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Sample records for pediatric cardiac postoperative

  1. Postoperative differences between colonization and infection after pediatric cardiac surgery-a propensity matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to identify the postoperative risk factors associated with the conversion of colonization to postoperative infection in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods Following approval from the Institutional Review Board, patient demographics, co-morbidities, surgery details, transfusion requirements, inotropic infusions, laboratory parameters and positive microbial results were recorded during the hospital stay, and the patients were divided into two groups: patients with clinical signs of infection and patients with only positive cultures but without infection during the postoperative period. Using propensity scores, 141 patients with infection were matched to 141 patients with positive microbial cultures but without signs of infection. Our database consisted of 1665 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent cardiac surgery between January 2004 and December 2008 at a single center. The association between the patient group with infection and the group with colonization was analyzed after propensity score matching of the perioperative variables. Results 179 patients (9.3%) had infection, and 253 patients (15.2%) had colonization. The occurrence of Gram-positive species was significantly greater in the colonization group (p = 0.004). The C-reactive protein levels on the first and second postoperative days were significantly greater in the infection group (p = 0.02 and p = 0.05, respectively). The sum of all the positive cultures obtained during the postoperative period was greater in the infection group compared to the colonization group (p = 0.02). The length of the intensive care unit stay (p < 0.001) was significantly longer in the infection group compared to the control group. Conclusions Based on our results, we uncovered independent relationships between the conversion of colonization to infection regarding positive S. aureus and bloodstream results, as well as significant differences

  2. Knowledge of and Attitudes Regarding Postoperative Pain among the Pediatric Cardiac Nursing Staff: An Indian Experience.

    PubMed

    Dongara, Ashish R; Shah, Shail N; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M; Phatak, Ajay G; Nimbalkar, Archana S

    2015-06-01

    Pain following cardiac intervention in children is a common, but complex phenomenon. Identifying and reporting pain is the responsibility of the nursing staff, who are the primary caregivers and spend the most time with the patients. Inadequately managed pain in children may lead to multiple short- and long-term adverse effects. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes regarding postoperative pain in children among the nursing staff at B.M. Patel Cardiac Center, Karamsad, Anand, Gujarat, India. The study included 42 of the 45 nurses employed in the cardiac center. The nurses participating in the study were responsible for the care of the pediatric patients. A modified Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain and a sociodemographic questionnaire were administered after obtaining written informed consent. The study was approved by the institutional Human Research Ethics Committee. Mean (SD) experience in years of the nursing staff was 2.32 (1.69) years (range 1 month to 5 years). Of the nurses, 67% were posted in the cardiac surgical intensive care unit (ICU). The mean (SD) score for true/false questions was 11.48 (2.95; range 7,19). The average correct response rate of the true/false questions was 45.9%. Knowledge about pain was only affected by the ward in which the nurse was posted. In first (asymptomatic) and second (symptomatic) case scenarios, 78.6% and 59.5% underestimated pain, respectively. Knowledge and attitudes regarding pain and its management is poor among nurses. Targeted training sessions and repeated reinforcement sessions are essential for holistic patient care. PMID:25439124

  3. The effect of preoperative intravenous paracetamol administration on postoperative fever in pediatrics cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Mohammad-Hasan; Foruzan-nia, Khalil; Behjati, Mostafa; Bagheri, Babak; Khanbabayi-Gol, Mehdi; Dareshiri, Shahla; Pishgahi, Alireza; Zarezadeh, Rafie; Lotfi-Naghsh, Nazgol; Lotfi-Naghsh, Ainaz; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Post-operative fever is a common complication of cardiac operations, which is known to be correlated with a greater degree of cognitive dysfunction 6 weeks after cardiac surgery. The aim of the present study was to examine efficacy and safety of single dose intravenous Paracetamol in treatment of post-operative fever in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: In this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial, 80 children, aged 1-12 years, presenting for open heart surgery were entered in the trial and randomly allocated into two groups: Placebo and Paracetamol. After induction of anaesthesia, 15 mg/kg intravenous Paracetamol solution was infused during 1 h in the Paracetamol group. Patients in placebo group received 15 mg/kg normal saline infusion during the same time. Since the end of operation until next 24 h in intensive care unit, axillary temperature of the two group patients was recorded in 4-h intervals. Any fever that occurred during this period had been treated with Paracetamol suppository (125 mg) and the amount of antipyretic drug consumption for each patient had been recorded. In order to examine the safety of Paracetamol, patients were evaluated for drug complication at the same time. Results: Mean axillary temperature during first 24 h after operation was significantly lower in Paracetamol group compared with placebo group (P = 0.001). Overall fever incidence during 24 h after operation was higher in placebo group compared with Paracetamol group (P = 0.012). Of Paracetamol group patients, 42.5% compared with 15% of placebo group participants had no consumption of antipyretic agent (Paracetamol suppository) during 24 h after operation (P = 0.001). Conclusion: This study suggests that single dose administration of intravenous Paracetamol before paediatric cardiac surgeries using cardiopulmonary bypass; reduce mean body temperature in the first 24 h after operation. PMID:25298601

  4. Longer red blood cell storage duration is associated with increased post-operative infections in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cholette, Jill M.; Pietropaoli, Anthony P.; Henrichs, Kelly F.; Alfieris, George M.; Powers, Karen S.; Phipps, Richard; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Swartz, Michael; Gensini, Francisco; Daugherty, L. Eugene; Nazarian, Emily; Rubenstein, Jeffrey S.; Sweeney, Dawn; Eaton, Michael; Blumberg, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants and children undergoing open heart surgery routinely require multiple red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Children receiving greater numbers of RBC transfusions have increased post-operative complications and mortality. Longer RBC storage age is also associated with increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill children. Whether the association of increased transfusions and worse outcomes can be ameliorated by use of fresh RBCs in pediatric cardiac surgery for congenital heart disease is unknown. Methods 128 consecutively transfused children undergoing repair or palliation of congenital heart disease with cardiopulmonary bypass who were participating in a randomized trial of washed v. standard RBC transfusions were evaluated for an association of RBC storage age and clinical outcomes. To avoid confounding with dose of transfusions and timing of infection versus timing of transfusion, a subgroup analysis of patients only transfused 1–2 units on the day of surgery was performed. Results Mortality was low (4.9%) with no association between RBC storage duration and survival. The post-operative infection rate was significantly higher in children receiving the oldest blood (25–38 days) compared to those receiving the freshest RBCs (7–15 days); (34% v. 7%; p = 0.004). Subgroup analysis of subjects receiving only 1–2 RBC transfusions on the day of surgery (n=74) also demonstrates a greater incidence of infections in subjects receiving the oldest RBC units [0 of 33 (0%) with 7–15 day storage, 1 of 21 (5%) with 16–24 day storage and 4 of 20 (20%) with 25–38 day storage; (p=0.01)]. In multivariate analysis, RBC storage age and corticosteroid administration were the only predictors of post-operative infection. Washing the oldest RBCs (>27 days) was associated with a higher infection rate and increased morbidity compared with unwashed RBCs. Discussion Longer RBC storage duration was associated with increased postoperative nosocomial

  5. High-dose fenoldopam reduces postoperative neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocaline and cystatin C levels in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of high-dose fenoldopam, a selective dopamine-1 receptor, on renal function and organ perfusion during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in infants with congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods A prospective single-center randomized double-blind controlled trial was conducted in a pediatric cardiac surgery department. We randomized infants younger than 1 year with CHD and biventricular anatomy (with exclusion of isolated ventricular and atrial septal defect) to receive blindly a continuous infusion of fenoldopam at 1 μg/kg/min or placebo during CPB. Perioperative urinary and plasma levels of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocaline (NGAL), cystatin C (CysC), and creatinine were measured to assess renal injury after CPB. Results We enrolled 80 patients: 40 received fenoldopam (group F) during CPB, and 40 received placebo (group P). A significant increase of urinary NGAL and CysC levels from baseline to intensive care unit (ICU) admission followed by restoration of normal values after 12 hours was observed in both groups. However, urinary NGAL and CysC values were significantly reduced at the end of surgery and 12 hours after ICU admission (uNGAL only) in group F compared with group P (P = 0.025 and 0.039, respectively). Plasma NGAL and CysC tended to increase from baseline to ICU admission in both groups, but they were not significantly different between the two groups. No differences were observed on urinary and plasma creatinine levels and on urine output between the two groups. Acute kidney injury (AKI) incidence in the postoperative period, as indicated by pRIFLE classification (pediatric score indicating Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss of function, and End-stage kidney disease level of renal damage) was 50% in group F and 72% in group P (P = 0.08; odds ratio (OR), 0.38; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.14 to 1.02). A significant reduction in diuretics (furosemide) and vasodilators (phentolamine

  6. Impact of the insulin and glucose content of the postoperative fluid on the outcome after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Szántó, Péter; Breuer, Tamás; Tóth, Roland; Gergely, Mihály; Prodán, Zsolt; Sápi, Erzsébet; Szatmári, András; Szántó, Tamás; Gál, János; Székely, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the insulin and glucose content of the maintenance fluid in influencing the outcomes of pediatric patients undergoing heart surgery. Methods A total of 2063 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery were screened between 2003 and 2008. A dextrose and an insulin propensity-matched group were constructed. In the dextrose model, 5% and 10% dextrose maintenance infusions were compared below 20 kg of weight. Results A total of 171 and 298 pairs of patients were matched in the insulin and glucose model, respectively. Mortality was lower in the insulin group (12.9% vs. 7%, p = 0.049). The insulin group had longer intensive care unit (ICU) stay [days, 10.9 (5.8–18.4) vs. 13.7 (8.2–21), p = 0.003], hospital stay [days, 19.8 (13.6–26.6) vs. 22.7 (17.6–29.7), p < 0.01], duration of mechanical ventilation [hours, 67 (19–140) vs. 107 (45–176), p = 0.006], and the incidence of severe infections (18.1% vs. 28.7%, p = 0.01) and dialysis (11.7% vs. 24%, p = 0.001) was higher. In the dextrose model, the incidence of pulmonary complications (13.09% vs. 22.5%, p < 0.01), low cardiac output (17.11% vs. 30.9%, p < 0.01), and severe infections (10.07% vs. 20.5%, p < 0.01) was higher, and the duration of the hospital stay [days, 16.4 (13.1–21.6) vs. 18.1 (13.8–24.6), p < 0.01] was longer in the 10% dextrose group. Conclusions Insulin treatment appeared to decrease mortality, and lower glucose content was associated with lower occurrence of adverse events. PMID:25598989

  7. Neuroprognostication After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Topjian, Alexis A.; Hammond, Rachel; Illes, Judy; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Management decisions and parental counseling after pediatric cardiac arrest depend on the ability of physicians to make accurate and timely predictions regarding neurological recovery. We evaluated neurologists and intensivists performing neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest to determine prediction agreement, accuracy, and confidence. METHODS Pediatric neurologists (n = 10) and intensivists (n = 9) reviewed 18 cases of children successfully resuscitated from a cardiac arrest and managed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Cases were sequentially presented (after arrest day 1, days 2–4, and days 5–7), with updated examinations, neurophysiologic data, and neuroimaging data. At each time period, physicians predicted outcome by Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category and specified prediction confidence. RESULTS Predicted discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category versus actual hospital discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category outcomes were compared. Exact (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = 0) and close (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = ±1) outcome prediction accuracies for all physicians improved over successive periods (P < 0.05). Prediction accuracy did not differ significantly between physician groups at any period or overall. Agreement improved over time among neurologists (day 1 Kappa [κ], 0.28; days 2–4 κ, 0.43; days 5–7 κ, 0.68) and among intensivists (day 1 κ, 0.30; days 2–4 κ, 0.44; days 5–7 κ, 0.57). Prediction confidence increased over time (P < 0.001) and did not differ between physician groups. CONCLUSIONS Inter-rater agreement among neurologists and among intensivists improved over time and reached moderate levels. For all physicians, prediction accuracy and confidence improved over time. Further prospective research is needed to better characterize how physicians

  8. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  9. Permanent cardiac pacing in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Wael; Hegazy, Ranya; AbdElAziz, Osama; Sobhy, Rodina; Hasanein, Hossam; Shaltout, Fawzan

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric pacemaker (PM) implants comprise less than 1 % of all PM implants. This study aimed to investigate permanent cardiac pacing among the pediatric population, identifying different indications and complications of pediatric cardiac pacing, especially focusing on the effect of the pacing sites, the PM lead type, and the indications for pacing. The current work is a cross-sectional study of 103 procedures for permanent PM insertion in pediatric patients between January 2001 and December 2010. The patients were followed up 1, 3, and 6 months after implantation, then every 6 months or as needed. Evaluation included routine clinical examination, electrocardiography, chest X-ray, echocardiography, and a full analysis of the pacing system measurements. The ages of the patients ranged from 0.09 to 12 years (median, 2.3 years). The most common indication for pacing was postoperative complete heart bock, noted in 54 patients (52.4 %). Transvenous endocardial PM insertion was performed in 92 procedures (89.3 %), whereas transthoracic epicardial insertion was performed in 11 procedures (10.7 %). The most common site of pacing was the right ventricular apex (n = 64, 62 %), followed by the right ventricular outflow tract (n = 25, 24.3 %). Transthoracic epicardial PM insertion was associated with a significantly higher percentage and greater severity of complications. In this study, 65 % of the patients with left ventricle (LV) dilation before pacing showed a significant improvement in LV dimensions and function after pacing. This was noted only in those with endocardially inserted PM leads in both the congenital and the postoperative groups regardless of the pacing site. Endocardial PM insertion in children is a safe procedure with fewer complications and a lower ventricular threshold than the epicardial route. Permanent single-chamber right ventricle pacing is safe and can lead to significant improvement in LV function and dimensions. However, long-term follow

  10. Cardiac risk assessment: decreasing postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Thanavaro, Joanne L

    2015-02-01

    Preoperative cardiac assessment helps identify patients undergoing noncardiac surgery who are at risk for significant postoperative cardiac complications and those who may benefit from additional preoperative evaluation and perioperative care. Advanced practice nurses can identify surgery- and patient-related risks by conducting a thorough health history and physical examination. Multiple risk indices and evidence-based guidelines are available to inform health care providers regarding patient evaluation and strategies to reduce postoperative cardiac risk. In general, preoperative tests are recommended only if the findings will influence medical therapy or perioperative monitoring or will require postponement of surgery until a cardiac condition can be corrected or stabilized. Medication management is a crucial component of the preoperative assessment; providers may need to initiate the use of beta-blockers and make decisions regarding continuing or withholding antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapy. Preoperative cardiac risk stratification, medication reconciliation, and device management are essential for providing safe care for patients. PMID:25645037

  11. Cardiac Transplant Postoperative Management and Care.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Regi; Koerner, Erika; Clark, Courtney; Halabicky, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure impacts a multitude of individuals each year. Treatment is based on the progression of the disease and severity of symptoms. Cardiac transplant is the gold standard treatment of advanced heart failure, although the availability of organs limits the number of transplants received each year. Postoperative care and monitoring for cardiac transplant is complex and requires specialized nurses and providers at transplant centers for successful outcomes. This article outlines cardiac transplant from preoperative care through transplant, as well as posttransplant monitoring and care including discharge. Special attention is focused on management in the intensive care unit setting and potential complications that can occur in the immediate postoperative period. Interventions for potential complications are also highlighted. PMID:27254638

  12. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  13. Postoperative Adiponectin Levels in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Open Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, A.; Kanety, H.; Avni, T.; Mishali, D.; Hemi, R.; Yissaschar, E.; Pariente, C.; Paret, G.; Modan-Moses, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ that secretes cytokines, including adiponectin, levels of which are negatively correlated with the severity of the inflammatory process. Aim. To assess the time course of adiponectin levels following open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and its correlation with early postoperative outcomes. Materials and Methods. Blood samples were obtained from 24 children undergoing cardiac surgery and analyzed for adiponectin, C-reactive protein, and other inflammatory markers. Results. Baseline adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with patients' preoperative weight and age. Postoperative adiponectin levels decreased compared to baseline (P = 0.01) and correlated negatively with duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (r = −0.438, P = 0.037), length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit (r = −0.457, P = 0.025), and the inotropic score (r = −0.471, P = 0.02). Adiponectin levels were positively correlated with sVCAM 1 levels; however, there was no correlation between adiponectin levels and sP selectin, tPA, MCP1, and sCD40. Conclusions. The inflammatory response after open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a reduction in adiponectin levels. Prolonged or more complicated surgery induced a more substantial inflammatory process characterized by a significant reduction in adiponectin levels over time and a delayed return to baseline levels. PMID:24224162

  14. Clinical applications of retrograde autologous priming in cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, G.W.; Nie, Y.F.; Jiao, Z.Y.; Zhao, W.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde autologous priming (RAP) has been routinely applied in cardiac pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, this technique is performed in pediatric patients weighing more than 20 kg, and research about its application in pediatric patients weighing less than 20 kg is still scarce. This study explored the clinical application of RAP in CPB in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Sixty pediatric patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group was treated with CPB using RAP, while the control group was treated with conventional CPB (priming with suspended red blood cells, plasma and albumin). The hematocrit (Hct) and lactate (Lac) levels at different perioperative time-points, mechanical ventilation time, hospitalization duration, and intraoperative and postoperative blood usage were recorded. Results showed that Hct levels at 15 min after CPB beginning (T2) and at CPB end (T3), and number of intraoperative blood transfusions were significantly lower in the experimental group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in CPB time, aortic blocking time, T2-Lac value or T3-Lac between the two groups (P>0.05). Postoperatively, there were no significant differences in Hct (2 h after surgery), mechanical ventilation time, intensive care unit time, or postoperative blood transfusion between two groups (P>0.05). RAP can effectively reduce the hemodilution when using less or not using any banked blood, while meeting the intraoperative perfusion conditions, and decreasing the perioperative blood transfusion volume in pediatric patients. PMID:27119427

