, IncHI1, and IncHI2 plasmids, and in the chromosomes of Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella oxytoca, and Cronobacter sakazakii isolates. In the Enterobacteriaceae chromosomes, these integrating elements appear to target a gene encoding a radical SAM superfamily protein. In the A/C2, IncHI1, and IncHI2 plasmids, genes encoding a phosphoadenosine phosphosulfate reductase were interrupted. The extremities of the integrating element are highly conserved, whilst the internal gene content varies. The detection of integrative elements in plasmids demonstrates an increased range of locations into which this type of mobile element can integrate and insertion in plasmids is likely to assist their spread. PMID:27318267

  2. Characterization of a Theta-Type Plasmid from Lactobacillus sakei: a Potential Basis for Low-Copy-Number Vectors in Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, Carl-Alfred; Crutz-Le Coq, Anne-Marie; Malleret, Christine; Zagorec, Monique

    2003-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 13-kb plasmid pRV500, isolated from Lactobacillus sakei RV332, was determined. Sequence analysis enabled the identification of genes coding for a putative type I restriction-modification system, two genes coding for putative recombinases of the integrase family, and a region likely involved in replication. The structural features of this region, comprising a putative ori segment containing 11- and 22-bp repeats and a repA gene coding for a putative initiator protein, indicated that pRV500 belongs to the pUCL287 subfamily of theta-type replicons. A 3.7-kb fragment encompassing this region was fused to an Escherichia coli replicon to produce the shuttle vector pRV566 and was observed to be functional in L. sakei for plasmid replication. The L. sakei replicon alone could not support replication in E. coli. Plasmid pRV500 and its derivative pRV566 were determined to be at very low copy numbers in L. sakei. pRV566 was maintained at a reasonable rate over 20 generations in several lactobacilli, such as Lactobacillus curvatus, Lactobacillus casei, and Lactobacillus plantarum, in addition to L. sakei, making it an interesting basis for developing vectors. Sequence relationships with other plasmids are described and discussed. PMID:12957947

  3. A Ribeiroia spp. (Class: Trematoda) - Specific PCR-based diagnostic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinitz, D.M.; Yoshino, T.P.; Cole, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Increased reporting of amphibian malformations in North America has been noted with concern in light of reports that amphibian numbers and species are declining worldwide. Ribeiroia ondatrae has been shown to cause a variety of types of malformations in amphibians. However, little is known about the prevalence of R. ondatrae in North America. To aid in conducting field studies of Ribeiroia spp., we have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic. Herein, we describe the development of an accurate, rapid, simple, and cost-effective diagnostic for detection of Ribeiroia spp. infection in snails (Planorbella trivolvis). Candidate oligonucleotide primers for PCR were designed via DNA sequence analyses of multiple ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 regions from Ribeiroia spp. and Echinostoma spp. Comparison of consensus sequences determined from both genera identified areas of sequence potentially unique to Ribeiroia spp. The PCR reliably produced a diagnostic 290-base pair (bp) product in the presence of a wide concentration range of snail or frog DNA. Sensitivity was examined with DNA extracted from single R. ondatrae cercaria. The single-tube PCR could routinely detect less than 1 cercariae equivalent, because DNA isolated from a single cercaria could be diluted at least 1:50 and still yield a positive result via gel electrophoresis. An even more sensitive nested PCR also was developed that routinely detected 100 fg of the 290-bp fragment. The assay did not detect furcocercous cercariae of certain Schistosomatidae, Echinostoma sp., or Sphaeridiotrema globulus nor adults of Clinostomum sp. or Cyathocotyle bushiensis. Field testing of 137 P. trivolvis identified 3 positives with no overt environmental cross-reactivity, and results concurred with microscopic examinations in all cases. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2007.

  4. Construction of plasmid, bacterial expression, purification, and assay of dengue virus type 2 NS5 methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Boonyasuppayakorn, Siwaporn; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of mosquito-borne flavivirus, causes self-limiting dengue fever as well as life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Its positive sense RNA genome has a cap at the 5'-end and no poly(A) tail at the 3'-end. The viral RNA encodes a single polyprotein, C-prM-E-NS1-NS2A-NS2B-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5. The polyprotein is processed into 3 structural proteins (C, prM, and E) and 7 nonstructural (NS) proteins (NS1, NS2A, NS2B, NS3, NS4A, NS4B, NS5). NS3 and NS5 are multifunctional enzymes performing various tasks in viral life cycle. The N-terminal domain of NS5 has distinct GTP and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) binding sites. The role of GTP binding site is implicated in guanylyltransferase (GTase) activity of NS5. The SAM binding site is involved in both N-7 and 2'-O-methyltransferase (MTase) activities involved in formation of type I cap. The C-terminal domain of NS5 catalyzes RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity involved in RNA synthesis. We describe the construction of the MTase domain of NS5 in an E. coli expression vector, purification of the enzyme, and conditions for enzymatic assays of N7- and 2'O-methyltransferase activities that yield the final type I 5'-capped RNA ((7Me)GpppA2'OMe-RNA). PMID:24696348

  5. pUCL287 plasmid from Tetragenococcus halophila (Pediococcus halophilus) ATCC 33315 represents a new theta-type replicon family of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Benachour, A; Frère, J; Novel, G

    1995-05-01

    A cryptic plasmid, pUCL287, was isolated from Tetragenococcus halophila (Pediococcus halophilus) ATCC 33315. It had a theta-type mechanism of replication in its natural host. Its minimal replicon, Rep287, was isolated on a 1.6-kb EcoRI fragment. The Rep287 host range included the genera Pediococcus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus and Leuconostoc but not genus Lactococcus. Plasmids hybridizing to pUCL287 are rare among lactic acid bacteria. As assessed by hybridization, Rep287 is dissimilar to pAM beta 1, pIP501 and pUCL22, representatives of the most common theta-type replicon groups in Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore, pUCL287 appears to represent a new theta-type replicon family from lactic acid bacteria. PMID:7750734

  6. Genome Sequencing of Xanthomonas vasicola Pathovar vasculorum Reveals Variation in Plasmids and Genes Encoding Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis, Type-IV Pilus and Type-III Secretion Effectors.

    PubMed

    Wasukira, Arthur; Coulter, Max; Al-Sowayeh, Noorah; Thwaites, Richard; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kubiriba, Jerome; Smith, Julian; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas vasicola pathovar vasculorum (Xvv) is the bacterial agent causing gumming disease in sugarcane. Here, we compare complete genome sequences for five isolates of Xvv originating from sugarcane and one from maize. This identified two distinct types of lipopolysaccharide synthesis gene clusters among Xvv isolates: one is similar to that of Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar citri (Xac) and is probably the ancestral type, while the other is similar to those of the sugarcane-inhabiting species, Xanthomonas sacchari. Four of six Xvv isolates harboured sequences similar to the Xac plasmid, pXAC47, and showed a distinct Type-IV pilus (T4P) sequence type, whereas the T4P locus of the other two isolates resembled that of the closely related banana pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum (Xcm). The Xvv isolate from maize has lost a gene encoding a homologue of the virulence effector, xopAF, which was present in all five of the sugarcane isolates, while xopL contained a premature stop codon in four out of six isolates. These findings shed new light on evolutionary events since the divergence of Xvv and Xcm, as well as further elucidating the relationships between the two closely related pathogens. PMID:25437615

  7. Genome Sequencing of Xanthomonas vasicola Pathovar vasculorum Reveals Variation in Plasmids and Genes Encoding Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis, Type-IV Pilus and Type-III Secretion Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Wasukira, Arthur; Coulter, Max; Al-Sowayeh, Noorah; Thwaites, Richard; Paszkiewicz, Konrad; Kubiriba, Jerome; Smith, Julian; Grant, Murray; Studholme, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas vasicola pathovar vasculorum (Xvv) is the bacterial agent causing gumming disease in sugarcane. Here, we compare complete genome sequences for five isolates of Xvv originating from sugarcane and one from maize. This identified two distinct types of lipopolysaccharide synthesis gene clusters among Xvv isolates: one is similar to that of Xanthomonas axonopodis pathovar citri (Xac) and is probably the ancestral type, while the other is similar to those of the sugarcane-inhabiting species, Xanthomonas sacchari. Four of six Xvv isolates harboured sequences similar to the Xac plasmid, pXAC47, and showed a distinct Type-IV pilus (T4P) sequence type, whereas the T4P locus of the other two isolates resembled that of the closely related banana pathogen, Xanthomonas campestris pathovar musacearum (Xcm). The Xvv isolate from maize has lost a gene encoding a homologue of the virulence effector, xopAF, which was present in all five of the sugarcane isolates, while xopL contained a premature stop codon in four out of six isolates. These findings shed new light on evolutionary events since the divergence of Xvv and Xcm, as well as further elucidating the relationships between the two closely related pathogens. PMID:25437615

  8. Conjugative Plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Pachulec, Emilia; van der Does, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM) determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones) and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants) have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233) or containing Dutch (pEP5289) or American (pEP5050) type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1α, β, γ, δ and ε subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids conjugated efficiently between

  9. Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli Resistant to Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporins in the Norwegian Broiler Production.

    PubMed

    Mo, Solveig Sølverød; Slettemeås, Jannice Schau; Berg, Einar Sverre; Norström, Madelaine; Sunde, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins have been detected in the Norwegian broiler production, despite the fact that antimicrobial agents are rarely used. The genetic mechanism responsible for cephalosporin resistance is mainly attributed to the presence of the blaCMY-2 gene encoding a plasmid-mediated AmpC-beta-lactamase (pAmpC). The aim of this study was to characterize and compare blaCMY-2 containing Escherichia coli isolated from the intestinal flora of broilers and retail chicken meat (fillets) to identify possible successful clones and/or resistance plasmids widespread in the Norwegian broiler production. Methods used included PCR based phylotyping, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis and whole genome sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of an IncK plasmid carrying blaCMY-2 was determined. Intestinal isolates displayed a higher degree of genetic diversity than meat isolates. A cluster of genetically related isolates belonging to ST38, phylogroup D, carrying blaCMY-2 containing IncK plasmids was identified. Furthermore, genes encoding plasmid stability systems (relBE/stbDE and pndAC) were identified on the IncK plasmid. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of a subset of isolates confirmed a close genetic relationship within the two most prevalent STs. The IncK plasmids within these two STs also shared a high degree of similarity. Cephalosporin-resistant E. coli with the same genetic characteristics have been identified in the broiler production in other European countries, and the IncK plasmid characterized in this study showed close homology to a plasmid isolated from retail chicken meat in the Netherlands. The results indicate that both clonal expansion and horizontal transfer of blaCMY-2 containing plasmids contribute to dissemination of cephalosporin resistant E. coli in the broiler production. The presence of plasmid

  10. Plasmid and Host Strain Characteristics of Escherichia coli Resistant to Extended-Spectrum Cephalosporins in the Norwegian Broiler Production

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Solveig Sølverød; Slettemeås, Jannice Schau; Berg, Einar Sverre; Norström, Madelaine; Sunde, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli resistant to extended-spectrum cephalosporins have been detected in the Norwegian broiler production, despite the fact that antimicrobial agents are rarely used. The genetic mechanism responsible for cephalosporin resistance is mainly attributed to the presence of the blaCMY-2 gene encoding a plasmid-mediated AmpC-beta-lactamase (pAmpC). The aim of this study was to characterize and compare blaCMY-2 containing Escherichia coli isolated from the intestinal flora of broilers and retail chicken meat (fillets) to identify possible successful clones and/or resistance plasmids widespread in the Norwegian broiler production. Methods used included PCR based phylotyping, conjugation experiments, plasmid replicon typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multiple locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis and whole genome sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of an IncK plasmid carrying blaCMY-2 was determined. Intestinal isolates displayed a higher degree of genetic diversity than meat isolates. A cluster of genetically related isolates belonging to ST38, phylogroup D, carrying blaCMY-2 containing IncK plasmids was identified. Furthermore, genes encoding plasmid stability systems (relBE/stbDE and pndAC) were identified on the IncK plasmid. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of a subset of isolates confirmed a close genetic relationship within the two most prevalent STs. The IncK plasmids within these two STs also shared a high degree of similarity. Cephalosporin-resistant E. coli with the same genetic characteristics have been identified in the broiler production in other European countries, and the IncK plasmid characterized in this study showed close homology to a plasmid isolated from retail chicken meat in the Netherlands. The results indicate that both clonal expansion and horizontal transfer of blaCMY-2 containing plasmids contribute to dissemination of cephalosporin resistant E. coli in the broiler production. The presence of plasmid

  11. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460-3.854), p-value < 0.001] was found to be a predictor of ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the bla CTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6')-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85-99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact. PMID:26904015

  12. Multiple ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Sequence Types Carrying Quinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance Genes Circulating in Companion and Domestic Farm Animals in Mwanza, Tanzania, Harbor Commonly Occurring Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Seni, Jeremiah; Falgenhauer, Linda; Simeo, Nabina; Mirambo, Mariam M.; Imirzalioglu, Can; Matee, Mecky; Rweyemamu, Mark; Chakraborty, Trinad; Mshana, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in humans, animals, and their surrounding environments is of global concern. Currently there is limited information on ESBL presence in rural farming communities worldwide. We performed a cross-sectional study in Mwanza, Tanzania, involving 600 companion and domestic farm animals between August/September 2014. Rectal swab/cloaca specimens were processed to identify ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We detected 130 (21.7%) animals carrying ESBL-producing bacteria, the highest carriage being among dogs and pigs [39.2% (51/130) and 33.1% (43/130), respectively]. The majority of isolates were Escherichia coli [93.3% (125/134)] and exotic breed type [OR (95%CI) = 2.372 (1.460–3.854), p-value < 0.001] was found to be a predictor of ESBL carriage among animals. Whole-genome sequences of 25 ESBL-producing E. coli were analyzed for phylogenetic relationships using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and core genome comparisons. Fourteen different sequence types were detected of which ST617 (7/25), ST2852 (3/25), ST1303 (3/25) were the most abundant. All isolates harbored the blaCTX-M-15 allele, 22/25 carried strA and strB, 12/25 aac(6′)-lb-cr, and 11/25 qnrS1. Antibiotic resistance was associated with IncF, IncY, as well as non-typable plasmids. Eleven isolates carried pPGRT46-related plasmids, previously reported from isolates in Nigeria. Five isolates had plasmids exhibiting 85–99% homology to pCA28, previously detected in isolates from the US. Our findings indicate a pan-species distribution of ESBL-producing E. coli clonal groups in farming communities and provide evidence for plasmids harboring antibiotic resistances of regional and international impact. PMID:26904015

  13. Replication of Staphylococcal Multiresistance Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Neville; Apisiridej, Sumalee; Berg, Tracey; O'Rourke, Brendon A.; Curnock, Steve; Dyke, Keith G. H.; Skurray, Ronald A.

    2000-01-01

    Based on structural and functional properties, three groups of large staphylococcal multiresistance plasmids have been recognized, viz., the pSK1 family, pSK41-like conjugative plasmids, and β-lactamase–heavy-metal resistance plasmids. Here we describe an analysis of the replication functions of a representative of each of these plasmid groups. The replication initiation genes from the Staphylococcus aureus plasmids pSK1, pSK41, and pI9789::Tn552 were found to be related to each other and to the Staphylococcus xylosus plasmid pSX267 and are also related to rep genes of several plasmids from other gram-positive genera. Nucleotide sequence similarity between pSK1 and pI9789::Tn552 extended beyond their rep genes, encompassing upstream divergently transcribed genes, orf245 and orf256, respectively. Our analyses revealed that genes encoding proteins related to the deduced orf245 product are variously represented, in several types of organization, on plasmids possessing six seemingly evolutionarily distinct types of replication initiation genes and including both theta-mode and rolling-circle replicons. Construction of minireplicons and subsequent functional analysis demonstrated that orf245 is required for the segregational stability of the pSK1 replicon. In contrast, no gene equivalent to orf245 is evident on the conjugative plasmid pSK41, and a minireplicon encoding only the pSK41 rep gene was found to exhibit a segregational stability approaching that of the parent plasmid. Significantly, the results described establish that many of the large multiresistance plasmids that have been identified in clinical staphylococci, which were formerly presumed to be unrelated, actually utilize an evolutionarily related theta-mode replication system. PMID:10735859

  14. Plasmid-mediated resistance to cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones in various Escherichia coli sequence types isolated from rooks wintering in Europe.

    PubMed

    Jamborova, Ivana; Dolejska, Monika; Vojtech, Jiri; Guenther, Sebastian; Uricariu, Raluca; Drozdowska, Joanna; Papousek, Ivo; Pasekova, Katerina; Meissner, Wlodzimierz; Hordowski, Jozef; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing, AmpC beta-lactamase-producing, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene-positive strains of Escherichia coli were investigated in wintering rooks (Corvus frugilegus) from eight European countries. Fecal samples (n = 1,073) from rooks wintering in the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Serbia, Spain, and Switzerland were examined. Resistant isolates obtained from selective cultivation were screened for ESBL, AmpC, and PMQR genes by PCR and sequencing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing were performed to reveal their clonal relatedness. In total, from the 1,073 samples, 152 (14%) cefotaxime-resistant E. coli isolates and 355 (33%) E. coli isolates with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin were found. Eighty-two (54%) of these cefotaxime-resistant E. coli isolates carried the following ESBL genes: blaCTX-M-1 (n = 39 isolates), blaCTX-M-15 (n = 25), blaCTX-M-24 (n = 4), blaTEM-52 (n = 4), blaCTX-M-14 (n = 2), blaCTX-M-55 (n = 2), blaSHV-12 (n = 2), blaCTX-M-8 (n = 1), blaCTX-M-25 (n = 1), blaCTX-M-28 (n = 1), and an unspecified gene (n = 1). Forty-seven (31%) cefotaxime-resistant E. coli isolates carried the blaCMY-2 AmpC beta-lactamase gene. Sixty-two (17%) of the E. coli isolates with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin were positive for the PMQR genes qnrS1 (n = 54), qnrB19 (n = 4), qnrS1 and qnrB19 (n = 2), qnrS2 (n = 1), and aac(6')-Ib-cr (n = 1). Eleven isolates from the Czech Republic (n = 8) and Serbia (n = 3) were identified to be CTX-M-15-producing E. coli clone B2-O25b-ST131 isolates. Ninety-one different sequence types (STs) among 191 ESBL-producing, AmpC-producing, and PMQR gene-positive E. coli isolates were determined, with ST58 (n = 15), ST10 (n = 14), and ST131 (n = 12) predominating. The widespread occurrence of highly diverse ESBL- and AmpC-producing and PMQR gene-positive E. coli isolates, including the clinically important multiresistant

  15. Plasmid-Mediated Resistance to Cephalosporins and Fluoroquinolones in Various Escherichia coli Sequence Types Isolated from Rooks Wintering in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Dolejska, Monika; Vojtech, Jiri; Guenther, Sebastian; Uricariu, Raluca; Drozdowska, Joanna; Papousek, Ivo; Pasekova, Katerina; Meissner, Wlodzimierz; Hordowski, Jozef; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing, AmpC beta-lactamase-producing, and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene-positive strains of Escherichia coli were investigated in wintering rooks (Corvus frugilegus) from eight European countries. Fecal samples (n = 1,073) from rooks wintering in the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Serbia, Spain, and Switzerland were examined. Resistant isolates obtained from selective cultivation were screened for ESBL, AmpC, and PMQR genes by PCR and sequencing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing were performed to reveal their clonal relatedness. In total, from the 1,073 samples, 152 (14%) cefotaxime-resistant E. coli isolates and 355 (33%) E. coli isolates with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin were found. Eighty-two (54%) of these cefotaxime-resistant E. coli isolates carried the following ESBL genes: blaCTX-M-1 (n = 39 isolates), blaCTX-M-15 (n = 25), blaCTX-M-24 (n = 4), blaTEM-52 (n = 4), blaCTX-M-14 (n = 2), blaCTX-M-55 (n = 2), blaSHV-12 (n = 2), blaCTX-M-8 (n = 1), blaCTX-M-25 (n = 1), blaCTX-M-28 (n = 1), and an unspecified gene (n = 1). Forty-seven (31%) cefotaxime-resistant E. coli isolates carried the blaCMY-2 AmpC beta-lactamase gene. Sixty-two (17%) of the E. coli isolates with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin were positive for the PMQR genes qnrS1 (n = 54), qnrB19 (n = 4), qnrS1 and qnrB19 (n = 2), qnrS2 (n = 1), and aac(6′)-Ib-cr (n = 1). Eleven isolates from the Czech Republic (n = 8) and Serbia (n = 3) were identified to be CTX-M-15-producing E. coli clone B2-O25b-ST131 isolates. Ninety-one different sequence types (STs) among 191 ESBL-producing, AmpC-producing, and PMQR gene-positive E. coli isolates were determined, with ST58 (n = 15), ST10 (n = 14), and ST131 (n = 12) predominating. The widespread occurrence of highly diverse ESBL- and AmpC-producing and PMQR gene-positive E. coli isolates, including the clinically important

  16. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  17. Recombinant goose-type lysozyme in channel catfish: Lysozyme activity and efficacy as plasmid DNA immunostimulant against Aeromonas hydrophila infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objectives of this study were: 1) to investigate whether recombinant channel catfish lysozyme g (CC-Lys-g) produced in E. coli expression system possesses any lysozyme activity; and 2) to evaluate whether channel catfish lysozyme g plasmid DNA could be used as an immunostimulant to protect chann...

  18. HDX-MS and deletion analysis of the type 4 secretion system protein TraF from the Escherichia coli F plasmid.

    PubMed

    Lento, Cristina; Ferraro, Michele; Wilson, Derek; Audette, Gerald F

    2016-02-01

    Conjugative DNA transfer by the F-plasmid is achieved through a type IV secretion system (T4SS) encoded within the plasmid's transfer region; TraF is one of several F-T4SS proteins essential for F-pilus assembly. In order to identify regions of the protein important for TraF function, a series of deletion mutants were assessed for their ability to recover conjugative transfer in a traF knockout. Interestingly, modification of any region of TraF abolishes pilus synthesis, resulting in a loss of rescue of conjugative function. Dynamic analysis of TraF by time-resolved hydrogen-deuterium exchange revealed that the C-terminal region containing the predicted thioredoxin-like domain is quite structured, while the N-terminal region, predicted to interact with TraH in the intact F-T4SS, was more dynamic. PMID:26785931

  19. High-level plasmid-mediated gentamicin resistance and pheromone response of plasmids present in clinical isolates of Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed Central

    Shiojima, M; Tomita, H; Tanimoto, K; Fujimoto, S; Ike, Y

    1997-01-01

    Eleven pheromone-responding plasmids encoding erythromycin or gentamicin resistance were isolated from multiresistant clinical Enterococcus faecalis isolates. The plasmids were classified into six types with respect to their pheromone responses. The three erythromycin resistance plasmids responded to different pheromones. Of the eight gentamicin resistance plasmids, four plasmids responded to same pheromone. Southern hybridization studies showed that the genes involved in regulation of the pheromone response were conserved in the drug resistance plasmids. PMID:9056018

  20. Comparable Genital Tract Infection, Pathology, and Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Inoculated with Wild-Type or Plasmid-Deficient Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar D

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yanyan; Frazer, Lauren C.; O'Connell, Catherine M.; Tarantal, Alice F.; Andrews, Charles W.; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Russell, Ali N.; Sullivan, Jeanne E.; Poston, Taylor B.; Vallejo, Abbe N.

