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Sample records for pdz domain proteins

  1. Interaction of ion channels and receptors with PDZ domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Kornau, H C; Seeburg, P H; Kennedy, M B

    1997-06-01

    The complex anatomy of neurons demands a high degree of functional organization. Therefore, membrane receptors and ion channels are often localized to selected subcellular sites and coupled to specific signal transduction machineries. PDZ domains have come into focus as protein interaction modules that mediate the binding of a class of submembraneous proteins to membrane receptors and ion channels and thus subserve these organizational aspects. The structures of two PDZ domains have been resolved, which has led to a structural understanding of the specificity of interactions of various PDZ domains with their respective partners. The functional implications of PDZ domain interactions are now being addressed in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9232802

  2. Predicting PDZ domain mediated protein interactions from structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PDZ domains are structural protein domains that recognize simple linear amino acid motifs, often at protein C-termini, and mediate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in important biological processes, such as ion channel regulation, cell polarity and neural development. PDZ domain-peptide interaction predictors have been developed based on domain and peptide sequence information. Since domain structure is known to influence binding specificity, we hypothesized that structural information could be used to predict new interactions compared to sequence-based predictors. Results We developed a novel computational predictor of PDZ domain and C-terminal peptide interactions using a support vector machine trained with PDZ domain structure and peptide sequence information. Performance was estimated using extensive cross validation testing. We used the structure-based predictor to scan the human proteome for ligands of 218 PDZ domains and show that the predictions correspond to known PDZ domain-peptide interactions and PPIs in curated databases. The structure-based predictor is complementary to the sequence-based predictor, finding unique known and novel PPIs, and is less dependent on training–testing domain sequence similarity. We used a functional enrichment analysis of our hits to create a predicted map of PDZ domain biology. This map highlights PDZ domain involvement in diverse biological processes, some only found by the structure-based predictor. Based on this analysis, we predict novel PDZ domain involvement in xenobiotic metabolism and suggest new interactions for other processes including wound healing and Wnt signalling. Conclusions We built a structure-based predictor of PDZ domain-peptide interactions, which can be used to scan C-terminal proteomes for PDZ interactions. We also show that the structure-based predictor finds many known PDZ mediated PPIs in human that were not found by our previous sequence-based predictor and is less dependent on

  3. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  4. A Thermodynamic Ligand Binding Study of the Third PDZ Domain (PDZ3) from the Mammalian Neuronal Protein PSD-95†

    PubMed Central

    Saro, Dorina; Li, Tao; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Paredes, Azrael; Caspers, Nicole; Spaller, Mark R.

    2008-01-01

    The thermodynamic parameters associated with the binding of several series of linear peptides to the third PDZ domain (PDZ3) of the postsynaptic density 95 protein (PSD-95) have been measured using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Two strategies were pursued in developing these binding ligands: (1) systematic N-terminal truncation of sequences derived from the C-terminal regions of identified PDZ3-binding proteins (CRIPT, neuroligin-1 and citron); and (2) selective mutation of specific positions within a consensus hexapeptide (KKETEV) known to bind PDZ3. Each synthetically prepared peptide was used to titrate PDZ3, which yielded the changes in Gibbs free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (TΔS) for the binding event. Selected peptides were subjected to additional analysis, which entailed (1) measuring the change in heat capacity (ΔCp) upon association, to assess the character of the binding interface; and (2) constructing thermodynamic double-mutant cycles, to determine the presence of cooperative effects. From the first series, the CRIPT protein proved to be the better source for higher affinity sequences. From the second series, enhanced binding was associated with peptides that closely adhered to the established motif for class I PDZ domain C-termini, X-(T/S)-X-(V/I/L), and more specifically to a narrower motif of X-T-X-V. Further, in both series a length of six residues was necessary and sufficient to capture maximal affinity. In addition, there were significant influences upon binding by modifying the abutting ‘X’ positions. The cumulative results provide greater detail into the specific nature of ligand binding to PDZ3, and will assist in the development of selective molecular probes for the study of this and structurally homologous PDZ domains. PMID:17474715

  5. Uncovering Quantitative Protein Interaction Networks for Mouse PDZ Domains using Protein Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Michael A.; Grantcharova, Viara P.; Sevecka, Mark; MacBeath, Gavin

    2008-01-01

    One of the principle challenges in systems biology is to uncover the networks of protein-protein interactions that underlie most biological processes. To date, experimental efforts directed at this problem have largely produced only qualitative networks that are replete with false positives and false negatives. Here, we describe a domain-centered approach – compatible with genome-wide investigations – that enables us to measure the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of recombinant PDZ domains for fluorescently-labeled peptides that represent physiologically-relevant binding partners. Using a pilot set of 22 PDZ domains, 4 PDZ domain clusters, and 20 peptides, we define a gold standard dataset by determining the KD for all 520 PDZ-peptide combinations using fluorescence polarization. We then show that microarrays of PDZ domains identify interactions of moderate to high affinity (KD ≤ 10 μM) in a high-throughput format with a false positive rate of 14% and a false negative rate of 14%. By combining the throughput of protein microarrays with the fidelity of fluorescence polarization, our domain/peptide-based strategy yields a quantitative network that faithfully recapitulates 85% of previously reported interactions and uncovers new biophysical interactions, many of which occur between proteins that are co-expressed. From a broader perspective, the selectivity data produced by this effort reveal a strong concordance between protein sequence and protein function, supporting a model in which interaction networks evolve through small steps that do not involve dramatic rewiring of the network. PMID:16637659

  6. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. PMID:25829303

  7. Viral Interactions with PDZ Domain-Containing Proteins-An Oncogenic Trait?

    PubMed

    James, Claire D; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Many of the human viruses with oncogenic capabilities, either in their natural host or in experimental systems (hepatitis B and C, human T cell leukaemia virus type 1, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, human immunodeficiency virus, high-risk human papillomaviruses and adenovirus type 9), encode in their limited genome the ability to target cellular proteins containing PSD95/ DLG/ZO-1 (PDZ) interaction modules. In many cases (but not always), the viruses have evolved to bind the PDZ domains using the same short linear peptide motifs found in host protein-PDZ interactions, and in some cases regulate the interactions in a similar fashion by phosphorylation. What is striking is that the diverse viruses target a common subset of PDZ proteins that are intimately involved in controlling cell polarity and the structure and function of intercellular junctions, including tight junctions. Cell polarity is fundamental to the control of cell proliferation and cell survival and disruption of polarity and the signal transduction pathways involved is a key event in tumourigenesis. This review focuses on the oncogenic viruses and the role of targeting PDZ proteins in the virus life cycle and the contribution of virus-PDZ protein interactions to virus-mediated oncogenesis. We highlight how many of the viral associations with PDZ proteins lead to deregulation of PI3K/AKT signalling, benefitting virus replication but as a consequence also contributing to oncogenesis. PMID:26797638

  8. The Chlamydia trachomatis Protease CPAF Contains a Cryptic PDZ-Like Domain with Similarity to Human Cell Polarity and Tight Junction PDZ-Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Rui; Valdivia, Raphael H.; McCafferty, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    The need for more effective anti-chlamydial therapeutics has sparked research efforts geared toward further understanding chlamydial pathogenesis mechanisms. Recent studies have implicated the secreted chlamydial serine protease, chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF) as potentially important for chlamydial pathogenesis. By mechanisms that remain to be elucidated, CPAF is directed to a discrete group of substrates, which are subsequently cleaved or degraded. While inspecting the previously solved CPAF crystal structure, we discovered that CPAF contains a cryptic N-terminal PSD95 Dlg ZO-1 (PDZ) domain spanning residues 106–212 (CPAF106-212). This PDZ domain is unique in that it bears minimal sequence similarity to canonical PDZ-forming sequences and displays little sequence and structural similarity to known chlamydial PDZ domains. We show that the CPAF106-212 sequence is homologous to PDZ domains of human tight junction proteins. PMID:26829550

  9. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis. PMID:25448478

  10. Ligand binding to the PDZ domains of postsynaptic density protein 95.

    PubMed

    Toto, Angelo; Pedersen, Søren W; Karlsson, O Andreas; Moran, Griffin E; Andersson, Eva; Chi, Celestine N; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2016-05-01

    Cellular scaffolding and signalling is generally governed by multidomain proteins, where each domain has a particular function. Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is involved in synapse formation and is a typical example of such a multidomain protein. Protein-protein interactions of PSD-95 are well studied and include the following three protein ligands: (i)N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit GluN2B, (ii) neuronal nitric oxide synthase and (iii) cysteine-rich protein (CRIPT), all of which bind to one or more of the three PDZ domains in PSD-95. While interactions for individual PDZ domains of PSD-95 have been well studied, less is known about the influence of neighbouring domains on the function of the respective individual domain. We therefore performed a systematic study on the ligand-binding kinetics of PSD-95 using constructs of different size for PSD-95 and its ligands. Regarding the canonical peptide-binding pocket and relatively short peptides (up to 15-mer), the PDZ domains in PSD-95 by and large work as individual binding modules. However, in agreement with previous studies, residues outside of the canonical binding pocket modulate the affinity of the ligands. In particular, the dissociation of the 101 amino acid CRIPT from PSD-95 is slowed down at least 10-fold for full-length PSD-95 when compared with the individual PDZ3 domain. PMID:26941280

  11. PDZ motifs in PTP-BL and RIL bind to internal protein segments in the LIM domain protein RIL.

    PubMed

    Cuppen, E; Gerrits, H; Pepers, B; Wieringa, B; Hendriks, W

    1998-03-01

    The specificity of protein-protein interactions in cellular signaling cascades is dependent on the sequence and intramolecular location of distinct amino acid motifs. We used the two-hybrid interaction trap to identify proteins that can associate with the PDZ motif-rich segment in the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL. A specific interaction was found with the Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3 (LIM) domain containing protein RIL. More detailed analysis demonstrated that the binding specificity resides in the second and fourth PDZ motif of PTP-BL and the LIM domain in RIL. Immunohistochemistry on various mouse tissues revealed a submembranous colocalization of PTP-BL and RIL in epithelial cells. Remarkably, there is also an N-terminal PDZ motif in RIL itself that can bind to the RIL-LIM domain. We demonstrate here that the RIL-LIM domain can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro and in vivo and can be dephosphorylated in vitro by the PTPase domain of PTP-BL. Our data point to the presence of a double PDZ-binding interface on the RIL-LIM domain and suggest tyrosine phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism for LIM-PDZ associations in the assembly of multiprotein complexes. These findings are in line with an important role of PDZ-mediated interactions in the shaping and organization of submembranous microenvironments of polarized cells. PMID:9487134

  12. PDZ Motifs in PTP-BL and RIL Bind to Internal Protein Segments in the LIM Domain Protein RIL

    PubMed Central

    Cuppen, Edwin; Gerrits, Herlinde; Pepers, Barry; Wieringa, Bé; Hendriks, Wiljan

    1998-01-01

    The specificity of protein–protein interactions in cellular signaling cascades is dependent on the sequence and intramolecular location of distinct amino acid motifs. We used the two-hybrid interaction trap to identify proteins that can associate with the PDZ motif-rich segment in the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-BL. A specific interaction was found with the Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3 (LIM) domain containing protein RIL. More detailed analysis demonstrated that the binding specificity resides in the second and fourth PDZ motif of PTP-BL and the LIM domain in RIL. Immunohistochemistry on various mouse tissues revealed a submembranous colocalization of PTP-BL and RIL in epithelial cells. Remarkably, there is also an N-terminal PDZ motif in RIL itself that can bind to the RIL-LIM domain. We demonstrate here that the RIL-LIM domain can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in vitro and in vivo and can be dephosphorylated in vitro by the PTPase domain of PTP-BL. Our data point to the presence of a double PDZ-binding interface on the RIL-LIM domain and suggest tyrosine phosphorylation as a regulatory mechanism for LIM-PDZ associations in the assembly of multiprotein complexes. These findings are in line with an important role of PDZ-mediated interactions in the shaping and organization of submembranous microenvironments of polarized cells. PMID:9487134

  13. Epidermolysis bullosa and embryonic lethality in mice lacking the multi-PDZ domain protein GRIP1

    PubMed Central

    Bladt, Friedhelm; Tafuri, Anna; Gelkop, Sigal; Langille, Lowell; Pawson, Tony

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) is an adaptor protein composed of seven PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens-1) domains, capable of mediating diverse protein–protein interactions. GRIP1 has been implicated in the regulation of neuronal synaptic function, but its physiologic roles have not been defined in vivo. We find that elimination of murine GRIP1 results in embryonic lethality. GRIP1−/− embryos develop abnormalities of the dermo-epidermal junction, resulting in extensive skin blistering around day 12 of embryonic life. Ultra-structural characterization of the blisters (or bullae) revealed cleavage of the dermo-epidermal junction below the lamina densa, an alteration reminiscent of the dystrophic form of human epidermolysis bullosa. Blisters were also observed in the lateral ventricle of the brain and in the meninges covering the cerebral cortex. These genetic data suggest that the GRIP1 scaffolding protein is required for the formation and integrity of the dermo-epidermal junction and reveal the importance of PDZ domains in the organization of supramolecular structures essential for mammalian embryonic development. PMID:11983858

  14. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  15. PDZ domain from Dishevelled -- a specificity study.

    PubMed

    Śmietana, Katarzyna; Mateja, Agnieszka; Krężel, Artur; Otlewski, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Intracellular signaling cascades induced by Wnt proteins play a key role in developmental processes and are implicated in cancerogenesis. It is still unclear how the cell determines which of the three possible Wnt response mechanisms should be activated, but the decision process is most likely dependent on Dishevelled proteins. Dishevelled family members interact with many diverse targets, however, molecular mechanisms underlying these binding events have not been comprehensively described so far. Here, we investigated the specificity of the PDZ domain from human Dishevelled-2 using C-terminal phage display, which led us to identification of a leucine-rich binding motif strongly resembling the consensus sequence of a nuclear export signal. PDZ interactions with several peptide and protein motifs (including the nuclear export signal sequence from Dishevelled-2 protein) were investigated in detail using fluorescence spectroscopy, mutational analysis and immunoenzymatic assays. The experiments showed that the PDZ domain can bind the nuclear export signal sequence of the Dishevelled-2 protein. Since the intracellular localization of Dishevelled is governed by nuclear localization and nuclear export signal sequences, it is possible that the intramolecular interaction between PDZ domain and the export signal could modulate the balance between nuclear and cytoplasmic pool of the Dishevelled protein. Such a regulatory mechanism would be of utmost importance for the differential activation of Wnt signaling cascades, leading to selective promotion of the nucleus-dependent Wnt β-catenin pathway at the expense of non-canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:21666888

  16. Crystallographic and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evaluation of the Impact of Peptide Binding to the Second PDZ Domain of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1E

    SciTech Connect

    J Zhang; P Sapienza; H Ke; A Chang; S Hengel; H Wang; G Phillips Jr.; A Lee

    2011-12-31

    PDZ (PSD95/Discs large/ZO-1) domains are ubiquitous protein interaction motifs found in scaffolding proteins involved in signal transduction. Despite the fact that many PDZ domains show a limited tendency to undergo structural change, the PDZ family has been associated with long-range communication and allostery. One of the PDZ domains studied most in terms of structure and biophysical properties is the second PDZ ('PDZ2') domain from protein tyrosine phosphatase 1E (PTP1E, also known as PTPL1). Previously, we showed through NMR relaxation studies that binding of the RA-GEF2 C-terminal peptide substrate results in long-range propagation of side-chain dynamic changes in human PDZ2 [Fuentes, E. J., et al. (2004) J. Mol. Biol. 335, 1105-1115]. Here, we present the first X-ray crystal structures of PDZ2 in the absence and presence of RA-GEF2 ligand, determined to resolutions of 1.65 and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures deviate somewhat from previously determined NMR structures and indicate that very minor structural changes in PDZ2 accompany peptide binding. NMR residual dipolar couplings confirm the crystal structures to be accurate models of the time-averaged atomic coordinates of PDZ2. The impact on side-chain dynamics was further tested with a C-terminal peptide from APC, which showed results nearly identical to those of RA-GEF2. Thus, allosteric transmission in PDZ2 induced by peptide binding is conveyed purely and robustly by dynamics. {sup 15}N relaxation dispersion measurements did not detect appreciable populations of a kinetic structural intermediate. Collectively, for ligand binding to PDZ2, these data support a lock-and-key binding model from a structural perspective and an allosteric model from a dynamical perspective, which together suggest a complex energy landscape for functional transitions within the ensemble.

  17. Evidence for PDZ domains in bacteria, yeast, and plants.

    PubMed Central

    Ponting, C. P.

    1997-01-01

    Several dozen signaling proteins are now known to contain 80-100 residue repeats, called PDZ (or DHR or GLGF) domains, several of which interact with the C-terminal tetrapeptide motifs X-Ser/Thr-X-Val-COO- of ion channels and/or receptors. PDZ domains have previously been noted only in mammals, flies, and worms, suggesting that the primordial PDZ domain arose relatively late in eukaryotic evolution. Here, techniques of sequence analysis-including local alignment, profile, and motif database searches-indicate that PDZ domain homologues are present in yeast, plants, and bacteria. It is suggested that two PDZ domains occur in bacterial high-temperature requirement A (htrA) and one in tail-specific protease (tsp) homologues, and that a yeast htrA homologue contains four PDZ domains. Sequence comparisons suggest that the spread of PDZ domains in these diverse organisms may have occurred via horizontal gene transfer. The known affinity of Escherichia coli tsp for C-terminal polypeptides is proposed to be mediated by its PDZ-like domain, in a similar manner to the binding of C-terminal polypeptides by animal PDZ domains. PMID:9041651

  18. The PDZ3 domain of the cellular scaffolding protein MAGI-1 interacts with the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Ran; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O.; Martin, Sterling C. T.; Readler, James M.; Kotha, Poornima L.N.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Excoffon, Katherine J.D.A.

    2015-01-01

    The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is an essential cellular protein that is involved in cell-cell adhesion, protein trafficking, and viral infection. The major isoform of CAR is selectively sorted to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells where it co-localizes with the cellular scaffolding protein membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted domain structure-1 (MAGI-1). Previously, we demonstrated CAR interacts with MAGI-1 through a PDZ–domain dependent interaction. Here, we show that the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 is exclusively responsible for the high affinity interaction between the seven exon isoform of CAR and MAGI-1 using yeast-two-hybrid analysis and confirming this interaction biochemically and in cellular lysates by in vitro pull down assay and co-immunoprecipitation. The high affinity interaction between the PDZ3 domain and CAR C-terminus was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Further, we investigated the biological relevance of this high affinity interaction between CAR and the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 and found that it does not alter CAR-mediated adenovirus infection. By contrast, interruption of this high affinity interaction altered the localization of MAGI-1 indicating that CAR is able to traffic MAGI-1 to cell junctions. These data deepen the molecular understanding of the interaction between CAR and MAGI-1 and indicate that although CAR plays a role in trafficking PDZ-based scaffolding proteins to cellular junctions, association with a high affinity intracellular binding partner does not significantly alter adenovirus binding and entry via CAR. PMID:25622559

  19. PDZ Domain Binding Selectivity Is Optimized Across the Mouse Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Michael A.; Chen, Jiunn R.; Grantcharova, Viara P.; Lei, Ying; Fuchs, Daniel; Allen, John E.; Zaslavskaia, Lioudmila A.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2009-01-01

    PDZ domains have long been thought to cluster into discrete functional classes defined by their peptide-binding preferences. We used protein microarrays and quantitative fluorescence polarization to characterize the binding selectivity of 157 mouse PDZ domains with respect to 217 genome-encoded peptides. We then trained a multidomain selectivity model to predict PDZ domain–peptide interactions across the mouse proteome with an accuracy that exceeds many large-scale, experimental investigations of protein-protein interactions. Contrary to the current paradigm, PDZ domains do not fall into discrete classes; instead, they are evenly distributed throughout selectivity space, which suggests that they have been optimized across the proteome to minimize cross-reactivity. We predict that focusing on families of interaction domains, which facilitates the integration of experimentation and modeling, will play an increasingly important role in future investigations of protein function. PMID:17641200

  20. The Usher syndrome proteins cadherin 23 and harmonin form a complex by means of PDZ-domain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Siemens, Jan; Kazmierczak, Piotr; Reynolds, Anna; Sticker, Melanie; Littlewood-Evans, Amanda; Müller, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) patients suffer from sensorineuronal deafness, vestibular dysfunction, and visual impairment. Several genetic loci have been linked to USH1, and four of the relevant genes have been identified. They encode the unconventional myosin VIIa, the PDZ-domain protein harmonin, and the putative adhesion receptors cadherin 23 (CDH23) and protocadherin 15 (PCDH15). We show here that CDH23 and harmonin form a protein complex. Two PDZ domains in harmonin interact with two complementary binding surfaces in the CDH23 cytoplasmic domain. One of the binding surfaces is disrupted by sequences encoded by an alternatively spliced CDH23 exon that is expressed in the ear, but not the retina. In the ear, CDH23 and harmonin are expressed in the stereocilia of hair cells, and in the retina within the photoreceptor cell layer. Because CDH23-deficient mice have splayed stereocilia, our data suggest that CDH23 and harmonin are part of a transmembrane complex that connects stereocilia into a bundle. Defects in the formation of this complex are predicted to disrupt stereocilia bundles and cause deafness in USH1 patients. PMID:12407180

  1. The PDZ-domain protein Whirlin facilitates mechanosensory signaling in mammalian proprioceptors.

    PubMed

    de Nooij, Joriene C; Simon, Christian M; Simon, Anna; Doobar, Staceyann; Steel, Karen P; Banks, Robert W; Mentis, George Z; Bewick, Guy S; Jessell, Thomas M

    2015-02-18

    Mechanoreception is an essential feature of many sensory modalities. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that govern the conversion of a mechanical force to distinct patterns of action potentials remain poorly understood. Proprioceptive mechanoreceptors reside in skeletal muscle and inform the nervous system of the position of body and limbs in space. We show here that Whirlin/Deafness autosomal recessive 31 (DFNB31), a PDZ-scaffold protein involved in vestibular and auditory hair cell transduction, is also expressed by proprioceptive sensory neurons (pSNs) in dorsal root ganglia in mice. Whirlin localizes to the peripheral sensory endings of pSNs and facilitates pSN afferent firing in response to muscle stretch. The requirement of Whirlin in both proprioceptors and hair cells suggests that accessory mechanosensory signaling molecules define common features of mechanoreceptive processing across sensory systems. PMID:25698744

  2. Syndecans as Cell Surface Receptors in Cancer Biology. A Focus on their Interaction with PDZ Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bill; Montmasson, Marine; Terradot, Laurent; Rousselle, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane receptors with ectodomains that are modified by glycosaminoglycan chains. The ectodomains can interact with a wide variety of molecules, including growth factors, cytokines, proteinases, adhesion receptors, and extracellular matrix (ECM) components. The four syndecans in mammals are expressed in a development-, cell-type-, and tissue-specific manner and can function either as co-receptors with other cell surface receptors or as independent adhesion receptors that mediate cell signaling. They help regulate cell proliferation and migration, angiogenesis, cell/cell and cell/ECM adhesion, and they may participate in several key tumorigenesis processes. In some cancers, syndecan expression regulates tumor cell proliferation, adhesion, motility, and other functions, and may be a prognostic marker for tumor progression and patient survival. The short cytoplasmic tail is likely to be involved in these events through recruitment of signaling partners. In particular, the conserved carboxyl-terminal EFYA tetrapeptide sequence that is present in all syndecans binds to some PDZ domain-containing proteins that may function as scaffold proteins that recruit signaling and cytoskeletal proteins to the plasma membrane. There is growing interest in understanding these interactions at both the structural and biological levels, and recent findings show their high degree of complexity. Parameters that influence the recruitment of PDZ domain proteins by syndecans, such as binding specificity and affinity, are the focus of active investigations and are important for understanding regulatory mechanisms. Recent studies show that binding may be affected by post-translational events that influence regulatory mechanisms, such as phosphorylation within the syndecan cytoplasmic tail. PMID:26869927

  3. The Golgi-associated PDZ Domain Protein PIST/GOPC Stabilizes the β1-Adrenergic Receptor in Intracellular Compartments after Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Koliwer, Judith; Park, Minjong; Bauch, Carola; von Zastrow, Mark; Kreienkamp, Hans-Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Many G-protein-coupled receptors carry C-terminal ligand motifs for PSD-95/discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) domains; via interaction with PDZ domain-containing scaffold proteins, this allows for integration of receptors into signaling complexes. However, the presence of PDZ domain proteins attached to intracellular membranes suggests that PDZ-type interactions may also contribute to subcellular sorting of receptors. The protein interacting specifically with Tc10 (PIST; also known as GOPC) is a trans-Golgi-associated protein that interacts through its single PDZ domain with a variety of cell surface receptors. Here we show that PIST controls trafficking of the interacting β1-adrenergic receptor both in the anterograde, biosynthetic pathway and during postendocytic recycling. Overexpression and knockdown experiments show that PIST leads to retention of the receptor in the trans-Golgi network (TGN), to the effect that overexpressed PIST reduces activation of the MAPK pathway by β1-adrenergic receptor (β1AR) agonists. Receptors can be released from retention in the TGN by coexpression of the plasma membrane-associated scaffold PSD-95, which allows for transport of receptors to the plasma membrane. Stimulation of β1 receptors and activation of the cAMP pathway lead to relocation of PIST from the TGN to an endosome-like compartment. Here PIST colocalizes with SNX1 and the internalized β1AR and protects endocytosed receptors from lysosomal degradation. In agreement, β1AR levels are decreased in hippocampi of PIST-deficient mice. Our data suggest that PIST contributes to the fine-tuning of β1AR sorting both during biosynthetic and postendocytic trafficking. PMID:25614626

  4. Role of the PDZ Domains in Escherichia coli DegP Protein▿

    PubMed Central

    Iwanczyk, Jack; Damjanovic, Daniela; Kooistra, Joel; Leong, Vivian; Jomaa, Ahmad; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Ortega, Joaquin

    2007-01-01

    PDZ domains are modular protein interaction domains that are present in metazoans and bacteria. These domains possess unique structural features that allow them to interact with the C-terminal residues of their ligands. The Escherichia coli essential periplasmic protein DegP contains two PDZ domains attached to the C-terminal end of the protease domain. In this study we examined the role of each PDZ domain in the protease and chaperone activities of this protein. Specifically, DegP mutants with either one or both PDZ domains deleted were generated and tested to determine their protease and chaperone activities, as well as their abilities to sequester unfolded substrates. We found that the PDZ domains in DegP have different roles; the PDZ1 domain is essential for protease activity and is responsible for recognizing and sequestering unfolded substrates through C-terminal tags, whereas the PDZ2 domain is mostly involved in maintaining the hexameric cage of DegP. Interestingly, neither of the PDZ domains was required for the chaperone activity of DegP. In addition, we found that the loops connecting the protease domain to PDZ1 and connecting PDZ1 to PDZ2 are also essential for the protease activity of the hexameric DegP protein. New insights into the roles of the PDZ domains in the structure and function of DegP are provided. These results imply that DegP recognizes substrate molecules targeted for degradation and substrate molecules targeted for refolding in different manners and suggest that the substrate recognition mechanisms may play a role in the protease-chaperone switch, dictating whether the substrate is degraded or refolded. PMID:17277057

  5. Biochemical and structural characterization of MUPP1-PDZ4 domain from Mus musculus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haili; Liu, Zexu; Huang, Yuxin; Zhang, Chao; Li, Gang; Liu, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Specific protein-protein interactions are important for biological signal transduction. The postsynaptic density-95, disc-large, and zonulin-1 (PDZ) domain is one of the most abundant protein interaction modules. Multi-PDZ-domain protein 1 (MUPP1), as a scaffold protein, contains 13 PDZ domains and plays an important role in cytoskeletal organization, cell polarity, and cell proliferation. The study on PDZ domain of MUPP1 helps to understand the mechanisms and functions of MUPP1. In the present study, the fourth PDZ domain of MUPP1 (MUPP1-PDZ4) from Mus musculus was cloned, expressed, purified, and characterized. The MUPP1-PDZ4 domain was subcloned into a pET-vector and expressed in Escherichia coli. Affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography were used to purify the protein. MUPP1-PDZ4 protein was a monomer with a molar mass of 16.4 kDa in solution and had a melting point of 60.3°C. Using the sitting-drop vapor-diffusion method, MUPP1-PDZ4 protein crystals were obtained in a solution (pH 7.0) containing 2% (v/v) polyethylene glycol 400, 0.1 M imidazole, and 24% (w/v) polyethylene glycol monoethyl ether 5000. Finally, the crystal was diffracted with 1.6 Å resolution. The crystal structure showed that MUPP1-PDZ4 domain contained three α-helices and six β-strands in the core. The GLGI motif, L562/A564 on the β-strand B, and H605/V608/L612 on the α-helix B formed a PDZ binding pocket which could bind to the C-terminal of the binding partners. This biochemical and structural information will provide insights into how PDZ binds to its target peptide and the theoretical foundation for the function of MUPP1. PMID:25662616

  6. The PDZ Domain as a Complex Adaptive System

    PubMed Central

    Kurakin, Alexei; Swistowski, Andrzej; Wu, Susan C.; Bredesen, Dale E.

    2007-01-01

    Specific protein associations define the wiring of protein interaction networks and thus control the organization and functioning of the cell as a whole. Peptide recognition by PDZ and other protein interaction domains represents one of the best-studied classes of specific protein associations. However, a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between selectivity and promiscuity commonly observed in the interactions mediated by peptide recognition modules as well as its functional meaning remain elusive. To address these questions in a comprehensive manner, two large populations of artificial and natural peptide ligands of six archetypal PDZ domains from the synaptic proteins PSD95 and SAP97 were generated by target-assisted iterative screening (TAIS) of combinatorial peptide libraries and by synthesis of proteomic fragments, correspondingly. A comparative statistical analysis of affinity-ranked artificial and natural ligands yielded a comprehensive picture of known and novel PDZ ligand specificity determinants, revealing a hitherto unappreciated combination of specificity and adaptive plasticity inherent to PDZ domain recognition. We propose a reconceptualization of the PDZ domain in terms of a complex adaptive system representing a flexible compromise between the rigid order of exquisite specificity and the chaos of unselective promiscuity, which has evolved to mediate two mutually contradictory properties required of such higher order sub-cellular organizations as synapses, cell junctions, and others – organizational structure and organizational plasticity/adaptability. The generalization of this reconceptualization in regard to other protein interaction modules and specific protein associations is consistent with the image of the cell as a complex adaptive macromolecular system as opposed to clockwork. PMID:17895993

  7. The Role of Protein Kinase A Regulation of the E6 PDZ-Binding Domain during the Differentiation-Dependent Life Cycle of Human Papillomavirus Type 18

    PubMed Central

    Delury, Craig P.; Marsh, Elizabeth K.; James, Claire D.; Boon, Siaw Shi; Banks, Lawrence; Knight, Gillian L.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 proteins of high-risk alpha types target a select group of PSD95/DLG1/ZO1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins by using a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PBM), an interaction that can be negatively regulated by phosphorylation of the E6 PBM by protein kinase A (PKA). Here, we have mutated the canonical PKA recognition motif that partially overlaps with the E6 PBM in the HPV18 genome (E6153PKA) and compared the effect of this mutation on the HPVl8 life cycle in primary keratinocytes with the wild-type genome and with a second mutant genome that lacks the E6 PBM (E6ΔPDZ). Loss of PKA recognition of E6 was associated with increased growth of the genome-containing cells relative to cells carrying the wild-type genome, and upon stratification, a more hyperplastic phenotype, with an increase in the number of S-phase competent cells in the upper suprabasal layers, while the opposite was seen with the E6ΔPDZ genome. Moreover, the growth of wild-type genome-containing cells was sensitive to changes in PKA activity, and these changes were associated with increased phosphorylation of the E6 PBM. In marked contrast to E6ΔPDZ genomes, the E6153PKA mutation exhibited no deleterious effects on viral genome amplification or expression of late proteins. Our data suggest that the E6 PBM function is differentially regulated by phosphorylation in the HPV18 life cycle. We speculate that perturbation of protein kinase signaling pathways could lead to changes in E6 PBM function, which in turn could have a bearing on tumor promotion and progression. PMID:23804647

  8. The Impact of Extra-Domain Structures and Post-Translational Modifications in the Folding/Misfolding Behaviour of the Third PDZ Domain of MAGUK Neuronal Protein PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Cobos, Eva S.; Villegas, Sandra; Martinez, Jose C.

