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Sample records for peak jumping mode

  1. Different Modes of Feedback and Peak Vertical Ground Reaction Force During Jump Landing: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ericksen, Hayley M.; Gribble, Phillip A.; Pfile, Kate R.; Pietrosimone, Brian G.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Excessive ground reaction force when landing from a jump may result in lower extremity injuries. It is important to better understand how feedback can influence ground reaction force (GRF) and potentially reduce injury risk. Objective: To determine the effect of expert-provided (EP), self-analysis (SA), and combination EP and SA (combo) feedback on reducing peak vertical GRF during a jump-landing task. Data Sources: We searched the Web of Science database on July 1, 2011; using the search terms ground reaction force, landing biomechanics, and feedback elicited 731 initial hits. Study Selection: Of the 731 initial hits, our final analysis included 7 studies that incorporated 32 separate data comparisons. Data Extraction: Standardized effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated between pretest and posttest scores for each feedback condition. Data Synthesis: We found a homogeneous beneficial effect for combo feedback, indicating a reduction in GRF with no CIs crossing zero. We also found a homogeneous beneficial effect for EP feedback, but the CIs from 4 of the 10 data comparisons crossed zero. The SA feedback showed strong, definitive effects when the intervention included a videotape SA, with no CIs crossing zero. Conclusions: Of the 7 studies reviewed, combo feedback seemed to produce the greatest decrease in peak vertical GRF during a jump-landing task. PMID:24067153

  2. Energy-to-peak state estimation for Markov jump RNNs with time-varying delays via nonsynchronous filter with nonstationary mode transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixian; Zhu, Yanzheng; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of energy-to-peak state estimation for a class of discrete-time Markov jump recurrent neural networks (RNNs) with randomly occurring nonlinearities (RONs) and time-varying delays is investigated. A practical phenomenon of nonsynchronous jumps between RNNs modes and desired mode-dependent filters is considered, and a nonstationary mode transition among the filters is used to model the nonsynchronous jumps to different degrees that are also mode dependent. The RONs are used to model a class of sector-like nonlinearities that occur in a probabilistic way according to a Bernoulli sequence. The time-varying delays are supposed to be mode dependent and unknown, but with known lower and upper bounds a priori. Sufficient conditions on the existence of the nonsynchronous filters are obtained such that the filtering error system is stochastically stable and achieves a prescribed energy-to-peak performance index. Further to the recent study on the class of nonsynchronous estimation problem, a monotonicity is observed in obtaining filtering performance index, while changing the degree of nonsynchronous jumps. A numerical example is presented to verify the theoretical findings. PMID:25576580

  3. Optimal loading range for the development of peak power output in the hexagonal barbell jump squat.

    PubMed

    Turner, Thomas S; Tobin, Daniel P; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies indicate that the utilization of the hexagonal barbell jump squat (HBJS) compared with the traditional barbell jump squat may offer a superior method of developing peak power. The notion that a single optimal load may be prescribed in training programs aiming to develop peak power is subject to debate. The purpose of this study was to identify the optimal load corresponding with peak power output during the HBJS in professional rugby union players. Seventeen professional rugby union players participated in this study. Participants performed 3 unloaded countermovement jumps on a force plate and 3 HBJS at each of the following randomized loads: 10, 20, 30, and 40% of box squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Peak power output was the dependent variable of interest. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance was conducted to compare peak power output across each load. Peak power output was the dependent variable of interest. A significant main effect for load was observed (Wilk's Lambda = 0.11, F(4,13) = 18.07, p < 0.01, partial η2 = 0.88). Results of the Bonferroni-adjusted pairwise comparisons indicated that peak power output in the HBJS is optimized at a load range between 10 and 20% of box squat 1RM. The results of this study indicate that the use of the HBJS with a training load between 10 and 20% of box squat 1RM optimizes peak power output in professional rugby union players. PMID:25486301

  4. Effect of attentional focus strategies on peak force and performance in the standing long jump.

    PubMed

    Wu, Will F W; Porter, Jared M; Brown, Lee E

    2012-05-01

    Significant benefits in standing long jump performance have been demonstrated when subjects were provided verbal instructions that promoted an external focus of attention compared with an internal focus of attention, suggesting differences in ground reaction forces. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate peak force and jump performance between internal and external focus of attention strategies. Untrained subjects were assigned to both experimental conditions in which verbal instructions were provided to promote either an external or internal focus of attention. All subjects completed a total number of 5 standing long jumps. The results of the study demonstrated that the external focus of attention condition elicited significantly greater jump distance (153.6 ± 38.6 cm) than the internal focus of attention condition (139.5 ± 46.7 cm). There were no significant differences observed between conditions in peak force (1429.8 ± 289.1 N and 1453.7 ± 299.7 N, respectively). The results add to the growing body of literature describing the training and learning benefits of an external focus of attention. Practitioners should create standardized verbal instructions using an external focus of attention to maximize standing long jump performance. PMID:22082793

  5. Development of a criterion method to determine peak mechanical power output in a countermovement jump.

    PubMed

    Owen, Nick J; Watkins, James; Kilduff, Liam P; Bevan, Huw R; Bennett, Mark A

    2014-06-01

    There is a general agreement that the most valid method of measuring peak lower-body mechanical power output (LBPP) in a countermovement jump (CMJ) is by analysis of the corresponding vertical component of the ground reaction force (VGRF)-time history of the jump. However, there is no published standard protocol. The purpose of this study was to establish a standard protocol. The variables necessary to define a valid and reliable CMJ method were: (a) vertical force range, (b) force sampling and integration frequency, (c) method of integration, (d) determination of body weight (BW), and (e) determination of the initiation of the CMJ. Countermovement jumps off a force platform (FP) were performed by 15 male professional rugby players. The 5 variables were then optimized to maximize the reliability and validity of the measure of LBPP. Errors of <1% (p ≤ 0.05) in the measurement of LBPP were obtained using the following specification: (a) 6 times BW (using a 16-bit analog to digital converter), (b) 1,000 Hz, (c) Simpson's rule or the trapezoidal rule, (d) mean VGRF for 1 second of quiet standing immediately before jump signal, and (e) 30 ms before the instant BW ± 5 SD is exceeded after the jump signal. Peak lower-body power output was most sensitive to variables 4 and 5. It was concluded that this study has established a standard protocol for the criterion method of measuring peak power in a CMJ using an FP. As all other estimates and less reliable methods of determining LBPP in a CMJ rely on the FP method for calibration, it is proposed that this protocol be used as the basis of future criterion measures using a FP. PMID:24276298

  6. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2014-01-15

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify and validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.

  7. Peak Vertical Jump Power as a Marker of Bone Health in Children.

    PubMed

    Baptista, F; Mil-Homens, P; Carita, A I; Janz, K; Sardinha, L B

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the accuracy of peak vertical jump power (VJP) to identify children with bone mineral density (BMD) below average, defined as BMD measured by DXA and adjusted for body height at the whole body less head≤- 1.0 standard deviation (SD). The sample included 114 boys and girls aged 8.5±0.4 years old. VJP was estimated from a countermovement jump performed on a contact mat using the measured flight time to calculate the height of rise of the center of gravity. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratio of having BMD≤1.0 SD decreased 1.2% per watt of power and the probability of BMD below average was 75.6% higher in boys than in girls with the same peak power jump. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the best trade-off between sensitivity and specificity to identify children with BMD<- 1.0 SD was 635 watts in boys (sensitivity=63.3%; specificity=69.2%; AUC=0.816, 95% CI: 0.681-0.95; p<0.001) and 515 watts in girls (sensitivity=75.0%; specificity=77.0%; AUC=0.849, 95% CI: 0.698-0.999; p=0.002). These cut-off values correspond to a vertical jump of 19.9 cm and 20.5 cm in 8-year-old boys and girls, respectively. The VJP showed a reasonable sensitivity and specificity as well good discriminant ability to identify children with BMD below average. PMID:27176885

  8. Jumping mode atomic force microscopy on grana membranes from spinach.

    PubMed

    Sznee, Kinga; Dekker, Jan P; Dame, Remus T; van Roon, Henny; Wuite, Gijs J L; Frese, Raoul N

    2011-11-11

    The thylakoid membrane system is a complex membrane system that organizes and reorganizes itself to provide plants optimal chemical energy from sunlight under different and varying environmental conditions. Grana membranes are part of this system and contain the light-driven water-splitting enzyme Photosystem II (PSII) and light-harvesting antenna complexes. Here, we present a direct visualization of PSII complexes within grana membranes from spinach. By means of jumping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid, minimal forces were applied between the scanning tip and membrane or protein, allowing complexes to be imaged with high detail. We observed four different packing arrangements of PSII complexes, which occur primarily as dimers: co-linear crystalline rows, nanometric domains of straight or skewed rows, and disordered domains. Upon storing surface-adhered membranes at low temperature prior to imaging, large-scale reorganizations of supercomplexes between PSII and light-harvesting complex II could be induced. The highest resolution images show the existence of membrane domains without obvious topography extending beyond supercomplexes. These observations illustrate the possibility for diffusion of proteins and smaller molecules within these densely packed membranes. PMID:21911498

  9. Changes in Sprint and Jump Performances After Traditional, Plyometric, and Combined Resistance Training in Male Youth Pre- and Post-Peak Height Velocity.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Radnor, John M; De Ste Croix, Mark B A; Cronin, John B; Oliver, Jon L

    2016-05-01

    Lloyd, RS, Radnor, JM, De Ste Croix, MBA, Cronin, JB, and Oliver, JL. Changes in sprint and jump performances after traditional, plyometric, and combined resistance training in male youth pre- and post-peak height velocity. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1239-1247, 2016-The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 6-week training interventions using different modes of resistance (traditional strength, plyometric, and combined training) on sprinting and jumping performances in boys before and after peak height velocity (PHV). Eighty school-aged boys were categorized into 2 maturity groups (pre- or post-PHV) and then randomly assigned to (a) plyometric training, (b) traditional strength training, (c) combined training, or (d) a control group. Experimental groups participated in twice-weekly training programs for 6 weeks. Acceleration, maximal running velocity, squat jump height, and reactive strength index data were collected pre- and postintervention. All training groups made significant gains in measures of sprinting and jumping irrespective of the mode of resistance training and maturity. Plyometric training elicited the greatest gains across all performance variables in pre-PHV children, whereas combined training was the most effective in eliciting change in all performance variables for the post-PHV cohort. Statistical analysis indicated that plyometric training produced greater changes in squat jump and acceleration performances in the pre-PHV group compared with the post-PHV cohort. All other training responses between pre- and post-PHV cohorts were not significant and not clinically meaningful. The study indicates that plyometric training might be more effective in eliciting short-term gains in jumping and sprinting in boys who are pre-PHV, whereas those who are post-PHV may benefit from the additive stimulus of combined training. PMID:26422612

  10. The Effect of Gender and Fatigue on the Biomechanics of Bilateral Landings from a Jump: Peak Values

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Evangelos; Sheikhzadeh, Ali; Hagins, Marshall; Nordin, Margareta

    2007-01-01

    Female athletes are substantially more susceptible than males to suffer acute non-contact anterior cruciate ligament injury. A limited number of studies have identified possible biomechanical risk factors that differ between genders. The effect of fatigue on the biomechanics of landing has also been inadequately investigated. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of gender and fatigue on peak values of biomechanical variables during landing from a jump. Thirty-two recreational athletes performed bilateral drop jump landings from a 40 cm platform. Kinetic, kinematic and electromyographic data were collected before and after a functional fatigue protocol. Females landed with 9° greater peak knee valgus (p = 0.001) and 140% greater maximum vertical ground reaction forces (p = 0.003) normalized to body weight compared to males. Fatigue increased peak foot abduction by 1.7° (p = 0.042), peak rectus femoris activity by 27% (p = 0.018), and peak vertical ground reaction force (p = 0.038) by 20%. The results of the study suggest that landing with increased peak knee valgus and vertical ground reaction force may contribute to increased risk for knee injury in females. Fatigue caused significant but small changes on some biomechanical variables. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs should focus on implementing strategies to effectively teach females to control knee valgus and ground reaction force. Key pointsFemale athletes landed with increased knee valgus and VGRF which may predispose them to ACL injury.Fatigue elicited a similar response in male and female athletes.The effectiveness of sports injury prevention programs may improve by focusing on teaching females to land softer and with less knee valgus. PMID:24149228

  11. Dropout dynamics in pulsed quantum dot lasers due to mode jumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolovskii, G. S.; Dudelev, V. V.; Deryagin, A. G.; Novikov, I. I.; Maximov, M. V.; Ustinov, V. M.; Kuchinskii, V. I.; Viktorov, E. A.; Abusaa, M.; Danckaert, J.; Kolykhalova, E. D.; Soboleva, K. K.; Zhukov, A. E.; Sibbett, W.; Rafailov, E. U.; Erneux, T.

    2015-06-29

    We examine the response of a pulse pumped quantum dot laser both experimentally and numerically. As the maximum of the pump pulse comes closer to the excited-state threshold, the output pulse shape becomes unstable and leads to dropouts. We conjecture that these instabilities result from an increase of the linewidth enhancement factor α as the pump parameter comes close to the excitated state threshold. In order to analyze the dynamical mechanism of the dropout, we consider two cases for which the laser exhibits either a jump to a different single mode or a jump to fast intensity oscillations. The origin of these two instabilities is clarified by a combined analytical and numerical bifurcation diagram of the steady state intensity modes.

  12. Robust fuzzy control for stochastic Markovian jumping systems via sliding mode method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bei; Jia, Tinggang; Niu, Yugang

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers the problem of sliding mode control for stochastic Markovian jumping systems by means of fuzzy method. The Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy stochastic model subject to state-dependent noise is presented. A key feature in this work is to remove the restricted condition that each local system model had to share the same input channel, which is usually assumed in some existing results. The integral sliding surface is constructed for every mode and the connections among various sliding surfaces are established via a set of coupled matrices. Moreover, the present sliding mode controller including the transition rates of modes can cope with the effect of Markovian switching. It is shown that both the reachability of sliding surfaces and the stability of sliding mode dynamics can be ensured. Finally, numerical simulation results are given.

  13. Axicons for mode conversion in high peak power, higher-order mode, fiber amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J W; DeSantolo, A; Westbrook, P S; Windeler, R S; Kremp, T; Headley, C; DiGiovanni, D J

    2015-12-28

    Higher-order mode fiber amplifiers have demonstrated effective areas as large as 6000 μm2, allowing for high pulse energy and peak power amplification. Long-period gratings are used to convert the fundamental mode to the higher-order mode at the entrance to the amplifier, and reconvert back to the fundamental at the exit, to achieve a diffraction limited beam. However, long period gratings are susceptible to nonlinearity at high peak power. In this work, we propose and demonstrate axicons for linear bulk-optic mode conversion at the output of higher order mode amplifiers. We achieve an M2 of less than 1.25 for 80% mode conversion efficiency. Experiments with pulsed amplifiers confirm that the mode conversion is free from nonlinearity. Furthermore, chirp pulse amplifier experiments confirm that HOM amplifiers plus axicon mode convertors provide energy scalability in femtosecond pulses, compared to smaller effective area, fundamental mode fiber amplifiers. We also propose and demonstrate a route towards fiber integration of the axicon mode convertor by fabricating axicons directly on the tip of the fiber amplifier end-cap. PMID:26832045

  14. Globally exponential stability and stabilization of interconnected Markovian jump system with mode-dependent delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhaohui; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problems of globally exponential stability and stabilization with H∞ performance for a class of interconnected Markovian jump system with mode-dependent delays in interconnection. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, delay-range-dependent globally mean-square exponential stability conditions are established in terms of linear matrix inequalities. Based on the obtained conditions, state feedback control utilizing global state information and state feedback control utilizing global state information of decentralised observers are developed to render the closed-loop interconnected Markovian jump time-delay system globally exponential stable with H∞ performance. Numerical simulation of a power system, composed of three coupled machines, is used to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  15. Transit time instabilities in an inverted fireball. II. Mode jumping and nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Fonda, B.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-01

    A fireball is formed inside a highly transparent spherical grid immersed in a dc discharge plasma. The ambient plasma acts as a cathode and the positively biased grid as an anode. A strong nearly current-free double layer separates the two plasmas. Electrons are accelerated into the fireball, ionize, and establish a discharge plasma with plasma potential near the grid potential. Ions are ejected from the fireball. Since electrons are lost at the same rate as ions, most electrons accelerated into the fireball just pass through it. Thus, the electron distribution contains radially counterstreaming electrons. High-frequency oscillations are excited with rf period given by the electron transit time through the fireball. Since the frequency is well below the electron plasma frequency, no eigenmodes other than a beam space-charge wave exists. The instability is an inertial transit-time instability similar to the sheath-plasma instability or the reflex vircator instability. In contrast to vircators, there is no electron reflection from a space-charge layer but counterstreaming arises from spherical convergence and divergence of electrons. While the basic instability properties have been presented in a companion paper [R. L. Stenzel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 012104 (2011)], the present paper focuses on observed mode jumping and nonlinear effects. The former produce frequency jumps and different potential profiles, the latter produce harmonics associated with electron bunching at large amplitudes. In situ probe measurements are presented and interpreted.

  16. Transit time instabilities in an inverted fireball. II. Mode jumping and nonlinearities

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R. L.; Gruenwald, J.; Fonda, B.; Ionita, C.; Schrittwieser, R.

    2011-01-15

    A fireball is formed inside a highly transparent spherical grid immersed in a dc discharge plasma. The ambient plasma acts as a cathode and the positively biased grid as an anode. A strong nearly current-free double layer separates the two plasmas. Electrons are accelerated into the fireball, ionize, and establish a discharge plasma with plasma potential near the grid potential. Ions are ejected from the fireball. Since electrons are lost at the same rate as ions, most electrons accelerated into the fireball just pass through it. Thus, the electron distribution contains radially counterstreaming electrons. High-frequency oscillations are excited with rf period given by the electron transit time through the fireball. Since the frequency is well below the electron plasma frequency, no eigenmodes other than a beam space-charge wave exists. The instability is an inertial transit-time instability similar to the sheath-plasma instability or the reflex vircator instability. In contrast to vircators, there is no electron reflection from a space-charge layer but counterstreaming arises from spherical convergence and divergence of electrons. While the basic instability properties have been presented in a companion paper [R. L. Stenzel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 012104 (2011)], the present paper focuses on observed mode jumping and nonlinear effects. The former produce frequency jumps and different potential profiles, the latter produce harmonics associated with electron bunching at large amplitudes. In situ probe measurements are presented and interpreted.

  17. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices.

  18. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices. PMID:27502844

  19. Mode jumping of split-ring resonator metamaterials controlled by high-permittivity BST and incident electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiaojian; Zeng, Xinxi; Cui, Tie Jun; Lan, Chuwen; Guo, Yunsheng; Zhang, Hao Chi; Zhang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the resonant modes of split-ring resonator (SRR) metamaterials that contain high-permittivity BST block numerically and experimentally. We observe interesting mode-jumping phenomena from the BST-included SRR absorber structure as the excitation wave is incident perpendicularly to the SRR plane. Specifically, when the electric field is parallel to the SRR gap, the BST block in the gap will induce a mode jumping from the LC resonance to plasmonic resonance (horizontal electric-dipole mode), because the displacement current excited by the Mie resonance in the dielectric block acts as a current channel in the gap. When the electric field is perpendicular to the gap side, the plasmonic resonance mode (vertical electric-dipole mode) in SRR changes to two joint modes contributed simultaneously by the back layer, SRR and BST block, as a result of connected back layer and SRR layer by the displacement current in the BST dielectric block. Based on the mode jumping effect as well as temperature and electric-field dependent dielectric constant, the BST-included SRR metamaterials may have great potentials for the applications in electromagnetic switches and widely tunable metamaterial devices. PMID:27502844

  20. Development of a single-longitudinal-mode, high-peak-power, tunable pulsed dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.F.; Valentini, J.J. )

    1994-09-01

    A compact, high-peak-power, user-friendly, single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) tunable dye laser has been developed. The device yields [gt]12 mJ pulses of 6 ns duration and [similar to]2.7[times]transform-limited linewidths of [lt]200 MHz. Seamless single-mode tunability of [gt]20 cm[sup [minus]1] is possible without resetting. The dye laser makes efficient use of the pump laser, with [similar to]10% conversion of the 532 nm pump energy to tunable dye power and occupies [lt]4 m[sup 2] (including pump laser and all diagnostics). The linewidth of the device can be switched from [lt]200 MHz SLM operation to [lt]0.5 cm[sup [minus]1] broadband modeless operation by moving one mirror. This allows rapid interchange between high-resolution scanning and a fast survey scan'' mode of operation to isolate the spectral region of interest at low resolution.

  1. Dynamics and stabilization of peak current-mode controlled buck converter with constant current load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Min-Rui; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Tun; Li, Zhen-Hua

    2015-10-01

    The discrete iterative map model of peak current-mode controlled buck converter with constant current load (CCL), containing the output voltage feedback and ramp compensation, is established in this paper. Based on this model the complex dynamics of this converter is investigated by analyzing bifurcation diagrams and the Lyapunov exponent spectrum. The effects of ramp compensation and output voltage feedback on the stability of the converter are investigated. Experimental results verify the simulation and theoretical analysis. The stability boundary and chaos boundary are obtained under the theoretical conditions of period-doubling bifurcation and border collision. It is found that there are four operation regions in the peak current-mode controlled buck converter with CCL due to period-doubling bifurcation and border-collision bifurcation. Research results indicate that ramp compensation can extend the stable operation range and transfer the operating mode, and output voltage feedback can eventually eliminate the coexisting fast-slow scale instability. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61371033), the Fok Ying-Tung Education Foundation for Young Teachers in the Higher Education Institutions of China (Grant No. 142027), the Sichuan Provincial Youth Science and Technology Fund, China (Grant Nos. 2014JQ0015 and 2013JQ0033), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. SWJTU11CX029).

  2. Mode shape analysis using a commercially available "peak-store" video frame buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Walter L.; Childers, Brooks A.

    1994-10-01

    Time exposure photography, sometimes coupled with strobe illumination, is an accepted method for motion analysis that bypasses frame by frame analysis and re synthesis of data. Garden variety video cameras can now exploit this technique using a unique frame buffer that is a non integrating memory that compares incoming data with that already stored. The device continuously outputs an analog video signal of the stored contents which can then be redigitized and analyzed using conventional equipment. Historically, photographic time exposures have been used to record the displacement envelope of harmonically oscillating structures to show mode shape. Mode shape analysis is crucial, for example, in aeroelastic testing of wind tunnel models. Aerodynamic, inertial, and elastic forces can couple together leading to catastrophic failure of a poorly designed aircraft. This paper will explore the usefulness of the peak store device as a videometric tool and in particular discuss methods for analyzing a targeted vibrating plate using the `peak store' in conjunction with calibration methods familiar to the close-range videometry community. Results for the first three normal modes will be presented.

  3. Mode shape analysis using a commercially available peak store video frame buffer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, Walter L.; Childers, Brooks A.

    1994-01-01

    Time exposure photography, sometimes coupled with strobe illumination, is an accepted method for motion analysis that bypasses frame by frame analysis and resynthesis of data. Garden variety video cameras can now exploit this technique using a unique frame buffer that is a non-integrating memory that compares incoming data with that already stored. The device continuously outputs an analog video signal of the stored contents which can then be redigitized and analyzed using conventional equipment. Historically, photographic time exposures have been used to record the displacement envelope of harmonically oscillating structures to show mode shape. Mode shape analysis is crucial, for example, in aeroelastic testing of wind tunnel models. Aerodynamic, inertial, and elastic forces can couple together leading to catastrophic failure of a poorly designed aircraft. This paper will explore the usefulness of the peak store device as a videometric tool and in particular discuss methods for analyzing a targeted vibrating plate using the 'peak store' in conjunction with calibration methods familiar to the close-range videometry community. Results for the first three normal modes will be presented.

  4. Radiation-induced transmission loss in low water peak single mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tingyun; Xiao, Zhongyin; Luo, Wenyun; Wen, Jianxiang; Yin, Jianchong; Wu, Wenkai; Gong, Renxiang

    2013-12-01

    Radiation-induced transmission loss in Low Water Peak Single Mode (LWPSM) fiber has been investigated. Formation and conversion processes of defect centers also have been proposed using electron spin resonance in the fiber irradiated with gamma rays. When the irradiation dose is low, Germanium electron center (GEC) and self-trapped hole center (STH) occur. With the increase of dose, E' centers (Si and Ge) and nonbridge oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) generate. With the help of thermal-bleaching or photo-bleaching, the radiation-induced loss of pre-irradiation optical fiber can be reduced effectively. The obtain results also have been analyzed in detail.

  5. Gamma irradiation effect on Rayleigh scattering in low water peak single-mode optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianxiang; Peng, Gang-Ding; Luo, Wenyun; Xiao, Zhongyin; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-11-01

    The Rayleigh scattering loss in low water peak single-mode optical fibers under varying Gamma rays irradiation has been investigated. We observed that the Rayleigh scattering coefficient (CR) of the fiber is almost linearly increased with the increase of Gamma irradiation in the low-dose range (< 500 Gy). Based on the electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra analysis, we confirmed that the Rayleigh scattering mainly results from the irradiation-induced defect centers associated with electron transfer or charge density redistribution around Ge and O atoms. This work provides a new interpretation of the optical loss and reveals a new mechanism on irradiation influence on Rayleigh scattering. PMID:22109205

  6. Single-mode single-frequency high peak power all-fiber MOPA at 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, L. V.; Likhachev, M. E.; Bubnov, M. M.; Paramonov, V. M.; Belovolov, M. I.; Lipatov, D. S.; Guryanov, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    In this Report, we present a record-high-peak-power single-frequency master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system based on a newly developed double-clad large-mode-area Yb-free Er-doped fiber (DC-LMA-EDF). A fiber Bragg grating wavelength-stabilized fiber-coupled diode laser at λ=1551 nm with ~2 MHz spectral width was used as the master oscillator. Its radiation was externally modulated with a 5 kHz repetition rate and 92 ns pulse duration and then amplified in a core-pumped Er-doped fiber amplifier up to an average power of 4 mW. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) generated at the last preamplifier stage was suppressed by a narrow-band (0.7 nm) DWDM filter. The last MOPA stage was based on the recently developed single-mode DC-LMA-EDF with a mode field diameter of 25 microns and pump clad-absorption of 3 dB/m at λ=980 nm. The pump and the signal were launched into this fiber through a commercial pump combiner in a co-propagating amplifier scheme. At first, we used a 3-m long DC-LMAEDF. In such configuration, a peak power of 800 W was achieved at the output of the amplifier together with a ~ 12 % pump conversion slope efficiency. Further power scaling was limited by SBS. After that we shortened the fiber length to 1 m. As a result, owing to large unabsorbed pump power, the efficiency decreased to ~5 %. However, a peak power of more than 3.5 kW was obtained before the SBS threshold. In this case, the pulse shape changed and its duration decreased to ~60 ns owing to inversion depletion after propagation of the forward front of the pulse. To the best of our knowledge, the peak power of more than 3.5 kW reported here is the highest value ever published for a single-frequency single-mode silica-based fiber laser system operating near λ=1550 nm.

  7. Optimizing Thomson's jumping ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjossem, Paul J. H.; Brost, Elizabeth C.

    2011-04-01

    The height to which rings will jump in a Thomson jumping ring apparatus is the central question posed by this popular lecture demonstration. We develop a simple time-averaged inductive-phase-lag model for the dependence of the jump height on the ring material, its mass, and temperature and apply it to measurements of the jump height for a set of rings made by slicing copper and aluminum alloy pipe into varying lengths. The data confirm a peak jump height that grows, narrows, and shifts to smaller optimal mass when the rings are cooled to 77 K. The model explains the ratio of the cooled/warm jump heights for a given ring, the reduction in optimal mass as the ring is cooled, and the shape of the mass resonance. The ring that jumps the highest is found to have a characteristic resistance equal to the inductive reactance of the set of rings.

  8. Boson peak in supercooled liquids: Time domain observations and mode coupling theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cang, Hu; Li, Jie; Andersen, Hans C.; Fayer, M. D.