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus macaques were studied to directly address the potential for plasmid-deficient Chlamydia trachomatis to serve as a live attenuated vaccine in the genital tract. Five repeated cervical inoculations of rhesus macaques with wild-type serovar D strain D/UW-3/Cx or a plasmid-deficient derivative of this strain, CTD153, resulted in infections with similar kinetics and induced comparable levels of protective immunity. After all animals received five challenges with D/UW-3/Cx, levels of inflammation observed grossly and histologically were similar between the groups. Animals in both groups developed evidence of oviduct dilatation; however, reduced oviduct dilatation was observed for “controllers,” i.e., animals without detectable chlamydial DNA in the fimbriae at weeks 5 and 12. Grouping animals into “ascenders” and “controllers” revealed that elevated early T cell responses were associated with protection, whereas higher antibody responses were associated with ascension. Protected animals shared common major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles. Overall, genetic differences of individual animals, rather than the presence or absence of the chlamydial plasmid in the primary infecting strain, appeared to play a role in determining the outcome of infection. PMID:26216426

  1. Molecular characterization of the lactococcal plasmid pCIS3: natural stacking of specificity subunits of a type I restriction/modification system in a single lactococcal strain.

    PubMed

    Seegers, J F; van Sinderen, D; Fitzgerald, G F

    2000-02-01

    A 6.1 kb plasmid from the Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strain UC509.9, named pCIS3, was found to mediate a restriction/modification (R/M) phenotype. Nucleotide sequence analysis of pCIS3 revealed the presence of an hsdS gene, typical of type I R/M systems. The presence of this plasmid resulted in a 10(4)-fold reduction in the efficiency of plating (e.o.p.) of unmodified phage. In addition to the hsdS gene of pCIS3, two more hsdS genes were identified in strain UC509.9, one located on the chromosome downstream of a gene highly homologous to hsdM genes and a third on the smallest (4 kb) plasmid, named pCIS1. The replication region of pCIS3 was highly similar to that of a large family of lactococcal theta replicons. In addition, pCIS3 was found to encode a member of the CorA family of magnesium transporters. PMID:10708382

  2. Quantification of genetically modified soybeans using a combination of a capillary-type real-time PCR system and a plasmid reference standard.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Akie; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sugimura, Mitsunori; Watanabe, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Kanamori, Hisayuki; Hino, Akihiro; Esaka, Muneharu; Maitani, Tamio

    2006-04-01

    Because the labeling of grains and feed- and foodstuffs is mandatory if the genetically modified organism (GMO) content exceeds a certain level of approved genetically modified varieties in many countries, there is a need for a rapid and useful method of GMO quantification in food samples. In this study, a rapid detection system was developed for Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS) quantification using a combination of a capillary-type real-time PCR system, a LightCycler real-time PCR system, and plasmid DNA as the reference standard. In addition, we showed for the first time that the plasmid and genomic DNA should be similar in the established detection system because the PCR efficiencies of using plasmid DNA and using genomic DNA were not significantly different. The conversion factor (Cf) to calculate RRS content (%) was further determined from the average value analyzed in three laboratories. The accuracy and reproducibility of this system for RRS quantification at a level of 5.0% were within a range from 4.46 to 5.07% for RRS content and within a range from 2.0% to 7.0% for the relative standard deviation (RSD) value, respectively. This system rapidly monitored the labeling system and had allowable levels of accuracy and precision. PMID:16636447

  3. Preparation of ultrasound microbubbles crosslinked to albumin nanoparticles packaged with tissue-type plasminogen activator gene plasmid and method of in vivo transfection

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Ji; Shang-Yi, Ji; Xia, He; Wen-Ping, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Aims To observe the effect of constructed ultrasound microbubble crosslinked to albium nanoparticles packaged with tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) gene plasmid on the in vivo transfection. Methods The rabbits were chosen for all experiments. A highly expressive gene plasmid for tPA was constructed and packaged into a prepared nanoparticle with bovine serum albumin (BSA). This albium nanoparticle packaged with tPA gene plasmid was crosslinked to an ultrasound microbubble prepared with BSA and sucrose to form a nano-targeting vector system for tPA gene transfection. The transfection and effective expression of tPA in heart, liver, leg skeletal muscle and the cervical rib were detected with polyclonal antibodies to tPA using immunohistochemical method; the tPA level and D-dimer content of blood were also tested. Results The expression of tPA could be seen in the tissues mentioned above, with the increase in blood tPA level and D-dimer content from 0.20 ± 0.05 µg/L and 81.76 ± 9.84 µg/L before the operation, to the higher levels of 0.44 ± 0.05 µg/L and 669.28 ± 97.74 µg/L after transfection. Conclusion The nano-targeting vector system for tPA gene was contructed successfully. This provides a new theory and experimental method for the nano-targeted transgene.

  4. High-throughput real-time PCR-based genotyping without DNA purification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background While improvements in genotyping technology have allowed for increased throughput and reduced time and expense, protocols remain hindered by the slow upstream steps of isolating, purifying, and normalizing DNA. Various methods exist for genotyping samples directly through blood, without having to purify the DNA first. These procedures were designed to be used on smaller throughput systems, however, and have not yet been tested for use on current high-throughput real-time (q)PCR based genotyping platforms. In this paper, a method of quantitative qPCR-based genotyping on blood without DNA purification was developed using a high-throughput qPCR platform. Findings The performances of either DNA purified from blood or the same blood samples without DNA purification were evaluated through qPCR-based genotyping. First, 60 different mutations prevalent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population were genotyped in 12 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals using the QuantStudio™12K Flex Real-Time PCR System. Genotyping directly from blood gave a call rate of 99.21%, and an accuracy of 100%, while the purified DNA gave a call rate of 92.49%, and an accuracy of 99.74%. Although no statistical difference was found for these parameters, an F test comparing the standard deviations of the wild type clusters for the two different methods indicated significantly less variation when genotyping directly from blood instead of after DNA purification. To further establish the ability to perform high-throughput qPCR based genotyping directly from blood, 96 individuals of Ashkenazi Jewish decent were genotyped for the same 60 mutations (5,760 genotypes in 5 hours) and resulted in a call rate of 98.38% and a diagnostic accuracy of 99.77%. Conclusion This study shows that accurate qPCR-based high-throughput genotyping can be performed without DNA purification. The direct use of blood may further expedite the entire genotyping process, reduce costs, and avoid tracking errors which can occur during

  5. Primer Extension Reactions for the PCR- based α- complementation Assay

    PubMed Central

    Achuthan, Vasudevan; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-01

    The PCR- based- α- complementation assay is an effective technique to measure the fidelity of polymerases, especially RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RDRP) and Reverse Transcriptases (RT). It has been successfully employed to determine the fidelity of the poliovirus polymerase 3D-pol (DeStefano, 2010) as well as the human immunodeficiency virus Reverse Transcriptase (HIV RT) (Achuthan et al., 2014). A major advantage of the assay is that since the PCR step is involved, even the low yield of products obtained after two rounds of low yield of RNA synthesis (for RDRP) or reverse transcription (for RT) can be measured using the assay. The assay also mimics the reverse transcription process, since both RNA- and DNA- directed RT synthesis steps are performed. We recently used this assay to show that the HIV RT, at physiologically relevant magnesium concentration, has accuracy in the same range as other reverse transcriptases (Achuthan et al., 2014). Here, we describe in detail how to prepare the inserts using the primer extension reactions. The prepared inserts are then processed further in the PCR- based- α- complementation assay.

  6. Bacterial Peritonitis Due to Acinetobacter baumannii Sequence Type 25 with Plasmid-Borne New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Snesrud, Erik; Clifford, Robert J.; Kwak, Yoon I.; Munoz-Urbizo, Ivón P.; Tabora-Castellanos, Juana; Milillo, Michael; Preston, Lan; Aviles, Ricardo; Sutter, Deena E.; Lesho, Emil P.

    2013-01-01

    A carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii strain was isolated from the peritoneal fluid of a patient with complicated intra-abdominal infection and evaluated at the Multidrug-resistant Organism Repository and Surveillance Network by whole-genome sequencing and real-time PCR. The isolate was sequence type 25 and susceptible to colistin and minocycline, with low MICs of tigecycline. blaNDM-1 was located on a plasmid with >99% homology to pNDM-BJ02. The isolate carried numerous other antibiotic resistance genes, including the 16S methylase gene, armA. PMID:23817381

  7. First Report of blaIMP-14 on a Plasmid Harboring Multiple Drug Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Anna E.; Peirano, Gisele; Sebra, Robert P.; Lynch, Tarah; Anson, Luke W.; Kasarskis, Andrew; Motyl, Mary R.; Crook, Derrick W.; Pitout, Johann D.

    2016-01-01

    The blaIMP-14 carbapenem resistance gene has largely previously been observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. As part of global surveillance and sequencing of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, we identified a sequence type 131 strain harboring blaIMP-14 within a class 1 integron, itself nested within an ∼54-kb multidrug resistance region on an epidemic IncA/C2 plasmid. The emergence of blaIMP-14 in this context in the ST131 lineage is of potential clinical concern. PMID:27246777

  8. First Report of blaIMP-14 on a Plasmid Harboring Multiple Drug Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131.

    PubMed

    Stoesser, Nicole; Sheppard, Anna E; Peirano, Gisele; Sebra, Robert P; Lynch, Tarah; Anson, Luke W; Kasarskis, Andrew; Motyl, Mary R; Crook, Derrick W; Pitout, Johann D

    2016-08-01

    The blaIMP-14 carbapenem resistance gene has largely previously been observed in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp. As part of global surveillance and sequencing of carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli, we identified a sequence type 131 strain harboring blaIMP-14 within a class 1 integron, itself nested within an ∼54-kb multidrug resistance region on an epidemic IncA/C2 plasmid. The emergence of blaIMP-14 in this context in the ST131 lineage is of potential clinical concern. PMID:27246777

  9. A Digital PCR-Based Method for Efficient and Highly Specific Screening of Genome Edited Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Jennifer R.; Postovit, Lynne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The rapid adoption of gene editing tools such as CRISPRs and TALENs for research and eventually therapeutics necessitates assays that can rapidly detect and quantitate the desired alterations. Currently, the most commonly used assay employs “mismatch nucleases” T7E1 or “Surveyor” that recognize and cleave heteroduplexed DNA amplicons containing mismatched base-pairs. However, this assay is prone to false positives due to cancer-associated mutations and/or SNPs and requires large amounts of starting material. Here we describe a powerful alternative wherein droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) can be used to decipher homozygous from heterozygous mutations with superior levels of both precision and sensitivity. We use this assay to detect knockout inducing alterations to stem cell associated proteins, NODAL and SFRP1, generated using either TALENs or an “all-in-one” CRISPR/Cas plasmid that we have modified for one-step cloning and blue/white screening of transformants. Moreover, we highlight how ddPCR can be used to assess the efficiency of varying TALEN-based strategies. Collectively, this work highlights how ddPCR-based screening can be paired with CRISPR and TALEN technologies to enable sensitive, specific, and streamlined approaches to gene editing and validation. PMID:27089539

  10. A Digital PCR-Based Method for Efficient and Highly Specific Screening of Genome Edited Cells.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Scott D; Vincent, Krista M; Berman, Jennifer R; Postovit, Lynne-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The rapid adoption of gene editing tools such as CRISPRs and TALENs for research and eventually therapeutics necessitates assays that can rapidly detect and quantitate the desired alterations. Currently, the most commonly used assay employs "mismatch nucleases" T7E1 or "Surveyor" that recognize and cleave heteroduplexed DNA amplicons containing mismatched base-pairs. However, this assay is prone to false positives due to cancer-associated mutations and/or SNPs and requires large amounts of starting material. Here we describe a powerful alternative wherein droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) can be used to decipher homozygous from heterozygous mutations with superior levels of both precision and sensitivity. We use this assay to detect knockout inducing alterations to stem cell associated proteins, NODAL and SFRP1, generated using either TALENs or an "all-in-one" CRISPR/Cas plasmid that we have modified for one-step cloning and blue/white screening of transformants. Moreover, we highlight how ddPCR can be used to assess the efficiency of varying TALEN-based strategies. Collectively, this work highlights how ddPCR-based screening can be paired with CRISPR and TALEN technologies to enable sensitive, specific, and streamlined approaches to gene editing and validation. PMID:27089539

  11. Biochemical characterization of three putative ATPases from a new type IV secretion system of Aeromonas veronii plasmid pAC3249A

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Type four secretion systems (TFSS) are bacterial macromolecular transport systems responsible for transfer of various substrates such as proteins, DNA or protein-DNA complexes. TFSSs encode two or three ATPases generating energy for the secretion process. These enzymes exhibit highest sequence conservation among type four secretion components. Results Here, we report the biochemical characterization of three ATPases namely TraE, TraJ and TraK (VirB4, VirB11 and VirD4 homologs of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens transfer system, respectively) from the transfer system of Aeromonas veronii plasmid pAC3249A. ATPases were expressed as His-tag fusion proteins in E. coli and purified by affinity chromatography. ATP binding and ATP hydrolysis experiments were performed with the purified ATPases. TraE and TraK showed strong binding to TNP-ATP and TNP-CTP (fluorescent analogs of ATP and CTP respectively) whereas TraJ showed weak binding. The optimum temperature range for the three ATPases was between 42°C and 50°C. Highest ATP hydrolysis activity for all the ATPases was observed in the presence of Mg2+ and Mn2+. However, TraJ and TraK also showed activity in the presence of Co2+. TraJ exhibited the highest specific activity of all the three ATPases with vmax 118 ± 5.68 nmol/min/mg protein and KM 0.58 ± 0.10 mM. Conclusions This is the first biochemical characterization of conjugative transport ATPases encoded by a conjugative plasmid from Aeromonas. Our study demonstrated that the three ATPases of a newly reported TFSS of A. veronii plasmid pAc3249A are functional in both ATP hydrolysis and ATP binding. PMID:20144229

  12. Hungarian population data on seven PCR-based loci.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Woller, J; Koons, B W; Furedi, S; Errera, J D; Padar, Z

    1996-07-01

    Hungarian population data for the loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, HLA-DQA1, and D1S80 were generated. The genotype frequency distributions for the loci do not deviate from Hardy Weinberg expectations. Furthermore, there was little evidence for departures from expectations of independence between the loci. Using a test for homogeneity all the loci were similar between two Hungarian population samples and only the HLA-DQA1 locus was statistically different between Hungarians and US Caucasians. There generally would be little forensic differences, whether a Hungarian or a US Caucasian database was used, for estimating multiple locus profile frequencies for the seven PCR-based loci. PMID:8754580

  13. [PCR-based detection of pathogens in clinical rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Ehrenstein, B; Reischl, U

    2016-05-01

    In the differential diagnostics of autoimmune-mediated rheumatic diseases, rheumatologists often have to consider infections (e. g. Lyme arthritis) or reactive diseases (e. g. reactive arthritis after urogenital bacterial infections). Furthermore, infections with an atypical presentation or caused by atypical pathogens (opportunistic infections) can complicate the immunosuppressive therapy of autoimmune diseases. For this purpose not only conventional microbiological culture methods but also PCR-based methods are increasingly being applied for the direct detection of pathogens in clinical specimens. The aim of this overview is to present commonly used PCR methods in the clinical practice of rheumatology and to describe their benefits and limitations compared to culture-based detection methods. PMID:26892924

  14. Characterization of IncI1 sequence type 71 epidemic plasmid lineage responsible for the recent dissemination of CTX-M-65 extended-spectrum β-lactamase in the Bolivian Chaco region.

    PubMed

    Riccobono, Eleonora; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Di Maggio, Tiziana; Revollo, Carmen; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Pallecchi, Lucia; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2015-09-01

    During the last decade, a significant diffusion of CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) was observed in commensal Escherichia coli from healthy children in the Bolivian Chaco region, with initial dissemination of CTX-M-2, which was then replaced by CTX-M-15 and CTX-M-65. In this work, we demonstrate that the widespread dissemination of CTX-M-65 observed in this context was related to the polyclonal spreading of an IncI1 sequence type 71 (ST71) epidemic plasmid lineage. The structure of the epidemic plasmid population was characterized by complete sequencing of four representatives and PCR mapping of the remainder (n = 16). Sequence analysis showed identical plasmid backbones (similar to that of the reference IncI1 plasmid, R64) and a multiresistance region (MRR), which underwent local microevolution. The MRR harbored genes responsible for resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, florfenicol, and fosfomycin (with microevolution mainly consisting of deletion events of resistance modules). The bla CTX-M-65 module harbored by the IncI1 ST71 epidemic plasmid was apparently derived from IncN-type plasmids, likely via IS26-mediated mobilization. The plasmid could be transferred by conjugation to several different enterobacterial species (Escherichia coli, Cronobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella enterica) and was stably maintained without selective pressure in these species, with the exception of K. oxytoca and S. enterica. Fitness assays performed in E. coli recipients demonstrated that the presence of the epidemic plasmid was apparently not associated with a significant biological cost. PMID:26100713

  15. Characterization of IncI1 Sequence Type 71 Epidemic Plasmid Lineage Responsible for the Recent Dissemination of CTX-M-65 Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase in the Bolivian Chaco Region

    PubMed Central

    Riccobono, Eleonora; Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Di Maggio, Tiziana; Revollo, Carmen; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Pallecchi, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, a significant diffusion of CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) was observed in commensal Escherichia coli from healthy children in the Bolivian Chaco region, with initial dissemination of CTX-M-2, which was then replaced by CTX-M-15 and CTX-M-65. In this work, we demonstrate that the widespread dissemination of CTX-M-65 observed in this context was related to the polyclonal spreading of an IncI1 sequence type 71 (ST71) epidemic plasmid lineage. The structure of the epidemic plasmid population was characterized by complete sequencing of four representatives and PCR mapping of the remainder (n = 16). Sequence analysis showed identical plasmid backbones (similar to that of the reference IncI1 plasmid, R64) and a multiresistance region (MRR), which underwent local microevolution. The MRR harbored genes responsible for resistance to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, florfenicol, and fosfomycin (with microevolution mainly consisting of deletion events of resistance modules). The blaCTX-M-65 module harbored by the IncI1 ST71 epidemic plasmid was apparently derived from IncN-type plasmids, likely via IS26-mediated mobilization. The plasmid could be transferred by conjugation to several different enterobacterial species (Escherichia coli, Cronobacter sakazakii, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Salmonella enterica) and was stably maintained without selective pressure in these species, with the exception of K. oxytoca and S. enterica. Fitness assays performed in E. coli recipients demonstrated that the presence of the epidemic plasmid was apparently not associated with a significant biological cost. PMID:26100713

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human-Invasive Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Strain of the Emerging Sequence Type 213 Harboring a Multidrug Resistance IncA/C Plasmid and a blaCMY-2-Carrying IncF Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Calva, Edmundo; Calva, Juan J.; Wiesner, Magdalena; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Puente, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 33676 was isolated in Mexico City, Mexico, from a patient with a systemic infection, and its complete genome sequence was determined using PacBio single-molecule real-time technology. Strain 33676 harbors an IncF plasmid carrying the extended-spectrum cephalosporin gene blaCMY-2 and a multidrug resistance IncA/C plasmid. PMID:26564044

  17. Real-Time PCR-Based Quantitation Method for the Genetically Modified Soybean Line GTS 40-3-2.

    PubMed

    Kitta, Kazumi; Takabatake, Reona; Mano, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes a real-time PCR-based method for quantitation of the relative amount of genetically modified (GM) soybean line GTS 40-3-2 [Roundup Ready(®) soybean (RRS)] contained in a batch. The method targets a taxon-specific soybean gene (lectin gene, Le1) and the specific DNA construct junction region between the Petunia hybrida chloroplast transit peptide sequence and the Agrobacterium 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene (epsps) sequence present in GTS 40-3-2. The method employs plasmid pMulSL2 as a reference material in order to quantify the relative amount of GTS 40-3-2 in soybean samples using a conversion factor (Cf) equal to the ratio of the RRS-specific DNA to the taxon-specific DNA in representative genuine GTS 40-3-2 seeds. PMID:26614294

  18. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamases among Enterobacteriaceae in Algiers hospitals.

    PubMed

    Iabadene, Hassen; Messai, Yamina; Ammari, Houria; Alouache, Souhila; Verdet, Charlotte; Bakour, Rabah; Arlet, Guillaume

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and diversity of plasmid-mediated AmpC cephalosporinases (PAcBLs) in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae collected between 2003 and 2007 from three Algiers hospitals. Antibiograms were determined on Mueller-Hinton agar plates using the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined by Etest. Isolates resistant to cefoxitin or ceftazidime were screened for bla(CMY), bla(DHA), bla(FOX) and bla(ACC) as well as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) genes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR products were sequenced by the Sanger method. Plasmid incompatibility grouping was conducted by PCR-based replicon typing. The prevalence of PAcBLs was 2.18% (11/505), comprising 8 CMY-2 and 3 DHA-1 enzymes. CTX-M-15 was co-produced with CMY-2 in three isolates and with DHA-1 in one isolate; the two remaining DHA-1-producers co-expressed SHV-12 ESBL. This is the first report of plasmid-mediated AmpC from Algeria, with the first detection of DHA-1 in Enterobacter cloacae. PMID:19570655

  19. Effect of porin loss on the activity of tigecycline against Klebsiella pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases or plasmid-mediated AmpC-type beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Conejo, M Carmen; Hernández, J Ramón; Pascual, Alvaro

    2008-07-01

    Tigecycline showed excellent in vitro activity against 50 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, plasmid-mediated AmpC-type beta-lactamases, or both. This activity was not affected by porin loss. Porin loss, however, did affect the activity of imipenem against strains that expressed both types of enzymes. PMID:18339509

  20. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George A.; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat. PMID:25584197

  1. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily. PMID:26527149

  2. Novel Class of Mutations of pilS Mutants, Encoding Plasmid R64 Type IV Prepilin: Interface of PilS-PilV Interactions▿

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Eriko; Muto, Tatsuya; Horiuchi, Takayuki; Furuya, Nobuhisa; Komano, Teruya

    2008-01-01

    The type IV pili of plasmid R64 belonging to the type IVB group are required only for liquid mating. They consist of the major and minor components PilS pilin and PilV adhesin, respectively. PilS pilin is first synthesized as a 22-kDa prepilin from the pilS gene and is then processed to a 19-kDa mature pilin by PilU prepilin peptidase. In a previous genetic analysis, we identified four classes of the pilS mutants (T. Horiuchi and T. Komano, J. Bacteriol. 180:4613-4620, 1998). The products of the class I pilS mutants were not processed by prepilin peptidase; the products of the class II mutants were not secreted; in the class III mutants type IV pili with reduced activities in liquid mating were produced; and in the class IV mutants type IV pili with normal activities were produced. Here, we describe a novel class, class V, of pilS mutants. Mutations in the pilS gene at Gly-56 or Tyr-57 produced type IV pili lacking PilV adhesin, which were inactive in liquid mating. Residues 56 and 57 of PilS pilin are suggested to function as an interface of PilS-PilV interactions. PMID:18065540

  3. PENICILLINASE PLASMID DNA FROM Staphylococcus aureus*

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Mark G.; Gordon, C. N.; Novick, Richard P.; Warner, Robert C.

