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Sample records for pdb carbohydrate residue

  1. Permethylation Linkage Analysis Techniques for Residual Carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permethylation analysis is the classic approach to establishing the position of glycosidic linkages between sugar residues. Typically, the carbohydrate is derivatized to form acid-stable methyl ethers, hydrolyzed, peracetylated, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The pos...

  2. NMR structure calculation for all small molecule ligands and non-standard residues from the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Emel Maden; Güntert, Peter

    2015-09-01

    An algorithm, CYLIB, is presented for converting molecular topology descriptions from the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary into CYANA residue library entries. The CYANA structure calculation algorithm uses torsion angle molecular dynamics for the efficient computation of three-dimensional structures from NMR-derived restraints. For this, the molecules have to be represented in torsion angle space with rotations around covalent single bonds as the only degrees of freedom. The molecule must be given a tree structure of torsion angles connecting rigid units composed of one or several atoms with fixed relative positions. Setting up CYANA residue library entries therefore involves, besides straightforward format conversion, the non-trivial step of defining a suitable tree structure of torsion angles, and to re-order the atoms in a way that is compatible with this tree structure. This can be done manually for small numbers of ligands but the process is time-consuming and error-prone. An automated method is necessary in order to handle the large number of different potential ligand molecules to be studied in drug design projects. Here, we present an algorithm for this purpose, and show that CYANA structure calculations can be performed with almost all small molecule ligands and non-standard amino acid residues in the PDB Chemical Component Dictionary. PMID:26123317

  3. CHARMM-GUI PDB Manipulator for Advanced Modeling and Simulations of Proteins Containing Non-standard Residues

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Sunhwan; Cheng, Xi; Islam, Shahidul M.; Huang, Lei; Rui, Huan; Zhu, Allen; Lee, Hui Sun; Qi, Yifei; Han, Wei; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Roux, Benoît; Im, Wonpil

    2016-01-01

    CHARMM-GUI, http://www.charmm-gui.org, is a web-based graphical user interface to prepare molecular simulation systems and input files to facilitate the usage of common and advanced simulation techniques. Since its original development in 2006, CHARMM-GUI has been widely adopted for various purposes and now contains a number of different modules designed to setup a broad range of simulations including free energy calculation and large-scale coarse-grained representation. Here, we describe functionalities that have recently been integrated into CHARMM-GUI PDB Manipulator, such as ligand force field generation, incorporation of methanethiosulfonate (MTS) spin labels and chemical modifiers, and substitution of amino acids with unnatural amino acids. These new features are expected to be useful in advanced biomolecular modeling and simulation of proteins. PMID:25443960

  4. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  5. Characterization of protein and carbohydrate mid-IR spectral features in crop residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Zhang, Yonggen; Wang, Mingjun; Li, Zhongyu; Wang, Zhibo; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-08-01

    To the best of our knowledge, a few studies have been conducted on inherent structure spectral traits related to biopolymers of crop residues. The objective of this study was to characterize protein and carbohydrate structure spectral features of three field crop residues (rice straw, wheat straw and millet straw) in comparison with two crop vines (peanut vine and pea vine) by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR). Also, multivariate analyses were performed on spectral data sets within the regions mainly related to protein and carbohydrate in this study. The results showed that spectral differences existed in mid-IR peak intensities that are mainly related to protein and carbohydrate among these crop residue samples. With regard to protein spectral profile, peanut vine showed the greatest mid-IR band intensities that are related to protein amide and protein secondary structures, followed by pea vine and the rest three field crop straws. The crop vines had 48-134% higher spectral band intensity than the grain straws in spectral features associated with protein. Similar trends were also found in the bands that are mainly related to structural carbohydrates (such as cellulosic compounds). However, the field crop residues had higher peak intensity in total carbohydrates region than the crop vines. Furthermore, spectral ratios varied among the residue samples, indicating that these five crop residues had different internal structural conformation. However, multivariate spectral analyses showed that structural similarities still exhibited among crop residues in the regions associated with protein biopolymers and carbohydrate. Further study is needed to find out whether there is any relationship between spectroscopic information and nutrition supply in various kinds of crop residue when fed to animals.

  6. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... beans Vegetables, such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, corn, potato with skin Fruits, such as raspberries, pears, apples, ... high in carbohydrates: Starchy vegetables: 1 cup mashed potato or sweet potato, 1 small ear of corn ...

  7. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    PubMed Central

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells. PMID:27606141

  8. PDB to AMPL Conversion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2002-09-01

    PDB to AMPL Conversion was written to convert protein data base files to AMPL files. The protein data bases on the internet contain a wealth of information about the structue and makeup of proteins. Each file contains information derived by one or more experiments and contains information on how the experiment waw performed, the amino acid building blocks of each chain, and often the three-dimensional structure of the protein extracted from the experiments. The waymore » a protein folds determines much about its function. Thus, studying the three-dimensional structure of the protein is of great interest. Analysing the contact maps is one way to examine the structure. A contact map is a graph which has a linear back bone of amino acids for nodes (i.e., adjacent amino acids are always connected) and vertices between non-adjacent nodes if they are close enough to be considered in contact. If the graphs are similar then the folds of the protein and their function should also be similar. This software extracts the contact maps from a protein data base file and puts in into AMPL data format. This format is designed for use in AMPL, a programming language for simplifying linear programming formulations.« less

  9. Degradation of carbohydrates during dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment can interfere with lignin measurements in solid residues.

    PubMed

    Katahira, Rui; Sluiter, Justin B; Schell, Daniel J; Davis, Mark F

    2013-04-01

    The lignin content measured after dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover indicates more lignin than could be accounted for on the basis of the untreated corn stover lignin content. This phenomenon was investigated using a combination of (13)C cross-polarization/magic-angle spinning (CP/MAS) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and lignin removal using acid chlorite bleaching. Only minimal contamination with carbohydrates and proteins was observed in the pretreated corn stover. Incorporating degradation products from sugars was also investigated using (13)C-labeled sugars. The results indicate that sugar degradation products are present in the pretreatment residue and may be intimately associated with the lignin. Studies comparing whole corn stover (CS) to extractives-free corn stover [CS(Ext)] clearly demonstrated that extractives are a key contributor to the high-lignin mass balance closure (MBC). Sugars and other low molecular weight compounds present in plant extractives polymerize and form solids during pretreatment, resulting in apparent Klason lignin measurements that are biased high. PMID:23428141

  10. Bioethanol production from carbohydrate-enriched residual biomass obtained after lipid extraction of Chlorella sp. KR-1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ok Kyung; Oh, You-Kwan; Lee, Eun Yeol

    2015-11-01

    The residual biomass of Chlorella sp. KR-1 obtained after lipid extraction was used for saccharification and bioethanol production. The carbohydrate was saccharified using simple enzymatic and chemical methods using Pectinex at pH 5.5 and 45°C and 0.3N HCl at 121°C for 15min with 76.9% and 98.2% yield, respectively, without any pretreatment. The residual biomass contained 49.7% carbohydrate consisting of 82.4% fermentable sugar and 17.6% non-fermentable sugar, which is valuable for bioethanol fermentation. Approximately 98.2% of the total carbohydrate was converted into monosaccharide (fermentable+non-fermentable sugar) using dilute acid saccharification. The fermentable sugar was subsequently fermented to bioethanol through separate hydrolysis and fermentation with a fermentation yield of 79.3%. Overall, 0.4g ethanol/g fermentable sugar and 0.16g ethanol/g residual biomass were produced. PMID:26218538

  11. Creative PDB`s (parts databases)

    SciTech Connect

    Cote, T.J.

    1998-12-31

    PDB component property entries and creative picklists can make the schematic entry process and downstream tools such as BOM generation more useful. This presentation will show how creative PDB`s can enhance the design process. Examples of PDB entries developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be discussed.

  12. PDB-Metrics: a web tool for exploring the PDB contents.

    PubMed

    Fileto, Renato; Kuser, Paula R; Yamagishi, Michel E B; Ribeiro, André A; Quinalia, Thiago G; Franco, Eduardo H; Mancini, Adauto L; Higa, Roberto H; Oliveira, Stanley R M; Santos, Edgard H; Vieira, Fabio D; Mazoni, Ivan; Cruz, Sergio A B; Neshich, Goran

    2006-01-01

    PDB-Metrics (http://sms.cbi.cnptia.embrapa.br/SMS/pdb_metrics/index.html) is a component of the Diamond STING suite of programs for the analysis of protein sequence, structure and function. It summarizes the characteristics of the collection of protein structure descriptions deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and provides a Web interface to search and browse the PDB, using a variety of alternative criteria. PDB-Metrics is a powerful tool for bioinformaticians to examine the data span in the PDB from several perspectives. Although other Web sites offer some similar resources to explore the PDB contents, PDB-Metrics is among those with the most complete set of such facilities, integrated into a single Web site. This program has been developed using SQLite, a C library that provides all the query facilities of a database management system. PMID:16819713

  13. Extension of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage to proteins with carbohydrate side chains and disulfide linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinxi; Shefcheck, Kevin; Callahan, John; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-12-01

    This laboratory has introduced a chemical method for residue-specific protein cleavage and has provided a preliminary assessment of the suitability of microwave-accelerated acid cleavage as a proteomic tool. This report is a continuing assessment of the fate of common protein modifications in microwave-accelerated acid cleavage. We have examined the cleavage of ribonuclease A and the related N-linked glycoprotein ribonuclease B, and the O-linked glycoprotein alpha crystallin A chain, using MALDI-TOF and LC-ESI-MS to identify the peptide products. RNase A and B each contains four disulfide bonds, and the addition of a reducing reagent, such as dithiothreitol, was found to be required to achieve efficient acidic proteolysis. The linkage of the glycosidic group to the asparagine side chain in ribonuclease B was found not to be cleaved by brief microwave treatment in 12.5% acetic acid. The distribution of the heterogeneous carbohydrate side chain in the glycopeptide products of acid cleavage was compared to that of the glycopeptide products of tryptic digestion. Hydrolysis within the carbohydrate chain itself is minimal under the conditions used. The O-linked side chain on alpha crystalline A was found to be cleaved during acid cleavage of the protein.

  14. Facilitating the enzymatic saccharification of pulped bamboo residues by degrading the remained xylan and lignin-carbohydrates complexes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Caoxing; He, Juan; Li, Xin; Min, Douyong; Yong, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    Kraft pulping was performed on bamboo residues and its impact on the chemical compositions and the enzymatic digestibility of the samples were investigated. To improve the digestibility of sample by degrading the xylan and lignin-carbohydrates complexes (LCCs), xylanase and α-L-arabinofuranosidase (AF) were supplemented with cellulase. The results showed more carbohydrates were remained in the samples pulped with low effective alkali (EA) charge, compared to conventional kraft pulping. When 120 IU/g xylanase and 15 IU/g AF were supplemented with 20 FPU/g cellulase, the xylan degradation yield of the sample pulped with 12% EA charge increased from 68.20% to 88.35%, resulting in an increased enzymatic saccharification efficiency from 58.98% to 83.23%. The amount of LCCs in this sample decreased from 8.63/100C9 to 2.99/100C9 after saccharification with these enzymes. The results indicated that degrading the remained xylan and LCCs in the pulp could improve its enzymatic digestibility. PMID:26080104

  15. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lütteke, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures.

  16. Reversible and irreversible cross-linking of immunoglobulin heavy chains through their carbohydrate residues.

    PubMed Central

    Heimgartner, U; Kozulić, B; Mosbach, K

    1990-01-01

    After periodate oxidation and incubation with a dihydrazide, cross-linking of the two heavy chains of immunoglobulins G from several species proceeds specifically through their oligosaccharides. We have used malonic acid dihydrazide, adipic acid dihydrazide and dithiodipropionic acid dihydrazide. The last compound is introduced in this work as a cleavable-carbohydrate-specific cross-linker. It was found that in rabbit and human immunoglobulins the degree of cross-linking was strongly dependent on the oxidation conditions but only very weakly dependent on the concentration and size of the dihydrazides. Papain cleavage of the cross-linked rabbit IgG indicated that the cross-linking occurred predominantly, if not exclusively, in the Fc region, probably through the two glycans linked to Asn-297 in the CH2 domain of each of the two heavy chains. The immunoglobulins from sheep, pig, goat and guinea pig show a comparable cross-linking pattern, indicating that the sugar chains from these immunoglobulins have a spatial structure closely related to that of rabbit and human IgG. When dithiodipropionic acid dihydrazide was used as the cross-linker, the cross-link could be cleaved by mercaptoethanol. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2111130

  17. Novel temperature-responsive polymer brushes with carbohydrate residues facilitate selective adhesion and collection of hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idota, Naokazu; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Kotsuchibashi, Yohei; Narain, Ravin; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-12-01

    Temperature-responsive glycopolymer brushes were designed to investigate the effects of grafting architectures of the copolymers on the selective adhesion and collection of hypatocytes. Homo, random and block sequences of N-isopropylacrylamide and 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylate were grafted on glass substrates via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. The galactose/lactose-specific lectin RCA120 and HepG2 cells were used to test for specific recognition of the polymer brushes containing galactose residues over the lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs). RCA120 showed a specific binding to the brush surfaces at 37 °C. These brush surfaces also facilitated the adhesion of HepG2 cells at 37 °C under nonserum conditions, whereas no adhesion was observed for NIH-3T3 fibroblasts. When the temperature was decreased to 25 °C, almost all the HepG2 cells detached from the block copolymer brush, whereas the random copolymer brush did not release the cells. The difference in releasing kinetics of cells from the surfaces with different grafting architectures can be explained by the correlated effects of significant changes in LCST, mobility, hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of the grafted polymer chains. These findings are important for designing ‘on-off’ cell capture/release substrates for various biomedical applications such as selective cell separation.

  18. Comparative analysis of carbohydrate residues in the midgut of phlebotomines (Diptera: Psychodidae) from colony and field populations from Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Davi Marcos Souza; da Silva, Bruno José Martins; de Sena, Chubert Bernardo Castro; Lima, José Aprígio Nunes; Vasconcelos Dos Santos, Thiago; Silveira, Fernando Tobias; Silva, Edilene Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis are worldwide diseases that occur in 98 countries including Brazil, transmitted by the bite of female phlebotomines during blood feeding. In Brazil it is known that some species of sand flies as Lutzomyia longipalpis sensun latum (vector of Leishmania infantum chagasi), Lutzomyia flaviscutellata (vector of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis) and Lutzomyia antunesi [suspected vector of Leishmania (Viannia) lindenbergi] are incriminated of transmitting the parasite Leishmania for the vertebrate host. The phlebotomine-parasite is mediated by the attachment of the promastigote lipophosphoglycan (LPG) to the midgut epithelium. However, another mechanism that is LPG-independent and mediated by N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc) seems to occur in some species of phlebotomines that are classified as permissive. The aim of this study was to characterize the carbohydrate residues that, probably, play a role in parasite attachment to the midgut of phlebotomine from colony and field populations from the Brazilian Amazonian region. We observed the presence of GalNAc, mannose, galactose and GlcNAc in all phlebotomine species. A binding assay between L. (L.) amazonensis and L. i.chagasi to the midguts of different species of phlebotomines was performed. The attachment of both Leishmania and vector species suggests the presence of GalNAc on the midgut surfaces. Thus, these results suggested that GalNAc is a possible binding sites of Leishmania in sand flies from the Brazilian Amazonian region. PMID:27264642

  19. PDB_REDO: automated re-refinement of X-ray structure models in the PDB.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Robbie P; Salzemann, Jean; Bloch, Vincent; Stockinger, Heinz; Berglund, Ann-Charlott; Blanchet, Christophe; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Combet, Christophe; Da Costa, Ana L; Deleage, Gilbert; Diarena, Matteo; Fabbretti, Roberto; Fettahi, Géraldine; Flegel, Volker; Gisel, Andreas; Kasam, Vinod; Kervinen, Timo; Korpelainen, Eija; Mattila, Kimmo; Pagni, Marco; Reichstadt, Matthieu; Breton, Vincent; Tickle, Ian J; Vriend, Gert

    2009-06-01

    Structural biology, homology modelling and rational drug design require accurate three-dimensional macromolecular coordinates. However, the coordinates in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) have not all been obtained using the latest experimental and computational methods. In this study a method is presented for automated re-refinement of existing structure models in the PDB. A large-scale benchmark with 16 807 PDB entries showed that they can be improved in terms of fit to the deposited experimental X-ray data as well as in terms of geometric quality. The re-refinement protocol uses TLS models to describe concerted atom movement. The resulting structure models are made available through the PDB_REDO databank (http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/pdb_redo/). Grid computing techniques were used to overcome the computational requirements of this endeavour. PMID:22477769

  20. Increase in the carbohydrate content of the microalgae Spirulina in culture by nutrient starvation and the addition of residues of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Vieira Salla, Ana Cláudia; Margarites, Ana Cláudia; Seibel, Fábio Ivan; Holz, Luiz Carlos; Brião, Vandré Barbosa; Bertolin, Telma Elita; Colla, Luciane Maria; Costa, Jorge Alberto Vieira

    2016-06-01

    Non-renewable sources that will end with time are the largest part of world energy consumption, which emphasizes the necessity to develop renewable sources of energy. This necessity has created opportunities for the use of microalgae as a biofuel. The use of microalgae as a feedstock source for bioethanol production requires high yields of both biomass and carbohydrates. With mixotrophic cultures, wastewater can be used to culture algae. The aim of the study was to increase the carbohydrate content in the microalgae Spirulina with the additions of residues from the ultra and nanofiltration of whey protein. The nutrient deficit in the Zarrouk medium diluted to 20% and the addition of 2.5% of both residue types led to high carbohydrate productivity (60 mg L(-1) d(-1)). With these culture conditions, the increase in carbohydrate production in Spirulina indicated that the conditions were appropriate for use with microalgae as a feedstock in the production of bioethanol. PMID:26967336

  1. Application of information theory to a three-body coarse-grained representation of proteins in the PDB: insights into the structural and evolutionary roles of residues in protein structure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jared J; Tabatabaei Ghomi, Hamed; Lill, Markus A

    2014-12-01

    Knowledge-based methods for analyzing protein structures, such as statistical potentials, primarily consider the distances between pairs of bodies (atoms or groups of atoms). Considerations of several bodies simultaneously are generally used to characterize bonded structural elements or those in close contact with each other, but historically do not consider atoms that are not in direct contact with each other. In this report, we introduce an information-theoretic method for detecting and quantifying distance-dependent through-space multibody relationships between the sidechains of three residues. The technique introduced is capable of producing convergent and consistent results when applied to a sufficiently large database of randomly chosen, experimentally solved protein structures. The results of our study can be shown to reproduce established physico-chemical properties of residues as well as more recently discovered properties and interactions. These results offer insight into the numerous roles that residues play in protein structure, as well as relationships between residue function, protein structure, and evolution. The techniques and insights presented in this work should be useful in the future development of novel knowledge-based tools for the evaluation of protein structure. PMID:25269778

  2. On the use of capillary electrophoresis for the determination of inorganic anions and cations, and carbohydrates in residues collected after a simulated suicide bombing attack.

    PubMed

    Sarazin, Cédric; Delaunay, Nathalie; Costanza, Christine; Eudes, Véronique; Gareil, Pierre

    2013-01-15

    In order to train scientist field investigators after terrorist attacks, the laboratory of the Prefecture de Police of Paris simulated a suicide bombing attack in a bus. After collection of the residues, analyses were carried out to determine the composition of the original explosive charge. This article focuses on the combined use, for the first time, of three new capillary electrophoresis methods for the determination of inorganic anions and cations, and carbohydrates in two representative extracts. Capillary electrophoresis appears as an effective tool to identify and quantify the compounds in real extracts and is fully complementary to chromatographic methods. PMID:23200391

  3. Mutational Insights into the Roles of Amino Acid Residues in Ligand Binding for Two Closely Related Family 16 Carbohydrate Binding Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Xiaoyun; Agarwal, Vinayak; Dodd, Dylan; Bae, Brian; Mackie, Roderick I.; Nair, Satish K.; Cann, Isaac K.O.

    2010-11-22

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) are specialized proteins that bind to polysaccharides and oligosaccharides. Caldanaerobius polysaccharolyticus Man5ACBM16-1/CBM16-2 bind to glucose-, mannose-, and glucose/mannose-configured substrates. The crystal structures of the two proteins represent the only examples in CBM family 16, and studies that evaluate the roles of amino acid residues in ligand binding in this family are lacking. In this study, we probed the roles of amino acids (selected based on CBM16-1/ligand co-crystal structures) on substrate binding. Two tryptophan (Trp-20 and Trp-125) and two glutamine (Gln-81 and Gln-93) residues are shown to be critical in ligand binding. Additionally, several polar residues that flank the critical residues also contribute to ligand binding. The CBM16-1 Q121E mutation increased affinity for all substrates tested, whereas the Q21G and N97R mutants exhibited decreased substrate affinity. We solved CBM/substrate co-crystal structures to elucidate the molecular basis of the increased substrate binding by CBM16-1 Q121E. The Gln-121, Gln-21, and Asn-97 residues can be manipulated to fine-tune ligand binding by the Man5A CBMs. Surprisingly, none of the eight residues investigated was absolutely conserved in CBM family 16. Thus, the critical residues in the Man5A CBMs are either not essential for substrate binding in the other members of this family or the two CBMs are evolutionarily distinct from the members available in the current protein database. Man5A is dependent on its CBMs for robust activity, and insights from this study should serve to enhance our understanding of the interdependence of its catalytic and substrate binding modules.

  4. Studying and Polishing the PDB's Macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jane S.; Richardson, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Macromolecular crystal structures are among the best of scientific data, providing detailed insight into these complex and biologically important molecules with a relatively low level of error and subjectivity. However, there are two notable problems with getting the most information from them. The first is that the models are not perfect: there is still opportunity for improving them, and users need to evaluate whether the local reliability in a structure is up to answering their question of interest. The second is that protein and nucleic acid molecules are highly complex and individual, inherently handed and 3-dimensional, and the cooperative and subtle interactions that govern their detailed structure and function are not intuitively evident. Thus there is a real need for graphical representations and descriptive classifications that enable molecular 3D literacy. We have spent our career working to understand these elegant molecules ourselves, and building tools to help us and others determine and understand them better. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) has of course been vital and central to this undertaking. Here we combine some history of our involvement as depositors, illustrators, evaluators, and end-users of PDB structures with commentary on how best to study and draw scientific inferences from them. PMID:23023928

  5. Carbohydrate markers of organism purity and growth environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Fox, Alvin

    2012-01-01

    Recent experience with Bacillus spore characterization has demonstrated that carbohydrate content can provide potentially vital bioforensic information. Like other metabolites, the carbohydrate profiles of samples reflect variations in cellular structures as well as presence of residual carbohydrates from the medium found as trace components. The presence and characteristics of residual carbohydrates, such as agar, represent strong indicators of culturing method. The methods to detect residual carbohydrates can be extended to other compounds used in processing and preservation of microbes in a dry form.

  6. Using ATR-FT/IR to detect carbohydrate-related molecular structure features of carinata meal and their in situ residues of ruminal fermentation in comparison with canola meal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-10-01

    .05) during 48 h ruminal degradation in both carinata meal and canola meal. Although carinata meal differed from canola meal in some carbohydrate spectral parameters, multivariate results from agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis showed that both original and in situ residues of two meals were not fully distinguished from each other within carbohydrate spectral regions. It was concluded that carbohydrate structural conformation could be detected in carinata meal by using ATR-FT/IR techniques and further study is needed to explore more information on molecular spectral features of other functional group such as protein structure profile and their association with potential nutrient supply and availability of carinata meal in animals.

  7. Representation of viruses in the remediated PDB archive

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, Catherine L. Dutta, Shuchismita; Westbrook, John D.; Henrick, Kim; Berman, Helen M.

    2008-08-01

    A new data model for PDB entries of viruses and other biological assemblies with regular noncrystallographic symmetry is described. A new scheme has been devised to represent viruses and other biological assemblies with regular noncrystallographic symmetry in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The scheme describes existing and anticipated PDB entries of this type using generalized descriptions of deposited and experimental coordinate frames, symmetry and frame transformations. A simplified notation has been adopted to express the symmetry generation of assemblies from deposited coordinates and matrix operations describing the required point, helical or crystallographic symmetry. Complete correct information for building full assemblies, subassemblies and crystal asymmetric units of all virus entries is now available in the remediated PDB archive.