  15. Extracorporeal life support in pediatric cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Low cardiac output (LCO) after corrective surgery remains a serious complication in pediatric congenital heart diseases (CHD). In the case of refractory LCO, extra corporeal life support (ECLS) extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or ventricle assist devices (VAD) is the final therapeutic option. In the present study we have reviewed the outcomes of pediatric patients after corrective surgery necessitating ECLS and compared outcomes with pediatric patients necessitating ECLS because of dilatated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Methods A retrospective single-centre cohort study was evaluated in pediatric patients, between 1991 and 2008, that required ECLS. A total of 48 patients received ECLS, of which 23 were male and 25 female. The indications for ECLS included CHD in 32 patients and DCM in 16 patients. Results The mean age was 1.2 ± 3.9 years for CHD patients and 10.4 ± 5.8 years for DCM patients. Twenty-six patients received ECMO and 22 patients received VAD. A total of 15 patients out of 48 survived, 8 were discharged after myocardial recovery and 7 were discharged after successful heart transplantation. The overall mortality in patients with extracorporeal life support was 68%. Conclusion Although the use of ECLS shows a significantly high mortality rate it remains the ultimate chance for children. For better results, ECLS should be initiated in the operating room or shortly thereafter. Bridge to heart transplantation should be considered if there is no improvement in cardiac function to avoid irreversible multiorgan failure (MFO). PMID:21083896

  16. Factors affecting postoperative blood loss in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Faraoni, David; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the influence of cyanotic disease on postoperative blood loss is closely related to age in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of a cyanotic disease is associated with increased postoperative blood loss in children aged 1 to 6 months. Children with cyanotic disease and aged<1 month who received fresh frozen plasma during cardiopulmonary bypass had less postoperative blood loss and higher maximal clot firmness on FIBTEM than cyanotic children from all other groups. Additional studies are needed to define optimal pathophysiology-based management in children undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:24512988

  17. Perfusionist strategies for blood conservation in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves

    2010-02-26

    There is increasing concern about the safety of homologous blood transfusion during cardiac surgery, and a restrictive transfusion practice is associated with improved outcome. Transfusion-free pediatric cardiac surgery is unrealistic for the vast majority of procedures in neonates or small infants; however, considerable progress has been made by using techniques that decrease the need for homologous blood products or even allow bloodless surgery in older infants and children. These techniques involve a decrease in prime volume by downsizing the bypass circuit with the help of vacuum-assisted venous drainage, microplegia, autologous blood predonation with or without infusion of recombinant (erythropoietin), cell salvaging, ultrafiltration and retrograde autologous priming. The three major techniques which are simple, safe, efficient, and cost-effective are: a prime volume as small as possible, cardioplegia with negligible hydric balance and circuit residual blood salvaged without any alteration. Furthermore, these three techniques can be used for all the patients, including emergencies and small babies. In every pediatric surgical unit, a strategy to decrease or avoid blood bank transfusion must be implemented. A strategy to minimize transfusion requirement requires a combined effort involving the entire surgical team with pre-, peri-, and postoperative planning and management. PMID:21160681

  18. Pediatric Cardiac Arrest Due to Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kjellemo, Hugo; Hansen, Andreas E; Øines, Dennis A; Nilsen, Thor O; Wik, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Survival from pediatric cardiac arrest due to trauma has been reported to be 0.0%-8.8%. Some argue that resuscitation efforts in the case of trauma-related cardiac arrests are futile. We describe a successful outcome in the case of a child who suffered cardiac arrest caused by external traumatic airway obstruction. Our case illustrates how to deal with pediatric traumatic cardiac arrests in an out-of-hospital environment. It also illustrates how good clinical treatment in these situations may be supported by correct treatment after hospital admission when it is impossible to ventilate the patient to provide sufficient oxygen delivery to vital organs. This case relates to a lifeless child of 3-5 years, blue, and trapped by an electrically operated garage door. The first ambulance arrived to find several men trying to bend the frame and the door apart in order to extricate the child, who was hanging in the air with head and neck squeezed between the horizontally-moving garage door and the vertical door frame. One paramedic found a car jack and used it to push the door and the frame apart, allowing the lifeless child to be extricated. Basic life support was then initiated. Intubation was performed by the anesthesiologist without drugs. With FiO2 1.0 the first documented SaO2 was <50%. Restoration of Spontaneous Circulation was achieved after thirty minutes, and she was transported to the hospital. After a few hours she was put on venous-arterial ECMO for 5.5 days and discharged home after two months. Outpatient examinations during the rest of 2013 were positive, and the child found not to be suffering from any injuries, either physical or mental. The last follow-up in October 2014 demonstrated she had made a 100% recovery and she started school in August 2014. PMID:26930137

  19. Pediatric cardiac surgery: a challenge and outcome analysis of the Guatemala effort.

    PubMed

    Leon-Wyss, Juan R; Veshti, Altin; Veras, Oscar; Gaitán, Guillermo A; O'Connell, Mauricio; Mack, Ricardo A; Calvimontes, Gonzalo; Garcia, Flor; Hidalgo, Amilcar; Reyes, Alfredo; Castañeda, Aldo R

    2009-01-01

    A large underserved population of children with congenital cardiac malformation (CCM) exists in many developing countries. In recent years, several strategies have been implemented to supplement this need. These strategies include transferring children to first-world countries for surgical care or the creation of local pediatric cardiovascular surgical programs. In 1997, an effort was made to create a comprehensive pediatric cardiac care program in Guatemala. The objective of this study is to examine the outcome analysis of the Guatemala effort. The goals of our new and first pediatric cardiac care program were to: 1) provide diagnosis and treatment to all children with a CCM in Guatemala; 2) train of local staff surgeons, 3) established a foundation locally and in the United States in 1997 to serve as a fundraising instrument to acquire equipment and remodeling of the pediatric cardiac unit and also to raise funds to pay the hospital for the almost exclusively poor pediatric cardiac patients. The staff now includes 3 surgeons from Guatemala, trained by the senior surgeon (A.R.C.), seven pediatric cardiologists, 3 intensivists, and 2 anesthesiologists, as well as intensive care and ward nurses, respiratory therapists, echocardiography technicians, and support personnel. The cardiovascular program expanded in 2005 to 2 cardiac operating rooms, 1 cardiac catheterization laboratory, 1 cardiac echo lab, 4 outpatients clinics a 6-bed intensive care unit and a 4-bed stepdown unit, a 20 bed general ward (2 beds/room) and a genetics laboratory. Our center has become a referral center for children from Central America. A total of 2,630 surgical procedures were performed between February 1997 and December 2007, increasing the number of operations each year. Postoperative complication occurred in 523 of 2,630 procedures (20%). A late follow-up study was conducted of all the patients operated from 1997 to 2005. Late mortality was 2.7%. Development of a sustainable pediatric

  20. The use of anticoagulation in pediatric cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Boris, JR; Harris, MA

    2003-01-01

    Palliation and repair of increasingly complex congenital heart defects as well as the emergence of novel contexts has led to multiple scenarios in which a real or potential risk of thromboembolism may exist. While various anticoagulation methodologies have been well defined for adults, there are few studies relating directly to pediatric patients. This article reviews a number of specific pediatric disease states, the representative pediatric literature, and, where appropriate, the corresponding adult literature. In so doing, the art and science of pediatric cardiac anticoagulation is defined with the hope to engender further thought regarding future directions of study and therapy. PMID:22368628

  1. Patient radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, K.E.; Leibovic, S.J.

    1983-08-01

    Exposure air product (EAP) and center field entrance exposure (free-in-air) were measured in seventeen pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. Exposures were recorded separately for biplane fluoroscopy and cine angiocardiography using flat-plate ionization chambers. In the posterior-anterior (PA) projections, median EAP was 425 Roentgen-square centimeter (R-cm/sup 2/), with a range of 90.5-3,882 R-cm/sup 2/; 29-35% of this exposure occurred during cine filming. In the lateral projection, median EAP was 276 R-cm/sup 2/ (range 117-1,173); 52-59% of this exposure was due to cine filming. Median center field entrance exposure in the PA view was 7.86 Roentgens (R) with a range 2.16-73.9 of and in the lateral projection 7.39 R (range 2.64-24.6). As much as 25% of the exposure from the entire examination was contributed by manual ''test'' exposures to set cine radiographic kVp. We recommend use of testing circuits, which determine cine radiographic factors automatically and thus should lower levels of exposure.

  2. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Jennie

    2015-02-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) remains a promising treatment for pediatric patients in cardiac arrest unresponsive to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation. With venoarterial extracorporeal support, blood is drained from the right atrium, oxygenated through the extracorporeal circuit, and transfused back to the body, bypassing the heart and lungs. The use of artificial oxygenation and perfusion thus provides the body a period of hemodynamic stability, while allowing resolution of underlying disease processes. Survival rates for ECPR patients are higher than those for traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), although neurological outcomes require further investigation. The impact of duration of CPR and length of treatment with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation vary in published reports. Furthermore, current guidelines for the initiation and use of ECPR are limited and may lead to confusion about appropriate use of this support. Many ethical concerns arise with this advanced form of life support. More often than not, the dilemma is not whether to withhold ECPR, but rather when to withdraw it. Although clinicians must decide if ECPR is appropriate and when further intervention is futile, the ultimate burden of choice is left to the patient's caregivers. Offering support and guidance to the patient's family as well as the patient is essential. PMID:25639578

  3. Rare presentation of four primary pediatric cardiac tumors.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Lauren R; Caltharp, Shelley A; Milla, Sarah S; Kogon, Brian F; Cundiff, Caitlin A; Dalal, Aarti; Quigley, Phillip C; Shehata, Bahig M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric cardiac tumors are extremely rare and usually benign. We selected four unique cases of pediatric cardiac tumors from a 15-year period at our institution. The four chosen cases represent unique, rare primary tumors of the heart. Our selection includes a case of Rosai Dorfman disease without systemic involvement, which is, to our knowledge, the second case of isolated cardiac Rosai Dorfman disease in a child. We present a case of subtotal replacement of myocardium by granulocytic sarcoma with minimal bone marrow involvement, representing the first reported case in a child manifested as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, as well as a case of a primary synovial sarcoma arising from the atrioventricular (AV) node, representing the fourth reported pediatric case of a cardiac synovial sarcoma, and it is the first to arise from the AV node. Finally, we present a primary congenital infantile fibrosarcoma of the heart, which is, to our knowledge, the first confirmed cardiac congenital infantile fibrosarcoma. These four cases represent the need for continued inclusion of rare cardiac conditions in a clinician's differential diagnosis. Furthermore, they present the need for more in-depth molecular and genomic analysis of pediatric cardiac tumors in order to identify their etiopathogenesis. PMID:26419627

  4. Comparison of Maximum Vasoactive Inotropic Score and Low Cardiac Output Syndrome As Markers of Early Postoperative Outcomes After Neonatal Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Ryan J.; Scheurer, Mark A.; Atz, Andrew M.; Zyblewski, Sinai C.; Hulsey, Thomas C.; Bradley, Scott M.; Graham, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome (LCOS) and maximum vasoactive inotropic score (VIS) have been used as surrogate markers for early postoperative outcomes in pediatric cardiac surgery. The objective of this study was to determine the associations between LCOS and maximum VIS with clinical outcomes in neonatal cardiac surgery. This was a secondary retrospective analysis of a prospective randomized trial, and the setting was a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit in a tertiary care children's hospital. Neonates (n = 76) undergoing corrective or palliative cardiac operations requiring cardiopulmonary bypass were prospectively enrolled. LCOS was defined by a standardized clinical criteria. VIS values were calculated by a standard formula during the first 36 postoperative hours, and the maximum score was recorded. Postoperative outcomes included hospital mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital lengths of stay (LOS), as well as total hospital charges. At surgery, the median age was 7 days and weight was 3.2 kg. LCOS occurred in 32 of 76 (42%) subjects. Median maximum VIS was 15 (range 5–33). LCOS was not associated with duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU LOS, hospital LOS, and hospital charges. Greater VIS was moderately associated with a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.001, r = 0.36), longer ICU LOS (p = 0.02, r = 0.27), and greater total hospital costs (p = 0.05, r = 0.22) but not hospital LOS (p = 0.52). LCOS was not associated with early postoperative outcomes. Maximum VIS has only modest correlation with duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU LOS, and total hospital charges. PMID:22349666

  5. Postoperative Pulmonary Dysfunction and Mechanical Ventilation in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Badenes, Rafael; Lozano, Angels; Belda, F. Javier

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pulmonary dysfunction (PPD) is a frequent and significant complication after cardiac surgery. It contributes to morbidity and mortality and increases hospitalization stay and its associated costs. Its pathogenesis is not clear but it seems to be related to the development of a systemic inflammatory response with a subsequent pulmonary inflammation. Many factors have been described to contribute to this inflammatory response, including surgical procedure with sternotomy incision, effects of general anesthesia, topical cooling, and extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and mechanical ventilation (VM). Protective ventilation strategies can reduce the incidence of atelectasis (which still remains one of the principal causes of PDD) and pulmonary infections in surgical patients. In this way, the open lung approach (OLA), a protective ventilation strategy, has demonstrated attenuating the inflammatory response and improving gas exchange parameters and postoperative pulmonary functions with a better residual functional capacity (FRC) when compared with a conventional ventilatory strategy. Additionally, maintaining low frequency ventilation during ECC was shown to decrease the incidence of PDD after cardiac surgery, preserving lung function. PMID:25705516

  6. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Diagnosis of Cor Triatriatum Sinistrum in Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kehrl, Thompson; Dagen, Callie T.; Becker, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the adolescent population secondary to congenital heart disease (CHD) is rare. Focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) in the emergency department (ED) can yield important clinical information, aid in resuscitative efforts during cardiac arrest and is commonly integrated into the evaluation of patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA). We report a case of pediatric cardiac arrest in which FoCUS was used to diagnose a critical CHD known as cor triatriatum sinistrum as the likely cause for PEA cardiac arrest and help direct ED resuscitation. PMID:26587102

  7. Inflammation, oxidative stress and postoperative atrial fibrillation in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Zakkar, M; Ascione, R; James, A F; Angelini, G D; Suleiman, M S

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a common complication of cardiac surgery that occurs in up to 60% of patients. POAF is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality, stroke and other arrhythmias that can impact on early and long term clinical outcomes and health economics. Many factors such as disease-induced cardiac remodelling, operative trauma, changes in atrial pressure and chemical stimulation and reflex sympathetic/parasympathetic activation have been implicated in the development of POAF. There is mounting evidence to support a major role for inflammation and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of POAF. Both are consequences of using cardiopulmonary bypass and reperfusion following ischaemic cardioplegic arrest. Subsequently, several anti-inflammatory and antioxidant drugs have been tested in an attempt to reduce the incidence of POAF. However, prevention remains suboptimal and thus far none of the tested drugs has provided sufficient efficacy to be widely introduced in clinical practice. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the onset and persistence of POAF is needed to develop more effective prediction and interventions. PMID:26116810

  8. Pediatric myocarditis: A sentinel of non-cardiac chronic diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Felszeghy, Enikő; Kovács, Tamás; Berkes, Andrea; Tóth, László; Balla, György; Korponay-Szabó, Ilma

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although long-term outcome studies in large pediatric myocarditis/cardiomyopathy populations have been reported in literature, none of them focused on comorbidities. Methods All children and adolescents (age <18 years) treated with myocarditis at the Department of Pediatrics, University of Debrecen, Hungary were followed. Patients suffering from myocarditis during the period 1996–2011 were enrolled. Results Over the 16-year period, a diagnosis of myocarditis was established in nine children. Their median age was 1.11 (0.03–8.71) years. Three of the nine patients died. Left ventricular dilatation and ejection fraction normalized within 1–21 months in the survivors. None of the cases progressed to dilated cardiomyopathy. Regarding non-cardiac comorbidities, myocarditis or recurrent peri-myocarditis preceded the manifestation of celiac disease in two patients, while cystic fibrosis was diagnosed after the improvement of cardiac function in another, and Alström syndrome was diagnosed several years after complete recovery from myocarditis in yet another patient. Conclusion These results suggest that manifestations of other chronic pediatric diseases may be more frequent among survivors of pediatric myocarditis. Prolonged follow-up of patients who survive myocarditis is therefore recommended not only to detect possible progression to cardiomyopathy but also to identify non-cardiac comorbidities. PMID:25598988

  9. Checklists and safety in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Konfirst, Chris; Preston, Stephanie; Yeh, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In rebuilding Tulane's pediatric heart center after Hurricane Katrina, the use of checklists proved to be essential, not only in rebuilding inventory and systems, but the culture of continued debriefing around their use was seminal in establishing a culture of safety and trust between caregivers; safety that ultimately benefitted our patients. PMID:25939842