    2014-01-01

    The modulation of binding affinities and specificities by post-translational modifications located out from the binding pocket of the third PDZ domain of PSD-95 (PDZ3) has been reported recently. It is achieved through an intra-domain electrostatic network involving some charged residues in the β2–β3 loop (were a succinimide modification occurs), the α3 helix (an extra-structural element that links the PDZ3 domain with the following SH3 domain in PSD-95, and contains the phosphorylation target Tyr397), and the ligand peptide. Here, we have investigated the main structural and thermodynamic aspects that these structural elements and their related post-translational modifications display in the folding/misfolding pathway of PDZ3 by means of site-directed mutagenesis combined with calorimetry and spectroscopy. We have found that, although all the assayed mutations generate proteins more prone to aggregation than the wild-type PDZ3, those directly affecting the α3 helix, like the E401R substitution or the truncation of the whole α3 helix, increase the population of the DSC-detected intermediate state and the misfolding kinetics, by organizing the supramacromolecular structures at the expense of the two β-sheets present in the PDZ3 fold. However, those mutations affecting the β2–β3 loop, included into the prone-to-aggregation region composed by a single β-sheet comprising β2 to β4 chains, stabilize the trimeric intermediate previously shown in the wild-type PDZ3 and slow-down aggregation, also making it partly reversible. These results strongly suggest that the α3 helix protects to some extent the PDZ3 domain core from misfolding. This might well constitute the first example where an extra-element, intended to link the PDZ3 domain to the following SH3 in PSD-95 and in other members of the MAGUK family, not only regulates the binding abilities of this domain but it also protects PDZ3 from misfolding and aggregation. The influence of the post

  9. The Role of Flexibility and Conformational Selection in the Binding Promiscuity of PDZ Domains

    PubMed Central

    Münz, Márton; Hein, Jotun; Biggin, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    In molecular recognition, it is often the case that ligand binding is coupled to conformational change in one or both of the binding partners. Two hypotheses describe the limiting cases involved; the first is the induced fit and the second is the conformational selection model. The conformational selection model requires that the protein adopts conformations that are similar to the ligand-bound conformation in the absence of ligand, whilst the induced-fit model predicts that the ligand-bound conformation of the protein is only accessible when the ligand is actually bound. The flexibility of the apo protein clearly plays a major role in these interpretations. For many proteins involved in signaling pathways there is the added complication that they are often promiscuous in that they are capable of binding to different ligand partners. The relationship between protein flexibility and promiscuity is an area of active research and is perhaps best exemplified by the PDZ domain family of proteins. In this study we use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the relationship between flexibility and promiscuity in five PDZ domains: the human Dvl2 (Dishevelled-2) PDZ domain, the human Erbin PDZ domain, the PDZ1 domain of InaD (inactivation no after-potential D protein) from fruit fly, the PDZ7 domain of GRIP1 (glutamate receptor interacting protein 1) from rat and the PDZ2 domain of PTP-BL (protein tyrosine phosphatase) from mouse. We show that despite their high structural similarity, the PDZ binding sites have significantly different dynamics. Importantly, the degree of binding pocket flexibility was found to be closely related to the various characteristics of peptide binding specificity and promiscuity of the five PDZ domains. Our findings suggest that the intrinsic motions of the apo structures play a key role in distinguishing functional properties of different PDZ domains and allow us to make predictions that can be experimentally tested. PMID:23133356

  10. Deciphering the unconventional peptide binding to the PDZ domain of MAST2.

    PubMed

    Delhommel, Florent; Chaffotte, Alain; Terrien, Elouan; Raynal, Bertrand; Buc, Henri; Delepierre, Muriel; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) and microtubule-associated serine threonine kinase 2 (MAST2) are key negative regulators of survival pathways in neuronal cells. The two proteins interact via the PDZ (PSD-95, Dlg1, Zo-1) domain of MAST2 (MAST2-PDZ). During infection by rabies virus, the viral glycoprotein competes with PTEN for interaction with MAST2-PDZ and promotes neuronal survival. The C-terminal PDZ-binding motifs (PBMs) of the two proteins bind similarly to MAST2-PDZ through an unconventional network of connectivity involving two anchor points. Combining stopped-flow fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC), microcalorimetry and NMR, we document the kinetics of interaction between endogenous and viral ligands to MAST2-PDZ as well as the dynamic and structural effects of these interactions. Viral and PTEN peptide interactions to MAST2-PDZ occur via a unique kinetic step which involves both canonical C-terminal PBM binding and N-terminal anchoring. Indirect effects induced by the PBM binding include modifications to the structure and dynamics of the PDZ dimerization surface which prevent MAST2-PDZ auto-association. Such an energetic communication between binding sites and distal surfaces in PDZ domains provides interesting clues for protein regulation overall. PMID:25942057

  11. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J.; McDonald, Neil Q.

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  12. Nucleo-cytoplasmic functions of the PDZ-LIM protein family: new insights in organ development

    PubMed Central

    Krcmery, Jennifer; Camarata, Troy; Kulisz, Andre; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent work on the PDZ-LIM protein family has revealed important activities at the cellular level, mediating signals between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton, with significant impact on organ development. We review and integrate current knowledge about the PDZ-LIM protein family and propose a new functional role, sequestering nuclear factors in the cytoplasm. Characterized by their PDZ and LIM domains, the PDZ-LIM family is comprised of evolutionarily conserved proteins found throughout the animal kingdom, from worms to humans. Combining two functional domains in one protein, PDZ-LIM proteins have wide-ranging and multi-compartmental cell functions during development and homeostasis while, in contrast, misregulation can lead to cancer formation and progression. New emerging roles include interactions with integrins, T-box transcription factors, and receptor tyrosine kinases. Facilitating the assembly of protein complexes, PDZ-LIM proteins can act as signal modulators, influence actin dynamics, regulate cell architecture and control gene transcription. PMID:20091751

  13. Role of PDZ Proteins in Regulating Trafficking, Signaling, and Function of GPCRs: Means, Motif, and Opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Guillermo; von Zastrow, Mark; Friedman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    PDZ proteins, named for the common structural domain shared by the postsynaptic density protein (PSD95), Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor (DlgA), and zonula occludens-1 protein (ZO-1), constitute a family of 200–300 recognized members. These cytoplasmic adapter proteins are capable of assembling a variety of membrane-associated proteins and signaling molecules in short-lived functional units. Here, we review PDZ proteins that participate in the regulation of signaling, trafficking, and function of G protein-coupled receptors. Salient structural features of PDZ proteins that allow them to recognize targeted GPCRs are considered. Scaffolding proteins harboring PDZ domains may contain single or multiple PDZ modules and may also include other protein–protein interaction modules. PDZ proteins may impact receptor signaling by diverse mechanisms that include retaining the receptor at the cell membrane, thereby increasing the duration of ligand binding, as well as importantly influencing GPCR internalization, trafficking, recycling, and intracellular sorting. PDZ proteins are also capable of modifying the assembled complex of accessory proteins such as β-arrestins that themselves regulate GPCR signaling. Additionally, PDZ proteins may modulate GPCR signaling by altering the G protein to which the receptor binds, or affect other regulatory proteins that impact GTPase activity, protein kinase A, phospholipase C, or modify downstream signaling events. Small molecules targeting the PDZ protein-GPCR interaction are being developed and may become important and selective drug candidates. PMID:21907913

  14. Biochemical Large-Scale Interaction Analysis of Murine Olfactory Receptors and Associated Signaling Proteins with Post-Synaptic Density 95, Drosophila Discs Large, Zona-Occludens 1 (PDZ) Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Scholz, Paul; Fränzel, Benjamin; Osterloh, Markus; Wolters, Dirk; Hatt, Hanns; Neuhaus, Eva Maria; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family among mammalian membrane proteins and are capable of initiating numerous essential signaling cascades. Various GPCR-mediated pathways are organized into protein microdomains that can be orchestrated and regulated through scaffolding proteins, such as PSD-95/discs-large/ZO1 (PDZ) domain proteins. However, detailed binding characteristics of PDZ–GPCR interactions remain elusive because these interactions seem to be more complex than previously thought. To address this issue, we analyzed binding modalities using our established model system. This system includes the 13 individual PDZ domains of the multiple PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1; the largest PDZ protein), a broad range of murine olfactory receptors (a multifaceted gene cluster within the family of GPCRs), and associated olfactory signaling proteins. These proteins were analyzed in a large-scale peptide microarray approach and continuative interaction studies. As a result, we demonstrate that canonical binding motifs were not overrepresented among the interaction partners of MUPP1. Furthermore, C-terminal phosphorylation and distinct amino acid replacements abolished PDZ binding promiscuity. In addition to the described in vitro experiments, we identified new interaction partners within the murine olfactory epithelium using pull-down-based interactomics and could verify the partners through co-immunoprecipitation. In summary, the present study provides important insight into the complexity of the binding characteristics of PDZ–GPCR interactions based on olfactory signaling proteins, which could identify novel clinical targets for GPCR-associated diseases in the future. PMID:25979994

  15. Insights into the C-terminal Peptide Binding Specificity of the PDZ Domain of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE INTERACTION WITH THE TIGHT JUNCTION PROTEIN CLAUDIN-3.

    PubMed

    Merino-Gracia, Javier; Costas-Insua, Carlos; Canales, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Crespo, Ignacio

    2016-05-27

    Neuronal nitric-oxide synthase, unlike its endothelial and inducible counterparts, displays a PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domain located at its N terminus involved in subcellular targeting. The C termini of various cellular proteins insert within the binding groove of this PDZ domain and determine the subcellular distribution of neuronal NOS (nNOS). The molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions are poorly understood because the PDZ domain of nNOS can apparently exhibit class I, class II, and class III binding specificity. In addition, it has been recently suggested that the PDZ domain of nNOS binds with very low affinity to the C termini of target proteins, and a necessary simultaneous lateral interaction must take place for binding to occur. We describe herein that the PDZ domain of nNOS can behave as a bona fide class III PDZ domain and bind to C-terminal sequences with acidic residues at the P-2 position with low micromolar binding constants. Binding to C-terminal sequences with a hydrophobic residue at the P-2 position plus an acidic residue at the P-3 position (class II) can also occur, although interactions involving residues extending up to the P-7 position mediate this type of binding. This promiscuous behavior also extends to its association to class I sequences, which must display a Glu residue at P-3 and a Thr residue at P-2 By means of site-directed mutagenesis and NMR spectroscopy, we have been able to identify the residues involved in each specific type of binding and rationalize the mechanisms used to recognize binding partners. Finally, we have analyzed the high affinity association of the PDZ domain of nNOS to claudin-3 and claudin-14, two tight junction tetraspan membrane proteins that are essential components of the paracellular barrier. PMID:27030110

  16. Membrane Binding and Modulation of the PDZ Domain of PICK1

    PubMed Central

    Erlendsson, Simon; Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolding proteins serve to assemble protein complexes in dynamic processes by means of specific protein-protein and protein-lipid binding domains. Many of these domains bind either proteins or lipids exclusively; however, it has become increasingly evident that certain domains are capable of binding both. Especially, many PDZ domains, which are highly abundant protein-protein binding domains, bind lipids and membranes. Here we provide an overview of recent large-scale studies trying to generalize and rationalize the binding patterns as well as specificity of PDZ domains towards membrane lipids. Moreover, we review how these PDZ-membrane interactions are regulated in the case of the synaptic scaffolding protein PICK1 and how this might affect cellular localization and function. PMID:26501328

  17. PDZ Protein Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptor Trafficking and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Henry A; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2015-10-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) contribute to the regulation of every aspect of human physiology and are therapeutic targets for the treatment of numerous diseases. As a consequence, understanding the myriad of mechanisms controlling GPCR signaling and trafficking is essential for the development of new pharmacological strategies for the treatment of human pathologies. Of the many GPCR-interacting proteins, postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons, disc large, zona occludens-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins appear most abundant and have similarly been implicated in disease mechanisms. PDZ proteins play an important role in regulating receptor and channel protein localization within synapses and tight junctions and function to scaffold intracellular signaling protein complexes. In the current study, we review the known functional interactions between PDZ domain-containing proteins and GPCRs and provide insight into the potential mechanisms of action. These PDZ domain-containing proteins include the membrane-associated guanylate-like kinases [postsynaptic density protein of 95 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 97 kilodaltons; postsynaptic density protein of 93 kilodaltons; synapse-associated protein of 102 kilodaltons; discs, large homolog 5; caspase activation and recruitment domain and membrane-associated guanylate-like kinase domain-containing protein 3; membrane protein, palmitoylated 3; calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase; membrane-associated guanylate kinase protein (MAGI)-1, MAGI-2, and MAGI-3], Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor proteins (NHERFs) (NHERF1, NHERF2, PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 1, and PDZ domain-containing kidney protein 2), Golgi-associated PDZ proteins (Gα-binding protein interacting protein, C-terminus and CFTR-associated ligand), PDZ domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) 1 and 2, regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-homology-RhoGEFs (PDZ domain-containing RhoGEF and

  18. Evidence that the tandem-pleckstrin-homology-domain-containing protein TAPP1 interacts with Ptd(3,4)P2 and the multi-PDZ-domain-containing protein MUPP1 in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kimber, Wendy A; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Cheung, Peter C F; Deak, Maria; Marsden, Louisa J; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Watt, Stephen; Javier, Ronald T; Gray, Alex; Downes, C Peter; Lucocq, John M; Alessi, Dario R

    2002-01-01

    PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is an established second messenger of growth-factor and insulin-induced signalling pathways. There is increasing evidence that one of the immediate breakdown products of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, namely PtdIns(3,4)P2, whose levels are elevated by numerous extracellular agonists, might also function as a signalling molecule. Recently, we identified two related pleckstrin-homology (PH)-domain-containing proteins, termed 'tandem-PH-domain-containing protein-1' (TAPP1) and TAPP2, which interacted in vitro with high affinity with PtdIns(3,4)P2, but did not bind PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 or other phosphoinositides. In the present study we demonstrate that stimulation of Swiss 3T3 or 293 cells with agonists that stimulate PtdIns(3,4)P2 production results in the marked translocation of TAPP1 to the plasma membrane. This recruitment is dependent on a functional PtdIns(3,4)P2-binding PH domain and is inhibited by wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor that prevents PtdIns(3,4)P2 generation. A search for proteins that interact with TAPP1 identified the multi-PDZ-containing protein termed 'MUPP1', a protein possessing 13 PDZ domains and no other known modular or catalytic domains [PDZ is postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disc large tumour suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1)]. We demonstrate that immunoprecipitation of endogenously expressed TAPP1 from 293-cell lysates results in the co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous MUPP1, indicating that these proteins are likely to interact with each other physiologically. We show that TAPP1 and TAPP2 interact with the 10th and 13th PDZ domain of MUPP1 through their C-terminal amino acids. The results of the present study suggest that TAPP1 and TAPP2 could function in cells as adapter proteins to recruit MUPP1, or other proteins that they may interact with, to the plasma membrane in response to signals that elevate PtdIns(3,4)P2. PMID:11802782

  19. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  20. Viral Interactions with PDZ Domain-Containing Proteins—An Oncogenic Trait?

    PubMed Central

    James, Claire D.; Roberts, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Many of the human viruses with oncogenic capabilities, either in their natural host or in experimental systems (hepatitis B and C, human T cell leukaemia virus type 1, Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, human immunodeficiency virus, high-risk human papillomaviruses and adenovirus type 9), encode in their limited genome the ability to target cellular proteins containing PSD95/ DLG/ZO-1 (PDZ) interaction modules. In many cases (but not always), the viruses have evolved to bind the PDZ domains using the same short linear peptide motifs found in host protein-PDZ interactions, and in some cases regulate the interactions in a similar fashion by phosphorylation. What is striking is that the diverse viruses target a common subset of PDZ proteins that are intimately involved in controlling cell polarity and the structure and function of intercellular junctions, including tight junctions. Cell polarity is fundamental to the control of cell proliferation and cell survival and disruption of polarity and the signal transduction pathways involved is a key event in tumourigenesis. This review focuses on the oncogenic viruses and the role of targeting PDZ proteins in the virus life cycle and the contribution of virus-PDZ protein interactions to virus-mediated oncogenesis. We highlight how many of the viral associations with PDZ proteins lead to deregulation of PI3K/AKT signalling, benefitting virus replication but as a consequence also contributing to oncogenesis. PMID:26797638

  1. Comparison of p53 and the PDZ domain containing protein MAGI-3 regulation by the E6 protein from high-risk human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ainsworth, Julia; Thomas, Miranda; Banks, Lawrence; Coutlee, Francois; Matlashewski, Greg

    2008-01-01

    Central to cellular transformation caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the ability of E6 proteins to target cellular p53 and proteins containing PDZ domains, including MAGI-3, for degradation. The aim of this study was to compare E6-mediated degradation of p53 and MAGI-3 under parallel experimental conditions and further with respect to the involvement of proteasomes and ubiquitination. We also compared the degradation of p53 and MAGI-3 by E6 from several HPV types including different variants from HPV-33. All of the E6 genes from different HPV types displayed similar abilities to mediate the degradation of both p53 and MAGI-3 although there may be subtle differences observed with the different 33E6 variants. There were however differences in E6 mediated degradation of p53 and MAGI-3. Proteasome inhibition assays partially protected p53 from E6 mediated degradation, but did not protect MAGI-3. In addition, under conditions where p53 was ubiquitinated by E6 and MDM2 in vivo, ubiquitination of MAGI-3 was not detected. These results imply that although both p53 and MAGI-3 represent effective targets for oncogenic E6, the mechanisms by which E6 mediates p53 and MAGI-3 degradation are distinct with respect to the involvement of ubiquitination prior to proteasomal degradation. PMID:18518978

  2. Frizzled 7 and PIP2 binding by syntenin PDZ2 domain supports Frizzled 7 trafficking and signalling.

    PubMed

    Egea-Jimenez, Antonio Luis; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Ivarsson, Ylva; Wawrzyniak, Anna Maria; Kashyap, Rudra; Loris, Remy; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Zimmermann, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    PDZ domain-containing proteins work as intracellular scaffolds to control spatio-temporal aspects of cell signalling. This function is supported by the ability of their PDZ domains to bind other proteins such as receptors, but also phosphoinositide lipids important for membrane trafficking. Here we report a crystal structure of the syntenin PDZ tandem in complex with the carboxy-terminal fragment of Frizzled 7 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). The crystal structure reveals a tripartite interaction formed via the second PDZ domain of syntenin. Biophysical and biochemical experiments establish co-operative binding of the tripartite complex and identify residues crucial for membrane PIP2-specific recognition. Experiments with cells support the importance of the syntenin-PIP2 interaction for plasma membrane targeting of Frizzled 7 and c-jun phosphorylation. This study contributes to our understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins as key players in membrane compartmentalization and dynamics. PMID:27386966

  3. Frizzled 7 and PIP2 binding by syntenin PDZ2 domain supports Frizzled 7 trafficking and signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egea-Jimenez, Antonio Luis; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Ivarsson, Ylva; Wawrzyniak, Anna Maria; Kashyap, Rudra; Loris, Remy; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Zimmermann, Pascale

    2016-07-01

    PDZ domain-containing proteins work as intracellular scaffolds to control spatio-temporal aspects of cell signalling. This function is supported by the ability of their PDZ domains to bind other proteins such as receptors, but also phosphoinositide lipids important for membrane trafficking. Here we report a crystal structure of the syntenin PDZ tandem in complex with the carboxy-terminal fragment of Frizzled 7 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). The crystal structure reveals a tripartite interaction formed via the second PDZ domain of syntenin. Biophysical and biochemical experiments establish co-operative binding of the tripartite complex and identify residues crucial for membrane PIP2-specific recognition. Experiments with cells support the importance of the syntenin-PIP2 interaction for plasma membrane targeting of Frizzled 7 and c-jun phosphorylation. This study contributes to our understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins as key players in membrane compartmentalization and dynamics.

  4. PDZ Binding Domains, Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation: A Menage-a-trois Tailing Dcp2 mRNA Decapping Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Diverse cellular activities are mediated through the interaction of protein domains and their binding partners. One such protein domain widely distributed in the higher metazoan world is the PDZ domain, which facilitates abundant protein-protein interactions. The PDZ domain-PDZ binding domain interaction has been implicated in several pathologies including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Down syndrome. PDZ domains bind to C-terminal peptides/proteins which have either of the following combinations: S/T-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type I, hydrophobic-Xhydrophobic- COOH for type II, and D/E-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type III, although hydrophobicity in the termini form the key characteristic of the PDZ-binding domains. We identified and characterized a Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana, a protein containing a putative PDZ-binding domain using mutagenesis and protein biochemistry. Now we are using bioinformatics to study the Cterminal end of mRNA decapping enzymes from complex metazoans with the aim of (1) identifying putative PDZ-binding domains (2) Correlating structural disorder with PDZ binding domains and (3) Demonstrating the presence of phosphorylation sites in C-terminal extremities of Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzymes. It is proposed here that the trinity of PDZbinding domains, structural disorder and phosphorylation-susceptible sites are a feature of the Dcp2 family of decapping enzymes and perhaps is a wider trick in protein evolution where scaffolding/tethering is a requirement for localization and function. It is critical though laboratory-based supporting evidence is sought to back-up this bioinformatics exploration into tail regions of mRNA decapping enzymes. PMID:27151193

  5. PDZ domains determine the native oligomeric structure of the DegP (HtrA) protease.

    PubMed

    Sassoon, N; Arié, J P; Betton, J M

    1999-08-01

    DegP (HtrA) is a periplasmic heat shock serine protease of Escherichia coli that degrades misfolded proteins at high temperatures. Biochemical and biophysical experiments have indicated that the purified DegP exists as a hexamer. To examine whether the PDZ domains of DegP were required for oligomerization, we constructed a DegP variant lacking both PDZ domains. This truncated variant, DegPDelta, exhibited no proteolytic activity but exerted a dominant-negative effect on growth at high temperatures by interfering with the functional assembly of oligomeric DegP. Thus, the PDZ domains contain information necessary for proper assembly of the functional hexameric structure of DegP. PMID:10417648

  6. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    PubMed Central

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on x-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with Rosetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several Rosetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions. PMID:24305904

  7. On the role of PDZ domain-encoding genes in Drosophila border cell migration.

    PubMed

    Aranjuez, George; Kudlaty, Elizabeth; Longworth, Michelle S; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2012-11-01

    Cells often move as collective groups during normal embryonic development and wound healing, although the mechanisms governing this type of migration are poorly understood. The Drosophila melanogaster border cells migrate as a cluster during late oogenesis and serve as a powerful in vivo genetic model for collective cell migration. To discover new genes that participate in border cell migration, 64 out of 66 genes that encode PDZ domain-containing proteins were systematically targeted by in vivo RNAi knockdown. The PDZ domain is one of the largest families of protein-protein interaction domains found in eukaryotes. Proteins that contain PDZ domains participate in a variety of biological processes, including signal transduction and establishment of epithelial apical-basal polarity. Targeting PDZ proteins effectively assesses a larger number of genes via the protein complexes and pathways through which these proteins function. par-6, a known regulator of border cell migration, was a positive hit and thus validated the approach. Knockdown of 14 PDZ domain genes disrupted migration with multiple RNAi lines. The candidate genes have diverse predicted cellular functions and are anticipated to provide new insights into the mechanisms that control border cell movement. As a test of this concept, two genes that disrupted migration were characterized in more detail: big bang and the Dlg5 homolog CG6509. We present evidence that Big bang regulates JAK/STAT signaling, whereas Dlg5/CG6509 maintains cluster cohesion. Moreover, these results demonstrate that targeting a selected class of genes by RNAi can uncover novel regulators of collective cell migration. PMID:23173089

  8. Computational Design of Selective Peptides to Discriminate Between Similar PDZ Domains in an Oncogenic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Jewell, Heather; Fitzpatrick, Jeremy; Zhang, Jian; Mierke, Dale F.; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-01-01

    Reagents that target protein-protein interactions to rewire signaling are of great relevance in biological research. Computational protein design may offer a means of creating such reagents on demand, but methods for encoding targeting selectivity are sorely needed. This is especially challenging when targeting interactions with ubiquitous recognition modules—e.g., PDZ domains, which bind C-terminal sequences of partner proteins. Here we consider the problem of designing selective PDZ inhibitor peptides in the context of an oncogenic signaling pathway, in which two PDZ domains (NHERF-2 PDZ2—N2P2 and MAGI-3 PDZ6—M3P6) compete for a receptor C-terminus to differentially modulate oncogenic activities. Because N2P2 increases tumorigenicity and M3P6 decreases it, we sought to design peptides that inhibit N2P2 without affecting M3P6. We developed a structure-based computational design framework that models peptide flexibility in binding, yet is efficient enough to rapidly analyze tradeoffs between affinity and selectivity. Designed peptides showed low-micromolar inhibition constants for N2P2 and no detectable M3P6 binding. Peptides designed for reverse discrimination bound M3P6 tighter than N2P2, further testing our technology. Experimental and computational analysis of selectivity determinants revealed significant indirect energetic coupling in the binding site. Successful discrimination between N2P2 and M3P6, despite their overlapping binding preferences, is highly encouraging for computational approaches to selective PDZ targeting, especially because design relied on a homology model of M3P6. Still, we demonstrate specific deficiencies of structural modeling that must be addressed to enable truly robust design. The presented framework is general and can be applied in many scenarios to engineer selective targeting. PMID:25451599

  9. A unique PDZ domain and arrestin-like fold interaction reveals mechanistic details of endocytic recycling by SNX27-retromer.

    PubMed

    Gallon, Matthew; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Steinberg, Florian; Mas, Caroline; Ghai, Rajesh; Sessions, Richard B; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M; Cullen, Peter J

    2014-09-01

    The sorting nexin 27 (SNX27)-retromer complex is a major regulator of endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling of transmembrane cargos that contain a PSD95, Dlg1, zo-1 (PDZ)-binding motif. Here we describe the core interaction in SNX27-retromer assembly and its functional relevance for cargo sorting. Crystal structures and NMR experiments reveal that an exposed β-hairpin in the SNX27 PDZ domain engages a groove in the arrestin-like structure of the vacuolar protein sorting 26A (VPS26A) retromer subunit. The structure establishes how the SNX27 PDZ domain simultaneously binds PDZ-binding motifs and retromer-associated VPS26. Importantly, VPS26A binding increases the affinity of the SNX27 PDZ domain for PDZ- binding motifs by an order of magnitude, revealing cooperativity in cargo selection. With disruption of SNX27 and retromer function linked to synaptic dysfunction and neurodegenerative disease, our work provides the first step, to our knowledge, in the molecular description of this important sorting complex, and more broadly describes a unique interaction between a PDZ domain and an arrestin-like fold. PMID:25136126

  10. A unique PDZ domain and arrestin-like fold interaction reveals mechanistic details of endocytic recycling by SNX27-retromer

    PubMed Central

    Gallon, Matthew; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Steinberg, Florian; Mas, Caroline; Ghai, Rajesh; Sessions, Richard B.; Teasdale, Rohan D.; Collins, Brett M.; Cullen, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The sorting nexin 27 (SNX27)-retromer complex is a major regulator of endosome-to-plasma membrane recycling of transmembrane cargos that contain a PSD95, Dlg1, zo-1 (PDZ)-binding motif. Here we describe the core interaction in SNX27-retromer assembly and its functional relevance for cargo sorting. Crystal structures and NMR experiments reveal that an exposed β-hairpin in the SNX27 PDZ domain engages a groove in the arrestin-like structure of the vacuolar protein sorting 26A (VPS26A) retromer subunit. The structure establishes how the SNX27 PDZ domain simultaneously binds PDZ-binding motifs and retromer-associated VPS26. Importantly, VPS26A binding increases the affinity of the SNX27 PDZ domain for PDZ- binding motifs by an order of magnitude, revealing cooperativity in cargo selection. With disruption of SNX27 and retromer function linked to synaptic dysfunction and neurodegenerative disease, our work provides the first step, to our knowledge, in the molecular description of this important sorting complex, and more broadly describes a unique interaction between a PDZ domain and an arrestin-like fold. PMID:25136126

  11. Confinement of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocyte-like H9c2 cells is mediated by selective interactions with PDZ domain and A-kinase anchoring proteins but not caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Cathleen D.; Haggie, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system regulates cardiac output by activating adrenergic receptors (ARs) in cardiac myocytes. The predominant cardiac ARs, β1- and β2AR, are structurally similar but mediate distinct signaling responses. Scaffold protein–mediated compartmentalization of ARs into discrete, multiprotein complexes has been proposed to dictate differential signaling responses. To test the hypothesis that βARs integrate into complexes in live cells, we measured receptor diffusion and interactions by single-particle tracking. Unstimulated β1- and β2AR were highly confined in the membrane of H9c2 cardiomyocyte-like cells, indicating that receptors are tethered and presumably integrated into protein complexes. Selective disruption of interactions with postsynaptic density protein 95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)–domain proteins and A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) increased receptor diffusion, indicating that these scaffold proteins participate in receptor confinement. In contrast, modulation of interactions between the putative scaffold caveolae and β2AR did not alter receptor dynamics, suggesting that these membrane domains are not involved in β2AR confinement. For both β1- and β2AR, the receptor carboxy-terminus was uniquely responsible for scaffold interactions. Our data formally demonstrate that distinct and stable protein complexes containing β1- or β2AR are formed in the plasma membrane of cardiomyocyte-like cells and that selective PDZ and AKAP interactions are responsible for the integration of receptors into complexes. PMID:21680711

  12. Identification of small-molecule compounds targeting the dishevelled PDZ domain by virtual screening and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jiwon; Ma, SongLing; Kim, Hyun-Yi; Yun, Ji-Hye; Heo, Jung-Nyoung; Lee, Weontae; Choi, Kang-Yell; No, Kyoung Tai

    2016-08-01

    The Dishevelled (Dvl) protein, which conveys signals from receptors to the downstream effectors, is a critical constituent of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the PDZ domain of Dvl protein functions through associations with a wide range of protein partners, Dvl protein involved in the Wnt signaling pathway has been considered to be therapeutic targets in cancers. In this study, we performed structure-based pharmacophore model of the Dvl PDZ domain to discover novel small-molecule binders and identified eight compounds with micromolar affinity. The most potent compound identified, BMD4702, efficiently bound to the Dvl PDZ domain with 11.2μM affinity and had a 0.186μM KD value according to surface plasmon resonance and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Combining both structural-kinetic relationship analyses and docking studies, we fourmulated that the ligand-binding site is composed of three H-bonds and three hydrophobic features. Thus, our approach led to the identification of potent binders of the Dvl PDZ domain and the findings provide novel insights into structure-based approaches to design high-affinity binders for the Dvl PDZ domain. PMID:27112452

  13. Affinity Enhancement by Ligand Clustering Effect Inspired by Peptide Dendrimers−Shank PDZ Proteins Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Liu, Miao; Zheng, Bo; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity binders are desirable tools to probe the function that specific protein−protein interactions play in cell. In the process of seeking a general strategy to design high-affinity binders, we found a clue from the βPIX (p21-activated kinase interacting exchange factor)−Shank PDZ interaction in synaptic assembly: three PDZ-binding sites are clustered by a parallel coiled-coil trimer but bind to Shank PDZ protein with 1:1 stoichiometry (1 trimer/1 PDZ). Inspired by this architecture, we proposed that peptide dendrimer, mimicking the ligand clustering in βPIX, will also show enhanced binding affinity, yet with 1:1 stoichiometry. This postulation has been proven here, as we synthesized a set of monomeric, dimeric and trimeric peptides and measured their binding affinity and stoichiometry with Shank PDZ domains by isothermal titration calorimetry, native mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance. This affinity enhancement, best explained by proximity effect, will be useful to guide the design of high-affinity blockers for protein−protein interactions. PMID:26918521

  14. Large-scale interaction profiling of PDZ domains through proteomic peptide-phage display using human and viral phage peptidomes.