  8. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  9. The PDB_REDO server for macromolecular structure model optimization

    PubMed Central

    Joosten, Robbie P.; Long, Fei; Murshudov, Garib N.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2014-01-01

    The refinement and validation of a crystallographic structure model is the last step before the coordinates and the associated data are submitted to the Protein Data Bank (PDB). The success of the refinement procedure is typically assessed by validating the models against geometrical criteria and the diffraction data, and is an important step in ensuring the quality of the PDB public archive [Read et al. (2011 ▶), Structure, 19, 1395–1412]. The PDB_REDO procedure aims for ‘constructive validation’, aspiring to consistent and optimal refinement parameterization and pro-active model rebuilding, not only correcting errors but striving for optimal interpretation of the electron density. A web server for PDB_REDO has been implemented, allowing thorough, consistent and fully automated optimization of the refinement procedure in REFMAC and partial model rebuilding. The goal of the web server is to help practicing crystallo­graphers to improve their model prior to submission to the PDB. For this, additional steps were implemented in the PDB_REDO pipeline, both in the refinement procedure, e.g. testing of resolution limits and k-fold cross-validation for small test sets, and as new validation criteria, e.g. the density-fit metrics implemented in EDSTATS and ligand validation as implemented in YASARA. Innovative ways to present the refinement and validation results to the user are also described, which together with auto-generated Coot scripts can guide users to subsequent model inspection and improvement. It is demonstrated that using the server can lead to substantial improvement of structure models before they are submitted to the PDB. PMID:25075342

  10. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  11. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are 3 major types of carbohydrates: Sugars Starches Fiber Sugars are found naturally in some foods ... syrups, such as those added to canned fruit Starches are found naturally in foods. Your body breaks ...

  12. PDB explorer -- a web based algorithm for protein annotation viewer and 3D visualization.

    PubMed

    Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Shardiwal, Rakesh Kumar; Yadav, Mukesh; Kanungo, Neha; Singh, Pooja; Shah, Pratik; Ahmed, Sheaza

    2014-12-01

    The PDB file format, is a text format characterizing the three dimensional structures of macro molecules available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Determined protein structure are found in coalition with other molecules or ions such as nucleic acids, water, ions, Drug molecules and so on, which therefore can be described in the PDB format and have been deposited in PDB database. PDB is a machine generated file, it's not human readable format, to read this file we need any computational tool to understand it. The objective of our present study is to develop a free online software for retrieval, visualization and reading of annotation of a protein 3D structure which is available in PDB database. Main aim is to create PDB file in human readable format, i.e., the information in PDB file is converted in readable sentences. It displays all possible information from a PDB file including 3D structure of that file. Programming languages and scripting languages like Perl, CSS, Javascript, Ajax, and HTML have been used for the development of PDB Explorer. The PDB Explorer directly parses the PDB file, calling methods for parsed element secondary structure element, atoms, coordinates etc. PDB Explorer is freely available at http://www.pdbexplorer.eminentbio.com/home with no requirement of log-in. PMID:25118648

  13. Resolving the ambiguity: Making sense of intrinsic disorder when PDB structures disagree.

    PubMed

    DeForte, Shelly; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-03-01

    Missing regions in X-ray crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) have played a foundational role in the study of intrinsically disordered protein regions (IDPRs), especially in the development of in silico predictors of intrinsic disorder. However, a missing region is only a weak indication of intrinsic disorder, and this uncertainty is compounded by the presence of ambiguous regions, where more than one structure of the same protein sequence "disagrees" in terms of the presence or absence of missing residues. The question is this: are these ambiguous regions intrinsically disordered, or are they the result of static disorder that arises from experimental conditions, ensembles of structures, or domain wobbling? A novel way of looking at ambiguous regions in terms of the pattern between multiple PDB structures has been demonstrated. It was found that the propensity for intrinsic disorder increases as the level of ambiguity decreases. However, it is also shown that ambiguity is more likely to occur as the protein region is placed within different environmental conditions, and even the most ambiguous regions as a set display compositional bias that suggests flexibility. The results suggested that ambiguity is a natural result for many IDPRs crystallized under different conditions and that static disorder and wobbling domains are relatively rare. Instead, it is more likely that ambiguity arises because many of these regions were conditionally or partially disordered. PMID:26683124

  14. Healthy carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  15. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  16. Carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Leturque, Armelle; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Le Gall, Maude

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates represent more than 50% of the energy sources present in most human diets. Sugar intake is regulated by metabolic, neuronal, and hedonic factors, and gene polymorphisms are involved in determining sugar preference. Nutrigenomic adaptations to carbohydrate availability have been evidenced in metabolic diseases, in the persistence of lactose digestion, and in amylase gene copy number. Furthermore, dietary oligosaccharides, fermentable by gut flora, can modulate the microbiotal diversity to the benefit of the host. Genetic diseases linked to mutations in the disaccharidase genes (sucrase-isomaltase, lactase) and in sugar transporter genes (sodium/glucose cotransporter 1, glucose transporters 1 and 2) severely impact carbohydrate intake. These diseases are revealed upon exposure to food containing the offending sugar, and withdrawal of this sugar from the diet prevents disease symptoms, failure to thrive, and premature death. Tailoring the sugar composition of diets to optimize wellness and to prevent the chronic occurrence of metabolic diseases is a future goal that may yet be realized through continued development of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics approaches. PMID:22656375

  17. PDB2Graph: A toolbox for identifying critical amino acids map in proteins based on graph theory.

    PubMed

    Niknam, Niloofar; Khakzad, Hamed; Arab, Seyed Shahriar; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-05-01

    The integrative and cooperative nature of protein structure involves the assessment of topological and global features of constituent parts. Network concept takes complete advantage of both of these properties in the analysis concomitantly. High compatibility to structural concepts or physicochemical properties in addition to exploiting a remarkable simplification in the system has made network an ideal tool to explore biological systems. There are numerous examples in which different protein structural and functional characteristics have been clarified by the network approach. Here, we present an interactive and user-friendly Matlab-based toolbox, PDB2Graph, devoted to protein structure network construction, visualization, and analysis. Moreover, PDB2Graph is an appropriate tool for identifying critical nodes involved in protein structural robustness and function based on centrality indices. It maps critical amino acids in protein networks and can greatly aid structural biologists in selecting proper amino acid candidates for manipulating protein structures in a more reasonable and rational manner. To introduce the capability and efficiency of PDB2Graph in detail, the structural modification of Calmodulin through allosteric binding of Ca(2+) is considered. In addition, a mutational analysis for three well-identified model proteins including Phage T4 lysozyme, Barnase and Ribonuclease HI, was performed to inspect the influence of mutating important central residues on protein activity. PMID:27043857

  18. Luffa acutangula agglutinin: Primary structure determination and identification of a tryptophan residue involved in its carbohydrate-binding activity using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gnanesh; Mishra, Padmanabh; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-12-01

    A lectin from phloem exudates of Luffa acutangula (ridge gourd) was purified on chitin affinity chromatography and characterized for its amino acid sequence and to study the role of tryptophan in its activity. The purified lectin was subjected to various proteolytic digestions, and the resulting peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometer. The peptide precursor ions were fragmented by collision-induced dissociation or electron transfer dissociation experiments, and a manual interpretation of MS/MS was performed to deduce amino acid sequence. This gave rise to almost complete sequence coverage of the lectin which showed high-sequence similarity with deduced sequences of phloem lectins present in the database. Chemical modification of lysine, tyrosine, histidine, arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid residues did not inhibit the hemagglutinating activity. However, the modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide showed the loss of hemagglutinating activity. Additionally, the mapping of tryptophan residues was performed to determine the extent and number of residues modified, which revealed that six residues per molecule were oxidized suggesting their accessibility. The retention of the lectin activity was seen when the modifications were performed in the presence of chitooligosaccharides due to protection of a tryptophan residue (W102) in the protein. These studies taken together have led to the identification of a particular tryptophan residue (W102) in the activity of the lectin. PMID:26597132

  19. Modelling the effect of solvents on carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrates are polar molecules and their conformational and anomeric equilibrium can be strongly influenced by solvents. This review provides examples of studies addressing different issues of glycochemistry, such as anomeric equilibrium, conformational changes in rings, modelling of inter-residu...

  20. Effects of Synchronization of Carbohydrate and Protein Supply in Total Mixed Ration with Korean Rice Wine Residue on Ruminal Fermentation, Nitrogen Metabolism and Microbial Protein Synthesis in Holstein Steers

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Min Yu; Kim, Hyun J.; Seo, J. K.; Park, T. S.; Yoon, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Ha, Jong K.

    2012-01-01

    Three Holstein steers in the growing phase, each with a ruminal cannula, were used to test the hypothesis that the synchronization of the hourly rate of carbohydrate and nitrogen (N) released in the rumen would increase the amount of retained nitrogen for growth and thus improve the efficiency of microbial protein synthesis (EMPS). In Experiment 1, in situ degradability coefficients of carbohydrate and N in feeds including Korean rice wine residue (RWR) were determined. In Experiment 2, three total mixed ration (TMR) diets having different rates of carbohydrate and N release in the rumen were formulated using the in situ degradability of the feeds. All diets were made to contain similar contents of crude protein (CP) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) but varied in their hourly pattern of nutrient release. The synchrony index of the three TMRs was 0.51 (LS), 0.77 (MS) and 0.95 (HS), respectively. The diets were fed at a restricted level (2% of the animal’s body weight) in a 3×3 Latin-square design. Synchronizing the hourly supply of energy and N in the rumen did not significantly alter the digestibility of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, NDF or acid detergent fiber (ADF) (p>0.05). The ruminal NH3-N content of the LS group at three hours after feeding was significantly higher (p<0.05) than that of the other groups; however, the mean values of ruminal NH3-N, pH and VFA concentration among the three groups were not significantly different (p>0.05). In addition, the purine derivative (PD) excretion in urine and microbial-N production (MN) among the three groups were not significantly different (p>0.05). In conclusion, synchronizing dietary energy and N supply to the rumen did not have a major effect on nutrient digestion or microbial protein synthesis (MPS) in Holstein steers. PMID:25049518

  1. Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism Carbohydrates are sugars. ... Metabolic Disorders Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders of Amino Acid Metabolism Disorders of Lipid Metabolism NOTE: This is ...

  2. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    PubMed

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1

  3. PDB_REDO: constructive validation, more than just looking for errors

    PubMed Central

    Joosten, Robbie P.; Joosten, Krista; Murshudov, Garib N.; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2012-01-01

    Developments of the PDB_REDO procedure that combine re-refinement and rebuilding within a unique decision-making framework to improve structures in the PDB are presented. PDB_REDO uses a variety of existing and custom-built software modules to choose an optimal refinement protocol (e.g. anisotropic, isotropic or overall B-factor refinement, TLS model) and to optimize the geometry versus data-refinement weights. Next, it proceeds to rebuild side chains and peptide planes before a final optimization round. PDB_REDO works fully automatically without the need for intervention by a crystallographic expert. The pipeline was tested on 12 000 PDB entries and the great majority of the test cases improved both in terms of crystallographic criteria such as R free and in terms of widely accepted geometric validation criteria. It is concluded that PDB_REDO is useful to update the otherwise ‘static’ structures in the PDB to modern crystallographic standards. The publically available PDB_REDO database provides better model statistics and contributes to better refinement and validation targets. PMID:22505269

  4. PDB_REDO: constructive validation, more than just looking for errors.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Robbie P; Joosten, Krista; Murshudov, Garib N; Perrakis, Anastassis

    2012-04-01

    Developments of the PDB_REDO procedure that combine re-refinement and rebuilding within a unique decision-making framework to improve structures in the PDB are presented. PDB_REDO uses a variety of existing and custom-built software modules to choose an optimal refinement protocol (e.g. anisotropic, isotropic or overall B-factor refinement, TLS model) and to optimize the geometry versus data-refinement weights. Next, it proceeds to rebuild side chains and peptide planes before a final optimization round. PDB_REDO works fully automatically without the need for intervention by a crystallographic expert. The pipeline was tested on 12 000 PDB entries and the great majority of the test cases improved both in terms of crystallographic criteria such as R(free) and in terms of widely accepted geometric validation criteria. It is concluded that PDB_REDO is useful to update the otherwise `static' structures in the PDB to modern crystallographic standards. The publically available PDB_REDO database provides better model statistics and contributes to better refinement and validation targets. PMID:22505269

  5. Carbohydrate and dietary fiber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrate provides 50 to 60% of the calories consumed by the average American. Although relatively little carbohydrate is needed in the diet, carbohydrate spares protein and fat being metabolized for calories. The principal dietary carbohydrates are sugars and starches. Sugars (simple carbohydrat...

  6. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes Print A A A Text Size ... that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates ...

  7. Report of the wwPDB Small-Angle Scattering Task Force: data requirements for biomolecular modeling and the PDB.

    PubMed

    Trewhella, Jill; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Sali, Andrej; Sato, Mamoru; Schwede, Torsten; Svergun, Dmitri I; Tainer, John A; Westbrook, John; Berman, Helen M

    2013-06-01

    This report presents the conclusions of the July 12-13, 2012 meeting of the Small-Angle Scattering Task Force of the worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB; Berman et al., 2003) at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The task force includes experts in small-angle scattering (SAS), crystallography, data archiving, and molecular modeling who met to consider questions regarding the contributions of SAS to modern structural biology. Recognizing there is a rapidly growing community of structural biology researchers acquiring and interpreting SAS data in terms of increasingly sophisticated molecular models, the task force recommends that (1) a global repository is needed that holds standard format X-ray and neutron SAS data that is searchable and freely accessible for download; (2) a standard dictionary is required for definitions of terms for data collection and for managing the SAS data repository; (3) options should be provided for including in the repository SAS-derived shape and atomistic models based on rigid-body refinement against SAS data along with specific information regarding the uniqueness and uncertainty of the model, and the protocol used to obtain it; (4) criteria need to be agreed upon for assessment of the quality of deposited SAS data and the accuracy of SAS-derived models, and the extent to which a given model fits the SAS data; (5) with the increasing diversity of structural biology data and models being generated, archiving options for models derived from diverse data will be required; and (6) thought leaders from the various structural biology disciplines should jointly define what to archive in the PDB and what complementary archives might be needed, taking into account both scientific needs and funding. PMID:23747111

  8. Patient management in the ICU: the PDB System.

    PubMed Central

    Salasidis, R.; Padjen, A. L.; Fleiszer, D.

    1991-01-01

    The Intensive Care Unit is the area in patient care where the amount of patient data from a variety of sources is particularly large. The problem for clinicians lies in the ability to gather, and use these data in the decision making process. A well designed computer based patient data management system, incorporating a variety of data analysis tools, would have a dramatic impact in patient care in an environment such as this. The PDB System has been in continuous use at the Montreal General Hospital's Surgical and Trauma Intensive Care Unit since Jan. 88. Its initial implementation in two beds in our SICU has allowed the complete replacement of the conventional patient paper record. It is used by all ICU staff, including nurses, physicians, and ward clerks for the recording/viewing of all patient vital data, laboratory data, medications, and optionally chart notes. In addition, medical staff has the option to use the entered data to perform a variety of data analysis procedures. PMID:1807781

  9. soaPDB: a web application for searching the Protein Data Bank, organizing results, and receiving automatic email alerts.

    PubMed

    Lesburg, Charles A; Duca, José S

    2008-07-01

    soaPDB is a web application that allows generation and organization of saved PDB searches, and offers automatic email alerts. This tool is used from a web interface to store PDB searches and results in a backend relational database. Written using the Ruby on Rails open-source web framework, soaPDB is easy to deploy, maintain and customize. soaPDB is freely available upon request for local installation and is also available at http://soapdb.dyndns.org:3000. PMID:18487276

  10. PDB4DNA: Implementation of DNA geometry from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) description for Geant4-DNA Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delage, E.; Pham, Q. T.; Karamitros, M.; Payno, H.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.; Maigne, L.; Perrot, Y.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes PDB4DNA, a new Geant4 user application, based on an independent, cross-platform, free and open source C++ library, so-called PDBlib, which enables use of atomic level description of DNA molecule in Geant4 Monte Carlo particle transport simulations. For the evaluation of direct damage induced on the DNA molecule by ionizing particles, the application makes use of an algorithm able to determine the closest atom in the DNA molecule to energy depositions. Both the PDB4DNA application and the PDBlib library are available as free and open source under the Geant4 license.

  11. Carbohydrate digestion and absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of simple and complex carbohydrates are present in human diets. Food carbohydrates include the sugars, starches, and fibers found mainly in fruits, vegetables, grains, and milk products. Small amounts of digestible carbohydrates come from non-plant sources (e.g., trehalose in insects and...

  12. PDBe: improved accessibility of macromolecular structure data from PDB and EMDB

    PubMed Central

    Velankar, Sameer; van Ginkel, Glen; Alhroub, Younes; Battle, Gary M.; Berrisford, John M.; Conroy, Matthew J.; Dana, Jose M.; Gore, Swanand P.; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Haslam, Pauline; Hendrickx, Pieter M. S.; Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Mir, Saqib; Fernandez Montecelo, Manuel A.; Mukhopadhyay, Abhik; Oldfield, Thomas J.; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Sen, Sanchayita; Slowley, Robert A.; Wainwright, Michael E.; Deshpande, Mandar S.; Iudin, Andrii; Sahni, Gaurav; Salavert Torres, Jose; Hirshberg, Miriam; Mak, Lora; Nadzirin, Nurul; Armstrong, David R.; Clark, Alice R.; Smart, Oliver S.; Korir, Paul K.; Kleywegt, Gerard J.

    2016-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (http://pdbe.org) accepts and annotates depositions of macromolecular structure data in the PDB and EMDB archives and enriches, integrates and disseminates structural information in a variety of ways. The PDBe website has been redesigned based on an analysis of user requirements, and now offers intuitive access to improved and value-added macromolecular structure information. Unique value-added information includes lists of reviews and research articles that cite or mention PDB entries as well as access to figures and legends from full-text open-access publications that describe PDB entries. A powerful new query system not only shows all the PDB entries that match a given query, but also shows the ‘best structures’ for a given macromolecule, ligand complex or sequence family using data-quality information from the wwPDB validation reports. A PDBe RESTful API has been developed to provide unified access to macromolecular structure data available in the PDB and EMDB archives as well as value-added annotations, e.g. regarding structure quality and up-to-date cross-reference information from the SIFTS resource. Taken together, these new developments facilitate unified access to macromolecular structure data in an intuitive way for non-expert users and support expert users in analysing macromolecular structure data. PMID:26476444

  13. Biological Macromolecular Structures Data from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) is a non-profit consortium that works to improve understanding of the function of biological systems through the study of the 3-D structure of biological macromolecules. The RCSB PDB is one of three sites serving as deposition, data processing, and distribution sites of the Protein Data Bank Archive. Each site provides its own view of the primary data, thus providing a variety of tools and resources for the global community. RCSB is also the official keeper for the PDB archive, with sole access authority to the PDB archive directory structure and contents. The RCSB PDB Information Portal for Biological Macromolecular Structures offers online tools for search and retrieval, for visualizing structures, for depositing, validating, or downloading data, news and highlights, a discussion forum, and links to other areas of related research. The PDB archive is a repository of atomic coordinates and other information describing proteins and other important biological macromolecules. Structural biologists use methods such as X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the location of each atom relative to each other in the molecule. They then deposit this information, which is then annotated and publicly released into the archive by the wwPDB. Results can be viewed as 3-D images or models.

  14. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  15. PDB2PQR: expanding and upgrading automated preparation of biomolecular structures for molecular simulations

    PubMed Central

    Dolinsky, Todd J.; Czodrowski, Paul; Li, Hui; Nielsen, Jens E.; Jensen, Jan H.; Klebe, Gerhard; Baker, Nathan A.

    2007-01-01

    Real-world observable physical and chemical characteristics are increasingly being calculated from the 3D structures of biomolecules. Methods for calculating pKa values, binding constants of ligands, and changes in protein stability are readily available, but often the limiting step in computational biology is the conversion of PDB structures into formats ready for use with biomolecular simulation software. The continued sophistication and integration of biomolecular simulation methods for systems- and genome-wide studies requires a fast, robust, physically realistic and standardized protocol for preparing macromolecular structures for biophysical algorithms. As described previously, the PDB2PQR web server addresses this need for electrostatic field calculations (Dolinsky et al., Nucleic Acids Research, 32, W665–W667, 2004). Here we report the significantly expanded PDB2PQR that includes the following features: robust standalone command line support, improved pKa estimation via the PROPKA framework, ligand parameterization via PEOE_PB charge methodology, expanded set of force fields and easily incorporated user-defined parameters via XML input files, and improvement of atom addition and optimization code. These features are available through a new web interface (http://pdb2pqr.sourceforge.net/), which offers users a wide range of options for PDB file conversion, modification and parameterization. PMID:17488841

  16. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  17. Dietary carbohydrates for diabetics.

    PubMed

    Rivellese, Angela A; Giacco, Rosalba; Costabile, Giuseppina

    2012-12-01

    The literature on the impact of dietary carbohydrates in the regulation of blood glucose levels and other metabolic abnormalities in diabetic patients over the last 3 years is reviewed. We try to differentiate the metabolic effects due to the amount of carbohydrates from those due to their different types. The review comprises a part dealing with the effects of diets having low or high carbohydrate content on body weight reduction, and a part in which the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are discussed in relation to isoenergetic diets. Overall, the data accumulated in the period considered seem to confirm that the decrease in energy intake is more important than the qualitative composition of the diet to reduce body weight, but that both the amount and the quality of carbohydrates are important in modulating blood glucose levels and other cardiovascular risk factors in both the fasting and the postprandial phases in diabetic individuals. PMID:22847773

  18. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  19. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  20. Preparation of nanoparticles bearing high density carbohydrate chains using carbohydrate-carrying polymers as emulsifier.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, A; Ishihara, T; Adachi, N; Akaike, T

    1994-10-01

    A novel method of preparing nanoparticles bearing high density carbohydrate chains on their surface is described. Carbohydrate-bearing nanoparticles of poly(lactic acid) or polystyrene were prepared by the solvent evaporation method using a carbohydrate-carrying polystyrene derivative which served as both an emulsifier and a surface coating. The diameter of the obtained nanoparticles ranged from 80 to 300 nm depending on the concentration of the polystyrene derivative. As the concentration of the polystyrene derivatives increased the nanoparticle diameter decreased, indicating that the polystyrene derivatives worked as an emulsifier. The obtained particles were specifically aggregated by carbohydrate-specific lectin, showing that the polystyrene derivative was retained on the particle surfaces and expressed carbohydrate residues. The density of carbohydrates on the particle surfaces was determined to be 3-5 molecules per square nanometre. The particles prepared by the present method were stably dispersed and hardly aggregated in aqueous media during storage and centrifugal treatment compared with the post-coated particles that were prepared by adsorbing polystyrene particles with the polystyrene derivative. In vitro study with isolated rat hepatocytes revealed that surface carbohydrate chains were recognized by hepatocytes. PMID:7888573

  1. Web servers and services for electrostatics calculations with APBS and PDB2PQR

    SciTech Connect

    Unni, Samir; Huang, Yong; Hanson, Robert M.; Tobias, Malcolm; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred; Nielsen, Jens E.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2011-04-02

    APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but it also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization electrostatics potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/.

  2. Web servers and services for electrostatics calculations with APBS and PDB2PQR.

    PubMed

    Unni, Samir; Huang, Yong; Hanson, Robert M; Tobias, Malcolm; Krishnan, Sriram; Li, Wilfred W; Nielsen, Jens E; Baker, Nathan A

    2011-05-01

    APBS and PDB2PQR are widely utilized free software packages for biomolecular electrostatics calculations. Using the Opal toolkit, we have developed a Web services framework for these software packages that enables the use of APBS and PDB2PQR by users who do not have local access to the necessary amount of computational capabilities. This not only increases accessibility of the software to a wider range of scientists, educators, and students but also increases the availability of electrostatics calculations on portable computing platforms. Users can access this new functionality in two ways. First, an Opal-enabled version of APBS is provided in current distributions, available freely on the web. Second, we have extended the PDB2PQR web server to provide an interface for the setup, execution, and visualization of electrostatic potentials as calculated by APBS. This web interface also uses the Opal framework which ensures the scalability needed to support the large APBS user community. Both of these resources are available from the APBS/PDB2PQR website: http://www.poissonboltzmann.org/. PMID:21425296

  3. Locked-ring C-Glycoside sugars. New carbohydrate products from plant cell walls.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Residual products from the fermentation of biomass for fuel ethanol production typically consist of complex carbohydrates, plus other products such as lignin. The analysis of these carbohydrate residues will be important for maximizing the fermentation process for optimal ethanol production. Techn...

  4. Comparison of temporal trends in VOCs as measured with PDB samplers and low-flow sampling methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of temporal trends in tetrachloroethylene (PCE) concentration determined by two sample techniques showed that passive diffusion bag (pdb) samplers adequately sample the large variation in PCE concentrations at the site. The slopes of the temporal trends in concentrations were comparable between the two techniques, and the pdb sample concentration generally reflected the instantaneous concentration sampled by the low-flow technique. Thus, the pdb samplers provided an appropriate sampling technique for PCE at these wells. One or two wells did not make the case for widespread application of pdb samples at all sites. However, application of pdb samples in some circumstances was appropriate for evaluating temporal and spatial variations in VOC concentrations, thus, should be considered as a useful tool in hydrogeology.