  10. Evaluating the Safety of Intraoperative Antiarrhythmics in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Rachel S; Moffett, Brady S; Hall, Stuart; Kim, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occurring during the intraoperative period for cardiac surgery have been associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Several antiarrhythmics have been utilized for the management of intraoperative arrhythmias. These antiarrhythmic medications can cause undesirable adverse outcomes in the intensive care setting. The incidence and treatment of adult intraoperative arrhythmias have been studied. In addition, the prevalence, risk factors, and optimal treatment of pediatric postoperative arrhythmias have also been studied. However, the literature has not been published on intraoperative antiarrhythmia treatment during pediatric cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of intraoperative antiarrhythmic medications utilized in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. This was a retrospective review of all patients who received an intraoperative antiarrhythmic in the cardiovascular operating room at Texas Children's Hospital. Patients were included if they underwent cardiovascular surgery from November 2008 to July 2013 and were excluded if antiarrhythmics were given intraoperatively for other indications (i.e., esmolol for hypertension) or if patients were older than 18 years of age. Safety of antiarrhythmic treatment was determined by the absence or presence of adverse events. Control or recurrence of the arrhythmia was analyzed as a secondary measure to help determine antiarrhythmic efficacy. A total of 45 patients were identified (53.3 % male). Patients were a median of 0.52 years at the time of surgery. Primary surgery types were tetralogy of Fallot repair (n = 6; 13.3 %) and ventricular septal defect closure (n = 5, 11.1 %). Thirty-one patients (68.9 %) had documented adverse events after the administration of antiarrhythmics. Most of these adverse events occurred after the administration of amiodarone (n = 16; 51.6 %) followed by esmolol (n = 15; 48.4 %). Fifty-one percent of the arrhythmias resolved in the operating

  11. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  12. Early detection of acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John Lynn; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a common problem in children undergoing cardiac surgery, with well documented increases in morbidity and mortality in both the short and the long term. Traditional approaches to the identification of AKI such as changes in serum creatinine have revealed a large incidence in this population with significant negative impact on clinical outcomes. However, the traditional diagnostic approaches to AKI diagnosis have inherent limitations that may lead to under-diagnosis of this pathologic process. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials for the prevention and treatment of AKI associated with cardiac surgery, at least in part due to the paucity of early predictive biomarkers. Novel non-invasive biomarkers have ushered in a new era that allows for earlier detection of AKI. With these new diagnostic tools, a more consistent approach can be employed across centers that may facilitate a more accurate representation of the actual prevalence of AKI and more importantly, clinical investigation that may minimize the occurrence of AKI following pediatric cardiac surgery. A thoughtful management approach is necessary to mitigate the effects of AKI after cardiac surgery, which is best accomplished in close collaboration with pediatric nephrologists. Long-term surveillance for improvement in kidney function and potential development of chronic kidney disease should also be a part of the comprehensive management strategy. PMID:27429538

  13. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  14. Moore's law, Dabbawalas, and pediatric cardiac care in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Duminda

    2015-01-01

    Sri Lanka is an island nation in Indian Ocean that provides free healthcare to all citizens through government healthcare system. It has commendable health indices in the region. Pediatric cardiac services have rapidly progressed over past few years helping to further bring down infant and under-five mortality rates. Lady Ridgeway Hospital for Children (LRH) is the only tertiary care referral center for children with heart disease in the country. Currently it performs approximately 1,000 cardiac catheterizations and 1,000 cardiac surgeries every year. Target is to double the surgical output to treat all children with heart diseases in a timely and appropriate manner. Being a middle-income country, this is not an easy task. Technology used in diagnosis and treatment of congenital heart diseases is rapidly advancing with its price tag. In such a setting, it is challenging to proceed to achieve this target in a resource-limited environment. PMID:26085764

  15. Alveolar recruitment in patients in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Padovani, Cauê; Cavenaghi, Odete Mauad

    2011-01-01

    Lung complications during postoperative period of cardiac surgery are frequently, highlighting atelectasis and hypoxemia. Alveolar recruitment maneuvers have an important role in the prevention and treatment of these complications. Thus, this study reviewed and updated the alveolar recruitment maneuvers performance in the immediate postoperative period of cardiac surgery. We noted the efficacy of alveolar recruitment through different specific techniques and the need for development of new studies. PMID:21881720

  16. Patient doses from fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedures in pediatrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, L. C.; Vano, E.; Gutierrez, F.; Rodriguez, C.; Gilarranz, R.; Manzanas, M. J.

    2007-08-01

    Infants and children are a higher risk population for radiation cancer induction compared to adults. Although some values on pediatric patient doses for cardiac procedures have been reported, data to determine reference levels are scarce, especially when compared to those available for adults in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The aim of this study is to make a new contribution to the scarce published data in pediatric cardiac procedures and help in the determination of future dose reference levels. This paper presents a set of patient dose values, in terms of air kerma area product (KAP) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), measured in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory equipped with a biplane x-ray system with dynamic flat panel detectors. Cardiologists were properly trained in radiation protection. The study includes 137 patients aged between 10 days and 16 years who underwent diagnostic catheterizations or therapeutic procedures. Demographic data and technical details of the procedures were also gathered. The x-ray system was submitted to a quality control programme, including the calibration of the transmission ionization chamber. The age distribution of the patients was 47 for <1 year; 52 for 1-<5 years; 25 for 5-<10 years and 13 for 10-<16 years. Median values of KAP were 1.9, 2.9, 4.5 and 15.4 Gy cm2 respectively for the four age bands. These KAP values increase by a factor of 8 when moving through the four age bands. The probability of a fatal cancer per fluoroscopically guided cardiac procedure is about 0.07%. Median values of ESAK for the four age bands were 46, 50, 56 and 163 mGy, which lie far below the threshold for deterministic effects on the skin. These dose values are lower than those published in previous papers.

  17. Reducing distress in pediatric cardiac catheterization.

    PubMed

    Naylor, D; Coates, T J; Kan, J

    1984-08-01

    To examine the efficacy of rehearsal in reducing distress in 3- to 6-year-old children undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization, 40 children were assigned randomly to the rehearsal preparation procedure or to usual preparation. The rehearsal program involved the use of behavioral rehearsal in the catheterization laboratory, manuals to explain the procedure to the parents, and coloring books to provide parents and children with a vicarious experience of catheterization. Rehearsed patients cried, yelled for mother, complained of pain less, and showed lower rates of motor activity than did control patients. Rehearsed patients also showed less overt regressive, aggressive, and anxiety behaviors at home following the catheterization than did controls. Parents in the rehearsed group showed less anxiety following the catheterization, and negative reactions in children correlated significantly with parental anxiety. Participants' reactions were uniformly more positive in the rehearsed than in the control patients. PMID:6741887

  18. Intravascular access in pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Brunette, D D; Fischer, R

    1988-11-01

    All cases of patients aged less than 48 months who presented in cardiac arrest to the Hennepin County Medical Center's emergency department (ED) during the years 1984 to 1986 were reviewed retrospectively. The ED record, initial and subsequent chest radiographs, hospital charts, and autopsy reports were analyzed. A total of 33 cases were reviewed. The average patient age was 5 months. The average time needed to establish intravascular access was 7.9 +/- 4.2 minutes. Success rates were 77% for central venous catheterization, 81% for surgical vein cutdown, 83% for intraosseous infusion, and 17% for percutaneous peripheral catheterization. Percutaneous peripheral catheterization, when successful, and bone marrow needle placement were the fastest methods of obtaining intravascular access. There were no major immediate complications, and delayed complications were minimal. Attempts at peripheral intravenous catheter placement should be brief, with rapid progression to intraosseous infusion if peripheral attempts are not successful. PMID:3178949

  19. Etiology of postoperative hyponatremia following pediatric intracranial tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cydni N; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Bratton, Susan L

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) cause postoperative hyponatremia in neurosurgery patients, can be difficult to distinguish clinically, and are associated with increased morbidity. The authors aimed to determine risk factors associated with CSW and SIADH among children undergoing surgery for intracranial tumors. METHODS This retrospective cohort study included children 0-19 years of age who underwent a first intracranial tumor surgery with postoperative hyponatremia (sodium ≤ 130 mEq/L). CSW was differentiated from SIADH by urine output and fluid balance, exclusive of other causes of hyponatremia. The CSW and SIADH groups were compared with basic bivariate analysis and recursive partitioning. RESULTS Of 39 hyponatremic patients, 17 (44%) had CSW and 10 (26%) had SIADH. Patients with CSW had significantly greater natriuresis compared with those with SIADH (median urine sodium 211 vs 28 mEq/L, p = 0.01). Age ≤ 7 years and female sex were significant risk factors for CSW (p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Both patient groups had hyponatremia onset within the first postoperative week. Children with CSW had trends toward increased sodium variability and symptomatic hyponatremia compared with those with SIADH. Most received treatment, but inappropriate treatment was noted to worsen hyponatremia. CONCLUSIONS The authors found that CSW was more common following intracranial tumor surgery and was associated with younger age and female sex. Careful assessment of fluid balance and urine output can separate patients with CSW from those who have SIADH, and high urine sodium concentrations (> 100 mEq/L) support a CSW diagnosis. Patients with CSW and SIADH had similar clinical courses, but responded to different interventions, making appropriate diagnosis and treatment imperative to prevent morbidity. PMID:26613271

  20. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction and neuroinflammation; Cardiac surgery and abdominal surgery are not the same.

    PubMed

    Hovens, Iris B; van Leeuwen, Barbara L; Mariani, Massimo A; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Schoemaker, Regien G

    2016-05-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a debilitating surgical complication, with cardiac surgery patients at particular risk. To gain insight in the mechanisms underlying the higher incidence of POCD after cardiac versus non-cardiac surgery, systemic and central inflammatory changes, alterations in intraneuronal pathways, and cognitive performance were studied after cardiac and abdominal surgery in rats. Male Wistar rats were subjected to ischemia reperfusion of the upper mesenteric artery (abdominal surgery) or the left coronary artery (cardiac surgery). Control rats remained naïve, received anesthesia only, or received thoracic sham surgery. Rats were subjected to affective and cognitive behavioral tests in postoperative week 2. Plasma concentrations of inflammatory factors, and markers for neuroinflammation (NGAL and microglial activity) and the BDNF pathway (BDNF, p38MAPK and DCX) were determined. Spatial memory was impaired after both abdominal and cardiac surgery, but only cardiac surgery impaired spatial learning and object recognition. While all surgical procedures elicited a pronounced acute systemic inflammatory response, NGAL and TNFα levels were particularly increased after abdominal surgery. Conversely, NGAL in plasma and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and microglial activity in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex on postoperative day 14 were increased after cardiac, but not abdominal surgery. Both surgery types induced hippocampal alterations in BDNF signaling. These results suggest that POCD after cardiac surgery, compared to non-cardiac surgery, affects different cognitive domains and hence may be more extended rather than more severe. Moreover, while abdominal surgery effects seem limited to hippocampal brain regions, cardiac surgery seems associated with more wide spread alterations in the brain. PMID:26867718

  1. Pediatric defibrillation after cardiac arrest: initial response and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Antonio; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Cristina; Domínguez, Pedro; Carrillo, Angel; Bellón, Jose María

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Shockable rhythms are rare in pediatric cardiac arrest and the results of defibrillation are uncertain. The objective of this study was to analyze the results of cardiopulmonary resuscitation that included defibrillation in children. Methods Forty-four out of 241 children (18.2%) who were resuscitated from inhospital or out-of-hospital cardiac arrest had been treated with manual defibrillation. Data were recorded according to the Utstein style. Outcome variables were a sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and one-year survival. Characteristics of patients and of resuscitation were evaluated. Results Cardiac disease was the major cause of arrest in this group. Ventricular fibrillation (VF) or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (PVT) was the first documented electrocardiogram rhythm in 19 patients (43.2%). A shockable rhythm developed during resuscitation in 25 patients (56.8%). The first shock (dose, 2 J/kg) terminated VF or PVT in eight patients (18.1%). Seventeen children (38.6%) needed more than three shocks to solve VF or PVT. ROSC was achieved in 28 cases (63.6%) and it was sustained in 19 patients (43.2%). Only three patients (6.8%), however, survived at 1-year follow-up. Children with VF or PVT as the first documented rhythm had better ROSC, better initial survival and better final survival than children with subsequent VF or PVT. Children who survived were older than the finally dead patients. No significant differences in response rate were observed when first and second shocks were compared. The survival rate was higher in patients treated with a second shock dose of 2 J/kg than in those who received higher doses. Outcome was not related to the cause or the location of arrest. The survival rate was inversely related to the duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Conclusion Defibrillation is necessary in 18% of children who suffer cardiac arrest. Termination of VF or PVT after the first defibrillation dose is achieved in a low

  2. Factors affecting recovery of postoperative bowel function after pediatric laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Daphnée; Andreu-Gallien, Juliette; Skhiri, Alia; Bonnard, Arnaud; Nivoche, Yves; Dahmani, Souhayl

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laparoscopic pediatric surgery allows a rapid postoperative rehabilitation and hospital discharge. However, the optimal postoperative pain management preserving advantages of this surgical technique remains to be determined. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the postoperative recovery of bowel function after laparoscopic surgery in children. Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis of factors affecting recovery of bowel function in children and infants undergoing laparoscopic surgery between January 1, 2009 and September 30, 2009, was performed. Factors included were: Age, weight, extent of surgery (extensive, regional or local), chronic pain (sickle cell disease or chronic intestinal inflammatory disease), American Society of Anaesthesiologists status, postoperative analgesia (ketamine, morphine, nalbuphine, paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], nefopam, regional analgesia) both in the Postanesthesia Care Unit and in the surgical ward; and surgical complications. Data analysis used classification and regression tree analysis (CART) with a 10-fold cross validation. Results: One hundred and sixty six patients were included in the analysis. Recovery of bowel function depended upon: The extent of surgery, the occurrence of postoperative surgical complications, the administration of postoperative morphine in the surgical ward, the coadministration of paracetamol and NSAIDs and/or nefopam in the surgical ward and the emergency character of the surgery. The CART method generated a decision tree with eight terminal nodes. The percentage of explained variability of the model and the cross validation were 58% and 49%, respectively. Conclusion: Multimodal analgesia using nonopioid analgesia that allows decreasing postoperative morphine consumption should be considered for the speed of bowel function recovery after laparoscopic pediatric surgery.

  3. Music benefits on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery.

    PubMed

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-08-12

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001). Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age. PMID:25635217

  4. Music Benefits on Postoperative Distress and Pain in Pediatric Day Care Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Ostuni, Selene; Bonomelli, Irene; Mencherini, Simonetta; Brunero, Marco; Zambaiti, Elisa; Mannarino, Savina; Larizza, Daniela; Albertini, Riccardo; Tinelli, Carmine; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative effect of music listening has not been established in pediatric age. Response on postoperative distress and pain in pediatric day care surgery has been evaluated. Forty-two children were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to the music-group (music intervention during awakening period) or the non-music group (standard postoperative care). Slow and fast classical music and pauses were recorded and played via ambient speakers. Heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, glucose and cortisol levels, faces pain scale and Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) Pain Scale were considered as indicators of response to stress and pain experience. Music during awakening induced lower increase of systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels. The non-music group showed progressive increasing values of glycemia; in music-group the curve of glycemia presented a plateau pattern (P<0.001). Positive impact on reactions to pain was noted using the FLACC scale. Music improves cardiovascular parameters, stress-induced hyperglycemia. Amelioration on pain perception is more evident in older children. Positive effects seems to be achieved by the alternation of fast, slow rhythms and pauses even in pediatric age. PMID:25635217

  5. Postoperative sedation and analgesia after pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, R; Ingelmo, P; Sperti, L R

    2006-04-01

    The goal of sedation in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is to produce a calm and comfortable child, free from pain and discomfort. Children receiving liver transplantation need analgesics to control pain from surgical incisions, drains, vascular access, or endotracheal suctioning. Sedatives are used to facilitate the delivery of nursing care, to prevent self-extubation, and to facilitate mechanical ventilation. Optimal sedation produces a state in which the patient is somnolent, responsive to the environment but untroubled by it, and with no excessive movements. A common problem in the PICU is the fluctuation in the delivery of sedatives and analgesics depending on the health care providers and on a breakdown in communication between physicians and nurses to define end points for pharmacological therapy. This variability more often leads to oversedation rather than undersedation. Oversedation delays extubation, promotes ventilator-associated pneumonia, and increases the risk of reintubation. The use of written sedation policies to guide practice at the bedside reduces the length of time for which patients require mechanical ventilation and the length of PICU stay. Protocols for drug administration practices increase patient safety during mechanical ventilation, promote nursing autonomy, and facilitate communication between nurses and physicians as well as between nurses. PMID:16647489

  6. Vancomycin Dosing and Pharmacokinetics in Postoperative Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Benefield, Emily C.; Hagemann, Tracy M.; Allen, H. Christine; Farmer, Kevin; Burton, Michael E.; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study compared vancomycin trough concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery (CTS) patients versus those in controls receiving 20 mg/kg/dose, intravenously, every 8 hours. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in children <18 years of age, following CTS, versus an age-and sex-matched control group. The primary objective was to determine differences in trough concentrations between groups. Secondary objectives included comparisons of pharmacokinetics between groups and development of vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as a doubling in serum creatinine from baseline. Also dosing projections were developed to target an area-under-the-curve-to-minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC:MIC) ratio of ≥400. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients in each group were evaluated. Mean trough concentrations were significantly different between groups (CTS: 18.4 mg/L; control: 8.8 mg/L; p < 0.01). Vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury AKI was significantly higher in the CTS group than in controls (25.9% versus 0%, respectively, p<0.01). There were significant differences in vancomycin elimination rates, with a high degree of variability, but no statistical differences in other parameters. Based on dosing projections, CTS patients would require 21 to 88 mg/kg/day, with a dosage interval determined by the child's glomerular filtration rate to achieve the target AUC:MIC ≥400. CONCLUSIONS: Vancomycin dosage of 20 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 8 hours achieved significantly higher trough concentrations in CTS patients than in controls. Pharmacokinetic parameters were highly variable in CTS patients, indicating more individualization of dosage is needed. A future prospective study is needed to determine whether the revised dosage projections achieve the AUC:MIC target and to determine whether these regimens are associated with less vancomycin-associated AKI. PMID:26997930