    1969-01-01

    A penicillinase plasmid from Staphylococcus aureus and three of its derivatives, all previously identified as extrachromosomal genetic elements, have been isolated in high yield as circular duplex DNA molecules. The wild-type plasmid was found by contour-length measurements of electron micrographs to have a molecular weight of 18.6 × 106 daltons. Two plasmids with deletions encompassing six and eight of the eleven known plasmid cistrons had molecular weights of 16.4 × 106 and 15.3 × 106 daltons, respectively. This information was used to establish approximate physical distances for the genetic map. A high-frequency transducing element also derived from the plasmid had a molecular weight of approximately 24 × 106 daltons. Although each plasmid preparation appeared homogeneous by ultracentrifugal analysis, electron micrographs always revealed the presence of a low percentage of complex oligomeric forms, particularly circular and catenated dimers. Images PMID:5260933

  4. Electroporation of plasmid DNA to swine muscle.

    PubMed

    Bodles-Brakhop, Angela M; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Broderick, Kate; Khan, Amir S

    2011-01-01

    For plasmid-mediated gene therapy applications, a major limitation to scale up from rodents to large animals is the low expression level of injected plasmid DNA. The electroporation technique, which results in the passage of foreign material through the cell membrane, is one method that has been shown to be effective at improving local plasmid uptake and consequently, expression levels. Previous studies have determined that optimized electroporation parameters (such as electric field intensity, number of pulses, lag time between plasmid injections and electroporations, and optimal plasmid formulation conditions) are dependent on the target muscle type and individual species. Here, we provide a detailed protocol to optimize conditions for the successful intramuscular electroporation of plasmid DNA to swine, a large animal model. Our results suggest that the technique is safe and effective for veterinary applications. Furthermore, these results provide evidence for the feasibility of upcoming human applications. PMID:21194033

  5. Northern and southern Croatian population data on seven PCR-based loci.

    PubMed

    Keys, K M; Budowle, B; Andelinovic, S; Definis-Gojanovic, M; Drmic, I; Mladen, M; Primorac, D

    1996-08-15

    Northern and southern Croatian sample populations were typed at seven PCR-based loci -LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, HLA-DQA1 and D1S80. The results show that all loci meet Hardy-Weinberg expectations and that there is little evidence for association of alleles between loci. Allelic frequency distributions at all loci, except HLA-DQA1, show no differences between the northern and southern Croatian sample populations. Moreover, the population data for Croatians are similar to U.S. Caucasians; only HLA-DQA1 for southern Croatians was statistically different compared with U.S. Caucasians. A Croatian population database(s) has been created and can be used for forensic analyses to estimate the frequency of a multiple locus DNA profile. PMID:8837495

  6. Strategies and approaches in plasmidome studies-uncovering plasmid diversity disregarding of linear elements?

    PubMed

    Dib, Julián R; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María E; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The term plasmid was originally coined for circular, extrachromosomal genetic elements. Today, plasmids are widely recognized not only as important factors facilitating genome restructuring but also as vehicles for the dissemination of beneficial characters within bacterial communities. Plasmid diversity has been uncovered by means of culture-dependent or -independent approaches, such as endogenous or exogenous plasmid isolation as well as PCR-based detection or transposon-aided capture, respectively. High-throughput-sequencing made possible to cover total plasmid populations in a given environment, i.e., the plasmidome, and allowed to address the quality and significance of self-replicating genetic elements. Since such efforts were and still are rather restricted to circular molecules, here we put equal emphasis on the linear plasmids which-despite their frequent occurrence in a large number of bacteria-are largely neglected in prevalent plasmidome conceptions. PMID:26074886

  7. Strategies and approaches in plasmidome studies—uncovering plasmid diversity disregarding of linear elements?

    PubMed Central

    Dib, Julián R.; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María E.; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The term plasmid was originally coined for circular, extrachromosomal genetic elements. Today, plasmids are widely recognized not only as important factors facilitating genome restructuring but also as vehicles for the dissemination of beneficial characters within bacterial communities. Plasmid diversity has been uncovered by means of culture-dependent or -independent approaches, such as endogenous or exogenous plasmid isolation as well as PCR-based detection or transposon-aided capture, respectively. High-throughput-sequencing made possible to cover total plasmid populations in a given environment, i.e., the plasmidome, and allowed to address the quality and significance of self-replicating genetic elements. Since such efforts were and still are rather restricted to circular molecules, here we put equal emphasis on the linear plasmids which—despite their frequent occurrence in a large number of bacteria—are largely neglected in prevalent plasmidome conceptions. PMID:26074886

  8. Identification and classification of bacterial Type III toxin–antitoxin systems encoded in chromosomal and plasmid genomes

    PubMed Central

    Blower, Tim R.; Short, Francesca L.; Rao, Feng; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Pei, Xue Y.; Fineran, Peter C.; Luisi, Ben F.; Salmond, George P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin systems are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They perform diverse functional roles, including the generation of persistence, maintenance of genetic loci and resistance to bacteriophages through abortive infection. Toxin–antitoxin systems have been divided into three types, depending on the nature of the interacting macromolecules. The recently discovered Type III toxin–antitoxin systems encode protein toxins that are inhibited by pseudoknots of antitoxic RNA, encoded by short tandem repeats upstream of the toxin gene. Recent studies have identified the range of Type I and Type II systems within current sequence databases. Here, structure-based homology searches were combined with iterative protein sequence comparisons to obtain a current picture of the prevalence of Type III systems. Three independent Type III families were identified, according to toxin sequence similarity. The three families were found to be far more abundant and widespread than previously known, with examples throughout the Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Proteobacteria. Functional assays confirmed that representatives from all three families act as toxin–antitoxin loci within Escherichia coli and at least two of the families confer resistance to bacteriophages. This study shows that active Type III toxin–antitoxin systems are far more diverse than previously known, and suggests that more remain to be identified. PMID:22434880

  9. A novel type of self-assembled nanoparticles as targeted gene carriers: an application for plasmid DNA and antimicroRNA oligonucleotide delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanliang; Liang, Gaofeng; Sun, Bo; Tian, Tian; Hu, Feihu; Xiao, Zhongdang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new type of amphiphilic cetylated polyethyleneimine (PEI) was synthesized, and then polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)/cetylated PEI/hyaluronic acid nanoparticles (PCPH NPs) were developed by self-assembly as a novel type of gene-delivering vehicle. The PCPH NPs showed good DNA-condensation ability by forming polyplexes with small particle size and positive zeta potential. The transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity of PCPH NPs were evaluated as plasmid DNA vectors to transfect HepG2 in vitro. PCPH NPs exhibited much lower cytotoxicity and higher gene-transfection efficiency than PEI (25,000) and commercial transfection reagents. Furthermore, PCPH NPs were used as an anti-miR-221 vector for transfecting HepG2 cells, and anti-miR-221 was effectively transfected into cells and produced a greater inhibitory effect on cancer-cell growth by PCPH NPs. These results demonstrate that PCPH NPs can be a promising nonviral vector for gene-delivery systems. PMID:26869785

  10. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  11. Efficient Cellular Entry of (r-x-r)-Type Carbamate-Plasmid DNA Complexes and Its Implication for Noninvasive Topical DNA Delivery to Skin.

    PubMed

    Vij, Manika; Natarajan, Poornemaa; Yadav, Amit K; Patil, Kiran M; Pandey, Tanuja; Gupta, Nidhi; Santhiya, Deenan; Kumar, Vaijayanti A; Fernandes, Moneesha; Ganguli, Munia

    2016-06-01

    Arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides are powerful tools for in vitro as well as in vivo delivery of a wide plethora of biomolecules. However, presence of consecutive arginine residues leads to enhanced amenability for proteolytic degradation as well as steric hindrances for membrane interactions which compromise its bioavailability. In order to overcome these limitations we previously reported a safe and stable octaarginine based oligomer, i.e., (r-x-r)4-carbamate, where the backbone amide linkages were replaced by carbamate linkages and 6-aminohexanoic acid based spacer moieties were incorporated for better flexibility, hydrophobicity, optimal spacing of guanidinium groups, and protection against proteolytic cleavage; resulting in improved transfection efficiency over its amide counterpart. In the present work we have investigated the mechanism behind this enhanced transfection efficiency and, based on our observations, demonstrate how the synergistic effect of rationalized oligomer designing, complex characteristics, and cell type contributes to overall effective intracellular delivery. Our results indicate that the (r-x-r)4-carbamate-plasmid DNA complexes primarily utilize lipid raft dependent pathway of cellular entry more than other pathways, and this possibly facilitates their increased entry in the lipid raft rich milieu of skin cells. We also emphasize the utility of oligomer (r-x-r)4-carbamate as an efficient carrier for topical delivery of nucleic acids in skin tissue. This carrier can be utilized for safe, efficient, and noninvasive delivery of therapeutically relevant macromolecular hydrophilic cargo like nucleic acids to skin. PMID:27175623

  12. Evaluation of Two PCR-Based Swine-Specific Fecal Source Tracking Assays (Poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR-based methods have been proposed to identify swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, the specificity and distribution of these targets have not been adequately assessed. Consequently, the utility of these assays in identifying swine fecal contamination...

  13. A Long-Term Low-Frequency Hospital Outbreak of KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Involving Intergenus Plasmid Diffusion and a Persisting Environmental Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Tofteland, Ståle; Naseer, Umaer; Lislevand, Jan Helge; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn; Samuelsen, Ørjan

    2013-01-01

    Background To study the molecular characteristics of a long-term, low frequency outbreak of blaKPC-2 in a low prevalence setting involving the hospital environment. Methodology/Principal Findings KPC-producing bacteria were screened by selective chromogenic agar and Real-Time PCR. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes was ascribed by PCRs and subsequent sequencing, and the KPC-producing isolates were phylogenetically typed using PFGE and multi-locus sequence typing. BlaKPC-2-plasmids were identified and analysed by S1-nuclease-PFGE hybridization and PCR based replicon typing. A ∼97 kb IncFII plasmid was seen to carry blaKPC-2 in all of the clinical isolates, in one of the isolates recovered from screened patients (1/136), and in the Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter asburiae isolates recovered from the environment (sinks) in one intensive care unit. The K. pneumoniae strain ST258 was identified in 6 out of 7 patients. An intergenus spread to E. asburiae and an interspecies spread to two different K. pneumoniae clones (ST27 and ST461) of the blaKPC-2 plasmid was discovered. K. pneumoniae ST258 and genetically related E. asburiae strains were found in isolates of both human and environmental origins. Conclusions/Significance We document a clonal transmission of the K. pneumoniae ST258 strain, and an intergenus plasmid diffusion of the IncFII plasmid carrying blaKPC-2 in this outbreak. A major reservoir in the patient population could not be unveiled. However, the identification of a persisting environmental reservoir of strains with molecular determinants linked to human isolates, suggests a possible role of the environment in the maintenance of this long-term outbreak. PMID:23536849

  14. A rapid and efficient method for cloning genes of type II restriction-modification systems by use of a killer plasmid.

    PubMed

    Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2007-07-01

    We present a method for cloning restriction-modification (R-M) systems that is based on the use of a lethal plasmid (pKILLER). The plasmid carries a functional gene for a restriction endonuclease having the same DNA specificity as the R-M system of interest. The first step is the standard preparation of a representative, plasmid-borne genomic library. Then this library is transformed with the killer plasmid. The only surviving bacteria are those which carry the gene specifying a protective DNA methyltransferase. Conceptually, this in vivo selection approach resembles earlier methods in which a plasmid library was selected in vitro by digestion with a suitable restriction endonuclease, but it is much more efficient than those methods. The new method was successfully used to clone two R-M systems, BstZ1II from Bacillus stearothermophilus 14P and Csp231I from Citrobacter sp. strain RFL231, both isospecific to the prototype HindIII R-M system. PMID:17468281

  15. Effects of a delocalizable cation on the headgroup of gemini lipids on the lipoplex-type nanoaggregates directly formed from plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Misra, Santosh K; Muñoz-Úbeda, Mónica; Datta, Sougata; Barrán-Berdón, Ana L; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; Kondaiah, Paturu; Junquera, Elena; Bhattacharya, Santanu; Aicart, Emilio

    2013-11-11

    Lipoplex-type nanoaggregates prepared from pEGFP-C3 plasmid DNA (pDNA) and mixed liposomes, with a gemini cationic lipid (CL) [1,2-bis(hexadecyl imidazolium) alkanes], referred as (C16Im)2Cn (where Cn is the alkane spacer length, n = 2, 3, 5, or 12, between the imidazolium heads) and DOPE zwitterionic lipid, have been analyzed by zeta potential, gel electrophoresis, SAXS, cryo-TEM, fluorescence anisotropy, transfection efficiency, fluorescence confocal microscopy, and cell viability/cytotoxicity experiments to establish a structure-biological activity relationship. The study, carried out at several mixed liposome compositions, α, and effective charge ratios, ρeff, of the lipoplex, demonstrates that the transfection of pDNA using CLs initially requires the determination of the effective charge of both. The electrochemical study confirms that CLs with a delocalizable positive charge in their headgroups yield an effective positive charge that is 90% of their expected nominal one, while pDNA is compacted yielding an effective negative charge which is only 10-25% than that of the linear DNA. SAXS diffractograms show that lipoplexes formed by CLs with shorter spacer (n = 2, 3, or 5) present three lamellar structures, two of them in coexistence, while those formed by CL with longest spacer (n = 12) present two additional inverted hexagonal structures. Cryo-TEM micrographs show nanoaggregates with two multilamellar structures, a cluster-type (at low α value) and a fingerprint-type, that coexist with the cluster-type at moderate α composition. The optimized transfection efficiency (TE) of pDNA, in HEK293T, HeLa, and H1299 cells was higher using lipoplexes containing gemini CLs with shorter spacers at low α value. Each lipid formulation did not show any significant levels of toxicity, the reported lipoplexes being adequate DNA vectors for gene therapy and considerably better than both Lipofectamine 2000 and CLs of the 1,2-bis(hexadecyl ammnoniun) alkane series, recently

  16. Development of a PCR-Based Reverse Genetics System for an Attenuated Duck Tembusu Virus Strain

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaogang; Shi, Ying; Yan, Dawei; Li, Xuesong; Yan, Pixi; Gao, Xuyuan; Zhang, Yuee; Yu, Lei; Ren, Chaochao; Li, Guoxin; Yan, Liping; Teng, Qiaoyang; Li, Zejun

    2016-01-01

    The infectious disease caused by the duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) has resulted in massive economic losses to the Chinese duck industry in China since 2010. Research on the molecular basis of DTMUV pathogenicity has been hampered by the lack of a reliable reverse genetics system for this virus. Here we developed a PCR-based reverse genetics system with high fidelity for the attenuated DTMUV strain FX2010-180P. The rescued virus was characterized by using both indirect immunofluorescence assays (IFA) and whole genome sequencing. The rescued virus (rFX2010-180P) grew to similar titers as compared with the wild-type virus in DF-1 cells, and had similar replication and immunogenicity properties in ducks. To determine whether exogenous proteins could be expressed from DTMUV, both an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene were introduced between the NS5 gene and the 3' non-coding sequence of FX2010-180P. A recombinant DTMUV expressing eGFP was rescued, but eGFP expression was unstable after 4 passages in DF-1 cells due to a deletion of 1,294 nucleotides. The establishment of a reliable reverse genetics system for FX2010-180P provides a foundation for future studies of DTMUV. PMID:27248497

  17. Characterization of pKP-M1144, a Novel ColE1-Like Plasmid Encoding IMP-8, GES-5, and BEL-1 β-Lactamases, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 252 Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radoslaw; Dobiasova, Hana; Studentova, Vendula; Esteves, Francisco J.; Derde, Lennie P. G.; Bonten, Marc J. M.; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Gniadkowski, Marek

    2015-01-01

    IMP-8 metallo-β-lactamase was identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 252 (ST252), isolated in a Portuguese hospital in 2009. blaIMP-8 was the first gene cassette of a novel class 3 integron, In1144, also carrying the blaGES-5, blaBEL-1, and aacA4 cassettes. In1144 was located on a ColE1-like plasmid, pKP-M1144 (12,029 bp), with a replication region of limited nucleotide similarity to those of other RNA-priming plasmids, such as pJHCMW1. In1144 and pKP-M1144 represent an interesting case of evolution of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26033721

  18. Characterization of pKP-M1144, a Novel ColE1-Like Plasmid Encoding IMP-8, GES-5, and BEL-1 β-Lactamases, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 252 Isolate.

    PubMed

    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radoslaw; Dobiasova, Hana; Studentova, Vendula; Esteves, Francisco J; Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Gniadkowski, Marek

    2015-08-01

    IMP-8 metallo-β-lactamase was identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 252 (ST252), isolated in a Portuguese hospital in 2009. blaIMP-8 was the first gene cassette of a novel class 3 integron, In1144, also carrying the blaGES-5, blaBEL-1, and aacA4 cassettes. In1144 was located on a ColE1-like plasmid, pKP-M1144 (12,029 bp), with a replication region of limited nucleotide similarity to those of other RNA-priming plasmids, such as pJHCMW1. In1144 and pKP-M1144 represent an interesting case of evolution of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26033721

  19. Genetic Environment of Plasmid Mediated CTX-M-15 Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases from Clinical and Food Borne Bacteria in North-Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Supriya; Hussain, Abbas; Mishra, Shweta; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha; Joshi, Santa Ram

    2015-01-01

    Background The study investigated the presence of CTX-M-15 type extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), compared their genetic arrangements and plasmid types in gram negative isolates of hospital and food origin in north-east India. From September 2013 to April 2014, a total of 252 consecutive, non-duplicate clinical isolates and 88 gram negative food isolates were selected. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of ESBL genes was performed. Presence of integrons and gene cassettes were analyzed by integrase and 59 base-element PCR respectively. The molecular environments surrounding blaCTX-M and plasmid types were investigated by PCR and PCR-based replicon typing respectively. Transformation was carried out to assess plasmid transfer. Southern blotting was conducted to localize the blaCTX-M-15 genes. DNA fingerprinting was performed by ERIC-PCR. Results Prevalence of ESBL was found to be 40.8% (103/252) in clinical and 31.8% (28/88) in food-borne isolates. Molecular characterization revealed the presence of 56.3% (58/103) and 53.5% (15/28) blaCTX-M-15 in clinical and food isolates respectively. Strains of clinical and food origin were non-clonal. Replicon typing revealed that IncI1 and IncFII plasmid were carrying blaCTX-M-15 in clinical and food isolates and were horizontally transferable. The ISEcp1 element was associated with blaCTX-M-15 in both clinical and food isolates. Conclusions The simultaneous presence of resistance determinants in non-clonal isolates of two different groups thus suggests that the microbiota of common food products consumed may serve as a reservoir for some of the drug resistance genes prevalent in human pathogens. PMID:26361395

  20. Plasmids in Frankia sp.

    PubMed

    Normand, P; Simonet, P; Butour, J L; Rosenberg, C; Moiroud, A; Lalonde, M

    1983-07-01

    A method to achieve cell lysis and isolate Frankia sp. plasmid DNA was developed. A screening of Frankia sp. strains belonging to different host compatibility groups (Alnus sp., Elaeagnus sp., Ceanothus sp.) showed that, of 39 strains tested, 4 (strains Cp11, ARgN22d, ArI3, and EUN1f) possessed plasmids ranging in size from 7.1 to 32.2 kilobase pairs as estimated from agarose gel electrophoresis and electron microscopy. A total of 11 plasmids were detected. PMID:6863219

  1. Real-time PCR based analysis of metal resistance genes in metal resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain J007.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Sangeeta; Sar, Pinaki

    2016-07-01

    A uranium (U)-resistant and -accumulating Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain was characterized to assess the response of toxic metals toward its growth and expression of metal resistance determinants. The bacterium showed MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration) values of 6, 3, and 2 mM for Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively; with resistance phenotype conferred by periplasmic Cu sequestering copA and RND type heavy metal efflux czcA genes. Real-time PCR-based expression analysis revealed significant upregulation of both these genes upon exposure to low concentrations of metals for short duration, whereas the global stress response gene sodA encoding superoxide dismutase enzyme was upregulated only at higher metal concentrations or longer exposure time. It could also be inferred that copA and czcA are involved in providing resistance only at low metal concentrations, whereas involvement of "global stress response" phenomenon (expression of sodA) at higher metal concentration or increased exposure was evident. This study provides significant understanding of the adaptive response of bacteria surviving in metal and radionuclide contaminated environments along with the development of real-time PCR-based quantification method of using metal resistance genes as biomarker for monitoring relevant bacteria in such habitats. PMID:26662317

  2. War Wound Treatment Complications Due to Transfer of an IncN Plasmid Harboring blaOXA-181 from Morganella morganii to CTX-M-27-Producing Sequence Type 131 Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C.; Appalla, Lakshmi; Koren, Michael; Kwak, Yoon I.; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male developed a recurrent sacral abscess associated with embedded shrapnel following a blast injury. Cultures grew extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing, carbapenem-susceptible Escherichia coli. Ertapenem was administered, but the infection recurred after each course of antibiotics. Initial surgical interventions were unsuccessful, and subsequent cultures yielded E. coli and Morganella morganii, both nonsusceptible to carbapenems. The isolates were Carba NP test negative, gave ambiguous results with the modified Hodge test, and amplified the blaOXA48-like gene by real-time PCR. All E. coli isolates were sequence type 131 (ST131), carried nine resistance genes (including blaCTX-M-27) on an IncF plasmid, and were identical by genome sequencing, except for 150 kb of plasmid DNA in carbapenem-nonsusceptible isolates only. Sixty kilobases of this was shared by M. morganii and represented an IncN plasmid harboring blaOXA-181. In M. morganii, the gene was flanked by IS3000 and ISKpn19, but in all but one of the E. coli isolates containing blaOXA-181, a second copy of ISKpn19 had inserted adjacent to IS3000. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of blaOXA-181 in the virulent ST131 clonal group and carried by the promiscuous IncN family of plasmids. The tendency of M. morganii to have high MICs of imipenem, a blaOXA-181 substrate profile that includes penicillins but not extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and weak carbapenemase activity almost resulted in the presence of blaOXA-181 being overlooked. We highlight the importance of surveillance for carbapenem resistance in all species, even those with intrinsic resistances, and the value of advanced molecular techniques in detecting subtle genetic changes. PMID:25870058