  5. Insulin and carbohydrate dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Gelato, Marie C

    2003-04-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) may experience abnormal body composition changes as well as metabolic abnormalities, including dyslipidemia, increases in triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and abnormal carbohydrate metabolism, ranging from insulin resistance with and without glucose intolerance to frank diabetes. Whether the body composition changes (i.e., increased visceral adiposity and fat wasting in the peripheral tissues) are linked to abnormalities in carbohydrate metabolism is unclear. The use of HAART with and without therapy with protease inhibitors (PIs) is related to carbohydrate abnormalities and changes in body composition. Regimens that include PIs appear to have a higher incidence of insulin resistance (up to 90%) and diabetes mellitus (up to 40%). The etiology of these abnormalities is not well understood; what is known about insulin and carbohydrate dysregulation with HAART is discussed. PMID:12652377

  6. Carbohydrate Dehydration Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the impact of various factors on the "charring reaction" of a carbohydrate with concentrated sulfuric acid including the type of sugar, the degree of fineness of the sugar crystals, and the amount of water added. (JRH)

  7. Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... both energy and nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Fiber can help you prevent constipation, ... meet the body’s needs for energy, vitamins and minerals, and fiber. Experts suggest that carbohydrate intake for ...

  8. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism is the process your body uses to make energy from the food you eat. Food is ... disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. Normally ...

  9. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  10. Pd/B4C/Y multilayer coatings for extreme ultraviolet applications near 10  nm wavelength.

    PubMed

    Windt, David L; Gullikson, Eric M

    2015-06-20

    A new extreme ultraviolet (EUV) multilayer coating has been developed comprising Pd and Y layers with thin B4C barrier layers at each interface, for normal incidence applications near 10 nm wavelength. Periodic, nonperiodic, and dual-stack coatings have been investigated and compared with similar structures comprising either Mo/Y or Pd/B4C bilayers. We find that Pd/B4C/Y multilayers provide higher reflectance than either Mo/Y or Pd/B4C, with much lower film stress than Pd/B4C. We have also investigated the performance of periodic multilayers comprising repetitions of Pd/Y, Ru/Y, or Ru/B4C/Y, as well as Pd/B4C multilayers deposited using reactive sputtering with an Ar:N2 gas mixture in order to reduce stress: these material combinations were all found to provide poor EUV performance. The temporal stability of a periodic Pd/B4C/Y multilayer stored in air was investigated over a period of 16 months, and a slight reduction in peak reflectance was observed. Periodic Pd/B4C/Y multilayers were also found to be thermally stable up to 100°C; at higher temperatures (200°C and 300°C) we observe a slight reduction in peak reflectance and a slight increase in multilayer period. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction of an as-deposited Pd/B4C/Y film indicates a fully amorphous structure, with interfaces that are both smoother and more abrupt than those observed in a comparable Pd/B4C multilayer in which the Pd layers are polycrystalline. The new Pd/B4C/Y multilayers are suitable for normal-incidence imaging and spectroscopy applications, including solar physics, plasma physics, high-brightness EUV light sources, and others. PMID:26193039

  11. Chemical doping and high-pressure studies of layered β -PdB i2 single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kui; Lv, Bing; Xue, Yu-Yi; Zhu, Xi-Yu; Deng, L. Z.; Wu, Zheng; Chu, C. W.

    2015-11-01

    We have systematically grown large single crystals of the layered compounds β -PdB i2 , and both the hole-doped PdB i2 -xP bx and the electron-doped N axPdB i2 , and studied their magnetic and transport properties. Hall effect measurements on PdB i2 , PdB i1.8P b0.2 , and N a0.057PdB i2 show that the charge transport is dominated by electrons in all of the samples. The electron concentration is substantially reduced upon Pb doping in PdB i2 -xP bx and increased upon Na intercalation in N axPdB i2 , indicating effective hole doping by Pb and electron doping by Na. We observed a monotonic decrease of the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) from 5.4 K in undoped PdB i2 to less than 2 K for x >0.35 in hole-doped PdB i2 -xP bx . Meanwhile, a rapid decrease of Tc with Na intercalation is also observed in the electron-doped N axPdB i2 , which is in disagreement with the theoretical expectation. In addition, both the magnetoresistance and Hall resistance further reveal evidence for a possible spin excitation associated with Fermi surface reconstruction at ˜50 K in the Na-intercalated PdB i2 sample. The complete phase diagram is thus established from hole doping to electron doping. Meanwhile, a high-pressure study of the undoped PdB i2 shows that the Tc is linearly suppressed under pressure with a d Tc/d P coefficient of -0.28 K/GPa.

  12. Digestion and Absorption of Carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrates are the major dietary sources of energy for humans. While most dietary carbohydrates are derived from multiple botanical sources, lactose and trehalose are the only animal-derived carbohydrates. Digestion of starch, the carbohydrate most abundantly consumed by humans, depends on the c...

  13. Glycosyltransferase engineering for carbohydrate synthesis.

    PubMed

    McArthur, John B; Chen, Xi

    2016-02-01

    Glycosyltransferases (GTs) are powerful tools for the synthesis of complex and biologically-important carbohydrates. Wild-type GTs may not have all the properties and functions that are desired for large-scale production of carbohydrates that exist in nature and those with non-natural modifications. With the increasing availability of crystal structures of GTs, especially those in the presence of donor and acceptor analogues, crystal structure-guided rational design has been quite successful in obtaining mutants with desired functionalities. With current limited understanding of the structure-activity relationship of GTs, directed evolution continues to be a useful approach for generating additional mutants with functionality that can be screened for in a high-throughput format. Mutating the amino acid residues constituting or close to the substrate-binding sites of GTs by structure-guided directed evolution (SGDE) further explores the biotechnological potential of GTs that can only be realized through enzyme engineering. This mini-review discusses the progress made towards GT engineering and the lessons learned for future engineering efforts and assay development. PMID:26862198

  14. Diarrhea caused by carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Heinz F; Hammer, Johann

    2012-09-01

    This article will focus on the role of the colon in the pathogenesis of diarrhea in carbohydrate malabsorption or physiologically incomplete absorption of carbohydrates, and on the most common manifestation of carbohydrate malabsorption, lactose malabsorption. In addition, incomplete fructose absorption, the role of carbohydrate malabsorption in other malabsorptive diseases, and congenital defects that lead to malabsorption will be covered. The article concludes with a section on diagnostic tools to evaluate carbohydrate malabsorption. PMID:22917167

  15. Ferrocene-containing carbohydrate dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Peter R; Balzani, Vincenzo; Clemente-León, Miguel; Colonna, Barbara; Credi, Alberto; Jayaraman, Narayanaswamy; Raymo, Francisco M; Stoddart, J Fraser; Venturi, Margherita

    2002-02-01

    Aliphatic amines, incorporating one or three (branched) acylated beta-D-glucopyranosyl residues, were coupled with the acid chloride of ferrocenecarboxylic acid and with the diacid chloride of 1,1'-ferrocenedicarboxylic acid to afford four dendrimer-type, carbohydrate-coated ferrocene derivatives in good yields (54-92%). Deprotection of the peracylated beta-D-glucopyranosyl residues was achieved quantitatively by using Zemplén conditions, affording four water-soluble ferrocene derivatives. When only one of the two cyclopentadienyl rings of the ferrocene unit is substituted, strong complexes are formed with beta-cyclodextrin in H2O, as demonstrated by liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry (LSIMS), 1H NMR spectroscopy, electrochemical measurements, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Molecular dynamics calculations showed that the unsubstituted cyclopentadienyl ring is inserted through the cavity of the toroidal host in these complexes. The electrochemical behavior of the protected and deprotected ferrocene-containing dendrimers was investigated in acetonitrile and water, respectively. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing molecular weight of the compound. The potential for oxidation of the ferrocene core, the rate constant of heterogeneous electron transfer, and the rate constant for the energy-transfer reaction with the luminescent excited state of the [Ru(bpy)3]2+ complex (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) are strongly affected by the number (one or two) of substituents and by the number (one or three) of carbohydrate branches present in the substituents. These effects are assigned to shielding of the ferrocene core by the dendritic branches. Electrochemical evidence for the existence of different conformers for one of the dendrimers in aqueous solution was obtained. PMID:11855715

  16. Outcome of the First wwPDB/CCDC/D3R Ligand Validation Workshop.

    PubMed

    Adams, Paul D; Aertgeerts, Kathleen; Bauer, Cary; Bell, Jeffrey A; Berman, Helen M; Bhat, Talapady N; Blaney, Jeff M; Bolton, Evan; Bricogne, Gerard; Brown, David; Burley, Stephen K; Case, David A; Clark, Kirk L; Darden, Tom; Emsley, Paul; Feher, Victoria A; Feng, Zukang; Groom, Colin R; Harris, Seth F; Hendle, Jorg; Holder, Thomas; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Kleywegt, Gerard J; Krojer, Tobias; Marcotrigiano, Joseph; Mark, Alan E; Markley, John L; Miller, Matthew; Minor, Wladek; Montelione, Gaetano T; Murshudov, Garib; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Haruki; Nicholls, Anthony; Nicklaus, Marc; Nolte, Robert T; Padyana, Anil K; Peishoff, Catherine E; Pieniazek, Susan; Read, Randy J; Shao, Chenghua; Sheriff, Steven; Smart, Oliver; Soisson, Stephen; Spurlino, John; Stouch, Terry; Svobodova, Radka; Tempel, Wolfram; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Tronrud, Dale; Velankar, Sameer; Ward, Suzanna C; Warren, Gregory L; Westbrook, John D; Williams, Pamela; Yang, Huanwang; Young, Jasmine

    2016-04-01

    Crystallographic studies of ligands bound to biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) represent an important source of information concerning drug-target interactions, providing atomic level insights into the physical chemistry of complex formation between macromolecules and ligands. Of the more than 115,000 entries extant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive, ∼75% include at least one non-polymeric ligand. Ligand geometrical and stereochemical quality, the suitability of ligand models for in silico drug discovery and design, and the goodness-of-fit of ligand models to electron-density maps vary widely across the archive. We describe the proceedings and conclusions from the first Worldwide PDB/Cambridge Crystallographic Data Center/Drug Design Data Resource (wwPDB/CCDC/D3R) Ligand Validation Workshop held at the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics at Rutgers University on July 30-31, 2015. Experts in protein crystallography from academe and industry came together with non-profit and for-profit software providers for crystallography and with experts in computational chemistry and data archiving to discuss and make recommendations on best practices, as framed by a series of questions central to structural studies of macromolecule-ligand complexes. What data concerning bound ligands should be archived in the PDB? How should the ligands be best represented? How should structural models of macromolecule-ligand complexes be validated? What supplementary information should accompany publications of structural studies of biological macromolecules? Consensus recommendations on best practices developed in response to each of these questions are provided, together with some details regarding implementation. Important issues addressed but not resolved at the workshop are also enumerated. PMID:27050687

  17. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations. PMID:26479502

  18. PhyreStorm: A Web Server for Fast Structural Searches Against the PDB.

    PubMed

    Mezulis, Stefans; Sternberg, Michael J E; Kelley, Lawrence A

    2016-02-22

    The identification of structurally similar proteins can provide a range of biological insights, and accordingly, the alignment of a query protein to a database of experimentally determined protein structures is a technique commonly used in the fields of structural and evolutionary biology. The PhyreStorm Web server has been designed to provide comprehensive, up-to-date and rapid structural comparisons against the Protein Data Bank (PDB) combined with a rich and intuitive user interface. It is intended that this facility will enable biologists inexpert in bioinformatics access to a powerful tool for exploring protein structure relationships beyond what can be achieved by sequence analysis alone. By partitioning the PDB into similar structures, PhyreStorm is able to quickly discard the majority of structures that cannot possibly align well to a query protein, reducing the number of alignments required by an order of magnitude. PhyreStorm is capable of finding 93±2% of all highly similar (TM-score>0.7) structures in the PDB for each query structure, usually in less than 60s. PhyreStorm is available at http://www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk/phyrestorm/. PMID:26517951

  19. Promoting a structural view of biology for varied audiences: an overview of RCSB PDB resources and experiences

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Shuchismita; Zardecki, Christine; Goodsell, David S.; Berman, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB) supports scientific research and education worldwide by providing an essential resource of information on biomolecular structures. In addition to serving as a deposition, data-processing and distribution center for PDB data, the RCSB PDB offers resources and online materials that different audiences can use to customize their structural biology instruction. These include resources for general audiences that present macromolecular structure in the context of a biological theme, method-based materials for researchers who take a more traditional approach to the presentation of structural science, and materials that mix theme-based and method-based approaches for educators and students. Through these efforts the RCSB PDB aims to enable optimal use of structural data by researchers, educators and students designing and understanding experiments in biology, chemistry and medicine, and by general users making informed decisions about their life and health. PMID:20877496

  20. Complex carbohydrates (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods such as peas, beans, whole grains, and vegetables. Both simple and complex carbohydrates are turned to glucose (blood sugar) in the body and are used as energy. Glucose is used in the cells of the body and in the brain. Any ...

  1. Carbohydrates and dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Suter, P M

    2005-01-01

    The most widely spread eating habit is characterized by a reduced intake of dietary fiber, an increased intake of simple sugars, a high intake of refined grain products, an altered fat composition of the diet, and a dietary pattern characterized by a high glycemic load, an increased body weight and reduced physical activity. In this chapter the effects of this eating pattern on disease risk will be outlined. There are no epidemiological studies showing that the increase of glucose, fructose or sucrose intake is directly and independently associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease (CHD). On the other hand a large number of studies has reported a reduction of fatal and non-fatal CHD events as a function of the intake of complex carbohydrates--respectively 'dietary fiber' or selected fiber-rich food (e.g., whole grain cereals). It seems that eating too much 'fast' carbohydrate [i.e., carbohydrates with a high glycemic index (GI)] may have deleterious long-term consequences. Indeed the last decades have shown that a low fat (and consecutively high carbohydrate) diet alone is not the best strategy to combat modern diseases including atherosclerosis. Quantity and quality issues in carbohydrate nutrient content are as important as they are for fat. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that for cardiovascular disease prevention a high sugar intake should be avoided. There is growing evidence of the high impact of dietary fiber and foods with a low GI on single risk factors (e.g., lipid pattern, diabetes, inflammation, endothelial function etc.) as well as also the development of the endpoints of atherosclerosis especially CHD. PMID:16596802

  2. Specific Carbohydrate Diet: Does It Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Go Back The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Email Print + Share There is no ... diet that has received attention is the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. This diet limits poorly digestible carbohydrates to ...

  3. Fine carbohydrate recognition of Euphorbia milii lectin.

    PubMed

    Irazoqui, Fernando J; Vozari-Hampe, Magdolna M; Lardone, Ricardo D; Villarreal, Marcos A; Sendra, Victor G; Montich, Guillermo G; Trindade, Vera M; Clausen, Henrik; Nores, Gustavo A

    2005-10-14

    Glycans are key structures involved in biological processes such as cell attachment, migration, and invasion. Information coded on cell-surface glycans is frequently deciphered by proteins, as lectins, that recognize specific carbohydrate topology. Here, we describe the fine carbohydrate specificity of Euphorbia milii lectin (EML). Competitive assays using various sugars showed that GalNAc was the strongest inhibitor, and that the hydroxyl axial position of C4 and acetamido on C2 of GalNAc are critical points of EML recognition. A hydrophobic locus adjacent to GalNAc is also an important region for EML binding. Direct binding assays of EML revealed a stereochemical requirement for a structure adjacent to terminal GalNAc, showing that GalNAc residue is a necessary but not sufficient condition for EML interaction. The capacity of EML to bind epithelial tumor cells makes it a potentially useful tool for study of some over-expressed GalNAc glycoconjugates. PMID:16122701

  4. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  5. Carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrate modification is a common phenomenon in nature. Many carbohydrate modifications such as some epimerization, O-acetylation, O-sulfation, O-methylation, N-deacetylation, and N-sulfation, take place after the formation of oligosaccharide or polysaccharide backbones. These modifications can be categorized as carbohydrate post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs). Carbohydrate PGMs further extend the complexity of the structures and the synthesis of carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. They also increase the capacity of the biological information that can be controlled by finely tuning the structures of carbohydrates. Developing efficient methods to obtain structurally defined naturally occurring oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates with carbohydrate PGMs is essential for understanding the biological significance of carbohydrate PGMs. Combine with high-throughput screening methods, synthetic carbohydrates with PGMs are invaluable probes in structure-activity relationship studies. We illustrate here several classes of carbohydrates with PGMs and their applications. Recent progress in chemical, enzymatic, and chemoenzymatic syntheses of these carbohydrates and their derivatives are also presented. PMID:17340000

  6. Chemical modification of B4C cap layers on Pd/B4C multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supruangnet, Ratchadaporn; Morawe, Christian; Peffen, Jean-Christophe; Nakajima, Hideki; Rattanasuporn, Surachet; Photongkam, Pat; Jearanaikoon, Nichada; Busayaporn, Wutthikri

    2016-03-01

    Chemical modifications of B4C cap layers on sputtered Pd/B4C multilayer coatings for X-ray optical applications were investigated using X-ray reflectivity, photoemission electron spectroscopy, photoemission electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate oxidation down to probing depths of about 10 nm and strong evidence for the formation of B2O3 crystals at the sample surface, while B4C like compounds are absent.

  7. High-resolution structure of the M14-type cytosolic carboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia refined exploiting PDB-REDO strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Hunter, William N.

    2014-02-01

    The structure of a bacterial M14-family carboxypeptidase determined exploiting microfocus synchrotron radiation and highly automated refinement protocols reveals its potential to act as a polyglutamylase. A potential cytosolic metallocarboxypeptidase from Burkholderia cenocepacia has been crystallized and a synchrotron-radiation microfocus beamline allowed the acquisition of diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit comprises a tetramer containing over 1500 amino acids, and the high-throughput automated protocols embedded in PDB-REDO were coupled with model–map inspections in refinement. This approach has highlighted the value of such protocols for efficient analyses. The subunit is constructed from two domains. The N-terminal domain has previously only been observed in cytosolic carboxypeptidase (CCP) proteins. The C-terminal domain, which carries the Zn{sup 2+}-containing active site, serves to classify this protein as a member of the M14D subfamily of carboxypeptidases. Although eukaryotic CCPs possess deglutamylase activity and are implicated in processing modified tubulin, the function and substrates of the bacterial family members remain unknown. The B. cenocepacia protein did not display deglutamylase activity towards a furylacryloyl glutamate derivative, a potential substrate. Residues previously shown to coordinate the divalent cation and that contribute to peptide-bond cleavage in related enzymes such as bovine carboxypeptidase are conserved. The location of a conserved basic patch in the active site adjacent to the catalytic Zn{sup 2+}, where an acetate ion is identified, suggests recognition of the carboxy-terminus in a similar fashion to other carboxypeptidases. However, there are significant differences that indicate the recognition of substrates with different properties. Of note is the presence of a lysine in the S1′ recognition subsite that suggests specificity towards an acidic substrate.

  8. RCSB PDB Mobile: iOS and Android mobile apps to provide data access and visualization to the RCSB Protein Data Bank

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Gregory B.; Bi, Chunxiao; Christie, Cole H.; Pang, Kyle; Prlić, Andreas; Nakane, Takanori; Zardecki, Christine; Voigt, Maria; Berman, Helen M.; Rose, Peter W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB PDB) resource provides tools for query, analysis and visualization of the 3D structures in the PDB archive. As the mobile Web is starting to surpass desktop and laptop usage, scientists and educators are beginning to integrate mobile devices into their research and teaching. In response, we have developed the RCSB PDB Mobile app for the iOS and Android mobile platforms to enable fast and convenient access to RCSB PDB data and services. Using the app, users from the general public to expert researchers can quickly search and visualize biomolecules, and add personal annotations via the RCSB PDB’s integrated MyPDB service. Availability and implementation: RCSB PDB Mobile is freely available from the Apple App Store and Google Play (http://www.rcsb.org). Contact: pwrose@ucsd.edu PMID:25183487

  9. Understanding carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions by means of glyconanotechnology.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Jesus M; Penadés, Soledad

    2004-01-01

    Carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction is a reliable and versatile mechanism for cell adhesion and recognition. Glycosphingolipid (GSL) clusters at the cell membrane are mainly involved in this interaction. To investigate carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction an integrated strategy (Glyconanotechnology) was developed. This strategy includes polyvalent tools (gold glyconanoparticles) mimicking GSL clustering at the cell membrane as well as analytical techniques such as AFM, TEM, and SPR to evaluate the interactions. The results obtained by means of this strategy and current status are presented. PMID:15483380

  10. Organizing multivalency in carbohydrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian; Despras, Guillaume; Lindhorst, Thisbe K

    2016-06-01

    The interactions of cell surface carbohydrates as well as of soluble glycoconjugates with their receptor proteins rule fundamental processes in cell biology. One of the supramolecular principles underlying and regulating carbohydrate recognition is multivalency. Many multivalent glycoconjugates have therefore been synthesized to study multivalency effects operative in glycobiology. This review is focused on smaller multivalent structures such as glycoclusters emphasizing carbohydrate-centered and heteromultivalent glycoconjugates. We are discussing primary, secondary and tertiary structural aspects including approaches to organize multivalency. PMID:27146554

  11. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  12. CARBOHYDRATE NUTRITION AND MANURE SCORING. PART I: CARBOHYDRATES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are elements of ration formulation for which we have no hard and fast rules. Carbohydrate supplementation is one of them. The 2001 Dairy NRC has done the best job to date in offering guidelines regarding the balance between forage & neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and nonfiber carbohydrates (N...

  13. Dietary carbohydrates and endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    Evans, W J; Hughes, V A

    1985-05-01

    Antecedent diet can greatly influence both substrate utilization during exercise and exercise performance itself. A number of studies have convincingly demonstrated that short-term (three to seven days) adaptation to a low carbohydrate diet results in greatly reduced liver and muscle glycogen stores. While carbohydrate utilization after such a diet is reduced, the limited glycogen stores can severely limit endurance exercise performance. High carbohydrate diets on the other hand expand carbohydrate stores which can limit performance. However, long-term adaptation to a low carbohydrate diet can greatly alter muscle and whole body energy metabolism to drastically limit the oxidation of limited carbohydrate stores with no adverse effect on performance. Glycogen loading techniques can result in supercompensation of muscle stores. Exercise induced depletion of muscle glycogen is the most important single factor in this phenomenon. Following the exercise a low carbohydrate diet for two to three days after which a high carbohydrate diet is eaten seemingly has the same effect on increasing muscle glycogen stores as simply eating a high carbohydrate diet. The form of the dietary carbohydrate during glycogen loading should be high in complex carbohydrates; however, the type of dietary starch that effects the greatest rate of resynthesis has not been investigated. Rapid resynthesis of glycogen following exercise is at least in part due to increased insulin sensitivity. The enhanced glucose transport caused by the increased sensitivity provides substrate for glycogen synthase. How rapidly this enhanced sensitivity returns to pre-exercise levels in humans is uncertain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3993621

  14. The Carbohydrate-Active EnZymes database (CAZy): an expert resource for Glycogenomics.

    PubMed

    Cantarel, Brandi L; Coutinho, Pedro M; Rancurel, Corinne; Bernard, Thomas; Lombard, Vincent; Henrissat, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    The Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme (CAZy) database is a knowledge-based resource specialized in the enzymes that build and breakdown complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates. As of September 2008, the database describes the present knowledge on 113 glycoside hydrolase, 91 glycosyltransferase, 19 polysaccharide lyase, 15 carbohydrate esterase and 52 carbohydrate-binding module families. These families are created based on experimentally characterized proteins and are populated by sequences from public databases with significant similarity. Protein biochemical information is continuously curated based on the available literature and structural information. Over 6400 proteins have assigned EC numbers and 700 proteins have a PDB structure. The classification (i) reflects the structural features of these enzymes better than their sole substrate specificity, (ii) helps to reveal the evolutionary relationships between these enzymes and (iii) provides a convenient framework to understand mechanistic properties. This resource has been available for over 10 years to the scientific community, contributing to information dissemination and providing a transversal nomenclature to glycobiologists. More recently, this resource has been used to improve the quality of functional predictions of a number genome projects by providing expert annotation. The CAZy resource resides at URL: http://www.cazy.org/. PMID:18838391

  15. Stereochemical Control in Carbohydrate Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Rhys; Northcote, Peter T.; Harvey, Joanne E.; Dangerfield, Emma M.; Stocker, Bridget L.

    2008-01-01

    Carbohydrates, in the form of glycoconjugates, have recently been shown to control a wide range of cellular processes. Accordingly, students interested in the study of organic chemistry and biomedical sciences should be exposed to carbohydrate chemistry. To this end, we have developed a sequence of experiments that leads the student from the…

  16. METHODOLOGICAL CHALLENGES IN CARBOHYDRATE ANALYSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrates can provide up to 80% of the dry matter in animal diets, yet their specific evaluation for research and diet formulation is only now becoming a focus in the animal sciences. Partitioning of dietary carbohydrates for nutritional purposes should reflect differences in digestion and ferm...