    2005-08-01

    Optical heterodyne-detected optical Kerr effect (OHD-OKE) experiments are presented for the supercooled liquid acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin - ASP). The ASP data and previously published OHD-OKE data on supercooled dibutylphthalate (DBP) display highly damped oscillations with a periods of ˜2ps as the temperature is reduced to and below the mode coupling theory (MCT) temperature TC. The oscillations become more pronounced below TC. The oscillations can be interpreted as the time domain signature of the boson peak. Recently a schematic MCT model, the Sjögren model, was used to describe the OHD-OKE data for a number of supercooled liquids by Götze and Sperl [W. Götze and M. Sperl, Phys. Rev. E 92, 105701 (2004)], but the short-time and low-temperature behaviors were not addressed. Franosch et al. [T. Franosch, W. Gotze, M. R. Mayr, and A. P. Singh, Phys. Rev. E 55, 3183 (1997)] found that the Sjögren model could describe the boson peak observed by depolarized light-scattering (DLS) experiments on glycerol. The OHD-OKE experiment measures a susceptibility that is a time domain equivalent of the spectrum measured in DLS. Here we present a detailed analysis of the ASP and DBP data over a broad range of times and temperatures using the Sjögren model. The MCT schematic model is able to describe the data very well at all temperatures and relevant time scales. The trajectory of MCT parameters that fit the high-temperature data (no short-time oscillations) when continued below TC results in calculations that reproduce the oscillations seen in the data. The results indicate that increasing translational-rotational coupling is responsible for the appearance of the boson peak as the temperature approaches and drops below TC.

  9. Bifurcation and chaos in high-frequency peak current mode Buck converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Yuan, Chang; Xin, Zhao; Fan, Yang; Cheng-En, Wu

    2016-07-01

    Bifurcation and chaos in high-frequency peak current mode Buck converter working in continuous conduction mode (CCM) are studied in this paper. First of all, the two-dimensional discrete mapping model is established. Next, reference current at the period-doubling point and the border of inductor current are derived. Then, the bifurcation diagrams are drawn with the aid of MATLAB. Meanwhile, circuit simulations are executed with PSIM, and time domain waveforms as well as phase portraits in i L–v C plane are plotted with MATLAB on the basis of simulation data. After that, we construct the Jacobian matrix and analyze the stability of the system based on the roots of characteristic equations. Finally, the validity of theoretical analysis has been verified by circuit testing. The simulation and experimental results show that, with the increase of reference current I ref, the corresponding switching frequency f is approaching to low-frequency stage continuously when the period-doubling bifurcation happens, leading to the converter tending to be unstable. With the increase of f, the corresponding I ref decreases when the period-doubling bifurcation occurs, indicating the stable working range of the system becomes smaller. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61376029), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China, and the College Graduate Research and Innovation Program of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. SJLX15_0092).

  10. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording. PMID:27026651

  11. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  12. Influence of photo- and thermal bleaching on pre-irradiation low water peak single mode fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jianchong; Wen, Jianxiang; Luo, Wenyun; Xiao, Zhongyin; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2011-12-01

    Reducing the radiation-induced transmission loss in low water peak single mode fiber (LWP SMF) has been investigated by using photo-bleaching method with 980nm pump light source and using thermal-bleaching method with temperature control system. The results show that the radiation-induced loss of pre-irradiation optical fiber can be reduced effectively with the help of photo-bleaching or thermal-bleaching. Although the effort of photo-bleaching is not as significant as thermal-bleaching, by using photo-bleaching method, the loss of fiber caused by radiation-induced defects can be reduced best up to 49% at 1310nm and 28% at 1550nm in low pre-irradiation condition, the coating of the fiber are not destroyed, and the rehabilitating time is just several hours, while self-annealing usually costs months' time. What's more, the typical high power LASER for photo-bleaching can be 980nm pump Laser Diode, which is very accessible.

  13. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  14. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  15. 1400, +/- 900V PEAK PULSE SWITCH MODE POWER SUPPLIES FOR SNS INJECTION KICKERS.

    SciTech Connect

    LAMBIASE,R.ENG,W.SANDBERG,J.DEWAN,S.HOLMES,R.RUST,K.ZENG,J.

    2004-03-10

    This paper describes simulation and experimental results for a 1400A, {+-} 900V peak rated, switch mode power supply for SNS Injection Kicker Magnets. For each magnet (13 m{Omega}, 160{micro}H), the power supply must supply controlled pulses at 60 Hz repetition rate. The pulse current must rise from zero to maximum in less than 1 millisec in a controlled manner, flat top for up to 2 millisec, and should fall in a controlled manner to less than 4A within 500{micro}s. The low current performance during fall time is the biggest challenge in this power supply. The simulation results show that to meet the controlled fall of the current and the current ripple requirements, voltage loop bandwidth of at least 10 kHz and switching frequency of at least 100 kHz are required. To achieve high power high frequency switching with IGBT switches, a series connected topology with three phase shifted (O{sup o}, 60{sup o} & 120{sup o}) converters each with 40 kHz switching frequency (IGBT at 20kHz), has been achieved. In this paper, the circuit topology, relevant system specifications and experimental results that meet the requirements of the power supply are described in detail. A unique six pulse SCR rectifier circuit with capacitor storage has been implemented to achieve minimum pulse width to meet required performance during current fall time below 50A due to the very narrow pulse width and non-linearity from IGBT turn-on/off times.

  16. Quantum walk with jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavička, H.; Potoček, V.; Kiss, T.; Lutz, E.; Jex, I.

    2011-09-01

    We analyze a special class of 1-D quantum walks (QWs) realized using optical multi-ports. We assume non-perfect multi-ports showing errors in the connectivity, i.e. with a small probability the multi-ports can connect not to their nearest neighbor but to another multi-port at a fixed distance - we call this a jump. We study two cases of QW with jumps where multiple displacements can emerge at one timestep. The first case assumes time-correlated jumps (static disorder). In the second case, we choose the positions of jumps randomly in time (dynamic disorder). The probability distributions of position of the QW walker in both instances differ significantly: dynamic disorder leads to a Gaussian-like distribution, while for static disorder we find two distinct behaviors depending on the parity of jump size. In the case of even-sized jumps, the distribution exhibits a three-peak profile around the position of the initial excitation, whereas the probability distribution in the odd case follows a Laplace-like discrete distribution modulated by additional (exponential) peaks for long times. Finally, our numerical results indicate that by an appropriate mapping a universal functional behavior of the variance of the long-time probability distribution can be revealed with respect to the scaled average of jump size.

  17. AFM PeakForce QNM mode: Evidencing nanometre-scale mechanical properties of chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Smolyakov, G; Pruvost, S; Cardoso, L; Alonso, B; Belamie, E; Duchet-Rumeau, J

    2016-10-20

    PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Mapping (QNM) AFM mode was used to explore the mechanical properties of textured chitin-silica hybrid films at the nanoscale. The influence of the force applied by the tip on the sample surface was studied for standard homogeneous samples, for chitin nanorods and for chitin-silica hybrid nanocomposites. Thick films of superimposed chitin nanorods showed a monotonous increase of DMT modulus (based on the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model) owing to an increase in modulus at the interface between nanorods due to geometrical constraints of the AFM acquisition. A similar variation of DMT modulus was obtained for chitin-silica hybrid thick films related to mechanical strengthening induced by the presence of silica. This work revealed the role of the organic-inorganic interface, at the nanoscale, in the mechanical behaviour of textured materials using PeakForce QNM mode, with optimized analysis conditions. PMID:27474579

  18. Jumping hoops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eunjin; Kim, Ho-Young

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of an elastic hoop as a model of the jumps of small insects. During a jump the initial elastic strain energy is converted to translational, gravitational, and vibrational energy, and is dissipated by interaction with the floor and the ambient air. We show that the strain energy is initially divided into translational, vibrational, and dissipation energies with a ratio that is constant regardless of the dimension, initial deflection, and the properties of a hoop. This novel result enables us to accurately predict the maximum jump height of a hoop with known initial conditions and drag coefficient without resorting to a numerical computation. Our model reduces the optimization of the hoop geometry for maximizing the jump height to a simple algebraic problem.

  19. Egg Bungee Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tretter, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In the spirit of the National Science Education Standards (NRC 1996), many teachers attempt to have their students experience science in a constructivist, inquiry-oriented manner. The egg bungee jump activity will certainly support that mode of teaching, and has the added benefit of providing a concrete context within which students can explore…

  20. Fault detection for a class of uncertain nonlinear Markovian jump stochastic systems with mode-dependent time delays and sensor saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Guangming; Li, Yongmin; Li, Ze

    2016-05-01

    This paper considers the problem of robust H∞ fault detection for a class of uncertain nonlinear Markovian jump stochastic systems with mode-dependent time delays and sensor saturation. We aim to design a linear mode-dependent H∞ fault detection filter that ensures, the fault detection system is not only stochastically asymptotically stable in the large, but also satisfies a prescribed H∞-norm level for all admissible uncertainties. By using the Lyapunov stability theory and generalised Itô formula, some novel delay-dependent sufficient conditions in terms of linear matrix inequality are proposed to guarantee the existence of the desired fault detection filter. Explicit expression of the desired mode-dependent linear filter parameters is characterised by matrix decomposition, congruence transformation and convex optimisation technique. Sector condition method is utilised to deal with sensor saturation, a definite relation of sector condition parameters with fault detection system robustness against disturbances and sensitivity to faults is put forward, and weighting fault signal approach is employed to improve the performance of the fault detection system. A simulation example and an industrial nonisothermal continuous stirred tank reactor system are utilised to verify the effectiveness and usefulness of the proposed method.

  1. High-peak-power, high-repetition-rate LD end-pumped Nd:YVO4 burst mode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hu; Yan, Renpeng; Fa, Xin; Yu, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Fan, Rongwei; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A compact high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate burst mode laser is achieved by an acousto-optical Q-switched Nd:YVO4 1064 nm laser directly pumped at 878.6 nm. Pulse trains with 10-100 pulses are obtained using acousto-optical Q-switch at repetition rates of 10-100 kHz under a pulsed pumping with a 1 ms duration. At the maximum pump energy of 108.5 mJ, the pulse energy of 10 kHz burst mode laser reaches 44 mJ corresponding to a single pulse energy of 4.4 mJ and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 40.5 %.The maximum peak power of ~468.1 kW at 10 kHz is obtained with a pulse width of 9.4 ns. The beam quality factor is measured to be M 2 ~1.5 and the pulse jitter is estimated to be less than 1 % in both amplitude and time region.

  2. High-peak-power, high-repetition-rate LD end-pumped Nd:YVO4 burst mode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Hu; Yan, Renpeng; Fa, Xin; Yu, Xin; Ma, Yufei; Fan, Rongwei; Li, Xudong; Chen, Deying; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-04-01

    A compact high-peak-power, high-repetition-rate burst mode laser is achieved by an acousto-optical Q-switched Nd:YVO4 1064 nm laser directly pumped at 878.6 nm. Pulse trains with 10-100 pulses are obtained using acousto-optical Q-switch at repetition rates of 10-100 kHz under a pulsed pumping with a 1 ms duration. At the maximum pump energy of 108.5 mJ, the pulse energy of 10 kHz burst mode laser reaches 44 mJ corresponding to a single pulse energy of 4.4 mJ and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 40.5 %.The maximum peak power of ~468.1 kW at 10 kHz is obtained with a pulse width of 9.4 ns. The beam quality factor is measured to be M 2 ~1.5 and the pulse jitter is estimated to be less than 1 % in both amplitude and time region.

  3. Supersonic Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    On October 14,2012, Felix Baumgartner, an Austrian sky-diver, set some new world records for his discipline. Jumping from a height of about 39 km, he reached a top speed of 1342 km/h, becoming the first human being to break the sound barrier in free fall. In order to understand some essential physics aspects of this remarkable feat, we wonder why…

  4. Epitaxial jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stura, Enrico A.; Charbonnier, Jean-Baptiste; Taussig, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    By a combination of seeding and changing the growth medium new crystal forms may be obtained. The procedure is called an epitaxial jump. The seeds used in the seeding are from crystals of the same or related protein. For example, seeding followed by an increase in precipitant concentration has given higher diffracting crystals of the complex between tissue factor, factor VIIa and the inhibitor 5L15. For both an anti-steroid antibody fragment and human placental alkaline phosphatase a polymorph was obtained by changing a low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) with one of a higher molecular weight. In the first case, in one direction and in the latter case, in the other direction. A change of conformation could also have contributed to this. A DsbA mutant illustrates how such changes, result in a different packing from that for the wild-type. Seeding from crystals of wild-type protein yields crystals which appear to be morphologically different from both the wild-type and mutant crystal forms.

  5. Asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design to tune the low-mode asymmetry during the peak drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jianfa; Dai, Zhensheng; Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang; Ye, Wenhua; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Shaoping

    2016-08-01

    The low-mode radiation flux asymmetry in the hohlraum is a main source of performance degradation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) implosion experiments. To counteract the deleterious effects of the large positive P2 flux asymmetry during the peak drive, this paper develops a new tuning method called asymmetric-shell ignition capsule design which adopts the intentionally asymmetric CH ablator layer or deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. A series of two-dimensional implosion simulations have been performed, and the results show that the intentionally asymmetric DT ice layer can significantly improve the fuel ρR symmetry, hot spot shape, hot spot internal energy, and the final neutron yield compared to the spherical capsule. This indicates that the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design is an effective tuning method, while the CH ablator asymmetric-shell capsule could not correct the fuel ρR asymmetry, and it is not as effective as the DT asymmetric-shell capsule design.

  6. Formation and conversion of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical fiber induced by gamma rays irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J. X.; Luo, W. Y.; Xiao, Z. Y.; Wang, T. Y.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zeng, X. L.

    2010-02-15

    The formation and conversion processes of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical (LWPSM) fiber irradiated with gamma rays were investigated at room temperature using electron spin resonance. Germanium electron center (GEC) and self-trapped hole center (STH) occur when the fibers are irradiated with 1 and 5 kGy cumulative doses, respectively. With the increase in irradiation doses, the GEC defect centers disappear, and new defect centers such as E{sup '} centers (Si and Ge) and nonbridge oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) generate. The generation of GEC and STH is attributed to the electron transfer, which is completely balanced. This is the main reason that radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) of the LWPSM fiber is only 10 dB/km at communication window. The new defect centers come from the conversion of GEC and STH to E{sup '} centers and NBOHC, and the conversion processes cause bond cleavage, which is the root cause that the RIA of the LWPSM fiber significantly increases up to 180 dB/km at working window. Furthermore, the concentration of new defect centers is saturated easily even by increasing cumulative doses.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation for Multi-Mode Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy of crystalline materials: Effects of surface structure and excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzza, B.; Chelda, S.; Robert-Goumet, C.; Bideux, L.; Monier, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Multi-Mode Elastic Peak Electron Spectroscopy (MM-EPES) analysis is confined to incoherent electron elastic scattering and the use of variable primary energy. This experimental method is very sensitive to the surface region of the sample. However, for quantitative interpretation, the MM-EPES method needs jointly a Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulation of electron trajectories in the solid. In the present work, we proposed a new approach to calculate the percentage η e of elastic reflected electrons by the surface of a sample. This simulation takes into account the surface effects (i.e. surface plasmon), and the atoms arrangement in the substrate. The concept of the surface excitation parameter (SEP) is also presented. Computer simulations were performed on the three low index single crystals of Cu, Au, Si and Ag. The results confirm that the distribution of substrate atoms, according to the crystallographic structure, influences the intensity measured by EPES. A simple prediction formula was proposed to calculate η e for elastic electrons entering in a Retarding Field Analyzer (RFA) spectrometer which is the apparatus giving experimentally numerical values of the percentage η e.

  8. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  9. Nonwork and off-peak trips by transit, walk and bicycle modes: An understanding of existing and potential markets. Final report, 1 August 1996--28 February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Soeoet, S.; Sen, A.; Yang, D.; Dirks, L.; Sternberg, T.

    1999-03-01

    The study identifies the characteristics of neighborhoods that contribute to off-peak transit, walk or bike use. The emphasis is on off-peak and nonwork trips and how to promote modes other than the automobile. By producing thirty maps illustrating socioeconomic and travel behavior patterns in the Chicago area, the potential for stabilizing and then increasing the utilization of these modes is examined. Substantial amounts of data were processed and reported. For example, off-peak trips, accounting for 48% of daily travel, are shorter than trips during the peak (in miles and minutes) for travel by both public transit and by private vehicle. Regionally, walking trips vary from 42% of all trips made by Chicago CBD residents (mainly to shop and work), 17% in the rest of the city and less than 5% in suburban Chicago. Bicycle ownership is related to the number of vehicles in the household, household income, household size and distance from the Chicago CBD. These data and field observations of three case-study neighborhoods revealed that differences in modes used are related to the land-use patterns and the socioeconomic characteristics of the resident population. While areas with low automobile ownership rates might suggest walking and bicycling, these nonmotorized modes are more common in affluent neighborhoods with a large number of nearby commercial and recreational destinations.

  10. Quantum-dot saturable absorber and Kerr-lens mode-locked Yb:KGW laser with >450  kW of peak power.

    PubMed

    Akbari, R; Zhao, H; Fedorova, K A; Rafailov, E U; Major, A

    2016-08-15

    The hybrid action of quantum-dot saturable absorber and Kerr-lens mode locking in a diode-pumped Yb:KGW laser was demonstrated. Using a quantum-dot saturable absorber with a 0.7% (0.5%) modulation depth, the mode-locked laser delivered 90 fs (93 fs) pulses with 3.2 W (2.9 W) of average power at the repetition rate of 77 MHz, corresponding to 462 kW (406 kW) of peak power and 41 nJ (38 nJ) of pulse energy. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest average and peak powers generated to date from quantum-dot saturable absorber-based mode-locked lasers. PMID:27519085

  11. Splitting of the zero-bias conductance peak as smoking gun evidence for the existence of the Majorana mode in a superconductor-semiconductor nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Sarma, S.; Sau, Jay D.; Stanescu, Tudor D.

    2012-12-01

    Recent observations of a zero-bias conductance peak in tunneling transport measurements in superconductor-semiconductor nanowire devices provide evidence for the predicted zero-energy Majorana modes, but not the conclusive proof of their existence. We establish that direct observation of a splitting of the zero-bias conductance peak can serve as the smoking gun evidence for the existence of the Majorana mode. We show that the splitting has an oscillatory dependence on the Zeeman field (chemical potential) at fixed chemical potential (Zeeman field). By contrast, when the density is constant rather than the chemical potential—the likely situation in the current experimental setups—the splitting oscillations are generically suppressed. Our theory predicts the conditions under which the splitting oscillations can serve as the smoking gun for the experimental confirmation of the elusive Majorana mode.

  12. Continental rift jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Charles A.

    1983-05-01

    Continental rift jumps, analogous to jumps of oceanic spreading ridges, are here proposed to be common. Good examples exist in Iceland and Afar (both transitional from ridge to rift jumps), West Africa (Benue Trough and Cameroon Volcanic Line), and Kenya. Indeed, the Kenya rift appears to have jumped c. 100 km eastward c. 10 m.y. ago and is currently jumping further to the east. Possible jumps exist in the Baikal rift, the Limagne-Bresse rift pair, and parallel to ancient continental margins (e.g., the Triassic basins of the eastern U.S. to Baltimore Canyon and Georges Bank). Continental rifts jump distances that are approximately equal to local lithosphere thickness, suggesting that jumped rifts are controlled by lithosphere fracturing, but there appears to be no reason for the fracturing except migration of hot spots.

  13. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  14. All-fiber quasi-continuous wave supercontinuum generation in single-mode high-nonlinear fiber pumped by submicrosecond pulse with low peak power.

    PubMed

    Gao, Weiqing; Liao, Meisong; Yan, Xin; Suzuki, Takenobu; Ohishi, Yasutake

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate quasi-continuous wave supercontinuum generation in a single-mode high-nonlinear fiber (HNLF) in 1.55 μm band, which is pumped by the amplified passively Q-switched submicrosecond pulse. The pump wavelength is in the normal dispersion region of HNLF and near to the zero-dispersion wavelength. The broad SC spectral range from 1200 to 2260 nm is obtained with the low pump peak power of 17.8 W. The 20 dB bandwidth of 922 nm from 1285 to 2207 nm is obtained with the assumption that the peak near 1560 nm is filtered. The spectrum density for the 20 dB bandwidth is from -27.5 to -7.5 dbm/nm. PMID:22614410

  15. High average/peak power linearly polarized all-fiber picosecond MOPA seeded by mode-locked noise-like pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H. L.; Ma, P. F.; Tao, R. M.; Wang, X. L.; Zhou, P.; Chen, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    The characteristics of mode-locked noise-like pulses generated from a passively mode-locked fiber oscillator are experimentally investigated. By carefully adjusting the two polarization controllers, stable mode-locked noise-like pulse emission with a high radio frequency signal/noise ratio of  >55 dB is successfully achieved, ensuring the safety and possibility of high power amplification. To investigate the amplification characteristics of such pulses, one all-fiber master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) is built to boost the power and energy of such pulses. Amplified noise-like pulses with average output power of 423 W, repetition rate of 18.71 MHz, pulse energy of 22.61 μJ, pulse duration of 72.1 ps and peak power of 314 kW are obtained. Near diffraction-limited beam is also demonstrated with M2 factor measured at full power operation of ~1.2 in the X and Y directions. The polarization extinction ratio at output power of 183 W is measured to be ~13 dB. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of high-power amplification of noise-like pulses and the highest peak power ever reported in all-fiber picosecond MOPAs. The temporal self-compression process of such pulses and high peak power when amplified make it an ideal pump source for generation of high-power supercontinuum. Other potential applications, such as material processing and optical coherent tomography, could also be foreseen.

  16. Potential for Non-Contact ACL Injury Between Step-Close-Jump and Hop-Jump Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li-I; Gu, Chin-Yi; Chen, Wei-Ling; Chang, Mu-San

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the kinematics and kinetics during the landing of hop-jump and step-close-jump movements in order to provide further inferring that the potential risk of ACL injuries. Eleven elite male volleyball players were recruited to perform hop-jump and step-close-jump tasks. Lower extremity kinematics and ground reaction forces during landing in stop-jump tasks were recorded. Lower extremity kinetics was calculated by using an inverse dynamic process. Step-close-jump tasks demonstrated smaller peak proximal tibia anterior shear forces during the landing phase. In step-close-jump tasks, increasing hip joint angular velocity during initial foot-ground contact decreased peak posterior ground reaction force during the landing phase, which theoretically could reduce the risk of ACL injury. Key points The different landing techniques required for these two stop-jump tasks do not necessarily affect the jump height. Hop-jump decreased the hip joint angular velocity at initial foot contact with ground, which could lead to an increasing peak posterior GRF during the landing phase. Hop-jump decreased hip and knee joint angular flexion displacement during the landing, which could increase the peak vertical loading rate during the landing phase. PMID:24149397

  17. A cockroach that jumps.

    PubMed

    Picker, Mike; Colville, Jonathan F; Burrows, Malcolm

    2012-06-23

    We report on a newly discovered cockroach (Saltoblattella montistabularis) from South Africa, which jumps and therefore differs from all other extant cockroaches that have a scuttling locomotion. In its natural shrubland habitat, jumping and hopping accounted for 71 per cent of locomotory activity. Jumps are powered by rapid and synchronous extension of the hind legs that are twice the length of the other legs and make up 10 per cent of the body weight. In high-speed images of the best jumps the body was accelerated in 10 ms to a take-off velocity of 2.1 m s(-1) so that the cockroach experienced the equivalent of 23 times gravity while leaping a forward distance of 48 times its body length. Such jumps required 38 µJ of energy, a power output of 3.4 mW and exerted a ground reaction force through both hind legs of 4 mN. The large hind legs have grooved femora into which the tibiae engage fully in advance of a jump, and have resilin, an elastic protein, at the femoro-tibial joint. The extensor tibiae muscles contracted for 224 ms before the hind legs moved, indicating that energy must be stored and then released suddenly in a catapult action to propel a jump. Overall, the jumping mechanisms and anatomical features show remarkable convergence with those of grasshoppers with whom they share their habitat and which they rival in jumping performance. PMID:22158737

  18. Jumping Good Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    Jumping rope is an activity that can be fun and enjoyable for all students. It requires minimal activity space, can be performed individually or in small groups, and is an inexpensive way to engage students in a lifelong physical activity. Jumping rope is commonly used by coaches and athletes for training purposes to improve aerobic endurance,…

  19. Optimal Ski Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rebilas, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Consider a skier who goes down a takeoff ramp, attains a speed "V", and jumps, attempting to land as far as possible down the hill below (Fig. 1). At the moment of takeoff the angle between the skier's velocity and the horizontal is [alpha]. What is the optimal angle [alpha] that makes the jump the longest possible for the fixed magnitude of the…

  20. 23-kW peak power femtosecond pulses from a mode-locked fiber ring laser at 2.8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duval, Simon; Olivier, Michel; Fortin, Vincent; Bernier, Martin; Piché, Michel; Vallée, Réal

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of soliton femtosecond fiber lasers emitting at 2.8 μm opens a new avenue for the generation of ultrashort pulses in the mid-infrared spectral region. In this paper, we investigate the peak power scalability of such lasers. By optimizing the output coupling ratio and the length of the Er3+: fluoride fiber in the cavity, we demonstrate the generation of 270-fs pulses with an energy of 7 nJ and an estimated peak power of 23 kW. These record performances at 2.8 μm surpass by far those obtained from standard soliton lasers at 1.55 μm. A numerical model of the laser including the effect of the intracavity atmospheric absorption is also presented. Numerical simulations agree well with the experimental results and suggest that the atmospheric propagation in the cavity could prevent the laser from self-starting in a mode-locked regime. This femtosecond laser could be the building block for simple and compact mid-infrared frequency combs and supercontinuum sources.

  1. Biomechanical analysis of the jump shot in basketball.

    PubMed

    Struzik, Artur; Pietraszewski, Bogdan; Zawadzki, Jerzy

    2014-09-29

    Basketball players usually score points during the game using the jump shot. For this reason, the jump shot is considered to be the most important element of technique in basketball and requires a high level of performance. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of the lower limbs during a jump shot without the ball and a countermovement jump without an arm swing. The differences between variables provide information about the potential that an athlete can utilise during a game when performing a jump shot. The study was conducted among 20 second-league basketball players by means of a Kistler force plate and the BTS SMART system for motion analysis. The variables measured included the take-off time, mean power, peak power, relative mean power, jump height, maximum landing force and calculated impact ratio. Surprisingly, more advantageous variables were found for the jump shot. This finding suggests a very high performance level in the jump shot in the studied group and a maximum utilisation of their motor abilities. Both types of jumps were characterised by high mean and peak power values and average heights. The high forces at landing, which result in considerable impact ratios, may have prompted the studied group to land softly. Use of the countermovement jump without an arm swing is recommended to assess and predict the progression of player's jumping ability. PMID:25414741

  2. How coalescing droplets jump.

    PubMed

    Enright, Ryan; Miljkovic, Nenad; Sprittles, James; Nolan, Kevin; Mitchell, Robert; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-10-28

    Surface engineering at the nanoscale is a rapidly developing field that promises to impact a range of applications including energy production, water desalination, self-cleaning and anti-icing surfaces, thermal management of electronics, microfluidic platforms, and environmental pollution control. As the area advances, more detailed insights of dynamic wetting interactions on these surfaces are needed. In particular, the coalescence of two or more droplets on ultra-low adhesion surfaces leads to droplet jumping. Here we show, through detailed measurements of jumping droplets during water condensation coupled with numerical simulations of binary droplet coalescence, that this process is fundamentally inefficient with only a small fraction of the available excess surface energy (≲ 6%) convertible into translational kinetic energy. These findings clarify the role of internal fluid dynamics during the jumping droplet coalescence process and underpin the development of systems that can harness jumping droplets for a wide range of applications. PMID:25171210

  3. Jump for the Moon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Increase bone strength and improve heart and other muscle endurance by performing jump training with a rope, both while stationary and moving. The Train Like an Astronaut project uses the excitemen...