  3. Extended-spectrum β-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae isolated in Brazil carry distinct types of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Viana, André L M; Cayô, Rodrigo; Avelino, Cassia C; Gales, Ana C; Franco, Marília C; Minarini, Luciene A R

    2013-09-01

    One hundred and six nalidixic acid-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates from two Brazilian hospitals isolated from June to October 2010 were evaluated to characterize the co-existence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistant (PMQR) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) determinants. The qnr genetic environment was determined by PCR and sequencing. Conjugation and hybridization experiments determined whether qnr-carrying plasmids were self-transferable. The aac(6')-Ib-cr and qepA genes were also screened. Thirteen qnr-like genes (12.3 %) were identified, with qnrB1 the most common, followed by qnrS1, qnrB2 and qnrB19. No qnrA, qnrC, qnrD or qepA determinant was detected. All qnr-positive strains possessed chromosomal substitutions in gyrase- and topoisomerase-encoding genes and four harboured a aac(6')-Ib-cr gene. The co-production of blaCTX-M was observed in ten qnr-positive strains. These results indicate the dissemination of PMQR genes shown in clinical isolates from Brazil, and their co-existence with ESBL genes emphasizes the complexity of plasmid-mediated resistance determinants among Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:23741024

  4. Linear and Circular Plasmid Content in Borrelia burgdorferi Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Radha; Kalu, Ogori; Purser, Joye; Norris, Steven; Stevenson, Brian; Schwartz, Ira

    2003-01-01

    The genome of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiologic agent of Lyme disease, is composed of a linear chromosome and more than 20 linear and circular plasmids. Typically, plasmid content analysis has been carried out by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and confirmed by Southern hybridization. However, multiple plasmids of virtually identical sizes (e.g., lp28 and cp32) complicate the interpretation of such data. The present study was undertaken to investigate the complete plasmid complements of B. burgdorferi clinical isolates cultivated from patients from a single region where early Lyme disease is endemic. A total of 21 isolates obtained from the skin biopsy or blood samples of Lyme disease patients were examined for their complete plasmid complements by Southern hybridization and plasmid-specific PCR analysis. All clinical isolates harbored at least six of the nine previously characterized cp32s. Fourteen isolates harbored all B31-like linear plasmids, and seven isolates simultaneously lacked lp56, lp38, and some segments of lp28-1. The distinctive plasmid profile observed in these seven isolates was specific to organisms that had ribosomal spacer type 2 and pulsed-field gel type A, which implies a clonal origin for this genotype. The presence of nearly identical complements of multiple linear and circular plasmids in all of the human isolates suggests that these plasmids may be particularly necessary for infection, adaptation, and/or maintenance in the infected host. PMID:12819050

  5. Gene Flow Across Genus Barriers – Conjugation of Dinoroseobacter shibae’s 191-kb Killer Plasmid into Phaeobacter inhibens and AHL-mediated Expression of Type IV Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Patzelt, Diana; Michael, Victoria; Päuker, Orsola; Ebert, Matthias; Tielen, Petra; Jahn, Dieter; Tomasch, Jürgen; Petersen, Jörn; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Rhodobacteraceae harbor a conspicuous wealth of extrachromosomal replicons (ECRs) and therefore the exchange of genetic material via horizontal transfer has been supposed to be a major evolutionary driving force. Many plasmids in this group encode type IV secretion systems (T4SS) that are expected to mediate transfer of proteins and/or DNA into host cells, but no experimental evidence of either has yet been provided. Dinoroseobacter shibae, a species of the Roseobacter group within the Rhodobacteraceae family, contains five ECRs that are crucial for anaerobic growth, survival under starvation and the pathogenicity of this model organism. Here we tagged two syntenous but compatible RepABC-type plasmids of 191 and 126-kb size, each encoding a T4SS, with antibiotic resistance genes and demonstrated their conjugational transfer into a distantly related Roseobacter species, namely Phaeobacter inhibens. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed transfer of those replicons into the recipient both individually but also together documenting the efficiency of conjugation. We then studied the influence of externally added quorum sensing (QS) signals on the expression of the T4SS located on the sister plasmids. A QS deficient D. shibae null mutant (ΔluxI1) lacking synthesis of N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) was cultivated with a wide spectrum of chemically diverse long-chain AHLs. All AHLs with lengths of the acid side-chain ≥14 reverted the ΔluxI1 phenotype to wild-type. Expression of the T4SS was induced up to log2 ∼3fold above wild-type level. We hypothesize that conjugation in roseobacters is QS-controlled and that the QS system may detect a wide array of long-chain AHLs at the cell surface. PMID:27303368

  6. Evaluation of Two PCR-based Swine-specific Fecal Source Tracking Assays (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR-based methods have been proposed to identify swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. However, the utility of these assays in identifying swine fecal contamination on a broad geographic scale is largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the specificity, distr...

  7. USE OF BACTEROIDES PCR-BASED METHODS TO EXAMINE FECAL CONTAMINATION SOURCES IN TROPICAL COASTAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several library independent Microbial Source Tracking methods have been developed to rapidly determine the source of fecal contamination. Thus far, none of these methods have been tested in tropical marine waters. In this study, we used a Bacteroides 16S rDNA PCR-based...

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED PCR-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTION OF PHYTOPHTHORA CACTORUM IN STRAWBERRY PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific and rapid plant pathogen detection methods can aid in strawberry disease management decisions. PCR-based diagnostics for Phytophthora cactorum and other strawberry pathogens are hindered by PCR inhibitors and lack of species-specific PCR primers. We developed a DNA extraction and purificati...

  9. Engineering large functional plasmids for biosafety.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Chris; Shank, Caroline; Santiago, Clayton; Wilson, James W

    2013-11-01

    Large bacterial plasmid constructs (generally 25-100 kb, but can be greater), such as those engineered with DNA encoding specific functions such as protein secretion or specialized metabolism, can carry antibiotic resistance genes and/or conjugation systems that typically must be removed before use in medical or environmental settings due to biosafety concerns. However, a convenient in vivo recombineering approach for intact large plasmids to sequentially remove multiple different genes using non-antibiotic selection methods is not described in the literature to our knowledge. We developed strategies and reagents for convenient removal of antibiotic resistance markers and conjugation genes while retaining non-antibiotic-based plasmid selection to increase practical utility of large engineered plasmids. This approach utilizes targeted lambda Red recombination of PCR products encoding the trpE and asd genes and as well as FLP/FRT-mediated marker removal. This is particularly important given that use of restriction enzymes with plasmids of this size is extremely problematic and often not feasible. This report provides the first example of the trpE gene/tryptophan prototrophy being used for recombineering selection. We applied this strategy to the plasmids R995+SPI-1 and R995+SPI-2 which encode cloned type III secretion systems to allow protein secretion and substrate delivery to eukaryotic cells. The resulting constructs are functional, stably maintained under conditions where the original constructs are unstable, completely defective for conjugative transfer, and transferred via electroporation. PMID:24055203

  10. In silico and in vitro evaluation of PCR-based assays for the detection of Bacillus anthracis chromosomal signature sequences.

    PubMed

    Ågren, Joakim; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; Hansen, Trine; Ruuls, Robin; Thierry, Simon; Vigre, Håkan; Janse, Ingmar; Sundström, Anders; Segerman, Bo; Koene, Miriam; Löfström, Charlotta; Van Rotterdam, Bart; Derzelle, Sylviane

    2013-11-15

    Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax, is a zoonotic pathogen that is relatively common throughout the world and may cause life threatening diseases in animals and humans. There are many PCR-based assays in use for the detection of B. anthracis. While most of the developed assays rely on unique markers present on virulence plasmids pXO1 and pXO2, relatively few assays incorporate chromosomal DNA markers due to the close relatedness of B. anthracis to the B. cereus group strains. For the detection of chromosomal DNA, different genes have been used, such as BA813, rpoB, gyrA, plcR, S-layer, and prophage-lambda. Following a review of the literature, an in silico analysis of all signature sequences reported for identification of B. anthracis was conducted. Published primer and probe sequences were compared for specificity against 134 available Bacillus spp. genomes. Although many of the chromosomal targets evaluated are claimed to be specific to B. anthracis, cross-reactions with closely related B. cereus and B. thuringiensis strains were often observed. Of the 35 investigated PCR assays, only 4 were 100% specific for the B. anthracis chromosome. An interlaboratory ring trial among five European laboratories was then performed to evaluate six assays, including the WHO recommended procedures, using a collection of 90 Bacillus strains. Three assays performed adequately, yielding no false positive or negative results. All three assays target chromosomal markers located within the lambdaBa03 prophage region (PL3, BA5345, and BA5357). Detection limit was further assessed for one of these highly specific assays. PMID:24005110

  11. Determination of Plasmid Segregational Stability in a Growing Bacterial Population.

    PubMed

    Kramer, M Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extensively used as cloning vectors for a number of genes for academic and commercial purposes. Moreover, attenuated bacteria carrying recombinant plasmids expressing genes with anti-tumor activity have shown promising therapeutic results in animal models of cancer. Equitable plasmid distribution between daughter cells during cell division, i.e., plasmid segregational stability, depends on many factors, including the plasmid copy number, its replication mechanism, the levels of recombinant gene expression, the type of bacterial host, and the metabolic burden associated with all these factors. Plasmid vectors usually code for antibiotic-resistant functions, and, in order to enrich the culture with bacteria containing plasmids, antibiotic selective pressure is commonly used to eliminate plasmid-free segregants from the growing population. However, administration of antibiotics can be inconvenient for many industrial and therapeutic applications. Extensive ongoing research is being carried out to develop stably-inherited plasmid vectors. Here, I present an easy and precise method for determining the kinetics of plasmid loss or maintenance for every ten generations of bacterial growth in culture. PMID:26846807

  12. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  13. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET), a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Val F; de Toro, María; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages. PMID:25522143

  14. Plasmid Flux in Escherichia coli ST131 Sublineages, Analyzed by Plasmid Constellation Network (PLACNET), a New Method for Plasmid Reconstruction from Whole Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M.; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ–proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages. PMID:25522143

  15. Divergent Evolution of the repFII Replicon of IncF Plasmids Carrying Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor cnf2, Cytolethal Distending Toxin cdtIII, and f17Ae Fimbrial Variant Genes in Type 2 Necrotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates from Calves.

    PubMed

    Bihannic, Morgan; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Among the pathovars of Escherichia coli in cattle, necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC) is defined by the production of cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs). In particular, type 2 NTEC (NTEC2) strains are frequent in diarrheic and septicemic calves and usually coproduce CNF type 2 (CNF2), cytolethal distending toxin type III (CDTIII), and fimbrial adhesins of the F17 family, whose genetic determinants have frequently been reported on the same Vir-like plasmid. In this study, we investigated the genetic environment of the cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII genes in a collection of fecal E. coli isolates recovered from 484 French and 58 Iranian calves. In particular, we highlighted the spread of cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII on similar 150-kb IncF plasmids harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F74 in NTEC2 isolates. Interestingly, this 150-kb IncF plasmid differed from the 140-kb IncF plasmid harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F75 and carrying cnf2 alone. These results suggest two divergent lineages of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids depending on the presence of the f17Ae and cdtIII genes. This partition was observed in E. coli strains of unrelated backgrounds, suggesting two different evolutionary paths of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids rather than divergent evolutions of NTEC2 clones. The driving forces for such divergent evolutions are not known, and further studies are required to clarify the selection of plasmid subtypes spreading virulence determinants in E. coli, in particular, plasmids of the IncF family. PMID:26546422

  16. Divergent Evolution of the repFII Replicon of IncF Plasmids Carrying Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor cnf2, Cytolethal Distending Toxin cdtIII, and f17Ae Fimbrial Variant Genes in Type 2 Necrotoxigenic Escherichia coli Isolates from Calves

    PubMed Central

    Bihannic, Morgan; Haenni, Marisa; Oswald, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Among the pathovars of Escherichia coli in cattle, necrotoxigenic E. coli (NTEC) is defined by the production of cytotoxic necrotizing factors (CNFs). In particular, type 2 NTEC (NTEC2) strains are frequent in diarrheic and septicemic calves and usually coproduce CNF type 2 (CNF2), cytolethal distending toxin type III (CDTIII), and fimbrial adhesins of the F17 family, whose genetic determinants have frequently been reported on the same Vir-like plasmid. In this study, we investigated the genetic environment of the cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII genes in a collection of fecal E. coli isolates recovered from 484 French and 58 Iranian calves. In particular, we highlighted the spread of cnf2, f17Ae, and cdtIII on similar 150-kb IncF plasmids harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F74 in NTEC2 isolates. Interestingly, this 150-kb IncF plasmid differed from the 140-kb IncF plasmid harboring the newly assigned repFII replicon allele F75 and carrying cnf2 alone. These results suggest two divergent lineages of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids depending on the presence of the f17Ae and cdtIII genes. This partition was observed in E. coli strains of unrelated backgrounds, suggesting two different evolutionary paths of cnf2-carrying IncF plasmids rather than divergent evolutions of NTEC2 clones. The driving forces for such divergent evolutions are not known, and further studies are required to clarify the selection of plasmid subtypes spreading virulence determinants in E. coli, in particular, plasmids of the IncF family. PMID:26546422

  17. Sequence of two plasmids from Clostridium perfringens chicken necrotic enteritis isolates and comparison with C. perfringens conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Parreira, Valeria R; Costa, Marcio; Eikmeyer, Felix; Blom, Jochen; Prescott, John F

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-six isolates of Clostridium perfringens of different MLST types from chickens with necrotic enteritis (NE) (15 netB-positive) or from healthy chickens (6 netB-positive, 5 netB-negative) were found to contain 1-4 large plasmids, with most netB-positive isolates containing 3 large and variably sized plasmids which were more numerous and larger than plasmids in netB-negative isolates. NetB and cpb2 were found on different plasmids consistent with previous studies. The pathogenicity locus NELoc1, which includes netB, was largely conserved in these plasmids whereas NeLoc3, present in the cpb2 containing plasmids, was less well conserved. A netB-positive and a cpb2-positive plasmid were likely to be conjugative, and the plasmids were completely sequenced. Both plasmids possessed the intact tcp conjugative region characteristic of C. perfringens conjugative plasmids. Comparative genomic analysis of nine CpCPs, including the two plasmids described here, showed extensive gene rearrangements including pathogenicity locus and accessory gene insertions around rather than within the backbone region. The pattern that emerges from this analysis is that the major toxin-containing regions of the variety of virulence-associated CpCPs are organized as complex pathogenicity loci. How these different but related CpCPs can co-exist in the same host has been an unanswered question. Analysis of the replication-partition region of these plasmids suggests that this region controls plasmid incompatibility, and that CpCPs can be grouped into at least four incompatibility groups. PMID:23189158

  18. Plasmid detection, characterization and ecology

    PubMed Central

    Smalla, Kornelia; Jechalke, Sven; Top, Eva M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids are important vehicles for rapid adaptation of bacterial populations to changing environmental conditions. To reduce the cost of plasmid carriage, it is thought that only a fraction of a local population carries plasmids or is permissive to plasmid uptake. Plasmids provide various accessory traits which might be beneficial under particular conditions. The genetic variation generated by plasmid carriage within populations ensures the robustness towards environmental change. Plasmid-mediated gene transfer plays an important role not only in the mobilization and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes but also in the spread of degradative pathways and pathogenicity determinants of pathogens. Here we summarize the state-of-the-art methods to study the occurrence, abundance and diversity of plasmids in environmental bacteria. Increasingly, cultivation independent total community DNA methods are being used to characterize and quantify the diversity and abundance of plasmids in relation to various biotic and abiotic factors. An improved understanding of the ecology of plasmids and their hosts is crucial in the development of intervention strategies for antibiotic resistance gene spread. We discuss the potentials and limitations of methods used to determine the host range of plasmids as the ecology of plasmids is tightly linked to their hosts. The recent advances in sequencing technologies provide an enormous potential for plasmid classification, diversity and evolution studies but numerous challenges still exist. PMID:26104560

  19. Extraction of genomic DNA from yeasts for PCR-based applications.

    PubMed

    Lõoke, Marko; Kristjuhan, Kersti; Kristjuhan, Arnold

    2011-05-01

    We have developed a quick and low-cost genomic DNA extraction protocol from yeast cells for PCR-based applications. This method does not require any enzymes, hazardous chemicals, or extreme temperatures, and is especially powerful for simultaneous analysis of a large number of samples. DNA can be efficiently extracted from different yeast species (Kluyveromyces lactis, Hansenula polymorpha, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Candida albicans, Pichia pastoris, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The protocol involves lysis of yeast colonies or cells from liquid culture in a lithium acetate (LiOAc)-SDS solution and subsequent precipitation of DNA with ethanol. Approximately 100 nanograms of total genomic DNA can be extracted from 1 × 10(7) cells. DNA extracted by this method is suitable for a variety of PCR-based applications (including colony PCR, real-time qPCR, and DNA sequencing) for amplification of DNA fragments of ≤ 3500 bp. PMID:21548894

  20. A PCR-based method to quantify fungal growth during pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Simeng, Zhou; Sacha, Grisel; Isabelle, Herpoël-Gimbert; Marie-Noëlle, Rosso

    2015-08-01

    Filamentous fungi have shown great potential in the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass and their use in bio-processes based on Solid State Fermentation (SSF) opens promising perspectives for plant biomass valorization. Obviously, quantification of the fungal biomass throughout the fermentation is a crucial parameter for SSF evaluation and control, both at the laboratory and industrial scale. Here we provide a qPCR-based method as a reliable alternative to conventional methods to estimate mycelial growth during plant biomass treatment. For the three strains analyzed, the lowest detection limit ranged from 58 to 272 μg mycelium dry weight per gram biomass (dry weight). We show that the qPCR-based method allows fungal growth monitoring during fermentation and provides relevant information for selection of the most appropriate fungal strains in specific SSF/reactor conditions. PMID:26031470

  1. Performance of PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays for mycoplasma detection.

    PubMed

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Lopes, Talíria Silva; Ferreira, Nívea; Balthazar, Nathália; Monteiro, Antônio M; Borojevic, Radovan; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2015-11-01

    Contaminated eukaryotic cell cultures are frequently responsible for unreliable results. Regulatory entities request that cell cultures must be mycoplasma-free. Mycoplasma contamination remains a significant problem for cell cultures and may have an impact on biological analysis since they affect many cell parameters. The gold standard microbiological assay for mycoplasma detection involves laborious and time-consuming protocols. PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays have been considered for routine cell culture screening in research laboratories since they are fast, easy and sensitive. Thus, the aim of this work is to compare the performance of two popular commercial assays, PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays, by assessing the level of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures from Rio de Janeiro Cell Bank (RJCB) and also from customers' laboratories. The results obtained by both performed assays were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. In addition, we evaluated the limit of detection of the PCR kit under our laboratory conditions and the storage effects on mycoplasma detection in frozen cell culture supernatants. The performance of both assays for mycoplasma detection was not significantly different and they showed very good agreement. The Bioluminescent assay for mycoplasma detection was slightly more dependable than PCR-based due to the lack of inconclusive results produced by the first technique, especially considering the ability to detect mycoplasma contamination in frozen cell culture supernatants. However, cell lines should be precultured for four days or more without antibiotics to obtain safe results. On the other hand, a false negative result was obtained by using this biochemical approach. The implementation of fast and reliable mycoplasma testing methods is an important technical and regulatory issue and PCR-based and Bioluminescent assays may be good candidates. However, validation studies are needed. PMID:26296900

  2. Development and evaluation of new primers for PCR-based identification of Prevotella intermedia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanbin; Liu, Dali; Wang, Yiwei; Zhu, Cailian; Liang, Jingping; Shu, Rong

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new Prevotella intermedia-specific PCR primers based on the 16S rRNA. The new primer set, Pi-192 and Pi-468, increased the accuracy of PCR-based P. intermedia identification and could be useful in the detection of P. intermedia as well as epidemiological studies on periodontal disease. PMID:24875331

  3. Nonconjugative Plasmids Encoding Sulfanilamide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuhashi, Susumu; Inoue, Kunio; Inoue, Matsuhisa

    1977-01-01

    Nonconjugative plasmids encoding sulfanilamide (Sa) resistance were demonstrated at a high frequency in Shigella and Escherichia coli strains resistant to sulfanilamide. These Sa plasmids were all compatible with the standard plasmids used in compatibility testing. The sizes of seven Sa plasmids were measured by electron microscopy and ranged from 1.79 to 2.08 μm, corresponding to 3.5 to 3.9 megadaltons. Images PMID:334067

  4. Toxin plasmids of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2013-06-01

    In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  5. Distribution of Intrinsic Plasmid Replicase Genes and Their Association with Carbapenem-Hydrolyzing Class D β-Lactamase Genes in European Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii▿

    PubMed Central

    Towner, Kevin J.; Evans, Benjamin; Villa, Laura; Levi, Katrina; Hamouda, Ahmed; Amyes, Sebastian G. B.; Carattoli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Ninety-six genetically diverse multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii from 25 hospitals in 17 European countries were screened by PCR for specific carbapenemase-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamase (CHDL) genes and by PCR-based replicon typing for the presence of 19 different plasmid replicase (rep) gene homology groups (GRs). Results were confirmed by DNA sequencing where necessary. All 96 isolates contained at least 1 (with a maximum of 4) of the 19 groups of rep genes. Groups detected were GR6 (repAci6; 93 isolates), GR2 (including repAci1 [67 isolates] and repAci2 [3 isolates]), GR16 (repApAB49; 12 isolates), GR12 (p2ABSDF0001; 10 isolates), GR3 (repAci3; 4 isolates), GR4 (repAci4; 3 isolates), GR10 (repAciX; 1 isolate), and GR14 (repp4AYE; 1 isolate). Variations in rep gene content were observed even among epidemiologically related isolates. Genes encoding OXA-58-like CHDLs (22 isolates) were associated with carriage of the repAci1, repAci3, repAci4, and repAciX genes, genes encoding OXA-40-like CHDLs (6 isolates) were associated with repAci2 and p2ABSDF0001, and genes encoding OXA-23-like CHDLs (8 isolates) were associated with repAci1. Most intrinsic Acinetobacter plasmids are non-self-transferable, but the almost ubiquitous repAci6 gene was strongly associated with a potential tra locus that could serve as a general system for plasmid mobilization and consequent horizontal transmission of plasmids and their associated antibiotic resistance genes among strains of A. baumannii. PMID:21300832

  6. Conservation of plasmids among plant-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae isolates of diverse origins.