  7. Establishment of Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Advanced Practice Provider Services.

    PubMed

    Gilliland, Jill; Donnellan, Amy; Justice, Lindsey; Moake, Lindy; Mauney, Jennifer; Steadman, Page; Drajpuch, David; Tucker, Dawn; Storey, Jean; Roth, Stephen J; Koch, Josh; Checchia, Paul; Cooper, David S; Staveski, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    The addition of advanced practice providers (APPs; nurse practitioners and physician assistants) to a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit (PCICU) team is a health care innovation that addresses medical provider shortages while allowing PCICUs to deliver high-quality, cost-effective patient care. APPs, through their consistent clinical presence, effective communication, and facilitation of interdisciplinary collaboration, provide a sustainable solution for the highly specialized needs of PCICU patients. In addition, APPs provide leadership, patient and staff education, facilitate implementation of evidence-based practice and quality improvement initiatives, and the performance of clinical research in the PCICU. This article reviews mechanisms for developing, implementing, and sustaining advance practice services in PCICUs. PMID:26714997

  8. Rationale for Implementation of Warm Cardiac Surgery in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Durandy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery was developed thanks to the introduction of hypothermia and cardiopulmonary bypass in the early 1950s. The deep hypothermia protective effect has been essential to circulatory arrest complex cases repair. During the early times of open-heart surgery, a major concern was to decrease mortality and to improve short-term outcomes. Both mortality and morbidity dramatically decreased over a few decades. As a consequence, the drawbacks of deep hypothermia, with or without circulatory arrest, became more and more apparent. The limitation of hypothermia was particularly evident for the brain and regional perfusion was introduced as a response to this problem. Despite a gain in popularity, the results of regional perfusion were not fully convincing. In the 1990s, warm surgery was introduced in adults and proved to be safe and reliable. This option eliminates the deleterious effect of ischemia–reperfusion injuries through a continuous, systemic coronary perfusion with warm oxygenated blood. Intermittent warm blood cardioplegia was introduced later, with impressive results. We were convinced by the easiness, safety, and efficiency of warm surgery and shifted to warm pediatric surgery in a two-step program. This article outlines the limitations of hypothermic protection and the basic reasons that led us to implement pediatric warm surgery. After tens of thousands of cases performed across several centers, this reproducible technique proved a valuable alternative to hypothermic surgery. PMID:27200324

  9. Rationale for Implementation of Warm Cardiac Surgery in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery was developed thanks to the introduction of hypothermia and cardiopulmonary bypass in the early 1950s. The deep hypothermia protective effect has been essential to circulatory arrest complex cases repair. During the early times of open-heart surgery, a major concern was to decrease mortality and to improve short-term outcomes. Both mortality and morbidity dramatically decreased over a few decades. As a consequence, the drawbacks of deep hypothermia, with or without circulatory arrest, became more and more apparent. The limitation of hypothermia was particularly evident for the brain and regional perfusion was introduced as a response to this problem. Despite a gain in popularity, the results of regional perfusion were not fully convincing. In the 1990s, warm surgery was introduced in adults and proved to be safe and reliable. This option eliminates the deleterious effect of ischemia-reperfusion injuries through a continuous, systemic coronary perfusion with warm oxygenated blood. Intermittent warm blood cardioplegia was introduced later, with impressive results. We were convinced by the easiness, safety, and efficiency of warm surgery and shifted to warm pediatric surgery in a two-step program. This article outlines the limitations of hypothermic protection and the basic reasons that led us to implement pediatric warm surgery. After tens of thousands of cases performed across several centers, this reproducible technique proved a valuable alternative to hypothermic surgery. PMID:27200324

  10. Penalized count data regression with application to hospital stay after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu; Ma, Shuangge; Zappitelli, Michael; Parikh, Chirag; Wang, Ching-Yun; Devarajan, Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery may lead to poor outcomes such as acute kidney injury (AKI) and prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS). Plasma and urine biomarkers may help with early identification and prediction of these adverse clinical outcomes. In a recent multi-center study, 311 children undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled to evaluate multiple biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of AKI and other clinical outcomes. LOS is often analyzed as count data, thus Poisson regression and negative binomial (NB) regression are common choices for developing predictive models. With many correlated prognostic factors and biomarkers, variable selection is an important step. The present paper proposes new variable selection methods for Poisson and NB regression. We evaluated regularized regression through penalized likelihood function. We first extend the elastic net (Enet) Poisson to two penalized Poisson regression: Mnet, a combination of minimax concave and ridge penalties; and Snet, a combination of smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD) and ridge penalties. Furthermore, we extend the above methods to the penalized NB regression. For the Enet, Mnet, and Snet penalties (EMSnet), we develop a unified algorithm to estimate the parameters and conduct variable selection simultaneously. Simulation studies show that the proposed methods have advantages with highly correlated predictors, against some of the competing methods. Applying the proposed methods to the aforementioned data, it is discovered that early postoperative urine biomarkers including NGAL, IL18, and KIM-1 independently predict LOS, after adjusting for risk and biomarker variables. PMID:24742430

  11. Vitamin C for the Prevention of Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation after Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Polymeropoulos, Evangelos; Bagos, Pantelis; Papadimitriou, Maria; Rizos, Ioannis; Patsouris, Efstratios; Τoumpoulis, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have investigated the administration of vitamin C (vitC) for the prevention of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) after cardiac surgery. However, their findings were inconsistent. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of vitC as prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative AF in cardiac surgery. Methods: A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, the Cochrane Library, and clinical trial registries, was performed. 9 studies, published from August 2001 to May 2015, were included, with a total of 1,037 patients. Patients were randomized to receive vitC, or placebo. Results: Cardiac surgery patients who received vitC as prophylaxis, had a significantly lower incidence of postoperative AF (random effects OR=0.478, 95% CI 0.340 – 0.673, P < 10-4). No significant heterogeneity was detected across the analyzed studies (I2=21.7%), and no publication bias or other small study-related bias was found. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that VitC is effective as prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative AF. The administration of vitC may be considered in all patients undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:27478787

  12. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Nilgun Kavrut; Baki, Elif Dogan; Kavakli, Ali Sait; Sahin, Ayca Sultan; Ayoglu, Raif Umut; Karaveli, Arzu; Emmiler, Mustafa; Inanoglu, Kerem; Karsli, Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229. PMID:27445610

  13. Utility of late gadolinium enhancement in pediatric cardiac MRI.

    PubMed

    Etesami, Maryam; Gilkeson, Robert C; Rajiah, Prabhakar

    2016-07-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) imaging sequence is increasingly used in the evaluation of pediatric cardiovascular disorders, and although LGE might be a normal feature at the sites of previous surgeries, it is pathologically seen as a result of extracellular space expansion, either from acute cell damage or chronic scarring or fibrosis. LGE is broadly divided into ischemic and non-ischemic patterns. LGE caused by myocardial infarction occurs in a vascular distribution and always involves the subendocardial portion, progressively involving the outer regions in a waveform pattern. Non-ischemic cardiomyopathies can have a mid-myocardial (either linear or patchy), subepicardial or diffuse subendocardial distribution. Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy can have a linear mid-myocardial pattern, while hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can have fine, patchy enhancement in hypertrophied and non-hypertrophied segments as well as right ventricular insertion points. Myocarditis and sarcoidosis have a mid-myocardial or subepicardial pattern of LGE. Fabry disease typically affects the basal inferolateral segment while Danon disease typically spares the septum. Pericarditis is characterized by diffuse or focal pericardial thickening and enhancement. Thrombus, the most common non-neoplastic cardiac mass, is characterized by absence of enhancement in all sequences, while neoplastic masses show at least some contrast enhancement, depending on the pathology. Regardless of the etiology, presence of LGE is associated with a poor prognosis. In this review, we describe the technical modifications required for performing LGE cardiac MR sequence in children, review and illustrate the patterns of LGE in children, and discuss their clinical significance. PMID:26718199

  14. Single Shot Adductor Canal Block for Postoperative Analgesia of Pediatric Patellar Dislocation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Yu; Li, Na; Xu, Yong-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Postoperative analgesia for the knee surgery in children can be challenging. Meanwhile acute pain management in pediatric patients is still often undertreated due to inadequate pain assessment or management. We reported the ultrasound-guided single-injection adductor canal block (ACB) with 0.2% ropivacaine and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) in addition in a series of 6 children. Patients’ age was range from 7 to 15 years old with right or left habitual patellar dislocation needing an open reduction and internal refixation. Pain assessments using Numeric Rating Scale scores on the operative limb were made preoperatively and at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h postoperatively at rest. Medication consumption was calculated as well. The possible complications, such as hemodynamic changes, nausea, vomiting, and dysesthesia, were also recorded at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h postoperatively at rest. The pain scores were low, and analgesic medication consumption was minimal. Meanwhile, no adverse events were recorded in any of the subject. Single-injection ACB might be an optimal analgesia strategy for patellar dislocation surgery in pediatric patients. PMID:26632911

  15. Dose optimization in pediatric cardiac x-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gislason, Amber J.; Davies, Andrew G.; Cowen, Arnold R.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to explore x-ray beam parameters with intent to optimize pediatric x-ray settings in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. This study examined the effects of peak x-ray tube voltage (kVp) and of copper (Cu) x-ray beam filtration independently on the image quality to dose balance for pediatric patient sizes. The impact of antiscatter grid removal on the image quality to dose balance was also investigated. Methods: Image sequences of polymethyl methacrylate phantoms approximating chest sizes typical of pediatric patients were captured using a modern flat-panel receptor based x-ray imaging system. Tin was used to simulate iodine-based contrast medium used in clinical procedures. Measurements of tin detail contrast and flat field image noise provided the contrast to noise ratio. Entrance surface dose (ESD) and effective dose (E) measurements were obtained to calculate the figure of merit (FOM), CNR{sup 2}/dose, which evaluated the dose efficiency of the x-ray parameters investigated. The kVp, tube current (mA), and pulse duration were set manually by overriding the system's automatic dose control mechanisms. Images were captured with 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.4, and 0.9 mm added Cu filtration, for 50, 55, 60, 65, and 70 kVp with the antiscatter grid in place, and then with it removed. Results: For a given phantom thickness, as the Cu filter thickness was increased, lower kVp was favored. Examining kVp alone, lower values were generally favored, more so for thinner phantoms. Considering ESD, the 8.5 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration. The 12 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.9 mm Cu, and the 16 cm phantom had highest FOM at 55 kVp using 0.4 mm Cu. With regard to E, the 8.5 and 12 cm phantoms had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.4 mm of Cu filtration, and the 16 cm phantom had the highest FOM at 50 kVp using 0.25 mm Cu. Antiscatter grid removal improved the FOM for a given set of x

  16. Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation following Open Cardiac Surgery: Predisposing Factors and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hashemzadeh, Khosrow; Dehdilani, Mahnaz; Dehdilani, Marjan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: New-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a common complication of cardiac surgery that has substantial effects on outcomes. The aim of this study is to analyze the risk factors in the pre, intra, and postoperative periods, and evaluate its impact on patients’ outcome. Methods: In this prospective study, between March 2007 and February 2011, a total of 1254 patients with preoperative sinus rhythm who underwent open cardiac surgery were included of which 177 (13.6%) had developed POAF. Many clinical variables that are associated with the development of POAF, were evaluated. Results: The study population consisted of 1254 patients that 864 (68.9%) were male and 390 (31.1%) female, and average age was 55.1±15.7 years. POAF occurred in 171 (13.6%) of patients and most of them (68.4%) developed within the first two days after surgery. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the following risk factors of POAF: Preoperative risk factors: age>50, smoking, Left ventricular hypertrophy, renal dysfunction, intraoperative risk factors: intraoperative inotrope use, valve surgery, atrial septal defect (ASD) surgery, bicaval cannulation, concomitant cardiac venting of pulmonary and aorta, longer cardiopulmonary time, longer cross-clamp time, postoperative use of inotropic agent after termination of cardiopulmonary bypass. Conclusion: POAF is the most common arrhythmia after cardiac surgery and not only concerted effort should be performed to identify and to reduce the risk factors, but also effective treatment is necessary to prevent mortality and morbidity. PMID:24252985

  17. Pediatric En Bloc Kidney Transplants: Clinical and Immediate Postoperative US Factors Associated with Vascular Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Fananapazir, Ghaneh; Tse, Gary; Corwin, Michael T; Santhanakrishnan, Chandrasekar; Perez, Richard V; McGahan, John P; Stewart, Susan; Troppmann, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To evaluate clinical and immediate postoperative ultrasonographic (US) risk factors associated with vascular thrombosis of pediatric en bloc kidney grafts. Materials and Methods This institutional review board-approved HIPAA-compliant retrospective study consisted of 195 recipients of pediatric en bloc kidney grafts throughout a 10-year period. The average recipient and donor age was 45 years (range, 7-74 years) and 9 months (range, 0-84 months), respectively. Clinical factors and immediate postoperative US findings were assessed. Categorical variables were evaluated by using the Fisher exact test and linear models with generalized estimating equations. Results Seventeen patients (23 kidneys) experienced thrombotic events. In six patients (eight kidneys), thrombosis occurred intraoperatively. The remaining 11 patients (15 kidneys) received a diagnosis of thrombosis on postoperative days 1-13. Recipients more than 40 years old had a higher incidence of arterial thrombosis than did younger recipients (eight of 62 vs three of 133, respectively; P < .01). Recipients were more likely to develop thrombosis with donor weight less than 5 kg (10 of 52 vs seven of 140 with donor weight of ≥ 5 kg; P < .01), with intraoperative perfusional concern (10 of 21 vs seven of 174 without; P < .01), or with right-sided allograft placement (10 of 64 vs seven of 131 left sided; P = .03). At US of the 15 postoperative thrombotic events, the incidence of thrombosis was greater when donor arterial velocity was less than 100 cm/sec (seven of 56 vs four of 126 with velocity ≥ 100 cm/sec; P = .04). An intrarenal arterial resistive index of less than 0.6 was associated with higher incidence of arterial thrombosis (nine of 123 vs zero of 217, respectively; P = .01). A resistive index greater than 0.8 was associated with a higher incidence of venous thrombosis (four of 13 vs one of 217, respectively; P = .04). Conclusion Clinical factors and immediate US findings can help stratify

  18. Limiting excessive postoperative blood transfusion after cardiac procedures. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, V A; Ferraris, S P

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of blood product use after cardiac operations reveals that a few patients (< or = 20%) consume the majority of blood products (> 80%). The risk factors that predispose a minority of patients to excessive blood use include patient-related factors, transfusion practices, drug-related causes, and procedure-related factors. Multivariate studies suggest that patient age and red blood cell volume are independent patient-related variables that predict excessive blood product transfusion after cardiac procedures. Other factors include preoperative aspirin ingestion, type of operation, over- or underutilization of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass, failure to correct hypothermia after cardiopulmonary bypass, and physician overtransfusion. A survey of the currently available blood conservation techniques reveals 5 that stand out as reliable methods: 1) high-dose aprotinin therapy, 2) preoperative erythropoietin therapy when time permits adequate dosage before operation, 3) hemodilution by harvest of whole blood immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass, 4) autologous predonation of blood, and 5) salvage of oxygenator blood after cardiopulmonary bypass. Other methods, such as the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid or desmopressin, cell saving devices, reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood, and hemofiltration have been reported to be less reliable and may even be harmful in some high-risk patients. Consideration of the available data allows formulation of a 4-pronged plan for limiting excessive blood transfusion after surgery: 1) recognize the causes of excessive transfusion, including the importance of red blood cell volume, type of procedure being performed, preoperative aspirin ingestion, etc.; 2) establish a quality management program, including a survey of transfusion practices that emphasizes physician education and availability of real-time laboratory testing to guide transfusion therapy; 3) adopt a multimodal approach using institution-proven techniques; and

  19. Pathways to postoperative hostility in cardiac patients: mediation of coping, spiritual struggle and interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Ai, Amy Lee; Pargament, Kenneth; Kronfol, Ziad; Tice, Terrence N; Appel, Hoa

    2010-03-01

    Using structural equation modeling, we estimated major pathways from preoperative distress, indicated by anxiety and other factors, to postoperative hostility in cardiac patients. Sequential interviews were conducted before and after surgery. Standardized medical and surgical indices were selected from a national database. Results showed that preoperative spiritual struggle mediated indirect effects of anxiety and anger coping on Interleukin-6 (IL-6) immediately before surgery. The link between spiritual struggle and IL-6 further mediated the indirect effects of anxiety and anger coping on postoperative hostility. Anger coping mediated the harmful influence of anxiety and counteracted the protection of positive religious coping on adjustment. PMID:20207662

  20. Comparison of dynamic measurements of pulse contour with pulsed heat continuous cardiac output in postoperative cardiac surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Martin; Lawrence, John; Belessis, Andrew; Murgo, Margherita; Shehabi, Yahya