  4. Suicide by Jumping.

    PubMed

    Beautrais, Annette

    2007-01-01

    Research on suicide by jumping is summarized. The incidence of suicide by this method varies but tends to be higher in cities, city states, or countries that have extensive high-rise housing. Most suicides by jumping occur from high-rise residential housing units. However, our knowledge about suicide by jumping tends to be limited to a small number of reports from sites, often bridges, which become well-known as places from which to take one's life. Media reports of newsworthy suicides from these sites appear to encourage imitative behavior. Prevention strategies have focused upon limiting suicides from iconic sites by surveillance, barriers, muted media reporting, and signage offering help and telephone hotlines. A small number of studies provides evidence that installing barriers at popular jumping sites reduces suicides from those sites. There are few reports of efforts to reduce suicides from high-rise residential buildings. PMID:26212196

  5. BIOMECHANICS. Jumping on water: Surface tension-dominated jumping of water striders and robotic insects.

    PubMed

    Koh, Je-Sung; Yang, Eunjin; Jung, Gwang-Pil; Jung, Sun-Pill; Son, Jae Hak; Lee, Sang-Im; Jablonski, Piotr G; Wood, Robert J; Kim, Ho-Young; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2015-07-31

    Jumping on water is a unique locomotion mode found in semi-aquatic arthropods, such as water striders. To reproduce this feat in a surface tension-dominant jumping robot, we elucidated the hydrodynamics involved and applied them to develop a bio-inspired impulsive mechanism that maximizes momentum transfer to water. We found that water striders rotate the curved tips of their legs inward at a relatively low descending velocity with a force just below that required to break the water surface (144 millinewtons/meter). We built a 68-milligram at-scale jumping robotic insect and verified that it jumps on water with maximum momentum transfer. The results suggest an understanding of the hydrodynamic phenomena used by semi-aquatic arthropods during water jumping and prescribe a method for reproducing these capabilities in artificial systems. PMID:26228144

  6. Chasing maximal performance: a cautionary tale from the celebrated jumping frogs of Calaveras County.

    PubMed

    Astley, H C; Abbott, E M; Azizi, E; Marsh, R L; Roberts, T J

    2013-11-01

    Maximal performance is an essential metric for understanding many aspects of an organism's biology, but it can be difficult to determine because a measured maximum may reflect only a peak level of effort, not a physiological limit. We used a unique opportunity provided by a frog jumping contest to evaluate the validity of existing laboratory estimates of maximum jumping performance in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana). We recorded video of 3124 bullfrog jumps over the course of the 4-day contest at the Calaveras County Jumping Frog Jubilee, and determined jump distance from these images and a calibration of the jump arena. Frogs were divided into two groups: 'rental' frogs collected by fair organizers and jumped by the general public, and frogs collected and jumped by experienced, 'professional' teams. A total of 58% of recorded jumps surpassed the maximum jump distance in the literature (1.295 m), and the longest jump was 2.2 m. Compared with rental frogs, professionally jumped frogs jumped farther, and the distribution of jump distances for this group was skewed towards long jumps. Calculated muscular work, historical records and the skewed distribution of jump distances all suggest that the longest jumps represent the true performance limit for this species. Using resampling, we estimated the probability of observing a given jump distance for various sample sizes, showing that large sample sizes are required to detect rare maximal jumps. These results show the importance of sample size, animal motivation and physiological conditions for accurate maximal performance estimates. PMID:24133149

  7. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  8. A Noise Reduction Method for Dual-Mass Micro-Electromechanical Gyroscopes Based on Sample Entropy Empirical Mode Decomposition and Time-Frequency Peak Filtering.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chong; Li, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Shi, Yunbo; Tang, Jun; Cao, Huiliang; Liu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The different noise components in a dual-mass micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) gyroscope structure is analyzed in this paper, including mechanical-thermal noise (MTN), electronic-thermal noise (ETN), flicker noise (FN) and Coriolis signal in-phase noise (IPN). The structure equivalent electronic model is established, and an improved white Gaussian noise reduction method for dual-mass MEMS gyroscopes is proposed which is based on sample entropy empirical mode decomposition (SEEMD) and time-frequency peak filtering (TFPF). There is a contradiction in TFPS, i.e., selecting a short window length may lead to good preservation of signal amplitude but bad random noise reduction, whereas selecting a long window length may lead to serious attenuation of the signal amplitude but effective random noise reduction. In order to achieve a good tradeoff between valid signal amplitude preservation and random noise reduction, SEEMD is adopted to improve TFPF. Firstly, the original signal is decomposed into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) by EMD, and the SE of each IMF is calculated in order to classify the numerous IMFs into three different components; then short window TFPF is employed for low frequency component of IMFs, and long window TFPF is employed for high frequency component of IMFs, and the noise component of IMFs is wiped off directly; at last the final signal is obtained after reconstruction. Rotation experimental and temperature experimental are carried out to verify the proposed SEEMD-TFPF algorithm, the verification and comparison results show that the de-noising performance of SEEMD-TFPF is better than that achievable with the traditional wavelet, Kalman filter and fixed window length TFPF methods. PMID:27258276

  9. Manipulation of polystyrene nanoparticles on a silicon wafer in the peak force tapping mode in water: pH-dependent friction and adhesion force

    SciTech Connect

    Schiwek, Simon; Stark, Robert W. E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de; Dietz, Christian E-mail: dietz@csi.tu-darmstadt.de; Heim, Lars-Oliver

    2015-03-14

    The friction force between nanoparticles and a silicon wafer is a crucial parameter for cleaning processes in the semiconductor industry. However, little is known about the pH-dependency of the friction forces and the shear strength at the interface. Here, we push polystyrene nanoparticles, 100 nm in diameter, with the tip of an atomic force microscope and measure the pH-dependency of the friction, adhesion, and normal forces on a silicon substrate covered with a native silicon dioxide layer. The peak force tapping mode was applied to control the vertical force on these particles. We successively increased the applied load until the particles started to move. The main advantage of this technique over single manipulation processes is the achievement of a large number of manipulation events in short time and in a straightforward manner. Geometrical considerations of the interaction forces at the tip-particle interface allowed us to calculate the friction force and shear strength from the applied normal force depending on the pH of an aqueous solution. The results clearly demonstrated that particle removal should be performed with a basic solution at pH 9 because of the low interaction forces between particle and substrate.

  10. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  11. Egg Bungee Jump!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike; Brand, Lance

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors present an egg bungee jumping activity. This activity introduces students to ways that engineers might apply calculations of failure to meet a challenge. Students are required to use common, everyday materials such as rubber bands, string, plastic bags, and eggs. They will apply technological problem solving, material…

  12. Jump into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen; Cohen, Ann; Meyer, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Jump Into Action (JIA) is a school-based team-taught program to help fifth-grade students make healthy food choices and be more active. The JIA team (physical education teacher, classroom teacher, school nurse, and parent) work together to provide a supportive environment as students set goals to improve food choices and increase activity.…

  13. Walking and jumping spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    The Equisetum plants, more commonly called ``horsetail,'' emit 50-microns spores that are spherical in shape and present four hygroscopic arms. Under high humidity, the arms are retracted. But under lower humidity, less than 70%, the four arms deploy beautifully. With time-lapse image recordings, we show that under repeated cycles of dry and high humidity, the spores behave as random walkers, since they move by about their size in a different direction at every cycle. The process is apparently stochastic because of the complex shape of the arms and hysteretic friction of the arms on the ground. For some spores, a decrease in humidity level results in very fast jumps, the spores taking off at a typical velocity of a meter per second, as recorded on high-speed camera. With these jumps, they reach centimetric elevations, much larger than their size. The physical mechanism at the root of these ``Levy-flight'' jumps is still under investigation. The walking and jumping phenomena thus provide motility, which we believe is helpful for the understanding of the biological dispersion of the spores. It could also bring biomimetic inspiration to engineer new motile elastic structures.

  14. Bilateral asymmetries in max effort single-leg vertical jumps.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Thomas M; Lawson, Brooke R; Reiser, Raoul F

    2005-01-01

    While asymmetries in the lower extremity during jumping may have implications during rehabilitation, it is not clear if healthy subjects should be expected to jump equivalently on each leg. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine if asymmetries exist in maximal effort single-leg vertical jumps. After obtaining university-approved informed consent, 13 men and 12 women with competitive volleyball playing experience and no injuries of the lower-extremity that would predispose them to asymmetries participated. After thorough warm-up, five maximal effort vertical jumps with countermovement were performed on each leg (random order) with ground reaction forces and lower extremity kinematics recorded. The best three jumps from each leg were analyzed, assigning the leg with the highest jump height average as the dominant side. Asymmetry was assessed by determining statistical significance in the dominant versus non-dominant sides (p < 0.05). A significant interaction existed between side and gender for thigh length and peak vertical ground reaction force. Women had a significantly shorter thigh and men a greater peak vertical ground reaction force on their dominant side. All other parameters were assessed as whole group. Jumps were significantly greater off the dominant leg (2.8 cm on average). No other differences between sides were observed. Significant differences in magnitude (p < 0.05) existed between the men and women in jump height, several anthropometric parameters, minimum ankle and hip angles, and vertical ground reaction forces (peak and average). In conclusion, though a person may jump slightly higher on one leg relative to the other, and women may jump slightly differently than men, the magnitude of the difference should be relatively small and due to the multi-factorial nature of jump performance, individual parameters related to performance may not be consistently different. PMID:15850125

  15. Jumping of water striders on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eunjin; Son, Jaehak; Jablonski, Piotr; Kim, Ho-Young

    2012-11-01

    Small insects such as water striders, springtails, fishing spiders freely move on water by adopting various modes of locomotion, such as rowing, galloping, jumping and meniscus-climbing. As the physics of jumping have not yet been fully understood among those ways of semi-aquatic propulsion, here we present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the dynamics of water striders leaping off water. We first image and analyze the trajectories of the legs and body of jumping water striders of three different species with a high-speed camera. We then theoretically compute the forces acting on the body by considering the capillary interaction between the flexible legs and deforming water meniscus. Our theory enables us to predict the maximum take-off speed for given leg lengths. The experimental measurements suggest that the water striders drive their legs near the optimal speed to gain the maximum take-off speed.

  16. Jump with Jill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Jill Jayne, who was working as a registered nutritionist in the New York City public school system when she was assigned to a group of 25 urban students in an after-school program in East Harlem. In the spring of 2006, Jayne took her "Jump With Jill" show to the streets outside Central Park, collected tips in a tin pot and,…

  17. Jumping hoops on water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eunjin; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    Small aquatic arthropods, such as water striders and fishing spiders, are able to jump off water to a height several times their body length. Inspired by the unique biological motility on water, we study a simple model using a flexible hoop to provide fundamental understanding and a mimicking principle of small jumpers on water. Behavior of a hoop on water, which is coated with superhydrophobic particles and initially bent into an ellipse from an equilibrium circular shape, is visualized with a high speed camera upon launching it into air by releasing its initial elastic strain energy. We observe that jumping of our hoops is dominated by the dynamic pressure of water rather than surface tension, and thus it corresponds to the dynamic condition experienced by fishing spiders. We calculate the reaction forces provided by water adopting the unsteady Bernoulli equation as well as the momentum loss into liquid inertia and viscous friction. Our analysis allows us to predict the jumping efficiency of the hoop on water in comparison to that on ground, and to discuss the evolutionary pressure rendering fishing spiders select such dynamic behavior.

  18. Correlation between toe flexor strength and ankle dorsiflexion ROM during the countermovement jump

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sung Joon; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Weon, Jong-Hyuck; Kim, Young; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Yun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the relationships between peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen healthy volunteers participated in the study. Each participant completed tests for peak toe flexor muscle strength, ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, and countermovement jump height. [Results] The results showed (1) a moderate correlation between ankle dorsiflexion range of motion and countermovement jump height and (2) a high correlation between peak first toe flexor muscle strength and countermovement jump height. Peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion are the main contributors to countermovement jump performance. [Conclusion] These findings indicate that the measurement of peak first toe flexor muscle strength and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion may be useful in clinical practice for improving jump performance in athletes training for sports such as volleyball and basketball.

  19. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  20. Particle jumps in structural glasses.

    PubMed

    Ciamarra, Massimo Pica; Pastore, Raffaele; Coniglio, Antonio

    2016-01-14

    Particles in structural glasses rattle around temporary equilibrium positions, that seldom change through a process which is much faster than the relaxation time, known as particle jump. Since the relaxation of the system is due to the accumulation of many such jumps, it could be possible to connect the single particle short time motion to the macroscopic relaxation by understanding the features of the jump dynamics. Here we review recent results in this research direction, clarifying the features of particle jumps that have been understood and those that are still under investigation, and examining the role of particle jumps in different theories of the glass transition. PMID:26481331

  1. Lift-off dynamics in a simple jumping robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Jeffrey; Lesov, Alex; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2013-03-01

    Jumping is an important behavior utilized by animals to escape predation, hunt, reach higher ground, and as a primary mode of locomotion. Many mathematical and physical robot models use numerous parameters and multi-link legs to accurately model jumping dynamics. However, a simple robot model can reveal important principles of high performance jumping. We study vertical jumping in a simple robot comprising an actuated mass-spring arrangement. The actuator frequency and phase are systematically varied to find optimal performance. Optimal jumps occur above and below (but not at) the robot's resonant frequency f0. Two distinct jumping modes emerge: a simple jump which is optimal above f0 is achievable with a squat maneuver, and a peculiar stutter jump which is optimal below f0 is generated with a counter-movement. A simple dynamical model reveals how optimal lift-off results from non-resonant transient dynamics. An expanded explanation of this work is provided at http://crablab.gatech.edu/pages/jumpingrobot/index.html This work was supported by the GEM Consortium, Burroughs Wellcome Fund, ARL MAST CTA, and NSF PoLS.

  2. Relationship between sprint ability and loaded/unloaded jump tests in elite sprinters.

    PubMed

    Loturco, Irineu; DʼAngelo, Ricardo A; Fernandes, Victor; Gil, Saulo; Kobal, Ronaldo; Cal Abad, Cesar C; Kitamura, Katia; Nakamura, Fabio Y

    2015-03-01

    The neuromechanical determinants of sprint running performance have been investigated in team sports athletes and non-elite sprinters. The aim of this study was to quantify the relationships between kinetic and performance parameters, obtained in loaded and unloaded vertical and horizontal jumps, and sprinting in elite athletes. Twenty-two sprinters performed squat jumps, countermovement jumps, horizontal jumps, and jump squats with different loads on a force platform, in addition to a 50-m sprint. Results indicated that jumping height and distance in vertical and horizontal jumps are more strongly correlated (R ≈ 0.81) to sprinting speed than the respective peak forces (R ≈ 0.36). Furthermore, the optimum load generating the maximum power in the jump squat is also highly correlated to sprint performance (R ≈ 0.72). These results reveal that vertical and horizontal jump tests may be used by coaches for assessing and monitoring qualities related to sprinting performance in elite sprinters. PMID:25162648

  3. Exploring Lightning Jump Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chronis, Themis; Carey, Larry D.; Schultz, Christopher J.; Schultz, Elise; Calhoun, Kristin; Goodman, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with the characteristics of storms exhibiting an abrupt temporal increase in the total lightning flash rate (i.e., lightning jump, LJ). An automated storm tracking method is used to identify storm "clusters" and total lightning activity from three different lightning detection systems over Oklahoma, northern Alabama and Washington, D.C. On average and for different employed thresholds, the clusters that encompass at least one LJ (LJ1) last longer, relate to higher Maximum Expected Size of Hail, Vertical Integrated Liquid and lightning flash rates (area-normalized) than the clusters that did not exhibit any LJ (LJ0). The respective mean values for LJ1 (LJ0) clusters are 80 min (35 min), 14 mm (8 mm), 25 kg per square meter (18 kg per square meter) and 0.05 flash per min per square kilometer (0.01 flash per min per square kilometer). Furthermore, the LJ1 clusters are also characterized by slower decaying autocorrelation functions, a result that implies a less "random" behavior in the temporal flash rate evolution. In addition, the temporal occurrence of the last LJ provides an estimate of the time remaining to the storm's dissipation. Depending of the LJ strength (i.e., varying thresholds), these values typically range between 20-60 min, with stronger jumps indicating more time until storm decay. This study's results support the hypothesis that the LJ is a proxy for the storm's kinematic and microphysical state rather than a coincidental value.

  4. Appropriate Loads for Peak-Power During Resisted Sprinting on a Non-Motorized Treadmill

    PubMed Central

    Andre, Matthew J.; Fry, Andrew C.; Lane, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the load which allows the highest peak power for resisted sprinting on a non-motorized treadmill and to determine if other variables are related to individual differences. Thirty college students were tested for vertical jump, vertical jump peak and mean power, 10 m sprint, 20 m sprint, leg press 1 RM, leg press 1 RM relative to body weight, leg press 1 RM relative to lean body mass, leg press 1 RM power, and leg press power at 80% of 1 RM. Participants performed eight resisted sprints on a non-motorized treadmill, with increasing relative loads expressed as percent of body weight. Sprint peak power was measured for each load. Pearson correlations were used to determine if relationships between the sprint peak power load and the other variables were significant. The sprint peak power load had a mode of 35% with 73% of all participants having a relative sprint peak power load between 25–35%. Significant correlations occurred between sprint peak power load and body weight, lean body mass, vertical jump peak and mean power, leg press 1 RM, leg press 1 RM relative to lean body mass, leg press 1 RM power, and leg press power at 80% of 1 RM (r = 0.44, 0.43, 0.39, 0.37, 0.47, 0.39, 0.46, and 0.47, respectively). Larger, stronger, more powerful athletes produced peak power at a higher relative load during resisted sprinting on a non-motorized treadmill. PMID:24233103

  5. 140-fs duration and 60-W peak power blue-violet optical pulses generated by a dispersion-compensated GaInN mode-locked semiconductor laser diode using a nonlinear pulse compressor.

    PubMed

    Kono, Shunsuke; Watanabe, Hideki; Koda, Rintaro; Fuutagawa, Noriyuki; Narui, Hironobu

    2015-12-14

    Blue-violet optical pulses of 140-fs duration and 60-W peak power were obtained from a dispersion-compensated GaInN mode-locked semiconductor laser diode using a nonlinear pulse compression technique. Wavelength-dependent group velocity dispersion expressed by third-order phase dispersion was applied to the optical pulses using a pulse compressor with a spatial light modulator. The obtained optical pulses had the shortest duration ever obtained for a mode-locked semiconductor laser diode using edge-emitting type devices. PMID:26698968

  6. Thersites: a `jumping' Trojan?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiganis, K.; Dvorak, R.; Pilat-Lohinger, E.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, we examine the dynamical evolution of the asteroid (1868) Thersites, a member of the Trojan belt. Thersites is librating around the Lagrangian point L_4, following, however, a chaotic orbit. The equations of motion for Thersites as well as for a distribution of neighboring initial conditions are integrated numerically for 50 million years in the Outer Solar System model (OSS), which consists of the Sun and the four giant planets. Our results indicate that the probability that this asteroid will eventually escape from the Trojan swarm is rather high. In fact, 20% from our initial distribution escaped within the integration time. Many of the remaining ones also show characteristic `jumps' in the orbital elements, especially the inclination. Secular resonances involving the nodes of the outer planets are found to be responsible for this chaotic behavior. The width of libration and eccentricity values that lead to grossly unstable orbits are calculated and compared with previously known results on the stability of the Trojans. Finally, a very interesting behavior has been observed for one of the escaping asteroids as he `jumped' from L_4 to L_5 where he remained performing a highly inclined libration for ~ 2 Myrs before escaping from the Trojan swarm. According to Homer, Thersites was not only the ugliest of all Greeks that took part in the Trojan war, but also had the most intolerable personality. His nasty habit of making fun of everybody cost him his life, as the last person for whom he spoke ironically about was Achilles, the mightiest warrior of all Greeks, who killed Thersites with just one punch!

  7. Kinematics of the long jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ajun; Zumerchik, John

    2000-03-01

    The long jump is one of the most natural events in track and field athletics. The jumper is allowed to run a 40-m runway at top speed and jump as far as possible from a takeoff board. It is an event in which the natural ability of the athlete plays a large role and technique is of secondary importance. The two most important factors in the long jump are speed and elevation.

  8. High peak-power picosecond pulse generation at 1.26 µm using a quantum-dot-based external-cavity mode-locked laser and tapered optical amplifier.

    PubMed

    Ding, Y; Aviles-Espinosa, R; Cataluna, M A; Nikitichev, D; Ruiz, M; Tran, M; Robert, Y; Kapsalis, A; Simos, H; Mesaritakis, C; Xu, T; Bardella, P; Rossetti, M; Krestnikov, I; Livshits, D; Montrosset, Ivo; Syvridis, D; Krakowski, M; Loza-Alvarez, P; Rafailov, E

    2012-06-18

    In this paper, we present the generation of high peak-power picosecond optical pulses in the 1.26 μm spectral band from a repetition-rate-tunable quantum-dot external-cavity passively mode-locked laser (QD-ECMLL), amplified by a tapered quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA). The laser emission wavelength was controlled through a chirped volume Bragg grating which was used as an external cavity output coupler. An average power of 208.2 mW, pulse energy of 321 pJ, and peak power of 30.3 W were achieved. Preliminary nonlinear imaging investigations indicate that this system is promising as a high peak-power pulsed light source for nonlinear bio-imaging applications across the 1.0 μm - 1.3 μm spectral range. PMID:22714493

  9. Jumping mechanisms and strategies in moths (Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Dorosenko, Marina

    2015-06-01

    To test whether jumping launches moths into the air, take-off by 58 species, ranging in mass from 0.1 to 220 mg, was captured in videos at 1000 frames s(-1). Three strategies for jumping were identified. First, rapid movements of both middle and hind legs provided propulsion while the wings remained closed. Second, middle and hind legs again provided propulsion but the wings now opened and flapped after take-off. Third, wing and leg movements both began before take-off and led to an earlier transition to powered flight. The middle and hind legs were of similar lengths and were between 10 and 130% longer than the front legs. The rapid depression of the trochantera and extension of the middle tibiae began some 3 ms before similar movements of the hind legs, but their tarsi lost contact with the ground before take-off. Acceleration times ranged from 10 ms in the lightest moths to 25 ms in the heaviest ones. Peak take-off velocities varied from 0.6 to 0.9 m s(-1) in all moths, with the fastest jump achieving a velocity of 1.2 m s(-1). The energy required to generate the fastest jumps was 1.1 µJ in lighter moths but rose to 62.1 µJ in heavier ones. Mean accelerations ranged from 26 to 90 m s(-2) and a maximum force of 9 G: was experienced. The highest power output was within the capability of normal muscle so that jumps were powered by direct contractions of muscles without catapult mechanisms or energy storage. PMID:25883381

  10. Physics and the Vertical Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offenbacher, Elmer L.

    1970-01-01

    The physics of vertical jumping is described as an interesting illustration for motivating students in a general physics course to master the kinematics and dynamics of one dimensional motion. The author suggests that mastery of the physical principles of the jump may promote understanding of certain biological phenomena, aspects of physical…

  11. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  12. Jump conditions in transonic equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Guazzotto, L.; Betti, R.; Jardin, S. C.

    2013-04-15

    In the present paper, the numerical calculation of transonic equilibria, first introduced with the FLOW code in Guazzotto et al.[Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)], is critically reviewed. In particular, the necessity and effect of imposing explicit jump conditions at the transonic discontinuity are investigated. It is found that 'standard' (low-{beta}, large aspect ratio) transonic equilibria satisfy the correct jump condition with very good approximation even if the jump condition is not explicitly imposed. On the other hand, it is also found that high-{beta}, low aspect ratio equilibria require the correct jump condition to be explicitly imposed. Various numerical approaches are described to modify FLOW to include the jump condition. It is proved that the new methods converge to the correct solution even in extreme cases of very large {beta}, while they agree with the results obtained with the old implementation of FLOW in lower-{beta} equilibria.

  13. The circular internal hydraulic jump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, S. A.; Kavcic, I.

    Circular hydraulic jumps are familiar in single layers. Here we report the discovery of similar jumps in two-layer flows. A thin jet of fluid impinging vertically onto a rigid horizontal plane surface submerged in a deep layer of less-dense miscible fluid spreads radially, and a near-circular internal jump forms within a few centimetres from the point of impact with the plane surface. A jump is similarly formed as a jet of relatively less-dense fluid rises to the surface of a deep layer of fluid, but it appears less stable or permanent in form. Several experiments are made to examine the case of a downward jet onto a horizontal plate, the base of a square or circular container. The inlet Reynolds numbers, Re, of the jet range from 112 to 1790. Initially jumps have an undular, laminar form with typically 2-4 stationary waves on the interface between the dense and less-dense layers but, as the depth of the dense layer beyond the jump increases, the transitions become more abrupt and turbulent, resulting in mixing between the two layers. During the transition to a turbulent regime, single and sometimes moving multiple cusps are observed around the periphery of jumps. A semi-empirical model is devised that relates the parameters of the laboratory experiment, i.e. flow rate, inlet nozzle radius, kinematic viscosity and reduced gravity, to the layer depth beyond the jump and the radius at which an undular jump occurs. The experiments imply that surface tension is not an essential ingredient in the formation of circular hydraulic jumps and demonstrate that stationary jumps can exist in stratified shear flows which can be represented as two discrete layers. No stationary circular undular jumps are found, however, in the case of a downward jet of dense fluid when the overlying, less-dense, fluid is stratified, but a stationary turbulent transition is observed. This has implications for the existence of stationary jumps in continuously stratified geophysical flows: results

  14. LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz, Erhan; Dogan, Muhammet; Koksal, Oguz Kagan

    2013-04-01

    The LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of tantalum have been calculated for the first time by the mass attenuation coefficients determined using narrow transmission geometry, primary source (241Am annular radioisotope source) and secondary source targets (Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Tb, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Cu, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, Pt, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi). The obtained results have been compared with theoretical values. They are in good agreement with each other.

  15. Evaluation of Metabolic Stress between Jumping at Different Cadences on the Digi-Jump Machine

    PubMed Central

    LYONS, THOMAS S.; NAVALTA, JAMES W.; CALLAHAN, ZACHARY J.

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that healthy adults achieve a minimum of thirty minutes of moderate intensity aerobic exercise five days per week. While cycling, walking, and jogging are commonly observed methods of achieving these recommendations, another option may be repetitive jumping. The purpose of this study was to examine the metabolic responses between repetitive jumping at a cadence of 120 jumps per minute (JPMs) vs. 100 JPMs when utilizing the Digi-Jump machine. Twenty-eight subjects completed two jumping trials, one at 120 JPMs and one at 100 JPMs. Subjects jumped until volitional exhaustion, or for a maximum of fifteen minutes. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed each minute of each exercise trial. RPE was differentiated, in that subjects reported perceived exertion of their total body, their upper-leg, and their lower leg. Results of this study indicated that there was no significant difference between the two trials for VO2, HR, or total body RPE. Differences were reported between trials for peak and average RER, with the 120 JPM trial eliciting a lower RER for both (peak: 1.08 ± .087 vs. 1.17 ± .1 p=.000; average: .99 ± .076 vs. 1.04 ± .098 p=.002), peak upper leg RPE (120: 15.29 ± 3.89 vs. 100: 16.75 ± 2.52 p=.022), and average lower leg RPE (120: 15.04 ± 2.55 vs. 100: 13.94 ± 2.02 p=.019). Also, there was a significant difference in exercise duration between the trials, with subjects able to exercise longer during the 120 JPM trial (12.4 ± 3.42 mins vs. 9.68 ± 4.31 mins p=.000). These data indicate that while the physiological stress may not be different between the two trials as indicated by VO2 and HR, the 120 JPM trial appears less strenuous as evidenced by RER values and by subjects’ ability to exercise longer at that cadence. PMID:27182351

  16. Aeromechanics of the Spider Cricket Jump: How to Jump 60+ Times Your Body Length and Still Land on Your Feet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Emily; Deshler, Nicolas; Gorman, David; Neves, Catarina; Mittal, Rajat

    2015-11-01

    Flapping, gliding, running, crawling and swimming have all been studied extensively in the past and have served as a source of inspiration for engineering designs. In the current project, we explore a mode of locomotion that straddles ground and air: jumping. The subject of our study is among the most proficient of long-jumpers in Nature: the spider cricket of the family Rhaphidophoridae, which can jump more than 60 times its body length. Despite jumping this immense distance, these crickets usually land on their feet, indicating an ability to control their posture during ``flight.'' We employ high-speed videogrammetry, to examine the jumps and to track the crickets' posture and appendage orientation throughout their jumps. Simple aerodynamic models are developed to predict the aerodynamic forces and moment on the crickets during `flight`. The analysis shows that these wingless insects employ carefully controlled and coordinated positioning of the limbs during flight so as to increase jump distance and to stabilize body posture during flight. The principles distilled from this study could serve as an inspiration for small jumping robots that can traverse complex terrains.