    PubMed

    von Bodman, S B; Shaw, P D

    1987-05-01

    Thirty isolates of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, pv. angulata (pathogens on tobacco), pv. coronafaciens, and pv. striafaciens (pathogens on oats) were examined for plasmid DNAs. The strains were obtained from plants throughout the world, some over 50 years ago. Of the 22 tobacco pathogens, 16 contain predominantly one type of plasmid, the pJP27.00 type. The remaining six tobacco-specific strains do not harbor detectable plasmids. The oat pathogens contain one, two, or three plasmids. DNA homology studies indicate that the plasmid DNAs are highly conserved. More importantly, the plasmids harbored by strains isolated from one host plant are conserved most stringently; e.g., the plasmids from the tobacco pathogens are, with one exception, indistinguishable by restriction endonuclease digestion and Southern hybridization. There is also extensive homology among plasmids indigenous to the oat-specific P. syringae pv. coronafaciens and pv. striafaciens strains. PMID:3628554

  7. Development of a high-throughput real time PCR based on a hot-start alternative for Pfu mediated by quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Fuming; Yang, Yang; Yuan, Lin; Ren, Jicun; Zhang, Zhizhou

    2015-09-01

    Hot start (HS) PCR is an excellent alternative for high-throughput real time PCR due to its ability to prevent nonspecific amplification at low temperature. Development of a cost-effective and simple HS PCR technique to guarantee high-throughput PCR specificity and consistency still remains a great challenge. In this study, we systematically investigated the HS characteristics of QDs triggered in real time PCR with EvaGreen and SYBR Green I dyes by the analysis of amplification curves, standard curves and melting curves. Two different kinds of DNA polymerases, Pfu and Taq, were employed. Here we showed that high specificity and efficiency of real time PCR were obtained in a plasmid DNA and an error-prone two-round PCR assay using QD-based HS PCR, even after an hour preincubation at 50 °C before real time PCR. Moreover, the results obtained by QD-based HS PCR were comparable to a commercial Taq antibody DNA polymerase. However, no obvious HS effect of QDs was found in real time PCR using Taq DNA polymerase. The findings of this study demonstrated that a cost-effective high-throughput real time PCR based on QD triggered HS PCR could be established with high consistency, sensitivity and accuracy.Hot start (HS) PCR is an excellent alternative for high-throughput real time PCR due to its ability to prevent nonspecific amplification at low temperature. Development of a cost-effective and simple HS PCR technique to guarantee high-throughput PCR specificity and consistency still remains a great challenge. In this study, we systematically investigated the HS characteristics of QDs triggered in real time PCR with EvaGreen and SYBR Green I dyes by the analysis of amplification curves, standard curves and melting curves. Two different kinds of DNA polymerases, Pfu and Taq, were employed. Here we showed that high specificity and efficiency of real time PCR were obtained in a plasmid DNA and an error-prone two-round PCR assay using QD-based HS PCR, even after an hour

  8. blaCTX-M-15 carried by IncF-type plasmids is the dominant ESBL gene in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae at a hospital in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Agyekum, Alex; Fajardo-Lubián, Alicia; Ansong, Daniel; Partridge, Sally R; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2016-04-01

    Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are among the most multidrug-resistant pathogens in hospitals and are spreading worldwide. Horizontal gene transfer and spread of high-risk clones are involved in ESBL dissemination. Investigation of the resistance phenotypes of 101 consecutive clinical E. coli (n=58) and K. pneumoniae (n=43) isolated at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana over 3months revealed 63 (62%) with an ESBL phenotype. All 63 had a blaCTX-M gene, and sequence analysis showed that 62 of these were blaCTX-M-15. blaCTX-M-15 was linked to ISEcp1 and orf477Δ in all isolates, and most isolates also carried blaTEM, aac(3)-II, aacA4cr, and/or blaOXA-30 genes on IncF plasmids. XbaI/pulsed-field electrophoresis showed heterogeneity among isolates of both species, suggesting that blaCTX-M-15 dissemination is caused by horizontal gene transfer rather than clonal spread of these species in Ghana. PMID:26830052

  9. An improved, PCR-based strategy for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in human blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-dos-Santos, G; Nishiya, A S; Sabino, E C; Chamone, D F; Saez-Alquézar, A

    1999-10-01

    Attempts were made to improve the PCR-based detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood samples, primarily for screening blood donors. Samples were obtained from candidate donors who were reactive in one or two of three serological tests for Chagas disease (and therefore considered 'indeterminate') or in all three tests (3+). Each sample was then examined using three different, PCR-based techniques: 'PCR-I' (in which the target DNA is a nuclear repetitive sequence); 'PCR-II' [amplifying a conserved region of the T. cruzi kinetoplast DNA (kDNA)]; and 'PCR-III' (a new strategy in which the target kDNA is amplified by 'nested' PCR). Among the samples from 3+ individuals, PCR-I, PCR-II and PCR-III amplified two (3.8%) out of 52, four (4.5%) out of 88, and 27 (25.7%) out of 105 samples tested, respectively. Seven, 69 and 70 samples from 'indeterminate' subjects were tested by PCR-I, PCR-II and PCR-III, respectively; there was not a single positive result by PCR-I or PCR-II, but three (4.3%) of the samples tested by PCR-III were positive. In a reconstruction experiment, in conditions in which PCR-I and PCR-II could not detect 10,000 parasites/ml, PCR-III was able to detect one parasite/ml. Although all three PCR-based strategies examined had rather poor sensitivities, PCR-III was far more sensitive than PCR-I or PCR-II. PMID:10715696

  10. Emergence of co-production of plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase and ESBL in cefoxitin-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, B; Mukherjee, M

    2016-09-01

    Plasmid-mediated AmpC (pAmpC) and ESBL co-production was detected in Escherichia coli a major etiologic agent of urinary tract infection. Isolates resistant to cefoxitin by CLSI methodology were tested for pAmpC beta-lactamase using phenylboronic acid and ESBLs by combined disk diffusion method. pAmpC/ESBL genes were characterized by PCR and sequencing. Transconjugation experiments were done to study the transfer of pAmpC and ESBL production from clinical isolates as donor to E. coli J53 AziR as recipient. Incompatibility groups of transmissible plasmids were classified by PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT). Among 148 urine culture positive isolates, E. coli was reported in 39.86 % (59/148), with 93.22 % (55/59) of cefoxitin resistance. pAmpC production was detected in 25, with varied distribution of blaCMY-2 and blaDHA-1type genes alone (n = 13 and 7 respectively) or in combination (n = 5). ESBL co-production was observed in 88 % (22/25) of pAmpC producing isolates with predominance of blaTEM (n = 20). Twenty-three transconjugants showed transmission of pAmpC-and ESBL-resistant genes with co-carriage of blaCMY-2 and blaTEM (n = 15) in plasmids of IncF type (n = 9) being predominant, followed by IncI1 (n = 4) and IncH1 (n = 2) in combination. All clinical isolates were clonally diverse. Resistance against different beta-lactams in uropathogenic E. coli has been an emerging concern in resource- poor countries such as India. Knowledge on the occurrence of AmpC beta-lactamases and ESBL amongst this pathogen and its transmission dynamics may aid in hospital infection control. PMID:27250633

  11. Application of a PCR-based approach to identify sex in Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarvi, S.I.; Banko, P.C.

    2000-01-01

    The application of molecular techniques to conservation genetics issues can provide important guidance criteria for management of endangered species. The results from this study establish that PCR-based approaches for sex determination developed in other bird species (Griffiths and Tiwari 1995; Griffiths et al. 1996, 1998; Ellegren 1996) can be applied with a high degree of confidence to at least four species of Hawaiian honeycreepers. This provides a rapid, reliable method with which population managers can optimize sex ratios within populations of endangered species that are subject to artificial manipulation through captive breeding programmes or geographic translocation.

  12. A PCR-based method to identify Entomophaga spp. infections in North American grasshoppers.

    PubMed

    Casique-Valdes, Rebeca; Sanchez-Peña, Sergio; Ivonne Torres-Acosta, R; Bidochka, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    A PCR-based method was developed for the detection and identification of two species of grasshopper-specific pathogens belonging to the genus Entomophaga in North America, Entomophaga calopteni and Entomophaga macleodii. Two separate sets of primers specific for amplification of a DNA product from each species of Entomophaga as well as a positive control were utilized. Grasshoppers were collected from two sites in Mexico during an epizootic with grasshoppers found in "summit disease", typical of Entomophaga infections. There was a preponderance of Melanopline grasshoppers infected by E. calopteni. The described method is an accurate tool for identification of North American grasshopper infections by Entomophaga species. PMID:22146240

  13. PCR-based immortalization and screening of hierarchical pools of cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    D'Esposito, M; Mazzarella, R; Pengue, G; Jones, C; D'Urso, M; Schlessinger, D

    1994-01-01

    Starting from sequences of at least 60 bp, PCR-based screening has been developed to recover cDNAs from libraries without the necessity for hybridization or extensive DNA extraction steps. The method maintains the indefinite availability of even scarce cDNA libraries and provides an estimate of the relative abundance of the mRNA species. Isolation of a cDNA clone can be done in less than a week. cDNAs were isolated that were cognate for fragments of expressed sequences and for an exon predicted from genomic sequence. Images PMID:7984433

  14. Rational design and PCR-based synthesis of an artificial Schizophyllum commune xylanase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Graham, R W; Atkinson, T; Kilburn, D G; Miller, R C; Warren, R A

    1993-01-01

    A synthetic gene encoding the Schizophyllum commune xylanase XynA was constructed by a novel PCR-based procedure. Three long oligonucleotides were synthesized and used in combination with flanking PCR primers to generate a 607 base pair gene which contained 31 unique locations for restriction enzyme cleavage. The amino acid sequence was tailored for expression in Escherichia coli by using only those codons found in highly expressed E. coli genes. The availability of the gene will facilitate analysis of the structure and function of this and other beta-(1,4) xylanases. Images PMID:8177740

  15. IncA/C Plasmid-Mediated Spread of CMY-2 in Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli from Food Animals in China

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Si-Qi; Yang, Lin; Lü, Dian-Hong; Zeng, Zhen-Ling; Liu, Ya-Hong; Jiang, Hong-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To obtain a broad molecular epidemiological characterization of plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamase CMY-2 in Escherichia coli isolates from food animals in China. Methods A total of 1083 E. coli isolates from feces, viscera, blood, drinking water, and sub-surface soil were examined for the presence of CMY-2 β-lactamases. CMY-2-producing isolates were characterized as follows: the blaCMY-2 genotype was determined using PCR and sequencing, characterization of the blaCMY-2 genetic environment, plasmid sizing using S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), PCR-based replicon typing, phylogenetic grouping, XbaI-PFGE, and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Results All 31 CMY-2 producers were only detected in feces, and presented with multidrug resistant phenotypes. All CMY-2 strains also co-harbored genes conferring resistance to other antimicrobials, including extended spectrum β-lactamases genes (blaCTX-M-14 or blaCTX-M-55), plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants (qnr, oqxA, and aac-(6′)-Ib-cr), floR and rmtB. The co-transferring of blaCMY-2 with qnrS1 and floR (alone and together) was mainly driven by the Inc A/C type plasmid, with sizes of 160 or 200 kb. Gene cassette arrays inserted in the class 1 or class 2 integron were amplified among 12 CMY-2 producers. CMY-2 producers belonged to avirulent groups B1 (n = 12) and A (n = 11), and virulent group D (n = 8). There was a good correlation between phylogenetic groups and sequence types (ST). Twenty-four STs were identified, of which the ST complexes (STC) 101/B1 (n = 6), STC10/A (n = 5), and STC155/B1 (n = 3) were dominant. Conclusions CMY-2 is the dominant AmpC β-lactamase in food animals and is associated with a transferable replicon IncA/C plasmid in the STC101, STC10, and STC155 strains. PMID:24816748

  16. Plasmid profiles, restriction fragment length polymorphisms and O-serotypes among Vibrio anguillarum isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, K.; Tiainen, T.; Larsen, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    A total of 279 Vibrio anguillarum strains were serotyped and examined for plasmid content. Plasmids were subjected to digestion with restriction enzymes. Most strains belonged to serogroup O1 (39%) and O2 (16%). In total 164 strains (53%) carried plasmids. Of the O1 and O2 isolates, 92% and 30%, respectively, carried one or more plasmids. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of plasmid DNA indicated that plasmids belonged to several groups. Each group seemed to be restricted to a single O-serovar. The largest group was the pJM1-like plasmids among most serovar O1 strains. Most of these plasmids were about 67 kb like the pJM1 plasmid, but various derivatives ranged from 26-77 kb. RFLP studies of the 67 kb plasmids revealed 17 different restriction patterns. Some patterns were dominant among European strains whereas others were dominant among North American strains. The results confirmed the applicability of O-serotyping together with plasmid profile and restriction analysis of plasmids for typing of V. anguillarum. They also indicated that plasmids among strains which belonged to the traditional fish pathogenic serogroups, O1 and O2, showed more homology than did strains from most other serogroups, that were usually non-pathogenic, environmental bacteria. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8972671

  17. Evolution of genes on the Salmonella Virulence plasmid phylogeny revealed from sequencing of the virulence plasmids of S. enterica serotype Dublin and comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chishih; Feng, Ye; Chien, An-Chi; Hu, Songnian; Chu, Chi-Hong; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2008-11-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Dublin harbors an approximately 80-kb virulence plasmid (pSDV), which mediates systemic infection in cattle. There are two types of pSDV: one is pSDVu (pOU1113) in strain OU7025 and the other pSDVr (pOU1115) in OU7409 (SD Lane) and many clinical isolates. Sequence analysis showed that pSDVr was a recombinant plasmid (co-integrate) of pSDVu and a plasmid similar to a 35-kb indigenous plasmid (pOU1114) of S. Dublin. Most of the F-transfer region in pSDVu was replaced by a DNA segment from the pOU1114-like plasmid containing an extra replicon and a pilX operon encoding for a type IV secretion system to form pSDVr. We reconstructed the particular evolutionary history of the seven virulence plasmids of Salmonella by comparative sequence analysis. The whole evolutionary process might begin with two different F-like plasmids (IncFI and IncFII), which then incorporated the spv operon and fimbriae operon from the chromosome to form the primitive virulence plasmids. Subsequently, these plasmids descended by deletion from a relatively large plasmid to smaller ones, with some recombination events occurring over time. Our results suggest that the phylogeny of virulence plasmids as a result of frequent recombination provides the opportunity for rapid evolution of Salmonella in response to the environmental cues. PMID:18718522

  18. PCR-based Detection of Spiroplasma Citri Associated with Citrus Stubborn Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improvements in polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of Spiroplasma citri, the causal agent of citrus stubborn disease, made PCR more reliable than culturing for S. citri detection. Primer sequences from the P89 putative adhesin gene, which is present on a plasmid as well as in the S. citri gen...

  19. Performance of PCR-based assays targeting Bacteroidales genetic markers of human fecal pollution in sewage and fecal samples

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous PCR-based methods available to characterize human fecal pollution in ambient waters. Each assay employs distinct oligonucleotides and many target different genes and microorganisms leading to potential variations in method performance. Laboratory comparisons ...

  20. Sociobiological Control of Plasmid Copy Number in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Watve, Mukta M.; Dahanukar, Neelesh; Watve, Milind G.

    2010-01-01

    All genes critical for plasmid replication regulation are located on the plasmid rather than on the host chromosome. It is possible therefore that there can be copy-up “cheater” mutants. In spite of this possibility, low copy number plasmids appear to exist stably in host populations. We examined this paradox using a multilevel selection model. Simulations showed that, a slightly higher copy number mutant could out-compete the wild type. Consequently, another mutant with still higher copy number could invade the first invader. However, the realized benefit of increasing intra-host fitness was saturating whereas that of inter-host fitness was exponential. As a result, above a threshold, intra-host selection was overcompensated by inter-host selection and the low copy number wild type plasmid could back invade a very high copy number plasmid. This led to a rock-paper-scissor (RPS) like situation that allowed the coexistence of plasmids with varied copy numbers. Furthermore, another type of cheater that had lost the genes required for conjugation but could hitchhike on a conjugal plasmid, could further reduce the advantage of copy-up mutants. These sociobiological interactions may compliment molecular mechanisms of replication regulation in stabilizing the copy numbers. PMID:20195362

  1. A Novel PCR-Based Approach for Accurate Identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruichao; Chiou, Jiachi; Chan, Edward Wai-Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    A PCR-based assay was developed for more accurate identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus through targeting the blaCARB-17 like element, an intrinsic β-lactamase gene that may also be regarded as a novel species-specific genetic marker of this organism. Homologous analysis showed that blaCARB-17 like genes were more conservative than the tlh, toxR and atpA genes, the genetic markers commonly used as detection targets in identification of V. parahaemolyticus. Our data showed that this blaCARB-17-specific PCR-based detection approach consistently achieved 100% specificity, whereas PCR targeting the tlh and atpA genes occasionally produced false positive results. Furthermore, a positive result of this test is consistently associated with an intrinsic ampicillin resistance phenotype of the test organism, presumably conferred by the products of blaCARB-17 like genes. We envision that combined analysis of the unique genetic and phenotypic characteristics conferred by blaCARB-17 shall further enhance the detection specificity of this novel yet easy-to-use detection approach to a level superior to the conventional methods used in V. parahaemolyticus detection and identification. PMID:26858713

  2. A Novel PCR-Based Approach for Accurate Identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruichao; Chiou, Jiachi; Chan, Edward Wai-Chi; Chen, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    A PCR-based assay was developed for more accurate identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus through targeting the bla CARB-17 like element, an intrinsic β-lactamase gene that may also be regarded as a novel species-specific genetic marker of this organism. Homologous analysis showed that bla CARB-17 like genes were more conservative than the tlh, toxR and atpA genes, the genetic markers commonly used as detection targets in identification of V. parahaemolyticus. Our data showed that this bla CARB-17-specific PCR-based detection approach consistently achieved 100% specificity, whereas PCR targeting the tlh and atpA genes occasionally produced false positive results. Furthermore, a positive result of this test is consistently associated with an intrinsic ampicillin resistance phenotype of the test organism, presumably conferred by the products of bla CARB-17 like genes. We envision that combined analysis of the unique genetic and phenotypic characteristics conferred by bla CARB-17 shall further enhance the detection specificity of this novel yet easy-to-use detection approach to a level superior to the conventional methods used in V. parahaemolyticus detection and identification. PMID:26858713

  3. A PCR-based genetic linkage map of human chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.; Kozman, H.M.; Thompson, A.

    1994-07-01

    A high-resolution cytogenetic-based physical map and a genetic linkage map of human chromosome 16 have been developed based on 79 PCR-typable genetic markers and 2 Southern-based RFLP markers. The PCR-based markers were previously-characterized polymorphic (AC){sub n} repeats. Two approaches have led to the characterization of 47 highly informative genetic markers spread along chromosome 16, some of which are closely linked to disease loci. In addition, 22 markers (D16S401-423) previously genetically mapped were also physically mapped. Ten markers characterized by other laboratories were physically mapped and genotyped on the CEPH families. These 32 markers were incorporated into the PCR-based map. Seventy-two markers have heterozygosities >0.50 and 51 of these markers >0.70. By multipoint linkage analysis a framework genetic map and a comprehensive genetic map were constructed. The length of the sex-averaged framework genetic map if 152.1 cM. The average distance and the median distance between markers on this map are 3.2 and 2.7 cM, respectively, and the largest gap is 15.9 cM. These maps were anchored to the high-resolution cytogenetic map (on average 1.5 Mb per interval). Together these integrated genetic and physical maps of human chromosome 16 provide the basis for the localization and ultimately the isolation of disease genes that map to this chromosome. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Use of plasmid profiles in epidemiologic surveillance of disease outbreaks and in tracing the transmission of antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, L W

    1988-01-01

    Plasmids are circular deoxyribonucleic acid molecules that exist in bacteria, usually independent of the chromosome. The study of plasmids is important to medical microbiology because plasmids can encode genes for antibiotic resistance or virulence factors. Plasmids can also serve as markers of various bacterial strains when a typing system referred to as plasmid profiling, or plasmid fingerprinting is used. In these methods partially purified plasma deoxyribonucleic acid species are separated according to molecular size by agarose gel electrophoresis. In a second procedure, plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid which has been cleaved by restriction endonucleases can be separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and the resulting pattern of fragments can be used to verify the identity of bacterial isolates. Because many species of bacteria contain plasmids, plasmid profile typing has been used to investigate outbreaks of many bacterial diseases and to trace inter- and intra-species spread of antibiotic resistance. Images PMID:2852997

  5. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  6. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Major Virulence Factors Dly, Plasmid-Encoded HlyA, and Chromosome-Encoded HlyA Are Secreted via the Type II Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Vences, Ana; Husmann, Matthias; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae is a marine bacterium that causes septicemia in marine animals and in humans. Previously, we had determined a major role of pPHDD1 plasmid-encoded Dly (damselysin) and HlyA (HlyApl) and the chromosome-encoded HlyA (HlyAch) hemolysins in virulence. However, the mechanisms by which these toxins are secreted remain unknown. In this study, we found that a mini-Tn10 transposon mutant in a plasmidless strain showing an impaired hemolytic phenotype contained an insertion in epsL, a component of a type II secretion system (T2SS). Reconstruction of the mutant by allelic exchange confirmed the specific involvement of epsL in HlyAch secretion. In addition, mutation of epsL in a pPHDD1-harboring strain caused an almost complete abolition of hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes, indicating that epsL plays a major role in secretion of the plasmid-encoded HlyApl and Dly. This was further demonstrated by analysis of different combinations of hemolysin gene mutants and by strain-strain complementation assays. We also found that mutation of the putative prepilin peptidase gene pilD severely affected hemolysis, which dropped at levels inferior to those of epsL mutants. Promoter expression analyses suggested that impairment of hemolysin secretion in epsL and pilD mutants might constitute a signal that affects hemolysin and T2SS gene expression at the transcriptional level. In addition, single epsL and pilD mutations caused a drastic decrease in virulence for mice, demonstrating a major role of T2SS and pilD in P. damselae subsp. damselae virulence. PMID:25583529

  7. Evaluation of the repeatability and reproducibility of a suite of qPCR-based microbial source tracking methods.

    PubMed

    Ebentier, Darcy L; Hanley, Kaitlyn T; Cao, Yiping; Badgley, Brian D; Boehm, Alexandria B; Ervin, Jared S; Goodwin, Kelly D; Gourmelon, Michèle; Griffith, John F; Holden, Patricia A; Kelty, Catherine A; Lozach, Solen; McGee, Charles; Peed, Lindsay A; Raith, Meredith; Ryu, Hodon; Sadowsky, Michael J; Scott, Elizabeth A; Santo Domingo, Jorge; Schriewer, Alexander; Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Shanks, Orin C; Van De Werfhorst, Laurie C; Wang, Dan; Wuertz, Stefan; Jay, Jennifer A

    2013-11-15

    Many PCR-based methods for microbial source tracking (MST) have been developed and validated within individual research laboratories. Inter-laboratory validation of these methods, however, has been minimal, and the effects of protocol standardization regimes have not been thoroughly evaluated. Knowledge of factors influencing PCR in different laboratories is vital to future technology transfer for use of MST methods as a tool for water quality management. In this study, a blinded set of 64 filters (containing 32 duplicate samples generated from 12 composite fecal sources) were analyzed by three to five core laboratories with a suite of PCR-based methods utilizing standardized reagents and protocols. Repeatability (intra-laboratory variability) and reproducibility (inter-laboratory variability) of observed results were assessed. When standardized methodologies were used, intra- and inter-laboratory %CVs were generally low (median %CV 0.1-3.3% and 1.9-7.1%, respectively) and comparable to those observed in similar inter-laboratory validation studies performed on other methods of quantifying fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in environmental samples. ANOVA of %CV values found three human-associated methods (BsteriF1, BacHum, and HF183Taqman) to be similarly reproducible (p > 0.05) and significantly more reproducible (p < 0.05) than HumM2. This was attributed to the increased variability associated with low target concentrations detected by HumM2 (approximately 1-2 log10copies/filter lower) compared to other human-associated methods. Cow-associated methods (BacCow and CowM2) were similarly reproducible (p > 0.05). When using standardized protocols, variance component analysis indicated sample type (fecal source and concentration) to be the major contributor to total variability with that from replicate filters and inter-laboratory analysis to be within the same order of magnitude but larger than inherent intra-laboratory variability. However, when reagents and

  8. Molecular analysis of plasmid encoded multi-drug resistance (MDR) in Salmonella enterica animal isolates by PFGE, replicon typing, and DNA microarray screening followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The development of Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) Salmonella is of global concern. MDR Salmonella genes can be transmitted in a number of ways including transfer of plasmids. To understand how MDR plasmids develop and are transmitted, their genetics must be thoroughly described. To achieve t...