    2007-02-01

    Cardiac output (CO) can be measured using bolus thermodilution via a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) and as continuous cardiac output (CCO), using pulsed heat thermoditution. Pulse contour cardiac output (PCCO) measures continuous CO by analysis of the arterial waveform after calibration with thermodilution CO. The Pulsion Medical Systems (PiCCO system) achieves this by transpulmonary aortic thermodilution (TDtpa). There is uncertainty regarding the agreement between TDtpa, CCO, and PCCO CO measurements in situations of rapid haemodynamic changes. We studied the agreement of the measures by comparing digital recordings of cardiac index (CI) determined by PCCO and CCO (PCCI and CCI, respectively) made during periods of haemodynamic instability. After ethics committee approval we studied four post-coronary artery bypass graft patients, in the immediate postoperative period. Each patient had a 7.5F CCO catheter (Edwards Lifesciences) and a 5F, 20cm PCCO femoral artery catheter. Digital recordings were obtained for the first 12-18 postoperative hours. Six epochs of instability were identified in the first two to three postoperative hours, and at the commencement of inotropic or vasoactive drugs. Notable features, despite frequent PCCO calibrations, were the marked difference of PCCI compared to CCI. In contradistinction, they tracked very closely during a period of stability. Limitations of both methods were noted. Whilst PCCO responded to rapid change, it developed significant error during haemodynmamic instability and requires frequent recalibration. CCO on the other hand has a considerable time lag in responding to changes in CO. The way a monitor measures CO must be taken into account when using the data in clinical management. PMID:17424793

  1. Tranexamic Acid in cardiac surgery and postoperative seizures: a case report series.

    PubMed

    Bell, David; Marasco, Silvana; Almeida, Aubrey; Rowland, Michael

    2010-08-01

    With the recent withdrawal of the antifibrinolytic aprotinin from the market, tranexamic acid (TxA) has become more widely used. This change has led to increasing concern about the side-effect profile of TxA, particularly the incidence of postoperative seizures. In this case series, we describe 7 patients over an 18-month period who had open-chamber cardiac surgery and developed seizures in the postoperative period. This incidence is increased compared with that of a cohort of patients in the previous 36 months who did not receive TxA (0.66% versus 0%; P < .05). The exact mechanism of TxA-induced seizures is thought to be via inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors in neurons. Data from the neurosurgical literature show a well-established link between this antifibrinolytic and seizures. There is now increasing awareness of this association in cardiac surgery, particularly when high TxA doses are used. PMID:20719731

  2. Invasive aspergillosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complication

    PubMed Central

    Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Silva-Júnior, Heraldo Maia; de Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Milan, Eveline Pípolo; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus is a ubiquitous fungus which can cause a variety of clinical syndromes. This fungus has emerged as agent of systemic infections and has therefore gained considerable public health importance. This paper describes two cases of invasive aspergillosis caused by A. fumigatus in immuno-suppressed patients and underscores the importance of early identification of Aspergillus infection associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complications. PMID:24031340

  3. Landiolol for junctional ectopic tachycardia refractory to amiodarone after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomomi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Maruo, Ayako; Matsuhisa, Hironori; Kadowaki, Tasuku; Noda, Rei

    2013-06-01

    Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) in children undergoing cardiac surgery is a serious arrhythmia that is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. We present here a case of successful landiolol therapy for postoperative JET in a 3-month-old infant who underwent ventricular septal defect closure and right pulmonary artery plasty. His left ventricular function was poor postoperatively. The JET was refractory to amiodarone and caused severe hypotension, which was required cardiac massage. Continuous intravenous infusion of low-dose landiolol reduced the persistent JET rate immediately, and restored to sinus rhythm with stable hemodynamics. PMID:22893321

  4. Postoperative arrhythmias after cardiac surgery: incidence, risk factors, and therapeutic management.

    PubMed

    Peretto, Giovanni; Durante, Alessandro; Limite, Luca Rosario; Cianflone, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a known complication after cardiac surgery and represent a major cause of morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and economic costs. However, little is known about incidence, risk factors, and treatment of early postoperative arrhythmias. Both tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias can present in the postoperative period. In this setting, atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is often self-limiting, but it may require anticoagulation therapy and either a rate or rhythm control strategy. However, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances can also occur. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias in the recovery period after cardiac surgery may warrant acute treatment and long-term preventive strategy in the absence of reversible causes. Transient bradyarrhythmias may be managed with temporary pacing wires placed at surgery, but significant and persistent atrioventricular block or sinus node dysfunction can occur with the need for permanent pacing. We provide a complete and updated review about mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the main postoperative arrhythmias. PMID:24511410

  5. Postoperative Arrhythmias after Cardiac Surgery: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Therapeutic Management

    PubMed Central

    Cianflone, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias are a known complication after cardiac surgery and represent a major cause of morbidity, increased length of hospital stay, and economic costs. However, little is known about incidence, risk factors, and treatment of early postoperative arrhythmias. Both tachyarrhythmias and bradyarrhythmias can present in the postoperative period. In this setting, atrial fibrillation is the most common heart rhythm disorder. Postoperative atrial fibrillation is often self-limiting, but it may require anticoagulation therapy and either a rate or rhythm control strategy. However, ventricular arrhythmias and conduction disturbances can also occur. Sustained ventricular arrhythmias in the recovery period after cardiac surgery may warrant acute treatment and long-term preventive strategy in the absence of reversible causes. Transient bradyarrhythmias may be managed with temporary pacing wires placed at surgery, but significant and persistent atrioventricular block or sinus node dysfunction can occur with the need for permanent pacing. We provide a complete and updated review about mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment strategies for the main postoperative arrhythmias. PMID:24511410

  6. Near infrared spectroscopy monitoring in the pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    PubMed

    Tanidir, Ibrahim Cansaran; Ozturk, Erkut; Ozyilmaz, Isa; Saygi, Murat; Kiplapinar, Neslihan; Haydin, Sertac; Guzeltas, Alper; Odemis, Ender

    2014-10-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method used to evaluate tissue oxygenation. We evaluated the relationship between cerebral and renal NIRS parameters during transcatheter intervention and adverse events in the catheterization room. Between January 1 and May 31, 2012, 123 of 163 pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization were followed by NIRS. All were monitored by electrocardiography, noninvasive blood pressure measurement, pulse oxymetry, initial and final blood lactate level measurement. The number of interventional procedures was 73 (59%). During the procedures, 39 patients experienced a total of 41 adverse events: 18 (19.5%) had desaturation, 10 (8.1%) arrhythmia, three (2.4%) had respiratory difficulty, six (4.8%) had a situation calling for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, three (2.4%) had anemia necessitating transfusion, and one (0.8%) had a cyanotic spell. Cranial NIRS values worsened in 12 (9.8%) and renal measurements worsened in 13 (12.5%) patients. The sensitivity and specificity of a 9% impairment of cranial values were 90 and 61%, respectively, while the corresponding calculations for a 21% fall in renal measurements were 54% sensitivity and 90% specificity. When arrhythmia developed, NIRS values fell simultaneously, while the development of a desaturation problem was heralded by NIRS falling 10-15 s earlier than changes in pulse oxymetry; on improving saturation, NIRS returned to earlier values 10-15 s before pulse oxymetry readings. NIRS monitoring may provide an early warning with regard to complications likely to develop during a procedure. A fall of 9% in cranial NIRS values, or of 21% in renal measurements, should raise clinician awareness. PMID:24404951

  7. A Low-Cost Simulation Model for R-Wave Synchronized Atrial Pacing in Pediatric Patients with Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Miriam; Egender, Friedemann; Heßling, Vera; Dähnert, Ingo; Gebauer, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) occurs frequently after pediatric cardiac surgery. R-wave synchronized atrial (AVT) pacing is used to re-establish atrioventricular synchrony. AVT pacing is complex, with technical pitfalls. We sought to establish and to test a low-cost simulation model suitable for training and analysis in AVT pacing. Methods A simulation model was developed based on a JET simulator, a simulation doll, a cardiac monitor, and a pacemaker. A computer program simulated electrocardiograms. Ten experienced pediatric cardiologists tested the model. Their performance was analyzed using a testing protocol with 10 working steps. Results Four testers found the simulation model realistic; 6 found it very realistic. Nine claimed that the trial had improved their skills. All testers considered the model useful in teaching AVT pacing. The simulation test identified 5 working steps in which major mistakes in performance test may impede safe and effective AVT pacing and thus permitted specific training. The components of the model (exclusive monitor and pacemaker) cost less than $50. Assembly and training-session expenses were trivial. Conclusions A realistic, low-cost simulation model of AVT pacing is described. The model is suitable for teaching and analyzing AVT pacing technique. PMID:26943363

  8. Melatonin treatment in the prevention of postoperative delirium in cardiac surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Artemiou, Panagiotis; Bilecova-Rabajdova, Miroslava; Sabol, Frantisek; Torok, Pavol; Kolarcik, Peter; Kolesar, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Post-cardiac surgery delirium is a severe complication. The circadian rhythm of melatonin secretion has been shown to be altered postoperatively. Aim of the study It was hypothesized that restoring normal sleeping patterns with a substance that is capable of resynchronizing circadian rhythm such as exogenous administration of melatonin may possibly reduce the incidence of postoperative delirium. Material and methods This paper represents a prospective clinical observational study. Two consecutive groups of 250 consecutive patients took part in the study. Group A was the control group and group B was the melatonin group. In group B, the patients received prophylactic melatonin treatment. The main objectives were to observe the incidence of delirium, to identify any predictors of delirium, and to compare the two groups based on the delirium incidence. Results The incidence of delirium was 8.4% in the melatonin group vs. 20.8% in the control group (p = 0.001). Predictors of delirium in the melatonin group were age (p = 0.001) and higher EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, age and EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.014) were predictors of postoperative delirium. Comparing the groups, the main predictors of delirium were age (p = 0.001), EuroSCORE II value (p = 0.001), cardio-pulmonary bypass (CPB) time (p = 0.001), aortic cross-clamping (ACC) time (p = 0.008), sufentanil dose (p = 0.001) and mechanical ventilation (p = 0.033). Conclusions Administration of melatonin significantly decreases the incidence of postoperative delirium after cardiac surgery. Prophylactic treatment with melatonin should be considered in every patient scheduled for cardiac surgery. PMID:26336494

  9. Apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes during pediatric cardiac surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, J.; Pipek, M.; Hambsch, J.; Schneider, P.; Tárnok, A.

    2006-02-01

    There is a constant need for clinical diagnostic systems that enable to predict disease course for preventative medicine. Apoptosis, programmed cell death, is the end point of the cell's response to different induction and leads to changes in the cell morphology that can be rapidly detected by optical systems. We tested whether apoptosis of T-cells in the peripheral blood is useful as predictor and compared different preparation and analytical techniques. Surgical trauma is associated with elevated apoptosis of circulating leukocytes. Increased apoptosis leads to partial removal of immune competent cells and could therefore in part be responsible for reduced immune defence. Cardiovascular surgery with but not without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces transient immunosuppression. Its effect on T-cell apoptosis has not been shown yet. Flow-cytometric data of blood samples from 107 children (age 3-16 yr.) who underwent cardiac surgery with (78) or without (29) CPB were analysed. Apoptotic T-lymphocytes were detected based on light scatter and surface antigen (CD45/CD3) expression (ClinExpImmunol2000;120:454). Results were compared to staining with CD3 antibodies alone and in the absence of antibodies. T-cell apoptosis rate was comparable when detected with CD45/CD3 or CD3 alone, however not in the absence of CD3. Patients with but not without CPB surgery had elevated lymphocyte apoptosis. T-cell apoptosis increased from 0.47% (baseline) to 0.97% (1 day postoperatively). In CPB patients with complication 1.10% significantly higher (ANOVA p=0.01) comparing to CPB patients without complications. Quantitation of circulating apoptotic cells based on light scatter seems an interesting new parameter for diagnosis. Increased apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes and neutrophils further contributes to the immune suppressive response to surgery with CPB. (Support: MP, Deutsche Herzstiftung, Frankfurt, Germany)

  10. Reiki therapy for postoperative oral pain in pediatric patients: Pilot data from a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anjana; Lin, Yuting; Oron, Assaf P.; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effects of Reiki as an adjuvant therapy to opioid therapy for postoperative pain control in pediatric patients. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized controlled study of children undergoing dental procedures. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either Reiki therapy or the control therapy (sham Reiki) preoperatively. Postoperative pain scores, opioid requirements, and side effects were assessed. Family members were also asked about perioperative care satisfaction. Multiple linear regressions were used for analysis. Results Thirty-eight children participated. The blinding procedure was successful. No statistically significant difference was observed between groups on all outcome measures. Implications Our study provides a successful example of a blinding procedure for Reiki therapy among children in the perioperative period. This study does not support the effectiveness of Reiki as an adjuvant therapy to opioid therapy for postoperative pain control in pediatric patients. PMID:24439640

  11. Utility of a dedicated pediatric cardiac anticoagulation program: the Boston Children's Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jenna M; Hellinger, Amy; Dionne, Roger; Brown, Loren; Galvin, Rosemary; Griggs, Suzanne; Mittler, Karen; Harney, Kathy; Manzi, Shannon; VanderPluym, Christina; Baker, Annette; O'Brien, Patricia; O'Connell, Cheryl; Almond, Christopher S

    2015-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of stroke in children. Warfarin therapy can be difficult to manage safely in this population because of its narrow therapeutic index, multiple drug and dietary interactions, small patient size, high-risk cardiac indications, and lack of data to support anticoagulation recommendations. We sought to describe our institution's effort to develop a dedicated cardiac anticoagulation service to address the special needs of this population and to review the literature. In 2009, in response to Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goals for Anticoagulation, Boston Children's Hospital created a dedicated pediatric Cardiac Anticoagulation Monitoring Program (CAMP). The primary purpose was to provide centralized management of outpatient anticoagulation to cardiac patients, to serve as a disease-specific resource to families and providers, and to devise strategies to evolve clinical care with rapidly emerging trends in anticoagulation care. Over 5 years the CAMP Service, staffed by a primary pediatric cardiology attending, a full-time nurse practitioner, and administrative assistant with dedicated support from pharmacy and nutrition, has enrolled over 240 patients ranging in age from 5 months to 55 years. The most common indications include a prosthetic valve (34 %), Fontan prophylaxis (20 %), atrial arrhythmias (11 %), cardiomyopathy (10 %), Kawasaki disease (7 %), and a ventricular assist device (2 %). A patient-centered multi-disciplinary cardiac anticoagulation clinic was created in 2012. Overall program international normalized ratio (INR) time in therapeutic range (TTR) is favorable at 67 % (81 % with a 0.2 margin) and has improved steadily over 5 years. Pediatric-specific guidelines for VKOR1 and CYP2C9 pharmacogenomics testing, procedural bridging with enoxaparin, novel anticoagulant use, and quality metrics have been developed. Program satisfaction is rated highly among families and providers. A dedicated pediatric

  12. Colonization of multidrug resistant pathogens in a hybrid pediatric cardiac surgery center

    PubMed Central

    Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Steffens, Mariusz; Arlukowicz, Elzbieta; Irga-Jaworska, Ninela; Chojnicki, Maciej; Kwasniak, Ewelina; Zielinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of multidrug resistant microorganisms worldwide is increasing. The aim of the study was to present institutional experience with the multidrug resistant microorganism colonization patterns observed in children with congenital heart diseases hospitalized in a hybrid pediatric cardiac surgery center. Material and methods Microbiological samples were routinely collected in all children admitted to our department. All microbiological samples were analyzed with regard to multidrug resistant microorganisms: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), Gram-negative rods producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), multidrug resistant Gram-negative rods (MDR-GNRs), carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC), carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (CRPA). Results In 30 (9%) swabs ‘alert’ pathogens from the above group of listed microorganisms were found. All positive swabs were isolated in 19 (16.1%) children. Multidrug resistant pathogen colonization was statistically significantly more often observed in children admitted from other medical facilities than in children admitted from home (38% vs. 10%, p = 0.0089). In the group of children younger than 6 months ‘alert’ pathogen were more often observed than in older children (34.1% vs. 5.4%, p < 0.001). Conclusions Preoperative multidrug resistant pathogen screening in children admitted and referred for congenital heart disease procedures may be of great importance since many of these patients are colonized with resistant bacteria. Knowledge of the patient's microbiome is important in local epidemiological control along with tailoring the most effective preoperative prophylactic antibiotic for each patient. The impact of preoperative screening on postoperative infections and other complications requires further analysis. PMID:27279859

  13. Hemoglobin-associated Oxidative Stress in the Pericardial Compartment of Post-operative Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Philip A.; Chacko, Balu K.; Ravi, Saranya; Johnson, Michelle S.; Mitchell, Tanecia; Barnes, Stephen; Arabshahi, Alireza; Dell’Italia, Louis J.; George, David J.; Steele, Chad; George, James F.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Melby, Spencer J.