    PubMed

    Ivarsson, Ylva; Arnold, Roland; McLaughlin, Megan; Nim, Satra; Joshi, Rakesh; Ray, Debashish; Liu, Bernard; Teyra, Joan; Pawson, Tony; Moffat, Jason; Li, Shawn Shun-Cheng; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Kim, Philip M

    2014-02-18

    The human proteome contains a plethora of short linear motifs (SLiMs) that serve as binding interfaces for modular protein domains. Such interactions are crucial for signaling and other cellular processes, but are difficult to detect because of their low to moderate affinities. Here we developed a dedicated approach, proteomic peptide-phage display (ProP-PD), to identify domain-SLiM interactions. Specifically, we generated phage libraries containing all human and viral C-terminal peptides using custom oligonucleotide microarrays. With these libraries we screened the nine PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domains of human Densin-180, Erbin, Scribble, and Disks large homolog 1 for peptide ligands. We identified several known and putative interactions potentially relevant to cellular signaling pathways and confirmed interactions between full-length Scribble and the target proteins β-PIX, plakophilin-4, and guanylate cyclase soluble subunit α-2 using colocalization and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. The affinities of recombinant Scribble PDZ domains and the synthetic peptides representing the C termini of these proteins were in the 1- to 40-μM range. Furthermore, we identified several well-established host-virus protein-protein interactions, and confirmed that PDZ domains of Scribble interact with the C terminus of Tax-1 of human T-cell leukemia virus with micromolar affinity. Previously unknown putative viral protein ligands for the PDZ domains of Scribble and Erbin were also identified. Thus, we demonstrate that our ProP-PD libraries are useful tools for probing PDZ domain interactions. The method can be extended to interrogate all potential eukaryotic, bacterial, and viral SLiMs and we suggest it will be a highly valuable approach for studying cellular and pathogen-host protein-protein interactions. PMID:24550280

  15. Different conformational dynamics of PDZ1 and PDZ2 in full-length EBP50 analyzed by hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Duc, Nguyen Minh; Kim, Dong Kyun; Lee, Su Youn; Li, Sheng; Seo, Min-Duk; Woods, Virgil L; Chung, Ka Young

    2015-08-01

    Ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding protein 50 (EBP50) is a scaffolding protein expressed in polarized epithelial cells in various organs, including the liver, kidney, and small intestine, in which it regulates the trafficking and targeting cellular proteins. EBP50 contains two postsynaptic density-95/disk-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domains (e.g., PDZ1 and PDZ2) and an ezrin/radixin/moesin-binding (EB) domain. PDZ domains are one of the major scaffolding domains regulating protein-protein interactions with critical biological roles in cell polarity, migration, proliferation, recognition, and cell-cell interaction. PDZ1 and PDZ2 in EBP50 have different ligand selectivity, although several high-resolution structural studies of isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 showed similar structures. We studied the conformations of full-length EBP50 and isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). The deuterium uptake profiles of isolated PDZ1 and PDZ2 were similar to those of full-length EBP50. Interestingly, PDZ1 was more dynamic than PDZ2, and these PDZ domains underwent different conformational changes upon ligand binding. These results might explain the differences in ligand-selectivity between PDZ1 and PDZ2. PMID:25789870

  16. A Mixed Protein Structure Network and Elastic Network Model Approach to Predict the Structural Communication in Biomolecular Systems: The PDZ2 Domain from Tyrosine Phosphatase 1E As a Case Study.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Francesco; Felline, Angelo; Seeber, Michele; Mariani, Simona; Fanelli, Francesca

    2013-05-14

    Graph theory is being increasingly used to study the structural communication in biomolecular systems. This requires incorporating information on the system's dynamics, which is time-consuming and not suitable for high-throughput investigations. We propose a mixed Protein Structure Network (PSN) and Elastic Network Model (ENM)-based strategy, i.e., PSN-ENM, for fast investigation of allosterism in biological systems. PSN analysis and ENM-Normal Mode Analysis (ENM-NMA) are implemented in the structural analysis software Wordom, freely available at http://wordom.sourceforge.net/ . The method performs a systematic search of the shortest communication pathways that traverse a protein structure. A number of strategies to compare the structure networks of a protein in different functional states and to get a global picture of communication pathways are presented as well. The approach was validated on the PDZ2 domain from tyrosine phosphatase 1E (PTP1E) in its free (APO) and peptide-bound states. PDZ domains are, indeed, the systems whose structural communication and allosteric features are best characterized both in vitro and in silico. The agreement between predictions by the PSN-ENM method and in vitro evidence is remarkable and comparable to or higher than that reached by more time-consuming computational approaches tested on the same biological system. Finally, the PSN-ENM method was able to reproduce the salient communication features of unbound and bound PTP1E inferred from molecular dynamics simulations. High speed makes this method suitable for high throughput investigation of the communication pathways in large sets of biomolecular systems in different functional states. PMID:26583738

  17. PDZ protein interactions underlying NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and neuroprotection by PSD-95 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hong; Hayashi, Amy; Sun, Hong-Shuo; Belmares, Michael P; Cobey, Carolyn; Phan, Thuymy; Schweizer, Johannes; Salter, Michael W; Wang, Yu Tian; Tasker, R Andrew; Garman, David; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Lu, Peter S; Tymianski, Michael

    2007-09-12

    In neuronal synapses, PDZ domains [postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95)/Discs large/zona occludens-1] of PSD-95 proteins interact with C termini of NMDA receptor [NMDAR (NR)] subunits, linking them to downstream neurotoxic signaling molecules. Perturbing NMDAR/PSD-95 interactions with a Tat peptide comprising the nine C-terminal residues of the NR2B subunit (Tat-NR2B9c) reduces neurons' vulnerability to excitotoxicity and ischemia. However, NR subunit C termini may bind many of >240 cellular PDZs, any of which could mediate neurotoxic signaling independently of PSD-95. Here, we performed a proteomic and biochemical analysis of the interactions of all known human PDZs with synaptic signaling proteins including NR1, NR2A-NR2D, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Tat-NR2B9c, whose interactions define PDZs involved in neurotoxic signaling, was also used. NR2A-NR2D subunits and Tat-NR2B9c had similar, highly specific, PDZ protein interactions, of which the strongest were with the PSD-95 family members (PSD-95, PSD-93, SAP97, and SAP102) and Tax interaction protein 1 (TIP1). The PSD-95 PDZ2 domain bound NR2A-NR2C subunits most strongly (EC50, approximately 1 microM), and fusing the NR2B C terminus to Tat enhanced its affinity for PSD-95 PDZ2 by >100-fold (EC50, approximately 7 nM). IC50 values for Tat-NR2B9c inhibiting NR2A-NR2C/PSD-95 interactions (approximately 1-10 microM) and nNOS/PSD-95 interactions (200 nM) confirmed the feasibility of such inhibition. To determine which of the PDZ interactions of Tat-NR2B9c mediate neuroprotection, one of PSD-95, PSD-93, SAP97, SAP102, TIP1, or nNOS expression was inhibited in cortical neurons exposed to NMDA toxicity. Only neurons lacking PSD-95 or nNOS but not PSD-93, SAP97, SAP102, or TIP1 exhibited reduced excitotoxic vulnerability. Thus, despite the ubiquitousness of PDZ domain-containing proteins, PSD-95 and nNOS above any other PDZ proteins are keys in effecting NMDAR-dependent excitotoxicity. Consequently, PSD-95

  18. Degenerate specificity of PDZ domains from RhoA-specific nucleotide exchange factors PDZRhoGEF and LARG.

    PubMed

    Smietana, Katarzyna; Kasztura, Monika; Paduch, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula; Derewenda, Zygmunt S; Otlewski, Jacek

    2008-01-01

    PDZ domains are ubiquitous protein-protein interaction modules which bind short, usually carboxyterminal fragments of receptors, other integral or membrane-associated proteins, and occasionally cytosolic proteins. Their role in organizing multiprotein complexes at the cellular membrane is crucial for many signaling pathways, but the rules defining their binding specificity are still poorly understood and do not readily explain the observed diversity of their known binding partners. Two homologous RhoA-specific, multidomain nucleotide exchange factors PDZRhoGEF and LARG contain PDZ domains which show a particularly broad recognition profile, as suggested by the identification of five diverse biological targets. To investigate the molecular roots of this phenomenon, we constructed a phage display library of random carboxyterminal hexapeptides. Peptide variants corresponding to the sequences identified in library selection were synthesized and their affinities for both PDZ domains were measured and compared with those of peptides derived from sequences of natural partners. Based on the analysis of the binding sequences identified for PDZRhoGEF, we propose a sequence for an 'optimal' binding partner. Our results support the hypothesis that PDZ-peptide interactions may be best understood when one considers the sum of entropic and dynamic effects for each peptide as a whole entity, rather than preferences for specific residues at a given position. PMID:18542831

  19. The PDZ domain protein PICK1 and the sodium channel BNaC1 interact and localize at mechanosensory terminals of dorsal root ganglion neurons and dendrites of central neurons.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Anne; Garcia-Anoveros, Jaime; Corey, David P

    2002-02-15

    Members of the BNaC/ASIC family of ion channels have been implicated in mechanotransduction and nociception mediated by dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. These ion channels are also expressed in the CNS. We identified the PDZ domain protein PICK1 as an interactor of BNaC1(ASIC2) in a yeast two-hybrid screen. We show by two-hybrid assays, glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays, and coimmunoprecipitations that the BNaC1-PICK1 interaction is specific, and that coexpression of both proteins leads to their clustering in intracellular compartments. The interaction between BNaC1 and PICK1 requires the PDZ domain of PICK1 and the last four amino acids of BNaC1. BNaC1 is similar to two other BNaC/ASIC family members, BNaC2 (ASIC1) and ASIC4, at its extreme C terminus, and we show that PICK1 also interacts with BNaC2. We found that PICK1, like BNaC1 and BNaC2, is expressed by DRG neurons and, like the BNaC1alpha isoform, is present at their peripheral mechanosensory endings. Both PICK1 and BNaC1alpha are also coexpressed by some pyramidal neurons of the cortex, by pyramidal neurons of the CA3 region of hippocampus, and by cerebellar Purkinje neurons, localizing to their dendrites and cell bodies. Therefore, PICK1 interacts with BNaC/ASIC channels and may regulate their subcellular distribution or function in both peripheral and central neurons. PMID:11739374

  20. NMDA receptor desensitization regulated by direct binding to PDZ1-2 domains of PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Sornarajah, Lavan; Vasuta, Oana Cristina; Zhang, Lily; Sutton, Christine; Li, Bo; El-Husseini, Alaa; Raymond, Lynn A.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activity by desensitization is important in physiological and pathological states; NMDAR desensitization contributes in shaping synaptic responses and may be protective by limiting calcium influx during sustained glutamate insults. We previously reported that glycine-independent desensitization decreases during hippocampal neuronal development, correlating with NMDAR synaptic localization and association with post-synaptic density 95 (PSD-95). PSD-95/Discs large/zona occludens (PDZ)-1,2 domains of PSD-95 bind to the C-terminus of NMDAR NR2 subunits. The role of PSD-95 in anchoring signaling proteins near NMDARs is well documented. To determine if PSD-95-induced changes in NMDAR desensitization occur because of direct binding to NR2 or due to recruitment of regulatory proteins, we tested the effects of various PSD-95 constructs on NMDAR currents in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and neurons. In HEK cells, wild-type PSD-95 significantly reduced wild-type NMDAR desensitization without altering currents of NMDARs containing NR2A-S1462A, a mutation that abolishes PSD-95 binding. The PSD-95 N-terminus truncated after the PDZ1-2 domains was sufficient for this effect in neurons with low endogenous PSD-95 levels; in NMDAR-expressing HEK cells, the effect persisted when PSD-95 multimerization was eliminated. Moreover, other PSD-95 family members with highly homologous PDZ1-2 domains significantly reduced NMDAR desensitization. In mature neurons, disruption of PSD-95/NMDAR interaction through protein kinase C (PKC) activation increased desensitization to levels found in immature neurons, and this effect was not due to PKC direct regulation of NMDAR activity. We conclude that direct binding of PSD-95 increases stability of NMDAR responses to agonist exposure in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. PMID:18400955

  1. Detection of a hidden folding intermediate of the third domain of PDZ.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hanqiao; Vu, Ngoc-Diep; Bai, Yawen

    2005-02-11

    The folding pathway of the third domain of PDZ from the synaptic protein PSD-95 was characterized using kinetic and equilibrium methods by monitoring the fluorescence signal from a Trp residue that is incorporated at a near-surface position. Kinetic folding of this domain showed multiple exponential phases, whereas unfolding showed a single exponential phase. The slow kinetic phases were attributed to isomerization of proline residues, since there are five proline residues in this domain. We found that the logarithms of the rate constants for the fast phase of folding and unfolding are linearly dependent on the concentrations of denaturant. The unfolding free energy derived from these rate constants at zero denaturant was close to the value measured using the equilibrium method, suggesting the absence of detectable sub-millisecond folding intermediates. However, native-state hydrogen exchange experiments detected a partially unfolded intermediate under native conditions. It was further confirmed by a protein engineering study. These data suggest that a hidden intermediate exists after the rate-limiting step in the folding of the third domain of PDZ. PMID:15663949

  2. Whirlin and PDZ domain-containing 7 (PDZD7) proteins are both required to form the quaternary protein complex associated with Usher syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Zou, Junhuang; Shen, Zuolian; Zhang, Weiping; Yang, Jun

    2014-12-26

    Usher syndrome (USH) is the leading genetic cause of combined hearing and vision loss. Among the three USH clinical types, type 2 (USH2) occurs most commonly. USH2A, GPR98, and WHRN are three known causative genes of USH2, whereas PDZD7 is a modifier gene found in USH2 patients. The proteins encoded by these four USH genes have been proposed to form a multiprotein complex, the USH2 complex, due to interactions found among some of these proteins in vitro, their colocalization in vivo, and mutual dependence of some of these proteins for their normal in vivo localizations. However, evidence showing the formation of the USH2 complex is missing, and details on how this complex is formed remain elusive. Here, we systematically investigated interactions among the intracellular regions of the four USH proteins using colocalization, yeast two-hybrid, and pull-down assays. We show that multiple domains of the four USH proteins interact among one another. Importantly, both WHRN and PDZD7 are required for the complex formation with USH2A and GPR98. In this USH2 quaternary complex, WHRN prefers to bind to USH2A, whereas PDZD7 prefers to bind to GPR98. Interaction between WHRN and PDZD7 is the bridge between USH2A and GPR98. Additionally, the USH2 quaternary complex has a variable stoichiometry. These findings suggest that a non-obligate, short term, and dynamic USH2 quaternary protein complex may exist in vivo. Our work provides valuable insight into the physiological role of the USH2 complex in vivo and informs possible reconstruction of the USH2 complex for future therapy. PMID:25406310

  3. A PDZ protein regulates the distribution of the transmembrane semaphorin, M-SemF.

    PubMed

    Wang, L H; Kalb, R G; Strittmatter, S M

    1999-05-14

    M-SemF is a membrane-associated, neurally enriched member of the semaphorin family of axon guidance signals. We considered whether the cytoplasmic domain of M-SemF might possess a signaling function and/or might control the distribution of M-SemF on the cell surface. We identify a PDZ-containing neural protein as an M-SemF cytoplasmic domain-associated protein (SEMCAP-1). SEMCAP-2 is a closely related nonneuronal protein. SEMCAP-1 has recently also been identified as GIPC, by virtue of its interaction with the RGS protein GAIP in vitro (De Vries, L., Lou, X., Zhao, G., Zheng, B., and Farquhar, M. G. (1998) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 95, 12340-12345). Expression studies support the notion that SEMCAP-1(GIPC) interacts with M-SemF, but not GAIP, in brain. Lung SEMCAP-2 and SEMCAP-1(GIPC) are potential partners for both GAIP and M-SemF. The protein interaction requires the single PDZ domain of SEMCAP-1(GIPC) and the carboxyl-terminal four residues of M-SemF, ESSV. While SEMCAP-1(GIPC) also interacts with SemC, it does not interact with other proteins containing a class I PDZ binding motif, nor does M-SemF interact with other class I PDZ proteins. Co-expression of SEMCAP-1(GIPC) induces the redistribution of dispersed M-SemF into detergent-resistant aggregates in HEK293 cells. Thus, SEMCAP-1(GIPC) appears to regulate the subcellular distribution of M-SemF in brain, and SEMCAPs could link M-SemF to G protein signal transduction pathways. PMID:10318831

  4. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Sangith, Nikhil; Srinivasaraghavan, Kannan; Sahu, Indrajit; Desai, Ankita; Medipally, Spandana; Somavarappu, Arun Kumar; Verma, Chandra; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9), a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a) proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b) PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein), S14 (a ribosomal protein), CSH1 (a growth hormone), E12 (a transcription factor) and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM) at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions. PMID:25009770

  5. A binding site outside the canonical PDZ domain determines the specific interaction between Shank and SAPAP and their function.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Menglong; Shang, Yuan; Guo, Tingfeng; He, Qinghai; Yung, Wing-Ho; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-05-31

    Shank and SAPAP (synapse-associated protein 90/postsynaptic density-95-associated protein) are two highly abundant scaffold proteins that directly interact with each other to regulate excitatory synapse development and plasticity. Mutations of SAPAP, but not other reported Shank PDZ domain binders, share a significant overlap on behavioral abnormalities with the mutations of Shank both in patients and in animal models. The molecular mechanism governing the exquisite specificity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction is not clear, however. Here we report that a sequence preceding the canonical PDZ domain of Shank, together with the elongated PDZ BC loop, form another binding site for a sequence upstream of the SAPAP PDZ-binding motif, leading to a several hundred-fold increase in the affinity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction. We provide evidence that the specific interaction afforded by this newly identified site is required for Shank synaptic targeting and the Shank-induced synaptic activity increase. Our study provides a molecular explanation of how Shank and SAPAP dosage changes due to their gene copy number variations can contribute to different psychiatric disorders. PMID:27185935

  6. The PDZ-binding chloride channel ClC-3B localizes to the Golgi and associates with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-interacting PDZ proteins.

    PubMed

    Gentzsch, Martina; Cui, Liying; Mengos, April; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Riordan, John R

    2003-02-21

    ClC chloride channels are widely distributed in organisms across the evolutionary spectrum, and members of the mammalian family play crucial roles in cellular function and are mutated in several human diseases (Jentsch, T. J., Stein, V., Weinreich, F., and Zdebik, A. A. (2002) Physiol. Rev. 82, 503-568). Within the ClC-3, -4, -5 branch of the family that are intracellular channels, two alternatively spliced ClC-3 isoforms were recognized recently (Ogura, T., Furukawa, T., Toyozaki, T., Yamada, K., Zheng, Y. J., Katayama, Y., Nakaya, H., and Inagaki, N. (2002) FASEB J. 16, 863-865). ClC-3A resides in late endosomes where it serves as an anion shunt during acidification. We show here that the ClC-3B PDZ-binding isoform resides in the Golgi where it co-localizes with a small amount of the other known PDZ-binding chloride channel, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). Both channel proteins bind the Golgi PDZ protein, GOPC (Golgi-associated PDZ and coiled-coil motif-containing protein). Interestingly, however, when overexpressed, GOPC, which is thought to influence traffic in the endocytic/secretory pathway, causes a large reduction in the amounts of both channels, probably by leading them to the degradative end of this pathway. ClC-3B as well as CFTR also binds EBP50 (ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50) and PDZK1, which are concentrated at the plasma membrane. However, only PDZK1 was found to promote interaction between the two channels, perhaps because they were able to bind to two different PDZ domains in PDZK1. Thus while small portions of the populations of ClC-3B and CFTR may associate and co-localize, the bulk of the two populations reside in different organelles of cells where they are expressed heterologously or endogenously, and therefore their cellular functions are likely to be distinct and not primarily related. PMID:12471024

  7. L-periaxin interacts with S-periaxin through its PDZ domain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yenan; Shi, Yawei

    2015-11-16

    Periaxin was first identified as a protein in myelinating Schwann cells through a screen of novel cytoskeleton-associated proteins in peripheral nerve myelination. The periaxin gene encodes two isoforms, namely, L- and S-periaxin, which are 1461 and 147 residues in size, respectively. Several loss-of-function mutations linked to autosomal recessive Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in periaxin have been described. In this study, the colocolization of L- and S-periaxin in the cytoplasm of RSC96 cells was found by immunofluorescence assays. The interaction between these two isoforms was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation, fluorescence complementation experiment, and GST pull-down assay. Results also showed that the two periaxin isoforms interacted in the cytoplasm through the PDZ domain, and their interaction prevented the homodimerization of L-periaxin. S-periaxin may regulate the function of L-periaxin in Schwann cells. PMID:26467811

  8. Structure-based identification of CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and rational design of peptide ligands to target such interaction in human fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Le; Han, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The recognition and association between Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated protein kinase II-α (CaMKIIα) and multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) plays an important role in sperm acrosome reaction and human fertilization, which is mediated by the binding of CaMKIIα's C-terminal tail to one or more PDZ domains of the scaffolding protein MUPP1. In this study, we attempt to identify the CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and to design peptide ligands that can potently target and then competitively disrupt such interaction. Here, a synthetic biology approach was proposed to systematically characterize the structural basis, energetic property, dynamic behavior and biological implication underlying the intermolecular interactions between the C-terminal peptide of CaMKIIα and all the 13 PDZ domains of MUPP1. These domains can be grouped into four clusters in terms of their sequence, structure and physiochemical profile; different clusters appear to recognize different classes of PDZ-binding motifs. The cluster 3 includes two members, i.e. MUPP1 PDZ 5 and 11 domains, which were suggested to bind class II motif Φ-X-Φ(-COOH) of the C-terminal peptide SGAPSV(-COOH) of CaMKIIα. Subsequently, the two domains were experimentally measured as the moderate- and high-affinity binders of the peptide by using fluorescence titration (dissociation constants K d = 25.2 ± 4.6 and 0.47 ± 0.08 µM for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively), which was in line with theoretical prediction (binding free energies ΔG total = -7.6 and -9.2 kcal/mol for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively). A systematic mutation of SGAPSV(-COOH) residues suggested few favorable amino acids at different residue positions of the peptide, which were then combined to generate a number of potent peptide mutants for PDZ 11 domain. Consequently, two peptides (SIAPNV(-COOH) and SIVMNV(-COOH)) were identified to have considerably improved affinity with K d increase by ~tenfold relative to

  9. Functional relevance of the disulfide-linked complex of the N-terminal PDZ domain of InaD with NorpA.

    PubMed

    Kimple, M E; Siderovski, D P; Sondek, J

    2001-08-15

    In Drosophila, phototransduction is mediated by G(q)-activation of phospholipase C and is a well studied model system for understanding the kinetics of signal initiation, propagation and termination controlled by G proteins. The proper intracellular targeting and spatial arrangement of most proteins involved in fly phototransduction require the multi-domain scaffolding protein InaD, composed almost entirely of five PDZ domains, which independently bind various proteins including NorpA, the relevant phospho lipase C-beta isozyme. We have determined the crystal structure of the N-terminal PDZ domain of InaD bound to a peptide corresponding to the C-terminus of NorpA to 1.8 A resolution. The structure highlights an intermolecular disulfide bond necessary for high affinity interaction as determined by both in vitro and in vivo studies. Since other proteins also possess similar, cysteine-containing consensus sequences for binding PDZ domains, this disulfide-mediated 'dock-and-lock' interaction of PDZ domains with their ligands may be a relatively ubiquitous mode of coordinating signaling pathways. PMID:11500369

  10. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Truschel, Steven T.; Sengupta, Debrup; Foote, Adam; Heroux, Annie; Macbeth, Mark R.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae. PMID:21515684

  11. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  12. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  13. Complex interaction of Drosophila GRIP PDZ domains and Echinoid during muscle morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Swan, Laura E; Schmidt, Manuela; Schwarz, Tobias; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Prange, Ulrike; Boeckers, Tobias; Thomas, Ulrich; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2006-08-01

    Glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP) homologues, initially characterized in synaptic glutamate receptor trafficking, consist of seven PDZ domains (PDZDs), whose conserved arrangement is of unknown significance. The Drosophila GRIP homologue (DGrip) is needed for proper guidance of embryonic somatic muscles towards epidermal attachment sites, with both excessive and reduced DGrip activity producing specific phenotypes in separate muscle groups. These phenotypes were utilized to analyze the molecular architecture underlying DGrip signaling function in vivo. Surprisingly, removing PDZDs 1-3 (DGripDelta1-3) or deleting ligand binding in PDZDs 1 or 2 convert DGrip to excessive in vivo activity mediated by ligand binding to PDZD 7. Yeast two-hybrid screening identifies the cell adhesion protein Echinoid's (Ed) type II PDZD-interaction motif as binding PDZDs 1, 2 and 7 of DGrip. ed loss-of-function alleles exhibit muscle defects, enhance defects caused by reduced DGrip activity and suppress the dominant DGripDelta1-3 effect during embryonic muscle formation. We propose that Ed and DGrip form a signaling complex, where competition between N-terminal and the C-terminal PDZDs of DGrip for Ed binding controls signaling function. PMID:16858411

  14. The NHERF1 PDZ1 domain and IRBIT interact and mediate the activation of Na+/H+ exchanger 3 by ANG II.

    PubMed

    He, Peijian; Zhao, Luqing; No, Yi Ran; Karvar, Serhan; Yun, C Chris

    2016-08-01

    Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE)3, a major Na(+) transporter in the luminal membrane of the proximal tubule, is subject to ANG II regulation in renal Na(+)/fluid absorption and blood pressure control. We have previously shown that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IRBIT) mediates ANG II-induced exocytosis of NHE3 in cultured proximal tubule epithelial cells. In searching for scaffold protein(s) that coordinates with IRBIT in NHE3 trafficking, we found that NHE regulatory factor (NHERF)1, NHE3, and IRBIT proteins were coexpressed in the same macrocomplexes and that loss of ANG II type 1 receptors decreased their expression in the renal brush-border membrane. We found that NHERF1 was required for ANG II-mediated forward trafficking and activation of NHE3 in cultured cells. ANG II induced a concomitant increase of NHERF1 interactions with NHE3 and IRBIT, which were abolished when the NHERF1 PDZ1 domain was removed. Overexpression of a yellow fluorescent protein-NHERF1 construct that lacks PDZ1, but not PDZ2, failed to exaggerate the ANG II-dependent increase of NHE3 expression in the apical membrane. Moreover, exogenous expression of PDZ1 exerted a dominant negative effect on NHE3 activation by ANG II. We further demonstrated that IRBIT was indispensable for the ANG II-provoked increase in NHERF1-NHE3 interactions and that phosphorylation of IRBIT at Ser(68) was necessary for the assembly of the NHEF1-IRBIT-NHE3 complex. Taken together, our findings suggest that NHERF1 mediates ANG II-induced activation of renal NHE3, which requires coordination between IRBIT and the NHERF1 PDZ1 domain in binding and transporting NHE3. PMID:27279487

  15. Two Mutations Preventing PDZ-Protein Interactions of GluR1 Have Opposite Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm, Jannic; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Hsieh, Helen; Malinow, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    The regulated trafficking of GluR1 contributes significantly to synaptic plasticity, but studies addressing the function of the GluR1 C-terminal PDZ-ligand domain in this process have produced conflicting results. Here, we resolve this conflict by showing that apparently similar C-terminal mutations of the GluR1 PDZ-ligand domain result in…

  16. Crystallization and Preliminary Diffraction Analysis of the CAL PDZ Domain in Complex with a Selective Peptide Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    J Amacher; P Cushing; J Weiner; D Madden

    2011-12-31

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which regulates epithelial fluid and ion homeostasis. The CFTR cytoplasmic C-terminus interacts with a number of PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) proteins that modulate its intracellular trafficking and chloride-channel activity. Among these, the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL) has a negative effect on apical-membrane expression levels of the most common disease-associated mutant {Delta}F508-CFTR, making CAL a candidate target for the treatment of CF. A selective peptide inhibitor of the CAL PDZ domain (iCAL36) has recently been developed and shown to stabilize apical expression of {Delta}F508-CFTR, enhancing net chloride-channel activity, both alone and in combination with the folding corrector corr-4a. As a basis for structural studies of the CAL-iCAL36 interaction, a purification protocol has been developed that increases the oligomeric homogeneity of the protein. Here, the cocrystallization of the complex in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 35.9, b = 47.7, c = 97.3 {angstrom}, is reported. The crystals diffracted to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (1.96 {angstrom}{sup 3} Da{sup -1}), it appears that the asymmetric unit contains two complexes.

  17. The NHERF1 PDZ2 Domain Regulates PKA–RhoA–p38-mediated NHE1 Activation and Invasion in Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Rosa A.; Bellizzi, Antonia; Busco, Giovanni; Weinman, Edward J.; Dell'Aquila, Maria E.; Casavola, Valeria; Azzariti, Amalia; Mangia, Anita; Paradiso, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the signal transduction systems governing invasion is fundamental for the design of therapeutic strategies against metastasis. Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1) is a postsynaptic density 95/disc-large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain-containing protein that recruits membrane receptors/transporters and cytoplasmic signaling proteins into functional complexes. NHERF1 expression is altered in breast cancer, but its effective role in mammary carcinogenesis remains undefined. We report here that NHERF1 overexpression in human breast tumor biopsies is associated with metastatic progression, poor prognosis, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression. In cultured tumor cells, hypoxia and serum deprivation increase NHERF1 expression, promote the formation of leading-edge pseudopodia, and redistribute NHERF1 to these pseudopodia. This pseudopodial localization of NHERF1 was verified in breast biopsies and in three-dimensional Matrigel culture. Furthermore, serum deprivation and hypoxia stimulate the Na+/H+ exchanger, invasion, and activate a protein kinase A (PKA)-gated RhoA/p38 invasion signal module. Significantly, NHERF1 overexpression was sufficient to induce these morphological and functional changes, and it potentiated their induction by serum deprivation. Functional experiments with truncated and binding groove-mutated PDZ domain constructs demonstrated that NHERF1 regulates these processes through its PDZ2 domain. We conclude that NHERF1 overexpression enhances the invasive phenotype in breast cancer cells, both alone and in synergy with exposure to the tumor microenvironment, via the coordination of PKA-gated RhoA/p38 signaling. PMID:17332506

  18. A C-terminal motif found in the β2-adrenergic receptor, P2Y1 receptor and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator determines binding to the Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor family of PDZ proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Randy A.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Premont, Richard T.; Blitzer, Jeremy T.; Rahman, Nadeem; Welsh, Michael J.; Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    The Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF) binds to the tail of the β2-adrenergic receptor and plays a role in adrenergic regulation of Na+/H+ exchange. NHERF contains two PDZ domains, the first of which is required for its interaction with the β2 receptor. Mutagenesis studies of the β2 receptor tail revealed that the optimal C-terminal motif for binding to the first PDZ domain of NHERF is D-S/T-x-L, a motif distinct from those recognized by other PDZ domains. The first PDZ domain of NHERF-2, a protein that is 52% identical to NHERF and also known as E3KARP, SIP-1, and TKA-1, exhibits binding preferences very similar to those of the first PDZ domain of NHERF. The delineation of the preferred binding motif for the first PDZ domain of the NHERF family of proteins allows for predictions for other proteins that may interact with NHERF or NHERF-2. For example, as would be predicted from the β2 receptor tail mutagenesis studies, NHERF binds to the tail of the purinergic P2Y1 receptor, a seven-transmembrane receptor with an intracellular C-terminal tail ending in D-T-S-L. NHERF also binds to the tail of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which ends in D-T-R-L. Because the preferred binding motif of the first PDZ domain of the NHERF family of proteins is found at the C termini of a variety of intracellular proteins, NHERF and NHERF-2 may be multifunctional adaptor proteins involved in many previously unsuspected aspects of intracellular signaling. PMID:9671706

  19. A PDZ-Like Motif in the Biliary Transporter ABCB4 Interacts with the Scaffold Protein EBP50 and Regulates ABCB4 Cell Surface Expression.

    PubMed

    Venot, Quitterie; Delaunay, Jean-Louis; Fouassier, Laura; Delautier, Danièle; Falguières, Thomas; Housset, Chantal; Maurice, Michèle; Aït-Slimane, Tounsia

    2016-01-01

    ABCB4/MDR3, a member of the ABC superfamily, is an ATP-dependent phosphatidylcholine translocator expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Defects in the ABCB4 gene are associated with rare biliary diseases. It is essential to understand the mechanisms of its canalicular membrane expression in particular for the development of new therapies. The stability of several ABC transporters is regulated through their binding to PDZ (PSD95/DglA/ZO-1) domain-containing proteins. ABCB4 protein ends by the sequence glutamine-asparagine-leucine (QNL), which shows some similarity to PDZ-binding motifs. The aim of our study was to assess the potential role of the QNL motif on the surface expression of ABCB4 and to determine if PDZ domain-containing proteins are involved. We found that truncation of the QNL motif decreased the stability of ABCB4 in HepG2-transfected cells. The deleted mutant ABCB4-ΔQNL also displayed accelerated endocytosis. EBP50, a PDZ protein highly expressed in the liver, strongly colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with ABCB4, and this interaction required the QNL motif. Down-regulation of EBP50 by siRNA or by expression of an EBP50 dominant-negative mutant caused a significant decrease in the level of ABCB4 protein expression, and in the amount of ABCB4 localized at the canalicular membrane. Interaction of ABCB4 with EBP50 through its PDZ-like motif plays a critical role in the regulation of ABCB4 expression and stability at the canalicular plasma membrane. PMID:26789121

  20. A PDZ-Like Motif in the Biliary Transporter ABCB4 Interacts with the Scaffold Protein EBP50 and Regulates ABCB4 Cell Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    Venot, Quitterie; Delaunay, Jean-Louis; Fouassier, Laura; Delautier, Danièle; Falguières, Thomas; Housset, Chantal; Maurice, Michèle; Aït-Slimane, Tounsia

    2016-01-01

    ABCB4/MDR3, a member of the ABC superfamily, is an ATP-dependent phosphatidylcholine translocator expressed at the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. Defects in the ABCB4 gene are associated with rare biliary diseases. It is essential to understand the mechanisms of its canalicular membrane expression in particular for the development of new therapies. The stability of several ABC transporters is regulated through their binding to PDZ (PSD95/DglA/ZO-1) domain-containing proteins. ABCB4 protein ends by the sequence glutamine-asparagine-leucine (QNL), which shows some similarity to PDZ-binding motifs. The aim of our study was to assess the potential role of the QNL motif on the surface expression of ABCB4 and to determine if PDZ domain-containing proteins are involved. We found that truncation of the QNL motif decreased the stability of ABCB4 in HepG2-transfected cells. The deleted mutant ABCB4-ΔQNL also displayed accelerated endocytosis. EBP50, a PDZ protein highly expressed in the liver, strongly colocalized and coimmunoprecipitated with ABCB4, and this interaction required the QNL motif. Down-regulation of EBP50 by siRNA or by expression of an EBP50 dominant-negative mutant caused a significant decrease in the level of ABCB4 protein expression, and in the amount of ABCB4 localized at the canalicular membrane. Interaction of ABCB4 with EBP50 through its PDZ-like motif plays a critical role in the regulation of ABCB4 expression and stability at the canalicular plasma membrane. PMID:26789121

  1. Genetic Variants at the PDZ-Interacting Domain of the Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I Interact with Diet to Influence the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Men and Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scaffolding protein PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) regulates the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B type I. However, the effect of PDZK1 genetic variants on lipids and metabolic syndrome (MetS) traits remains unknown. This study evaluated the association of 3 PDZK1 single nucleotide polymo...

  2. Monitoring Protein-Protein Interactions between the Mammalian Integral Membrane Transporters and PDZ-interacting Partners Using a Modified Split-ubiquitin Membrane Yeast Two-hybrid System*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gisler, Serge M.; Kittanakom, Saranya; Fuster, Daniel; Wong, Victoria; Bertic, Mia; Radanovic, Tamara; Hall, Randy A.; Murer, Heini; Biber, Jürg; Markovich, Daniel; Moe, Orson W.; Stagljar, Igor

    2008-01-01

    PDZ-binding motifs are found in the C-terminal tails of numerous integral membrane proteins where they mediate specific protein-protein interactions by binding to PDZ-containing proteins. Conventional yeast two-hybrid screens have been used to probe protein-protein interactions of these soluble C termini. However, to date no in vivo technology has been available to study interactions between the full-length integral membrane proteins and their cognate PDZ-interacting partners. We previously developed a split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) system to test interactions between such integral membrane proteins by using a transcriptional output based on cleavage of a transcription factor from the C terminus of membrane-inserted baits. Here we modified MYTH to permit detection of C-terminal PDZ domain interactions by redirecting the transcription factor moiety from the C to the N terminus of a given integral membrane protein thus liberating their native C termini. We successfully applied this “MYTH 2.0” system to five different mammalian full-length renal transporters and identified novel PDZ domain-containing partners of the phosphate (NaPi-IIa) and sulfate (NaS1) transporters that would have otherwise not been detectable. Furthermore this assay was applied to locate the PDZ-binding domain on the NaS1 protein. We showed that the PDZ-binding domain for PDZK1 on NaS1 is upstream of its C terminus, whereas the two interacting proteins, NHERF-1 and NHERF-2, bind at a location closer to the N terminus of NaS1. Moreover NHERF-1 and NHERF-2 increased functional sulfate uptake in Xenopus oocytes when co-expressed with NaS1. Finally we used MYTH 2.0 to demonstrate that the NaPi-IIa transporter homodimerizes via protein-protein interactions within the lipid bilayer. In summary, our study establishes the MYTH 2.0 system as a novel tool for interactive proteomics studies of membrane protein complexes. PMID:18407958

  3. Combination of genetic screening and molecular dynamics as a useful tool for identification of disease-related mutations: ZASP PDZ domain G54S mutation case.