  17. Nearest-cell: a fast and easy tool for locating crystal matches in the PDB

    SciTech Connect

    Ramraj, V.; Evans, G.; Diprose, J. M.; Esnouf, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    A fast and easy tool to locate unit-cell matches in the PDB is described. When embarking upon X-ray diffraction data collection from a potentially novel macromolecular crystal form, it can be useful to ascertain whether the measured data reflect a crystal form that is already recorded in the Protein Data Bank and, if so, whether it is part of a large family of related structures. Providing such information to crystallographers conveniently and quickly, as soon as the first images have been recorded and the unit cell characterized at an X-ray beamline, has the potential to save time and effort as well as pointing to possible search models for molecular replacement. Given an input unit cell, and optionally a space group, Nearest-cell rapidly scans the Protein Data Bank and retrieves near-matches.

  18. Outcome of the First wwPDB Hybrid/Integrative Methods Task Force Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Andrej; Berman, Helen M.; Schwede, Torsten; Trewhella, Jill; Kleywegt, Gerard; Burley, Stephen K.; Markley, John; Nakamura, Haruki; Adams, Paul; Bonvin, Alexandre M.J.J.; Chiu, Wah; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Di Maio, Frank; Ferrin, Thomas E.; Grünewald, Kay; Gutmanas, Aleksandras; Henderson, Richard; Hummer, Gerhard; Iwasaki, Kenji; Johnson, Graham; Lawson, Catherine L.; Meiler, Jens; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Nilges, Michael; Nussinov, Ruth; Patwardhan, Ardan; Rappsilber, Juri; Read, Randy J.; Saibil, Helen; Schröder, Gunnar F.; Schwieters, Charles D.; Seidel, Claus A. M.; Svergun, Dmitri; Topf, Maya; Ulrich, Eldon L.; Velankar, Sameer; Westbrook, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Structures of biomolecular systems are increasingly computed by integrative modeling that relies on varied types of experimental data and theoretical information. We describe here the proceedings and conclusions from the first wwPDB Hybrid/Integrative Methods Task Force Workshop held at the European Bioinformatics Institute in Hinxton, UK, October 6 and 7, 2014. At the workshop, experts in various experimental fields of structural biology, experts in integrative modeling and visualization, and experts in data archiving addressed a series of questions central to the future of structural biology. How should integrative models be represented? How should the data and integrative models be validated? What data should be archived? How should the data and models be archived? What information should accompany the publication of integrative models? PMID:26095030

  19. Abuse potential of carbohydrates for overweight carbohydrate cravers

    PubMed Central

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; Smith, Malaina; Kendzor, Darla; Appelhans, Bradley; Hedeker, Donald; Pagoto, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The long-rejected construct of food addiction is undergoing re-examination. Objectives . To evaluate whether a novel carbohydrate food shows abuse potential for rigorously defined carbohydrate cravers, as evidenced by selective self-administration and mood enhancement during double-blind discrimination testing. Methods Discrete trials choice testing was performed with 61 overweight (BMI m=27.64, SD=2.59) women (ages 18–45; 19.70% African American) whose diet records showed >4 weekly afternoon/evening emotional eating episodes confined to snacks with carbohydrate:protein ≥ 6:1. After being induced into a sad mood, participants were exposed, double-blind and in counterbalanced order, to taste-matched carbohydrate and protein beverages. They were asked to choose and self-administer the drink that made them feel better. Results Women overwhelmingly chose the carbohydrate beverage, even though blinded. Mixed-effects regression modeling, controlling for beverage order, revealed greater liking and greater reduction in dysphoria following the carbohydrate beverage compared to the protein beverage, but no differential effect on vigor. Conclusion For women who crave them, carbohydrates appear to display abuse potential, plausibly contributing to overconsumption and overweight. PMID:18273603

  20. Photoaffinity probes for studying carbohydrate biology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seok-Ho; Wands, Amberlyn M.; Kohler, Jennifer J.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates and carbohydrate-containing biomolecules engage in binding events that underlie many essential biological processes. Yet these carbohydrate-mediated interactions are often poorly characterized, due to their low affinities and heterogenous natures. The use of photocrosslinking functional groups offers a way to photochemically capture carbohydrate-containing complexes, which can be isolated for further analysis. Here we survey progress in the synthesis and use of carbohydrate-based photoprobes, reagents that incorporate carbohydrates or their analogs, photocrosslinking moieties, and affinity purification handles. Carbohydrate photoprobes, used in combination with modern mass spectrometry methods, can provide important new insights into the cellular roles of carbohydrates and glycosylated molecules. PMID:23239902

  1. Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

  2. Carbohydrate Recognition Properties of Human Ficolins

    PubMed Central

    Gout, Evelyne; Garlatti, Virginie; Smith, David F.; Lacroix, Monique; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Lunardi, Thomas; Martin, Lydie; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Arlaud, Gérard J.; Gaboriaud, Christine; Thielens, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    Ficolins are oligomeric innate immune recognition proteins consisting of a collagen-like region and a fibrinogen-like recognition domain that bind to pathogen- and apoptotic cell-associated molecular patterns. To investigate their carbohydrate binding specificities, serum-derived L-ficolin and recombinant H- and M-ficolins were fluorescently labeled, and their carbohydrate binding ability was analyzed by glycan array screening. L-ficolin preferentially recognized disulfated N-acetyllactosamine and tri- and tetrasaccharides containing terminal galactose or N-acetylglucosamine. Binding was sensitive to the position and orientation of the bond between N-acetyllactosamine and the adjacent carbohydrate. No significant binding of H-ficolin to any of the 377 glycans probed could be detected, providing further evidence for its poor lectin activity. M-ficolin bound preferentially to 9-O-acetylated 2-6-linked sialic acid derivatives and to various glycans containing sialic acid engaged in a 2-3 linkage. To further investigate the structural basis of sialic acid recognition by M-ficolin, point mutants were produced in which three residues of the fibrinogen domain were replaced by their counterparts in L-ficolin. Mutations G221F and A256V inhibited binding to the 9-O-acetylated sialic acid derivatives, whereas Y271F abolished interaction with all sialic acid-containing glycans. The crystal structure of the Y271F mutant fibrinogen domain was solved, showing that the mutation does not alter the structure of the ligand binding pocket. These analyses reveal novel ficolin ligands such as sulfated N-acetyllactosamine (L-ficolin) and gangliosides (M-ficolin) and provide precise insights into the sialic acid binding specificity of M-ficolin, emphasizing the essential role of Tyr271 in this respect. PMID:20032467

  3. Carbohydrate drugs: current status and development prospect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a great effort devoted to the investigation of the roles of carbohydrates in various essential biological processes and the development of carbohydrates to therapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the carbohydrate drugs which have been recorded in several pharmacopoeias, marketed, and under development. A prospect of the future development of carbohydrate drugs is discussed as well. PMID:25994058

  4. Survey of phosphorylation near drug binding sites in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and their effects

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle P.; Gifford, Kathleen M.; Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    While it is currently estimated that 40–50% of eukaryotic proteins are phosphorylated, little is known about the frequency and local effects of phosphorylation near pharmaceutical inhibitor binding sites. In this study, we investigated how frequently phosphorylation may affect the binding of drug inhibitors to target proteins. We examined the 453 non-redundant structures of soluble mammalian drug target proteins bound to inhibitors currently available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We cross-referenced these structures with phosphorylation data available from the PhosphoSitePlus database. 322/453 (71%) of drug targets have evidence of phosphorylation that has been validated by multiple methods or labs. For 132/453 (29%) of those, the phosphorylation site is within 12Å of the small molecule-binding site, where it would likely alter small molecule binding affinity. We propose a framework for distinguishing between drug-phosphorylation site interactions that are likely to alter the efficacy of drugs vs. those that are not. In addition we highlight examples of well-established drug targets, such as estrogen receptor alpha, for which phosphorylation may affect drug affinity and clinical efficacy. Our data suggest that phosphorylation may affect drug binding and efficacy for a significant fraction of drug target proteins. PMID:24833420

  5. Survey of phosphorylation near drug binding sites in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and their effects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle P; Gifford, Kathleen M; Waitzman, Joshua S; Rice, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    While it is currently estimated that 40 to 50% of eukaryotic proteins are phosphorylated, little is known about the frequency and local effects of phosphorylation near pharmaceutical inhibitor binding sites. In this study, we investigated how frequently phosphorylation may affect the binding of drug inhibitors to target proteins. We examined the 453 non-redundant structures of soluble mammalian drug target proteins bound to inhibitors currently available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We cross-referenced these structures with phosphorylation data available from the PhosphoSitePlus database. Three hundred twenty-two of 453 (71%) of drug targets have evidence of phosphorylation that has been validated by multiple methods or labs. For 132 of 453 (29%) of those, the phosphorylation site is within 12 Å of the small molecule-binding site, where it would likely alter small molecule binding affinity. We propose a framework for distinguishing between drug-phosphorylation site interactions that are likely to alter the efficacy of drugs versus those that are not. In addition we highlight examples of well-established drug targets, such as estrogen receptor alpha, for which phosphorylation may affect drug affinity and clinical efficacy. Our data suggest that phosphorylation may affect drug binding and efficacy for a significant fraction of drug target proteins. PMID:24833420

  6. A guest molecule-host cavity fitting algorithm to mine PDB for small molecule targets.

    PubMed

    Byrem, William C; Armstead, Stephen C; Kobayashi, Shunji; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Eckmann, David M

    2006-08-01

    Inhaled anesthetic molecule occupancy of a protein internal cavity depends in part on the volumes of the guest molecule and the host site. Current algorithms to determine volume and surface area of cavities in proteins whose structures have been determined and cataloged make no allowance for shape or small degrees of shape adjustment to accommodate a guest. We developed an algorithm to determine spheroid dimensions matching cavity volume and surface area and applied it to screen the cavities of 6,658 nonredundant structures stored in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for potential targets of halothane (2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane). Our algorithm determined sizes of prolate and oblate spheroids matching dimensions of each cavity found. If those spheroids could accommodate halothane (radius 2.91 A) as a guest, we determined the packing coefficient. 394,766 total cavities were identified. Of 58,681 cavities satisfying the fit criteria for halothane, 11,902 cavities had packing coefficients in the range of 0.46-0.64. This represents 20.3% of cavities large enough to hold halothane, 3.0% of all cavities processed, and found in 2,432 protein structures. Our algorithm incorporates shape dependence to screen guest-host relationships for potential small molecule occupancy of protein cavities. Proteins with large numbers of such cavities are more likely to be functionally altered by halothane. PMID:16904958

  7. RNApdbee—a webserver to derive secondary structures from pdb files of knotted and unknotted RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Antczak, Maciej; Zok, Tomasz; Popenda, Mariusz; Lukasiak, Piotr; Adamiak, Ryszard W.; Blazewicz, Jacek; Szachniuk, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In RNA structural biology and bioinformatics an access to correct RNA secondary structure and its proper representation is of crucial importance. This is true especially in the field of secondary and 3D RNA structure prediction. Here, we introduce RNApdbee—a new tool that allows to extract RNA secondary structure from the pdb file, and presents it in both textual and graphical form. RNApdbee supports processing of knotted and unknotted structures of large RNAs, also within protein complexes. The method works not only for first but also for high order pseudoknots, and gives an information about canonical and non-canonical base pairs. A combination of these features is unique among existing applications for RNA structure analysis. Additionally, a function of converting between the text notations, i.e. BPSEQ, CT and extended dot-bracket, is provided. In order to facilitate a more comprehensive study, the webserver integrates the functionality of RNAView, MC-Annotate and 3DNA/DSSR, being the most common tools used for automated identification and classification of RNA base pairs. RNApdbee is implemented as a publicly available webserver with an intuitive interface and can be freely accessed at http://rnapdbee.cs.put.poznan.pl/. PMID:24771339

  8. Being a binding site: characterizing residue composition of binding sites on proteins.

    PubMed

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2007-01-01

    The Protein Data Bank contains the description of more than 45,000 three-dimensional protein and nucleic-acid structures today. Started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed articles, the proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still frequently needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. This fact implies that the fully automatic processing of the whole PDB is a very hard task. We first cleaned and re-structured the PDB data, then analyzed the residue composition of the binding sites in the whole PDB for frequency and for hidden association rules. Main results of the paper: (i) the cleaning and repairing algorithm (ii) redundancy elimination from the data (iii) application of association rule mining to the cleaned non-redundant data set. We have found numerous significant relations of the residue-composition of the ligand binding sites on protein surfaces, summarized in two figures. One of the classical data-mining methods for exploring implication-rules, the association-rule mining, is capable to find previously unknown residue-set preferences of bind ligands on protein surfaces. Since protein-ligand binding is a key step in enzymatic mechanisms and in drug discovery, these uncovered preferences in the study of more than 19,500 binding sites may help in identifying new binding protein-ligand pairs. PMID:18305831

  9. Web-based visualisation and analysis of 3D electron-microscopy data from EMDB and PDB.

    PubMed

    Lagerstedt, Ingvar; Moore, William J; Patwardhan, Ardan; Sanz-García, Eduardo; Best, Christoph; Swedlow, Jason R; Kleywegt, Gerard J

    2013-11-01

    The Protein Data Bank in Europe (PDBe) has developed web-based tools for the visualisation and analysis of 3D electron microscopy (3DEM) structures in the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) and Protein Data Bank (PDB). The tools include: (1) a volume viewer for 3D visualisation of maps, tomograms and models, (2) a slice viewer for inspecting 2D slices of tomographic reconstructions, and (3) visual analysis pages to facilitate analysis and validation of maps, tomograms and models. These tools were designed to help non-experts and experts alike to get some insight into the content and assess the quality of 3DEM structures in EMDB and PDB without the need to install specialised software or to download large amounts of data from these archives. The technical challenges encountered in developing these tools, as well as the more general considerations when making archived data available to the user community through a web interface, are discussed. PMID:24113529

  10. The Structural and Energetic Basis of Carbohydrate Aromatic Packing Interactions in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wentao; Enck, Sebastian; Price, Joshua L.; Powers, David L.; Powers, Evan T.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Dyson, H. Jane; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate-aromatic interactions mediate many biological processes. However, the structure–energy relationships underpinning direct carbohydrate–aromatic packing in aqueous solution have been difficult to assess experimentally and remain elusive. Here, we determine the structures and folding energetics of chemically synthesized glycoproteins to quantify the contributions of the hydrophobic effect and CH–π interactions to carbohydrate–aromatic packing interactions in proteins. We find that the hydrophobic effect contributes significantly to protein–carbohydrate interactions. Interactions between carbohydrates and aromatic amino acid side chains, however, are supplemented by CH–π interactions. The strengths of experimentally determined carbohydrate–π interactions do not correlate with the electrostatic properties of the involved aromatic residues, suggesting that the electrostatic component of CH–π interactions in aqueous solution is small. Thus, tight binding of carbohydrates and aromatic residues is driven by the hydrophobic effect and CH–π interactions featuring a dominating dispersive component. PMID:23742246

  11. Cancer Vaccines and Carbohydrate Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Lum, Michelle; Vijay, Geraldine; Jain, Miten; Almogren, Adel; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens (TACA) result from the aberrant glycosylation that is seen with transformation to a tumor cell. The carbohydrate antigens that have been found to be tumor-associated include the mucin related Tn, Sialyl Tn, and Thomsen-Friedenreich antigens, the blood group Lewis related LewisY, Sialyl LewisX and Sialyl LewisA, and LewisX, (also known as stage-specific embryonic antigen-1, SSEA-1), the glycosphingolipids Globo H and stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3), the sialic acid containing glycosphingolipids, the gangliosides GD2, GD3, GM2, fucosyl GM1, and Neu5GcGM3, and polysialic acid. Recent developments have furthered our understanding of the T-independent type II response that is seen in response to carbohydrate antigens. The selection of a vaccine target antigen is based on not only the presence of the antigen in a variety of tumor tissues but also on the role this antigen plays in tumor growth and metastasis. These roles for TACAs are being elucidated. Newly acquired knowledge in understanding the T-independent immune response and in understanding the key roles that carbohydrates play in metastasis are being applied in attempts to develop an effective vaccine response to TACAs. The role of each of the above mentioned carbohydrate antigens in cancer growth and metastasis and vaccine attempts using these antigens will be described. PMID:21964054

  12. Re-refinement from deposited X-ray data can deliver improved models for most PDB entries

    SciTech Connect

    Joosten, Robbie P.; Womack, Thomas; Vriend, Gert; Bricogne, Gérard

    2009-02-01

    An evaluation of validation and real-space intervention possibilities for improving existing automated (re-)refinement methods. The deposition of X-ray data along with the customary structural models defining PDB entries makes it possible to apply large-scale re-refinement protocols to these entries, thus giving users the benefit of improvements in X-ray methods that have occurred since the structure was deposited. Automated gradient refinement is an effective method to achieve this goal, but real-space intervention is most often required in order to adequately address problems detected by structure-validation software. In order to improve the existing protocol, automated re-refinement was combined with structure validation and difference-density peak analysis to produce a catalogue of problems in PDB entries that are amenable to automatic correction. It is shown that re-refinement can be effective in producing improvements, which are often associated with the systematic use of the TLS parameterization of B factors, even for relatively new and high-resolution PDB entries, while the accompanying manual or semi-manual map analysis and fitting steps show good prospects for eventual automation. It is proposed that the potential for simultaneous improvements in methods and in re-refinement results be further encouraged by broadening the scope of depositions to include refinement metadata and ultimately primary rather than reduced X-ray data.

  13. Re-refinement from deposited X-ray data can deliver improved models for most PDB entries.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Robbie P; Womack, Thomas; Vriend, Gert; Bricogne, Gérard

    2009-02-01

    The deposition of X-ray data along with the customary structural models defining PDB entries makes it possible to apply large-scale re-refinement protocols to these entries, thus giving users the benefit of improvements in X-ray methods that have occurred since the structure was deposited. Automated gradient refinement is an effective method to achieve this goal, but real-space intervention is most often required in order to adequately address problems detected by structure-validation software. In order to improve the existing protocol, automated re-refinement was combined with structure validation and difference-density peak analysis to produce a catalogue of problems in PDB entries that are amenable to automatic correction. It is shown that re-refinement can be effective in producing improvements, which are often associated with the systematic use of the TLS parameterization of B factors, even for relatively new and high-resolution PDB entries, while the accompanying manual or semi-manual map analysis and fitting steps show good prospects for eventual automation. It is proposed that the potential for simultaneous improvements in methods and in re-refinement results be further encouraged by broadening the scope of depositions to include refinement metadata and ultimately primary rather than reduced X-ray data. PMID:19171973

  14. Outcome of the First wwPDB/CCDC/D3R Ligand Validation Workshop

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adams, Paul  D.; Aertgeerts, Kathleen; Bauer, Cary; Bell, Jeffrey A.; Berman, Helen  M.; Bhat, Talapady  N.; Blaney, Jeff  M.; Bolton, Evan; Bricogne, Gerard; Brown, David; et al

    2016-04-05

    Crystallographic studies of ligands bound to biological macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids) represent an important source of information concerning drug-target interactions, providing atomic level insights into the physical chemistry of complex formation between macromolecules and ligands. Of the more than 115,000 entries extant in the Protein Data Bank archive, ~75% include at least one non-polymeric ligand. Ligand geometrical and stereochemical quality, the suitability of ligand models for in silico drug discovery/design, and the goodness-of-fit of ligand models to electron density maps vary widely across the archive. We describe the proceedings and conclusions from the first Worldwide Protein Data Bank/Cambridge Crystallographicmore » Data Centre/Drug Design Data Resource (wwPDB/CCDC/D3R) Ligand Validation Workshop held at the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics at Rutgers University on July 30-31, 2015. Experts in protein crystallography from academe and industry came together with non-profit and for-profit software providers for crystallography and with experts in computational chemistry and data archiving to discuss and make recommendations on best practices, as framed by a series of questions central to structural studies of macromolecule-ligand complexes. What data concerning bound ligands should be archived in the Protein Data Bank? How should the ligands be best represented? How should structural models of macromolecule-ligand complexes be validated? What supplementary information should accompany publications of structural studies of biological macromolecules? Consensus recommendations on best practices developed in response to each of these questions are provided, together with some details regarding implementation. Important issues addressed but not resolved at the workshop are also enumerated.« less

  15. Challenges with nonfiber carbohydrate methods.

    PubMed

    Hall, M B

    2003-12-01

    Nonfiber carbohydrates (NFC) encompass a compositionally and nutritionally diverse group exclusive of those carbohydrates found in NDF. Their content in feeds has often been described as a single value estimated by difference as 100% of dry matter minus the percentages of CP, NDF (adjusted for CP in NDF), ether extract, and ash. A calculated value was used because of difficulties with assays for individual NFC, but it does not differentiate among nutritionally distinct NFC. Errors in NFC estimation can arise from not accounting for CP in NDF and when multipliers other than 6.25 are appropriate to estimate CP. Analyses that begin to distinguish among NFC are those for starch, soluble fiber (non-NDF, nonstarch polysaccharides), and low molecular weight carbohydrates (mono- and oligosaccharides). Many starch analyses quantify alpha-glucans through specific hydrolysis of alpha-(1 --> 4) and alpha-(1 --> 6) linkages in the glucan, and measurement of released glucose. Incomplete gelatinization and hydrolysis will lead to underestimation of starch content. Starch values are inflated by enzyme preparations that hydrolyze carbohydrates other than alpha-glucan, measurement of all released monosaccharides without specificity for glucose, and failure to exclude free glucose present in the unhydrolyzed sample. Soluble fiber analyses err in a fashion similar to NFC if estimation of CP requires multipliers other than 6.25, or if contaminants such as CP and starch have not been properly accounted. Depolymerization and incomplete precipitation can also decrease soluble fiber estimates. The low molecular weight carbohydrates have been defined as carbohydrates soluble in 78 to 80% ethanol, which separates them from polysaccharides. They can be measured in extracts using broad-spectrum colorimetric assays (phenol-sulfuric acid assay or reducing sugar analysis of acid hydrolyzed samples) or chromatographic methods. Limitations of the colorimetric assays include lack of differentiation

  16. New carbohydrate-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Callstrom, M.R.

    1992-07-01

    We have prepared a series of new carbohydrate-based materials based on the use of carbohydrates as a template for the introduction of functionality to polymeric materials with complete regio- and stereochemical control. The synthesis of these new materials by the use of chemical and enzymatic methods allows for the rational design of new materials based on the properties of the monomeric subunit. These materials have potential applications that range from their use in enhanced oil recovery to biodegradable plastics to biological applications including targeted drug delivery and enzyme stabilization.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CARBOHYDRATE COMPONENTS OF Taenia solium ONCOSPHERE PROTEINS AND THEIR ROLE IN THE ANTIGENICITY

    PubMed Central

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that post-translational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells. PMID:23982308

  18. Recent trends in carbohydrate modeling.

    PubMed

    Dyekjaer, Jane Dannow; Rasmussen, Kjeld

    2003-11-01

    The exploding activities in modeling of carbohydrates during the past few years is reviewed with emphasis on advances in improving force fields, coupling of NMR measurements with molecular dynamics simulations, direct calculation of thermodynamic properties, application of quantum chemical methods on a large scale, and web-access to modeling. PMID:14529512

  19. New Techniques for the Analysis of Carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrates are complex. In addition to the size/mass differences increasing from monosaccharides to oligosaccharides to polysaccharides, the carbohydrate analyst must also contend with which sugars are present (composition), how they are joined together (linkage), and their stereochemistry (conf...