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and valvular heart disease often require treatment with corrective surgery to prevent future myocardial infarction, ischemic heart disease, and heart failure. Mechanisms underlying the development of the associated complications of surgery are multifactorial and have been linked to inflammation and oxidative stress, classically as measured in the blood or plasma of patients. Post-operative pericardial fluid (PO-PCF) has not been investigated in depth with respect to the potential to induce oxidative stress. This is important since cardiac surgery disrupts the integrity of the pericardial membrane surrounding the heart, and causes significant alterations in the composition of the pericardial fluid (PCF). This includes contamination with hemolyzed blood and high concentrations of oxidized hemoglobin, which suggests that cardiac surgery results in oxidative stress within the pericardial space. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that PO-PCF is highly pro-oxidant and that the potential interaction between inflammatory cell-derived hydrogen peroxide with hemoglobin is associated with oxidative stress. Blood and PCF were collected from 31 patients at the time of surgery and postoperatively from 4 to 48 hours after coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, or valve repair (mitral or aortic). PO-PCF contained high concentrations of neutrophils and monocytes which are capable of generating elevated amounts of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide through the oxidative burst. In addition, PO-PCF primed naïve neutrophils resulting in an enhanced oxidative burst upon stimulation. The PO-PCF also contained increased concentrations of cell-free oxidized hemoglobin which was associated with elevated levels of F2α-isoprostanes and prostaglandins, consistent with both oxidative stress and activation of cyclooxygenase. Lastly, protein analysis of the PO-PCF revealed evidence of protein thiol oxidation and protein carbonylation. We conclude that PO-PCF is

  14. Dexmedetomidine as an adjunct in postoperative analgesia following cardiac surgery: A randomized, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Priye, Shio; Jagannath, Sathyanarayan; Singh, Dipali; Shivaprakash, S.; Reddy, Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine analgesic efficacy of dexmedetomidine used as a continuous infusion without loading dose in postcardiac surgery patients. Settings and Design: A prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical study in a single tertiary care hospital on patients posted for elective cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass. Interventions: Sixty-four patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery under general anesthesia were shifted to intensive care unit (ICU) and randomly divided into two groups. Group A (n = 32) received a 12 h infusion of normal saline and group B (n = 32) received a 12 h infusion of dexmedetomidine 0.4 μg/kg/h. Postoperative pain was managed with bolus intravenous fentanyl. Total fentanyl consumption, hemodynamic monitoring, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) pain ratings, Ramsay Sedation Scale were charted every 6th hourly for 24 h postoperatively and followed-up till recovery from ICU. Student's t-test, Chi-square/Fisher's exact test has been used to find the significance of study parameters between the groups. Results: Dexmedetomidine treated patients had significantly less VAS score at each level (P < 0.001). Total fentanyl consumption in dexmedetomidine group was 128.13 ± 35.78 μg versus 201.56 ± 36.99 μg in saline group (P < 0.001). A statistically significant but clinically unimportant sedation was noted at 6 and 12 h (P < 0.001, and P = 0.046 respectively). Incidence of delirium was less in dexmedetomidine group (P = 0.086+). Hemodynamic parameters were statistically insignificant. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine infusion even without loading dose provides safe, effective adjunct analgesia, reduces narcotic consumption, and showed a reduced trend of delirium incidence without undesirable hemodynamic effects in the cardiac surgery patients. PMID:26543448

  15. Innovation in Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care: An Exponential Convergence Toward Transformation of Care.

    PubMed

    Maher, Kevin O; Chang, Anthony C; Shin, Andrew; Hunt, Juliette; Wong, Hector R

    2015-10-01

    The word innovation is derived from the Latin noun innovatus, meaning renewal or change. Although companies such as Google and Apple are nearly synonymous with innovation, virtually all sectors in our current lives are imbued with yearn for innovation. This has led to organizational focus on innovative strategies as well as recruitment of chief innovation officers and teams in a myriad of organizations. At times, however, the word innovation seems like an overused cliché, as there are now more than 5,000 books in print with the word "innovation" in the title. More recently, innovation has garnered significant attention in health care. The future of health care is expected to innovate on a large scale in order to deliver sustained value for an overall transformative care. To date, there are no published reports on the state of the art in innovation in pediatric health care and in particular, pediatric cardiac intensive care. This report will address the issue of innovation in pediatric medicine with relevance to cardiac intensive care and delineate possible future directions and strategies in pediatric cardiac intensive care. PMID:26467873

  16. Prevalence of and risk factors for persistent postoperative nonanginal pain after cardiac surgery: a 2-year prospective multicentre study

    PubMed Central

    Choinière, Manon; Watt-Watson, Judy; Victor, J. Charles; Baskett, Roger J.F.; Bussières, Jean S.; Carrier, Michel; Cogan, Jennifer; Costello, Judy; Feindel, Christopher; Guertin, Marie-Claude; Racine, Mélanie; Taillefer, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Persistent postoperative pain continues to be an underrecognized complication. We examined the prevalence of and risk factors for this type of pain after cardiac surgery. Methods: We enrolled patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass grafting or valve replacement, or both, from Feb. 8, 2005, to Sept. 1, 2009. Validated measures were used to assess (a) preoperative anxiety and depression, tendency to catastrophize in the face of pain, health-related quality of life and presence of persistent pain; (b) pain intensity and interference in the first postoperative week; and (c) presence and intensity of persistent postoperative pain at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after surgery. The primary outcome was the presence of persistent postoperative pain during 24 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 1247 patients completed the preoperative assessment. Follow-up retention rates at 3 and 24 months were 84% and 78%, respectively. The prevalence of persistent postoperative pain decreased significantly over time, from 40.1% at 3 months to 22.1% at 6 months, 16.5% at 12 months and 9.5% at 24 months; the pain was rated as moderate to severe in 3.6% at 24 months. Acute postoperative pain predicted both the presence and severity of persistent postoperative pain. The more intense the pain during the first week after surgery and the more it interfered with functioning, the more likely the patients were to report persistent postoperative pain. Pre-existing persistent pain and increased preoperative anxiety also predicted the presence of persistent postoperative pain. Interpretation: Persistent postoperative pain of nonanginal origin after cardiac surgery affected a substantial proportion of the study population. Future research is needed to determine whether interventions to modify certain risk factors, such as preoperative anxiety and the severity of pain before and immediately after surgery, may help to minimize or prevent persistent postoperative pain. PMID:24566643

  17. Predictors of Acute Renal Failure During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Patients After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lin; Long, Cun; Liu, Jinping; Hei, Feilong; Ji, Bingyang; Yu, Kun; Hu, Qiang; Hu, Jinxiao; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with increased mortality in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. A retrospective study analyzed 42 children (≤15 years) after cardiac surgery requiring venous-arterial ECMO between December 2008 and December 2014 at Fuwai Hospital. ARF was defined as ≥300% rise in serum creatinine (SCr) concentration from baseline or application of dialysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of ARF during ECMO. A total of 42 children (age, interquartile range [IQR], 13.0 [7.2-29.8] months; weight, IQR, 8.5 [6.7-11.0] kg) after cardiac surgery requiring ECMO were included in this study. The total survival rate was 52.4%, and the incidence of ARF was 40.5%. As the result of univariate analysis, ECMO duration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, maximum free hemoglobin (FHB) during ECMO, lactate level, and mean blood pressure before initiation of ECMO were entered in multiple logistic regression analysis. In multiple logistic regression analysis, FHB during ECMO (OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023-1.261) and lactate level before initiation of ECMO (OR 1.602, 95% CI 1.025-2.502) were risk factors for ARF during ECMO after pediatric cardiac surgery. There was a linear correlation between maximum SCr and maximum FHB (Pearson's r = 0.535, P = 0.001). Maximum SCr during ECMO has also a linear correlation with lactate level before initiation of ECMO (Pearson's r = 0.342, P = 0.044). Increased FHB during ECMO and high lactate level before initiation of ECMO were risk factors for ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:26636965

  18. Perioperative management of pediatric patients on mechanical cardiac support.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Emad B; Motta, Pablo; Rossano, Joseph; Hale, Brittani; Morales, David L

    2011-05-01

    The population of children with end-stage heart failure requiring mechanical circulatory support is growing. These children present for diagnostic imaging studies, various interventions and noncardiac surgical procedures that require anesthetic care. This article is a review of the population demographics of children on mechanical cardiac support, the alternative devices available, and the important concepts for safe perioperative management of these patients. The discussion will be limited to devices for short- and long-term cardiac support, excluding extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for respiratory support. PMID:21332879

  19. A novel mouse model of pediatric cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation reveals age-dependent neuronal sensitivities to ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Deng, G; Yonchek, JC; Quillinan, N; Strnad, FA; Exo, J; Herson, PS; Traystman, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric sudden cardiac arrest (CA) is an unfortunate and devastating condition, often leading to poor neurologic outcomes. However, little experimental data on the pathophysiology of pediatric CA is currently available due to the scarcity of animal models. New Method We developed a novel experimental model of pediatric cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CA/CPR) using postnatal day 20–25 mice. Adult (8–12 weeks) and pediatric (P20–25) mice were subjected to 6 min CA/CPR. Hippocampal CA1 and striatal neuronal injury were quantified 3 days after resuscitation by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Fluoro-Jade B staining, respectively. Results Pediatric mice exhibited less neuronal injury in both CA1 hippocampal and striatal neurons compared to adult mice. Increasing ischemia time to 8 min CA/CPR resulted in an increase in hippocampal injury in pediatric mice, resulting in similar damage in adult and pediatric brains. In contrast, striatal injury in the pediatric brain following 6 or 8 min CA/CPR remained extremely low. As observed in adult mice, cardiac arrest causes delayed neuronal death in pediatric mice, with hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage maturing at 72 hours after insult. Finally, mild therapeutic hypothermia reduced hippocampal CA1 neuronal injury after pediatric CA/CPR. Comparison with Existing Method This is the first report of a cardiac arrest and CPR model of global cerebral ischemia in mice Conclusions Therefore, the mouse pediatric CA/CPR model we developed is unique and will provide an important new tool to the research community for the study of pediatric brain injury. PMID:24192226

  20. Pediatric cardiac surgery in low- and middle-income countries or emerging economies: a continuing challenge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyenvu; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A number of recent publications, addresses, seminars, and conferences have addressed the global backlog and increasing incidence of both congenital and acquired cardiac diseases in children, with reference to early and delayed recognition, late referral, availability of and access to services, costs, risks, databases, and early and long-term results and follow-up. A variety of proposals, recommendations, and projects have been outlined and documented. The ultimate goal of these endeavors is to increase the quality and quantity of pediatric cardiac care and surgery worldwide and particularly in underserved areas. A contemporary review of past and present initiatives is presented with a subsequent focus on the more challenging areas. PMID:25870347

  1. Preoperative Preparation for Cardiac Surgery Facilitates Recovery, Reduces Psychological Distress, and Reduces the Incidence of Acute Postoperative Hypertension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Erling A.

    1987-01-01

    Cardiac surgery patients were assigned to information-only, information-plus-coping, or control preoperative preparation groups. Preoperatively, both experimental groups were significantly less anxious than were controls. Both experimental groups increased patients' belief in control over recovery. Postoperatively, experimental patients were less…

  2. Staged Delayed Sternal Closure Using a Binder Clip After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Tai; Nishioka, Masahiko; Akashige, Toru; Higa, Shotaro; Nagata, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    After pediatric cardiac surgery, patients who undergo delayed sternal closure may become hemodynamically unstable. We performed a staged sternal closure technique using a binder clip in 31 consecutive patients to minimize cardiopulmonary instability. Only one patient (3.2%) died of mediastinitis. Thus, our technique may be safe and minimize cardiopulmonary instability. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12767 (J Card Surg 2016;31:464-466). PMID:27277820

  3. Down syndrome and postoperative complications after paediatric cardiac surgery: a propensity-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Roland; Szántó, Péter; Prodán, Zsolt; Lex, Daniel J; Sápi, Erzsébet; Szatmári, András; Gál, János; Szántó, Tamás; Székely, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The incidence of congenital heart disease is ∼50%, mostly related to endocardial cushion defects. The aim of our study was to investigate the postoperative complications that occur after paediatric cardiac surgery. METHODS Our perioperative data were analysed in paediatric patients with Down syndrome undergoing cardiac surgery. We retrospectively analysed the data from 2063 consecutive paediatric patients between January 2003 and December 2008. After excluding the patients who died or had missing data, the analysed database (before propensity matching) contained 129 Down patients and 1667 non-Down patients. After propensity matching, the study population comprised 222 patients and 111 patients had Down syndrome. RESULTS Before propensity matching, the occurrences of low output syndrome (21.2 vs 32.6%, P = 0.003), pulmonary complication (14 vs 28.7%, P < 0.001) and severe infection (11.9 vs 22.5%, P = 0.001) were higher in the Down group. Down patients were more likely to have prolonged mechanical ventilation [median (interquartile range) 22 (9–72) h vs 49 (24–117) h, P = 0.007]. The total intensive care unit length of stay [6.9 (4.2–12.4) days vs 8.3 (5.3–13.2) days, P = 0.04] and the total hospital length of stay [17.3 (13.3–23.2) days vs 18.3 (15.1–23.6) days, P = 0.05] of the Down patients were also longer. Mortality was similar in the two groups before (3.58 vs 3.88%, P = 0.86) and after (5.4 vs 4.5%, P = 1.00) propensity matching. After propensity matching, there was no difference in the occurrence of adverse events. CONCLUSIONS After propensity matching Down syndrome was not associated with increased mortality or complication rate following congenital cardiac surgery. PMID:23832837

  4. Provision of Transition Education and Referral Patterns from Pediatric Cardiology to Adult Cardiac Care.

    PubMed

    Harbison, Anna L; Grady, Stafford; Chi, Kevin; Fernandes, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    ACC/AHA guidelines recommend a structured preparation for and transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care for adult survivors of pediatric onset heart disease (POHD). Given this, we sought to describe the transition and transfer practices for a cohort of young adults with POHD and to determine factors associated with successful transfer to adult-oriented cardiac care. We performed a single-center, retrospective chart review on patients ≥18 years of age, with POHD likely to require lifelong cardiac care, who were seen in outpatient pediatric cardiology (PC) between 2008 and 2011. Successful transfer was defined as the subsequent attendance at adult cardiology (AC) within 2 years of PC visit. We identified 118 patients who met study criteria. Mean age 22.4 ± 2.0 years, 59 % male, 64 % white and 40 % Hispanic. Mean transition education topics noted was 3.3 ± 1.8 out of 20 and covered the underlying cardiac disease (89 %), follow-up and current medications (56 %) and exercise limitations (34 %). Recommendations for follow-up were AC (57 %) and PC (33 %). Of those told to transfer to AC, 79 % successfully transferred. Characteristics of successful transfer included: prior cardiac surgery (p = 0.008), cardiac medication use (p = 0.006) and frequency of follow-up ≤1 year (p = 0.037). One-quarter of all subjects did not follow-up within at least 2 years. Despite published guidelines, transition education appears lacking and the approach to transfer to adult cardiac care is not consistent. Given the increased risk of morbidity and mortality in this patient population, standardization of transition education and transfer processes appear warranted. PMID:26385471

  5. Comparison of preoperative rectal paracetamol with paracetamol - diclofenac combination for postoperative analgesia in pediatric surgeries under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yallapragada, Srivishnu Vardhan; Shenoy, Thrivikram

    2016-01-01

    Context: Traditionally, pain in children is a topic that has received only minimal attention. However, in the recent times, considerable progress has been made in the field of neonatal and pediatric pharmacology. The concept of preemptive analgesia is important in combating postoperative pain in children. In this study, we sought to compare the effectiveness of preemptive analgesia provided by paracetamol alone and by its combination with diclofenac when administered per rectum. Aims: To compare the efficacy of preoperative rectal paracetamol with paracetamol - diclofenac combination for postoperative analgesia in pediatric surgeries under general anesthesia. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized double-blind study. Subjects and Methods: Sixty children scheduled for various surgeries under general anesthesia were randomly allocated into two Groups A and B, with 30 in each. Children in Group A received paracetamol suppository 20 mg/kg and those in Group B received paracetamol 20 mg/kg + diclofenac 2 mg/kg as suppository immediately after tracheal intubation. All the children were assessed for 24 h from the time of extubation. The pain was measured using numerical rating scale in children above 7 years and face-legs-activity-cry-consolability scale in children below 7 years. The time interval between extubation and the administration of the first dose of rescue analgesic was taken as the duration of postoperative analgesia. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive and inferential statistical methods were used to analyze the data. Results: The duration of postoperative analgesia was significantly longer in paracetamol + diclofenac group (21.13 ± 2.68 h) as compared to paracetamol alone group (10.18 ± 2.39 h). Conclusions: The combination of paracetamol and diclofenac administered per rectum preoperatively is more effective than paracetamol alone in providing postoperative analgesia in children. PMID:27212765

  6. Potential benefit of the CT adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction method for pediatric cardiac diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miéville, Frédéric A.; Ayestaran, Paul; Argaud, Christophe; Rizzo, Elena; Ou, Phalla; Brunelle, Francis; Gudinchet, François; Bochud, François; Verdun, Francis R.

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction (ASIR) is a new imaging reconstruction technique recently introduced by General Electric (GE). This technique, when combined with a conventional filtered back-projection (FBP) approach, is able to improve the image noise reduction. To quantify the benefits provided on the image quality and the dose reduction by the ASIR method with respect to the pure FBP one, the standard deviation (SD), the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), the image uniformity and the noise homogeneity were examined. Measurements were performed on a control quality phantom when varying the CT dose index (CTDIvol) and the reconstruction kernels. A 64-MDCT was employed and raw data were reconstructed with different percentages of ASIR on a CT console dedicated for ASIR reconstruction. Three radiologists also assessed a cardiac pediatric exam reconstructed with different ASIR percentages using the visual grading analysis (VGA) method. For the standard, soft and bone reconstruction kernels, the SD is reduced when the ASIR percentage increases up to 100% with a higher benefit for low CTDIvol. MTF medium frequencies were slightly enhanced and modifications of the NPS shape curve were observed. However for the pediatric cardiac CT exam, VGA scores indicate an upper limit of the ASIR benefit. 40% of ASIR was observed as the best trade-off between noise reduction and clinical realism of organ images. Using phantom results, 40% of ASIR corresponded to an estimated dose reduction of 30% under pediatric cardiac protocol conditions. In spite of this discrepancy between phantom and clinical results, the ASIR method is as an important option when considering the reduction of radiation dose, especially for pediatric patients.