    PubMed

    Fratev, Filip; Mihaylova, Elina; Pajeva, Ilza

    2014-05-27

    Cypher/ZASP (LDB3 gene) is known to interact with a network of proteins. It binds to α-actinin and the calcium voltage channels (LTCC) via its PDZ domain. Here we report the identification of a highly conserved ZASP G54S mutation classified as a variant of unknown significance in a sample of an adult with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). The initial bioinformatics calculations strongly evaluated G54S as damaging. Furthermore, we employed accelerated and classical molecular dynamics and free energy calculations to study the structural impact of this mutation on the ZASP apo form and to address the question of whether it can be linked to HCM. Seventeen independent MD runs and simulations of 2.5 μs total were performed and showed that G54S perturbs the α2 helix position via destabilization of the adjacent loop linked to the β5 sheet. This also leads to the formation of a strong H-bond between peptide target residues Leu17 and Gln66, thus restricting both the α-actinin2 and LTCC C-terminal peptides to access their natural binding site and reducing in this way their binding capacity. On the basis of these observations and the adult's clinical data, we propose that ZASP(G54S) and presumably other ZASP PDZ domain mutations can cause HCM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported ZASP PDZ domain mutation that might be linked to HCM. The integrated workflow used in this study can be applied for the identification and description of other mutations that might be related to particular diseases. PMID:24730657

  4. Canonical and Noncanonical Sites Determine NPT2A Binding Selectivity to NHERF1 PDZ1

    PubMed Central

    Mamonova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qiangmin; Khajeh, Jahan Ali; Bu, Zimei; Bisello, Alessandro; Friedman, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF1) is a scaffolding protein containing 2 PDZ domains that coordinates the assembly and trafficking of transmembrane receptors and ion channels. Most target proteins harboring a C-terminus recognition motif bind more-or-less equivalently to the either PDZ domain, which contain identical core-binding motifs. However some substrates such as the type II sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter (NPT2A), uniquely bind only one PDZ domain. We sought to define the structural determinants responsible for the specificity of interaction between NHERF1 PDZ domains and NPT2A. By performing all-atom/explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in combination with biological mutagenesis, fluorescent polarization (FP) binding assays, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we found that in addition to canonical interactions of residues at 0 and -2 positions, Arg at the -1 position of NPT2A plays a critical role in association with Glu43 and His27 of PDZ1 that are absent in PDZ2. Experimentally introduced mutation in PDZ1 (Glu43Asp and His27Asn) decreased binding to NPT2A. Conversely, introduction of Asp183Glu and Asn167His mutations in PDZ2 promoted the formation of favorable interactions yielding micromolar KDs. The results describe novel determinants within both the PDZ domain and outside the canonical PDZ-recognition motif that are responsible for discrimination of NPT2A between two PDZ domains. The results challenge general paradigms for PDZ recognition and suggest new targets for drug development. PMID:26070212

  5. Targeted inhibition of disheveled PDZ domain via NSC668036 depresses fibrotic process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cong; Dai, Jinghong; Sun, Zhaorui; Shi, Chaowen; Cao, Honghui; and others

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling on myofibroblast differentiation of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts in vitro and evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of NSC668036 in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis murine model. In vitro study, NSC668036, a small organic inhibitor of the PDZ domain in Dvl, suppressed β-catenin-driven gene transcription and abolished TGF-β1-induced migration, expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in fibroblasts. In vivo study, we found that NSC668036 significantly suppressed accumulation of collagen I, α-SMA, and TGF-β1 but increased the expression of CK19, Occludin and E-cadherin that can inhibit pulmonary fibrogenesis. Because fibrotic lung exhibit aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, these data collectively suggest that inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling at the Dvl level may be an effective approach to the treatment of fibrotic lung diseases. - Highlights: • NSC668036 inhibited the proliferation and migration of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. • NSC668036 suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • TGF-β-induced stimulation of profibrotic responses were inhibited by NSC668036. • NSC668036 can inhibit the development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. Inhalational anesthetics disrupt postsynaptic density protein-95, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 domain protein interactions critical to action of several excitatory receptor channels related to anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Feng; Chen, Qiang; Sato, Yuko; Skinner, John; Tang, Pei; Johns, Roger A.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have shown previously that inhaled anesthetics disrupt the interaction between the second postsynaptic density protein-95, Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor, and zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) and the C-terminus of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B. Our data indicate that PDZ domains may serve as a molecular target for inhaled anesthetics. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be illustrated. Methods Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, co-immunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid analysis were used to assess PDZ domain-mediated protein-protein interactions in different conditions. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to investigate isoflurane-induced chemical shift changes in the PDZ1–3 domains of PSD-95. A surface plasmon resonance-based BIAcore assay was used to examine the ability of isoflurane to inhibit the PDZ domain-mediated protein-protein interactions in real time. Results Halothane and isoflurane dose dependently inhibited PDZ domain-mediated interactions between PSD-95 and Shaker-type potassium channel Kv1.4 and between α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor subunit GluA2 and its interacting proteins— glutamate receptor interacting protein or protein interacting with c kinase 1. However, halothane and isoflurane had no effect on PDZ domain-mediated interactions between γ-aminobutyric acid, type B receptor and its interacting proteins. The inhaled anesthetic isoflurane mostly affected the residues close to or in the peptide binding groove of PSD-95 PDZ1 and PDZ2 (especially PDZ2), while barely affecting the peptide binding groove of PSD-95 PDZ3. Conclusion These results suggest that inhaled anesthetics interfere with PDZ domain-mediated protein-protein interactions at several receptors important to neuronal excitation, anesthesia and pain processing. PMID:25654436

  7. Structure-Based Design of a Br Halogen Bond at the Complex Interface of the Human Placental HtrA1 PDZ Domain with Its Heptapeptide Ligand.

    PubMed

    Dou, Shuo-Fen; Liu, Hong; Cao, Tong-Mei; Wen, Qing-Li; Li, Jie; Shao, Qing-Chun

    2016-04-01

    The shock-induced serine protease HtrA1 is a potential regulator of human placenta development during pregnancy. The protein contains a functional PDZ domain that has been solved in complex with a phage display-derived heptapeptide: Asp-6 Ser-5 Arg-4 Ile-3 Trp-2 Trp-1 Val0 . In this study, a rationally designed halogen bond was introduced to the domain-peptide complex based on its NMR structure in solution. We computationally compared the stabilization energies and hindrance effects due to the presence of different halogens X (X = F, Cl, Br, or I), using a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach, and found that the Br atom could considerably promote the peptide binding free energy (ΔΔG = -5.2 kcal/mol). Fluorescence assays confirmed that the peptide affinity to the HtrA1 PDZ domain was improved by approximately sevenfold upon bromination. Structural analysis identified a geometrically perfect halogen bond between the Br atom of the peptide Trp-1 residue and the carbonyl O atom of the HtrA1 Ile385 residue, with a bond length and an interaction energy of d = 3.20 Å and ΔE = -3.7 kcal/mol, respectively. PMID:26972470

  8. The ESEV PDZ-Binding Motif of the Avian Influenza A Virus NS1 Protein Protects Infected Cells from Apoptosis by Directly Targeting Scribble▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbing; Golebiewski, Lisa; Dow, Eugene C.; Krug, Robert M.; Javier, Ronald T.; Rice, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    The NS1 protein from influenza A viruses contains a four-amino-acid sequence at its carboxyl terminus that is termed the PDZ-binding motif (PBM). The NS1 PBM is predicted to bind to cellular PDZ proteins and functions as a virulence determinant in infected mice. ESEV is the consensus PBM sequence of avian influenza viruses, while RSKV is the consensus sequence of human viruses. Currently circulating highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses encode an NS1 protein with the ESEV PBM. We identified cellular targets of the avian ESEV PBM and identified molecular mechanisms involved in its function. Using glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays, we found that the ESEV PBM enables NS1 to associate with the PDZ proteins Scribble, Dlg1, MAGI-1, MAGI-2, and MAGI-3. Because Scribble possesses a proapoptotic activity, we investigated the interaction between NS1 and Scribble. The association between NS1 and Scribble is direct and requires the ESEV PBM and two Scribble PDZ domains. We constructed recombinant H3N2 viruses that encode an H6N6 avian virus NS1 protein with either an ESEV or mutant ESEA PBM, allowing an analysis of the ESEV PBM in infections in mammalian cells. The ESEV PBM enhanced viral replication up to 4-fold. In infected cells, NS1 with the ESEV PBM relocalized Scribble into cytoplasmic puncta concentrated in perinuclear regions and also protected cells from apoptosis. In addition, the latter effect was eliminated by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated Scribble depletion. This study shows that one function of the avian ESEV PBM is to reduce apoptosis during infection through disruption of Scribble's proapoptotic function. PMID:20702615

  9. The PDZ-Binding Motif of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Envelope Protein Is a Determinant of Viral Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M.; Nieto-Torres, Jose L.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Regla-Nava, Jose A.; Fernandez-Delgado, Raul; Castaño-Rodriguez, Carlos; Enjuanes, Luis

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) lacking the envelope (E) protein is attenuated in vivo. Here we report that E protein PDZ-binding motif (PBM), a domain involved in protein-protein interactions, is a major determinant of virulence. Elimination of SARS-CoV E protein PBM by using reverse genetics caused a reduction in the deleterious exacerbation of the immune response triggered during infection with the parental virus and virus attenuation. Cellular protein syntenin was identified to bind the E protein PBM during SARS-CoV infection by using three complementary strategies, yeast two-hybrid, reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy assays. Syntenin redistributed from the nucleus to the cell cytoplasm during infection with viruses containing the E protein PBM, activating p38 MAPK and leading to the overexpression of inflammatory cytokines. Silencing of syntenin using siRNAs led to a decrease in p38 MAPK activation in SARS-CoV infected cells, further reinforcing their functional relationship. Active p38 MAPK was reduced in lungs of mice infected with SARS-CoVs lacking E protein PBM as compared with the parental virus, leading to a decreased expression of inflammatory cytokines and to virus attenuation. Interestingly, administration of a p38 MAPK inhibitor led to an increase in mice survival after infection with SARS-CoV, confirming the relevance of this pathway in SARS-CoV virulence. Therefore, the E protein PBM is a virulence domain that activates immunopathology most likely by using syntenin as a mediator of p38 MAPK induced inflammation. PMID:25122212

  10. Allosteric communication pathways and thermal rectification in PDZ-2 protein: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Miño-Galaz, Germán A

    2015-05-21

    Allosteric communication in proteins is a fundamental and yet unresolved problem of structural biochemistry. Previous findings, from computational biology ( Ota, N.; Agard, D. A. J. Mol. Biol. 2005 , 351 , 345 - 354 ), have proposed that heat diffuses in a protein through cognate protein allosteric pathways. This work studied heat diffusion in the well-known PDZ-2 protein, and confirmed that this protein has two cognate allosteric pathways and that heat flows preferentially through these. Also, a new property was also observed for protein structures: heat diffuses asymmetrically through the structures. The underling structure of this asymmetrical heat flow was a normal length hydrogen bond (∼2.85 Å) that acted as a thermal rectifier. In contrast, thermal rectification was compromised in short hydrogen bonds (∼2.60 Å), giving rise to symmetrical thermal diffusion. Asymmetrical heat diffusion was due, on a higher scale, to the local, structural organization of residues that, in turn, was also mediated by hydrogen bonds. This asymmetrical/symmetrical energy flow may be relevant for allosteric signal communication directionality in proteins and for the control of heat flow in materials science. PMID:25933631

  11. The Human PDZome: A Gateway to PSD95-Disc Large-Zonula Occludens (PDZ)-mediated Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Belotti, Edwige; Polanowska, Jolanta; Daulat, Avais M.; Audebert, Stéphane; Thomé, Virginie; Lissitzky, Jean-Claude; Lembo, Frédérique; Blibek, Karim; Omi, Shizue; Lenfant, Nicolas; Gangar, Akanksha; Montcouquiol, Mireille; Santoni, Marie-Josée; Sebbagh, Michael; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Angers, Stéphane; Kodjabachian, Laurent; Reboul, Jérome; Borg, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions organize the localization, clustering, signal transduction, and degradation of cellular proteins and are therefore implicated in numerous biological functions. These interactions are mediated by specialized domains able to bind to modified or unmodified peptides present in binding partners. Among the most broadly distributed protein interaction domains, PSD95-disc large-zonula occludens (PDZ) domains are usually able to bind carboxy-terminal sequences of their partners. In an effort to accelerate the discovery of PDZ domain interactions, we have constructed an array displaying 96% of the human PDZ domains that is amenable to rapid two-hybrid screens in yeast. We have demonstrated that this array can efficiently identify interactions using carboxy-terminal sequences of PDZ domain binders such as the E6 oncoviral protein and protein kinases (PDGFRβ, BRSK2, PCTK1, ACVR2B, and HER4); this has been validated via mass spectrometry analysis. Taking advantage of this array, we show that PDZ domains of Scrib and SNX27 bind to the carboxy-terminal region of the planar cell polarity receptor Vangl2. We also have demonstrated the requirement of Scrib for the promigratory function of Vangl2 and described the morphogenetic function of SNX27 in the early Xenopus embryo. The resource presented here is thus adapted for the screen of PDZ interactors and, furthermore, should facilitate the understanding of PDZ-mediated functions. PMID:23722234

  12. PATJ, a Tight Junction-Associated PDZ Protein, Is a Novel Degradation Target of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus E6 and the Alternatively Spliced Isoform 18 E6*▿

    PubMed Central

    Storrs, Carina H.; Silverstein, Saul J.

    2007-01-01

    The E6 protein from high-risk human papillomavirus types interacts with and degrades several PDZ domain-containing proteins that localize to adherens junctions or tight junctions in polarized epithelial cells. We have identified the tight junction-associated multi-PDZ protein PATJ (PALS1-associated TJ protein) as a novel binding partner and degradation target of high-risk types 16 and 18 E6. PATJ functions in the assembly of the evolutionarily conserved CRB-PALS1-PATJ and Par6-aPKC-Par3 complexes and is critical for the formation of tight junctions in polarized cells. The ability of type 18 E6 full-length to bind to, and the subsequent degradation of, PATJ is dependent on its C-terminal PDZ binding motif. We demonstrate that the spliced 18 E6* protein, which lacks a C-terminal PDZ binding motif, associates with and degrades PATJ independently of full-length 18 E6. Thus, PATJ is the first binding partner that is degraded in response to both isoforms of 18 E6. The ability of E6 to utilize a non-E6AP ubiquitin ligase for the degradation of several PDZ binding partners has been suggested. We also demonstrate that 18 E6-mediated degradation of PATJ is not inhibited in cells where E6AP is silenced by shRNA. This suggests that the E6-E6AP complex is not required for the degradation of this protein target. PMID:17287269

  13. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  14. Allosteric activation of the Par-6 PDZ via a partial unfolding transition

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Dustin S.; Peterson, Francis C.; Kovrigin, Evgenii L.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Proteins exist in a delicate balance between the native and unfolded states, where thermodynamic stability may be sacrificed to attain the flexibility required for efficient catalysis, binding or allosteric control. Par-6 regulates the Par polarity complex by transmitting a GTPase signal through the CRIB-PDZ module that alters PDZ lig-and binding. Allosteric activation of the PDZ is achieved by local rearrangement of the L164 and K165 side chains to stabilize the interdomain CRIB-PDZ interface and reposition a conserved element of the ligand binding pocket. However, microsecond to millisecond dynamics measurements revealed that L164/K165 exchange requires a larger rearrangement than expected. The margin of thermodynamic stability for the PDZ domain is modest (~3 kcal/mol) and further reduced by transient interactions with the disordered CRIB domain. Measurements of local structural stability revealed that tertiary contacts within the PDZ are disrupted by a partial unfolding transition that enables interconversion of the L/K switch. The unexpected participation of partial PDZ unfolding in the allosteric mechanism of Par-6 suggests that native-state unfolding may be essential for the function of other marginally stable proteins. PMID:23705660

  15. Biochemical investigations of the mechanism of action of small molecules ZL006 and IC87201 as potential inhibitors of the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anders; Pedersen, Søren W.; Dorr, Liam A.; Vallon, Gary; Ripoche, Isabelle; Ducki, Sylvie; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    ZL006 and IC87201 have been presented as efficient inhibitors of the nNOS/PSD-95 protein-protein interaction and shown great promise in cellular experiments and animal models of ischemic stroke and pain. Here, we investigate the proposed mechanism of action of ZL006 and IC87201 using biochemical and biophysical methods, such as fluorescence polarization (FP), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and 1H-15N HSQC NMR. Our data show that under the applied in vitro conditions, ZL006 and IC87201 do not interact with the PDZ domains of nNOS or PSD-95, nor inhibit the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interface by interacting with the β-finger of nNOS-PDZ. Our findings have implications for further medicinal chemistry efforts of ZL006, IC87201 and analogues, and challenge the general and widespread view on their mechanism of action. PMID:26177569

  16. PDZ Structure and Implication in Selective Drug Design against Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Joshua; Spellmon, Nicholas; Trescott, Laura; Sun, Fei; Li, Chunying; Yang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains play an essential role in a number of cellular processes by facilitating protein scaffolding and assembly of protein complexes. These domains consist of 80 to 90 amino acids and are found to recognize short C-terminal sequences of target proteins. Protein complex formation between PDZ target molecules can lead to a number of signaling and regulatory cascades that may either promote or inhibit the activation of certain proteins. It has been shown that the interaction of the PDZ domains of NHERF2 with LPA2 plays an inhibitory role on the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) by promoting the assembly of a CFTR-NHERF2-LPA2 complex. CFTR regulates chloride ion transport across the epithelial plasma membrane, and individuals possessing CFTR mutations show decreased protein function and consequently, viscous mucus accumulation due to improper fluid transport. This type of ailment is termed cystic fibrosis. Thus, insight to the structure of PDZ domains and how they function to form macromolecular complexes could be therapeutically important in augmenting CFTR channel activity in cystic fibrosis patients. Here we review the PDZ domain family while dissecting their structure, function and implications in CFTR regulation and cystic fibrosis. PMID:25523900

  17. A Novel PDZ Domain Interaction Mediates the Binding between Human Papillomavirus 16 L2 and Sorting Nexin 27 and Modulates Virion Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Broniarczyk, Justyna; Bergant, Martina; Playford, Martin P.; Banks, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have demonstrated an interaction between sorting nexin 17 and the L2 capsid proteins from a variety of papillomavirus types. This interaction is required for late endosomal trafficking of the L2 protein and entry of the L2/DNA complex into the nucleus during infection. Here we show an interaction between papillomavirus L2 proteins and the related PX-FERM family member sorting nexin 27 (SNX27), which is mediated in part by a novel interaction between the PDZ domain of SNX27 and sequences in a central portion of L2. The interaction is direct and, unlike that with SNX17, is variable in strength depending on the papillomavirus type. We show that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of SNX27 alone leads to a marginal reduction in the efficiency of viral infection but that double knockdown of both sorting nexins results in a striking reduction in infection, greater than that observed for the knockdown of either sorting nexin alone. These results suggest that the HPV L2 proteins can interact through distinct mechanisms with multiple components of the cellular cargo-sorting machinery. IMPORTANCE The trafficking of papillomaviruses to the host cell nucleus during their natural infectious life cycle is an incompletely understood process. Studies have suggested that the virus minor capsid protein L2 can interact with the endosomal recycling pathway, in part by association with sorting nexin 17, to ensure that virus DNA bound to L2 is recycled through the trans-Golgi network rather than back to the plasma membrane. In this study, we characterize the interaction between L2 and a second sorting nexin, SNX27, which is also part of the retromer complex. The study furthers our understanding of papillomavirus infection dynamics and provides potential tools for the further dissection of endosomal structure and function. PMID:26202251

  18. Regulation of SLC26A3 activity by NHERF4 PDZ-mediated interaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Nam, Joo Hyun; Park, Joonhee; Kang, Dong-Won; Kim, Joo Young; Lee, Min Goo; Yoon, Jae Seok

    2012-09-01

    SLC26A3 functions as a chloride/bicarbonate anion exchanger expressed in the secretory epithelial cells in the intestine, pancreas, and salivary glands. SLC26A3 has a C-terminal class I PDZ binding motif that assembles regulatory factors or other transporters by anchoring to various PDZ scaffold proteins. NHERF4 is an epithelial-enriched PDZ domain scaffold protein that has attracted attention because of its enriched tissue expression in the intestine and kidney. In this study, we identified SLC26A3 as a novel binding transporter of NHERF4. We investigated the functional role of NHERF4 in the regulation of SLC26A3 by using integrated biochemical and physiological approaches. A direct protein-protein interaction was identified between the PDZ-binding motif of SLC26A3 and the third PDZ domain of NHERF4. Interaction with NHERF4 decreased the level of SLC26A3 expression on the plasma membrane, which led to reduced SLC26A3 anion exchange activity. Notably, interaction with NHERF4 induced rapid internalisation of SLC26A3 from the plasma membrane. The SLC26A3-NHERF4 interaction was modulated by phosphorylation; serine 329 of NHERF4-PDZ3 played a critical role in modulating binding selectivity. Our findings suggest that NHERF4 is a novel modulator of luminal fluidity in the intestine by adjusting SLC26A3 expression and activity through a phosphorylation-dependent mechanism. PMID:22627094

  19. Putting into Practice Domain-Linear Motif Interaction Predictions for Exploration of Protein Networks

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Katja; Fournane, Sadek; Kieffer, Bruno; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Travé, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    PDZ domains recognise short sequence motifs at the extreme C-termini of proteins. A model based on microarray data has been recently published for predicting the binding preferences of PDZ domains to five residue long C-terminal sequences. Here we investigated the potential of this predictor for discovering novel protein interactions that involve PDZ domains. When tested on real negative data assembled from published literature, the predictor displayed a high false positive rate (FPR). We predicted and experimentally validated interactions between four PDZ domains derived from the human proteins MAGI1 and SCRIB and 19 peptides derived from human and viral C-termini of proteins. Measured binding intensities did not correlate with prediction scores, and the high FPR of the predictor was confirmed. Results indicate that limitations of the predictor may arise from an incomplete model definition and improper training of the model. Taking into account these limitations, we identified several novel putative interactions between PDZ domains of MAGI1 and SCRIB and the C-termini of the proteins FZD4, ARHGAP6, NET1, TANC1, GLUT7, MARCH3, MAS, ABC1, DLL1, TMEM215 and CYSLTR2. These proteins are localised to the membrane or suggested to act close to it and are often involved in G protein signalling. Furthermore, we showed that, while extension of minimal interacting domains or peptides toward tandem constructs or longer peptides never suppressed their ability to interact, the measured affinities and inferred specificity patterns often changed significantly. This suggests that if protein fragments interact, the full length proteins are also likely to interact, albeit possibly with altered affinities and specificities. Therefore, predictors dealing with protein fragments are promising tools for discovering protein interaction networks but their application to predict binding preferences within networks may be limited. PMID:22069443

  20. Quantifying protein–protein interactions in high throughput using protein domain microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Allen, John E; Gordus, Andrew; Stiffler, Michael A; Karp, Ethan S; Chang, Bryan H; MacBeath, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarrays provide an efficient way to identify and quantify protein–protein interactions in high throughput. One drawback of this technique is that proteins show a broad range of physicochemical properties and are often difficult to produce recombinantly. To circumvent these problems, we have focused on families of protein interaction domains. Here we provide protocols for constructing microarrays of protein interaction domains in individual wells of 96-well microtiter plates, and for quantifying domain–peptide interactions in high throughput using fluorescently labeled synthetic peptides. As specific examples, we will describe the construction of microarrays of virtually every human Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain, as well as microarrays of mouse PDZ domains, all produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli. For domains that mediate high-affinity interactions, such as SH2 and PTB domains, equilibrium dissociation constants (KDs) for their peptide ligands can be measured directly on arrays by obtaining saturation binding curves. For weaker binding domains, such as PDZ domains, arrays are best used to identify candidate interactions, which are then retested and quantified by fluorescence polarization. Overall, protein domain microarrays provide the ability to rapidly identify and quantify protein–ligand interactions with minimal sample consumption. Because entire domain families can be interrogated simultaneously, they provide a powerful way to assess binding selectivity on a proteome-wide scale and provide an unbiased perspective on the connectivity of protein–protein interaction networks. PMID:20360771

  1. Palmitoylation-dependent regulation of glutamate receptors and their PDZ domain-containing partners

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gareth M.; Huganir, Richard L.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that both AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid)- and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate)-type glutamate receptors, and many of their interacting partners, are palmitoylated proteins. Interfering with palmitoylation dramatically affects receptor trafficking and distribution and, in turn, can profoundly alter synaptic transmission. Increased knowledge of synaptic palmitoylation not only will aid our understanding of physiological neuronal regulation, but also may provide insights into, and even novel treatments for, neuropathological conditions. In the present paper, we review recent advances regarding the regulation of ionotropic glutamate receptor trafficking and function by palmitoylation. PMID:23356261

  2. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  3. A novel PDZ protein regulates the activity of guanylyl cyclase C, the heat-stable enterotoxin receptor.

    PubMed

    Scott, Robert O; Thelin, William R; Milgram, Sharon L

    2002-06-21

    Secretory diarrhea is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea in humans. Secretory diarrhea may be caused by binding of heat-stable enterotoxins to the intestinal receptor guanylyl cyclase C (GCC). Activation of GCC catalyzes the formation of cGMP, initiating a signaling cascade that opens the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel at the apical cell surface. To identify proteins that regulate the trafficking or function of GCC, we used the unique COOH terminus of GCC as the "bait" to screen a human intestinal yeast two-hybrid library. We identified a novel protein, IKEPP (intestinal and kidney-enriched PDZ protein) that associates with the COOH terminus of GCC in biochemical assays and by co-immunoprecipitation. IKEPP is expressed in the intestinal epithelium, where it is preferentially accumulated at the apical surface. The GCC-IKEPP interaction is not required for the efficient targeting of GCC to the apical cell surface. Rather, the association with IKEPP significantly inhibits heat-stable enterotoxin-mediated activation of GCC. Our findings are the first to identify a regulatory protein that associates with GCC to modulate the catalytic activity of the enzyme and provides new insights in mechanisms that regulate GCC activity in response to bacterial toxin. PMID:11950846

  4. Cell-Permeable Peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 Inhibits Chronic Inflammatory Pain Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Feng; Su, Qingning; Johns, Roger A.

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory conditions can lead to persistent debilitating pain, and the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) has been shown to play an important role in the processing of inflammatory pain. Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), a scaffolding protein, has been identified to interact with NMDARs at neuronal synapses of the central nervous system. However, the role of these interactions in the central sensitization of nociceptive processing has not been defined. In the present study, we investigated the effect of disrupting NMDAR/PSD-95 interactions on chronic inflammatory pain behaviors. We constructed a fusion peptide, Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2, comprising the second PDZ domain of PSD-95, to disrupt specificallyNMDARs/PSD-95 protein interactions. Western blot analysis showed that Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 intraperitoneally injected into mice was delivered intracellularly into neurons in the central nervous system. By in vitro and in vivo binding assays, we found that the Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 dose-dependently inhibited the interactions between NMDARs and PSD-95. Furthermore, behavioral testing showed that mice given Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 exhibited significantly reduced complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain behaviors compared to the vehicle-treated group. Our results indicate that by disrupting NMDAR/PSD-95 protein interactions, the cell-permeable fusion peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 provides a new target and approach for chronic inflammatory pain therapy. PMID:18781143

  5. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  6. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  7. Domain-mediated protein interaction prediction: From genome to network.

    PubMed

    Reimand, Jüri; Hui, Shirley; Jain, Shobhit; Law, Brian; Bader, Gary D

    2012-08-14

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs), involved in many biological processes such as cellular signaling, are ultimately encoded in the genome. Solving the problem of predicting protein interactions from the genome sequence will lead to increased understanding of complex networks, evolution and human disease. We can learn the relationship between genomes and networks by focusing on an easily approachable subset of high-resolution protein interactions that are mediated by peptide recognition modules (PRMs) such as PDZ, WW and SH3 domains. This review focuses on computational prediction and analysis of PRM-mediated networks and discusses sequence- and structure-based interaction predictors, techniques and datasets for identifying physiologically relevant PPIs, and interpreting high-resolution interaction networks in the context of evolution and human disease. PMID:22561014

  8. Disruption of 5-HT2A Receptor-PDZ Protein Interactions Alleviates Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wattiez, Anne-Sophie; Pichon, Xavier; Dupuis, Amandine; Hernández, Alejandro; Privat, Anne-Marie; Aissouni, Youssef; Chalus, Maryse; Pelissier, Teresa; Eschalier, Alain; Marin, Philippe; Courteix, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Despite common pathophysiological mechanisms, inflammatory and neuropathic pain do not respond equally to the analgesic effect of antidepressants, except for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which show a limited efficacy in both conditions. We previously demonstrated that an interfering peptide (TAT-2ASCV) disrupting the interaction between 5-HT2A receptors and its associated PDZ proteins (e.g. PSD-95) reveals a 5-HT2A receptor-mediated anti-hyperalgesic effect and enhances the efficacy of fluoxetine (a SSRI) in diabetic neuropathic pain conditions in rats. Here, we have examined whether the same strategy would be useful to treat inflammatory pain. Sub-chronic inflammatory pain was induced by injecting λ-carrageenan (100 µl, 2%) into the left hind paw of the rat. Mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed after acute treatment with TAT-2ASCV or/and fluoxetine (SSRI) 2.5 h after λ-carrageenan injection. Possible changes in the level of 5-HT2A receptors and its associated PDZ protein PSD-95 upon inflammation induction were quantified by Western blotting in dorsal horn spinal cord. Administration of TAT-2ASCV peptide (100 ng/rat, intrathecally) but not fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) relieves mechanical hyperalgesia (paw pressure test) in inflamed rats. This anti-hyperalgesic effect involves spinal 5-HT2A receptors and GABAergic interneurons as it is abolished by a 5-HT2A antagonist (M100907, 150 ng/rat, intrathecally) and a GABAA antagonist, (bicuculline, 3 µg/rat, intrathecally). We also found a decreased expression of 5-HT2A receptors in the dorsal spinal cord of inflamed animals which could not be rescued by TAT-2ASCV injection, while the amount of PSD-95 was not affected by inflammatory pain. Finally, the coadministration of fluoxetine does not further enhance the anti-hyperalgesic effect of TAT-2ASCV peptide. This study reveals a role of the interactions between 5-HT2A receptors and PDZ proteins in the pathophysiological pathways of

  9. Activated RhoA Binds to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain of PDZ-RhoGEF, a Potential Site for Autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Medina, Frank; Liu, Mu-ya; Thomas, Celestine; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2010-07-19

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze exchange of GDP for GTP by stabilizing the nucleotide-free state of the small GTPases through their Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology (DH {center_dot} PH) domains. Unconventionally, PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), a member of the RGS-RhoGEFs, binds tightly to both nucleotide-free and activated RhoA (RhoA {center_dot} GTP). We have characterized the interaction between PRG and activated RhoA and determined the structure of the PRG-DH {center_dot} PH-RhoA {center_dot} GTP{gamma}S (guanosine 5{prime}-O-[{gamma}-thio]triphosphate) complex. The interface bears striking similarity to a GTPase-effector interface and involves the switch regions in RhoA and a hydrophobic patch in PRG-PH that is conserved among all Lbc RhoGEFs. The two surfaces that bind activated and nucleotide-free RhoA on PRG-DH {center_dot} PH do not overlap, and a ternary complex of PRG-DH {center_dot} PH bound to both forms of RhoA can be isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. This novel interaction between activated RhoA and PH could play a key role in regulation of RhoGEF activity in vivo.