  20. Carbohydrates - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Carbohydrates URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/carbohydrates.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  1. Carbohydrates - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Carbohydrates URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/carbohydrates.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  2. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  3. Fluorous-based carbohydrate quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Guosong

    2015-03-20

    Fluorous chemistry has brought many applications from catalysis to separation science, from supramolecular materials to analytical chemistry. However, fluorous-based quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) has not been reported so far. In the current paper, fluorous interaction has been firstly utilized in QCM, and carbohydrate-protein interaction and carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction have been detected afterward. PMID:25541017

  4. Accuracy of Carbohydrate Counting in Adults.

    PubMed

    Meade, Lisa T; Rushton, Wanda E

    2016-07-01

    In Brief This study investigates carbohydrate counting accuracy in patients using insulin through a multiple daily injection regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The average accuracy test score for all patients was 59%. The carbohydrate test in this study can be used to emphasize the importance of carbohydrate counting to patients and to provide ongoing education. PMID:27621531

  5. Biophysical characterization of laforin-carbohydrate interaction.

    PubMed

    Dias, David M; Furtado, Joana; Wasielewski, Emeric; Cruz, Rui; Costello, Bernard; Cole, Lindsay; Faria, Tiago Q; Baaske, Philipp; Brito, Rui M M; Ciulli, Alessio; Simões, Isaura; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Faro, Carlos; Geraldes, Carlos F G C; Castanheira, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    Laforin is a human dual-specificity phosphatase (DSP) involved in glycogen metabolism regulation containing a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM). Mutations in the gene coding for laforin are responsible for the development of Lafora disease, a progressive fatal myoclonus epilepsy with early onset, characterized by the intracellular deposition of abnormally branched, hyperphosphorylated insoluble glycogen-like polymers, called Lafora bodies. Despite the known importance of the CBM domain of laforin in the regulation of glycogen metabolism, the molecular mechanism of laforin-glycogen interaction is still poorly understood. Recently, the structure of laforin with bound maltohexaose was determined and despite the importance of such breakthrough, some molecular interaction details remained missing. We herein report a thorough biophysical characterization of laforin-carbohydrate interaction using soluble glycans. We demonstrated an increased preference of laforin for the interaction with glycans with higher order of polymerization and confirmed the importance of tryptophan residues for glycan interaction. Moreover, and in line with what has been described for other CBMs and lectins, our results confirmed that laforin-glycan interactions occur with a favourable enthalpic contribution counter-balanced by an unfavourable entropic contribution. The analysis of laforin-glycan interaction through the glycan side by saturation transfer difference (STD)-NMR has shown that the CBM-binding site can accommodate between 5 and 6 sugar units, which is in line with the recently obtained crystal structure of laforin. Overall, the work in the present study complements the structural characterization of laforin and sheds light on the molecular mechanism of laforin-glycan interaction, which is a pivotal requisite to understand the physiological and pathological roles of laforin. PMID:26578817

  6. GenomewidePDB 2.0: A Newly Upgraded Versatile Proteogenomic Database for the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seul-Ki; Hancock, William S; Paik, Young-Ki

    2015-09-01

    Since the launch of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP) in 2012, the number of "missing" proteins has fallen to 2932, down from ∼5932 since the number was first counted in 2011. We compared the characteristics of missing proteins with those of already annotated proteins with respect to transcriptional expression pattern and the time periods in which newly identified proteins were annotated. We learned that missing proteins commonly exhibit lower levels of transcriptional expression and less tissue-specific expression compared with already annotated proteins. This makes it more difficult to identify missing proteins as time goes on. One of the C-HPP goals is to identify alternative spliced product of proteins (ASPs), which are usually difficult to find by shot-gun proteomic methods due to their sequence similarities with the representative proteins. To resolve this problem, it may be necessary to use a targeted proteomics approach (e.g., selected and multiple reaction monitoring [S/MRM] assays) and an innovative bioinformatics platform that enables the selection of target peptides for rarely expressed missing proteins or ASPs. Given that the success of efforts to identify missing proteins may rely on more informative public databases, it was necessary to upgrade the available integrative databases. To this end, we attempted to improve the features and utility of GenomewidePDB by integrating transcriptomic information (e.g., alternatively spliced transcripts), annotated peptide information, and an advanced search interface that can find proteins of interest when applying a targeted proteomics strategy. This upgraded version of the database, GenomewidePDB 2.0, may not only expedite identification of the remaining missing proteins but also enhance the exchange of information among the proteome community. GenomewidePDB 2.0 is available publicly at http://genomewidepdb.proteomix.org/. PMID:26272709

  7. Carbohydrate metabolism of malarial parasites

    PubMed Central

    Homewood, C. A.

    1977-01-01

    The evidence for the pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates by malarial parasites is critically reviewed. In all species studied, glucose is catabolized mainly by glycolysis with little participation of the pentose—phosphate pathway. It has not been proved conclusively that there is a functioning citric acid cycle in the intraerythrocytic stages of avian plasmodia, nor is it certain that these stages of any malarial parasites use oxygen. PMID:338181

  8. Fate of proteins and carbohydrates in membrane bioreactor operated at high sludge age.

    PubMed

    Hocaoglu, Selda Murat; Orhon, Derin

    2010-01-01

    The paper evaluated the fate of proteins and carbohydrates in the course of substrate removal by membrane bioreactor (MBR), which was used for the biological treatment of black and grey water components of a controlled decentralized residential area. The MBRs were operated at a high sludge age of 60 days to better observe the magnitude of soluble residual products. Both groups were detected in the raw wastewater and represented 15% of the soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD) content for black water and 9% for grey water. Corresponding ratios in the process effluent were significantly increased to 70% and 24% respectively, indicating that both proteins and carbohydrates were likely to be generated as residual soluble microbial products. Residual soluble organics accumulated in the reactor at much higher levels as compared to the effluent due to cake filtration occurring on the surface of the membrane, entrapping fractions larger than 4-8 nm for proteins, and around 14 nm for carbohydrates. Mass balance showed that proteins and carbohydrates accumulated in the reactor were partially removed due to longer retention and possible acclimation of the biomass. The observed removal rate was much lower for carbohydrates compared with proteins. PMID:20560086

  9. Carbohydrate content of acid alpha-glucosidase (gamma-amylase) from human liver.

    PubMed

    Belen'ky, D M; Mikhajlov, V I; Rosenfeld, E L

    1979-05-01

    The presence of carbohydrates in homogeneous preparations of human liver acid alpha-glucosidase has been established and the carbohydrate content of the enzyme determined. The enzyme was purified with the specific purpose of removing all low-molecular-weight carbohydrates. It was specifically adsorbed on Concanavalin A-Sepharose, eluted with methyl-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and gave a positive reaction with the phenol-sulphuric acid reagent. These facts taken together provide evidence that the enzyme studied is a glycoprotein. The analysis of the carbohydrate content of human liver acid alpha-glucosidase showed that there were 8.3 glucosamine, 13.2 mannose and possibly 3--4 glucose residues per molecule of the enzyme with a molecular weight of 98,000. PMID:376187

  10. Stacking Interactions between Carbohydrate and Protein Quantified by Combination of Theoretical and Experimental Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nečasová, Ivona; Mishra, Sushil Kumar; Komárek, Jan; Koča, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate – receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/π interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/π interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate - protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL) lectin complexes with α-l-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were −8.5, −7.1 and −4.1 kcal.mol−1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values −8.8, −7.9 kcal.mol−1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was −0.9 kcal.mol−1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the α-l-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction. PMID:23056230

  11. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Look for terms such as: Corn sweetener Corn syrup High-fructose corn syrup Dextrose Fructose Glucose Lactose Maltose Sucrose Honey Sugar Brown sugar Invert sugar Molasses Malt syrup Syrup You also should limit the amount of ...

  12. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sugar occurs naturally in these nutrient-rich foods: Fruits Milk and milk products Some foods have added ... Heavy syrups, such as those added to canned fruit Refined foods with added sugar provide calories, but ...

  13. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... syrup If you are thinking about using a sugar substitute, you may wonder if they are safe. The ... with nutrients, such as fruits and vegetables. Some sugar substitutes you can buy include: Aspartame (say: ASS-per- ...

  14. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  15. Preoperative Oral Carbohydrate Loading in Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Son, Kum-Hee; Kim, So-Young; Cho, Yeong-Ah; Han, Sung-Sik; Park, Sang-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Overnight fasting before elective surgery has been the routine to reduce the risk of pulmonary aspiration. Recently, several international guidelines for preoperative fasting recommend to intake carbohydrate-containing fluids up to 2 to 3 hours before the induction of anesthesia to improve postoperative recovery. Based on the recommendations, we developed a "preoperative carbohydrate diet" provided for the preoperative patients. The purpose of this case report is to share our experience of applying preoperative carbohydrate loading prior to surgery. PMID:27482525

  16. Reuteran and levan as carbohydrate sinks in transgenic sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Rolene; Basson, Carin E; Bekker, Jan; Eduardo, Iban; Rohwer, Johann M; Uys, Lafras; van Wyk, Johannes H; Kossmann, Jens

    2012-12-01

    The present study reports the effect of high molecular weight bacterial fructan (levan) and glucan (reuteran) on growth and carbohydrate partitioning in transgenic sugarcane plants. These biopolymers are products of bacterial glycosyltransferases, enzymes that catalyze the polymerization of glucose or fructose residues from sucrose. Constructs, targeted to different subcellular compartments (cell wall and cytosol) and driven by the Cauliflower mosaic virus-35S: maize-ubiquitin promoter, were introduced into sugarcane by biolistic transformation. Polysaccharide accumulation severely affected growth of callus suspension cultures. Regeneration of embryonic callus tissue into plants proved problematic for cell wall-targeted lines. When targeted to the cytosol, only plants with relative low levels of biopolymer accumulation survived. In internodal stalk tissue that accumulate reuteran (max 0.03 mg/g FW), sucrose content (ca 60 mg/g FW) was not affected, while starch content (<0.4 mg/g FW) was increased up to four times. Total carbohydrate content was not significantly altered. On the other hand, starch and sucrose levels were significantly reduced in plants accumulating levan (max 0.01 mg/g FW). Heterologous expression resulted in a reduction in total carbohydrate assimilation rather than a simple diversion by competition for substrate. PMID:22903192

  17. Carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta.

    PubMed

    Hespell, R B; Canale-Parola, E

    1970-07-01

    The pathways of carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta, a free-living, strictly anaerobic spirochete, were studied. The organism fermented glucose to ethyl alcohol, acetate, lactate, CO(2), and H(2). Assays of enzymatic activities in cell extracts, and determinations of radioactivity distribution in products formed from (14)C-labeled glucose indicated that S. stenostrepta degraded glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The spirochete utilized a clostridial-type clastic reaction to metabolize pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A, CO(2), and H(2), without production of formate. Acetyl-coenzyme A was converted to ethyl alcohol by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent acetaldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase catalyzed the formation of acetate from acetyl-coenzyme A. Hydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were detected in cell extracts. A rubredoxin was isolated from cell extracts of S. stenostrepta. Preparations of this rubredoxin stimulated acetyl phosphate formation from pyruvate by diethylaminoethyl cellulose-treated extracts of S. stenostrepta, an indication that rubredoxin may participate in pyruvate cleavage by this spirochete. Nutritional studies showed that S. stenostrepta fermented a variety of carbohydrates, but did not ferment amino acids or other organic acids. An unidentified growth factor present in yeast extract was required by the organism. Exogenous supplements of biotin, riboflavin, and vitamin B(12) were either stimulatory or required for growth. PMID:5423371

  18. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta

    PubMed Central

    Hespell, Robert B.; Canale-Parola, E.

    1970-01-01

    The pathways of carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta, a free-living, strictly anaerobic spirochete, were studied. The organism fermented glucose to ethyl alcohol, acetate, lactate, CO2, and H2. Assays of enzymatic activities in cell extracts, and determinations of radioactivity distribution in products formed from 14C-labeled glucose indicated that S. stenostrepta degraded glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The spirochete utilized a clostridial-type clastic reaction to metabolize pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A, CO2, and H2, without production of formate. Acetyl-coenzyme A was converted to ethyl alcohol by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent acetaldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase catalyzed the formation of acetate from acetyl-coenzyme A. Hydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were detected in cell extracts. A rubredoxin was isolated from cell extracts of S. stenostrepta. Preparations of this rubredoxin stimulated acetyl phosphate formation from pyruvate by diethylaminoethyl cellulose-treated extracts of S. stenostrepta, an indication that rubredoxin may participate in pyruvate cleavage by this spirochete. Nutritional studies showed that S. stenostrepta fermented a variety of carbohydrates, but did not ferment amino acids or other organic acids. An unidentified growth factor present in yeast extract was required by the organism. Exogenous supplements of biotin, riboflavin, and vitamin B12 were either stimulatory or required for growth. PMID:5423371

  19. 1001 optimal PDB structure alignments: integer programming methods for finding the maximum contact map overlap.

    PubMed

    Caprara, Alberto; Carr, Robert; Istrail, Sorin; Lancia, Giuseppe; Walenz, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Protein structure comparison is a fundamental problem for structural genomics, with applications to drug design, fold prediction, protein clustering, and evolutionary studies. Despite its importance, there are very few rigorous methods and widely accepted similarity measures known for this problem. In this paper we describe the last few years of developments on the study of an emerging measure, the contact map overlap (CMO), for protein structure comparison. A contact map is a list of pairs of residues which lie in three-dimensional proximity in the protein's native fold. Although this measure is in principle computationally hard to optimize, we show how it can in fact be computed with great accuracy for related proteins by integer linear programming techniques. These methods have the advantage of providing certificates of near-optimality by means of upper bounds to the optimal alignment value. We also illustrate effective heuristics, such as local search and genetic algorithms. We were able to obtain for the first time optimal alignments for large similar proteins (about 1,000 residues and 2,000 contacts) and used the CMO measure to cluster proteins in families. The clusters obtained were compared to SCOP classification in order to validate the measure. Extensive computational experiments showed that alignments which are off by at most 10% from the optimal value can be computed in a short time. Further experiments showed how this measure reacts to the choice of the threshold defining a contact and how to choose this threshold in a sensible way. PMID:15072687

  20. Determining a carbohydrate profile for Hansenula polymorpha

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of the levels of carbohydrates in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha required the development of new analytical procedures. Existing fractionation and analytical methods were adapted to deal with the problems involved with the lysis of whole cells. Using these new procedures, the complete carbohydrate profiles of H. polymorpha and selected mutant strains were determined and shown to correlate favourably with previously published results.

  1. [Carbohydrate-binding proteins of marine invertebrates].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianov, P A; Chernikov, O V; Kobelev, S S; Chikalovets, I V; Molchanova, V I; Li, W

    2007-01-01

    The information on the carbohydrate specificity and molecular organization of some carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) of marine invertebrates is reported. Antiviral activity of some of the lectins against human immunodeficiency virus has been studied. Lectins of marine invertebrates are promising tools for studying natural glycoconjugates and cell effectors in vitro. PMID:17375673

  2. Mastering ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: the impact of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Nehls, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhiza formation is the consequence of a mutualistic interaction between certain soil fungi and plant roots that helps to overcome nutritional limitations faced by the respective partners. In symbiosis, fungi contribute to tree nutrition by means of mineral weathering and mobilization of nutrients from organic matter, and obtain plant-derived carbohydrates as a response. Support with easily degradable carbohydrates seems to be the driving force for fungi to undergo this type of interaction. As a consequence, the fungal hexose uptake capacity is strongly increased in Hartig net hyphae of the model fungi Amanita muscaria and Laccaria bicolor. Next to fast carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, storage carbohydrates are of special interest. In functional A. muscaria ectomycorrhizas, expression and activity of proteins involved in trehalose biosynthesis is mainly localized in hyphae of the Hartig net, indicating an important function of trehalose in generation of a strong carbon sink by fungal hyphae. In symbiosis, fungal partners receive up to approximately 19 times more carbohydrates from their hosts than normal leakage of the root system would cause, resulting in a strong carbohydrate demand of infected roots and, as a consequence, a more efficient plant photosynthesis. To avoid fungal parasitism, the plant seems to have developed mechanisms to control carbohydrate drain towards the fungal partner and link it to the fungus-derived mineral nutrition. In this contribution, current knowledge on fungal strategies to obtain carbohydrates from its host and plant strategies to enable, but also to control and restrict (under certain conditions), carbon transfer are summarized. PMID:18272925

  3. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5(')-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C-C and C-O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results. PMID:25669546

  4. Carbohydrates as synthetic tools in organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Boysen, Mike M K

    2007-01-01

    While amino acids, terpenes and alkaloids have found broad application as tools in stereoselective organic synthesis, carbohydrates have only lately been recognised as versatile starting materials for chiral auxiliaries, reagents, ligands and organocatalysts. The structural diversity of carbohydrates and the high density of functional groups offer a wide variety of opportunities for derivatization and tailoring of synthetic tools to a specific problem. PMID:17712826

  5. Mammalian galectins: structure, carbohydrate specificity, and functions.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, E M; Kurmyshkina, O V; Bovin, N V

    2008-04-01

    Galectins are a family of beta-galactoside binding lectins, homological by a sequence of the carbohydrate-binding site. In this review literature data about structure and carbohydrate specificity of galectins are discussed. The role of galectins in the regulation of cell adhesion in immune response, inflammation, and cancer progression is considered. PMID:18457568

  6. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Joong-Won; Bernstein, Elliot R.

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  7. A Systematic Analysis of the Structures of Heterologously Expressed Proteins and Those from Their Native Hosts in the RCSB PDB Archive.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ren-Bin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Liu, Jie; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Qin-Qin; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant expression of proteins has become an indispensable tool in modern day research. The large yields of recombinantly expressed proteins accelerate the structural and functional characterization of proteins. Nevertheless, there are literature reported that the recombinant proteins show some differences in structure and function as compared with the native ones. Now there have been more than 100,000 structures (from both recombinant and native sources) publicly available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive, which makes it possible to investigate if there exist any proteins in the RCSB PDB archive that have identical sequence but have some difference in structures. In this paper, we present the results of a systematic comparative study of the 3D structures of identical naturally purified versus recombinantly expressed proteins. The structural data and sequence information of the proteins were mined from the RCSB PDB archive. The combinatorial extension (CE), FATCAT-flexible and TM-Align methods were employed to align the protein structures. The root-mean-square distance (RMSD), TM-score, P-value, Z-score, secondary structural elements and hydrogen bonds were used to assess the structure similarity. A thorough analysis of the PDB archive generated five-hundred-seventeen pairs of native and recombinant proteins that have identical sequence. There were no pairs of proteins that had the same sequence and significantly different structural fold, which support the hypothesis that expression in a heterologous host usually could fold correctly into their native forms. PMID:27517583

  8. A Systematic Analysis of the Structures of Heterologously Expressed Proteins and Those from Their Native Hosts in the RCSB PDB Archive

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ren-Bin; Lu, Hui-Meng; Liu, Jie; Shi, Jian-Yu; Zhu, Jing; Lu, Qin-Qin; Yin, Da-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant expression of proteins has become an indispensable tool in modern day research. The large yields of recombinantly expressed proteins accelerate the structural and functional characterization of proteins. Nevertheless, there are literature reported that the recombinant proteins show some differences in structure and function as compared with the native ones. Now there have been more than 100,000 structures (from both recombinant and native sources) publicly available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive, which makes it possible to investigate if there exist any proteins in the RCSB PDB archive that have identical sequence but have some difference in structures. In this paper, we present the results of a systematic comparative study of the 3D structures of identical naturally purified versus recombinantly expressed proteins. The structural data and sequence information of the proteins were mined from the RCSB PDB archive. The combinatorial extension (CE), FATCAT-flexible and TM-Align methods were employed to align the protein structures. The root-mean-square distance (RMSD), TM-score, P-value, Z-score, secondary structural elements and hydrogen bonds were used to assess the structure similarity. A thorough analysis of the PDB archive generated five-hundred-seventeen pairs of native and recombinant proteins that have identical sequence. There were no pairs of proteins that had the same sequence and significantly different structural fold, which support the hypothesis that expression in a heterologous host usually could fold correctly into their native forms. PMID:27517583

  9. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: the dual role of deposited experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Bricogne, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    Macromolecular structures deposited in the PDB can and should be continually reinterpreted and improved on the basis of their accompanying experimental X-ray data, exploiting the steady progress in methods and software that the deposition of such data into the PDB on a massive scale has made possible. Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when it was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be

  10. Low-carbohydrate diets: an update on current research.

    PubMed

    Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Davis, Nichola J

    2009-10-01

    The diabetes and obesity epidemics have stimulated research to assess the benefits and potential risks of low-carbohydrate diets. Carbohydrate comprises less than 45% of calories in carbohydrate-restricted diets, but very low carbohydrate ketogenic diets may restrict carbohydrate to 20 g initially with variability in the carbohydrate level subsequently. Some research suggests that low-carbohydrate diets may achieve better early weight loss than comparison diets higher in carbohydrate. Studies of up to 1 year suggest that weight loss on low-carbohydrate diet is comparable with fat-restricted diets with higher carbohydrate content. Limited research has been conducted to evaluate low-carbohydrate diets in managing type 2 diabetes. Although science continues to advance in this field, current research suggests that low-carbohydrate diets can be a viable option for achieving weight loss and may have beneficial effects on glycemic control, triglyceride levels, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in some patients. PMID:19793510

  11. What I Need to Know about Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... URL Español What I need to know about Carbohydrate Counting and Diabetes Page Content On this page: ... counting? Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is carbohydrate counting? Carbohydrate * counting, also called carb counting, is ...

  12. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: The dual role of deposited experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Bricogne, Gerard

    2014-09-30

    Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when it was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be made generally available, along with the precursor entries, with various views of the structures being made available depending on the types of questions that users are interested in answering.

  13. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: The dual role of deposited experimental data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Bricogne, Gerard

    2014-09-30

    Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when itmore » was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be made generally available, along with the precursor entries, with various views of the structures being made available depending on the types of questions that users are interested in answering.« less

  14. Continuous mutual improvement of macromolecular structure models in the PDB and of X-ray crystallographic software: the dual role of deposited experimental data

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Bricogne, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Accurate crystal structures of macromolecules are of high importance in the biological and biomedical fields. Models of crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) are in general of very high quality as deposited. However, methods for obtaining the best model of a macromolecular structure from a given set of experimental X-ray data continue to progress at a rapid pace, making it possible to improve most PDB entries after their deposition by re-analyzing the original deposited data with more recent software. This possibility represents a very significant departure from the situation that prevailed when the PDB was created, when it was envisioned as a cumulative repository of static contents. A radical paradigm shift for the PDB is therefore proposed, away from the static archive model towards a much more dynamic body of continuously improving results in symbiosis with continuously improving methods and software. These simultaneous improvements in methods and final results are made possible by the current deposition of processed crystallographic data (structure-factor amplitudes) and will be supported further by the deposition of raw data (diffraction images). It is argued that it is both desirable and feasible to carry out small-scale and large-scale efforts to make this paradigm shift a reality. Small-scale efforts would focus on optimizing structures that are of interest to specific investigators. Large-scale efforts would undertake a systematic re-optimization of all of the structures in the PDB, or alternatively the redetermination of groups of structures that are either related to or focused on specific questions. All of the resulting structures should be made generally available, along with the precursor entries, with various views of the structures being made available depending on the types of questions that users are interested in answering. PMID:25286839

  15. C-type lectin-like carbohydrate recognition of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III containing ricin-type -trefoil folds.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Unno, Hideaki; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Eto, Seiichiro; Hidemura, Haruki; Kato, Norihisa; Yonekura, Masami; Kusunoki, Masami

    2007-12-28

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent hemolytic lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata. The three-dimensional structure of CEL-III/GalNAc and CEL-III/methyl alpha-galactoside complexes was solved by x-ray crystallographic analysis. In these complexes, five carbohydrate molecules were found to be bound to two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) located in the N-terminal 2/3 portion of the polypeptide and that contained beta-trefoil folds similar to ricin B-chain. The 3-OH and 4-OH of bound carbohydrate molecules were coordinated with Ca(2+) located at the subdomains 1alpha, 1gamma, 2alpha, 2beta, and 2gamma, simultaneously forming hydrogen bond networks with nearby amino acid side chains, which is similar to carbohydrate binding in C-type lectins. The binding of carbohydrates was further stabilized by aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine and tryptophan, through a stacking interaction with the hydrophobic face of carbohydrates. The importance of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate-binding sites was confirmed by the mutational analyses. The orientation of bound GalNAc and methyl alpha-galactoside was similar to the galactose moiety of lactose bound to the carbohydrate-binding site of the ricin B-chain, although the ricin B-chain does not require Ca(2+) ions for carbohydrate binding. The binding of the carbohydrates induced local structural changes in carbohydrate-binding sites in subdomains 2alpha and 2beta. Binding of GalNAc also induced a slight change in the main chain structure of domain 3, which could be related to the conformational change upon binding of specific carbohydrates to induce oligomerization of the protein. PMID:17977832

  16. Carbohydrate-lectin interactions assayed by SPR.

    PubMed

    Duverger, Eric; Lamerant-Fayel, Nathalie; Frison, Natacha; Monsigny, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance is a valuable tool to determine the affinity between glycoconjugates and sugar-binding proteins such as plant and animal lectins. The main interest of using such an approach is that neither the lectins - which are proteins - nor their ligands - natural compounds such as glycoproteins, oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, or synthetic glycoconjugates such as glycoclusters or neoglycoproteins - require any tag. Because lectins bear several binding sites, they behave like immunoglobulin eliciting avidity phenomena. This peculiarity may lead to erroneous results if special conditions are not applied. We obtained best and reproducible results when the lectin was immobilized and its ligands were used as soluble analytes. With heterogeneous glycoconjugates such as neoglycoproteins (which are heterogeneous in terms of nature, number, and position of sugar residues) or a mixture of oligosaccharides, the data may be more accurately gathered by using the Sips approach, which has been used to determine mean binding constants of polyclonal antibodies. With small analytes such as oligosaccharides, we found it convenient to determine binding constants by using an inhibitory approach: a neoglycoprotein (M (r) = approximately 80,000) was allowed to bind to the immobilized lectin and small oligosaccharides were used as inhibitors. With larger glycoconjugates such as peptides substituted with glycoclusters, direct binding measurements gave accurate results. Because of the availability of low-cost simple sugars (mono- or disaccharides) it is very convenient to use large concentrations of such carbohydrates to clean the sensor chips instead of more drastic cleaning solutions such as acids or alkali, in such a way that the immobilized lectin is stable for many experiments. PMID:20217620

  17. Phenol-Sulfuric Acid Method for Total Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, S. Suzanne

    The phenol-sulfuric acid method is a simple and rapid colorimetric method to determine total carbohydrates in a sample. The method detects virtually all classes of carbohydrates, including mono-, di-, oligo-, and polysaccharides. Although the method detects almost all carbohydrates, the absorptivity of the different carbohydrates varies. Thus, unless a sample is known to contain only one carbohydrate, the results must be expressed arbitrarily in terms of one carbohydrate.