  17. Application of a tri-axial accelerometer to estimate jump frequency in volleyball.

    PubMed

    Jarning, Jon M; Mok, Kam-Ming; Hansen, Bjørge H; Bahr, Roald

    2015-03-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is prevalent among athletes, and most likely associated with a high jumping load. If methods for estimating jump frequency were available, this could potentially assist in understanding and preventing this condition. The objective of this study was to explore the possibility of using peak vertical acceleration (PVA) or peak resultant acceleration (PRA) measured by an accelerometer to estimate jump frequency. Twelve male elite volleyball players (22.5 ± 1.6 yrs) performed a training protocol consisting of seven typical motion patterns, including jumping and non-jumping movements. Accelerometer data from the trial were obtained using a tri-axial accelerometer. In addition, we collected video data from the trial. Jump-float serving and spike jumping could not be distinguished from non-jumping movements using differences in PVA or PRA. Furthermore, there were substantial inter-participant differences in both the PVA and the PRA within and across movement types (p < 0.05). These findings suggest that neither PVA nor PRA measured by a tri-axial accelerometer is an applicable method for estimating jump frequency in volleyball. A method for acquiring real-time estimates of jump frequency remains to be verified. However, there are several alternative approaches, and further investigations are needed. PMID:25902964

  18. Influence of a Horizontal Approach on the Mechanical Output during Drop Jumps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruan, Mianfang; Li, Li

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of a horizontal approach to mechanical output during drop jumps. Participants performed drop jumps from heights of 15, 30, 45, and 60 cm with zero, one, two, and three approach steps. The peak summed power during the push-off phase changed quadratically across heights (6.2 [plus or minus] 0.3, 6.7 [plus or…

  19. Hydraulic jumps with upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2013-11-01

    Hydraulic jumps in flows with background shear are investigated, motivated by applications such as the flow over sills in Knight Inlet and the Pre-Bosphorus Channel. The full solution space and allowable solutions to several two-layer theories for hydraulic jumps with upstream shear are identified. The two-layer theories considered, including a recent theory by Borden et al. (JFM, 2012), are distinguished by how dissipation is partitioned between the layers. It is found that upstream shear with a faster and thinner lower layer causes an increase in bore speed, for a given jump height. Further, these two-layer solutions only exist for a limited range of upstream shear. 2D numerical simulations are conducted, guided by the two-layer theory solution space, and the results are compared to the theories. The simulations show the qualitative types of hydraulic transitions that occur, including undular bores, fully turbulent jumps, and conjugate state-like solutions; the type depends on the jump height and upstream shear for fixed upstream layer depths. Numerical simulations are used to investigate the mixing. Finally, a few 3D numerical simulations were made and are found to be consistent with the 2D results.

  20. The Jumps: Contemporary Theory, Technique and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilt, Fred, Ed.

    This collection of essays offers a cross section of modern theory and progress in the training of the four "jumping" events in track and field athletics--pole vault, high jump, long jump, and triple jump. It is written for athletic coaches in these specialties. Articles range from general and historical reviews of technique and training matters to…

  1. Hydraulic jumps in inhomogeneous strongly coupled toroidal dust flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piel, Alexander; Wilms, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The inhomogeneous flow of strongly coupled dust particles in a toroidal particle trap with harmonic radial confinement is analyzed in the incompressible fluid limit. It is shown that the flow can spontaneously generate shock-like events, which are similar to the hydraulic jump in open channel flows. A definition of the Froude number for this model is given and the critical speed is recovered as the group velocity of surface waves. This hydraulic model is compared with molecular-dynamics simulations, which show that a sudden bifurcation of the flow lines and a localized temperature peak appear just at the point where the critical condition for the hydraulic jump is located.

  2. Effect of load positioning on the kinematics and kinetics of weighted vertical jumps.

    PubMed

    Swinton, Paul A; Stewart, Arthur D; Lloyd, Ray; Agouris, Ioannis; Keogh, Justin W L

    2012-04-01

    One of the most popular exercises for developing lower-body muscular power is the weighted vertical jump. The present study sought to examine the effect of altering the position of the external load on the kinematics and kinetics of the movement. Twenty-nine resistance-trained rugby union athletes performed maximal effort jumps with 0, 20, 40, and 60% of their squat 1 repetition maximum (1RM) with the load positioned (a) on the posterior aspect of the shoulder using a straight barbell and (b) at arms' length using a hexagonal barbell. Kinematic and kinetic variables were calculated through integration of the vertical ground reaction force data using a forward dynamics approach. Performance of the hexagonal barbell jump resulted in significantly (p < 0.05) greater values for jump height, peak force, peak power, and peak rate of force development compared with the straight barbell jump. Significantly (p < 0.05) greater peak power was produced during the unloaded jump compared with all trials where the external load was positioned on the shoulder. In contrast, significantly (p < 0.05) greater peak power was produced when using the hexagonal barbell combined with a load of 20% 1RM compared with all other conditions investigated. The results suggest that weighted vertical jumps should be performed with the external load positioned at arms' length rather than on the shoulder when attempting to improve lower-body muscular performance. PMID:22446664

  3. Effect of ankle kinesio taping on vertical jump with run-up and countermovement jump in athletes with ankle functional instability.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Chang, Chih-Han; Wu, Hong-Wen

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] Limited research has been performed in spite of biomechanical evaluation of jump landing with kinesio taping. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of kinesio taping applied to athletes. In this study, the authors wished to investigate the effect of kinesio taping during a vertical jump with run-up and countermovement jump on ankle functional instability. [Subjects and Methods] Ten male athletes with ankle functional instability (FI) were recruited in this study from a college volleyball team. Each participant was requested to perform two tasks, the countermovement jump and vertical jump with run-up. Infrared high-speed cameras and force plates were used to assess the effect of ankle taping. [Results] The results showed that the peak ground reaction force in the sagittal plane during a vertical jump with run-up slowed down after kinesio taping and that the peak ankle plantar flexion moment in both types of jump also decreased. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study proved the effect of kinesio taping on ankle functional instability, which was evaluated by measuring the vertical ground reaction force and peak plantar flexion moment. Its finding may allow us to provide some recommendations for athletes and trainers. PMID:26311931

  4. Effect of ankle kinesio taping on vertical jump with run-up and countermovement jump in athletes with ankle functional instability

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yi-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Feng; Chang, Chih-Han; Wu, Hong-Wen

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Limited research has been performed in spite of biomechanical evaluation of jump landing with kinesio taping. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of kinesio taping applied to athletes. In this study, the authors wished to investigate the effect of kinesio taping during a vertical jump with run-up and countermovement jump on ankle functional instability. [Subjects and Methods] Ten male athletes with ankle functional instability (FI) were recruited in this study from a college volleyball team. Each participant was requested to perform two tasks, the countermovement jump and vertical jump with run-up. Infrared high-speed cameras and force plates were used to assess the effect of ankle taping. [Results] The results showed that the peak ground reaction force in the sagittal plane during a vertical jump with run-up slowed down after kinesio taping and that the peak ankle plantar flexion moment in both types of jump also decreased. [Conclusion] In conclusion, this study proved the effect of kinesio taping on ankle functional instability, which was evaluated by measuring the vertical ground reaction force and peak plantar flexion moment. Its finding may allow us to provide some recommendations for athletes and trainers. PMID:26311931

  5. Revival of the Jumping Disc

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucke, C.; Schlichting, H-J.

    2009-01-01

    Snap discs made of bimetal have many technical applications as thermostats. Jumping discs are a toy version of such snap discs. Besides giving technical information, we describe physical investigations. We show especially how, through simple measurements and calculations, you can determine the initial speed ([approximately equal to]3.5 m…

  6. The Effect of Depth Jumps and Weight Training on Leg Strength and Vertical Jump.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clutch, David; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Two experiments examined the results of depth jumping programs to determine: (1) whether certain depth jumping routines, when combined with weight training, are better than others; and (2) the effect of depth jumping on athletes already in training. Results indicated that depth jumping is effective, but no more so than regular jumping routines.…

  7. Mesopause jumps at Antarctic latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lübken, Franz-Josef; Höffner, Josef; Becker, Erich; Latteck, Ralph; Murphy, Damian

    2016-04-01

    Recent high resolution temperature measurements by resonance lidar at Davis (69°S) occasionally showed a sudden mesopause altitude increase by ˜5 km and an associated mesopause temperature decrease by ˜10 K. We present further observations which are closely related to this 'mesopause jump', namely the increase of mean height of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) observed by a VHF radar, very strong westward winds in the upper mesosphere measured by an MF radar, and relatively large eastward winds in the stratosphere taken from reanalysis. We compare to similar observations in the Northern Hemisphere, namely at ALOMAR (69°N) where such mesopause jumps have never been observed. We present a detailed explanation of mesopause jumps. They occur only when stratospheric winds are moderately eastward and mesospheric winds are very large (westward). Under these conditions, gravity waves with comparatively large eastward phase Speeds can pass the stratosphere and propagate to the lower thermosphere because their vertical wavelengths in the mesosphere are rather large which implies reduced dynamical stability. When finally breaking in the lower thermosphere, these waves drive an enhanced residual circulation that causes a cold and high-altitude mesopause. The conditions for a mesopause jump occur only in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and are associated with the late breakdown of the polar vortex. Mesopause jumps are primarily, but not only, observed prior and close to solstice. We also show that during the onset of PMSE in the SH, stratospheric zonal winds are still eastward (up to 30 m/s), and that the onset is not closely related to the Transition of the stratospheric circulation.

  8. Test-retest reliability of jump execution variables using mechanography: A comparison of jump protocols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanography during the vertical jump test allows for evaluation of force-time variables reflecting jump execution, which may enhance screening for functional deficits that reduce physical performance and determining mechanistic causes underlying performance changes. However, utility of jump mechan...

  9. Mechanical parameters and flight phase characteristics in aquatic plyometric jumping.

    PubMed

    Louder, Talin J; Searle, Cade J; Bressel, Eadric

    2016-09-01

    Plyometric jumping is a commonly prescribed method of training focused on the development of reactive strength and high-velocity concentric power. Literature suggests that aquatic plyometric training may be a low-impact, effective supplement to land-based training. The purpose of the present study was to quantify acute, biomechanical characteristics of the take-off and flight phase for plyometric movements performed in the water. Kinetic force platform data from 12 young, male adults were collected for counter-movement jumps performed on land and in water at two different immersion depths. The specificity of jumps between environmental conditions was assessed using kinetic measures, temporal characteristics, and an assessment of the statistical relationship between take-off velocity and time in the air. Greater peak mechanical power was observed for jumps performed in the water, and was influenced by immersion depth. Additionally, the data suggest that, in the water, the statistical relationship between take-off velocity and time in air is quadratic. Results highlight the potential application of aquatic plyometric training as a cross-training tool for improving mechanical power and suggest that water immersion depth and fluid drag play key roles in the specificity of the take-off phase for jumping movements performed in the water. PMID:27125295

  10. Lift-off performance of a jumping robot on hard and soft ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Jeffrey; Lesov, Alex; Wiesenfeld, Kurt; Goldman, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    We study lift-off during jumping on hard ground and granular media in a simple robot composed of a linear actuator in series with a spring. On hard ground, the robot jumps from a metallic base. On granular media (GM) composed of 0 . 3 mm glass particles, a circular foot is attached to the spring and an air-fluidized bed sets the initial volume fraction, φ. The actuator frequency and phase are systematically varied to find optimal performance. On both substrates, optimal jump height does not occur at the robot's resonant frequency f0. Two distinct jumping modes emerge: a simple jump which is optimal above f0 is achievable with a squat maneuver, and a ``stutter'' jump which is optimal below f0 is generated with a counter-movement. For hard ground, both modes exhibit similar performance. On closely packed GM (φ = 0 . 62), the simple jump becomes the favored mode. On loosely packed GM (φ = 0 . 58), jump height performance is significantly reduced due to greater yielding in the material. A dynamical model reveals how optimal lift-off results from non-resonant transient dynamics.

  11. International Toys in Space: Jump Rope

    NASA Video Gallery

    Cosmonaut Valery Korzun attempts jumping rope in microgravity. He decides to adapt the activity by taking out the "jumping part," but the act of spinning the rope around him still proves difficult....

  12. Strawberry Shortcake and Other Jumping Rope Ideas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Polly K.; Taylor, Michaell K.

    Information, guidelines, and activities for jumping rope are given. A short history of jumping rope explains how it evolved from a spring ritual for men to a play activity involving mostly young girls. Physical and cultural reasons are given as to why jumping rope has been more a sport for girls than for boys. Research studies are noted which show…

  13. The Physics of Equestrian Show Jumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinner, Art

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the kinematics and dynamics of equestrian show jumping. For some time I have attended a series of show jumping events at Spruce Meadows, an international equestrian center near Calgary, Alberta, often referred to as the "Wimbledon of equestrian jumping." I have always had a desire to write an article such as this…

  14. The Effects of Caffeine on Vertical Jump Height and Execution in Collegiate Athletes.

    PubMed

    Bloms, Lucas P; Fitzgerald, John S; Short, Martin W; Whitehead, James R

    2016-07-01

    Bloms, LP, Fitzgerald, JS, Short, MW, and Whitehead, JR. The effects of caffeine on vertical jump height and execution in collegiate athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1855-1861, 2016-Caffeine ingestion elicits a variety of physiological effects that may be beneficial to maximal-intensity exercise performance, although its effectiveness and physical mechanism of action enhancing ballistic task performance are unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of caffeine ingestion on vertical jump height and jump execution in Division I collegiate athletes. The study used a single-blind, randomized, crossover design. Athletes (n = 25) consumed either caffeine (5 mg·kg) or placebo. After a 60-minute waiting period, athletes performed 3 squat jumps (SJ) and 3 countermovement jumps (CMJ) while standing on a force platform. Jump height and execution variables were calculated from mechanography data. In comparison with placebo, caffeine increased SJ height (32.8 ± 6.2 vs. 34.5 ± 6.7 cm; p = 0.001) and CMJ height (36.4 ± 6.9 vs. 37.9 ± 7.4 cm; p = 0.001). Peak force (p = 0.032) and average rate of force development (p = 0.037) were increased during the CMJ in the caffeine trail compared with the control. Time to half peak force was the only execution variable improved with caffeine (p = 0.019) during the SJ. It seems that caffeine affects both height and execution of jumping. Our data indicate that the physical mechanism of jump enhancement is increased peak force production or rate of force development during jumping depending on technique. The physical mechanism of jump enhancement suggests that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may transfer to other ballistic tasks involving the lower-body musculature in collegiate athletes. PMID:26626028

  15. The effects of short-term jump training on bone metabolism in females using oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Reiger, Jamie; Yingling, Vanessa R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of oral contraceptive use on bone serum markers following a 3-week jumping protocol. Twenty-three females (18-25 years) were grouped as oral contraceptive users (OC+) or non-users (OC-). Following a 3-week observation period, participants completed a 3-week (15-day) jump protocol. Jump sessions consisting of ten 42 cm drop jumps with a 30 s rest interval between jumps were completed each day, 5 days per week. Peak vertical ground reaction force and loading rate were measured and the osteogenic index was calculated. Serum markers for bone formation, bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and bone resorption, C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX) were measured at three time points (pre-, mid-, post-jump). BAP and CTX increased significantly (P = 0.0017, 0.0488) in both groups post-jump; however, bone metabolic markers were not different between the OC+ and OC- groups. Osteogenic index, ground reaction force and vertical jump height were similar between groups. Correlations between markers of bone metabolism and participants' age at menarche, weight, loading rate and years on OC were not significant. A 3-week jumping protocol was found to be effective in stimulating bone metabolism in both OC+ and OC- groups. PMID:26008875

  16. Vertical jumping and signaled avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cándido, Antonio; Maldonado, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment intended to demonstrate that the vertical jumping response can be learned using a signaled-avoidance technique. A photoelectric cell system was used to record the response. Twenty female rats, divided equally into two groups, were exposed to intertrial intervals of either 15 or 40 s. Subjects had to achieve three successive criteria of acquisition: 3, 5, and 10 consecutive avoidance responses. Results showed that both groups learned the avoidance response, requiring increasingly larger numbers of trials as the acquisition criteria increased. No significant effect of intertrial interval was observed. PMID:16812559

  17. Diagnostic studies of ensemble forecast "jumps"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnusson, Linus; Hewson, Tim; Ferranti, Laura; Rodwell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    During 2015 we saw exceptional consistency in successive seasonal forecasts produced at ECMWF, for the winter period 2015/16, right across the globe. This winter was characterised by a well-predicted and unusually strong El Nino, and some have ascribed the consistency to that. For most of December this consistency was mirrored in the (separate) ECMWF monthly forecast system, which correctly predicted anomalously strong (mild) zonal flow, over the North Atlantic and western Eurasia, even in forecasts for weeks 3 and 4. In monthly forecasts in general these weeks are often devoid of strong signals. However in late December and early January strong signals, even in week 2, proved to be incorrect, most notably over the North Atlantic and Eurasian sectors. Indeed on at least two occasions the outcome was beyond the ensemble forecast range over Scandinavia. In one of these conditions flipped from extreme mild to extreme cold as a high latitude block developed. Temperature prediction is very important to many customers, notably those dealing with renewable energy, because cold weather causes increased demand but also tends to coincide with reduced wind power production. So understandably jumps can cause consternation amongst some customer groups, and are very difficult to handle operationally. This presentation will discuss the results of initial diagnostic investigations into what caused the "ensemble jumps", particularly at the week two lead, though reference will also be made to a related shorter range (day 3) jump that was important for flooding over the UK. Initial results suggest that an inability of the ECMWF model to correctly represent convective outbreaks over North America (that for winter-time were quite extreme) played an important role. Significantly, during this period, an unusually large amount of upper air data over North America was rejected or ascribed low weight. These results bear similarities to previous diagnostic studies at ECMWF, wherein major

  18. Covariant jump conditions in electromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itin, Yakov

    2012-02-01

    A generally covariant four-dimensional representation of Maxwell's electrodynamics in a generic material medium can be achieved straightforwardly in the metric-free formulation of electromagnetism. In this setup, the electromagnetic phenomena are described by two tensor fields, which satisfy Maxwell's equations. A generic tensorial constitutive relation between these fields is an independent ingredient of the theory. By use of different constitutive relations (local and non-local, linear and non-linear, etc.), a wide area of applications can be covered. In the current paper, we present the jump conditions for the fields and for the energy-momentum tensor on an arbitrarily moving surface between two media. From the differential and integral Maxwell equations, we derive the covariant boundary conditions, which are independent of any metric and connection. These conditions include the covariantly defined surface current and are applicable to an arbitrarily moving smooth curved boundary surface. As an application of the presented jump formulas, we derive a Lorentzian type metric as a condition for existence of the wave front in isotropic media. This result holds for ordinary materials as well as for metamaterials with negative material constants.

  19. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  20. Body acceleration distribution and O2 uptake in humans during running and jumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, A.; Mccutcheon, E. P.; Shvartz, E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The distribution of body acceleration and associated oxygen uptake and heart rate responses are investigated in treadmill running and trampoline jumping. Accelerations in the +Gz direction were measured at the lateral ankle, lumbosacral region and forehead of eight young men during level treadmill walking and running at four speeds and trampoline jumping at four heights, together with corresponding oxygen uptake and heart rate. With increasing treadmill speed, peak acceleration at the ankle is found always to exceed that at the back and forehead, and acceleration profiles with higher frequency components than those observed during jumping are observed. Acceleration levels are found to be more uniformly distributed with increasing height in jumping, although comparable oxygen uptake and heat rates are obtained. Results indicate that the magnitude of the biomechanical stimuli is greater in trampoline jumping than in running, which finding could be of use in the design of procedures to avert deconditioning in persons exposed to weightlessness.

  1. Quantum jumps and entropy production

    SciTech Connect

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter

    2003-09-01

    The irreversible motion of an open quantum system can be represented through an ensemble of state vectors following a stochastic dynamics with piecewise deterministic paths. It is shown that this representation leads to a natural definition of the rate of quantum entropy production. The entropy production rate is expressed in terms of the von Neumann entropy and of the numbers of quantum jumps corresponding to the various decay channels of the open system. The proof of the positivity and of the convexity of the entropy production rate is given. Monte Carlo simulations of the stochastic dynamics of a driven qubit and of a {lambda} configuration involving a dark state are performed in order to illustrate the general theory.

  2. Effect of different knee starting angles on intersegmental coordination and performance in vertical jumps.

    PubMed

    Gheller, Rodrigo G; Dal Pupo, Juliano; Ache-Dias, Jonathan; Detanico, Daniele; Padulo, Johnny; dos Santos, Saray G

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of different knee starting angles on jump performance, kinetic parameters, and intersegmental coupling coordination during a squat jump (SJ) and a countermovement jump (CMJ). Twenty male volleyball and basketball players volunteered to participate in this study. The CMJ was performed with knee flexion at the end of the countermovement phase smaller than 90° (CMJ(<90)), greater than 90° (CMJ(>90)), and in a preferred position (CMJ(PREF)), while the SJ was performed from a knee angle of 70° (SJ(70)), 90° (SJ(90)), 110° (SJ(110)), and in a preferred position (SJ(PREF)). The best jump performance was observed in jumps that started from a higher squat depth (CMJ(<90)-SJ(70)) and in the preferred positions (CMJ and SJ), while peak power was observed in the SJ(110) and CMJ(>90). Analysis of continuous relative phase showed that thigh-trunk coupling was more in-phase in the jumps (CMJ and SJ) performed with a higher squat depth, while the leg-thigh coupling was more in-phase in the CMJ(>90) and SJ(PREF). Jumping from a position with knees more flexed seems to be the best strategy to achieve the best performance. Intersegmental coordination and jump performance (CMJ and SJ) were affected by different knee starting angles. PMID:25965000

  3. Peak flow meter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  4. Neuromechanical simulation of the locust jump.

    PubMed

    Cofer, D; Cymbalyuk, G; Heitler, W J; Edwards, D H

    2010-04-01

    The neural circuitry and biomechanics of kicking in locusts have been studied to understand their roles in the control of both kicking and jumping. It has been hypothesized that the same neural circuit and biomechanics governed both behaviors but this hypothesis was not testable with current technology. We built a neuromechanical model to test this and to gain a better understanding of the role of the semi-lunar process (SLP) in jump dynamics. The jumping and kicking behaviors of the model were tested by comparing them with a variety of published data, and were found to reproduce the results from live animals. This confirmed that the kick neural circuitry can produce the jump behavior. The SLP is a set of highly sclerotized bands of cuticle that can be bent to store energy for use during kicking and jumping. It has not been possible to directly test the effects of the SLP on jump performance because it is an integral part of the joint, and attempts to remove its influence prevent the locust from being able to jump. Simulations demonstrated that the SLP can significantly increase jump distance, power, total energy and duration of the jump impulse. In addition, the geometry of the joint enables the SLP force to assist leg flexion when the leg is flexed, and to assist extension once the leg has begun to extend. PMID:20228342

  5. Jumping to conclusions in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Simon L; Averbeck, Bruno B; Furl, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a mental disorder associated with a variety of symptoms, including hallucinations, delusions, social withdrawal, and cognitive dysfunction. Impairments on decision-making tasks are routinely reported: evidence points to a particular deficit in learning from and revising behavior following feedback. In addition, patients tend to make hasty decisions when probabilistic judgments are required. This is known as “jumping to conclusions” (JTC) and has typically been demonstrated by presenting participants with colored beads drawn from one of two “urns” until they claim to be sure which urn the beads are being drawn from (the proportions of colors vary in each urn). Patients tend to make early decisions on this task, and there is evidence to suggest that a hasty decision-making style might be linked to delusion formation and thus be of clinical relevance. Various accounts have been proposed regarding what underlies this behavior. In this review, we briefly introduce the disorder and the decision-making deficits associated with it. We then explore the evidence for each account of JTC in the context of a wider decision-making deficit and then go on to summarize work exploring JTC in healthy controls using pharmacological manipulations and functional imaging. Finally, we assess whether JTC might have a role in therapy. PMID:26170674

  6. Rope Jumping: A Preliminary Developmental Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickstrom, Ralph L.

    The basic movement pattern used in skilled individual rope jumping performance was determined and used as a model against which to evaluate the rope jumping form used by children at various levels of skills development. The techniques of adults and nursery school children were filmed and analyzed. The specific causes of unsuccessful attempts were…

  7. The Phase Shift in the Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2008-01-01

    The popular physics demonstration experiment known as Thomson's Jumping Ring (JR) has been variously explained as a simple example of Lenz's law, or as the result of a phase shift of the ring current relative to the induced emf. The failure of the first-quadrant Lenz's law explanation is shown by the time the ring takes to jump and by levitation.…

  8. The Locust Jump: An Integrated Laboratory Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jon

    2005-01-01

    The locust is well known for its ability to jump large distances to avoid predation. This class sets out a series of investigations into the mechanisms underlying the jump enabling students to bring together information from biomechanics, muscle physiology, and anatomy. The nature of the investigation allows it to be undertaken at a number of…

  9. Internal hydraulic jumps with large upstream shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kelly; Helfrich, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Internal hydraulic jumps in approximately two-layered flows with large upstream shear are investigated using numerical simulations. The simulations allow continuous density and velocity profiles, and a jump is forced to develop by downstream topography, similar to the experiments conducted by Wilkinson and Wood (1971). High shear jumps are found to exhibit significantly more entrainment than low shear jumps. Furthermore, the downstream structure of the flow has an important effect on the jump properties. Jumps with a slow upper (inactive) layer exhibit a velocity minimum downstream of the jump, resulting in a sub-critical downstream state, while flows with the same upstream vertical shear and a larger barotropic velocity remain super-critical downstream of the jump. A two-layer theory is modified to account for the vertical structure of the downstream density and velocity profiles and entrainment is allowed through a modification of the approach of Holland et al. (2002). The resulting theory can be matched reasonably well with the numerical simulations. However, the results are very sensitive to how the downstream vertical profiles of velocity and density are incorporated into the layered model, highlighting the difficulty of the two layer approximation when the shear is large.

  10. Natural and systematic polar motion jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapanov, Y.; Vondrak, J.; Ron, C.; Pachalieva, R.

    2014-12-01

    Polar motion consists mainly of two harmonic oscillations with variable phases and amplitudes and small irregular variations. The small irregular variations may be due to various geophysical excitations and observation inaccuracy (mostly in the first half of the last century). A part of irregular polar motion variations consists of fast jumps of the mean values of polar motion coordinates. The direct determination of the polar motion jumps is difficult, because the jump values are very small relative to the seasonal and Chandler amplitudes. A useful high sensitive method of data jumps determination is proposed. The method consists of data integration and piecewise linear or parabolic trends determina- tion. This method is applied to determine the natural and systematic polar motion jumps existing in pole coordinates from the solutions OA10 for the period 1899.7ñ1962.0 and C04 for the period 1962.0- 2013.5. Only a few of the determined polar motion jumps can be interpreted as systematic biases due to observational errors. The major part of the detected polar motion jumps occurs almost regularly near the epochs of minimum amplitude (due to the beat of seasonal and Chandler wobbles), so the natural origin of these jumps is supposed.

  11. Control of tumbling during the locust jump

    PubMed Central

    Cofer, David; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Heitler, William J.; Edwards, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    Locust can jump precisely to a target, yet they can also tumble during the trajectory. We propose two mechanisms that would allow the locust to control tumbling during the jump. The first is that prior to the jump, locusts adjust the pitch of their body to move the center of mass closer to the intended thrust vector. The second is that contraction of the dorsolongitudinal muscles during the jump will produce torques that counter the torque produced by thrust. We found that locusts increased their take-off angle as the initial body pitch increased, and that little tumbling occurred for jumps that observed this relationship. Simulations of locust jumping demonstrated that a pitch versus take-off angle relationship that minimized tumbling in simulated jumps was similar to the relationship observed in live locusts. Locusts were strongly biased to pitch head-upward, and performed dorsiflexions far more often than ventral flexions. The direction and magnitude of tumbling could be controlled in simulations by adjusting the tension in the dorsolongitudinal muscles. These mechanisms allowed the simulations to match the data from the live animals. Control of tumbling was also found to influence the control of jump elevation. The bias to pitch head-upwards may have an evolutionary advantage when evading a predator and so make control of tumbling important for the locust. PMID:20833932

  12. 25 CFR 11.437 - Bail jumping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bail jumping. 11.437 Section 11.437 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.437 Bail jumping. A person set at liberty by court order, with or without bail,...

  13. 25 CFR 11.437 - Bail jumping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bail jumping. 11.437 Section 11.437 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.437 Bail jumping. A person set at liberty by court order, with or without bail,...