  10. Effect of disrupting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor/postsynaptic density protein -95 interactions on the threshold for halothane anesthesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Feng; Johns, Roger A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Our previous studies have shown that clinically relevant concentrations of inhalational anesthetics dose-dependently and specifically inhibit the PSD-95, Dlg, and ZO-1 (PDZ) domain-mediated protein interactions between postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, and that the knockdown of spinal PSD-95 by intrathecal injection of PSD-95 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide significantly reduces the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration for isoflurane in rats. Methods We constructed a fusion peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 comprising the second PDZ domain of PSD-95, which can specifically disrupt PSD-95 PDZ2-mediated protein interactions by binding to interaction partner. By intraperitoneal injection of this fusion peptide into mice, we investigated the effect of disrupting the PSD-95 PDZ2-mediated protein interactions on the threshold for halothane anesthesia. Results Systemically injected fusion peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 was delivered into the central nervous system, disrupted the protein-protein interactions between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor NR2 subunits and PSD-95, and significantly reduced the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration and righting reflex EC50 for halothane. Conclusions By disrupting PSD-95 PDZ2 domain-mediated protein interactions, intraperitoneal injection of cell-permeant fusion peptide Tat-PSD-95 PDZ2 dose-dependently reduces the threshold for halothane anesthesia. These results suggest that PDZ domain-mediated protein interactions at synapses in the central nervous system might play an important role in the molecular mechanisms of halothane anesthesia. PMID:18431124

  11. Activation of Nanoscale Allosteric Protein Domain Motion Revealed by Neutron Spin Echo Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Farago, Bela; Li, Jianquan; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Callaway, David J.E.; Bu, Zimei

    2010-01-01

    NHERF1 is a multidomain scaffolding protein that assembles signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by the membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 Ångstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length-scales and on submicrosecond timescales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much-simplified coarse-grained model suffices to describe interdomain motion of a multidomain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. Our results demonstrate that the dynamic propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves changes in long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond timescales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE. PMID:21081097

  12. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Type 1 (CRHR1) Clustering with MAGUKs Is Mediated via Its C-Terminal PDZ Binding Motif

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Julia; Engeholm, Maik; Ederer, Marion S.; Breu, Johannes; Møller, Thor C.; Michalakis, Stylianos; Rasko, Tamas; Wanker, Erich E.; Biel, Martin; Martinez, Karen L.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Deussing, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1) plays an important role in orchestrating neuroendocrine, behavioral, and autonomic responses to stress. To identify molecules capable of directly modulating CRHR1 signaling, we performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen using the C-terminal intracellular tail of the receptor as bait. We identified several members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family: postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97), SAP102 and membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 (MAGI2). CRHR1 is co-expressed with the identified MAGUKs and with the additionally investigated PSD93 in neurons of the adult mouse brain and in primary hippocampal neurons, supporting the probability of a physiological interaction in vivo. The C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95, discs large, zona occludens 1) binding motif of CRHR1 is essential for its physical interaction with MAGUKs, as revealed by the CRHR1-STAVA mutant, which harbors a functionally impaired PDZ binding motif. The imitation of a phosphorylation at Thr413 within the PDZ binding motif also disrupted the interaction with MAGUKs. In contrast, distinct PDZ domains within the identified MAGUKs are involved in the interactions. Expression of CRHR1 in primary neurons demonstrated its localization throughout the neuronal plasma membrane, including the excitatory post synapse, where the receptor co-localized with PSD95 and SAP97. The co-expression of CRHR1 and respective interacting MAGUKs in HEK293 cells resulted in a clustered subcellular co-localization which required an intact PDZ binding motif. In conclusion, our study characterized the PDZ binding motif-mediated interaction of CRHR1 with multiple MAGUKs, which directly affects receptor function. PMID:26352593

  13. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  14. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem; Travé, Gilles; Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future. PMID:25062098

  15. Allostery Is an Intrinsic Property of the Protease Domain of DegS Implications for Enzyme Function and Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, Jungsan; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.

    2010-12-02

    DegS is a periplasmic Escherichia coli protease, which functions as a trimer to catalyze the initial rate-limiting step in a proteolytic cascade that ultimately activates transcription of stress response genes in the cytoplasm. Each DegS subunit consists of a protease domain and a PDZ domain. During protein folding stress, DegS is allosterically activated by peptides exposed in misfolded outer membrane porins, which bind to the PDZ domain and stabilize the active protease. It is not known whether allostery is conferred by the PDZ domains or is an intrinsic feature of the trimeric protease domain. Here, we demonstrate that free DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} equilibrates between active and inactive trimers with the latter species predominating. Substrate binding stabilizes active DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} in a positively cooperative fashion. Mutations can also stabilize active DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} and produce an enzyme that displays hyperbolic kinetics and degrades substrate with a maximal velocity within error of that for fully activated, intact DegS. Crystal structures of multiple DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} variants, in functional and non-functional conformations, support a two-state model in which allosteric switching is mediated by changes in specific elements of tertiary structure in the context of an invariant trimeric base. Overall, our results indicate that protein substrates must bind sufficiently tightly and specifically to the functional conformation of DegS{sup {Delta}PDZ} to assist their own degradation. Thus, substrate binding alone may have regulated the activities of ancestral DegS trimers with subsequent fusion of the protease domain to a PDZ domain, resulting in ligand-mediated regulation.

  16. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  17. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. Structure of Dimeric and Tetrameric Complexes of the BAR Domain Protein PICK1 Determined by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten L; Thorsen, Thor S; Johner, Niklaus; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Erlendsson, Simon; Tian, Xinsheng; Simonsen, Jens B; Høiberg-Nielsen, Rasmus; Christensen, Nikolaj M; Khelashvili, George; Streicher, Werner; Teilum, Kaare; Vestergaard, Bente; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Arleth, Lise; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2015-07-01

    PICK1 is a neuronal scaffolding protein containing a PDZ domain and an auto-inhibited BAR domain. BAR domains are membrane-sculpting protein modules generating membrane curvature and promoting membrane fission. Previous data suggest that BAR domains are organized in lattice-like arrangements when stabilizing membranes but little is known about structural organization of BAR domains in solution. Through a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis, we determine the structure of dimeric and tetrameric complexes of PICK1 in solution. SAXS and biochemical data reveal a strong propensity of PICK1 to form higher-order structures, and SAXS analysis suggests an offset, parallel mode of BAR-BAR oligomerization. Furthermore, unlike accessory domains in other BAR domain proteins, the positioning of the PDZ domains is flexible, enabling PICK1 to perform long-range, dynamic scaffolding of membrane-associated proteins. Together with functional data, these structural findings are compatible with a model in which oligomerization governs auto-inhibition of BAR domain function. PMID:26073603

  19. Domain interaction between NMDA receptor subunits and the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Kornau, H C; Schenker, L T; Kennedy, M B; Seeburg, P H

    1995-09-22

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subserves synaptic glutamate-induced transmission and plasticity in central neurons. The yeast two-hybrid system was used to show that the cytoplasmic tails of NMDA receptor subunits interact with a prominent postsynaptic density protein PSD-95. The second PDZ domain in PSD-95 binds to the seven-amino acid, COOH-terminal domain containing the terminal tSXV motif (where S is serine, X is any amino acid, and V is valine) common to NR2 subunits and certain NR1 splice forms. Transcripts encoding PSD-95 are expressed in a pattern similar to that of NMDA receptors, and the NR2B subunit co-localizes with PSD-95 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The interaction of these proteins may affect the plasticity of excitatory synapses. PMID:7569905

  20. The scaffold protein PDZK1 undergoes a head-to-tail intramolecular association that negatively regulates its interaction with EBP50

    PubMed Central

    LaLonde, David P.; Bretscher, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    PDZK1 (also known as CAP70, NHERF3, NaPi-Cap1) is a scaffolding protein composed of four PDZ (Post-Synaptic Density-95, Discs Large, Zonula Occludens-1) domains followed by a short carboxyl-terminal tail. This scaffold acts as a mediator of localization and expression levels of multiple receptors in the kidney, liver and endothelium. Here, we characterize the self-association properties of the protein. PDZK1 can undergo modest homo-dimerization in vivo and in vitro through self-association involving its third PDZ domain. In addition, the tail of PDZK1 interacts in an intramolecular fashion with the first PDZ domain, but this interaction does not contribute to dimer formation. The interaction between the tail of PDZK1 and its first PDZ domain induces the protein to adopt a more compact conformation. A head-to-tail association has also been reported for EBP50/NHERF1, a two PDZ domain member of the same scaffolding protein family as PDZK1, and shown to regulate binding of target proteins to the EBP50 PDZ domains. As opposed to EBP50, the association of PDZK1 with specific ligands for its PDZ domains is unaffected by the intramolecular association, establishing a different mode of interaction among these two members of the same scaffolding family. However, the tail of PDZK1 interacts with the PDZ domains of EBP50, and this interaction is negatively regulated by the intramolecular association of PDZK1. Thus, we have uncovered a regulated association between the two PDZ-containing scaffolding molecules, PDZK1 and EBP50. PMID:19173579

  1. Inferring Domain-Domain Interactions from Protein-Protein Interactions with Formal Concept Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Identifying reliable domain-domain interactions will increase our ability to predict novel protein-protein interactions, to unravel interactions in protein complexes, and thus gain more information about the function and behavior of genes. One of the challenges of identifying reliable domain-domain interactions is domain promiscuity. Promiscuous domains are domains that can occur in many domain architectures and are therefore found in many proteins. This becomes a problem for a method where the score of a domain-pair is the ratio between observed and expected frequencies because the protein-protein interaction network is sparse. As such, many protein-pairs will be non-interacting and domain-pairs with promiscuous domains will be penalized. This domain promiscuity challenge to the problem of inferring reliable domain-domain interactions from protein-protein interactions has been recognized, and a number of work-arounds have been proposed. This paper reports on an application of Formal Concept Analysis to this problem. It is found that the relationship between formal concepts provides a natural way for rare domains to elevate the rank of promiscuous domain-pairs and enrich highly ranked domain-pairs with reliable domain-domain interactions. This piggybacking of promiscuous domain-pairs onto less promiscuous domain-pairs is possible only with concept lattices whose attribute-labels are not reduced and is enhanced by the presence of proteins that comprise both promiscuous and rare domains. PMID:24586450

  2. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  3. Analysis of multi-domain protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Amitava; Hua, Duy P; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-01-01

    Proteins with a modular architecture of multiple domains connected by linkers often exhibit diversity in the relative positions of domains while the domain tertiary structure remains unchanged. The biological function of these modular proteins, or the regulation of their activity depends on the variation in domain orientation and separation. Accordingly, careful characterization of inter-domain motion and correlated fluctuations of multi-domain systems is relevant for understanding the functional behavior of modular proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a powerful approach to study these motions in atomic detail. Nevertheless, the common procedure for analyzing fluctuations from MD simulations after overall rigid-body alignment fails for multi-domain proteins; it greatly overestimates correlated positional fluctuations in the presence of relative domain motion. We show here that expressing the atomic motions of a multi-domain protein as a combination of displacement within the domain reference frame and motion of the relative domains correctly separates the internal motions to allow a useful description of correlated fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology of separating the domain fluctuations and local fluctuations by application to the tandem SH2 domains of human Syk protein kinase and by characterizing an effect of phosphorylation on the dynamics. Correlated motions are assessed from a distance covariance rather than the more common vector-coordinate covariance. The approach makes it possible to calculate the proper correlations in fluctuations internal to a domain as well as between domains. PMID:26675644

  4. Protein structural domains: definition and prediction.

    PubMed

    Ezkurdia, Iakes; Tress, Michael L

    2011-11-01

    Recognition and prediction of structural domains in proteins is an important part of structure and function prediction. This unit lists the range of tools available for domain prediction, and describes sequence and structural analysis tools that complement domain prediction methods. Also detailed are the basic domain prediction steps, along with suggested strategies for different protein sequences and potential pitfalls in domain boundary prediction. The difficult problem of domain orientation prediction is also discussed. All the resources necessary for domain boundary prediction are accessible via publicly available Web servers and databases and do not require computational expertise. PMID:22045561

  5. Domains mediate protein-protein interactions and nucleate protein assemblies.

    PubMed

    Costa, S; Cesareni, G

    2008-01-01

    Cell physiology is governed by an intricate mesh of physical and functional links among proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites. The recent information flood coming from large-scale genomic and proteomic approaches allows us to foresee the possibility of compiling an exhaustive list of the molecules present within a cell, enriched with quantitative information on concentration and cellular localization. Moreover, several high-throughput experimental and computational techniques have been devised to map all the protein interactions occurring in a living cell. So far, such maps have been drawn as graphs where nodes represent proteins and edges represent interactions. However, this representation does not take into account the intrinsically modular nature of proteins and thus fails in providing an effective description of the determinants of binding. Since proteins are composed of domains that often confer on proteins their binding capabilities, a more informative description of the interaction network would detail, for each pair of interacting proteins in the network, which domains mediate the binding. Understanding how protein domains combine to mediate protein interactions would allow one to add important features to the protein interaction network, making it possible to discriminate between simultaneously occurring and mutually exclusive interactions. This objective can be achieved by experimentally characterizing domain recognition specificity or by analyzing the frequency of co-occurring domains in proteins that do interact. Such approaches allow gaining insights on the topology of complexes with unknown three-dimensional structure, thus opening the prospect of adopting a more rational strategy in developing drugs designed to selectively target specific protein interactions. PMID:18491061

  6. The effect of RGS12 on PDGFbeta receptor signalling to p42/p44 mitogen activated protein kinase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sambi, Balwinder S; Hains, Melinda D; Waters, Catherine M; Connell, Michelle C; Willard, Francis S; Kimple, Adam J; Pyne, Susan; Siderovski, David P; Pyne, Nigel J

    2006-07-01

    We have previously shown that the PDGFbeta receptor uses a classical GPCR-mediated pathway in order to induce efficient activation of p42/p44 MAPK in response to PDGF. We therefore, considered the possibility that GTPase accelerating proteins (RGS proteins), which regulate GPCR signalling, modulate PDGFbeta receptor-mediated signal transmission. Several lines of evidence were obtained to support functional interaction between the PDGFbeta receptor and RGS12 in HEK 293 and airway smooth muscle cells. Firstly, the over-expression of the RGS12 PDZ/PTB domain N-terminus or RGS12 PTB domain reduced the PDGF-induced activation of p42/p44 MAPK. Secondly, the RGS12 PDZ/PTB domain N-terminus and RGS12 PDZ domain can form a complex with the PDGFbeta receptor. Therefore, the results presented here provide the first evidence to support the concept that the PDZ/PTB domain N-terminus and/or the PTB domain of RGS12 may modulate PDGFbeta receptor signalling. In airway smooth muscle cells, over-expressed recombinant RGS12 and the isolated PDZ/PTB domain N-terminus co-localised with PDGFbeta receptor in cytoplasmic vesicles. To provide additional evidence for a role of the PDZ/PTB domain N-terminus, we used RGS14. RGS14 has the same C-terminal domain architecture of an RGS box, tandem Ras-binding domains (RBDs) and GoLoco motif as RGS12, but lacks the PDZ/PTB domain N-terminus. In this regard, RGS14 exhibited a different sub-cellular distribution compared with RGS12, being diffusely distributed in ASM cells. These findings suggest that RGS12 via its PDZ/PTB domain N-terminus may regulate trafficking of the PDGFbeta receptor in ASM cells. PMID:16214305

  7. Enhanced protein domain discovery using taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Coin, Lachlan; Bateman, Alex; Durbin, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Background It is well known that different species have different protein domain repertoires, and indeed that some protein domains are kingdom specific. This information has not yet been incorporated into statistical methods for finding domains in sequences of amino acids. Results We show that by incorporating our understanding of the taxonomic distribution of specific protein domains, we can enhance domain recognition in protein sequences. We identify 4447 new instances of Pfam domains in the SP-TREMBL database using this technique, equivalent to the coverage increase given by the last 8.3% of Pfam families and to a 0.7% increase in the number of domain predictions. We use PSI-BLAST to cross-validate our new predictions. We also benchmark our approach using a SCOP test set of proteins of known structure, and demonstrate improvements relative to standard Hidden Markov model techniques. Conclusions Explicitly including knowledge about the taxonomic distribution of protein domains can enhance protein domain recognition. Our method can also incorporate other context-specific domain distributions – such as domain co-occurrence and protein localisation. PMID:15137915

  8. Diversity in protein recognition by PTB domains.

    PubMed

    Forman-Kay, J D; Pawson, T

    1999-12-01

    Phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domains were originally identified as modular domains that recognize phosphorylated Asn-Pro-Xxx-p Tyr-containing proteins. Recent binding and structural studies of PTB domain complexes with target peptides have revealed a number of deviations from the previously described mode of interaction, with respect to both the sequences of possible targets and their structures within the complexes. This diversity of recognition by PTB domains extends and strengthens our general understanding of modular binding domain recognition. PMID:10607674

  9. Analysis of Multiple HPV E6 PDZ Interactions Defines Type-Specific PDZ Fingerprints That Predict Oncogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Miranda; Myers, Michael P.; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins are characterised by the presence of a class I PDZ-binding motif (PBM) on their extreme carboxy termini. The PBM is present on the E6 proteins derived from all cancer-causing HPV types, but can also be found on some related non-cancer-causing E6 proteins. We have therefore been interested in investigating the potential functional differences between these different E6 PBMs. Using an unbiased proteomic approach in keratinocytes, we have directly compared the interaction profiles of these different PBMs. This has allowed us to identify the potential PDZ target fingerprints of the E6 PBMs from 7 different cancer-causing HPV types, from 3 HPV types with weak cancer association, and from one benign HPV type that possesses an ancestral PBM. We demonstrate a striking increase in the number of potential PDZ targets bound by each E6 PBM as cancer-causing potential increases, and show that the HPV-16 and HPV-18 PBMs have the most flexibility in their PDZ target selection. Furthermore, the specific interaction with hScrib correlates directly with increased oncogenic potential. In contrast, hDlg is bound equally well by all the HPV E6 PBMs analysed, indicating that this is an evolutionarily conserved interaction, and was most likely one of the original E6 PBM target proteins that was important for the occupation of a potential new niche. Finally, we present evidence that the cell junction components ZO-2 and β-2 syntrophin are novel PDZ domain–containing targets of a subset of high-risk HPV types. PMID:27483446

  10. Opposing Effects of a Tyrosine-Based Sorting Motif and a PDZ-Binding Motif Regulate Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Envelope Trafficking▿

    PubMed Central

    Ilinskaya, Anna; Heidecker, Gisela; Derse, David

    2010-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates binding of the virus to its receptor on the surface of target cells and subsequent fusion of virus and cell membranes. To better understand the mechanisms that control HTLV-1 Env trafficking and activity, we have examined two protein-protein interaction motifs in the cytoplasmic domain of Env. One is the sequence YSLI, which matches the consensus YXXΦ motifs that are known to interact with various adaptor protein complexes; the other is the sequence ESSL at the C terminus of Env, which matches the consensus PDZ-binding motif. We show here that mutations that destroy the YXXΦ motif increased Env expression on the cell surface and increased cell-cell fusion activity. In contrast, mutation of the PDZ-binding motif greatly diminished Env expression in cells, which could be restored to wild-type levels either by mutating the YXXΦ motif or by silencing AP2 and AP3, suggesting that interactions with PDZ proteins oppose an Env degradation pathway mediated by AP2 and AP3. Silencing of the PDZ protein hDlg1 did not affect Env expression, suggesting that hDlg1 is not a binding partner for Env. Substitution of the YSLI sequence in HTLV-1 Env with YXXΦ elements from other cell or virus membrane-spanning proteins resulted in alterations in Env accumulation in cells, incorporation into virions, and virion infectivity. Env variants containing YXXΦ motifs that are predicted to have high-affinity interaction with AP2 accumulated to lower steady-state levels. Interestingly, mutations that destroy the YXXΦ motif resulted in viruses that were not infectious by cell-free or cell-associated routes of infection. Unlike YXXΦ, the function of the PDZ-binding motif manifests itself only in the producer cells; AP2 silencing restored the incorporation of PDZ-deficient Env into virus-like particles (VLPs) and the infectivity of these VLPs to wild-type levels. PMID:20463077

  11. A complex of ZO-1 and the BAR-domain protein TOCA-1 regulates actin assembly at the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Krystofiak, Evan; Kachar, Bechara; Anderson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and sealing of the tight junction barrier are critically dependent on the perijunctional actin cytoskeleton, yet little is known about physical and functional links between barrier-forming proteins and actin. Here we identify a novel functional complex of the junction scaffolding protein ZO-1 and the F-BAR–domain protein TOCA-1. Using MDCK epithelial cells, we show that an alternative splice of TOCA-1 adds a PDZ-binding motif, which binds ZO-1, targeting TOCA-1 to barrier contacts. This isoform of TOCA-1 recruits the actin nucleation–promoting factor N-WASP to tight junctions. CRISPR-Cas9–mediated knockout of TOCA-1 results in increased paracellular flux and delayed recovery in a calcium switch assay. Knockout of TOCA-1 does not alter FRAP kinetics of GFP ZO-1 or occludin, but longer term (12 h) time-lapse microscopy reveals strikingly decreased tight junction membrane contact dynamics in knockout cells compared with controls. Reexpression of TOCA-1 with, but not without, the PDZ-binding motif rescues both altered flux and membrane contact dynamics. Ultrastructural analysis shows actin accumulation at the adherens junction in TOCA-1–knockout cells but unaltered freeze-fracture fibril morphology. Identification of the ZO-1/TOCA-1 complex provides novel insights into the underappreciated dependence of the barrier on the dynamic nature of cell-to-cell contacts and perijunctional actin. PMID:26063734

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 E6 activates NF-kappaB, induces cIAP-2 expression, and protects against apoptosis in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    James, Michael A; Lee, John H; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J

    2006-06-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a critical factor in the pathogenesis of most cervical cancers and some aerodigestive cancers. The HPV E6 oncoprotein from high-risk HPV types contributes to the immortalization and transformation of cells by multiple mechanisms, including degradation of p53, transcriptional activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and degradation of several proteins containing PDZ domains. The ability of E6 to bind PDZ domain-containing proteins is independent of p53 degradation or hTERT activation but does correlate with oncogenic potential (R. A. Watson, M. Thomas, L. Banks, and S. Roberts, J. Cell Sci. 116:4925-4934, 2003) and is essential for induction of epithelial hyperplasia in vivo (M. L. Nguyen, M. M. Nguyen, D. Lee, A. E. Griep, and P. F. Lambert, J. Virol. 77:6957-6964, 2003). In this study, we found that HPV type 16 E6 was able to activate NF-kappaB in airway epithelial cells through the induction of nuclear binding activity of p52-containing NF-kappaB complexes in a PDZ binding motif-dependent manner. Transcript accumulation for the NF-kappaB-responsive antiapoptotic gene encoding cIAP-2 and binding of nuclear factors to the proximal NF-kappaB binding site of the cIAP-2 gene promoter are induced by E6 expression. Furthermore, E6 is able to protect cells from TNF-induced apoptosis. All of these E6-dependent phenotypes are dependent on the presence of the PDZ binding motif of E6. Our results imply a role for targeting of PDZ proteins by E6 in NF-kappaB activation and protection from apoptosis in airway epithelial cells. PMID:16699010

  13. Immunosilencing a Highly Immunogenic Protein Trimerization Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Sliepen, Kwinten; van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic proteins and protein subunit vaccines contain heterologous trimerization domains, such as the widely used GCN4-based isoleucine zipper (IZ) and the T4 bacteriophage fibritin foldon (Fd) trimerization domains. We found that these domains induced potent anti-IZ or anti-Fd antibody responses in animals when fused to an HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) immunogen. To dampen IZ-induced responses, we constructed an IZ domain containing four N-linked glycans (IZN4) to shield the underlying protein surface. When fused to two different vaccine antigens, HIV-1 Env and influenza hemagglutinin (HA), IZN4 strongly reduced the antibody responses against the IZ, but did not affect the antibody titers against Env or HA. Silencing of immunogenic multimerization domains with glycans might be relevant for therapeutic proteins and protein vaccines. PMID:25635058

  14. Domain swapping: entangling alliances between proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M J; Choe, S; Eisenberg, D

    1994-01-01

    The comparison of monomeric and dimeric diphtheria toxin (DT) reveals a mode for protein association which we call domain swapping. The structure of dimeric DT has been extensively refined against data to 2.0-A resolution and a three-residue loop has been corrected as compared with our published 2.5-A-resolution structure. The monomeric DT structure has also been determined, at 2.3-A resolution. Monomeric DT is a Y-shaped molecule with three domains: catalytic (C), transmembrane (T), and receptor binding (R). Upon freezing in phosphate buffer, DT forms a long-lived, metastable dimer. The protein chain tracing discloses that upon dimerization an unprecedented conformational rearrangement occurs: the entire R domain from each molecule of the dimer is exchanged for the R domain from the other. This involves breaking the noncovalent interactions between the R domain and the C and T domains, rotating the R domain by 180 degrees with atomic movements up to 65 A, and re-forming the same noncovalent interactions between the R domain and the C and T domains of the other chain of the dimer. This conformational transition explains the long life and metastability of the DT dimer. Several other intertwined, dimeric protein structures satisfy our definition of domain swapping and suggest that domain swapping may be the molecular mechanism for evolution of these oligomers and possibly of oligomeric proteins in general. Images PMID:8159715

  15. Long-range conformational transition of a photoswitchable allosteric protein: molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Buchenberg, Sebastian; Knecht, Volker; Walser, Reto; Hamm, Peter; Stock, Gerhard

    2014-11-26

    A local perturbation of a protein may lead to functional changes at some distal site. An example is the PDZ2 domain of human tyrosine phosphatase 1E, which shows an allosteric transition upon binding to a peptide ligand. Recently Buchli et al. presented a time-resolved study of this transition by covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove and using a femtosecond laser pulse that triggers the cis-trans photoisomerization of azobenzene. To aid the interpretation of these experiments, in this work seven microsecond runs of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations each for the wild-type PDZ2 in the ligand-bound and -free state, as well as the photoswitchable protein (PDZ2S) in the cis and trans states of the photoswitch, in explicit water were conducted. First the theoretical model is validated by recalculating the available NMR data from the simulations. By comparing the results for PDZ2 and PDZ2S, it is analyzed to what extent the photoswitch indeed mimics the free-bound transition. A detailed description of the conformational rearrangement following the cis-trans photoisomerization of PDZ2S reveals a series of photoinduced structural changes that propagate from the anchor residues of the photoswitch via intermediate secondary structure segments to the C-terminus of PDZ2S. The changes of the conformational distribution of the C-terminal region is considered as the distal response of the isolated allosteric protein. PMID:25365469

  16. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity.

    PubMed

    Horn, Anselm H C; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  17. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Anselm H. C.; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  18. The architecture of the protein domain universe.

    PubMed

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2005-03-14

    Understanding the design of the universe of protein structures may provide insights into protein evolution. We study the architecture of the protein domain universe, which has been found to poses peculiar scale-free properties. We examine the origin of these scale-free properties of the graph of protein domain structures (PDUG) and determine that that the PDUG is not modular, i.e. it does not consist of modules with uniform properties. Instead, we find the PDUG to be self-similar at all scales. We further characterize the PDUG architecture by studying the properties of the hub nodes that are responsible for the scale-free connectivity of the PDUG. We introduce a measure of the betweenness centrality of protein domains in the PDUG and find a power-law distribution of the betweenness centrality values. The scale-free distribution of hubs in the protein universe suggests that a set of specific statistical mechanics models, such as the self-organized criticality model, can potentially identify the principal driving forces of protein evolution. We also find a gatekeeper protein domain, removal of which partitions the largest cluster into two large sub-clusters. We suggest that the loss of such gatekeeper protein domains in the course of evolution is responsible for the creation of new fold families. PMID:15777630

  19. Tuning Protein Autoinhibition by Domain Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jae-Hyun; Muralidharan, Vasant; Vila-Perello, Miquel; Raleigh, Daniel P.; Muir, Tom W.; Palmer, Arthur G.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of many multi-domain signaling proteins requires rearrangement of autoinhibitory interdomain interactions that occlude activator binding sites. In one model for activation, the major inactive conformation exists in equilibrium with activated-like conformations that can be stabilized by ligand binding or post-translational modifications. The molecular basis for this model is established for the archetypal signaling adapter protein Crk-II by measuring the thermodynamics and kinetics of the equilibrium between autoinhibited and activated-like states using fluorescence and NMR spectroscopies, together with segmental isotopic labeling via expressed protein ligation. The results demonstrate that intramolecular domain-domain interactions both stabilize the autoinhibited state and induce the activated-like conformation. A combination of favorable interdomain interactions and unfavorable intradomain structural changes fine-tunes the population of the activated-like conformation and allows facile response to activators. This mechanism suggests a general strategy for optimization of autoinhibitory interactions of multi-domain proteins. PMID:21532593

  20. Biodiversity of voltage sensor domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Yasushi

    2007-06-01

    The six-transmembrane type voltage-gated ion channels play an essential role in neuronal excitability, muscle contraction, and secretion. The voltage sensor domain (VSD) is the key element of voltage-gated ion channels for sensing transmembrane potential, and has been studied at the levels of both biophysics and protein structure. Two recently identified proteins containing VSD without a pore domain showed unexpected biological roles: regulation of phosphatase activity and proton permeation. These proteins not only provide novel platforms to understand mechanisms of voltage sensing and ion permeation but also highlight previously unappreciated roles of membrane potential in non-neuronal cells. PMID:17347852

  1. DELETION OF THE PDZ MOTIF OF HPV16 E6 PREVENTING IMMORTALIZATION AND ANCHORAGE-INDEPENDENT GROWTH IN HUMAN TONSIL EPITHELIAL CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Spanos, William C.; Geiger, Jeremy; Anderson, Mary E.; Harris, George F.; Bossler, Aaron D.; Smith, Russell B.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Lee, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) has been associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) in up to 60%of sampled specimens. Methods To understand better the viral genes required to transform human tonsil epithelial cells (HTEC), we isolated HTECs and transduced them with retroviral vectors containing HPV16 E6 and E7. Results Immortalization and anchorage-independent growth of HTECs only occurred with expression of E6 and E7 with resultant degradation of p53. However, cells expressing E6 lacking the PSD-95/disc-large/Zo-1 (PDZ) motif did not immortalize or grow anchorage independent. Telomerase activity and degradation of p53 were similar for wild-type and mutant E6. Conclusion The mechanism of oncogenic transformation by E6 in HTECs is dependent on the PDZ binding motif. Identification of pathways affected by the interaction of E6 and PDZ domain containing proteins will further our understanding of how HPV causes HNSCC and will provide potential therapeutic targets. PMID:17657785

  2. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level. PMID:27309309

  3. ECOD: An Evolutionary Classification of Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Kinch, Lisa N.; Pei, Jimin; Shi, Shuoyong; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of a protein, including both close and distant relationships, often reveals insight into its structure and function. Fast and easy access to such up-to-date information facilitates research. We have developed a hierarchical evolutionary classification of all proteins with experimentally determined spatial structures, and presented it as an interactive and updatable online database. ECOD (Evolutionary Classification of protein Domains) is distinct from other structural classifications in that it groups domains primarily by evolutionary relationships (homology), rather than topology (or “fold”). This distinction highlights cases of homology between domains of differing topology to aid in understanding of protein structure evolution. ECOD uniquely emphasizes distantly related homologs that are difficult to detect, and thus catalogs the largest number of evolutionary links among structural domain classifications. Placing distant homologs together underscores the ancestral similarities of these proteins and draws attention to the most important regions of sequence and structure, as well as conserved functional sites. ECOD also recognizes closer sequence-based relationships between protein domains. Currently, approximately 100,000 protein structures are classified in ECOD into 9,000 sequence families clustered into close to 2,000 evolutionary groups. The classification is assisted by an automated pipeline that quickly and consistently classifies weekly releases of PDB structures and allows for continual updates. This synchronization with PDB uniquely distinguishes ECOD among all protein classifications. Finally, we present several case studies of homologous proteins not recorded in other classifications, illustrating the potential of how ECOD can be used to further biological and evolutionary studies. PMID:25474468

  4. Protein Domain Decomposition Using a Graph-Theoretic Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Xu, D.; Gabow, H.N.

    2000-08-20

    This paper presents a new algorithm for the decomposition of a multi-domain protein into individual structural domains. The underlying principle used is that residue-residue contacts are denser within a domain than between domains.