  18. Isolation of carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    Four previously unrecognized strains of extremely halophilic bacteria that utilize carbohydrates have been isolated. Gas production proved an unreliable index of carbohydrate metabolism; therefore, carbohydrate utilization was measured by determining acid formation and sugar disappearance during growth. By these procedures, carbohydrate utilization was readily detected. The results suggest that carbohydrate dissimilation by extremely halophilic bacteria may be more common than previously thought and that the apparent rarity of carbohydrate-metabolizing halophiles may be an artifact of the isolation procedures used.

  19. Dynamics of crop residue composition-decomposition: Temporal modeling of multivariate carbon sources and processes [abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined multivariate relationships in structural carbohydrates plus lignin (STC) and non-structural (NSC) carbohydrates and their impact on C:N ratio and the dynamics of active (ka) and passive (kp) residue decomposition of alfalfa, corn, soybean, cuphea and switchgrass as candidates in diverse ...

  20. Carbohydrate polymers for nonviral nucleic acid delivery.

    PubMed

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M; Srinivasachari, Sathya; Reineke, Theresa M

    2010-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  1. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  2. Carbohydrate Polymers for Nonviral Nucleic Acid Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sizovs, Antons; McLendon, Patrick M.; Srinivasachari, Sathya

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates have been investigated and developed as delivery vehicles for shuttling nucleic acids into cells. In this review, we present the state of the art in carbohydrate-based polymeric vehicles for nucleic acid delivery, with the focus on the recent successes in preclinical models, both in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric scaffolds based on the natural polysaccharides chitosan, hyaluronan, pullulan, dextran, and schizophyllan each have unique properties and potential for modification, and these results are discussed with the focus on facile synthetic routes and favorable performance in biological systems. Many of these carbohydrates have been used to develop alternative types of biomaterials for nucleic acid delivery to typical polyplexes, and these novel materials are discussed. Also presented are polymeric vehicles that incorporate copolymerized carbohydrates into polymer backbones based on polyethylenimine and polylysine and their effect on transfection and biocompatibility. Unique scaffolds, such as clusters and polymers based on cyclodextrin (CD), are also discussed, with the focus on recent successes in vivo and in the clinic. These results are presented with the emphasis on the role of carbohydrate and charge on transfection. Use of carbohydrates as molecular recognition ligands for cell-type specific delivery is also briefly reviewed. We contend that carbohydrates have contributed significantly to progress in the field of non-viral DNA delivery, and these new discoveries are impactful for developing new vehicles and materials for treatment of human disease. PMID:21504102

  3. Reductive opening of carbohydrate phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals.

    PubMed

    Chéry, Florence; Cabianca, Elena; Tatibouët, Arnaud; De Lucchi, Ottorino; Lindhorst, Thisbe K; Rollin, Patrick

    2015-11-19

    The phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetal is a relatively new protecting group in carbohydrate chemistry. However, carbohydrate-derived phenylsulfonylethylidene (PSE) acetals show a different behavior in reductive desulfonylation than simple symmetrical acetals. Here we have investigated various SET-type reaction conditions in order to open PSE acetals regioselectively and to produce chiral ω-hydroxyethenyl ethers. Whereas sodium amalgam leads to a mixture of regioisomeric vinyl ethers besides the ethylidene acetal, samarium iodide is suited for regioselective ring opening. This is shown with seven different carbohydrate PSE acetals, both of the 1,3-dioxane and the 1,3-dioxolane type. PMID:26469209

  4. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, T.; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F.

    2002-03-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use.

  5. Stereoselective synthesis: Molecular editing of carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Deoxygenation reactions have been used to convert biomass-derived carbohydrates into useful platform chemicals. Now, a method has been described that can selectively excise C-O bonds to produce valuable chiral synthons.

  6. Workshop to establish databases of carbohydrate spectra

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The workshop was organized to formulate guidelines for establishing spectral databases of complex carbohydrates. The databases will enable the scientific community to avoid the great waste of research effort and funds that frequently occurs when carbohydrate chemists are forced to duplicate the structural characterization of previously characterized complex carbohydrates. Chemists waste their effort on repetitive characterizations because in the absence of spectral databases they are unaware they are analyzing a known molecule until they have completely determined its structure. Chemists will be able to avoid much of this wasted effort when the collections of mass and of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra initiated at the workshop are subsequently developed into searchable databases. Then scientists only need query the databases with the spectrum or with information defining the spectrum of an unidentified carbohydrate to find out if it has been previously characterized.

  7. PDB_Hydro: incorporating dipolar solvents with variable density in the Poisson-Boltzmann treatment of macromolecule electrostatics.

    PubMed

    Azuara, Cyril; Lindahl, Erik; Koehl, Patrice; Orland, Henri; Delarue, Marc

    2006-07-01

    We describe a new way to calculate the electrostatic properties of macromolecules which eliminates the assumption of a constant dielectric value in the solvent region, resulting in a Generalized Poisson-Boltzmann-Langevin equation (GPBLE). We have implemented a web server (http://lorentz.immstr.pasteur.fr/pdb_hydro.php) that both numerically solves this equation and uses the resulting water density profiles to place water molecules at preferred sites of hydration. Surface atoms with high or low hydration preference can be easily displayed using a simple PyMol script, allowing for the tentative prediction of the dimerization interface in homodimeric proteins, or lipid binding regions in membrane proteins. The web site includes options that permit mutations in the sequence as well as reconstruction of missing side chain and/or main chain atoms. These tools are accessible independently from the electrostatics calculation, and can be used for other modeling purposes. We expect this web server to be useful to structural biologists, as the knowledge of solvent density should prove useful to get better fits at low resolution for X-ray diffraction data and to computational biologists, for whom these profiles could improve the calculation of interaction energies in water between ligands and receptors in docking simulations. PMID:16845031

  8. NRG-CING: integrated validation reports of remediated experimental biomolecular NMR data and coordinates in wwPDB

    PubMed Central

    Doreleijers, Jurgen F.; Vranken, Wim F.; Schulte, Christopher; Markley, John L.; Ulrich, Eldon L.; Vriend, Gert; Vuister, Geerten W.

    2012-01-01

    For many macromolecular NMR ensembles from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) the experiment-based restraint lists are available, while other experimental data, mainly chemical shift values, are often available from the BioMagResBank. The accuracy and precision of the coordinates in these macromolecular NMR ensembles can be improved by recalculation using the available experimental data and present-day software. Such efforts, however, generally fail on half of all NMR ensembles due to the syntactic and semantic heterogeneity of the underlying data and the wide variety of formats used for their deposition. We have combined the remediated restraint information from our NMR Restraints Grid (NRG) database with available chemical shifts from the BioMagResBank and the Common Interface for NMR structure Generation (CING) structure validation reports into the weekly updated NRG-CING database (http://nmr.cmbi.ru.nl/NRG-CING). Eleven programs have been included in the NRG-CING production pipeline to arrive at validation reports that list for each entry the potential inconsistencies between the coordinates and the available experimental NMR data. The longitudinal validation of these data in a publicly available relational database yields a set of indicators that can be used to judge the quality of every macromolecular structure solved with NMR. The remediated NMR experimental data sets and validation reports are freely available online. PMID:22139937

  9. ValidatorDB: database of up-to-date validation results for ligands and non-standard residues from the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Sehnal, David; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Pravda, Lukáš; Ionescu, Crina-Maria; Geidl, Stanislav; Horský, Vladimír; Jaiswal, Deepti; Wimmerová, Michaela; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Following the discovery of serious errors in the structure of biomacromolecules, structure validation has become a key topic of research, especially for ligands and non-standard residues. ValidatorDB (freely available at http://ncbr.muni.cz/ValidatorDB) offers a new step in this direction, in the form of a database of validation results for all ligands and non-standard residues from the Protein Data Bank (all molecules with seven or more heavy atoms). Model molecules from the wwPDB Chemical Component Dictionary are used as reference during validation. ValidatorDB covers the main aspects of validation of annotation, and additionally introduces several useful validation analyses. The most significant is the classification of chirality errors, allowing the user to distinguish between serious issues and minor inconsistencies. Other such analyses are able to report, for example, completely erroneous ligands, alternate conformations or complete identity with the model molecules. All results are systematically classified into categories, and statistical evaluations are performed. In addition to detailed validation reports for each molecule, ValidatorDB provides summaries of the validation results for the entire PDB, for sets of molecules sharing the same annotation (three-letter code) or the same PDB entry, and for user-defined selections of annotations or PDB entries. PMID:25392418

  10. Carbohydrate Nutrition and Team Sport Performance.

    PubMed

    Williams, Clyde; Rollo, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The common pattern of play in 'team sports' is 'stop and go', i.e. where players perform repeated bouts of brief high-intensity exercise punctuated by lower intensity activity. Sprints are generally 2-4 s long and recovery between sprints is of variable length. Energy production during brief sprints is derived from the degradation of intra-muscular phosphocreatine and glycogen (anaerobic metabolism). Prolonged periods of multiple sprints drain muscle glycogen stores, leading to a decrease in power output and a reduction in general work rate during training and competition. The impact of dietary carbohydrate interventions on team sport performance have been typically assessed using intermittent variable-speed shuttle running over a distance of 20 m. This method has evolved to include specific work to rest ratios and skills specific to team sports such as soccer, rugby and basketball. Increasing liver and muscle carbohydrate stores before sports helps delay the onset of fatigue during prolonged intermittent variable-speed running. Carbohydrate intake during exercise, typically ingested as carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions, is also associated with improved performance. The mechanisms responsible are likely to be the availability of carbohydrate as a substrate for central and peripheral functions. Variable-speed running in hot environments is limited by the degree of hyperthermia before muscle glycogen availability becomes a significant contributor to the onset of fatigue. Finally, ingesting carbohydrate immediately after training and competition will rapidly recover liver and muscle glycogen stores. PMID:26553494

  11. Dietary Carbohydrates and Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain.

    PubMed

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) affect a large number of children throughout the world. Carbohydrates (which provide the majority of calories consumed in the Western diet) have been implicated both as culprits for the etiology of symptoms and as potential therapeutic agents (e.g., fiber) in childhood FGIDs. In this review, we detail how carbohydrate malabsorption may cause gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., bloating) via the physiologic effects of both increased osmotic activity and increased gas production from bacterial fermentation. Several factors may play a role, including: (1) the amount of carbohydrate ingested; (2) whether ingestion is accompanied by a meal or other food; (3) the rate of gastric emptying (how quickly the meal enters the small intestine); (4) small intestinal transit time (the time it takes for a meal to enter the large intestine after first entering the small intestine); (5) whether the meal contains bacteria with enzymes capable of breaking down the carbohydrate; (6) colonic bacterial adaptation to one's diet, and (7) host factors such as the presence or absence of visceral hypersensitivity. By detailing controlled and uncontrolled trials, we describe how there is a general lack of strong evidence supporting restriction of individual carbohydrates (e.g., lactose, fructose) for childhood FGIDs. We review emerging evidence suggesting that a more comprehensive restriction of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) may be effective. Finally, we review how soluble fiber (a complex carbohydrate) supplementation via randomized controlled intervention trials in childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders has demonstrated efficacy. PMID:27355647

  12. Preoperative carbohydrate nutrition reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting compared to preoperative fasting

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Neslihan; Çekmen, Nedim; Bilgin, Ferruh; Erten, Ela; Özhan, Mehmet Özhan; Coşar, Ahmet

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this prospective, randomized, single-blinded study was to compare the effects of a carbohydrate drink 400 mL given 2 h before the surgery with preoperative overnight fasting on the gastric pH and residual volume, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and antiemetic consumption in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Materials And Methods: Forty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II patients who underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Randomized, prospective, controlled study, Gulhane Medical Faculty and Guven Hospital Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation. Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: Pre-operative carbohydrate drink group (group C, n = 20) and preoperative fasting group (group F, n = 20). Group C was given a 400 mL carbohydrate drink 2 h before to the surgery. The patients of group F were fasted 8 h before the surgery. Both groups were operated under general anesthesia with volatile anesthetics. Results: Hemodynamic parameters, demographic data, gastric acidity and residual volumes were similar for both groups. No complications were observed. PONV and antiemetic consumption was lower in group C compared to group F (P = 0.001). Patient's satisfaction was higher in group C (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This study showed that pre-operative carbohydrate drink may be used safely and also improves patient's satisfaction and comfort in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:24497851

  13. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  14. Structural consequences of chromophore formation and exploration of conserved lid residues amongst naturally occurring fluorescent proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, Matthew H.; Li, Binsen; Shahid, Ramza; Peshkepija, Paola; Zimmer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Computational methods were used to generate the lowest energy conformations of the immature precyclized forms of the 28 naturally occurring GFP-like proteins deposited in the pdb. In all 28 GFP-like proteins, the beta-barrel contracts upon chromophore formation and becomes more rigid. Our prior analysis of over 260 distinct naturally occurring GFP-like proteins revealed that most of the conserved residues are located in the top and bottom of the barrel in the turns between the β-sheets (Ong et al. 2011) [1]. Structural analyses, molecular dynamics simulations and the Anisotropic Network Model were used to explore the role of these conserved lid residues as possible folding nuclei. Our results are internally consistent and show that the conserved residues in the top and bottom lids undergo relatively less translational movement than other lid residues, and a number of these residues may play an important role as hinges or folding nuclei in the fluorescent proteins.

  15. Carbohydrate ligands for endothelial - Leukocyte adhesion molecule 1

    SciTech Connect

    Tiemeyer, M.; Swiedler, S.J.; Ishihara, Masayuki; Moreland, M.; Schweingruber, H.; Hirtzer, P.; Brandley, B.K. )

    1991-02-15

    The acute inflammatory response requires that circulating leukocytes bind to and penetrate the vascular wall to access the site of injury. Several receptors have been implicated in this interaction, including a family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins. The authors report here the identification of an endogenous carbohydrate ligand for one of these receptors, endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule 1 (ELAM-1). Radiolabeled COS cells transfected with a plasmid containing the cDNA for ELAM-1 were used as probes to screen glycolipids extracted from human leukocytes. COS cells transfected with this plasmid adhered to a subset of sialylated glycolipids resolved on TLC plates or adsorbed on polyvinyl chloride microtiter wells. Adhesion to these glycolipids required calcium but was not inhibited by heparin, chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or yeast phosphomannan. Monosaccharide composition, linkage analysis, and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry of the glycolipids indicate that the ligands for ELAM-1 are terminally sialylated lactosylceramides with a variable number of N-acetyllactosamine repeats and at least one fucosylated N-acetylglucosamine residue.

  16. Characterizing the glycocalyx of poultry spermatozoa; semen cryopreservation methods alter the carbohydrate component of rooster sperm membrane glycoconjugates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The carbohydrate-rich zone on the sperm surface is essential for inmunoprotection in the female tract and early gamete interactions. We recently have shown the glycocalyx of chicken sperm to be extensively sialylated and contain residues of mannose, glucose, galactose, fucose, N-acetyl-galactosamine...

  17. Effect of carbohydrate ingestion subsequent to carbohydrate supercompensation on endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Robertson, R J; Denys, B G; DaSilva, S G; Visich, P; Suminski, R R; Utter, A C; Goss, F L; Metz, K F

    1995-12-01

    This investigation determined whether carbohydrate ingestion during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise enhanced endurance performance when the exercise was preceded by carbohydrate supercompensation. Seven male trained cyclists performed two trials at an initial power output corresponding to 71 +/- 1% of their peak oxygen consumption. During the trials, subjects ingested either a 6% glucose/sucrose (C) solution or an equal volume of artificially flavored and sweetened placebo (P) every 20 min throughout exercise. Both C and P were preceded by a 6-day carbohydrate supercompensation procedure in which subjects undertook a depletion-taper exercise sequence in conjunction with a moderate- and high-carbohydrate diet regimen. Statistical analysis of time to exhaustion, plasma glucose concentration, carbohydrate oxidation rate, fat oxidation rate, and plasma glycerol concentration indicated that in spite of a carbohydrate supercompensation procedure administered prior to exercise, carbohydrate ingestion during exercise can exert an additional ergogenic effect by preventing a decline in blood glucose levels and maintaining carbohydrate oxidation during the later stages of moderate-intensity exercise. PMID:8605519

  18. Ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine accumulation in the halophile Virgibacillus halodenitrificans PDB-F2 in response to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ping; Li, Hui; Yu, Yunjiang; Gu, Jidong; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-08-01

    The moderately halophilic bacterium Virgibacillus halodenitrificans PDB-F2 copes with salinity by synthesizing or taking up compatible solutes. The main compatible solutes in this strain were ectoine and hydroxyectoine, as determined by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that ectoine was the major solute that was synthesized in response to elevated salinity, while hydroxyectoine was a minor solute. However, the hydroxyectoine/ectoine ratio increased from 0.04 at 3 % NaCl to 0.45 at 15 % NaCl in the late exponential growth phase. A cluster of ectoine biosynthesis genes was identified, including three genes in the order of ectA, ectB, and ectC. The hydroxyectoine biosynthesis gene ectD was not part of the ectABC gene cluster. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reactions (RT-qPCR) showed that the expression of the ect genes was salinity dependent. The expression of ectABC reached a maximum at 12 % NaCl, while ectD expression increased up to 15 % NaCl. Ectoine and hydroxyectoine production was growth phase dependent. The hydroxyectoine/ectoine ratio increased from 0.018 in the early exponential phase to 0.11 in the stationary phase at 5 % NaCl. Hydroxyectoine biosynthesis started much later than ectoine biosynthesis after osmotic shock, and the temporal expression of the ect genes differed under these conditions, with the ectABC genes being expressed first, followed by ectD gene. Increased culture salinity triggered ectoine or hydroxyectoine uptake when they were added to the medium. Hydroxyectoine was accumulated preferentially when both ectoine and hydroxyectoine were provided exogenously. PMID:27106915

  19. The PDB database is a rich source of alpha-helical anti-microbial peptides to combat disease causing pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Phu, My; de Morais, Tâmara Prado; Nascimento, Rafael; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Rao, Basuthkar J.; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of α-helical anti-microbial peptides (AH-AMP) to combat pathogens is fast gaining prominence. Based on recently published open access software for characterizing α-helical peptides (PAGAL), we elucidate a search methodology (SCALPEL) that leverages the massive structural data pre-existing in the PDB database to obtain AH-AMPs belonging to the host proteome. We provide in vitro validation of SCALPEL on plant pathogens ( Xylella fastidiosa, Xanthomonas arboricola and Liberibacter crescens) by identifying AH-AMPs that mirror the function and properties of cecropin B, a well-studied AH-AMP. The identified peptides include a linear AH-AMP present within the existing structure of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC20), and an AH-AMP mimicing the properties of the two α-helices of cecropin B from chitinase (CHITI25). The minimum inhibitory concentration of these peptides are comparable to that of cecropin B, while anionic peptides used as control failed to show any inhibitory effect on these pathogens. Substitute therapies in place of conventional chemotherapies using membrane permeabilizing peptides like these might also prove effective to target cancer cells. The use of native structures from the same organism could possibly ensure that administration of such peptides will be better tolerated and not elicit an adverse immune response. We suggest a similar approach to target Ebola epitopes, enumerated using PAGAL recently, by selecting suitable peptides from the human proteome, especially in wake of recent reports of cationic amphiphiles inhibiting virus entry and infection. PMID:26629331

  20. The PDB database is a rich source of alpha-helical anti-microbial peptides to combat disease causing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Phu, My; de Morais, Tâmara Prado; Nascimento, Rafael; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Rao, Basuthkar J; Asgeirsson, Bjarni; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of α-helical anti-microbial peptides (AH-AMP) to combat pathogens is fast gaining prominence. Based on recently published open access software for characterizing α-helical peptides (PAGAL), we elucidate a search methodology (SCALPEL) that leverages the massive structural data pre-existing in the PDB database to obtain AH-AMPs belonging to the host proteome. We provide in vitro validation of SCALPEL on plant pathogens ( Xylella fastidiosa, Xanthomonas arboricola and Liberibacter crescens) by identifying AH-AMPs that mirror the function and properties of cecropin B, a well-studied AH-AMP. The identified peptides include a linear AH-AMP present within the existing structure of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PPC20), and an AH-AMP mimicing the properties of the two α-helices of cecropin B from chitinase (CHITI25). The minimum inhibitory concentration of these peptides are comparable to that of cecropin B, while anionic peptides used as control failed to show any inhibitory effect on these pathogens. Substitute therapies in place of conventional chemotherapies using membrane permeabilizing peptides like these might also prove effective to target cancer cells. The use of native structures from the same organism could possibly ensure that administration of such peptides will be better tolerated and not elicit an adverse immune response. We suggest a similar approach to target Ebola epitopes, enumerated using PAGAL recently, by selecting suitable peptides from the human proteome, especially in wake of recent reports of cationic amphiphiles inhibiting virus entry and infection. PMID:26629331

  1. Crop residues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop residues [e.g., corn (Zea mays) stover and small grain straw] are sometimes excluded when discussing cellulosic energy crops per se, but because of the vast area upon which they are grown and their current role in the development of cellulosic energy systems. This chapter focuses on current cor...

  2. The Role of Carbohydrate in Maintaining Extensin in an Extended Conformation 1

    PubMed Central

    Stafstrom, Joel P.; Staehelin, L. Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Monomers of the plant cell wall glycoprotein extensin are secreted into the wall where they become cross-linked to each other to form a rigid matrix. Expression of the extensin matrix is correlated with the inhibition of further cell elongation during normal development, with increased resistance to virulent pathogens and with other physiological responses characterized by wall strengthening. Carbohydrates make up about two-thirds of the mass of extensin. Arabinose oligomers linked to hydroxyproline residues represent 95% of the total carbohydrate with the remainder occurring as single residues of galactose linked to some serine residues. Electron microscopy of shadowed extensin shows the glycosylated form to be an easily visualized and highly elongated molecule. In contrast, extensin that has been deglycosylated with anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is difficult to resolve in the EM. Glycosylated extensin elutes from a gel filtration column much more rapidly than does the deglycosylated form, and from this analysis we have calculated respective Stokes' radii of 89 and 11 Ångstroms for these molecules. Others have shown that inhibition of extensin glycosylation has no effect on its secretion or insolubilization in the cell wall, but that this extensin cannot inhibit cell elongation. It is likely that carbohydrate moieties keep extensin in an extended conformation and that extensin must be in this conformation to form a cross-linked matrix that can function properly in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:16664782

  3. Biochemical suitability of crop residues for cellulosic ethanol: disincentives to nitrogen fertilization in corn agriculture.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Morgan E; Hockaday, William C; Masiello, Caroline A; Snapp, Sieglinde; McSwiney, Claire P; Baldock, Jeffrey A

    2011-03-01

    Concerns about energy security and climate change have increased biofuel demand, particularly ethanol produced from cellulosic feedstocks (e.g., food crop residues). A central challenge to cropping for cellulosic ethanol is the potential environmental damage from increased fertilizer use. Previous analyses have assumed that cropping for carbohydrate in residue will require the same amount of fertilizer as cropping for grain. Using (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, we show that increases in biomass in response to fertilization are not uniform across biochemical classes (carbohydrate, protein, lipid, lignin) or tissues (leaf and stem, grain, reproductive support). Although corn grain responds vigorously and nonlinearly, corn residue shows only modest increases in carbohydrate yields in response to high levels of fertilization (25% increase with 202 kg N ha(-1)). Lignin yields in the residue increased almost twice as much as carbohydrate yields in response to nitrogen, implying that residue feedstock quality declines as more fertilizer is applied. Fertilization also increases the decomposability of corn residue, implying that soil carbon sequestration becomes less efficient with increased fertilizer. Our results suggest that even when corn is grown for grain, benefits of fertilization decline rapidly after the ecosystem's N demands are met. Heavy application of fertilizer yields minimal grain benefits and almost no benefits in residue carbohydrates, while degrading the cellulosic ethanol feedstock quality and soil carbon sequestration capacity. PMID:21348531

  4. Potential effect of ultrasound on carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Bera, Smritilekha; Mondal, Dhananjoy; Martin, Jacob T; Singh, Man

    2015-06-17

    The use of ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful alternative energy sources for the synthesis of carbohydrate-derived biologically and pharmaceutically potential compounds. Spectacular advances have been made in the field of sonication-assisted organic reactions, which are known for producing superior yields, enhanced reactivity of the reactant, improved stereoselectivity, and shortened reaction times. Orthogonal protection-deprotection reactions and/or modification and manipulation of functional groups in carbohydrates are common synthetic steps in carbohydrate chemistry. These reaction steps can be driven by the ultrasonic energy generated by acoustic cavitation via the formation and subsequent collapse of ultrasound-induced bubbles. The ultrasound-assisted synthesis of differently functionalised monosaccharides is useful in a wide variety of applications of carbohydrate chemistry such as the glycosylation of oligosaccharides, one pot domino reactions, thioglycoside syntheses, azidoglycoside syntheses, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions, and syntheses of natural products. This review article covers ultrasound-mediated reactions on carbohydrates that have been described in the literature since 2000. PMID:25954862

  5. Heterogeneously-Catalyzed Conversion of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigier, Karine De Oliveira; Jérôme, François

    Polyfunctionality of carbohydrates and their low solubility in conventional organic solvents make rather complex their conversion to higher value added chemicals. Therefore, innovative processes are now strongly needed in order to increase the selectivity of these reactions. Here, we report an overview of the different heterogeneously-catalyzed processes described in the literature. In particular, hydrolysis, dehydration, oxidation, esterification, and etherification of carbohydrates are presented. We shall discuss the main structural parameters that need to be controlled and that permit the conversion of carbohydrates to bioproducts with good selectivity. The conversion of monosaccharides and disaccharides over solid catalysts, as well as recent advances in the heterogeneously-catalyzed conversion of cellulose, will be presented.