  9. Performance of human fecal anaerobe-associated PCR-based assays in a multi-laboratory method evaluation study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Layton, Blythe A.; Cao, Yiping; Ebentier, Darcy L.; Hanley, Kaitlyn; Ballesté, Elisenda; Brandão, João; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara N.; Converse, Reagan; Farnleitner, Andreas H.; Gentry-Shields, Jennifer, Gidley, Maribeth L.; Gourmelon, Michèle; Lee, Chang Soo; Lee, Jiyoung; Lozach, Solen; Madi, Tania; Meijer, Wim G.; Noble, Rachel; Peed, Lindsay; Reischer, Georg H.; Rodrigues, Raquel; Rose, Joan B.; Schriewer, Alexander; Sinigalliano, Chris; Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Stewart, Jill; Van De Werfhorst; Laurie, C.; Wang, Dan; Whitman, Richard; Wuertz, Stefan; Jay, Jenny; Holden, Patricia A.; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Shanks, Orin; Griffith, John F.

    2013-01-01

    A number of PCR-based methods for detecting human fecal material in environmental waters have been developed over the past decade, but these methods have rarely received independent comparative testing in large multi-laboratory studies. Here, we evaluated ten of these methods (BacH, BacHum-UCD, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtH), BsteriF1, gyrB, HF183 endpoint, HF183 SYBR, HF183 Taqman®, HumM2, and Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH (Mnif)) using 64 blind samples prepared in one laboratory. The blind samples contained either one or two fecal sources from human, wastewater or non-human sources. The assay results were assessed for presence/absence of the human markers and also quantitatively while varying the following: 1) classification of samples that were detected but not quantifiable (DNQ) as positive or negative; 2) reference fecal sample concentration unit of measure (such as culturable indicator bacteria, wet mass, total DNA, etc); and 3) human fecal source type (stool, sewage or septage). Assay performance using presence/absence metrics was found to depend on the classification of DNQ samples. The assays that performed best quantitatively varied based on the fecal concentration unit of measure and laboratory protocol. All methods were consistently more sensitive to human stools compared to sewage or septage in both the presence/absence and quantitative analysis. Overall, HF183 Taqman® was found to be the most effective marker of human fecal contamination in this California-based study.

  10. Mix and match of KPC-2 encoding plasmids in Enterobacteriaceae-comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Chmelnitsky, Inna; Shklyar, Maya; Leavitt, Azita; Sadovsky, Evgeniya; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Ben Dalak, Maayan; Edgar, Rotem; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2014-06-01

    We performed comparative sequence analysis of 3 blaKPC-2 encoding plasmids to examine evolution of these plasmids and their dissemination. We found that all of them have an IncN replicon with a newly determined IncN plasmid sequence type (ST), ST15. The 2 Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPN) plasmids also harbor an IncF2A1-B1- replicon. The blaKPC-2 is located in the Tn4401c transposon with a newly discovered mutation in the P2 promoter. Screening of the 27 additional blaKPC-2 carrying plasmids from Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli (EC), and K. pneumoniae showed that: all KPN and EC plasmids are IncN plasmids belonging to ST15; 4/7 KPN and 1/6 EC plasmids contain an additional IncF2A1-B1- replicon; all Enterobacter plasmids belong to neither IncN nor IncF2A1-B1- replicon plasmids; 6/7 KPN and 2/5 EC plasmids carry the mutated P2 promoter. Study of the blaKPC-2 environment, transposon, pMLST, and Inc group suggests transposon and plasmid inter- and intra-species dissemination and evolution. PMID:24743043

  11. Rapid PCR-Based Method Which Can Determine Both Phenotype and Genotype of Lactococcus lactis Subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Masaru; Kobayashi, Miho; Okamoto, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    A highly efficient, rapid, and reliable PCR-based method for distinguishing Lactococcus lactis subspecies (L. lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris) is described. Primers complementary to positions in the glutamate decarboxylase gene have been constructed. PCR analysis with extracted DNA or with cells of different L. lactis strains resulted in specific fragments. The length polymorphism of the PCR fragments allowed a clear distinction of the L. lactis subspecies. The amplified fragment length polymorphism with the primers and the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the amplified products agreed perfectly with the identification based on genotypic and phenotypic analyses, respectively. Isolates from cheese starters were investigated by this method, and amplified fragments of genetic variants were found to be approximately 40 bp shorter than the typical L. lactis subsp. cremoris fragments. PMID:11976090

  12. Rapid detection and identification of Clostridium chauvoei by PCR based on flagellin gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Kojima, A; Uchida, I; Sekizaki, T; Sasaki, Y; Ogikubo, Y; Tamura, Y

    2001-02-26

    We developed a one-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system that specifically detects Clostridium chauvoei. Oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify a 516-bp fragment of the structural flagellin gene. The specificity of the PCR was investigated by analyzing 59 strains of clostridia, and seven strain of other genera. A 516-bp fragment could be amplified from all the C. chauvoei strains tested, and no amplification was observed by using DNAs from the other strains tested, including Clostridium septicum. Similarly, this PCR-based method specifically detected C. chauvoei DNA sequences in samples of muscle and exudate of obtained from mice within 12h of inoculation. In tests using samples of muscle or liver, the limit of detection was about 200 organisms per reaction. These results suggest that the one-step PCR system may be useful for direct detection and identification of C. chauvoei in clinical specimens. PMID:11182502

  13. PCR-Based Analysis of Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number, Mitochondrial DNA Damage, and Nuclear DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P; Rooney, John P; Ryde, Ian T; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role that DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit, we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  14. PCR-based assessment of shellfish traceability and sustainability in international Mediterranean seafood markets.

    PubMed

    Galal-Khallaf, Asmaa; Ardura, Alba; Borrell, Yaisel J; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2016-07-01

    Two mitochondrial markers (cytochrome oxidase COI and 16S rDNA) were employed for species identification of commercial shellfish from two Mediterranean countries. New COI Barcodes were generated for six species: Pleoticus robustus, Metapenaeopsis barbata, Parapenaeus fissuroides, Hymenopenaeus debilis, Metapenaeus affinis and Sepia aculeata. Biodiversity of the seafood species analyzed was greater in Egypt, with nine crustacean and two cephalopod species found compared with only three crustaceans and three cephalopods in Spain. In total, 17.2% and 15.2% products were mislabeled in Egypt and Spain, respectively. Population decline is a problem for some of the substitute species. Others were exotic and/or invasive in exporters' regions. This study offers the first comparable study of shellfish traceability in these Mediterranean markets. The PCR-based method used in this study proved to be reliable, effective and, therefore, could be employed for routine seafood analysis. PMID:26920298

  15. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  16. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  17. Plasmid acquisition in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.; Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, bacteria often show an increased resistance to antibiotics. Bacteria can develop resistance to an antibiotic after transformation, the acquisition of DNA, usually in the form of a plasmid containing a gene for resistance to one or more antibiotics. In order to study the capacity of bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics in microgravity, we have modified the standard protocol for transformation of Escherichia coli for use in the NASA-flight-certified hardware package, The Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA). Here we report on the ability of E. coli to remain competent for long periods of time at temperatures that are readily available on the Space Shuttle, and present some preliminary flight results.

  18. Presence and Analysis of Plasmids in Human and Animal Associated Arcobacter Species

    PubMed Central

    Douidah, Laid; De Zutter, Lieven; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Deforce, Dieter; Ingmer, Hanne; Vandenberg, Olivier; Van den Abeele, Anne-Marie; Houf, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we report the screening of four Arcobacter species for the presence of small and large plasmids. Plasmids were present in 9.9% of the 273 examined strains. One Arcobacter cryaerophilus and four Arcobacter butzleri plasmids were selected for further sequencing. The size of three small plasmids isolated from A. butzleri and the one from A. cryaerophilus strains ranged between 4.8 and 5.1 kb, and the size of the large plasmid, isolated from A. butzleri, was 27.4 kbp. The G+C content of all plasmids ranged between 25.4% and 26.2%. A total of 95% of the large plasmid sequence represents coding information, which contrasts to the 20 to 30% for the small plasmids. Some of the open reading frames showed a high homology to putative conserved domains found in other related organisms, such as replication, mobilization and genes involved in type IV secretion system. The large plasmid carried 35 coding sequences, including seven genes in a contiguous region of 11.6 kbp that encodes an orthologous type IV secretion system found in the Wolinella succinogenes genome, Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni plasmids, which makes this plasmid interesting for further exploration. PMID:24465575

  19. Evolved plasmid-host interactions reduce plasmid interference cost.

    PubMed

    Yano, Hirokazu; Wegrzyn, Katarznya; Loftie-Eaton, Wesley; Johnson, Jenny; Deckert, Gail E; Rogers, Linda M; Konieczny, Igor; Top, Eva M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic selection drives adaptation of antibiotic resistance plasmids to new bacterial hosts, but the molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. We previously showed that a broad-host-range plasmid was poorly maintained in Shewanella oneidensis, but rapidly adapted through mutations in the replication initiation gene trfA1. Here we examined if these mutations reduced the fitness cost of TrfA1, and whether this was due to changes in interaction with the host's DNA helicase DnaB. The strains expressing evolved TrfA1 variants showed a higher growth rate than those expressing ancestral TrfA1. The evolved TrfA1 variants showed a lower affinity to the helicase than ancestral TrfA1 and were no longer able to activate the helicase at the oriV without host DnaA. Moreover, persistence of the ancestral plasmid was increased upon overexpression of DnaB. Finally, the evolved TrfA1 variants generated higher plasmid copy numbers than ancestral TrfA1. The findings suggest that ancestral plasmid instability can at least partly be explained by titration of DnaB by TrfA1. Thus under antibiotic selection resistance plasmids can adapt to a novel bacterial host through partial loss of function mutations that simultaneously increase plasmid copy number and decrease unfavorably high affinity to one of the hosts' essential proteins. PMID:27121483

  20. PCR-Based Method To Differentiate the Subspecies of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex on the Basis of Genomic Deletions

    PubMed Central

    Huard, Richard C.; de Oliveira Lazzarini, Luiz Claudio; Butler, W. Ray; van Soolingen, Dick; Ho, John L.

    2003-01-01

    The classical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MtbC) subspecies include Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium africanum (subtypes I and II), Mycobacterium bovis (along with the attenuated M. bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin [BCG]), and Mycobacterium microti; increasingly recognized MtbC groupings include Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae and “Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp. canettii.” Previous investigations have documented each MtbC subspecies as a source of animal and/or human tuberculosis. However, study of these organisms is hindered by the lack of a single protocol that quickly and easily differentiates all of the MtbC groupings. Towards this end we have developed a rapid, simple, and reliable PCR-based MtbC typing method that makes use of MtbC chromosomal region-of-difference deletion loci. Here, seven primer pairs (which amplify within the loci 16S rRNA, Rv0577, IS1561′, Rv1510, Rv1970, Rv3877/8, and Rv3120) were run in separate but simultaneous reactions. Each primer pair either specifically amplified a DNA fragment of a unique size or failed, depending upon the source mycobacterial DNA. The pattern of amplification products from all of the reactions, visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis, allowed immediate identification either as MtbC composed of M. tuberculosis (or M. africanum subtype II), M. africanum subtype I, M. bovis, M. bovis BCG, M. caprae, M. microti, or “M. canettii” or as a Mycobacterium other than MtbC (MOTT). This MtbC PCR typing panel provides an advanced approach to determine the subspecies of MtbC isolates and to differentiate them from clinically important MOTT species. It has proven beneficial in the management of Mycobacterium collections and may be applied for practical clinical and epidemiological use. PMID:12682155

  1. Seamless stitching of biosynthetic gene cluster containing type I polyketide synthases using Red/ET mediated recombination for construction of stably co-existing plasmids.

    PubMed

    Su, Chun; Zhao, Xin-Qing; Wang, Hai-Na; Qiu, Rong-Guo; Tang, Li

    2015-01-10

    Type I polyketides are natural products with diverse functions that are important for medical and agricultural applications. Manipulation of large biosynthetic gene clusters containing type I polyketide synthases (PKS) for heterologous expression is difficult due to the existence of conservative sequences of PKS in multiple modules. Red/ET mediated recombination has permitted rapid manipulation of large fragments; however, it requires insertion of antibiotic selection marker in the cassette, raising the problem of interference of expression by leaving "scar" sequence. Here, we report a method for precise seamless stitching of large polyketide biosynthetic gene cluster using a 48.4kb fragment containing type I PKS involved in fostriecin biosynthesis as an example. rpsL counter-selection was used to assist seamless stitching of large fragments, where we have overcome both the size limitations and the restriction on endonuclease sites during the Red/ET recombination. The compatibility and stability of the co-existing vectors (p184 and pMT) which respectively accommodate 16kb and 32.4kb inserted fragments were demonstrated. The procedure described here is efficient for manipulation of large DNA fragments for heterologous expression. PMID:25311549

  2. Plasmid Copy Number Determination by Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Anindyajati; Artarini, A Anita; Riani, Catur; Retnoningrum, Debbie S

    2016-01-01

    that both primer pairs were acceptable and were predicted to have good performance. Those predictions were in agreement with the in vitro test that gave a single band in the PCR product's electropherogram and a single peak in DNA amplicon's melting curve with a Tm value of 79.01 ± 0.11°C for the tdk primer and 81.53 ± 0.29°C for the ori primer. The efficiency of each primer was 1.95 and 1.97, respectively. The calculation result of pCAD's copy number was 13.1 ± 0.3 copies/cell, showing that pCAD's low copy number has been determined and confirmed. Meanwhile, it was 576.3 ± 91.9 copies/cell for pJExpress414-sod, in accordance with the hypothesis that pUC ori regulates the high copy number plasmid. In conclusion, the designed primers and qPCR conditions used in this study can be used to determine plasmid copy number for plasmids with pBR322 and pUC ori. The method should be tested further on plasmids harboring other type of ori. PMID:27110501

  3. Plasmid Profiles of Virulent Rhodococcus equi Strains Isolated from Infected Foals in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kalinowski, Marcin; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Jarosz, Łukasz; Kato, Kiyoko; Hieda, Yu; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Takai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important bacterial pathogen in foals up to 6 months old, widespread in horse farms all over the world. It was found that only virulent R. equi strains expressing 15-17 kDa virulence-associated protein (VapA) and having large virulence plasmid of 85-90 kb containing vapA gene are pathogenic for horses. To date, 12 plasmid types have been reported in VapA positive strains from horses. There are no data concerning plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains isolated from horses and horse farm environment. The aim of the study is to determine plasmid profiles of virulent R. equi strains isolated in Poland from dead foals as well as from soil samples taken from horse breeding farms. Plasmid profiles of 10 clinical strains derived from 8 farms and 11 environmental strains from 3 farms, confirmed as virulent by PCR, were compared with 12 reference strains containing the known plasmid size and type. Plasmid DNAs were analysed by digestion with the restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, EcoT22I, and HindIII for detailed comparison and estimation of plasmid sizes. The results of RFLP analysis revealed that all except one isolates used in the study are classified as VapA 85 kb type I plasmid. One strain harboured VapA 87 kb type I plasmid. This is the first report of plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains. The results of our preliminary investigations on horse farms located in central and eastern Poland indicate that the virulent R. equi strains thus far isolated from diseased foals and horse farms environment represent a highly uniform plasmid pattern. PMID:27074033

  4. Plasmid Profiles of Virulent Rhodococcus equi Strains Isolated from Infected Foals in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, Marcin; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Jarosz, Łukasz; Kato, Kiyoko; Hieda, Yu; Kakuda, Tsutomu; Takai, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an important bacterial pathogen in foals up to 6 months old, widespread in horse farms all over the world. It was found that only virulent R. equi strains expressing 15–17 kDa virulence-associated protein (VapA) and having large virulence plasmid of 85–90 kb containing vapA gene are pathogenic for horses. To date, 12 plasmid types have been reported in VapA positive strains from horses. There are no data concerning plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains isolated from horses and horse farm environment. The aim of the study is to determine plasmid profiles of virulent R. equi strains isolated in Poland from dead foals as well as from soil samples taken from horse breeding farms. Plasmid profiles of 10 clinical strains derived from 8 farms and 11 environmental strains from 3 farms, confirmed as virulent by PCR, were compared with 12 reference strains containing the known plasmid size and type. Plasmid DNAs were analysed by digestion with the restriction endonucleases BamHI, EcoRI, EcoT22I, and HindIII for detailed comparison and estimation of plasmid sizes. The results of RFLP analysis revealed that all except one isolates used in the study are classified as VapA 85 kb type I plasmid. One strain harboured VapA 87 kb type I plasmid. This is the first report of plasmid types of Polish field R. equi strains. The results of our preliminary investigations on horse farms located in central and eastern Poland indicate that the virulent R. equi strains thus far isolated from diseased foals and horse farms environment represent a highly uniform plasmid pattern. PMID:27074033

  5. PCR-based detection of gene transfer vectors: application to gene doping surveillance.

    PubMed

    Perez, Irene C; Le Guiner, Caroline; Ni, Weiyi; Lyles, Jennifer; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O

    2013-12-01

    Athletes who illicitly use drugs to enhance their athletic performance are at risk of being banned from sports competitions. Consequently, some athletes may seek new doping methods that they expect to be capable of circumventing detection. With advances in gene transfer vector design and therapeutic gene transfer, and demonstrations of safety and therapeutic benefit in humans, there is an increased probability of the pursuit of gene doping by athletes. In anticipation of the potential for gene doping, assays have been established to directly detect complementary DNA of genes that are top candidates for use in doping, as well as vector control elements. The development of molecular assays that are capable of exposing gene doping in sports can serve as a deterrent and may also identify athletes who have illicitly used gene transfer for performance enhancement. PCR-based methods to detect foreign DNA with high reliability, sensitivity, and specificity include TaqMan real-time PCR, nested PCR, and internal threshold control PCR. PMID:23912835

  6. Development of rapid canine fecal source identification PCR-based assays.

    PubMed

    Green, Hyatt C; White, Karen M; Kelty, Cathy A; Shanks, Orin C

    2014-10-01

    The extent to which dogs contribute to aquatic fecal contamination is unknown despite the potential for zoonotic transfer of harmful human pathogens. We used genome fragment enrichment (GFE) to identify novel nonribosomal microbial genetic markers potentially useful for detecting dog fecal contamination with PCR-based methods in environmental samples. Of the 679 sequences obtained from GFE, we used 84 for the development of PCR assays targeting putative canine-associated genetic markers. Twelve genetic markers were shown to be prevalent among dog fecal samples and were rarely found in other animals. Three assays, DG3, DG37, and DG72, performed best in terms of specificity and sensitivity and were used for the development of SYBR Green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays. qPCR analysis of 244 fecal samples collected from a wide geographic range indicated that marker concentrations were below limits of detection in noncanine hosts. As a proof-of-concept, these markers were detected in urban stormwater samples, suggesting a future application of newly developed methods for water quality monitoring. PMID:25203917

  7. PCR-based detection of bioluminescent microbial populations in Tyrrhenian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentile, Gabriela; De Luca, Massimo; Denaro, Renata; La Cono, Violetta; Smedile, Francesco; Scarfì, Simona; De Domenico, Emilio; De Domenico, Maria; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2009-05-01

    The present study is focused on the development of a cultivation-independent molecular approach for specific detection of bioluminescent bacteria within microbial communities by direct amplification of luxA gene from environmental DNA. A new set of primers, specifically targeting free-living bioluminescent bacteria, was designed on the base of l uxA sequences available from the public database. Meso- and bathypelagic seawater samples were collected from two stations in Tyrrhenian Sea at the depths of 500 and 2750 m. The same seawater samples also were used to isolate bioluminescent bacteria that were further subjected to luxA and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PCR products obtained by amplification with designed primers were cloned, and the phylogenetic affiliation of 40 clones was determined. All of them were clustered into three groups, only distantly related to the Photobacterium phosphoreum and Photobacterium kishitanii clades. The half of all clones formed a tight monophyletic clade, while the rest of clones were organized in "compartment"-specific, meso- and bathypelagic ecotypes. No matches with luxA gene sequences of four bioluminescent strains, isolated from the same seawater samples, were observed. These findings indicate that the PCR-based approach developed in present manuscript, allowed us to detect the novel, "yet to be cultivated" lineages of bioluminescent bacteria, which are likely specific for distinct warm bathypelagic realms of Mediterranean Sea.