  14. Control of tumbling during the locust jump.

    PubMed

    Cofer, David; Cymbalyuk, Gennady; Heitler, William J; Edwards, Donald H

    2010-10-01

    Locust can jump precisely to a target, yet they can also tumble during the trajectory. We propose two mechanisms that would allow the locust to control tumbling during the jump. The first is that prior to the jump, locusts adjust the pitch of their body to move the center of mass closer to the intended thrust vector. The second is that contraction of the dorsolongitudinal muscles during the jump will produce torques that counter the torque produced by thrust. We found that locusts increased their take-off angle as the initial body pitch increased, and that little tumbling occurred for jumps that observed this relationship. Simulations of locust jumping demonstrated that a pitch versus take-off angle relationship that minimized tumbling in simulated jumps was similar to the relationship observed in live locusts. Locusts were strongly biased to pitch head-upward, and performed dorsiflexions far more often than ventral flexions. The direction and magnitude of tumbling could be controlled in simulations by adjusting the tension in the dorsolongitudinal muscles. These mechanisms allowed the simulations to match the data from the live animals. Control of tumbling was also found to influence the control of jump elevation. The bias to pitch head-upwards may have an evolutionary advantage when evading a predator and so make control of tumbling important for the locust. PMID:20833932

  15. A review on the basketball jump shot.

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Victor H A; Rodacki, André L F; Satern, Miriam N

    2015-06-01

    The ability to shoot an effective jump shot in the sport of basketball is critical to a player's success. In an attempt to better understand the aspects related to expert performance, researchers have investigated successful free throws and jump shots of various basketball players and identified movement variables that contribute to their success. The purpose of this study was to complete a systematic review of the scientific literature on the basketball free throw and jump shot for the purpose of revealing the critical components of shooting that coaches, teachers, and players should focus on when teaching, learning, practising, and performing a jump shot. The results of this review are presented in three sections: (a) variables that affect ball trajectory, (b) phases of the jump shot, and PMID:26102462

  16. Jumping performance in the highly aquatic frog, Xenopus tropicalis: sex-specific relationships between morphology and performance

    PubMed Central

    Vasilopoulou-Kampitsi, Menelia; Bonneaud, Camille

    2014-01-01

    Frogs are characterized by a morphology that has been suggested to be related to their unique jumping specialization. Yet, the functional demands associated with jumping and swimming may not be that different as suggested by studies with semi-aquatic frogs. Here, we explore whether features previously identified as indicative of good burst swimming performance also predict jumping performance in a highly aquatic frog, Xenopus tropicalis. Moreover, we test whether the morphological determinants of jumping performance are similar in the two sexes and whether jumping performance differs in the two sexes. Finally we test whether jumping capacity is positively associated with burst swimming and terrestrial endurance capacity in both sexes. Our results show sex-specific differences in jumping performance when correcting for differences in body size. Moreover, the features determining jumping performance are different in the two sexes. Finally, the relationships between different performance traits are sex-dependent as well with females, but not males, showing a trade-off between peak jumping force and the time jumped to exhaustion. This suggests that different selective pressures operate on the two sexes, with females being subjected to constraints on locomotion due to their greater body mass and investment in reproductive capacity. In contrast, males appear to invest more in locomotor capacity giving them higher performance for a given body size compared to females. PMID:25392760

  17. Repetitive Hops Induce Postactivation Potentiation in Triceps Surae as well as an Increase in the Jump Height of Subsequent Maximal Drop Jumps

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Julian; Kramer, Andreas; Gruber, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Postactivation potentiation (PAP) has been defined as the increase in twitch torque after a conditioning contraction. The present study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of hops as conditioning contractions to induce PAP and increase performance in subsequent maximal drop jumps. In addition, we wanted to test if and how PAP can contribute to increases in drop jump rebound height. Twelve participants performed 10 maximal two-legged hops as conditioning contractions. Twitch peak torques of triceps surae muscles were recorded before and after the conditioning hops. Then, subjects performed drop jumps with and without 10 conditioning hops before each drop jump. Recordings included ground reaction forces, ankle and knee angles and electromyographic activity in five leg muscles. In addition, efferent motoneuronal output during ground contact was estimated with V-wave stimulation. The analyses showed that after the conditioning hops, twitch peak torques of triceps surae muscles were 32% higher compared to baseline values (P < 0.01). Drop jumps performed after conditioning hops were significantly higher (12%, P < 0.05), but V-waves and EMG activity remained unchanged. The amount of PAP and the change in drop jump rebound height were positively correlated (r2 = 0.26, P < 0.05). These results provide evidence for PAP in triceps surae muscles induced by a bout of hops and indicate that PAP can contribute to the observed performance enhancements in subsequent drop jumps. The lack of change in EMG activity and V-wave amplitude suggests that the underlying mechanisms are more likely intramuscular than neural in origin. PMID:24147061

  18. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds Formed Between Amino Acid Molecules in Aqueous Solution Investigated by Temperature-jump Nanosecond Time-resolved Transient Mid-IR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Man-ping; Li, Heng; Zhang, Qing-li; Weng, Yu-xiang; Qiu, Xiang-gang

    2007-08-01

    Carboxyl (COO-) vibrational modes of two amino acids histidine and glycine in D2O solution were investigated by temperature-dependent FTIR spectroscopy and temperature-jump nanosecond time-resolved IR difference absorbance spectroscopy. The results show that hydrogen bonds are formed between amino acid molecules as well as between the amino acid molecule and the solvent molecules. The asymmetric vibrational frequency of COO- around 1600-1610 cm-1 is blue shifted when raising temperature, indicating that the strength of the hydrogen bonds becomes weaker at higher temperature. Two bleaching peaks at 1604 and 1612 cm-1 were observed for histidine in response to a temperature jump from 10 °C to 20 °C. The lower vibrational frequency at 1604 cm-1 is assigned to the chain COO- group which forms the intermolecular hydrogen bond with NH3+ group, while the higher frequency at 1612 cm-1 is assigned to the end COO- group forming hydrogen bonds with the solvent molecules. This is because that the hydrogen bonds in the former are expected to be stronger than the latter. In addition the intensities of these two bleaching peaks are almost the same. In contrast, only the lower frequency at 1604 cm-1 bleaching peak has been observed for glycine. The fact indicates that histidine molecules form a dimer-like intermolecular chain while glycine forms a relatively longer chain in the solution. The rising phase of the IR absorption kinetics in response to the temperature-jump detected at 1604 cm-1 for histidine is about 30+/-10 ns, within the resolution limit of our instrument, indicating that breaking or weakening the hydrogen bond is a very fast process.

  19. JUMP LANDING CHARACTERISTICS IN ELITE SOCCER PLAYERS WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    PubMed Central

    Grande, I.; Mejuto, G.; Los Arcos, A.; Yanci, J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the parameters that characterize the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, and to determine the relationship among these parameters in elite soccer players with cerebral palsy (CP). Thirteen male members of the Spanish national soccer team for people with CP (mean age: 27.1 ± 4.7 years) volunteered for the study. Each participant performed three counter movement jumps. The characteristics of the first peak of the vertical ground reaction force during the landing phase of a jump, which corresponds to the forefoot contact with the ground, were similar to the results obtained in previous studies. However, a higher magnitude of rearfoot contact with the ground (F2) was observed in participants with CP than in participants without CP. Furthermore, a significant correlation between F2 magnitude and the elapsed time until its production (T2) was not observed (r = -0.474 for p = 0.102). This result implies that a landing technique based on a delay in the production of F2 might not be effective to reduce its magnitude, contrary to what has been observed in participants without CP. The absence of a significant correlation between these two parameters in the present study, and the high magnitude of F2, suggest that elite soccer players with CP should use footwear with proper cushioning characteristics. PMID:24744473

  20. Vertical jumping biomechanical evaluation through the use of an inertial sensor-based technology.

    PubMed

    Setuain, I; Martinikorena, J; Gonzalez-Izal, M; Martinez-Ramirez, A; Gómez, M; Alfaro-Adrián, J; Izquierdo, M

    2016-01-01

    Progress in micro-electromechanical systems has turned inertial sensor units (IUs) into a suitable tool for vertical jumping evaluation. In total, 9 men and 8 women were recruited for this study. Three types of vertical jumping tests were evaluated in order to determine if the data provided by an IU placed at the lumbar spine could reliably assess jumping biomechanics and to examine the validity of the IU compared with force plate platform recordings. Robust correlation levels of the IU-based jumping biomechanical evaluation with respect to the force plate across the entire analysed jumping battery were found. In this sense, significant and extremely large correlations were found when raw data of both IU and force plate-derived normalised force-time curves were compared. Furthermore, significant and mainly moderate correlation levels were also found between both instruments when isolated resultant forces' peak values of predefined jumping phases of each manoeuvre were analysed. However, Bland and Altman graphical representation demonstrated a systematic error in the distribution of the data points within the mean ±1.96 SD intervals. Using IUs, several biomechanical variables such as the resultant force-time curve patterns of the three different vertical jumps analysed were reliably measured. PMID:26256752

  1. Biomechanics of jumping in the flea.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Gregory P; Burrows, Malcolm

    2011-03-01

    It has long been established that fleas jump by storing and releasing energy in a cuticular spring, but it is not known how forces from that spring are transmitted to the ground. One hypothesis is that the recoil of the spring pushes the trochanter onto the ground, thereby generating the jump. A second hypothesis is that the recoil of the spring acts through a lever system to push the tibia and tarsus onto the ground. To decide which of these two hypotheses is correct, we built a kinetic model to simulate the different possible velocities and accelerations produced by each proposed process and compared those simulations with the kinematics measured from high-speed images of natural jumping. The in vivo velocity and acceleration kinematics are consistent with the model that directs ground forces through the tibia and tarsus. Moreover, in some natural jumps there was no contact between the trochanter and the ground. There were also no observable differences between the kinematics of jumps that began with the trochanter on the ground and jumps that did not. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the tibia and tarsus have spines appropriate for applying forces to the ground, whereas no such structures were seen on the trochanter. Based on these observations, we discount the hypothesis that fleas use their trochantera to apply forces to the ground and conclude that fleas jump by applying forces to the ground through the end of the tibiae. PMID:21307071

  2. Kinematics and Kinetics of Squats, Drop Jumps and Imitation Jumps of Ski Jumpers

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Carole A.; Keller, Melanie; Ammann, Fabian; Hübner, Klaus; Lindorfer, Julia; Taylor, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pauli, CA, Keller, M, Ammann, F, Hübner, K, Lindorfer, J, Taylor, WR, and Lorenzetti, S. Kinematics and kinetics of squats, drop jumps and imitation jumps of ski jumpers. J Strength Cond Res 30(3): 643–652, 2016—Squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps are commonly used training exercises in ski jumping to enhance maximum force, explosive force, and sport-specific skills. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the kinetics and kinematics of training exercises in ski jumping and to find objective parameters in training exercises that most correlate with the competition performance of ski jumpers. To this end, barbell squats, drop jumps, and imitation jumps were measured in a laboratory environment for 10 elite ski jumpers. Force and motion data were captured, and the influence of maximum vertical force, force difference, vertical take-off velocity, knee moments, knee joint power, and a knee valgus/varus index was evaluated and correlated with their season jump performance. The results indicate that, especially for the imitation jumps, a good correlation exists between the vertical take-off velocity and the personal jump performance on the hill (R = 0.718). Importantly, however, the more the athletes tended toward a valgus knee alignment during the measured movements, the worse their performance (R = 0.729 imitation jumps; R = 0.685 squats). Although an evaluation of the athletes' lower limb alignment during competitive jumping on the hill is still required, these preliminary data suggest that performance training should additionally concentrate on improving knee alignment to increase ski jumping performance. PMID:26418370

  3. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  4. Predicting vertical jump height from bar velocity.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Amador; Štirn, Igor; Padial, Paulino; Argüelles-Cienfuegos, Javier; De la Fuente, Blanca; Strojnik, Vojko; Feriche, Belén

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the use of maximum (Vmax) and final propulsive phase (FPV) bar velocity to predict jump height in the weighted jump squat. FPV was defined as the velocity reached just before bar acceleration was lower than gravity (-9.81 m·s(-2)). Vertical jump height was calculated from the take-off velocity (Vtake-off) provided by a force platform. Thirty swimmers belonging to the National Slovenian swimming team performed a jump squat incremental loading test, lifting 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% of body weight in a Smith machine. Jump performance was simultaneously monitored using an AMTI portable force platform and a linear velocity transducer attached to the barbell. Simple linear regression was used to estimate jump height from the Vmax and FPV recorded by the linear velocity transducer. Vmax (y = 16.577x - 16.384) was able to explain 93% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.47 cm. FPV (y = 12.828x - 6.504) was able to explain 91% of jump height variance with a standard error of the estimate of 1.66 cm. Despite that both variables resulted to be good predictors, heteroscedasticity in the differences between FPV and Vtake-off was observed (r(2) = 0.307), while the differences between Vmax and Vtake-off were homogenously distributed (r(2) = 0.071). These results suggest that Vmax is a valid tool for estimating vertical jump height in a loaded jump squat test performed in a Smith machine. Key pointsVertical jump height in the loaded jump squat can be estimated with acceptable precision from the maximum bar velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer.The relationship between the point at which bar acceleration is less than -9.81 m·s(-2) and the real take-off is affected by the velocity of movement.Mean propulsive velocity recorded by a linear velocity transducer does not appear to be optimal to monitor ballistic exercise performance. PMID:25983572

  5. Condensation-induced jumping water drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narhe, R. D.; Khandkar, M. D.; Shelke, P. B.; Limaye, A. V.; Beysens, D. A.

    2009-09-01

    Water droplets can jump during vapor condensation on solid benzene near its melting point. This phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kind of micro scale steam engine, is studied experimentally and numerically. The latent heat of condensation transferred at the drop three phase contact line melts the substrate during a time proportional to R (the drop radius). The wetting conditions change and a spontaneous jump of the drop results in random direction over length ˜1.5R , a phenomenon that increases the coalescence events and accelerates the growth. Once properly rescaled by the jump length scale, the growth dynamics is, however, similar to that on a solid surface.

  6. Condensation-induced jumping water drops.

    PubMed

    Narhe, R D; Khandkar, M D; Shelke, P B; Limaye, A V; Beysens, D A

    2009-09-01

    Water droplets can jump during vapor condensation on solid benzene near its melting point. This phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kind of micro scale steam engine, is studied experimentally and numerically. The latent heat of condensation transferred at the drop three phase contact line melts the substrate during a time proportional to R (the drop radius). The wetting conditions change and a spontaneous jump of the drop results in random direction over length approximately 1.5R , a phenomenon that increases the coalescence events and accelerates the growth. Once properly rescaled by the jump length scale, the growth dynamics is, however, similar to that on a solid surface. PMID:19905120

  7. Plyometric Long Jump Training With Progressive Loading Improves Kinetic and Kinematic Swimming Start Parameters.

    PubMed

    Rebutini, Vanessa Z; Pereira, Gleber; Bohrer, Roberta C D; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Rodacki, André L F

    2016-09-01

    Rebutini, VZ, Pereira, G, Bohrer, RCD, Ugrinowitsch, C, and Rodacki, ALF. Plyometric long jump training with progressive loading improves kinetic and kinematic swimming start parameters. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2392-2398, 2016-This study was aimed to determine the effects of a plyometric long jump training program on torque around the lower limb joints and kinetic and kinematics parameters during the swimming jump start. Ten swimmers performed 3 identical assessment sessions, measuring hip and knee muscle extensors during maximal voluntary isometric contraction and kinetic and kinematics parameters during the swimming jump start, at 3 instants: INI (2 weeks before the training program, control period), PRE (2 weeks after INI measurements), and POST (24-48 hours after 9 weeks of training). There were no significant changes from INI to PRE measurements. However, the peak torque and rate of torque development increased significantly from PRE to POST measurements for both hip (47 and 108%) and knee (24 and 41%) joints. There were significant improvements to the horizontal force (7%), impulse (9%), and angle of resultant force (19%). In addition, there were significant improvements to the center of mass displacement (5%), horizontal takeoff velocity (16%), horizontal velocity at water entrance (22%), and peak angle velocity for the knee (15%) and hip joints (16%). Therefore, the plyometric long jump training protocol was effective to enhance torque around the lower limb joints and to control the resultant vector direction, to increase the swimming jump start performance. These findings suggest that coaches should use long jump training instead of vertical jump training to improve swimming start performance. PMID:24531431

  8. Jumping without using legs: the jump of the click-beetles (Elateridae) is morphologically constrained.

    PubMed

    Ribak, Gal; Weihs, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    To return to their feet, inverted click-beetles (Elateridae) jump without using their legs. When a beetle is resting on its dorsal side, a hinge mechanism is locked to store elastic energy in the body and releases it abruptly to launch the beetle into the air. While the functional morphology of the jumping mechanism is well known, the level of control that the beetle has over this jumping technique and the mechanical constraints governing the jumps are not entirely clear. Here we show that while body rotations in air are highly variable, the jumps are morphologically constrained to a constant "takeoff" angle (79.9°±1.56°, n = 9 beetles) that directs 98% of the jumping force vertically against gravity. A physical-mathematical model of the jumping action, combined with measurements from live beetle, imply that the beetle may control the speed at takeoff but not the jumping angle. In addition, the model shows that very subtle changes in the exact point of contact with the ground can explain the vigorous rotations of the body seen while the beetle is airborne. These findings suggest that the evolution of this unique non-legged jumping mechanism resulted in a jumping technique that is capable of launching the body high into the air but it is too constrained and unstable to allow control of body orientation at landing. PMID:21698194

  9. Effect of Ankle Joint Contact Angle and Ground Contact Time on Depth Jump Performance.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Joshua H; Flanagan, Sean P

    2015-11-01

    Athletes often need to both jump high and get off the ground quickly, but getting off the ground quickly can decrease the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) impulse, impeding jump height. Energy stored in the muscle-tendon complex during the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) may mitigate the effects of short ground contact times (GCTs). To take advantage of the SSC, several coaches recommend "attacking" the ground with the foot in a dorsiflexed (DF) position at contact. However, the efficacy of this technique has not been tested. This investigation tested the hypotheses that shorter GCTs would lead to smaller vertical depth jump heights (VDJH), and that this difference could be mitigated by instructing the athletes to land in a DF as opposed to a plantar flexed (PF) foot position. Eighteen healthy junior college athletes performed depth jumps from a 45-cm box onto force platforms under instruction to achieve one of the 2 objectives (maximum jump height [hmax] or minimal GCT [tmin]), with one of the 2 foot conditions (DF or PF). These variations created 4 distinct jump conditions: DF-hmax, DF-tmin, PF-hmax, and PF-tmin. For all variables examined, there were no significant interactions. For all 4 conditions, the ankle was PF during landing, but the DF condition was 28.87% less PF than the PF condition. The tmin conditions had a 23.48% shorter GCT than hmax. There were no significant main effects for jump height. The peak impact force for tmin was 22.14% greater than hmax and 19.11% greater for DF compared with PF conditions. A shorter GCT did not necessitate a smaller jump height, and a less PF foot did not lead to improvements in jump height or contact time during a depth jump from a 45-cm box. The same jump height was attained in less PF and shorter GCT conditions by larger impact forces. To decrease contact time while maintaining jump height, athletes should be instructed to "get off the ground as fast as possible." This cue seems to be more important than foot

  10. Motor Control of Landing from a Jump in Simulated Hypergravity.

    PubMed

    Gambelli, Clément N; Theisen, Daniel; Willems, Patrick A; Schepens, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, when landing from a counter-movement jump, muscles contract before touchdown to anticipate imminent collision with the ground and place the limbs in a proper position. This study assesses how the control of landing is modified when gravity is increased above 1 g. Hypergravity was simulated in two different ways: (1) by generating centrifugal forces during turns of an aircraft (A300) and (2) by pulling the subject downwards in the laboratory with a Subject Loading System (SLS). Eight subjects were asked to perform counter-movement jumps at 1 g on Earth and at 3 hypergravity levels (1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 g) both in A300 and with SLS. External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments and muscular activity of 6 lower limb muscles were recorded. Our results show that both in A300 and with SLS, as in 1 g: (1) the anticipation phase is present; (2) during the loading phase (from touchdown until the peak of vertical ground reaction force), lower limb muscles act like a stiff spring, whereas during the second part (from the peak of vertical ground reaction force until the return to the standing position), they act like a compliant spring associated with a damper. (3) With increasing gravity, the preparatory adjustments and the loading phase are modified whereas the second part does not change drastically. (4) The modifications are similar in A300 and with SLS, however the effect of hypergravity is accentuated in A300, probably due to altered sensory inputs. This observation suggests that otolithic information plays an important role in the control of the landing from a jump. PMID:26505472

  11. Motor Control of Landing from a Jump in Simulated Hypergravity

    PubMed Central

    Gambelli, Clément N.; Theisen, Daniel; Willems, Patrick A.; Schepens, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    On Earth, when landing from a counter-movement jump, muscles contract before touchdown to anticipate imminent collision with the ground and place the limbs in a proper position. This study assesses how the control of landing is modified when gravity is increased above 1 g. Hypergravity was simulated in two different ways: (1) by generating centrifugal forces during turns of an aircraft (A300) and (2) by pulling the subject downwards in the laboratory with a Subject Loading System (SLS). Eight subjects were asked to perform counter-movement jumps at 1 g on Earth and at 3 hypergravity levels (1.2, 1.4 and 1.6 g) both in A300 and with SLS. External forces applied to the body, movements of the lower limb segments and muscular activity of 6 lower limb muscles were recorded. Our results show that both in A300 and with SLS, as in 1 g: (1) the anticipation phase is present; (2) during the loading phase (from touchdown until the peak of vertical ground reaction force), lower limb muscles act like a stiff spring, whereas during the second part (from the peak of vertical ground reaction force until the return to the standing position), they act like a compliant spring associated with a damper. (3) With increasing gravity, the preparatory adjustments and the loading phase are modified whereas the second part does not change drastically. (4) The modifications are similar in A300 and with SLS, however the effect of hypergravity is accentuated in A300, probably due to altered sensory inputs. This observation suggests that otolithic information plays an important role in the control of the landing from a jump. PMID:26505472

  12. Injuries At Indoor Trampoline Parks Jump

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160460.html Injuries at Indoor Trampoline Parks Jump Researchers say finding shows need for safety ... News) -- A wave of injuries at indoor trampoline parks has prompted a call for design and safety ...

  13. PERFORMANCE OF THE AGS TRANSITION JUMP SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    AHRENS,L.A.; BRENNAN,J.M.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; VAN ASSELT,W.K.

    1999-03-29

    The transition jump system has been indispensable to the high intensity proton operation of the AGS complex. Nevertheless, transition crossing remains one of the major hurdles as the accelerator complex intensity is pushed upward. To enhance the performance of the system ''quadrupole pumping'' in the Booster is used to minimize the necessary longitudinal dilution of the beam on the AGS injection porch. During the transition jump sextupole correctors at strategic locations are pulsed to minimize the effects of the chromatic non-linearity of the jump system. The available instrumentation for diagnosing the performance of the system will be described, along with installed hardware to counter the non-linear effects of the transition jump system.

  14. Jumping mechanisms in dictyopharid planthoppers (Hemiptera, Dicytyopharidae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    The jumping performance of four species of hemipterans belonging to the family Dictyopharidae, from Europe, South Africa and Australia, were analysed from high-speed images. The body shape in all was characterised by an elongated and tapering head that gave a streamlined appearance. The body size ranged from 6 to 9 mm in length and from 6 to 23 mg in mass. The hind legs were 80-90% of body length and 30-50% longer than the front legs, except in one species in which the front legs were particularly large so that all legs were of similar length. Jumping was propelled by rapid and simultaneous depression of the trochantera of both hind legs, powered by large muscles in the thorax, and was accompanied by extension of the tibiae. In the best jumps, defined as those with the fastest take-off velocity, Engela minuta accelerated in 1.2 ms to a take-off velocity of 5.8 m s(-1), which is the fastest achieved by any insect described to date. During such a jump, E. minuta experienced an acceleration of 4830 m s(-2) or 490 g, while other species in the same family experienced 225-375 g. The best jumps in all species required an energy expenditure of 76-225 μJ, a power output of 12-80 mW and exerted a force of 12-29 mN. The required power output per mass of jumping muscle ranged from 28,000 to 140,200 W kg(-1) muscle and thus greatly exceeded the maximum active contractile limit of normal muscle. To achieve such a jumping performance, these insects must be using a power amplification mechanism in a catapult-like action. It is suggested that their streamlined body shape improves jumping performance by reducing drag, which, for a small insect, can substantially affect forward momentum. PMID:24198256

  15. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Manos, Daria; Hamer, Okka; Müller, Nestor L

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is a relatively common complication of blunt chest trauma. Occasionally, it may result from pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving or from sports activities not associated with barotrauma such as long breath-hold diving. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from a bungee jump in a previously healthy man. Bungee jumping is an increasingly popular sport with relatively few reported injuries. To our knowledge pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:18043394

  16. Velocity-jump models with crowding effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treloar, Katrina K.; Simpson, Matthew J.; McCue, Scott W.

    2011-12-01

    Velocity-jump processes are discrete random-walk models that have many applications including the study of biological and ecological collective motion. In particular, velocity-jump models are often used to represent a type of persistent motion, known as a run and tumble, that is exhibited by some isolated bacteria cells. All previous velocity-jump processes are noninteracting, which means that crowding effects and agent-to-agent interactions are neglected. By neglecting these agent-to-agent interactions, traditional velocity-jump models are only applicable to very dilute systems. Our work is motivated by the fact that many applications in cell biology, such as wound healing, cancer invasion, and development, often involve tissues that are densely packed with cells where cell-to-cell contact and crowding effects can be important. To describe these kinds of high-cell-density problems using a velocity-jump process we introduce three different classes of crowding interactions into a one-dimensional model. Simulation data and averaging arguments lead to a suite of continuum descriptions of the interacting velocity-jump processes. We show that the resulting systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations predict the mean behavior of the stochastic simulations very well.

  17. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  18. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  19. Effects of Short-Term Isokinetic Training on Standing Long-Jump Performance in Untrained Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morriss, Calvin J.; Tolfrey, Keith; Coppack, Russell J.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the effects of a brief isokinetic training program on quadriceps and hamstring peak torque (PT) and standing long-jump performance. Tests on 12 untrained men indicated that the brief training program was at least as effective in improving quadriceps isokinetic (but not hamstring) PT. PT gains subsequent to isokinetic resistance training…

  20. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  1. Alterations of Vertical Jump Mechanics after a Half-Marathon Mountain Running Race.

    PubMed

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N; Noutsos, Konstantinos; Pappas, Achilleas; Bogdanis, Gregory; Vagenas, Georgios; Bayios, Ioannis A; Boudolos, Konstantinos D

    2016-06-01

    The fatiguing effect of long-distance running has been examined in the context of a variety of parameters. However, there is scarcity of data regarding its effect on the vertical jump mechanics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the alterations of countermovement jump (CMJ) mechanics after a half-marathon mountain race. Twenty-seven runners performed CMJs before the race (Pre), immediately after the race (Post 1) and five minutes after Post 1 (Post 2). Instantaneous and ensemble-average analysis focused on jump height and, the maximum peaks and time-to-maximum peaks of: Displacement, vertical force (Fz), anterior-posterior force (Fx), Velocity and Power, in the eccentric (tECC) and concentric (tCON) phase of the jump, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used for statistical analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The jump height decrease was significant in Post 2 (-7.9%) but not in Post 1 (-4.1%). Fx and Velocity decreased significantly in both Post 1 (only in tECC) and Post 2 (both tECC and tCON). Α timing shift of the Fz peaks (earlier during tECC and later during tCON) and altered relative peak times (only in tECC) were also observed. Ensemble-average analysis revealed several time intervals of significant post-race alterations and a timing shift in the Fz-Velocity loop. An overall trend of lowered post-race jump output and mechanics was characterised by altered jump timing, restricted anterior-posterior movement and altered force-velocity relations. The specificity of mountain running fatigue to eccentric muscle work, appears to be reflected in the different time order of the post-race reductions, with the eccentric phase reductions preceding those of the concentric one. Thus, those who engage in mountain running should particularly consider downhill training to optimise eccentric muscular action. Key pointsThe 4.1% reduction of jump height immediately after the race is not statistically significantThe eccentric phase alterations of jump mechanics precede

  2. Alterations of Vertical Jump Mechanics after a Half-Marathon Mountain Running Race

    PubMed Central

    Rousanoglou, Elissavet N.; Noutsos, Konstantinos; Pappas, Achilleas; Bogdanis, Gregory; Vagenas, Georgios; Bayios, Ioannis A.; Boudolos, Konstantinos D.