  6. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals. PMID:25300547

  7. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Quentin R.; Lindsay, Richard J.; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. Here, we focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  8. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johnson, Quentin R.; Lindsay, Richard J.; Petridis, Loukas; Shen, Tongye

    2015-04-28

    Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (bio)molecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. Here, we focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We reviewmore » the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.« less

  9. Minimally refined biomass fuel. [carbohydrate-water-alcohol mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1981-03-26

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water-solubilizes the carbohydrate; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the viscosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  10. Carbohydrate mouth rinse and caffeine improves high-intensity interval running capacity when carbohydrate restricted.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Andreas M; Cocking, Scott; Cockayne, Molly; Barnard, Marcus; Tench, Jake; Parker, Liam; McAndrew, John; Langan-Evans, Carl; Close, Graeme L; Morton, James P

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that carbohydrate mouth rinsing, alone or in combination with caffeine, augments high-intensity interval (HIT) running capacity undertaken in a carbohydrate-restricted state. Carbohydrate restriction was achieved by performing high-intensity running to volitional exhaustion in the evening prior to the main experimental trials and further refraining from carbohydrate intake in the post-exercise and overnight period. On the subsequent morning, eight males performed 45-min steady-state (SS) exercise (65% [Formula: see text]) followed by HIT running to exhaustion (1-min at 80% [Formula: see text]interspersed with 1-min walking at 6 km/h). Subjects completed 3 trials consisting of placebo capsules (administered immediately prior to SS and immediately before HIT) and placebo mouth rinse at 4-min intervals during HIT (PLACEBO), placebo capsules but 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CMR) at corresponding time-points or finally, caffeine capsules (200 mg per dose) plus 10% carbohydrate mouth rinse (CAFF + CMR) at corresponding time-points. Heart rate, capillary glucose, lactate, glycerol and NEFA were not different at exhaustion during HIT (P > 0.05). However, HIT capacity was different (P < 0.05) between all pair-wise comparisons such that CAFF + CMR (65 ± 26 min) was superior to CMR (52 ± 23 min) and PLACEBO (36 ± 22 min). We conclude that carbohydrate mouth rinsing and caffeine ingestion improves exercise capacity undertaken in carbohydrate-restricted states. Such nutritional strategies may be advantageous for those athletes who deliberately incorporate elements of training in carbohydrate-restricted states (i.e. the train-low paradigm) into their overall training programme in an attempt to strategically enhance mitochondrial adaptations of skeletal muscle. PMID:26035740

  11. Crystallization, neutron data collection, initial structure refinement and analysis of a xyloglucan heptamer bound to an engineered carbohydrate-binding module from xylanase.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; von Schantz, Laura; Schrader, Tobias E; Ostermann, Andreas; Logan, Derek T; Fisher, S Zoë

    2015-08-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are discrete parts of carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that bind specific types of carbohydrates. Ultra high-resolution X-ray crystallographic studies of CBMs have helped to decipher the basis for specificity in carbohydrate-protein interactions. However, additional studies are needed to better understand which structural determinants confer which carbohydrate-binding properties. To address these issues, neutron crystallographic studies were initiated on one experimentally engineered CBM derived from a xylanase, X-2 L110F, a protein that is able to bind several different plant carbohydrates such as xylan, β-glucan and xyloglucan. This protein evolved from a CBM present in xylanase Xyn10A of Rhodothermus marinus. The protein was complexed with a branched xyloglucan heptasaccharide. Large single crystals of hydrogenous protein (∼1.6 mm(3)) were grown at room temperature and subjected to H/D exchange. Both neutron and X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 1.6 Å resolution. Joint neutron and X-ray refinement using phenix.refine showed significant density for residues involved in carbohydrate binding and revealed the details of a hydrogen-bonded water network around the binding site. This is the first report of a neutron structure of a CBM and will add to the understanding of protein-carbohydrate binding interactions. PMID:26249702

  12. Carbohydrate histochemistry of skin glands in the Turkish Angora goat.

    PubMed

    Meyer, W; Sağlam, M; Tanyolaç, A; Schwarz, R

    1993-09-01

    The skin glands of the general body surface of the Turkish Angora goat were studied by means of selected carbohydrate histochemical methods, in particular several PO-lectin procedures. Both gland types exhibited intensive secretion production, irrespective of season and body region. The different histochemical staining procedures demonstrated that glycoconjugates, especially neutral glycoproteins are present in the secretory cells and secretion products of the apocrine glands. The peroxidase (PO)-lectin-procedures indicated the following saccharide residues: alpha-D-mannose, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine, alpha-D-glucose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, beta-D-galactose, alpha-D-galactose, and alpha-fucose, including small amounts of N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-glycolylneuraminic acid. Relatively large amounts of glycoconjugates, probably also glycolipids, were found in the peripheral cells and the sebum of the sebaceous glands, exhibiting the following saccharide residues: N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, alpha-fucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-glycolylneuraminic acid. The results obtained are discussed as related to findings from corresponding studies in other mammalian species. The secretory substances present obviously create a clearly alkaline pH milieu within the fleece of the Angora goat. Such conditions are also known to exist, for example, in the Merino sheep fleece. PMID:8217467

  13. The clinical impact of carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Born, Peter

    2011-03-01

    Malabsorption of carbohydrates such as fructose, lactose or sorbitol can often be detected among patients suffering from so-called non specific abdominal complaints. Sometimes the differential diagnosis may be difficult. So far successful treatment consists of dietary interventions only. Nevertheless, many questions are remaining still unanswered. PMID:21429446

  14. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse. PMID:23177152

  15. Genetics of carbohydrate accumulation in onion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fructans are soluble carbohydrates composed of fructose chains attached to a basal sucrose molecule and act both as health-enhancing pro- and pre-biotics. In onion, higher fructan concentrations are correlated with greater soluble solids content, dry weights, and pungency. We analyzed dry weights ...

  16. DIETARY CARBOHYDRATE IMPACT ON MILK COMPONENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Carbohydrates have long been recognized as the primary source of energy in dairy cattle diets, however, their effects on milk production beyond their energy values have not been well explored. There is basic recognition that fiber with its important role in maintaining rumen function can influence ...

  17. The diagenesis of carbohydrates by hydrogen sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Frank D.

    1983-08-01

    Carbohydrates react with hydrogen sulfide under low temperature (100° to 200°C) yielding a variety of organosulfur compounds including thiophenes, thiols, sulfides and sulfones. A polymer is also produced, whose elemental composition is within the range of natural coals. When reductive dehydration is carried out in the presence of hydrocarbon, organosulfur compounds are formed in the carbon number range of the hydrocarbon used. In these processes, an active hydrogen transfer catalyst is produced which facilitates the passage of hydrogen between normal paraffins and saccharide units, distributing sulfur between these two families primarily in the form of thiophene rings. The simplicity of these systems - H 2S, carbohydrates, H 2O, hydrocarbon - and the facility of the chemistry would suggest that the carbohydrates and hydrogen sulfide may be important agents in the diagenetic processes leading to petroleum and coal. Carbohydrate reduction by hydrogen sulfide may constitute an important route through which certain organosulfur compounds found in petroleum and coal entered these materials in early diagenesis.

  18. General Properties, Occurrence, and Preparation of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robyt, John F.

    D-Glucose and its derivatives and analogues, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-muramic acid, D-glucopyranosyl uronic acid, and D-glucitol represent 99.9% of the carbohydrates on the earth. D-Glucose is found in the free state in human blood and in the combined state in disaccharides, sucrose, lactose, and α,α-trehalose, in cyclic dextrins, and in polysaccharides, starch, glycogen, cellulose, dextrans; N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and an analogue N-acetyl-D-muramic acid are found in bacterial cell wall polysaccharide, murein, along with teichoic acids made up of poly-glycerol or -ribitol phosphodiesters. Other carbohydrates, D-mannose, D-mannuronic acid, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-galacturonic acid, D-iduronic acid, L-guluronic acid, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, D-xylose, and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid are found in glycoproteins, hemicelluloses, glycosaminoglycans, and polysaccharides of plant exudates, bacterial capsules, alginates, and heparin. D-Ribofuranose-5-phosphate is found in many coenzymes and is the backbone of RNAs (ribonucleic acid), and 2-deoxy-D-ribofuranose-5-phosphate is the backbone of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). D-Fructofuranose is found in sucrose, inulin, and levan. The general properties and occurrence of these carbohydrates and general methods of isolation and preparation of carbohydrates are presented.

  19. Indicators of normal carbohydrate digestion in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More research is needed to determine the nutritional and clinical significance of the intermediate values of low but not deficient duodenal disaccharidase activities, but the Dahlqvist-method biopsy assay of activity serves as a gnomon of carbohydrate digestion, in the sense that Anaximander used a ...

  20. Effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen production and fermentation products.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2016-01-01

    Organic waste from municipalities, food waste and agro-industrial residues are ideal feedstocks for use in biological conversion processes in biorefinery chains, representing biodegradable materials containing a series of substances belonging to the three main groups of the organic matter: carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. Biological hydrogen production by dark fermentation may assume a central role in the biorefinery concept, representing an up-front treatment for organic waste capable of hydrolysing complex organics and producing biohydrogen. This research study was aimed at evaluating the effects of carbohydrate, protein and lipid content of organic waste on hydrogen yields, volatile fatty acid production and carbon-fate. Biogas and hydrogen productions were linearly correlated to carbohydrate content of substrates while proteins and lipids failed to produce significant contributions. Chemical composition also produced effects on the final products of dark fermentation. Acetic and butyric acids were the main fermentation products, with their ratio proving to correlate with carbohydrate and protein content. The results obtained in this research study enhance the understanding of data variability on hydrogen yields from organic waste. Detailed information on waste composition and chemical characterisation are essential to clearly identify the potential performances of the dark fermentation process. PMID:26254676

  1. High Carbohydrate-Fiber Nutrition for Running and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battinelli, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    The roles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and fiber in producing energy for health and exercise are discussed. Long-distance runners should have a high intake of complex carbohydrates and fiber. (PP)

  2. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for

  3. Residual Cap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    10 May 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a summertime view of the south polar residual cap of Mars. In this image, mesas composed largely of solid carbon dioxide are separated from one another by irregularly-shaped depressions. The variation in brightness across this scene is a function of several factors including, but not limited to, varying proportions of dust and solid carbon dioxide, undulating topography, and differences in the roughness of the slopes versus the flat surfaces.

    Location near: 86.7oS, 343.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  4. Influence of Grape Maturity on Complex Carbohydrate Composition of Red Sparkling Wines.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lapuente, Leticia; Apolinar-Valiente, Rafael; Guadalupe, Zenaida; Ayestarán, Belén; Pérez-Magariño, Silvia; Williams, Pascale; Doco, Thierry

    2016-06-22

    This paper studied how grape maturity affected complex carbohydrate composition during red sparkling wine making and wine aging. Grape ripening stage (premature and mature grapes) showed a significant impact on the content, composition, and evolution of polysaccharides and oligosaccharides of sparkling wines. Polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, mannoproteins, rhamnogalacturonans II, and oligosaccharides in base wines increased with maturity. For both maturity stages, polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose, and the glucuronic acid glycosyl residue of the oligosaccharides were the major carbohydrates detected in all vinification stages. The total glycosyl content of oligosaccharides decreased during the whole period of aging on yeast lees. The reduction of polysaccharides rich in arabinose and galactose and rhamnogalacturonans type II during the aging was more pronounced in mature samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the polysaccharide and oligosaccharide composition of red sparkling wines. PMID:27226011

  5. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaidong; Zhang, Guimin; Yao, Chaoxiang; Junaid, Muhammad; Lu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Houjin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme. PMID:26562160

  6. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chaoxiang; Junaid, Muhammad; Lu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Houjin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme. PMID:26562160

  7. A study of the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin formation by nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Makowska, Joanna; Zmudzińska, Wioletta; Uber, Dorota; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2014-12-01

    Chain reversals are often nucleation sites in protein folding. The β-hairpins of FBP28 WW domain and IgG are stable and have been proved to initiate the folding and are, therefore, suitable for studying the influence of charged residues on β-hairpin conformation. In this paper, we carried out NMR examination of the conformations in solution of two fragments from the FPB28 protein (PDB code: 1E0L) (N-terminal part) namely KTADGKT-NH2 (1E0L 12-18, D7) and YKTADGKTY-NH2 (1E0L 11-19, D9), one from the B3 domain of the protein G (PDB code: 1IGD), namely DDATKT-NH2 (1IGD 51-56) (Dag1), and three variants of Dag1 peptide: DVATKT-NH2 (Dag2), OVATKT-NH2 (Dag3) and KVATKT-NH2 (Dag4), respectively, in which the original charged residue were replaced with non-polar residues or modified charged residues. It was found that both the D7 and D9 peptides form a large fraction bent conformations. However, no hydrophobic contacts between the terminal Tyr residues of D9 occur, which suggests that the presence of a pair of like-charged residues stabilizes chain reversal. Conversely, only the Dag1 and Dag2 peptides exhibit some chain reversal; replacing the second aspartic-acid residue with a valine and the first one with a basic residue results in a nearly extended conformation. These results suggest that basic residues farther away in sequence can result in stabilization of chain reversal owing to screening of the non-polar core. Conversely, smaller distance in sequence prohibits this screening, while the presence oppositely-charged residues can stabilize a turn because of salt-bridge formation. PMID:25316116

  8. Carbohydrate Engineered Cells for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jian; Yarema, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Carbohydrates are integral components of the stem cell niche on several levels; proteoglycans are a major constituent of the extracellular matrix (ECM) surrounding a cell, glycosoaminoglycans (GAGs) help link cells to the ECM and the neighboring cells, and small but informationally-rich oligosaccharides provide a “sugar code” that identifies each cell and provides it with unique functions. This article samples roles that glycans play in development and then describes how metabolic glycoengineering – a technique where monosaccharide analogs are introduced into the metabolic pathways of a cell and are biosynthetically incorporated into the glycocalyx – is overcoming many of the long-standing barriers to manipulating carbohydrates in living cells and tissues and is becoming an intriguing new tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20117158

  9. Pre-operative nutrition and carbohydrate loading.

    PubMed

    Kratzing, Caroline

    2011-08-01

    An optimal nutritional state is an important consideration in providing successful operative outcomes. Unfortunately, many aspects of surgery are not constructive to providing this. In addition, the metabolic and immune response to injury induces a catabolic state and insulin resistance, a known risk factor of post-operative complications. Aggressive insulin therapy post-operatively has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality but similar results can be achieved when insulin resistance is lessened by the use of pre-operative carbohydrate loading. Consuming carbohydrate-containing drinks up to 2 h before surgery has been found to be an effective way to attenuate insulin resistance, minimise protein losses, reduce hospital stays and improve patient comfort without adversely affecting gastric emptying. Enhanced recovery programmes have employed carbohydrate loading as one of several strategies aimed at reducing post-operative stress and improving the recovery process. Studies examining the benefits of these programmes have demonstrated significantly shorter post-operative hospital stays, faster return to normal functions and lower occurrences of surgical complications. As a consequence of the favourable evidence they are now being implemented in many surgical units. Further benefit to post-operative recovery may be found with the use of immune-enhancing diets, i.e. supplementation with n-3 fatty acids, arginine, glutamine and/or nucleotides. These have the potential to boost the immune system, improve wound healing and reduce inflammatory markers. Research exploring the benefits of immunonutrition and solidifying the use of carbohydrate loading is ongoing; however, there is strong evidence to link good pre-operative nutrition and improved surgical outcomes. PMID:21781358

  10. Harvesting carbohydrate-rich Arthrospira platensis by spontaneous settling.

    PubMed

    Depraetere, Orily; Pierre, Guillaume; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Badri, Hanène; Foubert, Imogen; Leys, Natalie; Markou, Giorgos; Wattiez, Ruddy; Michaud, Philippe; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2015-03-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis is an attractive feedstock for carbohydrate-based biofuels because it accumulated up to 74% of carbohydrates when nitrogen stressed. Nitrogen stressed A. platensis also settled spontaneously, and this occurred simultaneously with carbohydrates accumulation, suggesting a link between both phenomena. The increased settling velocity was neither due to production of extracellular carbohydrates, nor due to degradation of gas vacuoles, but was caused by an increase in the specific density of the filaments as a result of accumulation of carbohydrates under the form of glycogen. Settling velocities of carbohydrate-rich A. platensis reached 0.64mh(-1), which allowed the biomass to be harvested using a lamella separator. The biomass could be concentrated at least 15 times, allowing removal of 94% of the water using gravity settling, thus offering a potential application as a low-cost and high-throughput method for primary dewatering of carbohydrate-rich A. platensis. PMID:25585253

  11. Hearing Loss, Dizziness, and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Albernaz, Pedro L. Mangabeira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction  Metabolic activity of the inner ear is very intense, and makes it sensitive to changes in the body homeostasis. This study involves a group of patients with inner ear disorders related to carbohydrate metabolism disturbances, including hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, and episodes of vertigo. Objectives  To describe the symptoms of metabolic inner ear disorders and the examinations required to establish diagnoses. These symptoms are often the first to allow for an early diagnosis of metabolic disorders and diabetes. Methods  Retrospective study of 376 patients with inner ear symptoms suggestive of disturbances of carbohydrate metabolism. The authors present patientś clinical symptoms and clinical evaluations, with emphasis on the glucose and insulin essays. Results  Authors based their conclusions on otolaryngological findings, diagnostic procedures and treatment principles. They found that auditory and vestibular symptoms usually occur prior to other manifestations of metabolic changes, leading to an early diagnosis of hyperinsulinemia, intestinal sugar malabsorption or diabetes. Previously undiagnosed diabetes mellitus type II was found in 39 patients. Conclusions  The identification of carbohydrate metabolism disturbances is important not only to minimize the patients' clinical symptoms, but also to help maintain their general health. PMID:27413410

  12. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.-H. Percival; Mielenz, Jonathan R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The hydrogen economy presents an appealing energy future but its implementation must solve numerous problems ranging from low-cost sustainable production, high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density hydrogen carrier and energy source for hydrogen production is possible due to emerging cell-free synthetic biology technology called cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB). Assembly of numerous enzymes and co-enzymes in vitro can create complicated set of biological reactions or pathways that microorganisms cannot complete, for example, C6H10O5 (aq) + 7 H2O (l) 12 H2 (g) + 6 CO2 (g) (PLoS One 2007, 2:e456). Thanks to 100% selectivity of enzymes, modest reaction conditions, and high-purity of generated hydrogen, carbohydrate is a promising hydrogen carrier for end users. Gravimetric density of carbohydrate is 14.8 H2 mass% if water can be recycled from PEM fuel cells or 8.33% H2 mass% without water recycling. Renewable carbohydrate can be isolated from plant biomass or would be produced from a combination of solar electricity/hydrogen and carbon dioxide fixation mediated by high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis mediated by SyPaB. The construction of this carbon-neutral carbohydrate economy would address numerous sustainability challenges, such as electricity and hydrogen storage, CO2 fixation and long-term storage, water conservation, transportation fuel production, plus feed and food production.

  13. Multivalent interaction based carbohydrate biosensors for signal amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanyan; Chalagalla, Srinivas; Li, Tiehai; Sun, Xue-long; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2010-01-01

    Multivalent interaction between boronic acids immobilized on Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) sensor surface and the carbohydrates modified Au - nanoparticle (AuNP) has been demonstrated for the development of a sensitive carbohydrate biosensor. Briefly, a boronic acid - containing polymer (boropolymer) as multivalent carbohydrate receptor was oriented immobilized on the cysteamine coated electrode through isourea bond formation. Carbohydrates were conjugated to AuNPs to generate a multivalent carbohydrates moiety to amplify the response signal. Thus, the binding of the carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs to the boropolymer surface are multivalent which could simultaneously increase the binding affinity and specificity. We systematically studied the binding between five carbohydrate conjugated AuNPs and the boropolymer. Our studies show that the associate constant (Ka) was in the order of fucose < glucose < mannose < galactose < maltose. A linear response in the range from 23 µM to 3.83 mM was observed for mannose conjugated AuNPs and the boropolymer recognition elements, with the lower detection limit of 1.5 µM for the carbohydrate analytes. Furthermore, the multivalent binding between carbohydrates and boronic acids are reversible and allow the regeneration of boropolymer surface by using 1M acetic acid so as to sequentially capture and release the carbohydrate analytes. PMID:20863680

  14. Characterizing the Glycocalyx of Poultry Spermatozoa: II. Low Temperature Storage of Turkey Semen and Sperm Mobility Phenotype Impact the Carbohydrate Component of Membrane Glycoconjugates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The turkey sperm glycocalyx is known to contain residues of sialic acid, alpha-mannose/alpha-glucose, alpha- and beta-galactose, alpha-fucose, alpha- and beta-N-acetyl-galactosamine, monomers and dimers of N-acetyl-glucosamine and N-acetyl-lactosamine. Potential changes in these carbohydrates during...

  15. Light period regulation of carbohydrate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janes, Harry W.

    1994-01-01

    We have shown that the photosynthetic period is important in regulating carbon partitioning. Even when the same amount of carbon is fixed over a 24h period considerably more is translocated out of the leaf under the longer photosynthetic period. This is extremely important when parts of the plant other than the leaves are to be sold. It is also important to notice the amount of carbon respired in the short photosynthetic period. The light period effect on carbohydrate fixation, dark respiration, and translocation is shown in this report.

  16. Carbohydrates/nucleosides/RNA-DNA-ligand interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptein, R.; McConnell, B.; Serianni, A.S.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Carbohydrate and nucleotide structural determination using modern spectroscopic techniques is dependent on our ability to label oligonucleotides and oligosaccharides with stable isotopes. Uniform Carbon 13 and Nitrogen 15 labeling of oligonucleotides is important to present-day efforts, which are focused on determining the structure of relatively small oligosaccharides and oligonucleotides, which form the elements of larger structures. Because of the relatively recent interest in three-dimensional structure, the development of techniques used to label them has lagged behind parallel techniques used to label peptides and proteins. Therefore, this group`s discussion focused primarily on problems faced today in obtaining oligonucleotides labeled uniformly with carbon 13 and nitrogen 15.

  17. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm−1–2970 cm−1) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials. PMID:21258555

  18. A carbohydrate-anion recognition system in aprotic solvents.

    PubMed

    Ren, Bo; Dong, Hai; Ramström, Olof

    2014-05-01

    A carbohydrate-anion recognition system in nonpolar solvents is reported, in which complexes form at the B-faces of β-D-pyranosides with H1-, H3-, and H5-cis patterns similar to carbohydrate-π interactions. The complexation effect was evaluated for a range of carbohydrate structures; it resulted in either 1:1 carbohydrate-anion complexes, or 1:2 complex formation depending on the protection pattern of the carbohydrate. The interaction was also evaluated with different anions and solvents. In both cases it resulted in significant binding differences. The results indicate that complexation originates from van der Waals interactions or weak CH⋅⋅⋅A(-) hydrogen bonds between the binding partners and is related to electron-withdrawing groups of the carbohydrates as well as increased hydrogen-bond-accepting capability of the anions. PMID:24616327

  19. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Spore-forming Bacilli are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI)-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. Results We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut. PMID:21892951

  20. Carbohydrate secretion by phototrophic communities in tidal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Winder, B.; Staats, N.; Stal, L. J.; Paterson, D. M.