  7. Are There Benefits to a Fresh Whole Blood vs. Packed Red Blood Cell Cardiopulmonary Bypass Prime on Outcomes in Neonatal and Pediatric Cardiac Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Valleley, Melinda S.; Buckley, Klayton W.; Hayes, Kylie M.; Fortuna, Randall R.; Geiss, Dale M.; Holt, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: Techniques for pediatric cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) have significantly improved over the years. The use of fresh whole blood (FWB) and pre-bypass ultrafiltration (PBUF) has been suggested as means for improving perioperative and postoperative outcomes. It is the intent of this study to show that fresh whole blood along with PBUF will result in balanced CPB prime that can offer a reduction in blood product exposures and blood loss along with improving several measured postoperative outcomes. After institutional review board approval, a retrospective review was conducted on 100 patients to analyze the benefits of FWB and PBUF on outcomes in neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery. Data analysis included preoperative and CPB data, perioperative inotrope and blood product exposure, and postoperative blood loss and blood product exposure measured for up to a 12-hour period in the intensive care unit (ICU). The three groups compared were FWB prime vs. packed red blood cell (PRBC) prime, <5 kg FWB prime vs. <5 kg PRBC prime, and 5+ kg FWB prime and 5+ kg PRBC prime. Cumulative blood product exposures for the FWB prime group found 62% received one blood exposure for the operative and postoperative period (p < .0001). The majority of patients who received a PRBC prime (64%) received three or more cumulative exposures (p < .0003). The <5 kg FWB group also received significantly less cumulative blood exposure, with 64% receiving just one exposure. Comparatively, 85% of the <5 kg PRBC patients received three or more blood product exposures perioperatively and postoperatively (p < .0001). Perioperative inotrope and postoperative blood loss did not differ among the groups. Outcomes for intraoperative death, intraoperative extubation, delayed sternal closure, and mediastinal reexploration were also not statistically different. The results of this study found that FWB leads to significantly less blood exposure, specifically in the <5-kg

  8. A pilot study of cerebrovascular reactivity autoregulation after pediatric cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer K.; Brady, Ken M.; Chung, Shang-En; Jennings, Jacky M.; Whitaker, Emmett E.; Aganga, Devon; Easley, Ronald B.; Heitmiller, Kerry; Jamrogowicz, Jessica L.; Larson, Abby C.; Lee, Jeong-Hoo; Jordan, Lori C.; Hogue, Charles W.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Bembea, Mela M.; Hunt, Elizabeth A.; Koehler, Raymond C.; Shaffner, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Improved survival after cardiac arrest has placed greater emphasis on neurologic resuscitation. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the relationship between cerebrovascular autoregulation and neurologic outcomes after pediatric cardiac arrest. Methods Children resuscitated from cardiac arrest had autoregulation monitoring during the first 72 hours after return of circulation with an index derived from near-infrared spectroscopy in a pilot study. The range of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) with optimal vasoreactivity (MAPOPT) was identified. The area under the curve (AUC) of the time spent with MAP below MAPOPT and MAP deviation below MAPOPT was calculated. Neurologic outcome measures included placement of a new tracheostomy or gastrostomy, death from a primary neurologic etiology (brain death or withdrawal of support for neurologic futility), and change in the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score (ΔPCPC). Results Thirty-six children were monitored. Among children who did not require extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), children who received a tracheostomy/gastrostomy had greater AUC during the second 24 hours after resuscitation than those who did not (P=0.04; n=19). Children without ECMO who died from a neurologic etiology had greater AUC during the first 48 hours than did those who lived or died from cardiovascular failure (P=0.04; n=19). AUC below MAPOPT was not associated with ΔPCPC when children with or without ECMO were analyzed separately. Conclusions Deviation from the blood pressure with optimal autoregulatory vasoreactivity may predict poor neurologic outcomes after pediatric cardiac arrest. This experimental autoregulation monitoring technique may help individualize blood pressure management goals after resuscitation. PMID:25046743

  9. Diagnosis of cardiac disease in pediatric end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Chavers, Blanche M.; Solid, Craig A.; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Frank X.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Collins, Allan J.; Frankenfield, Diane L.; Herzog, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Cardiac disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in children with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). This study aimed to report the frequency of cardiac disease diagnostic methods used in US pediatric maintenance hemodialysis patients. Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of all US pediatric (ages 0.7–18 years, n = 656) maintenance hemodialysis patients was performed using data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ESRD Clinical Performance Measures Project. Clinical and laboratory information was collected in 2001. Results were analysed by age, sex, race, Hispanic ethnicity, dialysis duration, body mass index (BMI), primary ESRD cause and laboratory data. Results. Ninety-two percent of the patients had a cardiovascular risk factor (63% hypertension, 38% anemia, 11% BMI > 94th percentile, 63% serum phosphorus > 5.5 mg/dL and 55% calcium–phosphorus product ≥ 55 mg2/dL2). A diagnosis of cardiac disease was reported in 24% (n = 155) of all patients: left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement 17%, congestive heart failure/pulmonary edema 8%, cardiomyopathy 2% and decreased left ventricular function 2%. Thirty-one percent of patients were not tested. Of those tested, the diagnostic methods used were chest X-rays in 60%, echocardiograms in 35% and electrocardiograms in 33%; left ventricular hypertrophy/enlargement was diagnosed using echocardiogram (72%), chest X-ray (20%) and electrocardiogram (15%). Conclusions. Although 92% of patients had cardiovascular risk factors, an echocardiography was performed in only one-third of the patients. Our study raises the question of why echocardiography, considered the gold standard for cardiac disease diagnosis, has been infrequently used in pediatric maintenance dialysis patients, a high-risk patient population. PMID:20861193

  10. Risk factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received tranexamic acid: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Montes, Felix R; Pardo, Daniel F; Carreño, Marisol; Arciniegas, Catalina; Dennis, Rodolfo J; Umaña, Juan P

    2012-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic agents are used during cardiac surgery to minimize bleeding and reduce exposure to blood products. Several reports suggest that tranexamic acid (TA) can induce seizure activity in the postoperative period. To examine factors associated with postoperative seizures in patients undergoing cardiac surgery who received TA. University-affiliated hospital. Case-control study. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) between January 2008 and December 2009 were identified. During this time, all patients undergoing heart surgery with CPB received TA. Cases were defined as patients who developed seizures that required initiation of anticonvulsive therapy within 48 h of surgery. Exclusion criteria included subjects with preexisting epilepsy and patients in whom the convulsive episode was secondary to a new ischemic lesion on brain imaging. Controls who did not develop seizures were randomly selected from the initial cohort. From an initial cohort of 903 patients, we identified 32 patients with postoperative seizures. Four patients were excluded. Twenty-eight cases and 112 controls were analyzed. Cases were more likely to have a history of renal impairment and higher preoperative creatinine values compared with controls (1.39 ± 1.1 vs. 0.98 ± 0.02 mg/dL, P = 0.02). Significant differences in the intensive care unit, postoperative and total lengths of stay were observed. An association between high preoperative creatinine value and postoperative seizure was identified. TA may be associated with the development of postoperative seizures in patients with renal dysfunction. Doses of TA should be reduced or even avoided in this population. PMID:22234015

  11. Initial Observations of the Effects of Calcium Chloride Infusions in Pediatric Patients with Low Cardiac Output.

    PubMed

    Averin, Konstantin; Villa, Chet; Krawczeski, Catherine D; Pratt, Jesse; King, Eileen; Jefferies, John L; Nelson, David P; Cooper, David S; Ryan, Thomas D; Sawyer, Jaclyn; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Lorts, Angela

    2016-03-01

    Myocardial contractility and relaxation are highly dependent on calcium homeostasis. Immature myocardium, as in pediatric patients, is thought to be more dependent on extracellular calcium for optimal function. For this reason, intravenous calcium chloride infusions may improve myocardial function in the pediatric patient. The objectives of this study were to report the hemodynamic changes seen after administration of continuous calcium chloride to critically ill children. We retrospectively identified pediatric patients (newborn to 17 years old) with hemodynamic instability admitted to the cardiac ICU between May 2011 and May 2012 who received a continuous infusion of calcium chloride. The primary outcome was improvement in cardiac output, assessed by arterial-mixed venous oxygen saturation (A-V) difference. Sixty-eight patients, mean age 0.87 ± 2.67 years, received a total of 116 calcium infusions. Calcium chloride infusions resulted in significant improvements in primary and secondary measures of cardiac output at 2 and 6 h. Six hours after calcium initiation, A-V oxygen saturation difference decreased by 7.4 % (32.6 ± 2.1 to 25.2 ± 2.0 %, p < 0.001), rSO2 increased by 5.5 % (63.1 vs 68.6 %, p < 0.001), and serum lactate decreased by 0.9 mmol/l (3.3 vs 2.4 mmol/l, p < 0.001) with no change in HR (149.1 vs 145.6 bpm p = 0.07). Urine output increased 0.66 ml/kg/h in the 8-h period after calcium initiation when compared to pre-initiation (p = 0.003). Neonates had the strongest evidence of effectiveness with other age groups trending toward significance. Calcium chloride infusions improve markers of cardiac output in a heterogenous group of pediatric patients in a cardiac ICU. Neonates appear to derive the most benefit from utilization of these infusions. PMID:26687150

  12. Elevated postoperative serum procalcitonin is not indicative of bacterial infection in cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Murali; Kavaraganahalli, Deepak; Pargaonkar, Sumant; Hosur, Rajathadri; Harivelam, Chidananda; Bharadwaj, Ashwin; Raghunathan, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Identifying infections early, commencing appropriate empiric antibiotic not only helps gain control early, but also reduces mortality and morbidity. Conventional cultures take about 5 days to identify infections. To identify the infections early biomarker like serum procalcitonin (SPC). Aims: We studied the correlation of an elevated level of SPC and positive culture in elective adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Methods: This prospective study was conducted from January to December 2013. SPC was checked in patients showing evidence of sepsis. Simultaneously, relevant culture was also undertaken. Correlation, specificity, and sensitivity of elevated SPC were checked. Results: A total of 819 adult patients were included in the study. 43 of them had signs of infection and SPC levels were checked. Based on the level of SPC criteria, 10 patients were diagnosed as “nil”, out of them, 4 had culture-positive infections, 17 were suggested to have “mild infection,” 3 out those had culture positivity. None among the eleven patients suggested to have “moderate infection,” had a positive culture, and one among the five suggested to have a severe infection had a positive culture. The sensitivity was 50% and the specificity 17%. The positive predictive value was 12% and the negative predictive value 60%. Conclusions: We failed to elicit positive correlation between elevated SPC levels and postoperative infection in cardio surgical patients. PMID:25849691

  13. Post cardiac surgery phrenic nerve palsy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Serraf, A; Planche, C; Lacour Gayet, F; Bruniaux, J; Nottin, R; Binet, J P

    1990-01-01

    From January 1978 to December 1988, 109 phrenic nerve paralyses (PNP) occurred in a total of 9149 cardiac operations performed in a population of patients younger than 15 years old (1.2%) whose age varied from 1 day to 15 years old and mean weight was 11.3 +/- 8.7 kg. PNP was diagnosed in 43 patients after closed procedures (1.2% of 3509 procedures) and in 66 patients after open heart operations (1.2% of 5640 operations). PNP was right sided in 49 cases and left sided in 60 cases. Open heart operations that predisposed to PNP were those which needed harvesting of autologous pericardium (P less than 0.0001) and wide exposure of the great vessels. The modified right Blalock-Taussig shunt was the main cause of PNP in closed procedures (P less than 0.02). Small children tolerated PNP less well. They needed longer ventilatory support (P less than 0.0005) and developed more respiratory complications. Seventeen children underwent plication of the affected hemidiaphragm and could be subsequently extubated. It is concluded that for prevention of PNP, a high level of attention should be exercised in neonates and small children, particularly when pericardium is harvested or when exposure needs extensive dissection of the great vessels and thymus resection, or at reoperation. We also prefer to avoid the use of iced slush lavage. PNP, when symptomatic, is best managed by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) ventilation. Diaphragmatic plication is recommended when after 2-3 weeks there is no recovery of diaphragmatic function or when there are troublesome respiratory complications. PMID:2171593

  14. Pediatric Cardiac Transplantation Using Hearts Previously Refused for Quality: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Easterwood, Rachel; Singh, Rakesh K.; McFeely, Eric D.; Zuckerman, Warren A.; Addonizio, Linda J.; Gilmore, Lisa; Beddows, Kimberly; Chen, Jonathan M.; Richmond, Marc E.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric donor hearts are regularly refused for donor quality with limited evidence as to which donor parameters are predictive of poor outcomes. We compare outcomes of recipients receiving hearts previously refused by other institutions for quality with the outcomes of recipients of primarily-offered hearts. Data for recipients aged ≤ 18 and their donors were obtained. Specific UNOS refusal codes were used to place recipients into refusal and non-refusal groups; demographics, morbidity, and mortality were compared. Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank test was used to determine differences in graft survival. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was constructed to determine independent risk factors for post-operative mortality. From 7/1/2000-4/30/2011, 182 recipients were transplanted and included for analysis. 130 received a primarily-offered heart; 52 received a refused heart. No difference in post-operative complications or graft survival between the two groups (p=0.355) was found. Prior refusal was not an independent risk factor for recipient mortality. Analysis of this large pediatric cohort examining outcomes with quality-refused hearts shows that in-hospital morbidity and long-term mortality for recipients of quality-refused hearts is no different than recipients of primarily-offered hearts, suggesting that donor hearts previously refused for quality are not necessarily unsuitable for transplant and often show excellent outcomes. PMID:23648205

  15. Early Head CT Findings Are Associated With Outcomes After Pediatric Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Starling, Rebecca M.; Shekdar, Karuna; Licht, Dan; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Berg, Robert A.; Topjian, Alexis A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Head CT after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is often obtained to evaluate intracranial pathology. Among children admitted to the PICU following pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, we hypothesized that loss of gray-white matter differentiation and basilar cistern and sulcal effacement are associated with mortality and unfavorable neurologic outcome. Design Retrospective, cohort study. Setting Single, tertiary-care center PICU. Patients Seventy-eight patients less than 18 years old who survived out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to PICU admission and had a head CT within 24 hours of return of spontaneous circulation were evaluated from July 2005 through May 2012. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Median time to head CT from return of spontaneous circulation was 3.3 hours (1.0, 6.0). Median patient age was 2.3 years (0.4, 9.5). Thirty-nine patients (50%) survived, of whom 29 (74%) had favorable neurologic outcome. Nonsurvivors were more likely than survivors to have 1) loss of gray-white matter differentiation (Hounsfield unit ratios, 0.96 [0.88, 1.07] vs 1.1 [1.07, 1.2]; p < 0.001), 2) basilar cistern effacement (93% vs 7%; p = 0.001; positive predictive value, 94%; negative predictive value, 59%), and 3) sulcal effacement (100% vs 0%; p ≤ 0.001; positive predictive value, 100%; negative predictive value, 68%). All patients with poor gray-white matter differentiation or sulcal effacement had unfavorable neurologic outcomes. Only one patient with basilar cistern effacement had favorable outcome. Conclusions Loss of gray-white matter differentiation and basilar cistern effacement and sulcal effacement are associated with poor outcome after pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Select patients may have favorable outcomes despite these findings. PMID:25844694

  16. A report on 5th congress of Asia Pacific Pediatric Cardiac Society, New Delhi, India, 6-9 March 2014

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K; Saxena, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The 5th Congress of Asia Pacific Pediatric Cardiac Society was held in New Delhi from 6-9 March 2014. This article describes the journey of preparing and hosting one of the largest international events in the specialty of Pediatric Cardiac Care ever held in India. A total of 938 delegates, including 400 from outside India, participated. The scientific program was inclusive keeping in mind the diverse background of delegates from the member nations. Large numbers of research papers were presented, mostly by fellows in training. PMID:25684899

  17. Blood brain barrier is impermeable to solutes and permeable to water after experimental pediatric cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Clark, Robert S B; Foley, Lesley M; Alexander, Henry; Hickey, Robert W; Drabek, Tomas; Kochanek, Patrick M; Manole, Mioara D

    2014-08-22

    Pediatric asphyxial cardiac arrest (CA) results in unfavorable neurological outcome in most survivors. Development of neuroprotective therapies is contingent upon understanding the permeability of intravenously delivered medications through the blood brain barrier (BBB). In a model of pediatric CA we sought to characterize BBB permeability to small and large molecular weight substances. Additionally, we measured the percent brain water after CA. Asphyxia of 9 min was induced in 16-18 day-old rats. The rats were resuscitated and the BBB permeability to small (sodium fluorescein and gadoteridol) and large (immunoglobulin G, IgG) molecules was assessed at 1, 4, and 24 h after asphyxial CA or sham surgery. Percent brain water was measured post-CA and in shams using wet-to-dry brain weight. Fluorescence, gadoteridol uptake, or IgG staining at 1, 4h and over the entire 24 h post-CA did not differ from shams, suggesting absence of BBB permeability to these solutes. Cerebral water content was increased at 3h post-CA vs. sham. In conclusion, after 9 min of asphyxial CA there is no BBB permeability over 24h to conventional small or large molecule tracers despite the fact that cerebral water content is increased early post-CA indicating the development of brain edema. Evaluation of novel therapies targeting neuronal death after pediatric CA should include their capacity to cross the BBB. PMID:24937271