    2016-01-01

    The fatiguing effect of long-distance running has been examined in the context of a variety of parameters. However, there is scarcity of data regarding its effect on the vertical jump mechanics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the alterations of countermovement jump (CMJ) mechanics after a half-marathon mountain race. Twenty-seven runners performed CMJs before the race (Pre), immediately after the race (Post 1) and five minutes after Post 1 (Post 2). Instantaneous and ensemble-average analysis focused on jump height and, the maximum peaks and time-to-maximum peaks of: Displacement, vertical force (Fz), anterior-posterior force (Fx), Velocity and Power, in the eccentric (tECC) and concentric (tCON) phase of the jump, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used for statistical analysis (p ≤ 0.05). The jump height decrease was significant in Post 2 (-7.9%) but not in Post 1 (-4.1%). Fx and Velocity decreased significantly in both Post 1 (only in tECC) and Post 2 (both tECC and tCON). Α timing shift of the Fz peaks (earlier during tECC and later during tCON) and altered relative peak times (only in tECC) were also observed. Ensemble-average analysis revealed several time intervals of significant post-race alterations and a timing shift in the Fz-Velocity loop. An overall trend of lowered post-race jump output and mechanics was characterised by altered jump timing, restricted anterior-posterior movement and altered force-velocity relations. The specificity of mountain running fatigue to eccentric muscle work, appears to be reflected in the different time order of the post-race reductions, with the eccentric phase reductions preceding those of the concentric one. Thus, those who engage in mountain running should particularly consider downhill training to optimise eccentric muscular action. Key points The 4.1% reduction of jump height immediately after the race is not statistically significant The eccentric phase alterations of jump mechanics precede

  3. Determination of LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of wolfram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cengiz, Erhan; Saritas, Nuriye

    2014-04-01

    The LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor of wolfram have been measured by two different methods. In the first method the mass attenuation coefficients have been obtained by narrow beam transmission geometry to calculate the LIII subshell absorption jump ratio and jump factor. In the latter these parameters have been derived from the LIII subshell X-ray production and the photoionization cross sections of the LIII subshell and higher subshells determined by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence technique and narrow beam transmission geometry, respectively. The results obtained by both methods have been compared with theoretical and experimental values. They are in good agreement with each other.

  4. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these Animals 2015, 5 1073 data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety. PMID:26506396

  5. Decentralised ? - filtering of networked control systems: a jump system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Radhawi, Muhammad Ali; Bettayeb, Maamar

    2014-10-01

    We consider the problem of decentralised estimation of discrete-time interconnected systems with local estimators communicating with their subsystems over lossy communication channels. Assuming that the packet losses follow the Gilbert-Elliot model, the networked estimation problem can be formulated into a Markovian jump linear system framework. Modelling subsystem interactions as sum quadratic constrained uncertainties, we design mode-dependent decentralised ?-estimators that robustly stabilise the estimator system and guarantee a given disturbance attenuation level. The estimation gains are derived with necessary and sufficient rank-constrained linear matrix inequality conditions. Results are also provided for local mode-dependent estimators. Estimator synthesis is done using a cone-complementarity linearisation algorithm for the rank-constraints. The results are illustrated via an example.

  6. Dynamical jumping real-time fault-tolerant routing protocol for wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guowei; Lin, Chi; Xia, Feng; Yao, Lin; Zhang, He; Liu, Bing

    2010-01-01

    In time-critical wireless sensor network (WSN) applications, a high degree of reliability is commonly required. A dynamical jumping real-time fault-tolerant routing protocol (DMRF) is proposed in this paper. Each node utilizes the remaining transmission time of the data packets and the state of the forwarding candidate node set to dynamically choose the next hop. Once node failure, network congestion or void region occurs, the transmission mode will switch to jumping transmission mode, which can reduce the transmission time delay, guaranteeing the data packets to be sent to the destination node within the specified time limit. By using feedback mechanism, each node dynamically adjusts the jumping probabilities to increase the ratio of successful transmission. Simulation results show that DMRF can not only efficiently reduce the effects of failure nodes, congestion and void region, but also yield higher ratio of successful transmission, smaller transmission delay and reduced number of control packets. PMID:22294933

  7. Understanding Vertical Jump Potentiation: A Deterministic Model.

    PubMed

    Suchomel, Timothy J; Lamont, Hugh S; Moir, Gavin L

    2016-06-01

    This review article discusses previous postactivation potentiation (PAP) literature and provides a deterministic model for vertical jump (i.e., squat jump, countermovement jump, and drop/depth jump) potentiation. There are a number of factors that must be considered when designing an effective strength-power potentiation complex (SPPC) focused on vertical jump potentiation. Sport scientists and practitioners must consider the characteristics of the subject being tested and the design of the SPPC itself. Subject characteristics that must be considered when designing an SPPC focused on vertical jump potentiation include the individual's relative strength, sex, muscle characteristics, neuromuscular characteristics, current fatigue state, and training background. Aspects of the SPPC that must be considered for vertical jump potentiation include the potentiating exercise, level and rate of muscle activation, volume load completed, the ballistic or non-ballistic nature of the potentiating exercise, and the rest interval(s) used following the potentiating exercise. Sport scientists and practitioners should design and seek SPPCs that are practical in nature regarding the equipment needed and the rest interval required for a potentiated performance. If practitioners would like to incorporate PAP as a training tool, they must take the athlete training time restrictions into account as a number of previous SPPCs have been shown to require long rest periods before potentiation can be realized. Thus, practitioners should seek SPPCs that may be effectively implemented in training and that do not require excessive rest intervals that may take away from valuable training time. Practitioners may decrease the necessary time needed to realize potentiation by improving their subject's relative strength. PMID:26712510

  8. Knee Control and Jump-Landing Technique in Young Basketball and Floorball Players.

    PubMed

    Leppänen, M; Pasanen, K; Kulmala, J-P; Kujala, U M; Krosshaug, T; Kannus, P; Perttunen, J; Vasankari, T; Parkkari, J

    2016-04-01

    Poor knee alignment is associated with increased loading of the joints, ligaments and tendons, and may increase the risk of injury. The study purpose was to compare differences in knee kinematics between basketball and floorball players during a vertical drop jump (VDJ) task. We wanted to investigate whether basketball players, whose sport includes frequent jump-landings, exhibited better knee control compared with floorball players, whose sport involves less jumping. Complete data was obtained from 173 basketball and 141 floorball players. Peak knee valgus and flexion angles during the VDJ were analyzed by 3D motion analysis.Larger knee valgus angles were observed among basketball players (- 3.2°, 95%CI -4.5 to - 2.0) compared with floorball players (- 0.9°, 95%CI -2.3 to 0.6) (P=0.022). Basketball players landed with a decreased peak knee flexion angle (83.1°, 95%CI 81.4 to 84.8) compared with floorball players (86.5°, 95%CI 84.6 to 88.4) (P=0.016). There were no significant differences in height, weight or BMI between basketball and floorball players. Female athletes exhibited significantly greater valgus angles than males. This study revealed that proper knee control during jump-landing does not seem to develop in young athletes simply by playing the sport, despite the fact that jump-landings occur frequently in practice and games. PMID:26701826

  9. High-peak-power single-oscillator actively Q-switched mode-locked Tm3+-doped fiber laser and its application for high-average output power mid-IR supercontinuum generation in a ZBLAN fiber.

    PubMed

    Kneis, Christian; Donelan, Brenda; Manek-Hönninger, Inka; Robin, Thierry; Cadier, Benoît; Eichhorn, Marc; Kieleck, Christelle

    2016-06-01

    A single-oscillator actively Q-switched mode-locked (QML) thulium-doped silica fiber laser is presented and used to pump a ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fiber for mid-infrared (mid-IR) supercontinuum (SC) generation. The fiber laser provided high-peak-power levels directly from the oscillator delivering single mode-locked pulse energies up to 48 μJ, being 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than conventional continuous wave mode-locked lasers. By pumping a ZBLAN fiber specially designed for high-output-power SC generation, 7.8 W have been achieved in all spectral bands with a spectrum extending to 4.2 μm. PMID:27244410

  10. Seasonal differences in jump performance in the Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea).

    PubMed

    Lees, John J; Folkow, Lars P; Codd, Jonathan R; Nudds, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    Fat storage is essential to the survival of many bird species, providing energy reserves, but can have an effect on locomotor performance with an associated potential increase in predation risk. In particular, the ability to initiate flight through jumping is critical to predator avoidance and may be influenced by changes in body mass (Mb). Here we investigate seasonal differences in the jump take-off performance of high Arctic Svalbard rock ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea) resulting from around a 50% increase in Mb during winter as a result of fat deposition. Using force-plate data and videography, we reveal that, in the absence of alterations to take-off angle, winter Svalbard rock ptarmigan are unable to increase hind-limb power output during jumping to compensate for their increased Mb. As a result, peak take-off velocity is reduced by 42% and jump duration is also extended during winter. The consequences of reduced jumping performance upon Svalbard ptarmigan during winter may be relatively small given their low risk of predation during this season. It may be, however, that the observed reduction in jumping performance when fat may contribute to the sub-maximal pattern of fat acquisition observed in other bird species. PMID:24659246

  11. Breast Support Garments are Ineffective at Reducing Breast Motion During an Aqua Aerobics Jumping Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Chris; Ayres, Bessie; Scurr, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    The buoyant forces of water during aquatic exercise may provide a form of ‘natural’ breast support and help to minimise breast motion and alleviate exercise induced breast pain. Six larger-breasted females performed standing vertical land and water-based jumps, whilst wearing three breast support conditions. Underwater video cameras recorded the motion of the trunk and right breast. Trunk and relative breast kinematics were calculated as well as exercised induced breast pain scores. Key results showed that the swimsuit and sports bra were able to significantly reduce the superioinferior breast range of motion by 0.04 and 0.05 m, respectively, and peak velocity by 0.23 and 0.33 m/s, respectively, during land-based jumping when compared to the bare-breasted condition, but were ineffective at reducing breast kinematics during water-based jumping. Furthermore, the magnitude of the swimsuit superioinferior breast range of motion during water-based jumping was significantly greater than land-based jumping (0.13 m and 0.06 m), yet there were no significant differences in exercise induced breast pain, thus contradicting previously published relationships between these parameters on land. Furthermore, the addition of an external breast support garment was able to reduce breast kinematics on land but not in water, suggesting the swimsuit and sports bras were ineffective and improvements in swimwear breast support garments may help to reduce excessive breast motion during aqua aerobic jumping exercises. PMID:26240648

  12. Jump Horse Safety: Reconciling Public Debate and Australian Thoroughbred Jump Racing Data, 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Ruse, Karen; Davison, Aidan; Bridle, Kerry

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary This paper documents the dynamics of Australian thoroughbred jump racing in the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with the aim of informing debate about risks to horses and the future of this activity. We conclude that the safety of Australian jump racing has improved in recent years but that steeplechases are considerably riskier for horses than hurdle races. Abstract Thoroughbred jump racing sits in the spotlight of contemporary welfare and ethical debates about horse racing. In Australia, jump racing comprises hurdle and steeplechase races and has ceased in all but two states, Victoria and South Australia. This paper documents the size, geography, composition, and dynamics of Australian jump racing for the 2012, 2013, and 2014 seasons with a focus on debate about risks to horses. We found that the majority of Australian jump racing is regional, based in Victoria, and involves a small group of experienced trainers and jockeys. Australian jump horses are on average 6.4 years of age. The jump career of the majority of horses involves participating in three or less hurdle races and over one season. Almost one quarter of Australian jump horses race only once. There were ten horse fatalities in races over the study period, with an overall fatality rate of 5.1 fatalities per 1000 horses starting in a jump race (0.51%). There was significant disparity between the fatality rate for hurdles, 0.75 fatalities per 1000 starts (0.075%) and steeplechases, 14 fatalities per 1000 starts (1.4%). Safety initiatives introduced by regulators in 2010 appear to have significantly decreased risks to horses in hurdles but have had little or no effect in steeplechases. Our discussion considers these data in light of public controversy, political debate, and industry regulation related to jump horse safety. PMID:26506396

  13. Altered astronaut lower limb and mass center kinematics in downward jumping following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, D. J.; Jackson, D. K.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    1997-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to the microgravity conditions encountered during space flight exhibit postural and gait instabilities upon return to earth that could impair critical postflight performance. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of microgravity exposure on astronauts' performance of two-footed jump landings. Nine astronauts from several Space Shuttle missions were tested both preflight and postflight with a series of voluntary, two-footed downward hops from a 30-cm-high step. A video-based, three-dimensional motion-analysis system permitted calculation of body segment positions and joint angular displacements. Phase-plane plots of knee, hip, and ankle angular velocities compared with the corresponding joint angles were used to describe the lower limb kinematics during jump landings. The position of the whole-body center of mass (COM) was also estimated in the sagittal plane using an eight-segment body model. Four of nine subjects exhibited expanded phase-plane portraits postflight, with significant increases in peak joint flexion angles and flexion rates following space flight. In contrast, two subjects showed significant contractions of their phase-plane portraits postflight and three subjects showed insignificant overall changes after space flight. Analysis of the vertical COM motion generally supported the joint angle results. Subjects with expanded joint angle phase-plane portraits postflight exhibited larger downward deviations of the COM and longer times from impact to peak deflection, as well as lower upward recovery velocities. Subjects with postflight joint angle phase-plane contraction demonstrated opposite effects in the COM motion. The joint kinematics results indicated the existence of two contrasting response modes due to microgravity exposure. Most subjects exhibited "compliant" impact absorption postflight, consistent with decreased limb stiffness and damping, and a reduction in the bandwidth of the postural control system

  14. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  15. Dynamic control of muscle stiffness and H reflex modulation during hopping and jumping in man.

    PubMed Central

    Dyhre-Poulsen, P; Simonsen, E B; Voigt, M

    1991-01-01

    1. The objective of the study was to evaluate the functional effects of reflexes on muscle mechanics during natural voluntary movements. The excitability of the H (Hoffmann) reflex was used as a measure of the excitability of the central component of the stretch reflex. 2. We recorded EMG, ground reaction forces and the H reflex in the soleus muscle in humans while landing from a downward jump, during drop jumping and during hopping. The movements were also recorded by high-speed cinematography. 3. The EMG pattern was adapted to the motor task. When landing the EMG in the soleus muscle and in the anterior tibial muscle showed preinnervation and alternating activity after touch down. When hopping there was little preinnervation in the soleus muscle, and the activity was initiated about 45 ms after touch down by a peak and continued unbroken until lift off. In the drop jumps the EMG pattern depended on the jumping style used by the subject. 4. The H reflex in the soleus muscle was strongly modulated in a manner appropriate to the requirements of the motor task. During landing from a downward jump the H reflex was low at touch down whereas while hopping it was high at touch down. During drop jumping it was variable and influenced by the jumping technique. 5. Muscle stiffness in the ankle joint was negative after touch down when landing, but always positive when hopping. 6. It is suggested that during landing the alternating EMG pattern after touch down was programmed and little influenced by reflexes. During hopping reflexes could contribute to the initial peak and the EMG during lift off. 7. The programmed EMG activity and the suppression of the H reflex while landing probably contribute to the development of the negative stiffness and change the muscles from a spring to a damping unit. PMID:1890636

  16. The Boson peak in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G M; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line TW. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih. PMID:23771033

  17. Hale Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the mountains that make up the central peak region of Hale Crater, located near 35.8oS, 36.5oW. Dark, smooth-surfaced sand dunes are seen to be climbing up the mountainous slopes. The central peak of a crater consists of rock brought up during the impact from below the crater floor. This autumn image is illuminated from the upper left and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  18. The Physics of Equestrian Show Jumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinner, Art

    2014-04-01

    This article discusses the kinematics and dynamics of equestrian show jumping. For some time I have attended a series of show jumping events at Spruce Meadows, an international equestrian center near Calgary, Alberta, often referred to as the "Wimbledon of equestrian jumping." I have always had a desire to write an article such as this one, but when I searched the Internet for information and looked at YouTube presentations, I could only find simplistic references to Newton's laws and the conservation of mechanical energy principle. Nowhere could I find detailed calculations. On the other hand, there were several biomechanical articles with empirical reports of the results of kinetic and dynamic investigations of show jumping using high-speed digital cameras and force plates. They summarize their results in tables that give information about the motion of a horse jumping over high fences (1.40 m) and the magnitudes of the forces encountered when landing. However, they do not describe the physics of these results.

  19. A locust-inspired miniature jumping robot.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Valentin; Gvirsman, Omer; Ben Hanan, Uri; Weiss, Avi; Ayali, Amir; Kosa, Gabor

    2015-12-01

    Unmanned ground vehicles are mostly wheeled, tracked, or legged. These locomotion mechanisms have a limited ability to traverse rough terrain and obstacles that are higher than the robot's center of mass. In order to improve the mobility of small robots it is necessary to expand the variety of their motion gaits. Jumping is one of nature's solutions to the challenge of mobility in difficult terrain. The desert locust is the model for the presented bio-inspired design of a jumping mechanism for a small mobile robot. The basic mechanism is similar to that of the semilunar process in the hind legs of the locust, and is based on the cocking of a torsional spring by wrapping a tendon-like wire around the shaft of a miniature motor. In this study we present the jumping mechanism design, and the manufacturing and performance analysis of two demonstrator prototypes. The most advanced jumping robot demonstrator is power autonomous, weighs 23 gr, and is capable of jumping to a height of 3.35 m, covering a distance of 1.37 m. PMID:26602094

  20. Determination of the Best Pre-Jump Height for Improvement of Two-Legged Vertical Jump

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Mahsa; Zolaktaf, Vahid; Marandi, Sayyed M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Athletic performance in many sports depends on two-legged vertical jump. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of different pre-jump height exercises on two-legged vertical jump and to determine the best pre-jump height(s). Methods: Subjects included 35 females and 42 males. By matched randomized sampling, subjects of each sex were assigned into four groups, namely, control, 10-cm hurdle, 20-cm hurdle, and 30-cm hurdle. They participated in the same training program for 6 weeks. Statistical analyses were based on one-way and repeated-measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Analysis of the data showed that practice over hurdles of 10 cm was better than no hurdle and hurdles of >10 cm. Also, jump attempts over hurdles were efficient for trained athletes, but not for untrained athletes. For both sexes, the rate of spike improvement was much better in the experimental groups than in the control groups; it was independent from the rate of progress in jump, which was relatively less evident. Conclusions: It is likely that rather than increasing jump height, training over hurdle enabled the players to use a higher percent of their jump potentials. PMID:23717758

  1. Increase in Jumping Height Associated with Maximal Effort Vertical Depth Jumps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedi, John F.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    In order to assess if there existed a statistically significant increase in jumping performance when dropping from different heights, 32 males, aged 19 to 26, performed a series of maximal effort vertical jumps after dropping from eight heights onto a force plate. Results are analyzed. (Author/MT)

  2. Comparing Fast Pressure Jump and Temperature Jump Protein Folding Experiments and Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Prigozhin, Maxim B.; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The unimolecular folding reaction of small proteins is now amenable to a very direct mechanistic comparison between experiment and simulation. We present such a comparison of microsecond pressure and temperature jump refolding kinetics of the engineered WW domain FiP35, a model system for beta sheet folding. Both perturbations produce experimentally a faster and a slower kinetic phase, the “slow” microsecond phase being activated. The fast phase shows differences between perturbation methods and is closer to the downhill limit by temperature jump, but closer to the transiently populated intermediate limit by pressure jump. These observations make more demands on simulations of the folding process than just a rough comparison of time scales. To complement experiments, we calculated several pressure jump and temperature jump all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories in explicit solvent, where FiP35 folded in five of the six simulations. We analyzed our pressure jump simulations by kinetic modeling and found that the pressure jump experiments and MD simulations are most consistent with a 4-state kinetic mechanism. Together, our experimental and computational data highlight FiP35’s position at the boundary where activated intermediates and downhill folding meet, and we show that this model protein is an excellent candidate for further pressure jump molecular dynamics studies to compare experiment and modeling at the folding mechanism level. PMID:25988868

  3. Popcorn: critical temperature, jump and sound.

    PubMed

    Virot, Emmanuel; Ponomarenko, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    Popcorn bursts open, jumps and emits a 'pop' sound in some hundredths of a second. The physical origin of these three observations remains unclear in the literature. We show that the critical temperature 180°C at which almost all of popcorn pops is consistent with an elementary pressure vessel scenario. We observe that popcorn jumps with a 'leg' of starch which is compressed on the ground. As a result, popcorn is midway between two categories of moving systems: explosive plants using fracture mechanisms and jumping animals using muscles. By synchronizing video recordings with acoustic recordings, we propose that the familiar 'pop' sound of the popcorn is caused by the release of water vapour. PMID:25673298

  4. Popcorn: critical temperature, jump and sound

    PubMed Central

    Virot, Emmanuel; Ponomarenko, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Popcorn bursts open, jumps and emits a ‘pop’ sound in some hundredths of a second. The physical origin of these three observations remains unclear in the literature. We show that the critical temperature 180°C at which almost all of popcorn pops is consistent with an elementary pressure vessel scenario. We observe that popcorn jumps with a ‘leg’ of starch which is compressed on the ground. As a result, popcorn is midway between two categories of moving systems: explosive plants using fracture mechanisms and jumping animals using muscles. By synchronizing video recordings with acoustic recordings, we propose that the familiar ‘pop’ sound of the popcorn is caused by the release of water vapour. PMID:25673298

  5. Jumping, snapping and popping at nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haviland, David

    2015-03-01

    The 'jump-to-contact' instability is well known in Atomic Force Microscopy. When a tip attached to a soft cantilever approaches a surface, the large attractive force gradient disrupts the quasi-static force balance and the tip snaps in to contact with the surface. Less appreciated is the converse instability, where a soft liquid-like polymer surface jumps to meet the tip. This nano-scale pop is inaudible, but it does leave a distinctive signature if one carefully monitors the cantilever's steady state dynamics when driven with multiple tones. The nonlinear tip-surface interaction causes intermodulation, or frequency mixing of the drive tones. When many intermodulation products are measured close to the cantilever resonance the spectrum can be transformed to reveal the in-phase and quadrature forces acting on the tip, as a function of oscillation amplitude. We present experimental measurements and theoretical modelling that reveal this surface-jump-to-tip instability.

  6. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  7. Recent Advancements in Lightning Jump Algorithm Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawrence D.

    2010-01-01

    In the past year, the primary objectives were to show the usefulness of total lightning as compared to traditional cloud-to-ground (CG) networks, test the lightning jump algorithm configurations in other regions of the country, increase the number of thunderstorms within our thunderstorm database, and to pinpoint environments that could prove difficult for any lightning jump configuration. A total of 561 thunderstorms have been examined in the past year (409 non-severe, 152 severe) from four regions of the country (North Alabama, Washington D.C., High Plains of CO/KS, and Oklahoma). Results continue to indicate that the 2 lightning jump algorithm configuration holds the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, with a probability of detection (POD) at 81%, a false alarm rate (FAR) of 45%, a critical success index (CSI) of 49% and a Heidke Skill Score (HSS) of 0.66. The second best performing algorithm configuration was the Threshold 4 algorithm, which had a POD of 72%, FAR of 51%, a CSI of 41% and an HSS of 0.58. Because a more complex algorithm configuration shows the most promise in terms of prospective operational lightning jump algorithms, accurate thunderstorm cell tracking work must be undertaken to track lightning trends on an individual thunderstorm basis over time. While these numbers for the 2 configuration are impressive, the algorithm does have its weaknesses. Specifically, low-topped and tropical cyclone thunderstorm environments are present issues for the 2 lightning jump algorithm, because of the suppressed vertical depth impact on overall flash counts (i.e., a relative dearth in lightning). For example, in a sample of 120 thunderstorms from northern Alabama that contained 72 missed events by the 2 algorithm 36% of the misses were associated with these two environments (17 storms).

  8. Picosecond pulse amplification up to a peak power of 42  W by a quantum-dot tapered optical amplifier and a mode-locked laser emitting at 1.26 µm.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph; Drzewietzki, Lukas; Rossetti, Mattia; Xu, Tianhong; Bardella, Paolo; Simos, Hercules; Mesaritakis, Charis; Ruiz, Mike; Krestnikov, Igor; Livshits, Daniil; Krakowski, Michel; Syvridis, Dimitris; Montrosset, Ivo; Rafailov, Edik U; Elsäßer, Wolfgang; Breuer, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    We experimentally study the generation and amplification of stable picosecond-short optical pulses by a master oscillator power-amplifier configuration consisting of a monolithic quantum-dot-based gain-guided tapered laser and amplifier emitting at 1.26 µm without pulse compression, external cavity, gain- or Q-switched operation. We report a peak power of 42 W and a figure-of-merit for second-order nonlinear imaging of 38.5  W2 at a repetition rate of 16 GHz and an associated pulse width of 1.37 ps. PMID:25680056

  9. Performance analysis of jump-gliding locomotion for miniature robotics.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, A; Zufferey, Jean-Christohphe; Floreano, Dario; Kovač, M

    2015-04-01

    Recent work suggests that jumping locomotion in combination with a gliding phase can be used as an effective mobility principle in robotics. Compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase, the potential benefits of hybrid jump-gliding locomotion includes the ability to extend the distance travelled and reduce the potentially damaging impact forces upon landing. This publication evaluates the performance of jump-gliding locomotion and provides models for the analysis of the relevant dynamics of flight. It also defines a jump-gliding envelope that encompasses the range that can be achieved with jump-gliding robots and that can be used to evaluate the performance and improvement potential of jump-gliding robots. We present first a planar dynamic model and then a simplified closed form model, which allow for quantification of the distance travelled and the impact energy on landing. In order to validate the prediction of these models, we validate the model with experiments using a novel jump-gliding robot, named the 'EPFL jump-glider'. It has a mass of 16.5 g and is able to perform jumps from elevated positions, perform steered gliding flight, land safely and traverse on the ground by repetitive jumping. The experiments indicate that the developed jump-gliding model fits very well with the measured flight data using the EPFL jump-glider, confirming the benefits of jump-gliding locomotion to mobile robotics. The jump-glide envelope considerations indicate that the EPFL jump-glider, when traversing from a 2 m height, reaches 74.3% of optimal jump-gliding distance compared to pure jumping without a gliding phase which only reaches 33.4% of the optimal jump-gliding distance. Methods of further improving flight performance based on the models and inspiration from biological systems are presented providing mechanical design pathways to future jump-gliding robot designs. PMID:25811417

  10. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  11. Peak of Desire

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Julie Y.; Bargh, John A.

    2008-01-01

    In three studies, we explore the existence of an evolved sensitivity to the peak as consistent with the evolutionary origins of many of our basic preferences. Activating the evolved motive of mating activates related adaptive mechanisms, including a general sensitivity to cues of growth and decay associated with determining mate value in human courtship. We establish that priming the mating goal also activates as well an evaluative bias that influences how people evaluate cues of growth. Specifically, living kinds that are immature or past their prime are devalued, whereas living kinds at their peak become increasingly valued. Study 1 establishes this goal-driven effect for human stimuli indirectly related to the mating goal. Studies 2 and 3 establish that the evaluative bias produced by the active mating goal extends to living kinds but not artifacts. PMID:18578847

  12. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  13. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  14. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  15. The epidemiology of injury in bungee jumping, BASE jumping, and skydiving.

    PubMed

    Søreide, Kjetil

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge regarding epidemiology of injury is of benefit to injury prevention of activities associated with high risk. As relatively 'young' activities, the investigation of injuries and deaths related in extreme sports such as bungee jumping and BASE jumping is relatively sparse. Studies evaluating risk in civilian and military skydiving activities have been reported over the past decades, but technique and equipment has changed. Risk with bungee jumping is only sporadically reported in the literature, most often in connection with eye injuries, but also rare events of serious, life-threatening injuries and even death. BASE is an acronym for Building, Antenna, Span, Earth, which represents the fixed objects from which jumps are made. Estimated risk in BASE jumping for any injury (independent of severity grade) is 0.4-0.5%, which as 5- to 8-fold higher than skydiving. Typically, men outnumber women in a ratio of 10:1 in both injuries and case fatality rates. Age is frequently reported to range from 30 to 40 years. Notably, differences in training and environmental locations exist between recreational skydiving and BASE jumping. As BASE jumps are made from lower altitudes than skydives, jumpers generally fall at lower speeds, have far less aerodynamic control, and may lose flying stability. Yet, typical injuries include a bruised or sprained ankle during landing. Protective gear including helmet and pads may help to prevent such injuries, while more complex knowledge of human factors, environment and training are needed to prevent fatal injuries. PMID:22824842

  16. Jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljkovic, Nenad; Preston, Daniel J.; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-07-01

    Micro- and nanoscale wetting phenomena have been an active area of research due to its potential for improving engineered system performance involving phase change. With the recent advancements in micro/nanofabrication techniques, structured surfaces can now be designed to allow condensing coalesced droplets to spontaneously jump off the surface due to the conversion of excess surface energy into kinetic energy. In addition to being removed at micrometric length scales (˜10 μm), jumping water droplets also attain a positive electrostatic charge (˜10-100 fC) from the hydrophobic coating/condensate interaction. In this work, we take advantage of this droplet charging to demonstrate jumping-droplet electrostatic energy harvesting. The charged droplets jump between superhydrophobic copper oxide and hydrophilic copper surfaces to create an electrostatic potential and generate power during formation of atmospheric dew. We demonstrated power densities of ˜15 pW/cm2, which, in the near term, can be improved to ˜1 μW/cm2. This work demonstrates a surface engineered platform that promises to be low cost and scalable for atmospheric energy harvesting and electric power generation.