  5. Localization of PTP-FERM in nerve processes through its FERM domain.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Yohzo; Ogata, Masato; Mori, Yoshiko; Oh-hora, Masatsugu; Hatano, Naoya; Hamaoka, Toshiyuki

    2002-03-22

    PTP-FERM is a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) of Caenorhabditis elegans containing a FERM domain and a PDZ domain. Here we report the characterization of PTP-FERM and the essential role of its FERM domain in the localization of PTP-FERM in the worm. There are at least three alternatively spliced PTP-FERM isoforms, all of which contain a band 4.1/FERM domain, a PDZ domain, and a catalytic domain. PTP-FERM possessed phosphatase activity. PTP-FERM was expressed predominantly in neurons in the nerve ring and the ventral nerve cord. PTP-FERM was found in the nerve processes and to be enriched in the peri-membrane region. Studies using various deletion mutants revealed that the FERM domain was essential and sufficient for the subcellular localization. These results suggest the essential role of the FERM domain in the function of PTP-FERM in the neurons of C. elegans. PMID:11890665

  6. Structural insights into PDZ-mediated interaction of NHERF2 and LPA(2), a cellular event implicated in CFTR channel regulation.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Joshua; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Guorong; Trescott, Laura; Brunzelle, Joseph; Sirinupong, Nualpun; Li, Chunying; Naren, Anjaparavanda P; Yang, Zhe

    2014-03-28

    The formation of CFTR-NHERF2-LPA2 macromolecular complex in airway epithelia regulates CFTR channel function and plays an important role in compartmentalized cAMP signaling. We previously have shown that disruption of the PDZ-mediated NHERF2-LPA2 interaction abolishes the LPA inhibitory effect and augments CFTR Cl(-) channel activity in vitro and in vivo. Here we report the first crystal structure of the NHERF2 PDZ1 domain in complex with the C-terminal LPA2 sequence. The structure reveals that the PDZ1-LPA2 binding specificity is achieved by numerous hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts with the last four LPA2 residues contributing to specific interactions. Comparison of the PDZ1-LPA2 structure to the structure of PDZ1 in complex with a different peptide provides insights into the diverse nature of PDZ1 substrate recognition and suggests that the conformational flexibility in the ligand binding pocket is involved in determining the broad substrate specificity of PDZ1. In addition, the structure reveals a small surface pocket adjacent to the ligand-binding site, which may have therapeutic implications. This study provides an understanding of the structural basis for the PDZ-mediated NHERF2-LPA2 interaction that could prove valuable in selective drug design against CFTR-related human diseases. PMID:24613836

  7. MBT domain proteins in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Bonasio, Roberto; Lecona, Emilio; Reinberg, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The Malignant Brain Tumor (MBT) domain is a “chromatin reader”, a protein module that binds to post-translational modifications on histone tails that are thought to affect a variety of chromatin processes, including transcription. More specifically, MBT domains recognize mono- and di-methylated lysines at a number of different positions on histone H3 and H4 tails. Three Drosophila proteins, SCM, L(3)MBT and SFMBT contain multiple adjacent MBT repeats and have critical roles in development, maintenance of cell identity, and tumor suppression. Although they function in different pathways, these proteins all localize to chromatin in vivo and repress transcription by a currently unknown molecular mechanism that requires the MBT domains. The human genome contains several homologues of these MBT proteins, some of which have been linked to important gene regulatory pathways, such as E2F/Rb- and Polycomb-mediated repression, and to the insurgence of certain neurological tumors. Here, we review the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of MBT proteins and their role in development and disease. PMID:19778625

  8. Protein function annotation using protein domain family resources.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-15

    As a result of the genome sequencing and structural genomics initiatives, we have a wealth of protein sequence and structural data. However, only about 1% of these proteins have experimental functional annotations. As a result, computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential in bridging this widening annotation gap. This article reviews the current approaches of protein function prediction using structure and sequence based classification of protein domain family resources with a special focus on functional families in the CATH-Gene3D resource. PMID:26434392

  9. Partial restoration of cardiac function with ΔPDZ nNOS in aged mdx model of Duchenne cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yi; Zhao, Junling; Yue, Yongping; Wasala, Nalinda B.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic gene deletion/over-expression studies have established the cardioprotective role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). However, it remains unclear whether nNOS-mediated heart protection can be translated to gene therapy. In this study, we generated an adeno-associated virus (AAV) nNOS vector and tested its therapeutic efficacy in the aged mdx model of Duchenne cardiomyopathy. A PDZ domain-deleted nNOS gene (ΔPDZ nNOS) was packaged into tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and delivered to the heart of ∼14-month-old female mdx mice, a phenotypic model of Duchenne cardiomyopathy. Seven months later, we observed robust nNOS expression in the myocardium. Supra-physiological ΔPDZ nNOS expression significantly reduced myocardial fibrosis, inflammation and apoptosis. Importantly, electrocardiography and left ventricular hemodynamics were significantly improved in treated mice. Additional studies revealed increased phosphorylation of phospholamban and p70S6K. Collectively, we have demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the AAV ΔPDZ nNOS vector in a symptomatic Duchenne cardiomyopathy model. Our results suggest that the cardioprotective role of ΔPDZ nNOS is likely through reduced apoptosis, enhanced phospholamban phosphorylation and improved Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signaling. Our study has opened the door to treat Duchenne cardiomyopathy with ΔPDZ nNOS gene transfer. PMID:24463882

  10. Exocyst complex subunit sec8 binds to postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95): a novel interaction regulated by cypin (cytosolic PSD-95 interactor).

    PubMed

    Riefler, Gary M; Balasingam, Gaithri; Lucas, Kenyatta G; Wang, Sheng; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2003-07-01

    The PDZ domains of postsynaptic density (PSD) protein-95 play a role in the localization of PSD-95 and binding partners to neuronal synapses. The identification of binding partners to these PDZ domains can help us in understanding how signalling complexes are assembled. We observed that one of the subunits in the sec6/8 or exocyst complex, sec8, contains a C-terminal consensus sequence for PDZ binding. Sec8 binds to PDZ1-2 of PSD-95, and this binding can be competed with a peptide that binds to PDZ1 and PDZ2 in the peptide-binding site. In addition, binding of sec8 is dependent on its C-terminal-binding sequence namely Thr-Thr-Val (TTV). Immunoblotting of rat tissue extracts shows that sec8 and PSD-95 are enriched in the same brain regions, and sec8 and PSD-95 have the same subcellular distribution in pheochromocytoma cells, suggesting that these proteins may interact in vivo. Immunoprecipitation studies of sec8 and PSD-95 in brain provide further evidence of a sec8 and PSD-95 interaction. Furthermore, the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor competes with sec8 for interaction with PSD-95. Taken together, our results suggest that the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor may function to regulate the ability of sec8 to bind to PSD-95. PMID:12675619

  11. Exocyst complex subunit sec8 binds to postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95): a novel interaction regulated by cypin (cytosolic PSD-95 interactor).

    PubMed Central

    Riefler, Gary M; Balasingam, Gaithri; Lucas, Kenyatta G; Wang, Sheng; Hsu, Shu-Chan; Firestein, Bonnie L

    2003-01-01

    The PDZ domains of postsynaptic density (PSD) protein-95 play a role in the localization of PSD-95 and binding partners to neuronal synapses. The identification of binding partners to these PDZ domains can help us in understanding how signalling complexes are assembled. We observed that one of the subunits in the sec6/8 or exocyst complex, sec8, contains a C-terminal consensus sequence for PDZ binding. Sec8 binds to PDZ1-2 of PSD-95, and this binding can be competed with a peptide that binds to PDZ1 and PDZ2 in the peptide-binding site. In addition, binding of sec8 is dependent on its C-terminal-binding sequence namely Thr-Thr-Val (TTV). Immunoblotting of rat tissue extracts shows that sec8 and PSD-95 are enriched in the same brain regions, and sec8 and PSD-95 have the same subcellular distribution in pheochromocytoma cells, suggesting that these proteins may interact in vivo. Immunoprecipitation studies of sec8 and PSD-95 in brain provide further evidence of a sec8 and PSD-95 interaction. Furthermore, the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor competes with sec8 for interaction with PSD-95. Taken together, our results suggest that the cytosolic PSD-95 interactor may function to regulate the ability of sec8 to bind to PSD-95. PMID:12675619

  12. PDlim2 Selectively Interacts with the PDZ Binding Motif of Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Influenza A Virus NS1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Li, Bo; Li, Hongyue; Li, Yapeng; Zhou, Weihong; Zhang, Cuizhu; Wang, Yingying; Rao, Zihe; Bartlam, Mark; Cao, Youjia

    2011-01-01

    The multi-functional NS1 protein of influenza A virus is a viral virulence determining factor. The last four residues at the C-terminus of NS1 constitute a type I PDZ domain binding motif (PBM). Avian influenza viruses currently in circulation carry an NS1 PBM with consensus sequence ESEV, whereas human influenza viruses bear an NS1 PBM with consensus sequence RSKV or RSEV. The PBM sequence of the influenza A virus NS1 is reported to contribute to high viral pathogenicity in animal studies. Here, we report the identification of PDlim2 as a novel binding target of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 strain with an NS1 PBM of ESEV (A/Chicken/Henan/12/2004/H5N1, HN12-NS1) by yeast two-hybrid screening. The interaction was confirmed by in vitro GST pull-down assays, as well as by in vivo mammalian two-hybrid assays and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. The binding was also confirmed to be mediated by the interaction of the PDlim2 PDZ domain with the NS1 PBM motif. Interestingly, our assays showed that PDlim2 bound specifically with HN12-NS1, but exhibited no binding to NS1 from a human influenza H1N1 virus bearing an RSEV PBM (A/Puerto Rico/8/34/H1N1, PR8-NS1). A crystal structure of the PDlim2 PDZ domain fused with the C-terminal hexapeptide from HN12-NS1, together with GST pull-down assays on PDlim2 mutants, reveals that residues Arg16 and Lys31 of PDlim2 are critical for the binding between PDlim2 and HN12-NS1. The identification of a selective binding target of HN12-NS1 (ESEV), but not PR8-NS1 (RSEV), enables us to propose a structural mechanism for the interaction between NS1 PBM and PDlim2 or other PDZ-containing proteins. PMID:21625420

  13. Increasing the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphB2 Prevents Amyloid-β-induced Depletion of Cell Surface Glutamate Receptors by a Mechanism That Requires the PDZ-binding Motif of EphB2 and Neuronal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Takashi; Kim, Daniel; Knox, Joseph A.; Johnson, Erik; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Diverse lines of evidence suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides causally contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. However, the mechanisms by which Aβ impairs neuronal functions remain to be fully elucidated. Previous studies showed that soluble Aβ oligomers interfere with synaptic functions by depleting NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) from the neuronal surface and that overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 can counteract this process. Through pharmacological treatments and biochemical analyses of primary neuronal cultures expressing wild-type or mutant forms of EphB2, we demonstrate that this protective effect of EphB2 depends on its PDZ-binding motif and the presence of neuronal activity but not on its kinase activity. We further present evidence that the protective effect of EphB2 may be mediated by the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA2, which can become associated with the PDZ-binding motif of EphB2 through PDZ domain-containing proteins and can promote the retention of NMDARs in the membrane. In addition, we show that the Aβ-induced depletion of surface NMDARs does not depend on several factors that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Aβ-induced neuronal dysfunction, including aberrant neuronal activity, tau, prion protein (PrPC), and EphB2 itself. Thus, although EphB2 does not appear to be directly involved in the Aβ-induced depletion of NMDARs, increasing its expression may counteract this pathogenic process through a neuronal activity- and PDZ-dependent regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. PMID:26589795

  14. EH domain proteins regulate cardiac membrane protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Gudmundsson, Hjalti; Hund, Thomas J.; Wright, Patrick J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Snyder, Jedidiah S.; Qian, Lan; Koval, Olha M.; Cunha, Shane R.; George, Manju; Rainey, Mark A.; Kashef, Farshid E.; Dun, Wen; Boyden, Penelope A.; Anderson, Mark E.; Band, Hamid; Mohler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Cardiac membrane excitability is tightly regulated by an integrated network of membrane-associated ion channels, transporters, receptors, and signaling molecules. Membrane protein dynamics in health and disease are maintained by a complex ensemble of intracellular targeting, scaffolding, recycling, and degradation pathways. Surprisingly, despite decades of research linking dysfunction in membrane protein trafficking with human cardiovascular disease, essentially nothing is known regarding the molecular identity or function of these intracellular targeting pathways in excitable cardiomyocytes. Objective We sought to discover novel pathways for membrane protein targeting in primary cardiomyocytes. Methods and Results We report the initial characterization of a large family of membrane trafficking proteins in human heart. We employed a tissue-wide screen for novel ankyrin-associated trafficking proteins and identified four members of a unique Eps15 homology (EH) domain-containing protein family (EHD1, EHD2, EHD3, EHD4) that serve critical roles in endosome-based membrane protein targeting in other cell types. We show that EHD1-4 directly associate with ankyrin, provide the first information on the expression and localization of these molecules in primary cardiomyocytes, and demonstrate that EHD1-4 are co-expressed with ankyrin-B in the myocyte perinuclear region. Notably, the expression of multiple EHD proteins is increased in animal models lacking ankyrin-B, and EHD3-deficient cardiomyocytes display aberrant ankyrin-B localization and selective loss of Na/Ca exchanger expression and function. Finally, we report significant modulation of EHD expression following myocardial infarction, suggesting that these proteins may play a key role in regulating membrane excitability in normal and diseased heart. Conclusions Our findings identify and characterize a new class of cardiac trafficking proteins, define the first group of proteins associated with the ankyrin

  15. Tetramer formation in Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins: analysis of a protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MADS domain proteins are transcription factors that coordinate several important developmental processes in plants. These proteins interact with other MADS domain proteins to form dimers, and it has been proposed that they are able to associate as tetrameric complexes that regulate transcription of target genes. Whether the formation of functional tetramers is a widespread property of plant MADS domain proteins, or it is specific to few of these transcriptional regulators remains unclear. Results We analyzed the structure of the network of physical interactions among MADS domain proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined the abundance of subgraphs that represent the connection pattern expected for a MADS domain protein heterotetramer. These subgraphs were significantly more abundant in the MADS domain protein interaction network than in randomized analogous networks. Importantly, these subgraphs are not significantly frequent in a protein interaction network of TCP plant transcription factors, when compared to expectation by chance. In addition, we found that MADS domain proteins in tetramer-like subgraphs are more likely to be expressed jointly than proteins in other subgraphs. This effect is mainly due to proteins in the monophyletic MIKC clade, as there is no association between tetramer-like subgraphs and co-expression for proteins outside this clade. Conclusions Our results support that the tendency to form functional tetramers is widespread in the MADS domain protein-protein interaction network. Our observations also suggest that this trend is prevalent, or perhaps exclusive, for proteins in the MIKC clade. Because it is possible to retrodict several experimental results from our analyses, our work can be an important aid to make new predictions and facilitates experimental research on plant MADS domain proteins. PMID:24468197

  16. AIDA: ab initio domain assembly for automated multi-domain protein structure prediction and domain–domain interaction prediction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Li, Zhanwen; Godzik, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Most proteins consist of multiple domains, independent structural and evolutionary units that are often reshuffled in genomic rearrangements to form new protein architectures. Template-based modeling methods can often detect homologous templates for individual domains, but templates that could be used to model the entire query protein are often not available. Results: We have developed a fast docking algorithm ab initio domain assembly (AIDA) for assembling multi-domain protein structures, guided by the ab initio folding potential. This approach can be extended to discontinuous domains (i.e. domains with ‘inserted’ domains). When tested on experimentally solved structures of multi-domain proteins, the relative domain positions were accurately found among top 5000 models in 86% of cases. AIDA server can use domain assignments provided by the user or predict them from the provided sequence. The latter approach is particularly useful for automated protein structure prediction servers. The blind test consisting of 95 CASP10 targets shows that domain boundaries could be successfully determined for 97% of targets. Availability and implementation: The AIDA package as well as the benchmark sets used here are available for download at http://ffas.burnham.org/AIDA/. Contact: adam@sanfordburnham.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25701568

  17. PDZ1 inhibitor peptide protects neurons against ischemia via inhibiting GluK2-PSD-95-module-mediated Fas signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Hui; Yan, Jing-Zhi; Yang, Guo; Chen, Li; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Hong, Xi-Ping; Wu, Shi-Liang; Hou, Xiao-Yu; Zhang, GuangYi

    2016-04-15

    Respecting the selective inhibition of peptides on protein-protein interactions, they might become potent methods in ischemic stroke therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of PDZ1 inhibitor peptide on ischemic neuron apoptosis and the relative mechanism. Results showed that PDZ1 inhibitor peptide, which significantly disrupted GluK2-PSD-95 interaction, efficiently protected neuron from ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis. Further, PDZ1 inhibited FasL expression, DISC assembly and activation of Caspase 8, Bid, Caspase 9 and Caspase 3 after global brain ischemia. Based on our previous report that GluK2-PSD-95 pathway increased FasL expression after global brain ischemia, the neuron protection effect of PDZ1 inhibitor peptide was considered to be achieved by disrupting GluK2-PSD-95 interaction and subsequently inhibiting FasL expression and Fas apoptosis pathway. PMID:26892027

  18. WW domain-containing proteins: retrospectives and the future.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Alian, Akram; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2012-01-01

    WW domains are protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions through recognition of proline-rich peptide motifs (PRM) and phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline sites. WW domains are found in many different structural and signaling proteins that are involved in a variety of cellular processes, including RNA transcription and processing, protein trafficking and stability, receptor signaling, and control of the cytoskeleton. WW domain-containing proteins and complexes have been implicated in major human diseases including cancer as well as in major signaling cascades such as the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, making them targets for new diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss how WW domains provide versatile platforms that link individual proteins into physiologically important networks and the indispensible role of WW domain-containing proteins in biology and pathology, especially tumorogenesis. PMID:22201747

  19. Fold of the conserved DTC domain in deltex proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Walker, John R.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2012-04-30

    Human Deltex 3-like (DTX3L) is a member of the Deltex family of proteins. Initially identified as a B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein, DTX3L is an E3 ligase that regulates subcellular localization of its partner protein, BAL, by a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic trafficking mechanism. Unlike other members of the Deltex family of proteins, DTX3L lacks the highly basic N-terminal motif and the central proline-rich motif present in other Deltex proteins, and instead contains other unique N-terminal domains. The C-terminal domains are, however, homologous with other members of the Deltex family of proteins; these include a RING domain and a previously unidentified C-terminal domain. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of this previously uncharacterized C-terminal domain of human DTX3L, which we term the Deltex C-terminal domain.

  20. Length constraints of multi­domain proteins in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Sarah; Song, Timothy; Nayak, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    The increasing number of annotated genome sequences in public databases has made it possible to study the length distributions and domain composition of proteins at unprecedented resolution. To identify factors that influence protein length in metazoans, we performed an analysis of all domain­annotated proteins from a total of 49 animal species from Ensembl (v.56) or EnsemblMetazoa (v.3). Our results indicate that protein length constraints are not fixed as a linear function of domain count and can vary based on domain content. The presence of repeating domains was associated with relaxation of the constraints that govern protein length. Conversely, for proteins with unique domains, length constraints were generally maintained with increased domain counts. It is clear that mean (and median) protein length and domain composition vary significantly between metazoans and other kingdoms; however, the connections between function, domain content, and length are unclear. We incorporated Gene Ontology (GO) annotation to identify biological processes, cellular components, or molecular functions that favor the incorporation of multi­domain proteins. Using this approach, we identified multiple GO terms that favor the incorporation of multi-domain proteins; interestingly, several of the GO terms with elevated domain counts were not restricted to a single gene family. The findings presented here represent an important step in resolving the complex relationship between protein length, function, and domain content. The comparison of the data presented in this work to data from other kingdoms is likely to reveal additional differences in the regulation of protein length. PMID:20975906

  1. A non-chromatographic protein purification strategy using Src 3 homology domains as generalized capture domains.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejae; Chen, Wilfred

    2016-09-20

    Protein purification using inverse phase transition of elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) domains is a useful alternative to chromatography. Genetic fusions of ELP domains to various proteins have the ability to reversibly transition between soluble monomers and micron-sized aggregates and this has been used to selectively purify many ELP fusions. Affinity domains can enhance this technology by using specific protein binding domains to enable ELP mediated affinity capture (EMAC) of proteins of interest (POI) that have been fused to corresponding affinity ligands. In this paper, we highlight the use of Src homology 3 (SH3) domains and corresponding peptide ligands in EMAC that have differential binding affinities towards SH3 for efficient capture and elution of proteins. Furthermore, differences between capture and elution of a monomeric and a multimeric protein were also studied. PMID:27457699

  2. Comparative Analysis of SWIRM Domain-Containing Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Yang, Songguang; Yuan, Lianyu; Cui, Yuhai; Wu, Keqiang

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin-remodeling complexes affect gene expression by using the energy of ATP hydrolysis to locally disrupt or alter the association of histones with DNA. SWIRM (Swi3p, Rsc8p, and Moira) domain is an alpha-helical domain of about 85 residues in chromosomal proteins. SWIRM domain-containing proteins make up large multisubunit complexes by interacting with other chromatin modification factors and may have an important function in plants. However, little is known about SWIRM domain-containing proteins in plants. In this study, 67 SWIRM domain-containing proteins from 6 plant species were identified and analyzed. Plant SWIRM domain proteins can be divided into three distinct types: Swi-type, LSD1-type, and Ada2-type. Generally, the SWIRM domain forms a helix-turn-helix motif commonly found in DNA-binding proteins. The genes encoding SWIRM domain proteins in Oryza sativa are widely expressed, especially in pistils. In addition, OsCHB701 and OsHDMA701 were downregulated by cold stress, whereas OsHDMA701 and OsHDMA702 were significantly induced by heat stress. These observations indicate that SWIRM domain proteins may play an essential role in plant development and plant responses to environmental stress. PMID:22924025

  3. δ-Catenin Regulates Spine Architecture via Cadherin and PDZ-dependent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Li; Seong, Eunju; Beuscher, James L; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-04-24

    The ability of neurons to maintain spine architecture and modulate it in response to synaptic activity is a crucial component of the cellular machinery that underlies information storage in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Here we show a critical role for δ-catenin, a component of the cadherin-catenin cell adhesion complex, in regulating spine head width and length in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. The loss of Ctnnd2, the gene encoding δ-catenin, has been associated with the intellectual disability observed in the cri du chat syndrome, suggesting that the functional roles of δ-catenin are vital for neuronal integrity and higher order functions. We demonstrate that loss of δ-catenin in a mouse model or knockdown of δ-catenin in pyramidal neurons compromises spine head width and length, without altering spine dynamics. This is accompanied by a reduction in the levels of synaptic N-cadherin. The ability of δ-catenin to modulate spine architecture is critically dependent on its ability to interact with cadherin and PDZ domain-containing proteins. We propose that loss of δ-catenin during development perturbs synaptic architecture leading to developmental aberrations in neural circuit formation that contribute to the learning disabilities in a mouse model and humans with cri du chat syndrome. PMID:25724647

  4. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  5. Emerging Roles of JmjC Domain-Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Accari, Sandra L; Fisher, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Jumonji C (JmjC) domain-containing proteins are a diverse superfamily of proteins containing a characteristic, evolutionarily conserved β-barrel structure that normally contains binding sites for Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate. In the best studied JmjC-domain proteins, the JmjC barrel has a histone demethylase catalytic activity. Histones are evolutionarily conserved proteins intimately involved in the packaging of DNA within the nucleus of eukaryotic organisms. The N-termini ("tails") of the histone proteins are subject to a diverse array of posttranslational modifications including methylation. Unlike many of the other histone modifications which are transient, methylation was thought to be permanent, until the relatively recent identification of the first demethylases. Jumonji C domain-containing proteins were first identified with a role in the modulation of histone methylation marks. This family of proteins is broken up into seven distinct subgroups based on domain architecture and their ability to antagonize specific histone methylation marks. Their biological functions derive from their ability to regulate gene expression and include roles in cell differentiation, growth, proliferation, and stress responses. However, one subgroup remains, the largest, in which the JmjC domain has no known biochemical function. These proteins belong to the JmjC-domain-only subgroup and as their name suggests, the only bioinformatically recognizable domain they contain is the highly conserved JmjC domain. PMID:26404469

  6. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  7. Computational Methods for Domain Partitioning of Protein Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veretnik, Stella; Shindyalov, Ilya

    Analysis of protein structures typically begins with decomposition of structure into more basic units, called "structural domains". The underlying goal is to reduce a complex protein structure to a set of simpler yet structurally meaningful units, each of which can be analyzed independently. Structural semi-independence of domains is their hallmark: domains often have compact structure and can fold or function independently. Domains can undergo so-called "domain shuffling"when they reappear in different combinations in different proteins thus implementing different biological functions (Doolittle, 1995). Proteins can then be conceived as being built of such basic blocks: some, especially small proteins, consist usually of just one domain, while other proteins possess a more complex architecture containing multiple domains. Therefore, the methods for partitioning a structure into domains are of critical importance: their outcome defines the set of basic units upon which structural classifications are built and evolutionary analysis is performed. This is especially true nowadays in the era of structural genomics. Today there are many methods that decompose the structure into domains: some of them are manual (i.e., based on human judgment), others are semiautomatic, and still others are completely automatic (based on algorithms implemented as software). Overall there is a high level of consistency and robustness in the process of partitioning a structure into domains (for ˜80% of proteins); at least for structures where domain location is obvious. The picture is less bright when we consider proteins with more complex architectures—neither human experts nor computational methods can reach consistent partitioning in many such cases. This is a rather accurate reflection of biological phenomena in general since domains are formed by different mechanisms, hence it is nearly impossible to come up with a set of well-defined rules that captures all of the observed cases.

  8. Continuous and discontinuous domains: an algorithm for the automatic generation of reliable protein domain definitions.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, A. S.; Barton, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the fast and accurate definition of protein structural domains from coordinate data without prior knowledge of the number or type of domains. The algorithm explicitly locates domains that comprise one or two continuous segments of protein chain. Domains that include more than two segments are also located. The algorithm was applied to a nonredundant database of 230 protein structures and the results compared to domain definitions obtained from the literature, or by inspection of the coordinates on molecular graphics. For 70% of the proteins, the derived domains agree with the reference definitions, 18% show minor differences and only 12% (28 proteins) show very different definitions. Three screens were applied to identify the derived domains least likely to agree with the subjective definition set. These screens revealed a set of 173 proteins, 97% of which agree well with the subjective definitions. The algorithm represents a practical domain identification tool that can be run routinely on the entire structural database. Adjustment of parameters also allows smaller compact units to be identified in proteins. PMID:7663343

  9. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families. PMID:26253692

  10. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains

    PubMed Central

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families. PMID:26253692

  11. Small protein domains fold inside the ribosome exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Marino, Jacopo; von Heijne, Gunnar; Beckmann, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Cotranslational folding of small protein domains within the ribosome exit tunnel may be an important cellular strategy to avoid protein misfolding. However, the pathway of cotranslational folding has so far been described only for a few proteins, and therefore, it is unclear whether folding in the ribosome exit tunnel is a common feature for small protein domains. Here, we have analyzed nine small protein domains and determined at which point during translation their folding generates sufficient force on the nascent chain to release translational arrest by the SecM arrest peptide, both in vitro and in live E. coli cells. We find that all nine protein domains initiate folding while still located well within the ribosome exit tunnel. PMID:26879042

  12. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  13. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay

    PubMed Central

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this aim, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to a thousand domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. Extracts of overexpressed domains are incubated with peptide-coated resins and subjected to filtration. Binding affinities are deduced from microfluidic capillary electrophoresis of flow-throughs. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from Human Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human PDZome. We obtained exquisite sequence-dependent binding profiles, describing quantitatively the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has a wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes. PMID:26053890

  14. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  15. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  16. Proteasomes and protein conjugation across domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Like other energy-dependent proteases, proteasomes, which are found across the three domains of life, are self-compartmentalized and important in the early steps of proteolysis. Proteasomes degrade improperly synthesized, damaged or misfolded proteins and hydrolyse regulatory proteins that must be specifically removed or cleaved for cell signalling. In eukaryotes, proteins are typically targeted for proteasome-mediated destruction through polyubiquitylation, although ubiquitin-independent pathways also exist. Interestingly, actinobacteria and archaea also covalently attach small proteins (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) and small archaeal modifier proteins (Samps), respectively) to certain proteins, and this may serve to target the modified proteins for degradation by proteasomes. PMID:22183254

  17. Domain stealing by receptors in a protein transport complex.

    PubMed

    Hulett, Joanne M; Walsh, Peter; Lithgow, Trevor

    2007-09-01

    The mitochondrion is an essential cellular compartment in eukaryotes. The mitochondrial proteins Tom20 and Tom22 are receptors that ensure recognition and binding of proteins imported for mitochondrial biogenesis. Comparison of the sequence for the Tom20 and Tom22 subunits in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces castellii, show a rare case of domain stealing, where in Saccharomyces castellii Tom22 has lost an acidic domain, and Tom20 has gained one. This example of domain stealing is a snapshot of evolution in action and provides excellent evidence that Tom20 and Tom22 are subunits of a single, composite receptor that binds precursor proteins for import into mitochondria. PMID:17586602

  18. Identification of structural domains in proteins by a graph heuristic.

    PubMed

    Wernisch, L; Hunting, M; Wodak, S J

    1999-05-15

    A novel automatic procedure for identifying domains from protein atomic coordinates is presented. The procedure, termed STRUDL (STRUctural Domain Limits), does not take into account information on secondary structures and handles any number of domains made up of contiguous or non-contiguous chain segments. The core algorithm uses the Kernighan-Lin graph heuristic to partition the protein into residue sets which display minimum interactions between them. These interactions are deduced from the weighted Voronoi diagram. The generated partitions are accepted or rejected on the basis of optimized criteria, representing basic expected physical properties of structural domains. The graph heuristic approach is shown to be very effective, it approximates closely the exact solution provided by a branch and bound algorithm for a number of test proteins. In addition, the overall performance of STRUDL is assessed on a set of 787 representative proteins from the Protein Data Bank by comparison to domain definitions in the CATH protein classification. The domains assigned by STRUDL agree with the CATH assignments in at least 81% of the tested proteins. This result is comparable to that obtained previously using PUU (Holm and Sander, Proteins 1994;9:256-268), the only other available algorithm designed to identify domains with any number of non-contiguous chain segments. A detailed discussion of the structures for which our assignments differ from those in CATH brings to light some clear inconsistencies between the concept of structural domains based on minimizing inter-domain interactions and that of delimiting structural motifs that represent acceptable folding topologies or architectures. Considering both concepts as complementary and combining them in a layered approach might be the way forward. PMID:10328269

  19. Sequence and structural analysis of BTB domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stogios, Peter J; Downs, Gregory S; Jauhal, Jimmy JS; Nandra, Sukhjeen K; Privé, Gilbert G

    2005-01-01

    Background The BTB domain (also known as the POZ domain) is a versatile protein-protein interaction motif that participates in a wide range of cellular functions, including transcriptional regulation, cytoskeleton dynamics, ion channel assembly and gating, and targeting proteins for ubiquitination. Several BTB domain structures have been experimentally determined, revealing a highly conserved core structure. Results We surveyed the protein architecture, genomic distribution and sequence conservation of BTB domain proteins in 17 fully sequenced eukaryotes. The BTB domain is typically found as a single copy in proteins that contain only one or two other types of domain, and this defines the BTB-zinc finger (BTB-ZF), BTB-BACK-kelch (BBK), voltage-gated potassium channel T1 (T1-Kv), MATH-BTB, BTB-NPH3 and BTB-BACK-PHR (BBP) families of proteins, among others. In contrast, the Skp1 and ElonginC proteins consist almost exclusively of the core BTB fold. There are numerous lineage-specific expansions of BTB proteins, as seen by the relatively large number of BTB-ZF and BBK proteins in vertebrates, MATH-BTB proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans, and BTB-NPH3 proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. Using the structural homology between Skp1 and the PLZF BTB homodimer, we present a model of a BTB-Cul3 SCF-like E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that shows that the BTB dimer or the T1 tetramer is compatible in this complex. Conclusion Despite widely divergent sequences, the BTB fold is structurally well conserved. The fold has adapted to several different modes of self-association and interactions with non-BTB proteins. PMID:16207353

  20. POU proteins bend DNA via the POU-specific domain.

    PubMed Central

    Verrijzer, C P; van Oosterhout, J A; van Weperen, W W; van der Vliet, P C

    1991-01-01

    POU proteins constitute a family of ubiquitous as well as cell type-specific transcription factors that share the conserved POU DNA binding domain. This domain consists of two distinct subdomains, a POU-specific domain and a POU homeodomain, that are both required for high affinity sequence-specific DNA binding. In a circular permutation assay, several POU proteins, including Oct-1, Oct-2A, Oct-6 and Pit-1, demonstrated a position dependent mobility of the protein-DNA complexes, suggesting induction of DNA bending. This was confirmed by detection of relative bend direction, using pre-bent DNA, and by enhanced ligase mediated cyclization. Bending was caused by interaction with the POU domain. By contrast, binding of the POU homeodomain did not distort the DNA structure, indicating that the POU-specific domain confers DNA bending. Images PMID:1915275

  1. Epigenetic repression of PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 promotes ovarian cancer via NOS2-derived nitric oxide signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wayne Bond; Lau, Bonnie; Luo, Zhongyue; Lin, Qiao; Yang, Huiliang; Xuan, Yu; Yi, Tao; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer constitutes one of the most lethal gynaecological malignancies worldwide and currently no satisfactory therapeutic approaches have been established. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms to develop targeted therapy of ovarian cancer is crucial. PDLIM2 is critical to promote ubiquitination of nuclear p65 and thus its role in inflammation has been highlighted recently. We demonstrate that PDLIM2 is decreased in both ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma and in various human ovarian cancer cell lines compared with normal ovary tissues and human ovarian surface epithelial cells (HOSE). Further functional analysis revealed that PDLIM2 is epigenetically repressed in ovarian cancer development and inhibition of PDLIM2 promoted ovarian cancer growth both in vivo and in vitro via NOS2-derived nitric oxide signaling, leading to recruitment of M2 type macrophages. These results suggest that PDLIM2 might be involved in ovarian cancer pathogenesis, which could serve as a promising therapeutic target for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:26593252

  2. CDD: a Conserved Domain Database for protein classification.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Anderson, John B; Cherukuri, Praveen F; DeWeese-Scott, Carol; Geer, Lewis Y; Gwadz, Marc; He, Siqian; Hurwitz, David I; Jackson, John D; Ke, Zhaoxi; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Liebert, Cynthia A; Liu, Chunlei; Lu, Fu; Marchler, Gabriele H; Mullokandov, Mikhail; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Simonyan, Vahan; Song, James S; Thiessen, Paul A; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Yin, Jodie J; Zhang, Dachuan; Bryant, Stephen H

    2005-01-01

    The Conserved Domain Database (CDD) is the protein classification component of NCBI's Entrez query and retrieval system. CDD is linked to other Entrez databases such as Proteins, Taxonomy and PubMed, and can be accessed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?db=cdd. CD-Search, which is available at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/wrpsb.cgi, is a fast, interactive tool to identify conserved domains in new protein sequences. CD-Search results for protein sequences in Entrez are pre-computed to provide links between proteins and domain models, and computational annotation visible upon request. Protein-protein queries submitted to NCBI's BLAST search service at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/BLAST are scanned for the presence of conserved domains by default. While CDD started out as essentially a mirror of publicly available domain alignment collections, such as SMART, Pfam and COG, we have continued an effort to update, and in some cases replace these models with domain hierarchies curated at the NCBI. Here, we report on the progress of the curation effort and associated improvements in the functionality of the CDD information retrieval system. PMID:15608175

  3. Identification and molecular characterization of BP75, a novel bromodomain-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Cuppen, E; van Ham, M; Pepers, B; Wieringa, B; Hendriks, W

    1999-10-15

    We here describe the identification and characterization of a novel bromodomain-containing protein, the bromodomain protein of 75 kDa (BP75). Initially, we identified BP75 in a two-hybrid screening for proteins that interact with the first PDZ (acronym for post-synaptic density protein PSD-95, Drosophila discs large tumor suppressor DlgA and the tight junction protein ZO-1) domain in protein tyrosine phosphatase-BAS-like (PTP-BL). We found that BP75 is expressed ubiquitously and show that both BP75 and a PTP-BL deletion mutant consisting of the first PDZ domain are located mainly in the nucleus, although cytoplasmic localization is also evident. Full-length PTP-BL, on the contrary, is predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, although some basal nuclear staining is observed. The described molecular interaction may reflect a mechanism of coupling submembraneous signalling events and nuclear events. PMID:10526152

  4. The acidic domains of the Toc159 chloroplast preprotein receptor family are intrinsically disordered protein domains

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The Toc159 family of proteins serve as receptors for chloroplast-destined preproteins. They directly bind to transit peptides, and exhibit preprotein substrate selectivity conferred by an unknown mechanism. The Toc159 receptors each include three domains: C-terminal membrane, central GTPase, and N-terminal acidic (A-) domains. Although the function(s) of the A-domain remains largely unknown, the amino acid sequences are most variable within these domains, suggesting they may contribute to the functional specificity of the receptors. Results The physicochemical properties of the A-domains are characteristic of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Using CD spectroscopy we show that the A-domains of two Arabidopsis Toc159 family members (atToc132 and atToc159) are disordered at physiological pH and temperature and undergo conformational changes at temperature and pH extremes that are characteristic of IDPs. Conclusions Identification of the A-domains as IDPs will be important for determining their precise function(s), and suggests a role in protein-protein interactions, which may explain how these proteins serve as receptors for such a wide variety of preprotein substrates. PMID:20042108

  5. The ProDom database of protein domain families.

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, F; Gouzy, J; Kahn, D

    1998-01-01

    The ProDom database contains protein domain families generated from the SWISS-PROT database by automated sequence comparisons. It can be searched on the World Wide Web (http://protein.toulouse.inra. fr/prodom.html ) or by E-mail (prodom@toulouse.inra.fr) to study domain arrangements within known families or new proteins. Strong emphasis has been put on the graphical user interface which allows for interactive analysis of protein homology relationships. Recent improvements to the server include: ProDom search by keyword; links to PROSITE and PDB entries; more sensitive ProDom similarity search with BLAST or WU-BLAST; alignments of query sequences with homologous ProDom domain families; and links to the SWISS-MODEL server (http: //www.expasy.ch/swissmod/SWISS-MODEL.html ) for homology based 3-D domain modelling where possible. PMID:9399865

  6. Tandem-repeat protein domains across the tree of life

    PubMed Central

    Jernigan, Kristin K.