  8. Organic Substances Interfere with Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR-Based Virus Detection in Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Hiroyuki; Furumai, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-based virus detection from water samples is occasionally hampered by organic substances that are coconcentrated during virus concentration procedures. To characterize these organic substances, samples containing commercially available humic acid, which is known to inhibit RT-PCR, and river water samples were subjected to adsorption-elution-based virus concentration using an electronegative membrane. In this study, the samples before, during, and after the concentration were analyzed in terms of organic properties and virus detection efficiencies. Two out of the three humic acid solutions resulted in RT-quantitative PCR (qPCR) inhibition that caused >3-log10-unit underestimation of spiked poliovirus. Over 60% of the organics contained in the two solutions were recovered in the concentrate, while over 60% of the organics in the uninhibited solution were lost during the concentration process. River water concentrates also caused inhibition of RT-qPCR. Organic concentrations in the river water samples increased by 2.3 to 3.9 times after the virus concentration procedure. The inhibitory samples contained organic fractions in the 10- to 100-kDa size range, which are suspected to be RT-PCR inhibitors. According to excitation-emission matrices, humic acid-like and protein-like fractions were also recovered from river water concentrates, but these fractions did not seem to affect virus detection. Our findings reveal that detailed organic analyses are effective in characterizing inhibitory substances. PMID:25527552

  9. Effect of reference database on frequency estimates of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Monson, K L; Budowle, B

    1998-05-01

    A variety of general, regional, ancestral and ethnic databases is available for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, DQA1, and D1S80. Generally, we observed greater differences in frequency estimations of DNA profiles between racial groups than between ethnic or geographic subgroups. Analysis revealed few forensically significant differences within ethnic subgroups, particularly within general United States groups, and multi-locus frequency estimates typically differ by less than a factor of ten. Using a database different from the one to which a target profile belongs tends to overestimate rarity. Implementation of the general correction of homozygote frequencies for a population substructure, advised by the 1996 National Research Council report, The Evaluation of Forensic DNA Evidence, has a minimal effect on profile frequencies. Even when it is known that both the suspect and all possible perpetrators must belong to the same isolated population, the special correction for inbreeding, which was proposed by the 1996 National Research Council report for this special case, has a relatively modest effect, typically a factor of two or less for 1% inbreeding. The effect becomes more substantial (exceeding a factor of ten) for inbreeding of 3% or more in multi-locus profiles rarer than about one in a million. PMID:9608687

  10. PCR-Based Seamless Genome Editing with High Efficiency and Fidelity in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yilan; Yang, Maohua; Chen, Jinjin; Yan, Daojiang; Cheng, Wanwan; Wang, Yanyan; Thygesen, Anders; Chen, Ruonan; Xing, Jianmin; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency and fidelity are the key obstacles for genome editing toolboxes. In the present study, a PCR-based tandem repeat assisted genome editing (TRAGE) method with high efficiency and fidelity was developed. The design of TRAGE is based on the mechanism of repair of spontaneous double-strand breakage (DSB) via replication fork reactivation. First, cat-sacB cassette flanked by tandem repeat sequence was integrated into target site in chromosome assisted by Red enzymes. Then, for the excision of the cat-sacB cassette, only subculturing is needed. The developed method was successfully applied for seamlessly deleting, substituting and inserting targeted genes using PCR products. The effects of different manipulations including sucrose addition time, subculture times in LB with sucrose and stages of inoculation on the efficiency were investigated. With our recommended procedure, seamless excision of cat-sacB cassette can be realized in 48 h efficiently. We believe that the developed method has great potential for seamless genome editing in E. coli. PMID:27019283

  11. PCR-based Approaches for the Detection of Clinical Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Jiang; Ji, Yinduo

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen that can cause a variety of infections, including superficial and systematic infections, in humans and animals. The persistent emergence of multidrug resistant S. aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus, has caused dramatically economic burden and concerns in the public health due to limited options of treatment of MRSA infections. In order to make a correct choice of treatment for physicians and understand the prevalence of MRSA, it is extremely critical to precisely and timely diagnose the pathogen that induces a specific infection of patients and to reveal the antibiotic resistant profile of the pathogen. In this review, we outlined different PCR-based approaches that have been successfully utilized for the rapid detection of S. aureus, including MRSA and MSSA, directly from various clinical specimens. The sensitivity and specificity of detections were pointed out. Both advantages and disadvantages of listed approaches were discussed. Importantly, an alternative approach is necessary to further confirm the detection results from the molecular diagnostic assays. PMID:27335617

  12. Effective PCR-based detection of Naegleria fowleri from cultured sample and PAM-developed mouse.

    PubMed

    Kang, Heekyoung; Seong, Gi-Sang; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, Mi Yeoun; Lee, Won-Ja; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2015-10-01

    Increasing numbers of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) cases due to Naegleria fowleri are becoming a serious issue in subtropical and tropical countries as a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD). To establish a rapid and effective diagnostic tool, a PCR-based detection technique was developed based on previous PCR methods. Four kinds of primer pairs, Nfa1, Nae3, Nf-ITS, and Naegl, were employed in the cultured amoebic trophozoites and a mouse with PAM experimentally developed by N. fowleri inoculation (PAM-mouse). For the extraction of genomic DNA from N. fowleri trophozoites (1×10(6)), simple boiling with 10μl of PBS (pH 7.4) at 100°C for 30min was found to be the most rapid and efficient procedure, allowing amplification of 2.5×10(2) trophozoites using the Nfa-1 primer. The primers Nfa1 and Nae3 amplified only N. fowleri DNA, whereas the ITS primer detected N. fowleri and N. gruberi DNA. Using the PAM-mouse brain tissue, the Nfa1 primer was able to amplify the N. fowleri DNA 4 days post infection with 1ng/μl of genomic DNA being detectable. Using the PAM-mouse CSF, amplification of the N. fowleri DNA with the Nae3 primer was possible 5 days post infection showing a better performance than the Nfa1 primer at day 6. PMID:26322498

  13. Straightforward and sensitive RT-qPCR based gene expression analysis of FFPE samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeka, Fjoralba; Vanderheyden, Katrien; De Smet, Els; Cuvelier, Claude A.; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Fragmented RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a known obstacle to gene expression analysis. In this study, the impact of RNA integrity, gene-specific reverse transcription and targeted cDNA preamplification was quantified in terms of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) sensitivity by measuring 48 protein coding genes on eight duplicate cultured cancer cell pellet FFPE samples and twenty cancer tissue FFPE samples. More intact RNA modestly increased gene detection sensitivity by 1.6 fold (earlier detection by 0.7 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 0.593–0.850). Application of gene-specific priming instead of whole transcriptome priming during reverse transcription further improved RT-qPCR sensitivity by a considerable 4.0 fold increase (earlier detection by 2.0 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 1.73–2.32). Targeted cDNA preamplification resulted in the strongest increase of RT-qPCR sensitivity and enabled earlier detection by an average of 172.4 fold (7.43 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 6.83–7.05). We conclude that gene-specific reverse transcription and targeted cDNA preamplification are adequate methods for accurate and sensitive RT-qPCR based gene expression analysis of FFPE material. The presented methods do not involve expensive or complex procedures and can be easily implemented in any routine RT-qPCR practice. PMID:26898768

  14. Helicobacter pylori is not eradicated after triple therapy: a nested PCR based study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Saurabh Kumar; Mishra, Girish Narayan; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Jain, Ashok Kumar; Nath, Gopal

    2014-01-01

    Detection of Helicobacter pylori after triple therapy is usually carried out by either rapid urease test (RUT), urea breath test (UBT), histology, bacterial isolation, and single round PCR or serological tests. In this study, antral biopsy specimens from 25 patients were tested for H. pylori by RUT, culture, histology, and nested PCR in their antral biopsy specimens before and after treatment. Three genes, namely, heat shock protein (hsp60), phosphoglucosamine mutase (ureC), and flagellar export ATP synthase (fliI) of H. pylori were targeted. Of the 25 antral biopsy specimens, the RUT, culture, histology, and nested PCR positivity dropped from 81.8% to 12%, 31% to 0%, 100 to 84%, and 100% to 92%, respectively, before and after therapy. Further, hsp60 specific amplicons from 23 out of 25 patients gave identical restriction pattern, while 6 fliI and 1 ureC specific amplicon produced different restriction pattern. Furthermore, variations in fliI gene sequences in H. pylori after treatment were also confirmed by sequencing and compared in silico. Nested PCR based detection of H. pylori is more sensitive method to detect H. pylori after therapy than culture, RUT, and histology. Further, this study suggests that H. pylori is not eradicated completely after triple therapy. PMID:25054141

  15. Rapid and Robust PCR-Based All-Recombinant Cloning Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    We report here a PCR-based cloning methodology that requires no post-PCR modifications such as restriction digestion and phosphorylation of the amplified DNA. The advantage of the present method is that it yields only recombinant clones thus eliminating the need for screening. Two DNA amplification reactions by PCR are performed wherein the first reaction amplifies the gene of interest from a source template, and the second reaction fuses it with the designed expression vector fragments. These vector fragments carry the essential elements that are required for the fusion product selection. The entire process can be completed in less than 8 hours. Furthermore, ligation of the amplified DNA by a DNA ligase is not required before transformation, although the procedure yields more number of colonies upon transformation if ligation is carried out. As a proof-of-concept, we show the cloning and expression of GFP, adh, and rho genes. Using GFP production as an example, we further demonstrate that the E. coli T7 express strain can directly be used in our methodology for the protein expression immediately after PCR. The expressed protein is without or with 6xHistidine tag at either terminus, depending upon the chosen vector fragments. We believe that our method will find tremendous use in molecular and structural biology. PMID:27007922

  16. Rapid and Robust PCR-Based All-Recombinant Cloning Methodology.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Abhishek Anil; Singh, Manika Indrajit; Jain, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    We report here a PCR-based cloning methodology that requires no post-PCR modifications such as restriction digestion and phosphorylation of the amplified DNA. The advantage of the present method is that it yields only recombinant clones thus eliminating the need for screening. Two DNA amplification reactions by PCR are performed wherein the first reaction amplifies the gene of interest from a source template, and the second reaction fuses it with the designed expression vector fragments. These vector fragments carry the essential elements that are required for the fusion product selection. The entire process can be completed in less than 8 hours. Furthermore, ligation of the amplified DNA by a DNA ligase is not required before transformation, although the procedure yields more number of colonies upon transformation if ligation is carried out. As a proof-of-concept, we show the cloning and expression of GFP, adh, and rho genes. Using GFP production as an example, we further demonstrate that the E. coli T7 express strain can directly be used in our methodology for the protein expression immediately after PCR. The expressed protein is without or with 6xHistidine tag at either terminus, depending upon the chosen vector fragments. We believe that our method will find tremendous use in molecular and structural biology. PMID:27007922

  17. Performance Assessment PCR-Based Assays Targeting Bacteroidales Genetic Markers of Bovine Fecal Pollution▿

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Orin C.; White, Karen; Kelty, Catherine A.; Hayes, Sam; Sivaganesan, Mano; Jenkins, Michael; Varma, Manju; Haugland, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    There are numerous PCR-based assays available to characterize bovine fecal pollution in ambient waters. The determination of which approaches are most suitable for field applications can be difficult because each assay targets a different gene, in many cases from different microorganisms, leading to variation in assay performance. We describe a performance evaluation of seven end-point PCR and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays reported to be associated with either ruminant or bovine feces. Each assay was tested against a reference collection of DNA extracts from 247 individual bovine fecal samples representing 11 different populations and 175 fecal DNA extracts from 24 different animal species. Bovine-associated genetic markers were broadly distributed among individual bovine samples ranging from 39 to 93%. Specificity levels of the assays spanned 47.4% to 100%. End-point PCR sensitivity also varied between assays and among different bovine populations. For qPCR assays, the abundance of each host-associated genetic marker was measured within each bovine population and compared to results of a qPCR assay targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences from Bacteroidales. Experiments indicate large discrepancies in the performance of bovine-associated assays across different bovine populations. Variability in assay performance between host populations suggests that the use of bovine microbial source-tracking applications will require a priori characterization at each watershed of interest. PMID:20061457

  18. PCR-based approach to distinguish group A human rotavirus genotype 1 vs. genotype 2 genes.

    PubMed

    McKell, Allison O; Nichols, Joshua C; McDonald, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are eleven-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and important causes of severe diarrhea in children. A full-genome classification system is readily used to describe the genetic makeup of individual RV strains. In this system, each viral gene is assigned a specific genotype based upon its nucleotide sequence and established percent identity cut-off values. However, a faster and more cost-effective approach to determine RV gene genotypes is to utilize specific oligonucleotide primer sets in RT-PCR/PCR. Such primer sets and PCR-based genotyping methods have already been developed for the VP7-, VP6-, VP4- and NSP4-coding gene segments. In this study, primers were developed for the remaining seven RV gene segments, which encode proteins VP1, VP2, VP3, NSP1, NSP2, NSP3, and NSP5/6. Specifically, primers were designed to distinguish the two most common human RV genotypes (1 vs. 2) for these genes and were validated on several cell culture-adapted human and animal RV strains, as well as on human RVs from clinical fecal specimens. As such, primer sets now exist for all eleven genes of common human RVs, allowing for the identification of reassortant strains with mixed constellations of both genotype 1 and 2 genes using a rapid and economical RT-PCR/PCR method. PMID:24012969

  19. PCR-based positive hybridization to detect genomic diversity associated with bacterial secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pomati, Francesco; Neilan, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    A PCR-based positive hybridization (PPH) method was developed to explore toxic-specific genes in common between toxigenic strains of Anabaena circinalis, a cyanobacterium able to produce saxitoxin (STX). The PPH technique is based on the same principles of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), although with the former no driver DNA is required and two tester genomic DNAs are hybridized at high stringency. The aim was to obtain genes associated with cyanobacterial STX production. The genetic diversity within phylogenetically similar strains of A.circinalis was investigated by comparing the results of the standard SSH protocol to the PPH approach by DNA-microarray analysis. SSH allowed the recovery of DNA libraries that were mainly specific for each of the two STX-producing strains used. Several candidate sequences were found by PPH to be in common between both the STX-producing testers. The PPH technique performed using unsubtracted genomic libraries proved to be a powerful tool to identify DNA sequences possibly transferred laterally between two cyanobacterial strains that may be candidate(s) in STX biosynthesis. The approach presented in this study represents a novel and valid tool to study the genetic basis for secondary metabolite production in microorganisms. PMID:14718552

  20. Large plasmids of avian Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Doetkott, D M; Nolan, L K; Giddings, C W; Berryhill, D L

    1996-01-01

    The plasmid DNA of 30 Escherichia coli isolates from chickens was extracted and examined using techniques designed to isolate large plasmids. This plasmid DNA was examined for the presence of certain known virulence-related genes including cvaC, traT, and some aerobactin-related sequences. Seventeen of the 30 isolates contained from one to four plasmids greater than 50 kb in size. Eleven of these 17 strains possessed plasmids greater than 100 kb in size. Therefore, E. coli isolates of chickens frequently contain large plasmids, and many of these plasmids are likely to contain virulence-related sequences. PMID:8980827

  1. Piggery manure used for soil fertilization is a reservoir for transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Binh, Chu Thi Thanh; Heuer, Holger; Kaupenjohann, Martin; Smalla, Kornelia

    2008-10-01

    In this study, the prevalence and types of transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids in piggery manure were investigated. Samples from manure storage tanks of 15 farms in Germany were analysed, representing diverse sizes of herds, meat or piglet production. Antibiotic resistance plasmids from manure bacteria were captured in gfp-tagged rifampicin-resistant Escherichia coli and characterized. The occurrence of plasmid types was also detected in total community DNA by PCR and hybridization. A total of 228 transconjugants were captured from 15 manures using selective media supplemented with amoxicillin, sulfadiazine or tetracycline. The restriction patterns of 81 plasmids representing different antibiotic resistance patterns or different samples clustered into seven groups. Replicon probing revealed that 28 of the plasmids belonged to IncN, one to IncW, 13 to IncP-1 and 19 to the recently discovered pHHV216-like plasmids. The amoxicillin resistance gene bla-TEM was detected on 44 plasmids, and sulphonamide resistance genes sul1, sul2 and/or sul3 on 68 plasmids. Hybridization of replicon-specific sequences amplified from community DNA revealed that IncP-1 and pHHV216-like plasmids were detected in all manures, while IncN and IncW ones were less frequent. This study showed that 'field-scale' piggery manure is a reservoir of broad-host range plasmids conferring multiple antibiotic resistance genes. PMID:18557938

  2. Development of PCR-based assays for detecting and differentiating three species of botrytis infecting broad bean

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Botrytis cinerea, B. fabae and B. fabiopsis are known to cause chocolate spot on broad bean. This study was conducted to develop PCR-based assays to detect and differentiate this three species. Two sets of primers, Bc-f/Bc-r for B. cinerea and Bfab-f/Bfab-r for B. fabiopsis, were designed based on t...

  3. A Reliable and Inexpensive Method of Nucleic Acid Extraction for the PCR-Based Detection of Diverse Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reliable extraction method is described for the preparation of total nucleic acids from several plant genera for subsequent detection of plant pathogens by PCR-based techniques. By the combined use of a modified CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) extraction protocol and a semi-automatic homogen...

  4. Combining Watershed Variables with PCR-based Methods for Better Characterization and Management of Fecal Pollution in Small Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Culture- and PCR-based measurements of fecal pollution were determined and compared to hydrologic and land use indicators. Stream water samples (n = 235) were collected monthly over a two year period from ten streams draining headwatersheds with different land use intensities ra...

  5. Evaluation of the repeatability and reproducibility of a suite of qPCR based microbial source tracking methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many PCR-based methods for microbial source tracking (MST) have been developed and validated within individual research laboratories. Inter-laboratory validation of these methods, however, has been minimal, and the effects of protocol standardization regimes have not been thor...

  6. Performance of human fecal anaerobe-associated PCR-based assays in a multi-laboratory method evaluation study

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of PCR-based methods for detecting human fecal material in environmental waters have been developed over the past decade, but these methods have rarely received independent comparative testing. Here, we evaluated ten of these methods (BacH, BacHum-UCD, B. thetaiotaomic...

  7. Combining watershed attributes with culture- and PCR-based methods for improved characterization and management of fecal pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Culture- and PCR-based methods for characterization of fecal pollution were evaluated in relation to physiographic, biotic, and chemical indicators of stream condition. Stream water samples (n = 235) were collected monthly over a two year period from ten channels draining subwat...

  8. Combining Watershed Variables with PCR-based Methods for Better Characterization and Management of Fecal Pollution in Small Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ability to distinguish between human and animal fecal pollution is important for risk assessment and watershed management, particularly in bodies of water used as sources of drinking water or for recreation. PCR-based methods were used to determine the source of fecal pollution ...

  9. Characterization of tet(Y)-carrying LowGC plasmids exogenously captured from cow manure at a conventional dairy farm.

    PubMed

    Kyselková, Martina; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Husník, Filip; Chroňáková, Alica; Heuer, Holger; Smalla, Kornelia; Elhottová, Dana

    2016-06-01

    Manure from dairy farms has been shown to contain diverse tetracycline resistance genes that are transferable to soil. Here, we focus on conjugative plasmids that may spread tetracycline resistance at a conventional dairy farm. We performed exogenous plasmid isolation from cattle feces using chlortetracycline for transconjugant selection. The transconjugants obtained harbored LowGC-type plasmids and tet(Y). A representative plasmid (pFK2-7) was fully sequenced and this was compared with previously described LowGC plasmids from piggery manure-treated soil and a GenBank record from Acinetobacter nosocomialis that we also identified as a LowGC plasmid. The pFK2-7 plasmid had the conservative backbone typical of LowGC plasmids, though this region was interrupted with an insert containing the tet(Y)-tet(R) tetracycline resistance genes and the strA-strB streptomycin resistance genes. Despite Acinetobacter populations being considered natural hosts of LowGC plasmids, these plasmids were not found in three Acinetobacter isolates from the study farm. The isolates harbored tet(Y)-tet(R) genes in identical genetic surroundings as pFK2-7, however, suggesting genetic exchange between Acinetobacter and LowGC plasmids. Abundance of LowGC plasmids and tet(Y) was correlated in manure and soil samples from the farm, indicating that LowGC plasmids may be involved in the spread of tet(Y) in the environment. PMID:27083193

  10. Monitoring toxic Ostreopsis cf. ovata in recreational waters using a qPCR based assay.

    PubMed

    Casabianca, Silvia; Perini, Federico; Casabianca, Anna; Battocchi, Cecilia; Giussani, Valentina; Chiantore, Mariachiara; Penna, Antonella

    2014-11-15

    Ostreopsis sp. is a toxic marine benthic dinoflagellate that causes high biomass blooms, posing a threat to human health, marine biota and aquaculture activities, and negatively impacting coastal seawater quality. Species-specific identification and enumeration is fundamental because it can allow the implementation of all the necessary preventive measures to properly manage Ostreopsis spp. bloom events in recreational waters and aquaculture farms. The aim of this study was to apply a rapid and sensitive qPCR method to quantify Ostreopsis cf. ovata abundance in environmental samples collected from Mediterranean coastal sites and to develop site-specific environmental standard curves. Similar PCR efficiencies of plasmid and environmental standard curves allowed us to estimate the LSU rDNA copy number per cell. Moreover, we assessed the effectiveness of mitochondrial COI and cob genes as alternative molecular markers to ribosomal genes in qPCR assays for Ostreopsis spp. quantification. PMID:25282181

  11. Evaluation of culture- and PCR-based detection methods for Escherichia coli O157:H7 in inoculated ground beeft.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Terrance M; Bosilevac, Joseph M; Nou, Xiangwu; Koohmaraie, Mohammad

    2005-08-01

    Currently, several beef processors employ test-and-hold systems for increased quality control of ground beef. In such programs, each lot of product must be tested and found negative for Escherichia coli O157:H7 prior to release of the product into commerce. Optimization of three testing attributes (detection time, specificity, and sensitivity) is critical to the success of such strategies. Because ground beef is a highly perishable product, the testing methodology used must be as rapid as possible. The test also must have a low false-positive result rate so product is not needlessly discarded. False-negative results cannot be tolerated because they would allow contaminated product to be released and potentially cause disease. In this study, two culture-based and three PCR-based methods for detecting E. coli O157:H7 in ground beef were compared for their abilities to meet the above criteria. Ground beef samples were individually spiked with five genetically distinct strains of E. coli O157: H7 at concentrations of 17 and 1.7 CFU/65 g and then subjected to the various testing methodologies. There was no difference (P > 0.05) in the abilities of the PCR-based methods to detect E. coli O157:H7 inoculated in ground beef at 1.7 CFU/65 g. The culture-based systems detected more positive samples than did the PCR-based systems, but the detection times (21 to 48 h) were at least 9 h longer than those for the PCR-based methods (7.5 to 12 h). Ground beef samples were also spiked with potentially cross-reactive strains. The PCR-based systems that employed an immunomagnetic separation step prior to detection produced fewer false-positive results. PMID:21132961

  12. PCR-Based Multiple Species Cell Counting for In Vitro Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruijie; Zhang, Junjie; Yang, X. Frank; Gregory, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Changes of bacterial profiles in microbial communities are strongly associated with human health. There is an increasing need for multiple species research in vitro. To avoid high cost or measurement of a limited number of species, PCR-based multiple species cell counting (PCR-MSCC) has been conceived. Species-specific sequence is defined as a unique sequence of one species in a multiple species mixed culture. This sequence is identified by comparing a random 1000 bp genomic sequence of one species with the whole genome sequences of the other species in the same artificial mixed culture. If absent in the other genomes, it is the species-specific sequence. Species-specific primers were designed based on the species-specific sequences. In the present study, ten different oral bacterial species were mixed and grown in Brain Heart Infusion Yeast Extract with 1% sucrose for 24 hours. Biofilm was harvested and processed for DNA extraction and q-PCR amplification with the species-specific primers. By comparing the q-PCR data of each species in the unknown culture with reference cultures, in which the cell number of each species was determined by colony forming units on agar plate, the cell number of that strain in the unknown mixed culture was calculated. This technique is reliable to count microorganism numbers that are less than 100,000 fold different from other species within the same culture. Theoretically, it can be used in detecting a species in a mixed culture of over 200 species. Currently PCR-MSCC is one of the most economic methods for quantifying single species cell numbers, especially for the low abundant species, in a multiple artificial mixed culture in vitro. PMID:25970462

  13. Role of the 85-Kilobase Plasmid and Plasmid-Encoded Virulence-Associated Protein A in Intracellular Survival and Virulence of Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Giguère, Steeve; Hondalus, Mary K.; Yager, Julie A.; Darrah, Patricia; Mosser, David M.; Prescott, John F.