  17. Safety assessment of jumps in ski racing.

    PubMed

    Schindelwig, K; Reichl, W; Kaps, P; Mössner, M; Nachbauer, W

    2015-12-01

    The influence of important parameters on the flight trajectory for jumps in downhill World Cup races was investigated. To quantify the impact injury risk at landing, the parameter equivalent landing height (ELH) was introduced, which considered a variable slope inclination during the landing movement. Altogether, 145 runs at four different jumps in World Cup races and trainings were recorded and analyzed. A simulation model was developed to predict the flight phase of the skier. Drag and lift areas were selected by parameter identification to fit the simulation trajectory to the two-dimensional data from the video analysis. The maximum values of the ELH which can be absorbed with muscle force was taken from the study of Minetti et al. for elite female and male ski racers. A sensitivity analysis based on the four jumps showed that ELH is mainly influenced by takeoff angle, takeoff speed, and the steepness of the landing surface. With the help of the developed simulation software, it should be possible to predict the ELH for jumps in advance. In case of an excessive ELH, improvements can be made by changing the takeoff inclination or the approach speed. PMID:25123506

  18. Jumping on the Social Media Bandwagon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Should a school district jump on the social media bandwagon? Yes! Social media provide a low-cost way to communicate school district priorities, influence decision makers, and tell its story without filters. Equally important, social media are where constituents are spending a lot of their time. With more than 800 million members, Facebook is an…

  19. The walk and jump of Equisetum spores.

    PubMed

    Marmottant, Philippe; Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Bienaimé, Diane

    2013-11-01

    Equisetum plants (horsetails) reproduce by producing tiny spherical spores that are typically 50 µm in diameter. The spores have four elaters, which are flexible ribbon-like appendages that are initially wrapped around the main spore body and that deploy upon drying or fold back in humid air. If elaters are believed to help dispersal, the exact mechanism for spore motion remains unclear in the literature. In this manuscript, we present observations of the 'walks' and 'jumps' of Equisetum spores, which are novel types of spore locomotion mechanisms compared to the ones of other spores. Walks are driven by humidity cycles, each cycle inducing a small step in a random direction. The dispersal range from the walk is limited, but the walk provides key steps to either exit the sporangium or to reorient and refold. Jumps occur when the spores suddenly thrust themselves after being tightly folded. They result in a very efficient dispersal: even spores jumping from the ground can catch the wind again, whereas non-jumping spores stay on the ground. The understanding of these movements, which are solely driven by humidity variations, conveys biomimetic inspiration for a new class of self-propelled objects. PMID:24026816

  20. Jumping the Alligators in the Ditch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Rims

    Poor black young people in rural Mississippi contemplate their schooling with the same feelings as their friends who dare to jump the local ditches filled with alligators: the odds are against escaping the alligators, and the advantages of getting to the far side are not very apparent. Living in conditions of extreme poverty, these young people…

  1. Jumping Genes: The Transposable DNAs of Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Claire M.; Berg, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Transposons are transposable elements that carry genes for antibiotic resistance. Provides background information on the structure and organization of these "jumping genes" in bacteria. Also describes the use of transposons in tagging genes and lists pertinent references and resource materials. (DH)

  2. Understanding the Physics of Bungee Jumping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Andre; Uylings, Peter; Kedzierska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often…

  3. Kinematic, Dynamic and EMG Analysis of Drop Jumps in Female Elite Triple Jump Athletes.

    PubMed

    Čoh, Milan; Matjačić, Zlatko; Peharec, Stanislav; Bačić, Petar; Rausavjević, Nikola; Maćkala, Krzysztof

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was a biodynamic analysis of the kinematic, dynamic and EMG parameters of two types of drop jumps (heights of 25 cm and 45 cm). The sample of measured subjects included four female elite triple jump athletes, with their best results varying from 13.33 to 15.06 meters. The kinematic and dynamic parameters were calculated with the use of a bipedal tensiometric force plate, which was synchronized with nine CCD cameras. A 16-channel electromyography (BTS Pocket, Myolab) was used to analyze the EMG activation of the following muscles: m. erector spinae, m. gluteus, m. rectus femoris, m. vastus medialis, m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps femoris, m. soleus and m. gastrocnemius medialis. In the drop jump from a 25 cm height, the measured subjects achieved the following results: height of jump 43.37 ± 5.39 cm and ground reaction force 2770 ± 411 N. In comparison, results for the drop jump from a 45 cm height were: height of jump 45.22 ± 4.65 cm and ground reaction force 2947 ± 366 N. Vertical velocity of the take-off in the 25 cm drop jump was 2.77 ± 0.19 ms(-1) and in the 45 cm drop jump it was 2.86 ± 0.15 ms(-1). Observation of the EMG activation revealed the proximal to distal principle of muscle activation at work in both types of drop jumps. In the first phase of the concentric phase the most active muscles were m. gluteus maximus and m. rectus femoris. The greatest activity of m. gastrocnemius medialis and m. soleus was noticed in the last third of the take-off action. Significantly high EMG activation of m. vastus medialis and m. vastus lateralis was already shown in the flight phase prior to the feet making contact with the ground. PMID:26434025

  4. Autoregulating Jump Performance to Induce Functional Overreaching.

    PubMed

    Claudino, João G; Cronin, John B; Mezêncio, Bruno; Pinho, João P; Pereira, Conrado; Mochizuki, Luis; Amadio, Alberto C; Serrão, Julio C

    2016-08-01

    Claudino, JG, Cronin, JB, Mezêncio, B, Pinho, JP, Pereira, C, Mochizuki, L, Amadio, AC, and Serrão, JC. Autoregulating jump performance to induce functional overreaching. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2242-2249, 2016-The purpose of this study was to determine whether autoregulating jump performance using the minimal individual difference (MID) associated with countermovement jump (CMJ) height could be used to regulate and monitor a training phase that elicited functional overreaching and tapering in team sport athletes. The participants were familiarized with the jump and then the CMJ height reliability was quantified to determine the MID. Countermovement jump height was assessed in the pretesting session (T0), at the end of 4 weeks of intensified training (T1), and after 2 weeks of tapering (T2). Eighteen national level U17 male futsal players were randomly allocated into the regulated group (RG; n = 9) and the control group (CG; n = 9). The RG performed 6 weeks of training with the training load regulated by mean height of CMJ with MID, whereas the CG performed the preplanned training. The differences between groups and across time points were compared by a 2-way analysis of variance. In the RG, the MID loading was increased in weeks 3 and 4 (8.2 and 14.5%, respectively; p < 0.001) compared with the preplanned loading of the CG during the overreaching phase. In the jump results, the RG significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced CMJ height during T1 (effect size [ES] = -0.31; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.58 to -0.02); however, there were no significant changes in the CG jump height at T1 and T2. At T2, the RG significantly increased CMJ height above baseline (ES = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.09 to 0.51). Researchers and practitioners could use this autoregulating method to regulate and monitor training load to achieve functional overreaching in youth futsal players. PMID:26808857

  5. Hormonal responses in strenuous jumping effort.

    PubMed

    Bosco, C; Tihanyl, J; Rivalta, L; Parlato, G; Tranquilli, C; Pulvirenti, G; Foti, C; Viru, M; Viru, A

    1996-02-01

    In order to test the possibility for rapid responses of blood hormone levels in short-term supramaximal exercises, serum concentrations of corticotropin (ACTH), cortisol (C), total testosterone (tT), free testosterone (fT), growth hormone (GH), thyrotropin (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), free triiodothyronine (fT3), prolactin (PRL), insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were determined by RIA procedures in blood samples obtained before and immediately after a 60-s period of consecutive vertical jumps (Bosco test). The study subjects were 16 Italian professional soccer players. Immediately after exercise, significant increases (p < 0.05) were found in the concentrations of ACTH (by 39%), C (by 14%), TSH (by 20%), fT3 (by 28%), fT4 (by 30%), tT (by 12%), fT (by 13%), and SHBG (by 21%). Significant changes were not detected in the blood levels of GH, IGF-I and PRL. Most pronounced testosterone responses were typical for persons of high jumping performance (the increase of serum tT correlated with average power output, r = 0.61 and jumping height, r = 0.66). The larger the drop in power output during 60-s jumping, the higher was the thyroid response: the difference in jumping height between the first and last 15-s period correlated with increases in TSH (r = 0.52) and in fT4, (r = 0.55). In conclusion, the obtained results indicate that in intense exercise, causing the rapid development of fatigue, rapid increases in serum levels of hormones of the pituitary-adrenocortical, pituitary-gonadal and pituitary-thyroid systems occur. PMID:8743723

  6. Hydrodynamics and energetics of jumping copepod nauplii and copepodids.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Navish; Andersen, Anders; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Within its life cycle, a copepod goes through drastic changes in size, shape and swimming mode. In particular, there is a stark difference between the early (nauplius) and later (copepodid) stages. Copepods inhabit an intermediate Reynolds number regime (between ~1 and 100) where both viscosity and inertia are potentially important, and the Reynolds number changes by an order of magnitude during growth. Thus we expect the life stage related changes experienced by a copepod to result in hydrodynamic and energetic differences, ultimately affecting the fitness. To quantify these differences, we measured the swimming kinematics and fluid flow around jumping Acartia tonsa at different stages of its life cycle, using particle image velocimetry and particle tracking velocimetry. We found that the flow structures around nauplii and copepodids are topologically different, with one and two vortex rings, respectively. Our measurements suggest that copepodids cover a larger distance compared to their body size in each jump and are also hydrodynamically quieter, as the flow disturbance they create attenuates faster with distance. Also, copepodids are energetically more efficient than nauplii, presumably due to the change in hydrodynamic regime accompanied with a well-adapted body form and swimming stroke. PMID:24948628

  7. The effects of passive leg press training on jumping performance, speed, and muscle power.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chiang; Chen, Chuan-Shou; Ho, Wei-Hua; Füle, Róbert János; Chung, Pao-Hung; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2013-06-01

    Passive leg press (PLP) training was developed based on the concepts of the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) and the benefits of high muscle contraction velocity. Passive leg press training enables lower limb muscle groups to apply a maximum downward force against a platform moved up and down at high frequency by an electric motor. Thus, these muscle groups accomplished both concentric and eccentric isokinetic contractions in a passive, rapid, and repetitive manner. This study investigates the effects of 10 weeks of PLP training at high and low movement frequencies have on jumping performance, speed, and muscle power. The authors selected 30 college students who had not performed systematic resistance training in the previous 6 months, including traditional resistance training at a squat frequency of 0.5 Hz, PLP training at a low frequency of 0.5 Hz, and PLP training at a high frequency of 2.5 Hz, and randomly divided them into 3 groups (n = 10). The participants' vertical jump, drop jump, 30-m sprint performance, explosive force, and SSC efficiency were tested under the same experimental procedures at pre- and post-training. Results reveal that high-frequency PLP training significantly increased participants' vertical jump, drop jump, 30-m sprint performance, instantaneous force, peak power, and SSC efficiency (p < 0.05). Additionally, their change rate abilities were substantially superior to those of the traditional resistance training (p < 0.05). The low-frequency PLP training significantly increased participants' vertical jump, 30-m sprint performance, instantaneous force, and peak power (p < 0.05). However, traditional resistance training only increased participants' 30-m sprint performance and peak power (p < 0.05). The findings suggest that jump performance, speed, and muscle power significantly improved after 10 weeks of PLP training at high movement frequency. A PLP training machine powered by an electrical motor enables muscles of the lower extremities to

  8. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  9. Berreman mode and epsilon near zero mode.

    PubMed

    Vassant, Simon; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Marquier, Francois; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss the existence of an electromagnetic mode propagating in a thin dielectric film deposited on a metallic film at the particular frequency such that the dielectric permittivity vanishes. We discuss the remarkable properties of this mode in terms of extreme subwavelength mode confinment and its potential applications. We also discuss the link between this mode, the IR absorption peak on a thin dielectric film known as Berreman effect and the surface phonon polariton mode at the air/dielectric interface. Finally, we establish a connection with the polarization shift occuring in quantum wells. PMID:23188363

  10. Jumping Jupiter Can Explain Mercury’s Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Fernando; Nesvorný, David; DeSouza, Sandro Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    The orbit of Mercury has large values of eccentricity and inclination that cannot be easily explained if this planet formed on a circular and coplanar orbit. Here, we study the evolution of Mercury’s orbit during the instability related to the migration of the giant planets in the framework of the jumping-Jupiter model. We found that some instability models are able to produce the correct values of Mercury’s eccentricity and inclination, provided that relativistic effects are included in the precession of Mercury’s perihelion. The orbital excitation is driven by the fast change of the normal oscillation modes of the system corresponding to the perihelion precession of Jupiter (for the eccentricity) and the nodal regression of Uranus (for the inclination).

  11. Network-based event-triggered filtering for Markovian jump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huijiao; Shi, Peng; Agarwal, Ramesh K.

    2016-06-01

    The problem of event-triggered H∞ filtering for networked Markovian jump system is studied in this paper. A dynamic discrete event-triggered scheme is designed to choose the transmitted data for different Markovian jumping modes. The time-delay modelling method is employed to describe the event-triggered scheme and the network-related behaviour, such as transmission delay, data package dropout and disorder, into a networked Markovian time-delay jump system. Furthermore, a sufficient condition is derived to guarantee that the resulting filtering error system is stochastically stable with a prescribed performance index. A co-design method for the H∞ filter and the event-triggered scheme is then proposed. The effectiveness and potential of the theoretic results obtained are illustrated by a simulation example.

  12. Pressure jump relaxation setup with IR detection and millisecond time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiewek, Martin; Krumova, Marina; Hempel, Günter; Blume, Alfred

    2007-04-01

    An instrument is described that allows the use of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy as a detection system for kinetic processes after a pressure jump of up to 100bars. The pressure is generated using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) pump and water as a pressure transducing medium. A flexible membrane separates the liquid sample in the IR cell from the pressure transducing medium. Two electromagnetic switching valves in the setup enable pressure jumps with a decay time of 4ms. The FTIR spectrometer is configured to measure time resolved spectra in the millisecond time regime using the rapid scan mode. All components are computer controlled. For a demonstration of the capability of the method first results on the kinetics of a phase transition between two lamellar phases of an aqueous phospholipid dispersion are presented. This combination of FTIR spectroscopy with the pressure jump relaxation technique can also be used for other systems which display cooperative transitions with concomitant volume changes.

  13. Jump rates for surface diffusion of large molecules from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Patrick Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen

    2015-04-21

    We apply a recently developed stochastic model for the surface diffusion of large molecules to calculate jump rates for 9,10-dithioanthracene on a Cu(111) surface. The necessary input parameters for the stochastic model are calculated from first principles using density functional theory (DFT). We find that the inclusion of van der Waals corrections to the DFT energies is critical to obtain good agreement with experimental results for the adsorption geometry and energy barrier for diffusion. The predictions for jump rates in our model are in excellent agreement with measured values and show a marked improvement over transition state theory (TST). We find that the jump rate prefactor is reduced by an order of magnitude from the TST estimate due to frictional damping resulting from energy exchange with surface phonons, as well as a rotational mode of the diffusing molecule.

  14. Improved Peak Cancellation for PAPR Reduction in OFDM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Lilin; Xiao, Yue; Ni, Wei; Li, Shaoqian

    This letter presents an improved peak cancellation (PC) scheme for peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems. The main idea is based on a serial peak cancellation (SPC) mode for alleviating the peak regrowth of the conventional schemes. Based on the SPC mode, two particular algorithms are developed with different tradeoff between PAPR and computational complexity. Simulation shows that the proposed scheme has a better tradeoff among PAPR, complexity and signal distortion than the conventional schemes.

  15. In Situ Temperature Jump Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Chan-Gyu; Casey, Andrew; Turner, Christopher J.; Griffin, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization is combined with temperature jump methods to develop a new 2D 13C- 13C NMR experiment that yields a factor or 100-170 increase insensitivity. The polaization step is performed at ∼100 K and the sample is subsequently melted with a 10.6 mm laser pulse to yield a sample with highly polarized 13C spins. 13C detected 2D 13C- 13C spectroscopy is performed in the usual manner. PMID:18942782

  16. Entropy jump across an inviscid shock wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salas, Manuel D.; Iollo, Angelo

    1995-01-01

    The shock jump conditions for the Euler equations in their primitive form are derived by using generalized functions. The shock profiles for specific volume, speed, and pressure are shown to be the same, however density has a different shock profile. Careful study of the equations that govern the entropy shows that the inviscid entropy profile has a local maximum within the shock layer. We demonstrate that because of this phenomenon, the entropy, propagation equation cannot be used as a conservation law.

  17. Mantises exchange angular momentum between three rotating body parts to jump precisely to targets.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm; Cullen, Darron A; Dorosenko, Marina; Sutton, Gregory P

    2015-03-16

    Flightless animals have evolved diverse mechanisms to control their movements in air, whether falling with gravity or propelling against it. Many insects jump as a primary mode of locomotion and must therefore precisely control the large torques generated during takeoff. For example, to minimize spin (angular momentum of the body) at takeoff, plant-sucking bugs apply large equal and opposite torques from two propulsive legs [1]. Interacting gear wheels have evolved in some to give precise synchronization of these legs [2, 3]. Once airborne, as a result of either jumping or falling, further adjustments may be needed to control trajectory and orient the body for landing. Tails are used by geckos to control pitch [4, 5] and by Anolis lizards to alter direction [6, 7]. When falling, cats rotate their body [8], while aphids [9] and ants [10, 11] manipulate wind resistance against their legs and thorax. Falling is always downward, but targeted jumping must achieve many possible desired trajectories. We show that when making targeted jumps, juvenile wingless mantises first rotated their abdomen about the thorax to adjust the center of mass and thus regulate spin at takeoff. Once airborne, they then smoothly and sequentially transferred angular momentum in four stages between the jointed abdomen, the two raptorial front legs, and the two propulsive hind legs to produce a controlled jump with a precise landing. Experimentally impairing abdominal movements reduced the overall rotation so that the mantis either failed to grasp the target or crashed into it head first. PMID:25754643

  18. Field measurements in unwadeable natural hydraulic jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle, B.; Pasternack, G.

    2003-04-01

    Recent research in fluvial geomorphology has emphasized the development and application of digital terrain models to better understand process-form relations. However, field measurements in mountain channels have largely been restricted to low velocity or ephemeral flow conditions. To address this problem, a new high-resolution mechanical surveying system was developed at UC Davis and used to measure the 3D bed and water surface topographies of an unwadeable plunging hydraulic jump in the Cache Creek basin, CA. Labeled as the River Truss, the system is capable of making high-resolution form and process measurements over a 30 to 115 m2 area. Bed and water surface DTMs were derived from the field data using AutoCAD. River Truss precision was assessed by DTM differencing the hydraulic jump bed surface topography with a DTM developed from tacheometric survey at low base flows. Bed surface DTMs indicate significant spatial complexity of the underlying bed step in the supercritical flow region and significant downstream bed scour. Water surface DTMs indicate 3D complexity of the plunging flow surface and divergence from 1D free-fall theory. Further study will emphasize the development and deployment of process-based instrumentation such that the complex turbulent air-water flow dynamics associated with natural hydraulic jumps may be better understood. Also, a second generation River Truss that has a larger coverage area and automated data collection has been designed and is now being built.

  19. Charmonium's K2 Peak

    SciTech Connect

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; /Madrid U.

    2005-07-11

    The newly reported Y(4260) becomes the second most massive state in the charmonium family. We argue that it displaces the {psi}(4415) as the (largely) 4s vector charmonium state, recall s-d wave interference to explain the lack of a signal in e{sup -}e{sup +} {yields} hadrons and suggest some further study avenues that can exclude exotic meson assignments. The absence of a J/{psi} KK mode can be understood, beyond phase space suppression, to be a consequence of chiral symmetry. We also provide a model calculation in this sector showing that, although forcing the fit somewhat (which suggests a small sea quark wavefunction component), the state can be incorporated in a standard scheme.

  20. Correlations between sagittal plane kinematics and landing impact force during single-leg lateral jump-landings

    PubMed Central

    Aizawa, Junya; Ohji, Shunsuke; Koga, Hideyuki; Masuda, Tadashi; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The correlations of peak vertical ground reaction force and sagittal angles during single-leg lateral jump-landing with noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury remain unknown. This study aimed to clarify the correlations between kinematics and impact force during lateral jump-landing. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty active males were included in the analysis. A sagittal-view movie camera and force plate were time synchronized. Trunk and lower extremity sagittal angles were measured 100 ms before initial contact and at peak vertical ground reaction force. Peak vertical ground reaction force, time between initial contact and peak vertical ground reaction force, and loading rate were calculated. [Results] The mean sagittal angle was 40.7° ± 7.7° for knee flexion during the flight phase and 16.4° ± 6.3° for pelvic anterior inclination during the landing phase. The mean peak vertical ground reaction force was four times the body weight. The median time to peak vertical ground reaction force was 63.8 ms. The knee flexion during the flight phase and pelvic anterior inclination angles during the landing phase were related to the peak vertical ground reaction force. [Conclusion] Increasing knee flexion and decreasing pelvic anterior inclination might reduce the impact during single-leg lateral jump-landing.

  1. The ingestion of a caffeinated energy drink improves jump performance and activity patterns in elite badminton players.

    PubMed

    Abian, Pablo; Del Coso, Juan; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, Cesar; Areces, Francisco; Ruiz-Vicente, Diana; Lara, Beatriz; Soriano, Lidon; Muñoz, Victor; Abian-Vicen, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a caffeine-containing energy drink to enhance physical and match performance in elite badminton players. Sixteen male and elite badminton players (25.4 ± 7.3 year; 71.8 ± 7.9 kg) participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled and randomised experiment. On two different sessions, badminton players ingested 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo). After 60 min, participants performed the following tests: handgrip maximal force production, smash jump without and with shuttlecock, squat jump, countermovement jump and the agility T-test. Later, a 45-min simulated badminton match was played. Players' number of impacts and heart rate was measured during the match. The ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink increased squat jump height (34.5 ± 4.7 vs. 36.4 ± 4.3 cm; P < 0.05), squat jump peak power (P < 0.05), countermovement jump height (37.7 ± 4.5 vs. 39.5 ± 5.1 cm; P < 0.05) and countermovement jump peak power (P < 0.05). In addition, an increased number of total impacts was found during the badminton match (7395 ± 1594 vs. 7707 ± 2033 impacts; P < 0.05). In conclusion, the results show that the use of caffeine-containing energy drink may be an effective nutritional aid to increase jump performance and activity patterns during game in elite badminton players. PMID:25530454

  2. The role of human ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon interaction and architecture in maximal vertical jumping examined in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farris, Dominic James; Lichtwark, Glen A; Brown, Nicholas A T; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2016-02-01

    Humans utilise elastic tendons of lower limb muscles to store and return energy during walking, running and jumping. Anuran and insect species use skeletal structures and/or dynamics in conjunction with similarly compliant structures to amplify muscle power output during jumping. We sought to examine whether human jumpers use similar mechanisms to aid elastic energy usage in the plantar flexor muscles during maximal vertical jumping. Ten male athletes performed maximal vertical squat jumps. Three-dimensional motion capture and a musculoskeletal model were used to determine lower limb kinematics that were combined with ground reaction force data in an inverse dynamics analysis. B-mode ultrasound imaging of the lateral gastrocnemius (GAS) and soleus (SOL) muscles was used to measure muscle fascicle lengths and pennation angles during jumping. Our results highlighted that both GAS and SOL utilised stretch and recoil of their series elastic elements (SEEs) in a catapult-like fashion, which likely serves to maximise ankle joint power. The resistance of supporting of body weight allowed initial stretch of both GAS and SOL SEEs. A proximal-to-distal sequence of joint moments and decreasing effective mechanical advantage early in the extension phase of the jumping movement were observed. This facilitated a further stretch of the SEE of the biarticular GAS and delayed recoil of the SOL SEE. However, effective mechanical advantage did not increase late in the jump to aid recoil of elastic tissues. PMID:26685172

  3. Determinants of the abilities to jump higher and shorten the contact time in a running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball.

    PubMed

    Miura, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Zushi, Koji

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to obtain useful information for developing training techniques for the running 1-legged vertical jump in basketball (lay-up shot jump). The ability to perform the lay-up shot jump and various basic jumps was measured by testing 19 male basketball players. The basic jumps consisted of the 1-legged repeated rebound jump, the 2-legged repeated rebound jump, and the countermovement jump. Jumping height, contact time, and jumping index (jumping height/contact time) were measured and calculated using a contact mat/computer system that recorded the contact and air times. The jumping index indicates power. No significant correlation existed between the jumping height and contact time of the lay-up shot jump, the 2 components of the lay-up shot jump index. As a result, jumping height and contact time were found to be mutually independent abilities. The relationships in contact time between the lay-up shot jump to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the 2-legged repeated rebound jump were correlated on the same significance levels (p < 0.05). A significant correlation for jumping height existed between the 1-legged repeated rebound jump and the lay-up shot jump (p < 0.05), although none existed for jumping height between the lay-up shot jump and both the 2-legged repeated rebound jump and countermovement jump. The lay-up shot index correlated more strongly to the 1-legged repeated rebound jump index (p < 0.01) when compared to the 2-legged repeated rebound jump index (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the 1-legged repeated rebound jump is effective in improving both contact time and jumping height in the lay-up shot jump. PMID:19996782

  4. Acute effects of static stretching on squat jump performance at different knee starting angles.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Antonio; Castagna, Carlo; Gervasoni, Elisa; Cè, Emiliano; Rampichini, Susanna; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Merati, Giampiero

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static stretching on leg extensor muscles during squat jump (SJ) at different knee starting angles. Seventeen male subjects (23 +/- 3 years, 179 +/- 5 cm, and 74 +/- 6 kg) performed on a force platform 2 series (preceded or not [control condition] by 10-minute static stretching of quadriceps and triceps surae muscles) of SJs at different knee starting angles: 50 degrees, 70 degrees, 90 degrees, and 110 degrees. Squat jump height, peak force, maximal acceleration, velocity, and power were calculated for each jump. The angle that maximized power development was obtained from the power-angle relationship. The SJ height, peak force, and maximal velocity increased according to angle amplitude in both control and stretching conditions (p < 0.01), performance being significantly lower in the stretching condition (p < 0.01). Peak power was obtained at 90 degrees in both control and stretching conditions, but was significantly lower (p < 0.01) after stretching. These results suggest that an acute bout of static stretching reduces power and force development during SJ, decrements being significantly higher at lower knee starting angles. Therefore, the use of static stretching may be questionable in those power activities requiring maximal power output at knee angles near full extension. PMID:20145567

  5. Vertical Jump and Leg Power Norms for Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, David D.; Peterson, D. Fred

    2004-01-01

    Medical students and their spouses (N = 724) served as participants to create norm-referenced vertical jump values for active, healthy people ages 21-30. All tests were conducted and measured by the same individual during a campus fitness evaluation using a Vertec[TM] apparatus. Jump height was measured to the nearest 0.5 in. Mean jump height was…

  6. Costs and benefits of larval jumping behaviour of Bathyplectes anurus.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Yoriko; Tani, Soichiro; Fukuda, Katsuto; Iwase, Shun-ichiro; Sugawara, Yuma; Tuda, Midori; Takagi, Masami

    2016-02-01

    Bathyplectes anurus, a parasitoid of the alfalfa weevils, forms a cocoon in the late larval stage and exhibits jumping behaviour. Adaptive significance and costs of the cocoon jumping have not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesised that jumping has the fitness benefits of enabling habitat selection by avoiding unfavourable environments. We conducted laboratory experiments, which demonstrated that jumping frequencies increased in the presence of light, with greater magnitudes of temperature increase and at lower relative humidity. In addition, when B. anurus individuals were allowed to freely jump in an arena with a light gradient, more cocoons were found in the shady area, suggesting microhabitat selection. In a field experiment, mortality of cocoons placed in the sun was significantly higher than for cocoons placed in the shade. B. anurus cocoons respond to environmental stress by jumping, resulting in habitat selection. In the presence of potential predators (ants), jumping frequencies were higher than in the control (no ant) arenas, though jumping frequencies decreased after direct contact with the predators. Body mass of B. anurus cocoons induced to jump significantly decreased over time than cocoons that did not jump, suggesting a cost to jumping. We discuss the benefits and costs of jumping behaviour and potential evolutionary advantages of this peculiar trait, which is present in a limited number of species. PMID:26687130

  7. Costs and benefits of larval jumping behaviour of Bathyplectes anurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Yoriko; Tani, Soichiro; Fukuda, Katsuto; Iwase, Shun-ichiro; Sugawara, Yuma; Tuda, Midori; Takagi, Masami

    2016-02-01

    Bathyplectes anurus, a parasitoid of the alfalfa weevils, forms a cocoon in the late larval stage and exhibits jumping behaviour. Adaptive significance and costs of the cocoon jumping have not been thoroughly studied. We hypothesised that jumping has the fitness benefits of enabling habitat selection by avoiding unfavourable environments. We conducted laboratory experiments, which demonstrated that jumping frequencies increased in the presence of light, with greater magnitudes of temperature increase and at lower relative humidity. In addition, when B. anurus individuals were allowed to freely jump in an arena with a light gradient, more cocoons were found in the shady area, suggesting microhabitat selection. In a field experiment, mortality of cocoons placed in the sun was significantly higher than for cocoons placed in the shade. B. anurus cocoons respond to environmental stress by jumping, resulting in habitat selection. In the presence of potential predators (ants), jumping frequencies were higher than in the control (no ant) arenas, though jumping frequencies decreased after direct contact with the predators. Body mass of B. anurus cocoons induced to jump significantly decreased over time than cocoons that did not jump, suggesting a cost to jumping. We discuss the benefits and costs of jumping behaviour and potential evolutionary advantages of this peculiar trait, which is present in a limited number of species.