    2015-01-01

    Tandem-repeat protein domains, composed of repeated units of conserved stretches of 20–40 amino acids, are required for a wide array of biological functions. Despite their diverse and fundamental functions, there has been no comprehensive assessment of their taxonomic distribution, incidence, and associations with organismal lifestyle and phylogeny. In this study, we assess for the first time the abundance of armadillo (ARM) and tetratricopeptide (TPR) repeat domains across all three domains in the tree of life and compare the results to our previous analysis on ankyrin (ANK) repeat domains in this journal. All eukaryotes and a majority of the bacterial and archaeal genomes analyzed have a minimum of one TPR and ARM repeat. In eukaryotes, the fraction of ARM-containing proteins is approximately double that of TPR and ANK-containing proteins, whereas bacteria and archaea are enriched in TPR-containing proteins relative to ARM- and ANK-containing proteins. We show in bacteria that phylogenetic history, rather than lifestyle or pathogenicity, is a predictor of TPR repeat domain abundance, while neither phylogenetic history nor lifestyle predicts ARM repeat domain abundance. Surprisingly, pathogenic bacteria were not enriched in TPR-containing proteins, which have been associated within virulence factors in certain species. Taken together, this comparative analysis provides a newly appreciated view of the prevalence and diversity of multiple types of tandem-repeat protein domains across the tree of life. A central finding of this analysis is that tandem repeat domain-containing proteins are prevalent not just in eukaryotes, but also in bacterial and archaeal species. PMID:25653910

  7. Insights into Hox Protein Function from a Large Scale Combinatorial Analysis of Protein Domains

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K.; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-01-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences. PMID:22046139

  8. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences. PMID:22046139

  9. Modeling the Evolution of Protein Domain Architectures Using Maximum Parsimony

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jessica H.; Geer, Lewis Y.; Panchenko, Anna R.; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2007-01-01

    Domains are basic evolutionary units of proteins and most proteins have more than one domain. Advances in domain modeling and collection are making it possible to annotate a large fraction of known protein sequences by a linear ordering of their domains, yielding their architecture. Protein domain architectures link evolutionarily related proteins and underscore their shared functions. Here, we attempt to better understand this association by identifying the evolutionary pathways by which extant architectures may have evolved. We propose a model of evolution in which architectures arise through rearrangements of inferred precursor architectures and acquisition of new domains. These pathways are ranked using a parsimony principle, whereby scenarios requiring the fewest number of independent recombination events, namely fission and fusion operations, are assumed to be more likely. Using a data set of domain architectures present in 159 proteomes that represent all three major branches of the tree of life allows us to estimate the history of over 85% of all architectures in the sequence database. We find that the distribution of rearrangement classes is robust with respect to alternative parsimony rules for inferring the presence of precursor architectures in ancestral species. Analyzing the most parsimonious pathways, we find 87% of architectures to gain complexity over time through simple changes, among which fusion events account for 5.6 times as many architectures as fission. Our results may be used to compute domain architecture similarities, for example, based on the number of historical recombination events separating them. Domain architecture “neighbors” identified in this way may lead to new insights about the evolution of protein function. PMID:17166515

  10. Crystallographic studies on protein misfolding: Domain swapping and amyloid formation in the SH3 domain.

    PubMed

    Cámara-Artigas, Ana

    2016-07-15

    Oligomerization by 3D domain swapping is found in a variety of proteins of diverse size, fold and function. In the early 1960s this phenomenon was postulated for the oligomers of ribonuclease A, but it was not until the 1990s that X-ray diffraction provided the first experimental evidence of this special manner of oligomerization. Nowadays, structural information has allowed the identification of these swapped oligomers in over one hundred proteins. Although the functional relevance of this phenomenon is not clear, this alternative folding of protomers into intertwined oligomers has been related to amyloid formation. Studies on proteins that develop 3D domain swapping might provide some clues on the early stages of amyloid formation. The SH3 domain is a small modular domain that has been used as a model to study the basis of protein folding. Among SH3 domains, the c-Src-SH3 domain emerges as a helpful model to study 3D domain swapping and amyloid formation. PMID:26924596

  11. WAP domain proteins as modulators of mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Thomas S; Roghanian, Ali; Simpson, Alexander John; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2011-10-01

    WAP (whey acidic protein) is an important whey protein present in milk of mammals. This protein has characteristic domains, rich in cysteine residues, called 4-DSC (four-disulfide core domain). Other proteins, mainly present at mucosal surfaces, have been shown to also possess these characteristic WAP-4-DSC domains. The present review will focus on two WAP-4-DSC containing proteins, namely SLPI (secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor) and trappin-2/elafin. Although first described as antiproteases able to inhibit in particular host neutrophil proteases [NE (neutrophil elastase), cathepsin-G and proteinase-3] and as such, able to limit maladaptive tissue damage during inflammation, it has become apparent that these molecules have a variety of other functions (direct antimicrobial activity, bacterial opsonization, induction of adaptive immune responses, promotion of tissue repair, etc.). After providing information about the 'classical' antiproteasic role of these molecules, we will discuss the evidence pertaining to their pleiotropic functions in inflammation and immunity. PMID:21936824

  12. Cellular functions of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and FYVE domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Simonsen, A; Stenmark, H

    2001-01-01

    PtdIns3P is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase product that has been strongly implicated in regulating membrane trafficking in both mammalian and yeast cells. PtdIns3P has been shown to be specifically located on membranes associated with the endocytic pathway. Proteins that contain FYVE zinc-finger domains are recruited to PtdIns3P-containing membranes. Structural information is now available concerning the interaction between FYVE domains and PtdIns3P. A number of proteins have been identified which contain a FYVE domain, and in this review we discuss the functions of PtdIns3P and its FYVE-domain-containing effector proteins in membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal regulation and receptor signalling. PMID:11284710

  13. Giant protein kinases: domain interactions and structural basis of autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, B; Heierhorst, J; Feil, S C; Parker, M W; Benian, G M; Weiss, K R; Kemp, B E

    1996-01-01

    The myosin-associated giant protein kinases twitchin and titin are composed predominantly of fibronectin- and immunoglobulin-like modules. We report the crystal structures of two autoinhibited twitchin kinase fragments, one from Aplysia and a larger fragment from Caenorhabditis elegans containing an additional C-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain. The structure of the longer fragment shows that the immunoglobulin domain contacts the protein kinase domain on the opposite side from the catalytic cleft, laterally exposing potential myosin binding residues. Together, the structures reveal the cooperative interactions between the autoregulatory region and the residues from the catalytic domain involved in protein substrate binding, ATP binding, catalysis and the activation loop, and explain the differences between the observed autoinhibitory mechanism and the one found in the structure of calmodulin-dependent kinase I. Images PMID:9003756

  14. LUD, a new protein domain associated with lactate utilization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A novel highly conserved protein domain, DUF162 [Pfam: PF02589], can be mapped to two proteins: LutB and LutC. Both proteins are encoded by a highly conserved LutABC operon, which has been implicated in lactate utilization in bacteria. Based on our analysis of its sequence, structure, and recent experimental evidence reported by other groups, we hereby redefine DUF162 as the LUD domain family. Results JCSG solved the first crystal structure [PDB:2G40] from the LUD domain family: LutC protein, encoded by ORF DR_1909, of Deinococcus radiodurans. LutC shares features with domains in the functionally diverse ISOCOT superfamily. We have observed that the LUD domain has an increased abundance in the human gut microbiome. Conclusions We propose a model for the substrate and cofactor binding and regulation in LUD domain. The significance of LUD-containing proteins in the human gut microbiome, and the implication of lactate metabolism in the radiation-resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans are discussed. PMID:24274019

  15. The BTB domains of the potassium channel tetramerization domain proteins prevalently assume pentameric states.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Giovanni; Pirone, Luciano; Pedone, Emilia; Marlovits, Thomas; Vitagliano, Luigi; Ciccarelli, Luciano

    2016-06-01

    Potassium channel tetramerization domain-containing (KCTD) proteins are involved in fundamental physio-pathological processes. Here, we report an analysis of the oligomeric state of the Bric-à-brack, Tram-track, Broad complex (BTB) domains of seven distinct KCTDs belonging to five major clades of the family evolution tree. Despite their functional and sequence variability, present electron microscopy data highlight the occurrence of well-defined pentameric states for all domains. Our data also show that these states coexist with alternative forms which include open pentamers. Thermal denaturation analyses conducted using KCTD1 as a model suggest that, in these proteins, different domains cooperate to their overall stability. Finally, negative-stain electron micrographs of KCTD6(BTB) in complex with Cullin3 show the presence of assemblies with a five-pointed pinwheel shape. PMID:27152988

  16. ZO-3, a Novel Member of the MAGUK Protein Family Found at the Tight Junction, Interacts with ZO-1 and Occludin

    PubMed Central

    Haskins, Julie; Gu, Lijie; Wittchen, Erika S.; Hibbard, Jennifer; Stevenson, Bruce R.

    1998-01-01

    A 130-kD protein that coimmunoprecipitates with the tight junction protein ZO-1 was bulk purified from Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and subjected to partial endopeptidase digestion and amino acid sequencing. A resulting 19–amino acid sequence provided the basis for screening canine cDNA libraries. Five overlapping clones contained a single open reading frame of 2,694 bp coding for a protein of 898 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 98,414 daltons. Sequence analysis showed that this protein contains three PSD-95/SAP90, discs-large, ZO-1 (PDZ) domains, a src homology (SH3) domain, and a region similar to guanylate kinase, making it homologous to ZO-1, ZO-2, the discs large tumor suppressor gene product of Drosophila, and other members of the MAGUK family of proteins. Like ZO-1 and ZO-2, the novel protein contains a COOH-terminal acidic domain and a basic region between the first and second PDZ domains. Unlike ZO-1 and ZO-2, this protein displays a proline-rich region between PDZ2 and PDZ3 and apparently contains no alternatively spliced domain. MDCK cells stably transfected with an epitope-tagged construct expressed the exogenous polypeptide at an apparent molecular mass of ∼130 kD. Moreover, this protein colocalized with ZO-1 at tight junctions by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. In vitro affinity analyses demonstrated that recombinant 130-kD protein directly interacts with ZO-1 and the cytoplasmic domain of occludin, but not with ZO-2. We propose that this protein be named ZO-3. PMID:9531559

  17. A duplicated motif controls assembly of zona pellucida domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovine, Luca; Qi, Huayu; Williams, Zev; Litscher, Eveline S.; Wassarman, Paul M.

    2004-04-01

    Many secreted eukaryotic glycoproteins that play fundamental roles in development, hearing, immunity, and cancer polymerize into filaments and extracellular matrices through zona pellucida (ZP) domains. ZP domain proteins are synthesized as precursors containing C-terminal propeptides that are cleaved at conserved sites. However, the consequences of this processing and the mechanism by which nascent proteins assemble are unclear. By microinjection of mutated DNA constructs into growing oocytes and mammalian cell transfection, we have identified a conserved duplicated motif [EHP (external hydrophobic patch)/IHP (internal hydrophobic patch)] regulating the assembly of mouse ZP proteins. Whereas the transmembrane domain (TMD) of ZP3 can be functionally replaced by an unrelated TMD, mutations in either EHP or IHP do not hinder secretion of full-length ZP3 but completely abolish its assembly. Because mutants truncated before the TMD are not processed, we conclude that the conserved TMD of mammalian ZP proteins does not engage them in specific interactions but is essential for C-terminal processing. Cleavage of ZP precursors results in loss of the EHP, thereby activating secreted polypeptides to assemble by using the IHP within the ZP domain. Taken together, these findings suggest a general mechanism for assembly of ZP domain proteins.

  18. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments. PMID:22383259

  19. Characterization of Two Dinoflagellate Cold Shock Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Mathieu; Roy, Sougata; Pelletier, Sarah; Averback, Alexandra; Lanthier, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Roughly two-thirds of the proteins annotated as transcription factors in dinoflagellate transcriptomes are cold shock domain-containing proteins (CSPs), an uncommon condition in eukaryotic organisms. However, no functional analysis has ever been reported for a dinoflagellate CSP, and so it is not known if they do in fact act as transcription factors. We describe here some of the properties of two CSPs from the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum, LpCSP1 and LpCSP2, which contain a glycine-rich C-terminal domain and an N-terminal cold shock domain phylogenetically related to those in bacteria. However, neither of the two LpCSPs act like the bacterial CSP, since they do not functionally complement the Escherichia coli quadruple cold shock domain protein mutant BX04, and cold shock does not induce LpCSP1 and LpCSP2 to detectable levels, based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both CSPs bind to RNA and single-stranded DNA in a nonspecific manner in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and both proteins also bind double-stranded DNA nonspecifically, albeit more weakly. These CSPs are thus unlikely to act alone as sequence-specific transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Dinoflagellate transcriptomes contain cold shock domain proteins as the major component of the proteins annotated as transcription factors. We show here that the major family of cold shock domain proteins in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium do not bind specific sequences, suggesting that transcriptional control is not a predominant mechanism for regulating gene expression in this group of protists. PMID:27303711

  20. Thioaptamers Targeting Dengue Virus Type-2 Envelope Protein Domain III

    PubMed Central

    Gandham, Sai Hari A.; Volk, David E.; Rao, Lokesh G. L.; Neerathilingam, Muniasamy; Gorenstein, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Thioaptamers targeting the dengue-2 virus (DENV-2) envelope protein domain III (EDIII) were developed. EDIII, which contains epitopes for binding neutralizing antibodies, is the putative host-receptor binding domain and is thus an attractive target for development of vaccines, anti-viral therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Thioaptamer DENTA-1 bound to DENV-2 EDIII adjacent to a known neutralizing antibody binding site with a dissociation constant of 154 nM. PMID:25261724

  1. Structural Insight into Golgi Membrane Stacking by GRASP65 and GRASP55 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yanbin; Yu, Wenying; Li, Xinxin; Lin, Shaoyu; Zhou, Ying; Hu, Junjie; Liu, Xinqi

    2013-01-01

    The stacking of Golgi cisternae involves GRASP65 and GRASP55. The oligomerization of the N-terminal GRASP domain of these proteins, which consists of two tandem PDZ domains, is required to tether the Golgi membranes. However, the molecular basis for GRASP assembly is unclear. Here, we determined the crystal structures of the GRASP domain of GRASP65 and GRASP55. The structures reveal similar homotypic interactions: the GRASP domain forms a dimer in which the peptide-binding pockets of the two neighboring PDZ2 domains face each other, and the dimers are further connected by the C-terminal tail of one GRASP domain inserting into the binding pocket of the PDZ1 domain in another dimer. Biochemical analysis suggests that both types of contacts are relatively weak but are needed in combination for GRASP-mediated Golgi stacking. Our results unveil a novel mode of membrane tethering by GRASP proteins and provide insight into the mechanism of Golgi stacking. PMID:23940043

  2. Structural Modeling of Protein Interactions by Analogy: Application to PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Korkin, Dmitry; Davis, Fred P; Alber, Frank; Luong, Tinh; Shen, Min-Yi; Lucic, Vladan; Kennedy, Mary B; Sali, Andrej

    2006-01-01

    We describe comparative patch analysis for modeling the structures of multidomain proteins and protein complexes, and apply it to the PSD-95 protein. Comparative patch analysis is a hybrid of comparative modeling based on a template complex and protein docking, with a greater applicability than comparative modeling and a higher accuracy than docking. It relies on structurally defined interactions of each of the complex components, or their homologs, with any other protein, irrespective of its fold. For each component, its known binding modes with other proteins of any fold are collected and expanded by the known binding modes of its homologs. These modes are then used to restrain conventional molecular docking, resulting in a set of binary domain complexes that are subsequently ranked by geometric complementarity and a statistical potential. The method is evaluated by predicting 20 binary complexes of known structure. It is able to correctly identify the binding mode in 70% of the benchmark complexes compared with 30% for protein docking. We applied comparative patch analysis to model the complex of the third PSD-95, DLG, and ZO-1 (PDZ) domain and the SH3-GK domains in the PSD-95 protein, whose structure is unknown. In the first predicted configuration of the domains, PDZ interacts with SH3, leaving both the GMP-binding site of guanylate kinase (GK) and the C-terminus binding cleft of PDZ accessible, while in the second configuration PDZ interacts with GK, burying both binding sites. We suggest that the two alternate configurations correspond to the different functional forms of PSD-95 and provide a possible structural description for the experimentally observed cooperative folding transitions in PSD-95 and its homologs. More generally, we expect that comparative patch analysis will provide useful spatial restraints for the structural characterization of an increasing number of binary and higher-order protein complexes. PMID:17096593

  3. Formation and organization of protein domains in the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    The cellular basis for the adaptive immune response during antigen recognition relies on a specialized protein interface known as the immunological synapse. Here, we propose a minimal mathematical model for the dynamics of the IS that encompass membrane mechanics, hydrodynamics and protein kinetics. Simple scaling laws describe the dynamics of protein clusters as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity of the adhesive proteins, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement the scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment suggests that passive dynamics suffices to describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, while the stabilization and long time dynamics of the synapse is likely determined by active cytoskeleton processes triggered by receptor binding. Our study reveals that the fluid flow generated by the interplay between membrane deformation and protein binding kinetics can assist immune cells in regulating protein sorting.

  4. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. PMID:27135912

  5. Reversible hydrogel formation driven by protein-peptide-specific interaction and chondrocyte entrapment.

    PubMed

    Ito, Fuyu; Usui, Kengo; Kawahara, Daigo; Suenaga, Atsushi; Maki, Tei; Kidoaki, Satoru; Suzuki, Harukazu; Taiji, Makoto; Itoh, Masayoshi; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Matsuda, Takehisa

    2010-01-01

    We developed a hydrogel self-assembling method driven by the interaction between recombinant tax-interactive protein-1 (TIP1) with the PDZ domain in a molecule, which is fused to each end of the triangular trimeric CutA protein (CutA-TIP1), and a PDZ domain-recognizable peptide which is covalently bound to each terminus of four-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PDZ-peptide-PEG). Genetic manipulation based on molecular-dynamic simulation generated a cell-adhesive RGD tripeptidyl sequence in the CutA loop region [CutA(RGD)-TIP1]. Spontaneous viscoelastic hydrogel formation occurred when either CutA-TIP1- or CutA(RGD)-TIP1-containing buffer solution and PDZ-peptide-PEG-containing buffer solutions were stoichiometrically mixed. Dynamic viscoelasticity measurement revealed shear stress-dependent reversible-phase transformation: a spontaneous viscoelastic hydrogel was formed at low shear stress, but it was transformed into a sol at high shear stress. Upon the cessation of shear, hydrogel was restored. When chondrocytes were pre-mixed with one of these two components containing buffer solutions, the stoichiometric mixed solution was also spontaneously gelled. Individual rounded cells and multicellular aggregates were entrapped within both hydrogels without substantial cellular impairment regardless of the presence or absence of RGD motif in the CutA-TIP1 molecule. The potential use of such a shear-sensitive hydrogel for injectable cell delivery into diseased or lost cartilage tissue is discussed. PMID:19836832

  6. Fosmid-Based Structure-Function Analysis Reveals Functionally Distinct Domains in the Cytoplasmic Domain of Drosophila Crumbs

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Sven; Flores-Benitez, David; Riedel, Falko; Knust, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved transmembrane protein Crumbs is required for epithelial polarity and morphogenesis in the embryo, control of tissue size in imaginal discs and morphogenesis of photoreceptor cells, and prevents light-dependent retinal degeneration. The small cytoplasmic domain contains two highly conserved regions, a FERM (i.e., protein 4.1/ezrin/radixin/moesin)-binding and a PDZ (i.e., postsynaptic density/discs large/ZO-1)-binding domain. Using a fosmid-based transgenomic approach, we analyzed the role of the two domains during invagination of the tracheae and the salivary glands in the Drosophila embryo. We provide data to show that the PDZ-binding domain is essential for the maintenance of cell polarity in both tissues. In contrast, in embryos expressing a Crumbs protein with an exchange of a conserved Tyrosine residue in the FERM-binding domain to an Alanine, both tissues are internalized, despite some initial defects in apical constriction, phospho-Moesin recruitment, and coordinated invagination movements. However, at later stages these embryos fail to undergo dorsal closure, germ band retraction, and head involution. In addition, frequent defects in tracheal fusion were observed. These results suggest stage and/or tissue specific binding partners. We discuss the power of this fosmid-based system for detailed structure-function analyses in comparison to the UAS/Gal4 system. PMID:23390593

  7. An Algebro-Topological Description of Protein Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Robert Clark; Knudsen, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    The space of possible protein structures appears vast and continuous, and the relationship between primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels is complex. Protein structure comparison and classification is therefore a difficult but important task since structure is a determinant for molecular interaction and function. We introduce a novel mathematical abstraction based on geometric topology to describe protein domain structure. Using the locations of the backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds, we build a combinatorial object – a so-called fatgraph. The description is discrete yet gives rise to a 2-dimensional mathematical surface. Thus, each protein domain corresponds to a particular mathematical surface with characteristic topological invariants, such as the genus (number of holes) and the number of boundary components. Both invariants are global fatgraph features reflecting the interconnectivity of the domain by hydrogen bonds. We introduce the notion of robust variables, that is variables that are robust towards minor changes in the structure/fatgraph, and show that the genus and the number of boundary components are robust. Further, we invesigate the distribution of different fatgraph variables and show how only four variables are capable of distinguishing different folds. We use local (secondary) and global (tertiary) fatgraph features to describe domain structures and illustrate that they are useful for classification of domains in CATH. In addition, we combine our method with two other methods thereby using primary, secondary, and tertiary structure information, and show that we can identify a large percentage of new and unclassified structures in CATH. PMID:21629687

  8. The mammalian autophagy initiator complex contains 2 HORMA domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Max; Schwarten, Melanie; Decker, Christina; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Willbold, Dieter; Weiergräber, Oliver H

    2015-01-01

    ATG101 is an essential component of the ULK complex responsible for initiating cellular autophagy in mammalian cells; its 3-dimensional structure and molecular function, however, are currently unclear. Here we present the X-ray structure of human ATG101. The protein displays an open HORMA domain fold. Both structural properties and biophysical evidence indicate that ATG101 is locked in this conformation, in contrast to the prototypical HORMA domain protein MAD2. Moreover, we discuss a potential mode of dimerization with ATG13 as a fundamental aspect of ATG101 function. PMID:26236954

  9. ELMO Domains, Evolutionary and Functional Characterization of a Novel GTPase-activating Protein (GAP) Domain for Arf Protein Family GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    East, Michael P.; Bowzard, J. Bradford; Dacks, Joel B.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The human family of ELMO domain-containing proteins (ELMODs) consists of six members and is defined by the presence of the ELMO domain. Within this family are two subclassifications of proteins, based on primary sequence conservation, protein size, and domain architecture, deemed ELMOD and ELMO. In this study, we used homology searching and phylogenetics to identify ELMOD family homologs in genomes from across eukaryotic diversity. This demonstrated not only that the protein family is ancient but also that ELMOs are potentially restricted to the supergroup Opisthokonta (Metazoa and Fungi), whereas proteins with the ELMOD organization are found in diverse eukaryotes and thus were likely the form present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. The segregation of the ELMO clade from the larger ELMOD group is consistent with their contrasting functions as unconventional Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors and the Arf family GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. We used unbiased, phylogenetic sorting and sequence alignments to identify the most highly conserved residues within the ELMO domain to identify a putative GAP domain within the ELMODs. Three independent but complementary assays were used to provide an initial characterization of this domain. We identified a highly conserved arginine residue critical for both the biochemical and cellular GAP activity of ELMODs. We also provide initial evidence of the function of human ELMOD1 as an Arf family GAP at the Golgi. These findings provide the basis for the future study of the ELMOD family of proteins and a new avenue for the study of Arf family GTPases. PMID:23014990

  10. TFPI cofactor function of protein S: essential role of the protein S SHBG-like domain

    PubMed Central

    Reglińska-Matveyev, Natalia; Andersson, Helena M.; Rezende, Suely M.; Dahlbäck, Björn; Crawley, James T. B.; Lane, David A.; Ahnström, Josefin

    2014-01-01

    Protein S is a cofactor for tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), accelerating the inhibition of activated factor X (FXa). TFPI Kunitz domain 3 residue Glu226 is essential for enhancement of TFPI by protein S. To investigate the complementary functional interaction site on protein S, we screened 44 protein S point, composite or domain swap variants spanning the whole protein S molecule for their TFPI cofactor function using a thrombin generation assay. Of these variants, two protein S/growth arrest–specific 6 chimeras, with either the whole sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG)-like domain (Val243-Ser635; chimera III) or the SHBG laminin G-type 1 subunit (Ser283-Val459; chimera I), respectively, substituted by the corresponding domain in growth arrest–specific 6, were unable to enhance TFPI. The importance of the protein S SHBG-like domain (and its laminin G-type 1 subunit) for binding and enhancement of TFPI was confirmed in FXa inhibition assays and using surface plasmon resonance. In addition, protein S bound to C4b binding protein showed greatly reduced enhancement of TFPI-mediated inhibition of FXa compared with free protein S. We show that binding of TFPI to the protein S SHBG-like domain enables TFPI to interact optimally with FXa on a phospholipid membrane. PMID:24740810

  11. Fused protein domains inhibit DNA binding by LexA.

    PubMed Central

    Golemis, E A; Brent, R

    1992-01-01

    Many studies of transcription activation employ fusions of activation domains to DNA binding domains derived from the bacterial repressor LexA and the yeast activator GAL4. Such studies often implicitly assume that DNA binding by the chimeric proteins is equivalent to that of the protein donating the DNA binding moiety. To directly investigate this issue, we compared operator binding by a series of LexA-derivative proteins to operator binding by native LexA, by using both in vivo and in vitro assays. We show that operator binding by many proteins such as LexA-Myc, LexA-Fos, and LexA-Bicoid is severely impaired, while binding of other LexA-derivative proteins, such as those that carry bacterially encoded acidic sequences ("acid blobs"), is not. Our results also show that DNA binding by LexA derivatives that contain the LexA carboxy-terminal dimerization domain (amino acids 88 to 202) is considerably stronger than binding by fusions that lack it and that heterologous dimerization motifs cannot substitute for the LexA88-202 function. These results suggest the need to reevaluate some previous studies of activation that employed LexA derivatives and modifications to recent experimental approaches that use LexA and GAL4 derivatives to detect and study protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1620111

  12. Effective Moment Feature Vectors for Protein Domain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jian-Yu; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Zhang, Yan-Ning; Chin, Francis Yuk-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Imaging processing techniques have been shown to be useful in studying protein domain structures. The idea is to represent the pairwise distances of any two residues of the structure in a 2D distance matrix (DM). Features and/or submatrices are extracted from this DM to represent a domain. Existing approaches, however, may involve a large number of features (100–400) or complicated mathematical operations. Finding fewer but more effective features is always desirable. In this paper, based on some key observations on DMs, we are able to decompose a DM image into four basic binary images, each representing the structural characteristics of a fundamental secondary structure element (SSE) or a motif in the domain. Using the concept of moments in image processing, we further derive 45 structural features based on the four binary images. Together with 4 features extracted from the basic images, we represent the structure of a domain using 49 features. We show that our feature vectors can represent domain structures effectively in terms of the following. (1) We show a higher accuracy for domain classification. (2) We show a clear and consistent distribution of domains using our proposed structural vector space. (3) We are able to cluster the domains according to our moment features and demonstrate a relationship between structural variation and functional diversity. PMID:24391828

  13. BAG4/SODD Protein Contains a Short BAG Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Briknarova, Klara; Takayama, Shinichi; Homma, Sachiko; Baker, Kelly; Cabezas, Edelmira; Hoyt, David W.; Li, Zhen; Satterthwait, Arnold C.; Ely, Kathryn R.

    2002-08-23

    BAG proteins are molecular chaperone regulators that affect diverse cellular pathways. All members share a conserved motif, called the ''BAG domain'' (BD), which binds to Hsp70/Hsc70 family proteins and modulates their activity. We have determined the solution structure of BD from BAG4/SODD (Bcl-2 ? Associated Athanogene / Silencer of Death Domains) by multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance methods and compared it to the corresponding domain in BAG1 (Briknarova et al., Nature Struct. Biol. 8:349-352). The difference between BDs from these two BAG proteins is striking and the structural comparison defines two subfamilies of mammalian BD-containing proteins. One subfamily includes the closely related BAG3, BAG4 and BAG5 proteins, and the other is represented by BAG1 which contains a structurally and evolutionarily distinct BD. BDs from both BAG1 and BAG4 are three-helix bundles; however, in BAG4, each helix in this bundle is three to four turns shorter than its counterpart in BAG1, which reduces the length of the domain by one-third. BAG4 BD thus represents a prototype of the minimal functional fragment that is capable of binding to Hsc70 and modulating its chaperone activity.