    1999-09-01

    Two different benthic phototrophic communities on tidal flats were investigated for their carbohydrate content and distribution. Carbohydrates were analysed as two operationally defined fractions, related to the difficulty of extraction from the sediment matrix. Water-soluble (colloidal) and EDTA-extractable (capsular) carbohydrates were measured in a cyanobacterial mat and a diatom biofilm. The chlorophyll-specific carbohydrate content of the two communities was very different. The diatom biofilm contained up to 100 times more colloidal carbohydrate than the cyanobacterial mat. The concentrations of colloidal carbohydrates in the diatom biofilm correlated with biomass (chlorophyll-a), but this was not the case with the carbohydrate in the EDTA extract. It is proposed that the capsular carbohydrates were probably recalcitrant to mineralisation and therefore accumulated in the sediment. Neither colloidal nor EDTA-extractable carbohydrate in the cyanobacterial mat correlated with chlorophyll-a. This was probably an artefact caused by the fact that approximately 50% of the chlorophyll-a in the mat was attributed to diatoms. The characteristics of extracellular polysaccharides were investigated in laboratory cultures of the dominant organisms. Extracellular polysaccharides of the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes and of the diatom Navicula menisculus did not contain uronic acids. However, carboxylated sugars were found in large quantities in the capsular polysaccharides of the cyanobacterium and were present in equal ratios in the extracellular and capsular carbohydrate of the diatom Cylindrotheca closterium. Both in laboratory model systems of diatom biofilms and in situ, enhanced colloidal carbohydrate production was observed in the light. No light-dependent increase in carbohydrate concentration was found for the cyanobacterial mat. The cyanobacteria formed a mat in which the filamentous organisms entangled sand grains and attached firmly to the substratum

  1. Evolutionary bases of carbohydrate recognition and substrate discrimination in the ROK protein family.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Maria S; Thompson, Steven M; Miller, Brian G

    2010-06-01

    The ROK (repressor, open reading frame, kinase) protein family (Pfam 00480) is a large collection of bacterial polypeptides that includes sugar kinases, carbohydrate responsive transcriptional repressors, and many functionally uncharacterized gene products. ROK family sugar kinases phosphorylate a range of structurally distinct hexoses including the key carbon source D: -glucose, various glucose epimers, and several acetylated hexosamines. The primary sequence elements responsible for carbohydrate recognition within different functional categories of ROK polypeptides are largely unknown due to a limited structural characterization of this protein family. In order to identify the structural bases for substrate discrimination in individual ROK proteins, and to better understand the evolutionary processes that led to the divergent evolution of function in this family, we constructed an inclusive alignment of 227 representative ROK polypeptides. Phylogenetic analyses and ancestral sequence reconstructions of the resulting tree reveal a discrete collection of active site residues that dictate substrate specificity. The results also suggest a series of mutational events within the carbohydrate-binding sites of ROK proteins that facilitated the expansion of substrate specificity within this family. This study provides new insight into the evolutionary relationship of ROK glucokinases and non-ROK glucokinases (Pfam 02685), revealing the primary sequence elements shared between these two protein families, which diverged from a common ancestor in ancient times. PMID:20512568

  2. Composition of the carbohydrate granules of the cyanobacterium, Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneegurt, M. A.; Sherman, D. M.; Sherman, L. A.; Mitchell, C. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142 is an aerobic, unicellular, diazotrophic cyanobacterium that temporally separates O2-sensitive N2 fixation from oxygenic photosynthesis. The energy and reducing power needed for N2 fixation appears to be generated by an active respiratory apparatus that utilizes the contents of large interthylakoidal carbohydrate granules. We report here on the carbohydrate and protein composition of the granules of Cyanothece sp. strain ATCC 51142. The carbohydrate component is a glucose homopolymer with branches every nine residues and is chemically identical to glycogen. Granule-associated protein fractions showed temporal changes in the number of proteins and their abundance during the metabolic oscillations observed under diazotrophic conditions. There also were temporal changes in the protein pattern of the granule-depleted supernatant fractions from diazotrophic cultures. None of the granule-associated proteins crossreacted with antisera directed against several glycogen-metabolizing enzymes or nitrogenase, although these proteins were tentatively identified in supernatant fractions. It is suggested that the granule-associated proteins are structural proteins required to maintain a complex granule architecture.

  3. Identification of a peptide mimic of the L2/HNK-1 carbohydrate epitope.

    PubMed

    Simon-Haldi, Maryline; Mantei, Ned; Franke, Jens; Voshol, Hans; Schachner, Melitta

    2002-12-01

    The L2/HNK-1 carbohydrate is carried by many neural recognition molecules and is involved in neural cell interactions during development, regeneration in the peripheral nervous system, synaptic plasticity, and autoimmune-based neuropathies. Its key structure consists of a sulfated glucuronic acid linked to lactosaminyl residues. Because of its biological importance but limited availability, the phage display method was used to isolate a collection of peptide mimics that bind specifically to an L2/HNK-1 antibody. The phages isolated from a 15-mer peptide library by adsorption to this antibody share a consensus sequence of amino acids. The peptide mimicked several important functions of the L2/HNK-1 carbohydrate, such as binding to motor neurons in vitro, and preferential promotion of in vitro neurite outgrowth from motor axons compared with sensory neurons. A scrambled version of the peptide had no activity. The combined observations indicate that we have isolated a mimic of the L2/HNK-1 carbohydrate that is able to act as its functional substitute. PMID:12472892

  4. Identification of a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules with broad ligand specificity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Yu-Liang; Cao, Qi-Long; Huang, Ming-Yue; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Most enzymes that act on carbohydrates include non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that recognize and target carbohydrates. CBMs bring their appended catalytic modules into close proximity with the target substrate and increase the hydrolytic rate of enzymes acting on insoluble substrates. We previously identified a novel CBM (CBMC5614-1) at the C-terminus of endoglucanase C5614-1 from an uncultured microorganism present in buffalo rumen. In the present study, that the functional region of CBMC5614-1 involved in ligand binding was localized to 134 amino acids. Two representative homologs of CBMC5614-1, sharing the same ligand binding profile, targeted a range of β-linked polysaccharides that adopt very different conformations. Targeted substrates included soluble and insoluble cellulose, β-1,3/1,4-mixed linked glucans, xylan, and mannan. Mutagenesis revealed that three conserved aromatic residues (Trp-380, Tyr-411, and Trp-423) play an important role in ligand recognition and targeting. These results suggest that CBMC5614-1 and its homologs form a novel CBM family (CBM72) with a broad ligand-binding specificity. CBM72 members can provide new insight into CBM-ligand interactions and may have potential in protein engineering and biocatalysis. PMID:26765840

  5. The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide of Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Evgeny; Li, Jianjun; Sadovskaya, Irina; Jabbouri, Said; Helander, Ilkka M

    2004-06-22

    The structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the lipopolysaccharide from Pectinatus frisingensis strain VTT E-79104 was analyzed using chemical degradations, NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and chemical methods. The LPS contains two major structural variants, differing in the presence or absence of an octasaccharide fragment. The largest structure of the carbohydrate backbone of the LPS, that could be deduced from experimental results, consists of 20 monosaccharides arranged in a nonrepetitive sequence: [carbohydrate structure: see text] where R is H or 4-O-Me-alpha-L-Fuc-(1-2)-4-O-Me-beta-Hep-(1-3)-alpha-GlcNAc-(1-2)-beta-Man-(1-3)-beta-ManNAc-(1-4)-alpha-Gal-(1-4)-beta-Hep-(1-3)-beta-GalNAc-(1- where Hep is a residue of D-glycero-D-galacto-heptose; all monosaccharides have the D-configuration except for 4-O-Me-L-Fuc and L-Ara4N. This structure is architecturally similar to the oligosaccharide system reported previously in P. frisingensis VTT E-82164 LPS, but differs from the latter in composition and also in the size of the outer region. PMID:15183738

  6. Carbohydrate Recognition by Boronolectins, Small Molecules, and Lectins

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shan; Cheng, Yunfeng; Reid, Suazette; Li, Minyong; Wang, Binghe

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrates are known to mediate a large number of biological and pathological events. Small and macromolecules capable of carbohydrate recognition have great potentials as research tools, diagnostics, vectors for targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents, and therapeutic agents. However, this potential is far from being realized. One key issue is the difficulty in the development of “binders” capable of specific recognition of carbohydrates of biological relevance. This review discusses systematically the general approaches that are available in developing carbohydrate sensors and “binders/receptors,” and their applications. The focus is on discoveries during the last five years. PMID:19291708

  7. Carbohydrate Analysis: Can We Control the Ripening of Bananas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deal, S. Todd; Farmer, Catherine E.; Cerpovicz, Paul F.

    2002-04-01

    We have developed an experiment for nutritional/introductory biochemistry courses that focuses on carbohydrate analysis--specifically, the carbohydrates found in bananas and the change in carbohydrate composition as the banana ripens. Pairs of students analyze the starch and reducing sugar content of green, ripe, and overripe bananas. Using the techniques and knowledge gained from these analyses, they then investigate the influence of various storage methods on the ripening process. While this experiment was developed for an introductory-level biochemistry lab, it can easily be adapted for use in other laboratory programs that seek to teach the fundamentals of carbohydrate analysis.

  8. Impact of Dietary Polyphenols on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hanhineva, Kati; Törrönen, Riitta; Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Pekkinen, Jenna; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Mykkänen, Hannu; Poutanen, Kaisa

    2010-01-01

    Polyphenols, including flavonoids, phenolic acids, proanthocyanidins and resveratrol, are a large and heterogeneous group of phytochemicals in plant-based foods, such as tea, coffee, wine, cocoa, cereal grains, soy, fruits and berries. Growing evidence indicates that various dietary polyphenols may influence carbohydrate metabolism at many levels. In animal models and a limited number of human studies carried out so far, polyphenols and foods or beverages rich in polyphenols have attenuated postprandial glycemic responses and fasting hyperglycemia, and improved acute insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. The possible mechanisms include inhibition of carbohydrate digestion and glucose absorption in the intestine, stimulation of insulin secretion from the pancreatic β–cells, modulation of glucose release from the liver, activation of insulin receptors and glucose uptake in the insulin-sensitive tissues, and modulation of intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression. The positive effects of polyphenols on glucose homeostasis observed in a large number of in vitro and animal models are supported by epidemiological evidence on polyphenol-rich diets. To confirm the implications of polyphenol consumption for prevention of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and eventually type 2 diabetes, human trials with well-defined diets, controlled study designs and clinically relevant end-points together with holistic approaches e.g., systems biology profiling technologies are needed. PMID:20480025

  9. Postexercise recovery period: carbohydrate and protein metabolism.

    PubMed

    Viru, A

    1996-02-01

    The essence of the postexercise recovery period is normalization of function and homeostatic equilibrium, and replenishment of energy resources and accomplishment of the reconstructive function. The repletion of energy stores is actualized in a certain sequence and followed by a transitory supercompensation. The main substrate for repletion of the muscle glycogen store is blood glucose derived from hepatic glucose output as well as from consumption of carbohydrates during the postexercise period. The repletion of liver glycogen is realized less rapidly. It depends to a certain extent on hepatic gluconeogenesis but mainly on supply with exogenous carbohydrates. The constructive function is founded on elevated protein turnover and adaptive protein synthesis. Whereas during and shortly after endurance exercise intensive protein breakdown was found in less active fast-twitch glycolytic fibers, during the later course of the recovery period the protein degradation rate increased together with intensification of protein synthesis rate in more active fast-twitch glycolytic oxidative and slow-twitch oxidative fibers. PMID:8680938

  10. Engineering Cel7A carbohydrate binding module and linker for reduced lignin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-06-01

    Non-productive binding of cellulases to lignin inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass, increasing enzyme requirements and the cost of biofuels. This study used site-directed mutagenesis of the Trichoderma Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM) and linker to investigate the mechanisms of adsorption to lignin and engineer a cellulase with increased binding specificity for cellulose. CBM mutations that added hydrophobic or positively charged residues decreased the specificity for cellulose, while mutations that added negatively charged residues increased the specificity. Linker mutations that altered predicted glycosylation patterns selectively impacted lignin affinity. Beneficial mutations were combined to generate a mutant with 2.5-fold less lignin affinity while fully retaining cellulose affinity. This mutant was uninhibited by added lignin during hydrolysis of Avicel and generated 40% more glucose than the wild-type enzyme from dilute acid-pretreated Miscanthus. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1369-1374. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26616493

  11. Effects of disturbance regime on carbohydrate reserves in meadow plants

    PubMed Central

    Janeček, Štěpán; Bartušková, Alena; Bartoš, Michael; Altman, Jan; de Bello, Francesco; Doležal, Jiří; Latzel, Vít; Lanta, Vojtěch; Lepš, Jan; Klimešová, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate storage enables plants to tolerate both seasonally unfavourable conditions and recover from disturbance. Although short-term changes in storage levels due to disturbance are fairly well known, less is known about long-term changes in storage levels, especially in response to cessation of repeated disturbance. Additionally, whereas it is presumably the total amount (pool) of storage carbohydrate reserves that is of importance, typically carbohydrate concentrations are measured instead, as a proxy. We assessed changes in carbohydrate concentrations and pools in storage organs and changes in above- versus belowground biomass in response to mowing cessation in nine herbs from two meadows (dry and wet) at the (June) peak of vegetation development and the (October) growing season end 1 and 3 years after the change in the disturbance regime. We tested three hypotheses: (1) storage will increase with abandonment of mowing only in the first year after disturbance cessation, but not further increase subsequently, as high storage would hinder competitive ability; (2) storage will increase towards the end of the season in both disturbed and undisturbed plants; and (3) changes in carbohydrate concentrations are accurate predictors of changes in pools. Although species-specific changes in carbohydrate reserves occurred in the wet meadow, more general trends appeared in the dry meadow. There, plants accumulated higher carbohydrate reserves at the end of the season, especially in unmown plots. However, the reserves for plants in both disturbance regimes were the same at the growing season peak (June) in both examined years. The increase in storage of carbohydrates on unmown plots in October was manifested by increases of both storage organ biomass and carbohydrate concentration, whereas in mown plots, it was due only to increased carbohydrate concentration. Although concentrations and pools represent different aspects of plant carbohydrate economy, concentrations will

  12. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Lindsay B.; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a

  13. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    PubMed

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  14. Solution structure of family 21 carbohydrate-binding module from Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Nan; Lai, Yen-Ting; Chou, Wei-I; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr; Lyu, Ping-Chiang

    2006-01-01

    CBMs (carbohydrate-binding modules) function independently to assist carbohydrate-active enzymes. Family 21 CBMs contain approx. 100 amino acid residues, and some members have starchbinding functions or glycogen-binding activities. We report here the first structure of a family 21 CBM from the SBD (starch-binding domain) of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoCBM21) determined by NMR spectroscopy. This CBM has a β-sandwich fold with an immunoglobulin-like structure. Ligand-binding properties of RoCBM21 were analysed by chemical-shift perturbations and automated docking. Structural comparisons with previously reported SBDs revealed two types of topologies, namely type I and type II, with CBM20, CBM25, CBM26 and CBM41 showing type I topology, with CBM21 and CBM34 showing type II topology. According to the chemical-shift perturbations, RoCBM21 contains two ligand-binding sites. Residues in site II are similar to those found in the family 20 CBM from Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (AnCBM20). Site I, however, is embedded in a region with unique sequence motifs only found in some members of CBM21s. Additionally, docking of β-cyclodextrin and malto-oligosaccharides highlights that side chains of Y83 and W47 (one-letter amino acid code) form the central part of the conserved binding platform in the SBD. The structure of RoCBM21 provides the first direct evidence of the structural features and the basis for protein–carbohydrate recognition from an SBD of CBM21. PMID:17117925

  15. Preoperative gastric emptying. Effects of anxiety and oral carbohydrate administration.

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, J; Thorell, A; Jacobsson, H; Larsson, S; Schnell, P O; Hylén, L; Ljungqvist, O

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Overnight fasting is routine before elective surgery. This may not be the optimal way to prepare for surgical stress, however, because intravenous carbohydrate supplementation instead of fasting has recently been shown to reduce postoperative insulin resistance. In the current study, gastric emptying of a carbohydrate-rich drink was investigated before elective surgery and in a control situation. METHODS: Twelve patients scheduled for elective surgery were randomly given 400 mL of either a carbohydrate-rich drink (285 mOsm/kg, 12.0% carbohydrates, n = 6) or water 4 hours before being anesthetized. Gastric emptying was measured (gamma camera, 99Tcm). Each patient repeated the protocol postoperatively as a control. All values were presented as the mean +/- SEM by means of a nonparametric statistical evaluation. RESULTS: Despite the increased anxiety experienced by patients before surgery (p < 0.005), gastric emptying did not differ between the experimental and control situations. Initially, water emptied more rapidly than carbohydrate. However, after 90 minutes, the stomach was emptied regardless of the solution administered (3.2 +/- 1.1% [mean +/- SEM] remaining in the stomach in the carbohydrate group versus 2.3 +/- 1.2% remaining in the stomach in the water group). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative anxiety does not prolong gastric emptying. The stomach had been emptied 90 minutes after ingestion of both the carbohydrate-rick drink and water, thereby indicating the possibility of allowing an intake of iso-osmolar carbohydrate-rich fluids before surgery. PMID:8526579

  16. [Determination of the total quantity of carbohydrates in dried yeast].

    PubMed

    Maksimenko, O A; Ziukova, L A; Fedorovich, R M

    1975-01-01

    Different colourimetric methods for measuring carbohydrates in yeast have been compared. A method using 5% phenol aqueous solution in the presence of concentrated sulphuric acid has been developed to quantitate carbohydrates. The method has been described as applied to an analysis of dry yeast. PMID:1129224

  17. Carbohydrate and fat: considerations for energy and more

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Historically, carbohydrates and fats were valued on their caloric contributions to diets. Feeding recommendations for these feed fractions now address inclusion levels, as well as consideration of the positive and negative effects of specific types of these nutrients. Feed carbohydrate characterizat...

  18. Why use DFT methods in the study of carbohydrates?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent advances in density functional theory (DFT) and computer technology allow us to study systems with more than 100 atoms routinely. This makes it feasible to study large carbohydrate molecules via quantum mechanical methods, whereas in the past, studies of carbohydrates were restricted to ...

  19. Carbohydrate-responsive gene expression in adipose tissue of rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although obesity is often associated with high fat diets, it can develop from a variety of meal patterns. Excessive intake of simple carbohydrates is one consistent eating behavior leading to obesity. However, the impact of over-consumption of diets with high carbohydrate-to-fat ratios (C/F) on body...

  20. Soil amino compound and carbohydrate contents influenced by organic amendments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Amino compounds (i. e. amino acids and sugars), and carbohydrates are labile organic components and contribute to the improvement of soil fertility and quality. Animal manure and other organic soil amendments are rich in both amino compounds and carbohydrates, hence organic soil amendments might af...

  1. [Carbohydrate component of immunoglobulin G in cattle suffering from leukosis].

    PubMed

    Meged', E F; Korotkoruchko, V P; Radionov, N T

    1982-01-01

    No essential differences are found in the composition and total amount of carbohydrates in the studied preparations of the immunoglobulin G subfraction in cattle suffering from leucosis and of the immunoglobulin G subfraction, identical in evolution, in healthy animals. It is shown that the main mass of carbohydrates is connected with Fc-fragment and heavy chains of the protein under study. PMID:7135515

  2. Comparing Low-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Comparing Low-Fat and Low-Carbohydrate Diets The full report is titled “Effects of Low-Carbohydrate and Low-Fat Diets. A Randomized Trial.” It is in the ...

  3. Preserving water soluble carbohydrate in hay and silage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The water soluble carbohydrate (WSC) content of forage may be manipulated by harvest timing within a 24-hour period to take advantage of the diurnal cycle. However, increases in carbohydrate may be lost during the haymaking or ensiling process. Rapid drying and dry storage is necessary to prevent lo...

  4. Reinforcement effect of soy protein and carbohydrates in polymer composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The modulus of soft polymer material can be increased by filler reinforcement. A review of using soy protein and carbohydrates as alternative renewable reinforcement material is presented here. Dry soy protein and carbohydrates are rigid and can form strong filler networks through hydrogen-bonding...

  5. Genetic Analyses of Soluble Carbohydrate Concentrations in Onion Bulbs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fructans are the primary soluble carbohydrate in onion (Allium cepa L.) bulbs and show significant correlations with dry weights and pungency. In this research, we estimated the genetic effects and interactions between two chromosome regions associated with higher amounts of soluble carbohydrates i...

  6. Structural and Functional Studies of Peptide-Carbohydrate Mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Margaret A.; Pinto, B. Mario

    Certain peptides act as molecular mimics of carbohydrates in that they are specifically recognized by carbohydrate-binding proteins. Peptides that bind to anti-carbohydrate antibodies, carbohydrate-processing enzymes, and lectins have been identified. These peptides are potentially useful as vaccines and therapeutics; for example, immunologically functional peptide molecular mimics (mimotopes) can strengthen or modify immune responses induced by carbohydrate antigens. However, peptides that bind specifically to carbohydrate-binding proteins may not necessarily show the corresponding biological activity, and further selection based on biochemical studies is always required. The degree of structural mimicry required to generate the desired biological activity is therefore an interesting question. This review will discuss recent structural studies of peptide-carbohydrate mimicry employing NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and molecular modeling, as well as relevant biochemical data. These studies provide insights into the basis of mimicry at the molecular level. Comparisons with other carbohydrate-mimetic compounds, namely proteins and glycopeptides, will be drawn. Finally, implications for the design of new therapeutic compounds will also be presented.

  7. Chemical Changes in Carbohydrates Produced by Thermal Processing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoseney, R. Carl

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical changes that occur in the carbohydrates found in food products when these products are subjected to thermal processing. Topics considered include browning reactions, starch found in food systems, hydrolysis of carbohydrates, extrusion cooking, processing of cookies and candies, and alterations in gums. (JN)

  8. Identification of carbohydrate anomers using ion mobility-mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, J.; Hahm, H. S.; Seeberger, P. H.; Pagel, K.

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrates are ubiquitous biological polymers that are important in a broad range of biological processes. However, owing to their branched structures and the presence of stereogenic centres at each glycosidic linkage between monomers, carbohydrates are harder to characterize than are peptides and oligonucleotides. Methods such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy can be used to characterize glycosidic linkages, but this technique requires milligram amounts of material and cannot detect small amounts of coexisting isomers. Mass spectrometry, on the other hand, can provide information on carbohydrate composition and connectivity for even small amounts of sample, but it cannot be used to distinguish between stereoisomers. Here, we demonstrate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry--a method that separates molecules according to their mass, charge, size, and shape--can unambiguously identify carbohydrate linkage-isomers and stereoisomers. We analysed six synthetic carbohydrate isomers that differ in composition, connectivity, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified, and relative concentrations of the minor isomer as low as 0.1 per cent can be detected. In addition, the analysis is rapid, and requires no derivatization and only small amounts of sample. These results indicate that ion mobility-mass spectrometry is an effective tool for the analysis of complex carbohydrates. This method could have an impact on the field of carbohydrate synthesis similar to that of the advent of high-performance liquid chromatography on the field of peptide assembly in the late 1970s.

  9. Genome of Bifidobacteria and Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the knowledge about bifidobacteria has considerably evolved thanks to recent progress in molecular biology. The analysis of the whole genome sequences of 48 taxa of bifidobacteria offers new perspectives for their classification, especially to set up limit between two species. Indeed, several species are presenting a high homology and should be reclassified. On the other hand, some subspecies are presenting a low homology and should therefore be reclassified into different species. In addition, a better knowledge of the genome of bifidobacteria allows a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in complex carbohydrate metabolism. The genome of some species of bifidobacteria from human but also from animal origin demonstrates high presence in genes involved in the metabolism of complex oligosaccharides. Those species should be further tested to confirm their potential to metabolize complex oligosaccharides in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26761794

  10. Carbohydrate loading in the preoperative setting.

    PubMed

    Hill, L T; Miller, M G A

    2015-03-01

    Nutrition support is an evolving field, and modern clinical nutrition practice should actively incorporate strategies to enhance various clinical outcomes. In surgical patients, clinical benefits can be maximised by nutritional support protocols that minimise and manage the perioperative fasting period. This approach, which includes the perioperative provision of clear carbohydrate-containing fluids, has been shown to be safe, is evidence based, and is supported by many professional societies. Such a strategy has been shown to aid the anaesthetic process and maintain an optimal metabolic state, including improved insulin sensitivity and blunted muscle catabolic activity. Some important consequences of this improved metabolic control include shorter hospital stay and fewer postoperative complications. A proactive multidisciplinary team approach is essential to use this nutrition support strategy with success across a hospital's surgical service. PMID:26294840