  8. An efficient interpolation technique for jump proposals in reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations

    PubMed Central

    Farr, W. M.; Mandel, I.; Stevens, D.

    2015-01-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed dataset is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty and it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot efficiently explore both parameter spaces at once. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here, we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose intermodel jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in modest dimensionality. We show that our technique leads to improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it to other proposals in the literature to improve the convergence of RJMCMCs. We also demonstrate the use of the same interpolation technique as a way to construct efficient ‘global’ proposal distributions for single-model MCMCs without prior knowledge of the structure of the posterior distribution, and discuss improvements that permit the method to be used in higher dimensional spaces efficiently. PMID:26543580

  9. An efficient interpolation technique for jump proposals in reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Farr, W M; Mandel, I; Stevens, D

    2015-06-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed dataset is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty and it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot efficiently explore both parameter spaces at once. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here, we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose intermodel jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in modest dimensionality. We show that our technique leads to improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it to other proposals in the literature to improve the convergence of RJMCMCs. We also demonstrate the use of the same interpolation technique as a way to construct efficient 'global' proposal distributions for single-model MCMCs without prior knowledge of the structure of the posterior distribution, and discuss improvements that permit the method to be used in higher dimensional spaces efficiently. PMID:26543580

  10. Force generation and temperature-jump and length-jump tension transients in muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Davis, J S; Rodgers, M E

    1995-05-01

    Muscle tension rises with increasing temperature. The kinetics that govern the tension rise of maximally Ca(2+)-activated, skinned rabbit psoas fibers over a temperature range of 0-30 degrees C was characterized in laser temperature-jump experiments. The kinetic response is simple and can be readily interpreted in terms of a basic three-step mechanism of contraction, which includes a temperature-sensitive rapid preequilibrium(a) linked to a temperature-insensitive rate-limiting step and followed by a temperature-sensitive tension-generating step. These data and mechanism are compared and contrasted with the more complex length-jump Huxley-Simmons phases in which all states that generate tension or bear tension are perturbed. The rate of the Huxley-Simmons phase 4 is temperature sensitive at low temperatures but plateaus at high temperatures, indicating a change in rate-limiting step from a temperature-sensitive (phase 4a) to a temperature-insensitive reaction (phase 4b); the latter appears to correlate with the slow, temperature-insensitive temperature-jump relaxation. Phase 3 is absent in the temperature-jump, which excludes it from tension generation. We confirm that de novo tension generation occurs as an order-disorder transition during phase 2slow and the equivalent, temperature-sensitive temperature-jump relaxation. PMID:7612845

  11. Deriving appropriate boundary conditions, and accelerating position-jump simulations, of diffusion using non-local jumping.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P R; Baker, R E; Yates, C A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we explore lattice-based position-jump models of diffusion, and the implications of introducing non-local jumping; particles can jump to a range of nearby boxes rather than only to their nearest neighbours. We begin by deriving conditions for equivalence with traditional local jumping models in the continuum limit. We then generalize a previously postulated implementation of the Robin boundary condition for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length, and present a novel implementation of flux boundary conditions, again generalized for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length. In both these cases we validate our results using stochastic simulation. We then proceed to consider two variations on the basic diffusion model: a hybrid local/non-local scheme suitable for models involving sharp concentration gradients, and the implementation of biased jumping. In all cases we show that non-local jumping can deliver substantial time savings for stochastic simulations. PMID:25514045

  12. Deriving appropriate boundary conditions, and accelerating position-jump simulations, of diffusion using non-local jumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. R.; Baker, R. E.; Yates, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we explore lattice-based position-jump models of diffusion, and the implications of introducing non-local jumping; particles can jump to a range of nearby boxes rather than only to their nearest neighbours. We begin by deriving conditions for equivalence with traditional local jumping models in the continuum limit. We then generalize a previously postulated implementation of the Robin boundary condition for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length, and present a novel implementation of flux boundary conditions, again generalized for a non-local process of arbitrary maximum jump length. In both these cases we validate our results using stochastic simulation. We then proceed to consider two variations on the basic diffusion model: a hybrid local/non-local scheme suitable for models involving sharp concentration gradients, and the implementation of biased jumping. In all cases we show that non-local jumping can deliver substantial time savings for stochastic simulations.

  13. Biomechanical Factors Associated With Jump Height: A Comparison of Cross-Sectional and Pre-to-Posttraining Change Findings.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Brendan M; Moran, Kieran A

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies investigating the biomechanical factors associated with maximal countermovement jump height have typically used cross-sectional data. An alternative but less common approach is to use pre-to-posttraining change data, where the relationship between an improvement in jump height and a change in a factor is examined more directly. Our study compared the findings of these approaches. Such an evaluation is necessary because cross-sectional studies are currently a primary source of information for coaches when examining what factors to train to enhance performance. The countermovement jump of 44 males was analyzed before and after an 8-week training intervention. Correlations with jump height were calculated using both cross-sectional (pretraining data only) and pre-to-posttraining change data. Eight factors identified in the cross-sectional analysis were not significantly correlated with a change in jump height in the pre-to-post analysis. Additionally, only 6 of 11 factors identified in the pre-to-post analysis were identified in the cross-sectional analysis. These findings imply that (a) not all factors identified in a cross-sectional analysis may be critical to jump height improvement and (b) cross-sectional analyses alone may not provide an insight into all of the potential factors to train to enhance jump height. Coaches must be aware of these limitations when examining cross-sectional studies to identify factors to train to enhance jump ability. Additional findings highlight that although exercises prescribed to improve jump height should aim to enhance concentric power production at all joints, a particular emphasis on enhancing hip joint peak power may be warranted. PMID:25992663

  14. The effect of exercise-induced muscle damage on isometric and dynamic knee extensor strength and vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Christopher; Eston, Roger

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we assessed the effect of exercise-induced muscle damage on knee extensor muscle strength during isometric, concentric and eccentric actions at 1.57 rad x s(-1) and vertical jump performance under conditions of squat jump, countermovement jump and drop jump. The eight participants (5 males, 3 females) were aged 29.5+/-7.1 years (mean +/- s). These variables, together with plasma creatine kinase (CK), were measured before, 1 h after and 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7 days after a bout of muscle damaging exercise: 100 barbell squats (10 sets x 10 repetitions at 70% body mass load). Strength was reduced for 4 days (P< 0.05) but no significant differences (P> 0.05) were apparent in the magnitude or rate of recovery of strength between isometric, concentric and eccentric muscle actions. The overall decline in vertical jump performance was dependent on jump method: squat jump performance was affected to a greater extent than countermovement (91.6+/-1.1% vs 95.2+/-1.3% of pre-exercise values, P< 0.05) and drop jump (95.2+/-1.4%, P< 0.05) performance. Creatine kinase was elevated (P < 0.05) above baseline 1 h after exercise, peaked on day 1 and remained significantly elevated on days 2 and 3. Strength loss after exercise-induced muscle damage was independent of the muscle action being performed. However, the impairment of muscle function was attenuated when the stretch-shortening cycle was used in vertical jumping performance. PMID:12043831

  15. Effects of different footwear on vertical jump and landing parameters.

    PubMed

    LaPorta, Joe W; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Galpin, Andrew J; Tufano, James J; Cazas, Vanessa L; Tan, Jeremy G

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about the effects of different footwear on anaerobic performance variables. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different footwear on vertical jumping and landing parameters. Ten men and 10 women participated. After a dynamic warm-up, subjects performed a vertical jump (VJ), depth drop (DD), and Bosco test on a force plate in 3 different conditions, on 3 separate days: bare feet (BF), minimalist footwear (MF), and tennis shoes (TS). Bare feet had greater relative peak power (relPP) in the VJ (men: BF, 59.87 ± 5.09 W⋅kg(-1); MF, 58.39 ± 5.69 W·kg(-1); TS, 57.70 ± 6.54 W·kg(-1); women: BF, 45.26 ± 4.10 W·kg(-1); MF, 45.06 ± 3.53 W·kg(-1); TS, 44.77 ± 4.55 W·kg(-1)), while for men, jump height (JH) was also greater in BF and MF (BF, 44.5 ± 4.46 cm; MF, 43.47 ± 5.5 cm; TS, 41.47 ± 14.45 cm). Results of the Bosco test revealed average relPP was greatest in BF compared with MF and TS (men: BF, 19.70 ± 3.01 W·kg(-1); MF, 19.28 ± 3.00 W·kg(-1); TS, 18.93 ± 3.33 W·kg(-1); women: BF, 14.68 ± 1.41 W·kg(-1); MF, 13.97 ± 1.56 W·kg(-1); TS 13.62 ± 1.67 W·kg(-1)), while for JH, BF and MF were greater than TS (men: BF, 28.62 ± 5.0 cm; MF, 27.78 ± 5.09 cm; TS, 26.54 ± 5.1 cm; women: BF, 18.60 ± 1.97 cm; MF, 17.86 ± 6.35 cm; TS, 17.35 ± 2.47 cm). No differences in relative impact force were seen during the DD between conditions. Therefore, athletes and coaches interested in enhancing single and multiple VJs might consider either BF or minimalist shoes. PMID:23254549

  16. Robust extended dissipative control for sampled-data Markov jump systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Park, Ju H.; Zhang, Lixian; Wu, Zheng-Guang

    2014-08-01

    This paper investigates the problem of the sampled-data extended dissipative control for uncertain Markov jump systems. The systems considered are transformed into Markov jump systems with polytopic uncertainties and sawtooth delays by using an input delay approach. The focus is on the design of a mode-independent sampled-data controller such that the resulting closed-loop system is mean-square exponentially stable with a given decay rate and extended dissipative. A novel exponential stability criterion and an extended dissipativty condition are established by proposing a new integral inequality. The reduced conservatism of the criteria is demonstrated by two numerical examples. Furthermore, a sufficient condition for the existence of a desired mode-independent sampled-data controller is obtained by solving a convex optimisation problem. Finally, a resistance, inductance and capacitance (RLC) series circuit is employed to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  17. The effect of patellar taping on some landing characteristics during counter movement jumps in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Jesús; Díaz, Francisco; Anza, María Soledad; Mejuto, Gaizka; Puente, Asier; Iturriaga, Gorka; Fernández, Juan-Ramón

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of patellar taping (PT) on landing characteristics of the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and on flight time during a counter movement jump (CMJ). Eleven healthy male subjects (age: 31.1 ± 4.2 years) volunteered for the study. Each subject performed six CMJs under two different jumping conditions: with PT and without PT (WPT). The order of the two conditions was randomized. All of the measured variables had fair-to-good reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient > 0.75). When we compared the PT and WPT groups, we did not find a significant difference in the magnitude of the first (F1) and second (F2) peaks of the VGRF. We also did not find a significant difference in the time to production of these peaks (T1 and T2), and the time to stabilization (TTS) (p < 0. 05). Furthermore, the flight time was similar in the two groups (0.475 ± 0.046 and 0.474 ± 0.056 s, respectively, for PT and WPT). These results suggest that PT does not jeopardize performance during CMJ. Furthermore, it also does not soften the VGRF generated during the landing, indicating that PT may be of limited utility in preventing injuries associated with this type of movement. Key pointsWe investigated whether patellar taping interferes with athletic performance, as has been suggested by previous studies.We also explored the effect of patellar taping on the forces generated during the landing phase of counter movement jumps.Patellar taping had no effect on the flight time during counter movement jumps.Patellar taping also had no effect on the vertical ground reaction force variables measured during the landing phase of counter movement jumps.This information may be relevant to athletes and trainers who are concerned about the effects of patellar taping on performance. PMID:24149562

  18. The Effect of Patellar Taping on Some Landing Characteristics During Counter Movement Jumps in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, Jesús; Díaz, Francisco; Anza, María Soledad; Mejuto, Gaizka; Puente, Asier; Iturriaga, Gorka; Fernández, Juan-Ramón

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of patellar taping (PT) on landing characteristics of the vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) and on flight time during a counter movement jump (CMJ). Eleven healthy male subjects (age: 31.1 ± 4.2 years) volunteered for the study. Each subject performed six CMJs under two different jumping conditions: with PT and without PT (WPT). The order of the two conditions was randomized. All of the measured variables had fair-to-good reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient > 0.75). When we compared the PT and WPT groups, we did not find a significant difference in the magnitude of the first (F1) and second (F2) peaks of the VGRF. We also did not find a significant difference in the time to production of these peaks (T1 and T2), and the time to stabilization (TTS) (p < 0. 05). Furthermore, the flight time was similar in the two groups (0.475 ± 0.046 and 0.474 ± 0.056 s, respectively, for PT and WPT). These results suggest that PT does not jeopardize performance during CMJ. Furthermore, it also does not soften the VGRF generated during the landing, indicating that PT may be of limited utility in preventing injuries associated with this type of movement. Key points We investigated whether patellar taping interferes with athletic performance, as has been suggested by previous studies. We also explored the effect of patellar taping on the forces generated during the landing phase of counter movement jumps. Patellar taping had no effect on the flight time during counter movement jumps. Patellar taping also had no effect on the vertical ground reaction force variables measured during the landing phase of counter movement jumps. This information may be relevant to athletes and trainers who are concerned about the effects of patellar taping on performance. PMID:24149562

  19. Parachute Jumping Induces More Sympathetic Activation Than Cortisol Secretion in First-Time Parachutists

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Giovanni; Chieffi, Sergio; Viggiano, Andrea; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Valenzano, Anna; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Messina, Antonietta; De Luca, Vincenzo; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Background: The word “stress” describes the status of the body affected by external or internal forces, or “stressors”, threatening to alter its dynamic balance or homeostasis. The adaptive changes which occur in reply to stressors are either behavioral or physical. Once a given threshold is surpassed, a systemic reaction takes place involving the “stress system” in the brain together with its peripheral components, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic sympathetic. Objectives: Stress induces an activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the SNS and the HPA axis would show parallel or divergent stress response patterns in a session of first parachute jump. Patients and Methods: Activation of the SNS was evaluated by dosage of salivary alpha-amylase, galvanic skin responses, and heart rate in seven male novice parachutists. Activation of HPA axis was tested by dosage of cortisol. These variables were measured before and 1 minute and 90 minute after the jump. Results: All variables reached a peak at 1 minute post-jump. Salivary alpha-amylase, galvanic skin responses and heart rate did not return to basal value at 90 minutes post-jump, while cortisol returned to basal value at 90 minutes post-jump. Conclusions: This evidence indicates that parachute jumping is accompanied by a dissociation of SNS and HPA response patterns in novice parachutists, showing a slower recovery in sympathetic activity than in cortisol secretion. PMID:27217924

  20. Association between traditional standing vertical jumps and a soccer-specific vertical jump.

    PubMed

    Requena, Bernardo; Garcia, Inmaculada; Requena, Francisco; Bressel, Eadric; Saez-Saez de Villarreal, Eduardo; Cronin, John

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the relationships between a soccer-specific vertical jump (ssVJ) test, that included common elements of a soccer VJ (e.g. run-up and intention to head), and three traditional VJ tests using elite soccer players. A secondary purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the VJs used in the analysis. A randomised order and counterbalanced design was used to assess the relationships between these VJs [countermovement jump (CMJ), drop jump for height (DJh), drop jump for maximum height and minimum ground contact time (DJh/t) and the ssVJ]. Take-off velocity, contact time and flight time were the dependent variables of interest and compared between jumps. Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CV) were used as measures of inter-session reliability. All VJ tests were found to have high ICCs (0.89-0.99) and acceptable within-subject CVs (<7.5%). All the ssVJ dependent variables were not significantly related (r<0.44) with similar variables from the CMJ and DJh tests and only moderately related (r=~0.49) with the DJh/t test variables. In addition, the DJh/t variables were not significantly correlated (r<0.47) with DJh and CMJ test variables. In conclusion, it would seem that the proposed ssVJ test and CMJ or DJh tests assess different leg qualities and thought should be given before using them interchangeably to assess or develop the same performance measures (i.e. velocity at take-off or jump height). PMID:24444234

  1. Simple jumping process with memory: Transport equation and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamińska, A.; Srokowski, T.

    2004-06-01

    We present a stochastic jumping process, defined in terms of jump-size probability density and jumping rate, which is a generalization of the well-known kangaroo process. The definition takes into account two process values: after and before the jump. Therefore, the process is able to preserve memory about its previous values. It possesses a simple stationary limit. Its master equation is interpreted as the kinetic equation with variable collision rate. The process can be easily applied to model systems which relax to distributions other than Maxwellian. The case of a constant jumping rate corresponds to the diffusion process, either normal or ballistic.

  2. Jumping performance of planthoppers (Hemiptera, Issidae).

    PubMed

    Burrows, Malcolm

    2009-09-01

    The structure of the hind limbs and the kinematics of their movements that propel jumping in planthopper insects (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Fulgoroidea, Issidae) were analysed. The propulsion for a jump was delivered by rapid movements of the hind legs that both move in the same plane beneath the body and parallel to its longitudinal axis, as revealed in high-speed sequences of images captured at rates up to 7500 images s(-1). The first and key movement was the depression of both trochantera about their coxae, powered by large depressor muscles in the thorax, accompanied by rapid extension of the tibiae about their femora. The initial movements of the two trochantera of the hind legs were synchronised to within 0.03 ms. The hind legs are only 20% longer than the front and middle legs, represent 65% of the body length, and have a ratio of 1.8 relative to the cube root of the body mass. The two hind coxae have a different structure to those in frog- and leafhoppers. They are fused at the mid-line, covered ventrally by transparent cuticle, and each is fixed laterally to a part of the internal skeleton called the pleural arch that extends to the articulation of a hind wing. A small and pointed, ventral coxal protrusion covered in microtrichia engages with a raised, smooth, white patch on a dorsal femur when a hind leg is levated (cocked) in preparation for a jump. In the best jumps by a male Issus, the body was accelerated in 0.8 ms to a take-off velocity of 5.5 m s(-1), was subjected to a force of 719 g and was displaced a horizontal distance of 1.1 m. This performance required an energy output of 303 microJ, a power output of 388 mW and exerted a force of 141 mN, or more than 700 times its body mass. This performance implies that a catapult mechanism must be used, and that Issus ranks alongside the froghopper Philaenus as one of the best insect jumpers. PMID:19684220

  3. Katabatic jumps over Martian polar terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Smith, Isaac; Holt, Jack

    2015-04-01

    Recent observational and modeling studies have shed light on the key role of mesoscale phenomena in driving the Martian climate and giving rise to remarkable signatures in the temperature, wind, pressure, and aerosol fields of the Martian atmosphere. At the mesoscale, Mars appears as an intense and exotic counterpart to the Earth, mainly as a result of pronounced diurnal and regional contrasts of surface temperature, and the much thinner atmosphere. While observations of clear-cut katabatic events are difficult on Earth, except over vast ice sheets, those intense downslope circulations are widespread on Mars owing to near-surface radiative cooling and uneven topography. Their intensity and regularity can be witnessed through numerous aeolian signatures on the surface, and distinctive thermal signatures in the steepest craters and volcanoes. Several observations (radar observations, frost streaks, spectral analysis of ices, ...) concur to show that aeolian processes play a key role in glacial processes in Martian polar regions over geological timescales. A spectacular manifestation of this resides in elongated clouds that forms at the bottom of polar spiral troughs, which dominates the polar landscape both in the North and South. An analogy with the terrestrial "wall-of-snow" over e.g. Antarctica slopes or coastlines posits that those clouds are caused by local katabatic jumps, also named Loewe phenomena, which can be deemed similar to first order to hydraulic jumps in open channel flow. With mesoscale modeling in polar regions using 5 nested domains operating a model downscaling from horizontal resolutions of about twenty kilometers to 200 meters, we were able 1. to predict the near-surface wind structure over the whole Martian polar caps, with interactions between katabatic acceleration, Coriolis deflection, transient phenomena, and thermally-forced circulations by the ice / bare soil contrast and 2. to show that katabatic jumps form at the bottom of polar troughs

  4. Engineering steady three-atom singlet states via quantum-jump-based feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiao-Qiang; Zheng, Tai-Yu; Zhang, Shou

    2012-04-01

    A scheme is presented for generating steady three-atom singlet states via three V-type atoms interacting with a strongly dissipative two-mode cavity. The local quantum feedback control is applied based on quantum-jump detection to make the target state fidelity as high as possible. This scheme is insensitive to detection inefficiencies since it only delays the time at which stationarity is achieved. Nevertheless, the spontaneous emission plays a negative role in the current system.

  5. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Checking your peak flow is one of the best ways to control your asthma and to keep it from getting worse. Asthma attacks ... Most times, they build slowly. Checking your peak flow can tell you if an attack is coming, ...

  6. Fatigue Alters Landing Shock Attenuation During a Single-Leg Vertical Drop Jump

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Sawada, Yutaka; Okubo, Yu; Shiozawa, Jyunya; Toda, Yuka; Yamada, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Landings in fatigue conditions are considered to be one of the factors that cause noncontact anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury. Additionally, it is known that fatigue alters lower extremity landing strategies and decreases the ability to attenuate shock during landing. Purpose: To determine characteristics of knee kinematics and shock attenuation during the landing phase of a single-leg vertical drop jump in a fatigued condition. The hypothesis was that knee kinematics during the landing phase of a single-leg vertical drop jump would demonstrate a significant difference between before and after fatigue. Study Design: Controlled laboratory study. Methods: Thirty-four college females participated in this experiment. They were randomly assigned to either the fatigue (n = 17) or control group (n = 17). The fatigue group performed the single-leg vertical drop jump before and after the fatigue protocol, which was performed on a bike ergometer. Knee kinematics data were obtained from the 3-dimensional motion analysis system. The ratio of each variable (%) was calculated, comparing the pre- to postfatigue protocol. Unpaired t tests were used to compare changes in kinematic variables between the fatigue-induced group and control group. Results: Peak knee flexion angular velocity increased significantly in the fatigue group (106.1% ± 8.0%) in comparison with the control group (100.7% ± 6.6%) (P < .05). However, peak knee flexion angle and acceleration had no differences between each group. Peak knee adduction/abduction angle, velocity, and acceleration also had no differences between each group. Conclusion: Fatigue decreased the ability to attenuate shock by increasing angular velocity in the direction of knee flexion during single-leg drop jump landing. These findings indicate the need to evaluate the ability to attenuate shock by measuring knee flexion angular velocity when fatigue is considered. Clinical Relevance: Measuring knee angular velocity

  7. Understanding the physics of bungee jumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heck, André; Uylings, Peter; Kędzierska, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Changing mass phenomena like the motion of a falling chain, the behaviour of a falling elastic bar or spring, and the motion of a bungee jumper surprise many a physicist. In this article we discuss the first phase of bungee jumping, when the bungee jumper falls, but the bungee rope is still slack. In instructional material this phase is often considered a free fall, but when the mass of the bungee rope is taken into account, the bungee jumper reaches acceleration greater than g. This result is contrary to the usual experience with free falling objects and therefore hard to believe for many a person, even an experienced physicist. It is often a starting point for heated discussions about the quality of the experiments and the physics knowledge of the experimentalist, or it may even prompt complaints about the quality of current physics education. But experiments do reveal the truth and students can do them supported by information and communication technology (ICT) tools. We report on a research project done by secondary school students and use their work to discuss how measurements with sensors, video analysis of self-recorded high-speed video clips and computer modelling allow study of the physics of bungee jumping.

  8. A jumping cylinder on an inclined plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, R. W.; Hernández-Gómez, J. J.; Marquina, V.

    2012-09-01

    The problem of a cylinder of mass m and radius r, with its centre of mass out of the cylinder’s axis, rolling on an inclined plane that makes an angle α with respect to the horizontal, is analysed. The equation of motion is partially solved to obtain the site where the cylinder loses contact with the inclined plane (jumps). Several simplifications are made: the analysed system consists of an homogeneous disc with a one-dimensional straight line mass parallel to the disc axis at a distance y < r of the centre of the cylinder. To compare our results with experimental data, we use a styrofoam cylinder to which a long brass rod is embedded parallel to the disc axis at a distance y < r from it, so the centre of mass lies at a distance d from the centre of the cylinder. Then the disc rolls without slipping on a long wooden ramp inclined at 15°, 30° and 45° with respect to the horizontal. To determine the jumping site, the movements are recorded with a high-speed video camera (Casio EX ZR100) at 240 and 480 frames per second. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  9. A jumping cylinder in an incline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Raul W.; Hernandez, Jorge; Marquina, Vivianne

    2012-02-01

    The problem of a cylinder of mass m and radius r, with its center of mass out of the cylinder axis, rolling in an incline that makes an angle α respect to the horizontal is analyzed. The equation of motion is solved to obtain the site where the cylinder loses contact with the incline (jumps). Several simplifications are made: the analyzed system consists of an homogeneous disc with a one dimensional straight line of mass parallel to the disc axis at a distance d < r of the center of the cylinder. To compare our results with experimental data, we use a Styrofoam cylinder of radius r = 10.0 ± 0.05 cm, high h = 5.55 ± 0.05 cm and a mass m1 = 24.45 ± 0.05 g, to which a 9.50 ± 0.01 mm diameter and 5.10 ± 0.001 cm long brass road of mass m2 = 30.75 ± 0.05 g was imbibed parallel to the disc axis at a distance of 5.40 ± 0.05 cm from it. Then the disc rolls on a 3.20 m long wooden ramp inclined at 30 and 45 respect to the horizontal. To determine the jumping site, the movements were recorded with a high-speed video camera (Casio EX ZR100) at 400 frames per second. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical predictions.

  10. CAPTURE OF TROJANS BY JUMPING JUPITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Morbidelli, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    Jupiter Trojans are thought to be survivors of a much larger population of planetesimals that existed in the planetary region when planets formed. They can provide important constraints on the mass and properties of the planetesimal disk, and its dispersal during planet migration. Here, we tested a possibility that the Trojans were captured during the early dynamical instability among the outer planets (aka the Nice model), when the semimajor axis of Jupiter was changing as a result of scattering encounters with an ice giant. The capture occurs in this model when Jupiter's orbit and its Lagrange points become radially displaced in a scattering event and fall into a region populated by planetesimals (that previously evolved from their natal transplanetary disk to {approx}5 AU during the instability). Our numerical simulations of the new capture model, hereafter jump capture, satisfactorily reproduce the orbital distribution of the Trojans and their total mass. The jump capture is potentially capable of explaining the observed asymmetry in the number of leading and trailing Trojans. We find that the capture probability is (6-8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} for each particle in the original transplanetary disk, implying that the disk contained (3-4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} planetesimals with absolute magnitude H < 9 (corresponding to diameter D = 80 km for a 7% albedo). The disk mass inferred from this work, M{sub disk} {approx} 14-28 M{sub Earth}, is consistent with the mass deduced from recent dynamical simulations of the planetary instability.