  14. Allosteric switching by mutually exclusive folding of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Radley, Tracy L; Markowska, Anna I; Bettinger, Blaine T; Ha, Jeung-Hoi; Loh, Stewart N

    2003-09-19

    Many proteins are built from structurally and functionally distinct domains. A major goal is to understand how conformational change transmits information between domains in order to achieve biological activity. A two-domain, bi-functional fusion protein has been designed so that the mechanical stress imposed by the folded structure of one subunit causes the other subunit to unfold, and vice versa. The construct consists of ubiquitin inserted into a surface loop of barnase. The distance between the amino and carboxyl ends of ubiquitin is much greater than the distance between the termini of the barnase loop. This topological constraint causes the two domains to engage in a thermodynamic tug-of-war in which only one can exist in its folded state at any given time. This conformational equilibrium, which is cooperative, reversible, and controllable by ligand binding, serves as a model for the coupled binding and folding mechanism widely used to mediate protein-protein interactions and cellular signaling processes. The position of the equilibrium can be adjusted by temperature or ligand binding and is monitored in vivo by cell death. This design forms the basis for a new class of cytotoxic proteins that can be activated by cell-specific effector molecules, and can thus target particular cell types for destruction. PMID:12963365

  15. Structural domains and main-chain flexibility in prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Blinov, N; Berjanskii, M; Wishart, D S; Stepanova, M

    2009-02-24

    In this study we describe a novel approach to define structural domains and to characterize the local flexibility in both human and chicken prion proteins. The approach we use is based on a comprehensive theory of collective dynamics in proteins that was recently developed. This method determines the essential collective coordinates, which can be found from molecular dynamics trajectories via principal component analysis. Under this particular framework, we are able to identify the domains where atoms move coherently while at the same time to determine the local main-chain flexibility for each residue. We have verified this approach by comparing our results for the predicted dynamic domain systems with the computed main-chain flexibility profiles and the NMR-derived random coil indexes for human and chicken prion proteins. The three sets of data show excellent agreement. Additionally, we demonstrate that the dynamic domains calculated in this fashion provide a highly sensitive measure of protein collective structure and dynamics. Furthermore, such an analysis is capable of revealing structural and dynamic properties of proteins that are inaccessible to the conventional assessment of secondary structure. Using the collective dynamic simulation approach described here along with a high-temperature simulations of unfolding of human prion protein, we have explored whether locations of relatively low stability could be identified where the unfolding process could potentially be facilitated. According to our analysis, the locations of relatively low stability may be associated with the beta-sheet formed by strands S1 and S2 and the adjacent loops, whereas helix HC appears to be a relatively stable part of the protein. We suggest that this kind of structural analysis may provide a useful background for a more quantitative assessment of potential routes of spontaneous misfolding in prion proteins. PMID:19178154

  16. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle. PMID:26813519

  17. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  18. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  19. ZASP Interacts with the Mechanosensing Protein Ankrd2 and p53 in the Signalling Network of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Valentina C.; Kyle, W. Buck; Kojic, Snezana; Vitulo, Nicola; Li, Zhaohui; Belgrano, Anna; Maiuri, Paolo; Banks, Lawrence; Vatta, Matteo; Valle, Giorgio; Faulkner, Georgine

    2014-01-01

    ZASP is a cytoskeletal PDZ-LIM protein predominantly expressed in striated muscle. It forms multiprotein complexes and plays a pivotal role in the structural integrity of sarcomeres. Mutations in the ZASP protein are associated with myofibrillar myopathy, left ventricular non-compaction and dilated cardiomyopathy. The ablation of its murine homologue Cypher results in neonatal lethality. ZASP has several alternatively spliced isoforms, in this paper we clarify the nomenclature of its human isoforms as well as their dynamics and expression pattern in striated muscle. Interaction is demonstrated between ZASP and two new binding partners both of which have roles in signalling, regulation of gene expression and muscle differentiation; the mechanosensing protein Ankrd2 and the tumour suppressor protein p53. These proteins and ZASP form a triple complex that appears to facilitate poly-SUMOylation of p53. We also show the importance of two of its functional domains, the ZM-motif and the PDZ domain. The PDZ domain can bind directly to both Ankrd2 and p53 indicating that there is no competition between it and p53 for the same binding site on Ankrd2. However there is competition for this binding site between p53 and a region of the ZASP protein lacking the PDZ domain, but containing the ZM-motif. ZASP is negative regulator of p53 in transactivation experiments with the p53-responsive promoters, MDM2 and BAX. Mutations in the ZASP ZM-motif induce modification in protein turnover. In fact, two mutants, A165V and A171T, were not able to bind Ankrd2 and bound only poorly to alpha-actinin2. This is important since the A165V mutation is responsible for zaspopathy, a well characterized autosomal dominant distal myopathy. Although the mechanism by which this mutant causes disease is still unknown, this is the first indication of how a ZASP disease associated mutant protein differs from that of the wild type ZASP protein. PMID:24647531

  20. Structural domains of vault proteins: a role for the coiled coil domain in vault assembly.

    PubMed

    van Zon, Arend; Mossink, Marieke H; Schoester, Martijn; Scheffer, George L; Scheper, Rik J; Sonneveld, Pieter; Wiemer, Erik A C

    2002-03-01

    Vaults consist of multiple copies of three proteins (MVP, VPARP, and TEP1) and several untranslated RNAs. The function of vaults is unknown but the typical and evolutionary conserved structure indicates a role in intracellular transport. Although all vault components have been identified and characterized, not much is known about vault protein assembly. In this study we identified and analyzed structural domains involved in vault assembly with emphasis on protein-protein interactions. Using a yeast two-hybrid system, we demonstrate within MVP an intramolecular binding site and show that MVP molecules interact with each other via their coiled coil domain. We show that purified MVP is able to bind calcium, most likely at calcium-binding EF-hands. No interactions could be detected between TEP1 and other vault proteins. However, the N-terminal half of MVP binds to a specific domain in the C-terminus of VPARP. Furthermore, VPARP contains amino acid stretches mediating intramolecular binding. PMID:11855821

  1. Glutamate Receptor Interacting Protein 1 Regulates CD4(+) CTLA-4 Expression and Transplant Rejection.

    PubMed

    Modjeski, K L; Levy, S C; Ture, S K; Field, D J; Shi, G; Ko, K; Zhu, Q; Morrell, C N

    2016-05-01

    PDZ domains are common 80- to 90-amino-acid regions named after the first three proteins discovered to share these domains: postsynaptic density 95, discs large, and zonula occludens. PDZ domain-containing proteins typically interact with the C-terminus of membrane receptors. Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1), a seven-PDZ domain protein scaffold, regulates glutamate receptor surface expression and trafficking in neurons. We have found that human and mouse T cells also express GRIP1. T cell-specific GRIP1(-/-) mice >11 weeks old had prolonged cardiac allograft survival. Compared with wild-type T cells, in vitro stimulated GRIP1(-/-) T cells had decreased expression of activation markers and increased apoptotic surface marker expression. Surface expression of the strong T cell inhibitory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) was increased on GRIP1(-/-) T cells from mice >11 weeks old. CTLA-4 increases with T cell stimulation and its surface expression on GRIP1(-/-) T cells remained high after stimulation was removed, indicating a possible internalization defect in GRIP1-deficient T cells. CTLA-4-blocking antibody treatment following heart transplantation led to complete rejection in T cell GRIP1(-/-) mice, indicating that increased CTLA-4 surface expression contributed to the extended graft survival. Our data indicate that GRIP1 regulates T cell activation by regulating CTLA-4 surface expression. PMID:26601915

  2. The nuclear envelope LEM-domain protein emerin

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Jason M; Tifft, Kathryn E; Wilson, Katherine L

    2013-01-01

    Emerin, a conserved LEM-domain protein, is among the few nuclear membrane proteins for which extensive basic knowledge—biochemistry, partners, functions, localizations, posttranslational regulation, roles in development and links to human disease—is available. This review summarizes emerin and its emerging roles in nuclear “lamina” structure, chromatin tethering, gene regulation, mitosis, nuclear assembly, development, signaling and mechano-transduction. We also highlight many open questions, exploration of which will be critical to understand how this intriguing nuclear membrane protein and its “family” influence the genome. PMID:23873439

  3. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  4. Cooperation of phosphoinositides and BAR domain proteins in endosomal tubulation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Narikawa, Naeko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shibasaki, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) regulate many intracellular events, including vesicular trafficking and actin remodeling, by recruiting proteins to their sites of function. PtdIns(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and related phosphoinositides are mainly synthesized by type I PtdIns-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks). We found that PIP5K induces endosomal tubules in COS-7 cells. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 6 has been shown to act upstream of PIP5K and regulate endocytic transport and tubulation. ARF GAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat, and pleckstrin homology domains 1 (ACAP1) has guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) activity for ARF6. While there were few tubules induced by the expression of ACAP1 alone, numerous endosomal tubules were induced by coexpression of PIP5K and ACAP1. ACAP1 has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain known to bind phosphoinositide and a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain that has been reported to detect membrane curvature. Truncated and point mutations in the ACAP1 BAR and PH domains revealed that both BAR and PH domains are required for tubulation. These results suggest that two ARF6 downstream molecules, PIP5K and ACAP1, function together in endosomal tubulation and that phosphoinositide levels may regulate endosomal dynamics. PMID:17010122

  5. EVEREST: automatic identification and classification of protein domains in all protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    Portugaly, Elon; Harel, Amir; Linial, Nathan; Linial, Michal

    2006-01-01

    Background Proteins are comprised of one or several building blocks, known as domains. Such domains can be classified into families according to their evolutionary origin. Whereas sequencing technologies have advanced immensely in recent years, there are no matching computational methodologies for large-scale determination of protein domains and their boundaries. We provide and rigorously evaluate a novel set of domain families that is automatically generated from sequence data. Our domain family identification process, called EVEREST (EVolutionary Ensembles of REcurrent SegmenTs), begins by constructing a library of protein segments that emerge in an all vs. all pairwise sequence comparison. It then proceeds to cluster these segments into putative domain families. The selection of the best putative families is done using machine learning techniques. A statistical model is then created for each of the chosen families. This procedure is then iterated: the aforementioned statistical models are used to scan all protein sequences, to recreate a library of segments and to cluster them again. Results Processing the Swiss-Prot section of the UniProt Knoledgebase, release 7.2, EVEREST defines 20,230 domains, covering 85% of the amino acids of the Swiss-Prot database. EVEREST annotates 11,852 proteins (6% of the database) that are not annotated by Pfam A. In addition, in 43,086 proteins (20% of the database), EVEREST annotates a part of the protein that is not annotated by Pfam A. Performance tests show that EVEREST recovers 56% of Pfam A families and 63% of SCOP families with high accuracy, and suggests previously unknown domain families with at least 51% fidelity. EVEREST domains are often a combination of domains as defined by Pfam or SCOP and are frequently sub-domains of such domains. Conclusion The EVEREST process and its output domain families provide an exhaustive and validated view of the protein domain world that is automatically generated from sequence data. The

  6. Structure-dependent electrical conductivity of protein: its differences between alpha-domain and beta-domain structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X Y; Shao, Jian; Jiang, S X; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2015-03-27

    Electron transports in the α-domain and β-domain of proteins have been comprehensively investigated. The structure-dependent electron transport of proteins has been experimentally measured and theoretically simulated, and both the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate significant differences in electrical conductivity between the α-domain and β-domain. By controlling the feedback system of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the conductance of a single α-domain protein hemoglobin (Hgb) and a β-domain protein superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD) were measured, respectively. The current signal of Hgb is obviously stronger, indicating that the α-domain is more conductive. To confirm our finding, molecular orbitals of both the β-domain in SOD and α-domain in Hgb have been analyzed based on first-principles calculations. As expected, tunneling transport and hopping in the α-domain are both more efficient, indicating that it is easier for electrons to transport through the α-domain, which are in great agreement with our experimental data. In order to explain our results, molecular structures of α- and β-domains have been carefully analyzed and show that the explanation should lie in the differences in packing mode between the α-domain and β-domain. This research should be very important to application prospects in molecular electronics. PMID:25736549

  7. Structure-dependent electrical conductivity of protein: its differences between alpha-domain and beta-domain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. Y.; Shao, Jian; Jiang, S. X.; Wang, Biao; Zheng, Yue

    2015-03-01

    Electron transports in the α-domain and β-domain of proteins have been comprehensively investigated. The structure-dependent electron transport of proteins has been experimentally measured and theoretically simulated, and both the theoretical and experimental results demonstrate significant differences in electrical conductivity between the α-domain and β-domain. By controlling the feedback system of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM), the conductance of a single α-domain protein hemoglobin (Hgb) and a β-domain protein superoxide dismutase enzyme (SOD) were measured, respectively. The current signal of Hgb is obviously stronger, indicating that the α-domain is more conductive. To confirm our finding, molecular orbitals of both the β-domain in SOD and α-domain in Hgb have been analyzed based on first-principles calculations. As expected, tunneling transport and hopping in the α-domain are both more efficient, indicating that it is easier for electrons to transport through the α-domain, which are in great agreement with our experimental data. In order to explain our results, molecular structures of α- and β-domains have been carefully analyzed and show that the explanation should lie in the differences in packing mode between the α-domain and β-domain. This research should be very important to application prospects in molecular electronics.

  8. Domain formation in membranes caused by lipid wetting of protein.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Sergey A; Frolov, Vladimir A J; Kuzmin, Peter I; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Chizmadzhev, Yuri A; Cohen, Fredric S

    2008-05-01

    Formation of rafts and other domains in cell membranes is considered as wetting of proteins by lipids. The membrane is modeled as a continuous elastic medium. Thermodynamic functions of the lipid films that wet proteins are calculated using a mean-field theory of liquid crystals as adapted to biomembranes. This approach yields the conditions necessary for a macroscopic wetting film to form; its thickness could also be determined. It is shown that films of macroscopic thicknesses form around large (tens nanometers in diameter) lipid-protein aggregates; only thin adsorption films form around single proteins or small complexes. The means by which wetting films can facilitate the merger of these aggregates is considered. It is shown that a wetting film prevents a protein from leaving an aggregate. Using experimentally derived values of elastic moduli and spontaneous curvatures as well as height mismatch between aggregates and bulk membrane, we obtained numerical results, which can be compared with the experimental data. PMID:18643096

  9. TOPDOM: database of conservatively located domains and motifs in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Julia; Dobson, László; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: The TOPDOM database—originally created as a collection of domains and motifs located consistently on the same side of the membranes in α-helical transmembrane proteins—has been updated and extended by taking into consideration consistently localized domains and motifs in globular proteins, too. By taking advantage of the recently developed CCTOP algorithm to determine the type of a protein and predict topology in case of transmembrane proteins, and by applying a thorough search for domains and motifs as well as utilizing the most up-to-date version of all source databases, we managed to reach a 6-fold increase in the size of the whole database and a 2-fold increase in the number of transmembrane proteins. Availability and implementation: TOPDOM database is available at http://topdom.enzim.hu. The webpage utilizes the common Apache, PHP5 and MySQL software to provide the user interface for accessing and searching the database. The database itself is generated on a high performance computer. Contact: tusnady.gabor@ttk.mta.hu. Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153630

  10. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues's method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, domain-domain interaction (DDI) data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS), and cancer linker degree (CLD) data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I) using individual algorithm, (II) combining algorithms, and (III) combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues's method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis. PMID:25866773

  11. A strategy for shuffling numerous Bacillus thuringiensis crystal protein domains.

    PubMed

    Knight, Jacqueline S; Broadwell, Andrew H; Grant, Warwick N; Shoemaker, Charles B

    2004-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis that produce Cry1Ba are toxic to Lucilia cuprina Wiedemann blow fly maggots in vivo, and when applied in quantity to sheep fleece, provide up to 6 wk protection against flystrike in the field. These strains also are toxic to Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) light brown apple moth caterpillars. B. thuringiensis expressing Cry1Db are toxic only to E. postvittana. When Cry1Ba and Cry1Db proteins are expressed within Escherichia coli, the recombinant bacteria have the same toxicity profile as the wild-type B. thuringiensis strain. In an effort to develop a Cry protein with improved blow fly toxicity, three different internal regions of Cry1Ba coding DNA, encoding all or part of domains I, II and III respectively were systematically exchanged with the corresponding region from a pool of other Cry protein coding DNAs. The chimeric products were then expressed in recombinant E. coli, and the resulting bacteria assayed for toxicity on L. cuprina and E. postvittana. Clones having insecticide bioactivity were characterized to identify the source of the replacement Cry domain. Despite successfully expressing a large number and variety of chimeric proteins within E. coli, many with measurable insecticidal activity, none of the chimeras had greater potency against L. cuprina than the wild-type Cry1Ba. Chimeric replacements involving domains I and II were rarely active, whereas a much higher proportion of domain III chimeras had some bioactivity. We conclude that shuffling of Cry coding regions through joining at the major conserved sequence motifs is an effective means for the production of a diverse number of chimeric Cry proteins but that such toxins with enhanced bioactive properties will be rare or nonexistent. PMID:15666731

  12. Domains of surfactant protein A that affect protein oligomerization, lipid structure and surface tension.

    PubMed

    Palaniyar, N; Ikegami, M; Korfhagen, T; Whitsett, J; McCormack, F X

    2001-05-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an abundant protein found in pulmonary surfactant which has been reported to have multiple functions. In this review, we focus on the structural importance of each domain of SP-A in the functions of protein oligomerization, the structural organization of lipids and the surface-active properties of surfactant, with an emphasis on ultrastructural analyses. The N-terminal domain of SP-A is required for disulfide-dependent protein oligomerization, and for binding and aggregation of phospholipids, but there is no evidence that this domain directly interacts with lipid membranes. The collagen-like domain is important for the stability and oligomerization of SP-A. It also contributes shape and dimension to the molecule, and appears to determine membrane spacing in lipid aggregates such as common myelin and tubular myelin. The neck domain of SP-A is primarily involved in protein trimerization, which is critical for many protein functions, but it does not appear to be directly involved in lipid interactions. The globular C-terminal domain of SP-A clearly plays a central role in lipid binding, and in more complex functions such as the formation and/or stabilization of curved membranes. In recent work, we have determined that the maintenance of low surface tension of surfactant in the presence of serum protein inhibitors requires cooperative interactions between the C-terminal and N-terminal domains of the molecule. This effect of SP-A requires a high degree of oligomeric assembly of the protein, and may be mediated by the activity of the protein to alter the form or physical state of surfactant lipid aggregates. PMID:11369537

  13. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  14. Targeting a KH-domain protein with RNA decoys.

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Aleksandr V; Eastmond, Dawn L; Liebhaber, Stephen A

    2002-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins are involved in the regulation of many aspects of eukaryotic gene expression. Targeted interference with RNA-protein interactions could offer novel approaches to modulation of expression profiles, alteration of developmental pathways, and reversal of certain disease processes. Here we investigate a decoy strategy for the study of the alphaCP subgroup of KH-domain RNA-binding proteins. These poly(C)-binding proteins have been implicated in a wide spectrum of posttranscriptional controls. Three categories of RNA decoys to alphaCPs were studied: poly(C) homopolymers, native mRNA-binding sites, and a high-affinity structure selected from a combinatorial library. Native chemistry was found to be essential for alphaCP decoy action. Because alphaCP proteins are found in both the nucleus and cytoplasm, decoy cassettes were incorporated within both nuclear (U1 snRNA) and cytoplasmic (VA1 RNA) RNA frameworks. Several sequences demonstrated optimal decoy properties when assayed for protein-binding and decoy bioactivity in vitro. A subset of these transcripts was shown to mediate targeted inhibition of alphaCP-dependent translation when expressed in either the nucleus or cytoplasm of transfected cells. Significantly, these studies establish the feasibility of developing RNA decoys that can selectively target biologic functions of abundant and widely expressed RNA binding proteins. PMID:12358435

  15. A new principle of oligomerization of plant DEG7 protease based on interactions of degenerated protease domains

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Holger; Mogg, Ulrike; Adamska, Iwona

    2011-01-01

    Deg/HtrA proteases are a large group of ATP-independent serine endoproteases found in almost every organism. Their usual domain arrangement comprises a trypsin-type protease domain and one or more PDZ domains. All Deg/HtrA proteases form homo-oligomers with trimers as the basic unit, where the active protease domain mediates the interaction between individual monomers. Among the members of the Deg/HtrA protease family, the plant protease DEG7 is unique since it contains two protease domains (one active and one degenerated) and four PDZ domains. In the present study, we investigated the oligomerization behaviour of this unusual protease using yeast two-hybrid analysis in vivo and with recombinant protein in vitro. We show that DEG7 forms trimeric complexes, but in contrast with other known Deg/HtrA proteases, it shows a new principle of oligomerization, where trimerization is based on the interactions between degenerated protease domains. We propose that, during evolution, a duplicated active protease domain degenerated and specialized in protein–protein interaction and complex formation. PMID:21247409

  16. Using support vector machine for improving protein-protein interaction prediction utilizing domain interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Mudita; Shah, Anuj R.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2010-10-02

    Understanding protein interactions is essential to gain insights into the biological processes at the whole cell level. The high-throughput experimental techniques for determining protein-protein interactions (PPI) are error prone and expensive with low overlap amongst them. Although several computational methods have been proposed for predicting protein interactions there is definite room for improvement. Here we present DomainSVM, a predictive method for PPI that uses computationally inferred domain-domain interaction values in a Support Vector Machine framework to predict protein interactions. DomainSVM method utilizes evidence of multiple interacting domains to predict a protein interaction. It outperforms existing methods of PPI prediction by achieving very high explanation ratios, precision, specificity, sensitivity and F-measure values in a 10 fold cross-validation study conducted on the positive and negative PPIs in yeast. A Functional comparison study using GO annotations on the positive and the negative test sets is presented in addition to discussing novel PPI predictions in Salmonella Typhimurium.

  17. A database of domain definitions for proteins with complex interdomain geometry.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Indraneel; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-01-01

    Protein structural domains are necessary for understanding evolution and protein folding, and may vary widely from functional and sequence based domains. Although, various structural domain databases exist, defining domains for some proteins is non-trivial, and definitions of their domain boundaries are not available. Here, we present a novel database of manually defined structural domains for a representative set of proteins from the SCOP "multi-domain proteins" class. (http://prodata.swmed.edu/multidom/). We consider our domains as mobile evolutionary units, which may rearrange during protein evolution. Additionally, they may be visualized as structurally compact and possibly independently folding units. We also found that representing domains as evolutionary and folding units do not always lead to a unique domain definition. However, unlike existing databases, we retain and refine these "alternate" domain definitions after careful inspection of structural similarity, functional sites and automated domain definition methods. We provide domain definitions, including actual residue boundaries, for proteins that well known databases like SCOP and CATH do not attempt to split. Our alternate domain definitions are suitable for sequence and structure searches by automated methods. Additionally, the database can be used for training and testing domain delineation algorithms. Since our domains represent structurally compact evolutionary units, the database may be useful for studying domain properties and evolution. PMID:19352501

  18. Normalized Cut Algorithm for Automated Assignment of Protein Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, M. P.; Liang, S.; Zha, H.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel computational method for automatic assignment of protein domains from structural data. At the core of our algorithm lies a recently proposed clustering technique that has been very successful for image-partitioning applications. This grap.,l-theory based clustering method uses the notion of a normalized cut to partition. an undirected graph into its strongly-connected components. Computer implementation of our method tested on the standard comparison set of proteins from the literature shows a high success rate (84%), better than most existing alternative In addition, several other features of our algorithm, such as reliance on few adjustable parameters, linear run-time with respect to the size of the protein and reduced complexity compared to other graph-theory based algorithms, would make it an attractive tool for structural biologists.

  19. PSI-2: Structural Genomics to Cover Protein Domain Family Space

    PubMed Central

    Dessailly, Benoît H.; Nair, Rajesh; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Fajardo, J. Eduardo; Kouranov, Andrei; Lee, David; Fiser, Andras; Godzik, Adam; Rost, Burkhard; Orengo, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Summary One major objective of structural genomics efforts, including the NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), has been to increase the structural coverage of protein sequence space. Here, we present the target selection strategy used during the second phase of PSI (PSI-2). This strategy, jointly devised by the bioinformatics groups associated with the PSI-2 large-scale production centres, targets representatives from large, structurally uncharacterised protein domain families, and from structurally uncharacterised subfamilies in very large and diverse families with incomplete structural coverage. These very large families are extremely diverse both structurally and functionally, and are highly over-represented in known proteomes. On the basis of several metrics, we then discuss to what extent PSI-2, during its first three years, has increased the structural coverage of genomes, and contributed structural and functional novelty. Together, the results presented here suggest that PSI-2 is successfully meeting its objectives and provides useful insights into structural and functional space. PMID:19523904

  20. Prediction of human protein-protein interaction by a domain-based approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaopan; Jiao, Xiong; Song, Jie; Chang, Shan

    2016-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are vital to a number of biological processes. With computational methods, plenty of domain information can help us to predict and assess PPIs. In this study, we proposed a domain-based approach for the prediction of human PPIs based on the interactions between the proteins and the domains. In this method, an optimizing model was built with the information from InterDom, 3did, DOMINE and Pfam databases. With this model, for 147 proteins in the integrin adhesome PPI network, 736 probable PPIs have been predicted, and the corresponding confidence probabilities of these PPIs were also calculated. It provides an opportunity to visualize the PPIs by using network graphs, which were constructed with Cytoscape, so that we can indicate underlying pathways possible. PMID:26925814

  1. PROSITE, a protein domain database for functional characterization and annotation.

    PubMed

    Sigrist, Christian J A; Cerutti, Lorenzo; de Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S; Bulliard, Virginie; Bairoch, Amos; Hulo, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of these profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. PROSITE is largely used for the annotation of domain features of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries. Among the 983 (DNA-binding) domains, repeats and zinc fingers present in Swiss-Prot (release 57.8 of 22 September 2009), 696 ( approximately 70%) are annotated with PROSITE descriptors using information from ProRule. In order to allow better functional characterization of domains, PROSITE developments focus on subfamily specific profiles and a new profile building method giving more weight to functionally important residues. Here, we describe AMSA, an annotated multiple sequence alignment format used to build a new generation of generalized profiles, the migration of ScanProsite to Vital-IT, a cluster of 633 CPUs, and the adoption of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) to facilitate PROSITE data integration and interchange with other sources. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.54, of 22 September 2009) contains 1308 patterns, 863 profiles and 869 ProRules. PROSITE is accessible at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:19858104

  2. PROSITE, a protein domain database for functional characterization and annotation

    PubMed Central

    Sigrist, Christian J. A.; Cerutti, Lorenzo; de Castro, Edouard; Langendijk-Genevaux, Petra S.; Bulliard, Virginie; Bairoch, Amos; Hulo, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    PROSITE consists of documentation entries describing protein domains, families and functional sites, as well as associated patterns and profiles to identify them. It is complemented by ProRule, a collection of rules based on profiles and patterns, which increases the discriminatory power of these profiles and patterns by providing additional information about functionally and/or structurally critical amino acids. PROSITE is largely used for the annotation of domain features of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot entries. Among the 983 (DNA-binding) domains, repeats and zinc fingers present in Swiss-Prot (release 57.8 of 22 September 2009), 696 (∼70%) are annotated with PROSITE descriptors using information from ProRule. In order to allow better functional characterization of domains, PROSITE developments focus on subfamily specific profiles and a new profile building method giving more weight to functionally important residues. Here, we describe AMSA, an annotated multiple sequence alignment format used to build a new generation of generalized profiles, the migration of ScanProsite to Vital-IT, a cluster of 633 CPUs, and the adoption of the Distributed Annotation System (DAS) to facilitate PROSITE data integration and interchange with other sources. The latest version of PROSITE (release 20.54, of 22 September 2009) contains 1308 patterns, 863 profiles and 869 ProRules. PROSITE is accessible at: http://www.expasy.org/prosite/. PMID:19858104

  3. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins. PMID:25820699

  4. Clustering of protein domains for functional and evolutionary studies

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Pavle; Zucko, Jurica; Vujaklija, Dušica; Kriško, Anita; Hranueli, Daslav; Long, Paul F; Etchebest, Catherine; Basrak, Bojan; Cullum, John

    2009-01-01

    Background The number of protein family members defined by DNA sequencing is usually much larger than those characterised experimentally. This paper describes a method to divide protein families into subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with experimental data allows an independent test of the quality of the clustering. Results An evolutionary split statistic is calculated for each column in a protein multiple sequence alignment; the statistic has a larger value when a column is better described by an evolutionary model that assumes clustering around two or more amino acids rather than a single amino acid. The user selects columns (typically the top ranked columns) to construct a motif. The motif is used to divide the family into subtypes using a stochastic optimization procedure related to the deterministic annealing EM algorithm (DAEM), which yields a specificity score showing how well each family member is assigned to a subtype. The clustering obtained is not strongly dependent on the number of amino acids chosen for the motif. The robustness of this method was demonstrated using six well characterized protein families: nucleotidyl cyclase, protein kinase, dehydrogenase, two polyketide synthase domains and small heat shock proteins. Phylogenetic trees did not allow accurate clustering for three of the six families. Conclusion The method clustered the families into functional subtypes with an accuracy of 90 to 100%. False assignments usually had a low specificity score. PMID:19832975

  5. Protein kinase domain of twitchin has protein kinase activity and an autoinhibitory region.

    PubMed

    Lei, J; Tang, X; Chambers, T C; Pohl, J; Benian, G M

    1994-08-19

    Twitchin is a 753-kDa polypeptide located in the muscle A-bands of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. It consists of multiple copies of both fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains and, near the C terminus, a protein kinase domain with greatest homology to the catalytic domains of myosin light chain kinases. We have expressed and purified from Escherichia coli twitchin's protein kinase catalytic core and flanking sequences that do not include fibronectin III and immunoglobulin C2 domains. The protein was shown to phosphorylate a model substrate and to undergo autophosphorylation. The autophosphorylation occurs at a slow rate, attaining a maximum at 3 h with a stoichiometry of about 1.0 mol of phosphate/mol of protein, probably through an intramolecular mechanism. Sequence analysis of proteolytically derived phosphopeptides revealed that autophosphorylation occurred N-terminal to the catalytic core, predominantly at Thr-5910, with possible minor sites at Ser5912 and/or Ser-5913. This portion of twitchin (residues 5890-6268) was also phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C in the absence of calcium and phosphotidylserine, but not by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. By comparing the activities of three twitchin segments, the enzyme appears to be inhibited by the 60-amino acid residues lying just C-terminal to the kinase catalytic core. Thus, like a number of other protein kinases including myosin light chain kinases, the twitchin kinase appears to be autoregulated. PMID:8063727

  6. A conserved BURP domain defines a novel group of plant proteins with unusual primary structures.

    PubMed

    Hattori, J; Boutilier, K A; van Lookeren Campagne, M M; Miki, B L

    1998-09-01

    We have identified a new class of plant proteins containing a common C-terminal region, which we have termed the BURP domain. These proteins are defined not only by the BURP domain, but also by the overall similarity in their modular construction. The BURP domain proteins consist of either three or four modules: (i) an N-terminal hydrophobic domain -- a presumptive transit peptide, joined to (ii) a short conserved segment or other short segment, (iii) an optional segment consisting of repeated units which is unique to each member, and (iv) the C-terminal BURP domain. These individual modules appear to be combined to form two main classes of BURP domain proteins. The BURP domain proteins, despite the similarities in their primary structural features, show no obvious similarities in the tissues or conditions under which they are expressed. The presence of the conserved BURP domain in diverse plant proteins suggests an important and fundamental functional role for this domain. PMID:9790599

  7. A Database of Domain Definitions for Proteins with Complex Interdomain Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Indraneel; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2009-01-01

    Protein structural domains are necessary for understanding evolution and protein folding, and may vary widely from functional and sequence based domains. Although, various structural domain databases exist, defining domains for some proteins is non-trivial, and definitions of their domain boundaries are not available. Here, we present a novel database of manually defined structural domains for a representative set of proteins from the SCOP “multi-domain proteins” class. (http://prodata.swmed.edu/multidom/). We consider our domains as mobile evolutionary units, which may rearrange during protein evolution. Additionally, they may be visualized as structurally compact and possibly independently folding units. We also found that representing domains as evolutionary and folding units do not always lead to a unique domain definition. However, unlike existing databases, we retain and refine these “alternate” domain definitions after careful inspection of structural similarity, functional sites and automated domain definition methods. We provide domain definitions, including actual residue boundaries, for proteins that well known databases like SCOP and CATH do not attempt to split. Our alternate domain definitions are suitable for sequence and structure searches by automated methods. Additionally, the database can be used for training and testing domain delineation algorithms. Since our domains represent structurally compact evolutionary units, the database may be useful for studying domain properties and evolution. PMID:19352501

  8. The X-ray structures of two mutant crystallin domains shed light on the evolution of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Norledge, B V; Mayr, E M; Glockshuber, R; Bateman, O A; Slingsby, C; Jaenicke, R; Driessen, H P

    1996-03-01

    We use protein engineering and crystallography to simulate aspects of the early evolution of beta gamma-crystallins by observing how a single domain oligomerizes in response to changes in a sequence extension. The crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of gamma beta-crystallin with its four-residue C-terminal extension shows that the domain does not form a symmetric homodimer analogous to the two-domain pairing in beta gamma-crystallins. Instead the C-terminal extension now forms heterologous interactions with other domains leading to the solvent exposure of the natural hydrophobic interface with a consequent loss in protein solubility. However, this domain truncated by just the C-terminal tyrosine forms a symmetric homodimer of domains in the crystal lattice. PMID:8605629

  9. West Nile virus methyltransferase domain interacts with protein kinase G

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The flaviviral nonstructural protein 5 (NS5) is a phosphoprotein, though the precise identities and roles of many specific phosphorylations remain unknown. Protein kinase G (PKG), a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, has previously been shown to phosphorylate dengue virus NS5. Methods We used mass spectrometry to specifically identify NS5 phosphosites. Co-immunoprecipitation assays were used to study protein-protein interactions. Effects on viral replication were measured via replicon system and plaque assay titering. Results We identified multiple sites in West Nile virus (WNV) NS5 that are phosphorylated during a WNV infection, and showed that the N-terminal methyltransferase domain of WNV NS5 can be specifically phosphorylated by PKG in vitro. Expressing PKG in cell culture led to an enhancement of WNV viral production. We hypothesized this effect on replication could be caused by factors beyond the specific phosphorylations of NS5. Here we show for the first time that PKG is also able to stably interact with a viral substrate, WNV NS5, in cell culture and in vitro. While the mosquito-borne WNV NS5 interacted with PKG, tick-borne Langat virus NS5 did not. The methyltransferase domain of NS5 is able to mediate the interaction between NS5 and PKG, and mutating positive residues in the αE region of the methyltransferase interrupts the interaction. These same mutations completely inhibited WNV replication. Conclusions PKG is not required for WNV replication, but does make a stable interaction with NS5. While the consequence of the NS5:PKG interaction when it occurs is unclear, mutational data demonstrates that this interaction occurs in a region of NS5 that is otherwise necessary for replication. Overall, the results identify an interaction between virus and a cellular kinase and suggest a role for a host kinase in enhancing flaviviral replication. PMID:23876037

  10. Targeting the inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein BIR3 binding domains.

    PubMed

    Jaquith, James B

    2014-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) play a critical role in the regulation of cellular apoptosis and cytokine signaling. IAP family members include XIAP, cIAP1, cIAP2, NAIP, survivin, Apollon/Bruce, ML-IAP/livin and TIAP. The IAPs have been targeted using both antisense oligonucleotides and small molecule inhibitors. Several research teams have advanced compounds that bind the highly conserved BIR3 domains of the IAPs into clinical trials, as single agents and in combination with standard of care. This patent review highlights the medicinal chemistry strategies that have been applied to the development of clinical compounds. PMID:24998289