    1999-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages and a cause of pneumonia in young horses (foals) and immunocompromised people. Isolates of R. equi from pneumonic foals typically contain large, 85- or 90-kb plasmids encoding a highly immunogenic virulence-associated protein (VapA). The objective of this study was to determine the role of the 85-kb plasmid and VapA in the intracellular survival and virulence of R. equi. Clinical isolates containing the plasmid and expressing VapA efficiently replicated within mouse macrophages in vitro, while plasmid-cured derivatives of these organisms did not multiply intracellularly. An isolate harboring the large plasmid also replicated in the tissues of experimentally infected mice, whereas its plasmid-cured derivative was rapidly cleared. All foals experimentally infected with a plasmid-containing clinical isolate developed severe bronchopneumonia, whereas the foals infected with its plasmid-cured derivative remained asymptomatic and free of visible lung lesions. By day 14 postinfection, lung bacterial burdens had increased considerably in foals challenged with the plasmid-containing clinical isolate. In contrast, bacteria could no longer be cultured from the lungs of foals challenged with the isogenic plasmid-cured derivative. A recombinant, plasmid-cured derivative expressing wild-type levels of VapA failed to replicate in macrophages and remained avirulent for both mice and foals. These results show that the 85-kb plasmid of R. equi is essential for intracellular replication within macrophages and for development of disease in the native host, the foal. However, expression of VapA alone is not sufficient to restore the virulence phenotype. PMID:10377138

  14. Comparative Genomics Provides Insight into the Diversity of the Attaching and Effacing Escherichia coli Virulence Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Tracy H.; Kaper, James B.; Nataro, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Attaching and effacing Escherichia coli (AEEC) strains are a genomically diverse group of diarrheagenic E. coli strains that are characterized by the presence of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genomic island, which encodes a type III secretion system that is essential to virulence. AEEC strains can be further classified as either enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), typical enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), or atypical EPEC, depending on the presence or absence of the Shiga toxin genes or bundle-forming pilus (BFP) genes. Recent AEEC genomic studies have focused on the diversity of the core genome, and less is known regarding the genetic diversity and relatedness of AEEC plasmids. Comparative genomic analyses in this study demonstrated genetic similarity among AEEC plasmid genes involved in plasmid replication conjugative transfer and maintenance, while the remainder of the plasmids had sequence variability. Investigation of the EPEC adherence factor (EAF) plasmids, which carry the BFP genes, demonstrated significant plasmid diversity even among isolates within the same phylogenomic lineage, suggesting that these EAF-like plasmids have undergone genetic modifications or have been lost and acquired multiple times. Global transcriptional analyses of the EPEC prototype isolate E2348/69 and two EAF plasmid mutants of this isolate demonstrated that the plasmid genes influence the expression of a number of chromosomal genes in addition to the LEE. This suggests that the genetic diversity of the EAF plasmids could contribute to differences in the global virulence regulons of EPEC isolates. PMID:26238712

  15. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes. PMID:26441947

  16. Exploring antibiotic resistance genes and metal resistance genes in plasmid metagenomes from wastewater treatment plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Dong; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids operate as independent genetic elements in microorganism communities. Through horizontal gene transfer (HGT), they can provide their host microorganisms with important functions such as antibiotic resistance and heavy metal resistance. In this study, six metagenomic libraries were constructed with plasmid DNA extracted from influent, activated sludge (AS) and digested sludge (DS) of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Compared with the metagenomes of the total DNA extracted from the same sectors of the wastewater treatment plant, the plasmid metagenomes had significantly higher annotation rates, indicating that the functional genes on plasmids are commonly shared by those studied microorganisms. Meanwhile, the plasmid metagenomes also encoded many more genes related to defense mechanisms, including ARGs. Searching against an antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) database and a metal resistance genes (MRGs) database revealed a broad-spectrum of antibiotic (323 out of a total 618 subtypes) and MRGs (23 out of a total 23 types) on these plasmid metagenomes. The influent plasmid metagenomes contained many more resistance genes (both ARGs and MRGs) than the AS and the DS metagenomes. Sixteen novel plasmids with a complete circular structure that carried these resistance genes were assembled from the plasmid metagenomes. The results of this study demonstrated that the plasmids in WWTPs could be important reservoirs for resistance genes, and may play a significant role in the horizontal transfer of these genes. PMID:26441947

  17. The genetic basis of plasmid tropism between Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia muridarum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibing; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Skilton, Rachel J; Ramsey, Kyle H; Thomson, Nicholas R; Clarke, Ian N

    2014-10-01

    The development of genetic transformation technology for Chlamydia trachomatis using its endogenous plasmid has recently been described. Chlamydia muridarum cannot be transformed by the C. trachomatis plasmid, indicating a barrier between chlamydial species. To determine which regions of the plasmid conferred the species specificity, we used the novel approach of transforming wild-type C. muridarum carrying the endogenous plasmid pNigg and forced recombination with the C. trachomatis vector pGFP::SW2 which carries the complete C. trachomatis plasmid (pSW2). Penicillin and chloramphenicol-resistant transformants expressing the green fluorescent protein were selected. Recovery of plasmids from these transformants showed they were recombinants. The differences between the pSW2 and pNigg allowed identification of the recombination breakpoints and showed that pGFP::SW2 had exchanged a ~ 1 kbp region with pNigg covering CDS 2. The recombinant plasmid (pSW2NiggCDS2) is maintained under antibiotic selection when transformed into plasmid-cured C. muridarum. The ability to select for recombinants in C. muridarum shows that the barrier is not at transformation, but at the level of plasmid replication or maintenance. Our studies show that CDS 2, together with adjoining sequences, is the main determinant of plasmid tropism. PMID:24700815

  18. The genetic basis of plasmid tropism between Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia muridarum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yibing; Cutcliffe, Lesley T; Skilton, Rachel J; Ramsey, Kyle H; Thomson, Nicholas R; Clarke, Ian N

    2014-01-01

    The development of genetic transformation technology for Chlamydia trachomatis using its endogenous plasmid has recently been described. Chlamydia muridarum cannot be transformed by the C. trachomatis plasmid, indicating a barrier between chlamydial species. To determine which regions of the plasmid conferred the species specificity, we used the novel approach of transforming wild-type C. muridarum carrying the endogenous plasmid pNigg and forced recombination with the C. trachomatis vector pGFP::SW2 which carries the complete C. trachomatis plasmid (pSW2). Penicillin and chloramphenicol-resistant transformants expressing the green fluorescent protein were selected. Recovery of plasmids from these transformants showed they were recombinants. The differences between the pSW2 and pNigg allowed identification of the recombination breakpoints and showed that pGFP::SW2 had exchanged a ∼ 1 kbp region with pNigg covering CDS 2. The recombinant plasmid (pSW2NiggCDS2) is maintained under antibiotic selection when transformed into plasmid-cured C. muridarum. The ability to select for recombinants in C. muridarum shows that the barrier is not at transformation, but at the level of plasmid replication or maintenance. Our studies show that CDS 2, together with adjoining sequences, is the main determinant of plasmid tropism. PMID:24700815

  19. mcr-1.2, a New mcr Variant Carried on a Transferable Plasmid from a Colistin-Resistant KPC Carbapenemase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain of Sequence Type 512.

    PubMed

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Arena, Fabio; Tascini, Carlo; Cannatelli, Antonio; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Fortunato, Simona; Giani, Tommaso; Menichetti, Francesco; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-09-01

    A novel mcr variant, named mcr-1.2, encoding a Gln3-to-Leu functional variant of MCR-1, was detected in a KPC-3-producing ST512 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate collected in Italy from a surveillance rectal swab from a leukemic child. The mcr-1.2 gene was carried on a transferable IncX4 plasmid whose structure was very similar to that of mcr-1-bearing plasmids previously found in Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae strains from geographically distant sites (Estonia, China, and South Africa). PMID:27401575

  20. PCR-Based Simple Subgrouping Is Validated for Classification of Gliomas and Defines Negative Prognostic Copy Number Aberrations in IDH Mutant Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Nakae, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Hikaru; Hayashi, Saeko; Hattori, Natsuki; Kumon, Masanobu; Nishiyama, Yuya; Adachi, Kazuhide; Nagahisa, Shinya; Hayashi, Takuro; Inamasu, Joji; Abe, Masato; Hasegawa, Mitsuhiro; Hirose, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    Genetic subgrouping of gliomas has been emphasized recently, particularly after the finding of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations. In a previous study, we investigated whole-chromosome copy number aberrations (CNAs) of gliomas and have described genetic subgrouping based on CNAs and IDH1 mutations. Subsequently, we classified gliomas using simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods to improve the availability of genetic subgrouping. We selected IDH1/2 and TP53 as markers and analyzed 237 adult supratentorial gliomas using Sanger sequencing. Using these markers, we classified gliomas into three subgroups that were strongly associated with patient prognoses. These included IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations, and IDH wild-type gliomas. IDH mutant gliomas without TP53 mutations, which mostly corresponded to gliomas carrying 1p19q co-deletions, showed lower recurrence rates than the other 2 groups. In the other high-recurrence groups, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations were significantly longer than those of patients with IDH wild-type gliomas. Notably, most IDH mutant gliomas with TP53 mutations had at least one of the CNAs +7q, +8q, −9p, and −11p. Moreover, IDH mutant gliomas with at least one of these CNAs had a significantly worse prognosis than did other IDH mutant gliomas. PCR-based mutation analyses of IDH and TP53 were sufficient for simple genetic diagnosis of glioma that were strongly associated with prognosis of patients and enabled us to detect negative CNAs in IDH mutant gliomas. PMID:26558387

  1. Complete sequence of three plasmids from Bacillus thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4 environmental isolate and comparison with related plasmids from the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Amadio, Ariel F; Benintende, Graciela B; Zandomeni, Rubén O

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen used worldwide as a bioinsecticide. It belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group as well as Bacillus anthracis and B. cereus. Plasmids from this group of organisms have been implicated in pathogenicity as they carry the genes responsible for different types of diseases that affect mammals and insects. Some plasmids, like pAW63 and pBT9727, encode a functional conjugation machinery allowing them to be transferred to a recipient cell. They also share extensive homology with the non-functional conjugation apparatus of pXO2 from B. anthracis. In this study we report the complete sequence of three plasmids from an environmental B. thuringiensis isolate from Argentina, obtained by a shotgun sequencing method. We obtained the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pFR12 (12,095bp), pFR12.5 (12,459bp) and pFR55 (55,712bp) from B. thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4. pFR12 and pFR12.5 were classified as cryptic as they do not code for any obvious functions besides replication and mobilization. Both small plasmids were classified as RCR plasmids due to similarities with the replicases they encode. Plasmid pFR55 showed a structural organization similar to that observed for plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. pFR55 also shares a tra region with these plasmids, containing genes related to T4SS and conjugation. A comparison between pFR55 and conjugative plasmids led to the postulation that pFR55 is a conjugative plasmid. Genes related to replication functions in pFR55 are different to those described for plasmids with known complete sequences. pFR55 is the first completely sequenced plasmid with a replication machinery related to that of ori44. The analysis of the complete sequence of plasmids from an environmental isolate of B. thuringiensis permitted the identification of a near complete conjugation apparatus in pFR55, resembling those of plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. The availability of this sequence is a step forward in the study

  2. A stable luciferase reporter plasmid for in vivo imaging in murine models of Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Bacconi, Marta; Haag, Andreas F; Torre, Antonina; Castagnetti, Andrea; Chiarot, Emiliano; Delany, Isabel; Bensi, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    In vivo imaging of bioluminescent bacteria permits their visualization in infected mice, allowing spatial and temporal evaluation of infection progression. Most available bioluminescent strains were obtained by integration of the luciferase genes into the bacterial chromosome, a challenging and time-consuming approach. Recently, episomal plasmids were used, which were introduced in bacteria and expressed all genes required for bioluminescence emission. However, the plasmid was progressively lost in vitro and in vivo, if bacteria were not maintained under antibiotic selective pressure. Increased stability could be obtained inserting into the plasmid backbone sequences that assured plasmid partition between daughter bacterial cells, or caused death of bacteria that had lost the plasmid. So far, no detailed analysis was performed of either plasmid stability in vivo or contribution of different stabilizing sequence types. Here we report the construction of a plasmid, which includes the Photorhabdus luminescens lux cassette expressed under the control of a Staphylococcus aureus specific gene promoter, and toxin/antitoxin (T/A) and partition sequences (Par) conferring stability and transmissibility of the plasmid. Following infection of mice with S. aureus carrying this plasmid, we demonstrated that the promoter-lux fusion was functional in vivo, that the plasmid was retained by 70-100% of bacterial cells 7 days post-infection, and that both stabilizing sequence types were required to maximize plasmid retention. These data suggest that the plasmid can be a valuable tool to study gene expression and bacterial spread in small laboratory animals infected with S. aureus or possibly other Gram-positive human pathogens. PMID:26685857

  3. PCR Based Microbial Monitor for Analysis of Recycled Water Aboard the ISSA: Issues and Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Gail H.; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Glass, John I.

    1995-01-01

    The monitoring of spacecraft life support systems for the presence of health threatening microorganisms is paramount for crew well being and successful completion of missions. Development of technology to monitor spacecraft recycled water based on detection and identification of the genetic material of contaminating microorganisms and viruses would be a substantial improvement over current NASA plans to monitor recycled water samples that call for the use of conventional microbiology techniques which are slow, insensitive, and labor intensive. The union of the molecular biology techniques of DNA probe hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) offers a powerful method for the detection, identification, and quantification of microorganisms and viruses. This technology is theoretically capable of assaying samples in as little as two hours with specificity and sensitivity unmatched by any other method. A major advance in probe-hybridization/PCR has come about in a technology called TaqMan(TM), which was invented by Perkin Elmer. Instrumentation using TaqMan concepts is evolving towards devices that could meet NASA's needs of size, low power use, and simplicity of operation. The chemistry and molecular biology needed to utilize these probe-hybridization/PCR instruments must evolve in parallel with the hardware. The following issues of chemistry and biology must be addressed in developing a monitor: Early in the development of a PCR-based microbial monitor it will be necessary to decide how many and which organisms does the system need the capacity to detect. We propose a set of 17 different tests that would detect groups of bacteria and fungus, as well as specific eukaryotic parasites and viruses; In order to use the great sensitivity of PCR it will be necessary to concentrate water samples using filtration. If a lower limit of detection of 1 microorganism per 100 ml is required then the microbes in a 100 ml sample must be concentrated into a volume that can be

  4. Improved PCR-Based Detection of Soil Transmitted Helminth Infections Using a Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Assay Design

    PubMed Central

    Pilotte, Nils; Papaiakovou, Marina; Grant, Jessica R.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Llewellyn, Stacey; McCarthy, James S.; Williams, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The soil transmitted helminths are a group of parasitic worms responsible for extensive morbidity in many of the world’s most economically depressed locations. With growing emphasis on disease mapping and eradication, the availability of accurate and cost-effective diagnostic measures is of paramount importance to global control and elimination efforts. While real-time PCR-based molecular detection assays have shown great promise, to date, these assays have utilized sub-optimal targets. By performing next-generation sequencing-based repeat analyses, we have identified high copy-number, non-coding DNA sequences from a series of soil transmitted pathogens. We have used these repetitive DNA elements as targets in the development of novel, multi-parallel, PCR-based diagnostic assays. Methodology/Principal Findings Utilizing next-generation sequencing and the Galaxy-based RepeatExplorer web server, we performed repeat DNA analysis on five species of soil transmitted helminths (Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides, and Strongyloides stercoralis). Employing high copy-number, non-coding repeat DNA sequences as targets, novel real-time PCR assays were designed, and assays were tested against established molecular detection methods. Each assay provided consistent detection of genomic DNA at quantities of 2 fg or less, demonstrated species-specificity, and showed an improved limit of detection over the existing, proven PCR-based assay. Conclusions/Significance The utilization of next-generation sequencing-based repeat DNA analysis methodologies for the identification of molecular diagnostic targets has the ability to improve assay species-specificity and limits of detection. By exploiting such high copy-number repeat sequences, the assays described here will facilitate soil transmitted helminth diagnostic efforts. We recommend similar analyses when designing PCR-based diagnostic tests for the detection of other

  5. A conjugative 38kB plasmid is present in multiple subspecies of Xylella fastidiosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A ~38kB plasmid was present in the Riv5 strain of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolated from ornamental plum in southern California. This plasmid, pXF-RIV5, encodes a complete type IV secretion system necessary for conjugation and DNA transfer. pXF-RIV5 is almost identical to pXFAS01 from X. ...

  6. Development of three specific PCR-based tools to determine quantity, cellulolytic transcriptional activity and phylogeny of anaerobic fungi.

    PubMed

    Dollhofer, Veronika; Callaghan, Tony Martin; Dorn-In, Samart; Bauer, Johann; Lebuhn, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Anaerobic fungi (AF) decompose plant material with their rhizoid and multiple cellulolytic enzymes. They disintegrate the complex structure of lignocellulosic substrates, making them more accessible and suitable for further microbial degradation. There is also much interest in their use as biocatalysts for biotechnological applications. Here, three novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods for detecting AF and their transcriptional activity in in vitro cultures and environmental samples were developed. Two real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based methods targeting AF were developed: AF-SSU, was designed to quantify the 18S rRNA genes of AF. AF-Endo, measuring transcripts of an endoglucanase gene from the glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5), was developed to quantify their transcriptional cellulolytic activity. The third PCR based approach was designed for phylogenetical analysis. It targets the 28S rRNA gene (LSU) of AF revealing their phylogenetic affiliation. The in silico-designed primer/probe combinations were successfully tested for the specific amplification of AF from animal and biogas plant derived samples. In combination, these three methods represent useful tools for the analysis of AF transcriptional cellulolytic activity, their abundance and their phylogenetic placement. PMID:27220661

  7. [Transfer of plasmid beta-lactamases in enterobacteria].

    PubMed

    Umaran, A; Garaizar, J; Gallego, L; Colom, K; Cisterna, R

    1989-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine which types of beta-lactamases codified by plasmids are transferred by conjugation from several species of enterobacteria. To this end, 352 strains of ampicillin-resistant enterobacteria from clinical samples from the Hospital Civil of Bilbao were evaluated. Their beta-lactamase activity and their capacity to transfer this capacity by conjugation were evaluated. The several types of plasmidic beta-lactamases in the strains that conjugated and in their respective transconjugants were characterized by analytic isoelectric approach, and also the sensitivity of these stains to 20 beta-lactamic antibiotics and the size of their plasmids. Twenty different types were detected, with a clear predominance of TEM 1. Type TEM 2 was found in 19% of the strains which conjugated, and much less commonly the types SHV 1, HMS 1 and a beta-lactamase of an approximate pl of 4.9 were found. The transfer of these beta-lactamases is mediated by a great variety of plasmids and is associated with variable levels of resistance to penicillins and unstable cephalosporins. The presence of betalactamases with activity on the more stable cephalosporins has not been detected. PMID:2490696

  8. A plasmid in Legionella pneumophila.

    PubMed Central

    Knudson, G B; Mikesell, P

    1980-01-01

    Sixteen strains from the six serogroups of Legionella pneumophila were examined for the presence of extrachromosomal genetic elements by a modified cleared lysate procedure, dye-buoyant centrifugation, and agarose gel electrophoresis. Two strains, Atlanta-1 and Atlanta-2 from serogroup II, each contained a plasmid of cryptic function with a molecular weight of ca. 30 megadaltons. Images Fig. 1 PMID:7429628

  9. Development of PCR-based methods for detection of Sphaerothecum destruens in fish tissues.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Holly L; Arkush, Kristen D

    2004-11-01

    Single-round and nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests were developed for amplification of a 434 bp fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene from Sphaerothecum destruens, previously known as the rosette agent, an intracellular parasite of salmonid fishes. Both tests have successfully amplified S. destruens-specific DNA from different isolates of S. destruens but not from related organisms. The limits of detection using the nested PCR test were 1 pg for purified S. destruens genomic DNA and 0.1 fg for plasmid DNA. We conducted 2 experimental transmission studies, consisting of injection or waterborne exposure of juvenile winter-run Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha to spore stages of the parasite. In the injection study, parasite DNA was detected in 100% of kidney samples from exposed fish (n = 83) at 1 and 3 mo post-exposure using nested PCR, versus 98% using microscopic analysis of Gram-stained impression smears made from the kidney. Following waterborne exposure, fish were sampled over the course of a year. From each fish, samples of gill, liver, posterior intestine and kidney were analyzed. S. destruens-specific DNA was detected most often in gill and kidney over the course of the experiment, and 71% (64/90) of the exposed fish were identified as positive for S. destruens using the nested PCR test, versus 16% (14/90) using microscopic analysis of Gram-stained kidney smears. Natural infections in captive broodstock of adult winter-run Chinook salmon, originally diagnosed by examination of Gram-stained kidney smears, were confirmed using the nested PCR test in all fish examined (15/15). Further, the nested test amplified parasite-specific DNA from other tissues in these fish with varying frequencies. This report introduces the first DNA-based detection method for S. destruens, to be used alone as a diagnostic tool or in conjunction with histologic tests for confirmatory identification of the parasite. PMID:15609874

  10. Genomics of microbial plasmids: classification and identification based on replication and transfer systems and host taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Shintani, Masaki; Sanchez, Zoe K.; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids are important “vehicles” for the communication of genetic information between bacteria. The exchange of plasmids transmits pathogenically and environmentally relevant traits to the host bacteria, promoting their rapid evolution and adaptation to various environments. Over the past six decades, a large number of plasmids have been identified and isolated from different microbes. With the revolution of sequencing technology, more than 4600 complete sequences of plasmids found in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes have been determined. The classification of a wide variety of plasmids is not only important to understand their features, host ranges, and microbial evolution but is also necessary to effectively use them as genetic tools for microbial engineering. This review summarizes the current situation of the classification of fully sequenced plasmids based on their host taxonomy and their features of replication and conjugative transfer. The majority of the fully sequenced plasmids are found in bacteria in the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Spirochaetes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Euryarcheota phyla, and key features of each phylum are included. Recent advances in the identification of novel types of plasmids and plasmid transfer by culture-independent methods using samples from natural environments are also discussed. PMID:25873913