  18. Pulsatile mechanical cardiac assistance in pediatric patients with the Berlin heart ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Frank; Boettcher, Wolfgang; Stiller, Brigitte; Hetzer, Roland

    2003-06-01

    Mechanical cardiac assistance for neonates, infants, children and adolescents may be accomplished with pulsatile ventricular assist devices (VAD) instead of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or centrifugal pumps. The Berlin Heart VAD consists of extracorporeal, pneumatically driven blood pumps for pulsatile univentricular or biventricular assistance for patients of all age groups. The blood pumps are heparin-coated. The stationary driving unit (IKUS) has the required enhanced compressor performance for pediatric pump sizes. The Berlin Heart VAD was used in a total number of 424 patients from 1987 to November 2001 at our institution. In 45 pediatric patients aged 2 days-17 years the Berlin Heart VAD was applied for long-term support (1-111 days, mean 20 days). There were three patient groups: Group I: "Bridge to transplantation" with various forms of cardiomyopathy (N = 21) or chronic stages of congenital heart disease (N = 9); Group II: "Rescue" in intractable heart failure after corrective surgery for congenital disease (N = 7) or in early graft failure after heart transplantation (N = 1); and Group III: "Acute myocarditis" (N = 7) as either bridge to transplantation or bridge to recovery. Seventeen patients were transplanted after support periods of between 4 and 111 days with 12 long-term survivors, having now survived for up to 10 years. Five patients (Groups I and III) were weaned from the system with four long-term survivors. In Group II only one patient survived after successful transplantation. Prolonged circulatory support with the Berlin Heart VAD is an effective method for bridging until cardiac recovery or transplantation in the pediatric age group. Extubation, mobilization, and enteral nutrition are possible. For long-term use, the Berlin Heart VAD offers advantages over centrifugal pumps and ECMO in respect to patient mobility and safety. PMID:12939019

  19. Unique concerns of the pediatric surgical patient: pre-, intra-, and postoperatively.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Dolly

    2006-06-01

    This article focuses on the unique concerns of pediatric surgical patients and emphasizes preparation of the family as an integrated unit. The statement from older standards of the American Nurses' Association that "children have the right to be treated with dignity and respect" remains a valid challenge for nurses caring for these patients. PMID:16698342

  20. EM for Regularized Zero Inflated Regression Models with Applications to Postoperative Morbidity after Cardiac Surgery in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu; Ma, Shuangge; Wang, Ching-Yun; Zappitelli, Michael; Devarajan, Prasad; Parikh, Chirag

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new statistical approach for predicting postoperative morbidity such as intensive care unit length of stay and number of complications after cardiac surgery in children. In a recent multi-center study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, 311 children undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled. Morbidity data are count data in which the observations take only non-negative integer values. Often the number of zeros in the sample cannot be accommodated properly by a simple model, thus requiring a more complex model such as the zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) regression model. We’re interested in identifying important risk factors for postoperative morbidity among many candidate predictors. There is only limited methodological work on variable selection for the zero-inflated regression models. In this paper, we consider regularized ZIP models through penalized likelihood function, and develop a new expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for numerical optimization. Simulation studies show that the proposed method has better performance than some competing methods. Using the proposed methods, we analyzed the postoperative morbidity, which improved the model fitting and identified important clinical and biomarker risk factors. PMID:25256715

  1. Determination of the threshold of cardiac troponin I associated with an adverse postoperative outcome after cardiac surgery: a comparative study between coronary artery bypass graft, valve surgery, and combined cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Hedoire, François; Le Manach, Yannick; Monier, Emmanuel; Guillou, Louis; Riou, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The objective of the present study was to compare postoperative cardiac troponin I (cTnI) release and the thresholds of cTnI that predict adverse outcome after elective coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), after valve surgery, and after combined cardiac surgery. Methods Six hundred and seventy-five adult patients undergoing conventional cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were retrospectively analyzed. Patients in the CABG (n = 225) and valve surgery groups (n = 225) were selected after matching (age, sex) with those in the combined surgery group (n = 225). cTnI was measured preoperatively and 24 hours after the end of surgery. The main endpoint was a severe postoperative cardiac event (sustained ventricular arrhythmias requiring treatment, need for inotropic support or intraaortic balloon pump for at least 24 hours, postoperative myocardial infarction) and/or death. Data are presented as the median and the odds ratio (95% confidence interval). Results Postoperative cTnI levels were significantly different among the three groups (combined surgery, 11.0 (9.5–13.1) ng/ml versus CABG, 5.2 (4.7–5.7) ng/ml and valve surgery, 7.8 (7.6–8.0) ng/ml; P < 0.05). The thresholds of cTnI predicting severe cardiac event and/or death were also significantly different among the three groups (combined surgery, 11.8 (11.5–14.8) ng/ml versus CABG, 7.8 (6.7–8.8) ng/ml and valve surgery, 9.3 (8.0–14.0) ng/ml; P < 0.05). An elevated cTnI above the threshold in each group was significantly associated with a severe cardiac event and/or death (odds ratio, 4.33 (2.82–6.64)). Conclusion The magnitude of postoperative cTnI release is related to the type of cardiac surgical procedure. Different thresholds of cTnI must be considered according to the procedure type to predict early an adverse postoperative outcome. PMID:17888156

  2. Comparison of caudal tramadol versus caudal fentanyl with bupivacaine for prolongation of postoperative analgesia in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, NM; Engineer, SR; Jansari, DB; Patel, RJ

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal block is a common technique for pediatric analgesia for infraumblical surgeries. Because of the short duration of analgesia with bupivacaine alone various additive have been used to prolong the action of bupivacaine. The present study was aimed to evaluate the analgesic effect of tramadol or fentanyl added to bupivacaine for infraumblical surgeries in pediatric patients. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, single-blind controlled trial. After written informed consent from parents, 100 patients belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status I-II, in the age group of 1-12 years, of either sex undergoing infraumblical surgery under general anesthesia were divided into two groups. Group BT received 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine with tramadol 2 mg/kg in normal saline and Group BF received 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2 μg/kg in normal saline with maximum volume of 12 ml in both groups. All patients were assessed intraoperatively for hemodynamic changes, the requirement of sevoflurane concentration, as well as postoperatively for pain by using FLACC (F = Face, L = Leg, A = Activity, C = Cry, C = Consolability), pain score and for sedation by using four point sedation score. Results: The mean duration of analgesia was 10–18 h in Group BT while in Group BF it was 7-11 h. The postoperatively period up to 1½ h, Group BF had higher sedation score up to two as compared to that below one on Group BT. Conclusion: Caudal tramadol significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia as compared to caudal fentanyl without any side effects. PMID:27051365

  3. Effectiveness of brain natriuretic peptide in predicting postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Toufektzian, Levon; Zisis, Charalambos; Balaka, Christina; Roussakis, Antonios

    2015-05-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels could effectively predict the occurrence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracic surgery. A total of 14 papers were identified using the reported search, of which 5 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, country, study type, population, outcomes and key results are tabulated. All studies were prospective observational, and all reported a significant association between BNP and N-terminal (NT)-proBNP plasma levels measured in the immediate preoperative period and the incidence of postoperative AF in patients undergoing either anatomical lung resections or oesophagectomy. One study reported a cut-off value of 30 pg/ml above which significantly more patients suffered from postoperative AF (P < 0.0001), while another one reported that this value could predict postoperative AF with a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 93%. Another study reported that patients with NT-proBNP levels of 113 pg/ml or above had an 8-fold increased risk of developing postoperative AF. These findings support that BNP or NT-proBNP levels, especially when determined during the preoperative period, if increased, are able to identify patients at risk for the development of postoperative AF after anatomical major lung resection or oesophagectomy. The same does not seem to be true for lesser lung resections. These high-risk patients might have a particular benefit from the administration of prophylactic antiarrhythmic therapy. PMID:25630332

  4. Preclinical testing of the Levitronix Ultramag pediatric cardiac assist device in a lamb model.

    PubMed

    Tuzun, Egemen; Harms, Kelly; Liu, Dong; Dasse, Kurt A; Conger, Jeff L; Richardson, J Scott; Fleischli, Andreas; Frazier, O H; Radovancevic, Branislav

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the Levitronix UltraMag pediatric ventricular assist system on healthy animals during 29- to 90-day periods by assessing hemocompatibility and hepatic and renal functions while operating the device in a flow range suitable for pediatric patients. Nine lambs (weight, 15 to 24 kg) received the Levitronix UltraMag with an outflow cannula anastomosed to the descending aorta and an inflow cannula inserted into the left ventricular apex. Pump function data were collected at 1-hour intervals, and postoperative hematology and clinical chemistry tests were performed weekly throughout the study. Complete necropsy and histopathologic examinations were performed at study termination. Pump and circuit were thoroughly inspected for evidence of thrombi. All animals reached the scheduled endpoint of 29 to 90 days without device-related problems. Mean flow was maintained at 1.14 +/- 0.19 L/min. Hematologic values were within normal range in all animals except in one lamb that had a severe hemolytic reaction after cefazolin sodium administration. In all animals, serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase and creatinine kinase levels increased after surgery but gradually returned to normal limits within 1 week. Postmortem examination of the explanted organs revealed small infarcted areas in five lamb kidneys, but renal function was unaffected. All other major organs were unremarkable. In one explanted pump (a 30-day study), a small thrombus was seen within the impeller blade. The other eight pumps were free of thrombus. The Levitronix UltraMag successfully operated in pediatric flow ranges without device-related adverse events. PMID:17515735

  5. Radiation exposure to the pediatric patient during cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography. Emphasis on the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.C.; Olson, A.P.; Steeg, C.N.; Casarella, W.J.

    1981-07-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to measure the radiation exposure to the skin, thyroid and gonads in 50 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography using cine photofluorography. Average exposures were 17.1 R to the skin, 2.3 R to the thyroid and 0.1 R to the gonads. Fluoroscopy accounted for approximately 80% of the skin and thyroid exposure and cine photofluorography for 20-25%. Occasional primary-beam irradiation was the major contributor to gonad exposure. Internal scatter of the incident x-ray beam was primarily responsible for thyroid exposure, so that infants received relatively high exposures; one receiving 7.3 R. The thyroid was not frequently in the primary beam. The significance of high radiation exposure to the thyroid, and in particular its relationship to thyroid carcinoma, are discussed. The results are compared with other series in the literature and relative exposures of cine photofluorography and serial filming are contrasted.

  6. Radiation exposure to the pediatric patient during cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography. Emphasis on the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, E.C.; Olson, A.P.; Steeg, C.N.; Casarella, W.J.

    1981-07-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimetry was used to measure the radiation exposure to the skin, thyroid and gonads in 50 consecutive pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization and angiocariography using cine photofluorography. Average exposures were 17.1 R to the skin, 2.3 R to the thyroid and 0.1 R to the gonads. Fluoroscopy accounted for approximately 80% of the skin and thyroid exposure and cine photofluorography for 20 to 25%. Occasional primary-beam irradiation was the major contributor to gonad exposure. Internal scatter of the incident x-ray beam was primarily responsible for thyroid exposure, so that infants received relatively high exposures; one receiving 7.3 R. The thyroid was not frequently in the primary beam. The significance of high radiation exposure to the thyroid, and in particular its relationship to thyroid carcinoma, are discussed. The results are compared with other series in the literature and relative exposures of cine photofluorography and serial filming are contrasted.

  7. Anesthesia and the Developing Brain: Relevance to the Pediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wise-Faberowski, Lisa; Quinonez, Zoel A.; Hammer, Gregory B.

    2014-01-01

    Anesthetic neurotoxicity has been a hot topic in anesthesia for the past decade. It is of special interest to pediatric anesthesiologists. A subgroup of children potentially at greater risk for anesthetic neurotoxicity, based on a prolonged anesthetic exposure early in development, are those children receiving anesthesia for surgical repair of congenital heart disease. These children have a known risk of neurologic deficit after cardiopulmonary bypass for surgical repair of congenital heart disease. Yet, the type of anesthesia used has not been considered as a potential etiology for their neurologic deficits. These children not only receive prolonged anesthetic exposure during surgical repair, but also receive repeated anesthetic exposures during a critical period of brain development. Their propensity to abnormal brain development, as a result of congenital heart disease, may modify their risk of anesthetic neurotoxicity. This review article provides an overview of anesthetic neurotoxicity from the perspective of a pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist and provides insight into basic science and clinical investigations as it relates to this unique group of children who have been studied over several decades for their risk of neurologic injury. PMID:24961762

  8. Detection of pulsus paradoxus by pulse oximetry in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Ghodsi, Hossein; Borzoee, Mohammad; Amirghofran, Ahmad Ali; Ajami, Gholamhossein; Serati, Zahra

    2009-01-01

    The presence or absence of pulsus paradoxus (PP), defined as an inspiratory decrease greater than 10 mmHg in systolic blood pressure, can have significant diagnostic and therapeutic implications for many clinical conditions including acute asthma, pericardial tamponade, heart failure, hypovolemia, shock states, and the like. However, PP may be difficult to measure in children. Indwelling arterial catheters facilitate the measurement of PP, but this invasive technique generally is reserved for critically ill patients. This study aimed to assess the use of the pulse oximetry plethysmographic waveform (POPW) for the detection of PP in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. The study enrolled 40 pediatric patients 18 years of age and younger who had invasive blood pressure monitoring with an intraarterial cannula. Systolic pressure variability (SPV) and changes in POPW amplitude (DeltaPOPW%), calculated using five consecutive snapshots from every patient's monitor, were compared using linear regression, Pearson product-moment correlation, the Spearman rank method, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. A strong correlation existed between respiratory SPV and DeltaPOPW% for the detection of PP (r = 0.682; p < 0.0001). A respiratory variation in DeltaPOPW% exceeding 25.44% (about one-fourth the amplitude of the tallest POP waveform) allowed detection of PP with a sensitivity of 86.7% and a specificity of 88%. Pulse oximetry is a readily available and easily performed noninvasive means for detecting PP in children. PMID:18665417

  9. In-hospital versus out-of-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest: A multicenter cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Moler, Frank W.; Meert, Kathleen; Donaldson, Amy E.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Brilli, Richard J.; Dalton, H.J.; Clark, Robert S. B.; Shaffner, D. H.; Schleien, Charles L.; Statler, Kimberly; Tieves, Kelly S.; Hackbarth, Richard; Pretzlaff, Robert; van der Jagt, Elise W.; Levy, Fiona; Hernan, Lynn; Silverstein, Faye S.; Dean, J Michael

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To describe a large multicenter cohort of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) with return of circulation (ROC) from either the in-hospital (IH) or out-of-hospital (OH) setting in order to determine if significant differences related to pre-event, arrest event, early post-arrest event characteristics and outcomes exist that would be critical in planning a clinical trial of therapeutic hypothermia (TH). Design Retrospective cohort study Setting Fifteen Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) sites. Patients Patients from 24 hours (h) to 18 years with either IH or OH CA who had a history of at least 1 minute of chest compressions and ROC for at least 20 minutes were eligible. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results A total of 491 patients met study entry criteria with 353 IH cases and 138 OH cases. Major differences between the IH and OH cohorts were observed for patient pre-arrest characteristics; arrest event initial rhythm described; and arrest medication use. Several post-arrest interventions were utilized differently, however, the use of TH was similar (<5%) in both cohorts. During the 0–12 h interval following ROC, OH cases had lower minimum temperature and pH, and higher maximum serum glucose recorded. Mortality was greater in the OH cohort (62% vs. 51%, p=0.04) with the cause attributed to a neurological indication much more frequent in the OH than IH cohort (69% vs. 20%; p < 0.01). Conclusions For pediatric CA with ROC, several major differences exist between IH and OH cohorts. The finding that the etiology of death was attributed to neurological indications much more frequently in OH arrests has important implications for future research. Investigators planning to evaluate the efficacy of new interventions such as TH should be aware that the IH and OH populations differ greatly and require independent clinical trials. PMID:19455024

  10. Postoperative Neurocognitive Dysfunction in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery after Remote Ischemic Preconditioning: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Meybohm, Patrick; Renner, Jochen; Broch, Ole; Caliebe, Dorothee; Albrecht, Martin; Cremer, Jochen; Haake, Nils; Scholz, Jens; Zacharowski, Kai; Bein, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Background Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPC) has been shown to enhance the tolerance of remote organs to cope with a subsequent ischemic event. We hypothesized that RIPC reduces postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction (POCD) in patients undergoing complex cardiac surgery. Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial including 180 adult patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients were randomized either to RIPC or to control group. Primary endpoint was postoperative neurocognitive dysfunction 5–7 days after surgery assessed by a comprehensive test battery. Cognitive change was assumed if the preoperative to postoperative difference in 2 or more tasks assessing different cognitive domains exceeded more than one SD (1 SD criterion) or if the combined Z score was 1.96 or greater (Z score criterion). Results According to 1 SD criterion, 52% of control and 46% of RIPC patients had cognitive deterioration 5–7 days after surgery (p = 0.753). The summarized Z score showed a trend to more cognitive decline in the control group (2.16±5.30) compared to the RIPC group (1.14±4.02; p = 0.228). Three months after surgery, incidence and severity of neurocognitive dysfunction did not differ between control and RIPC. RIPC tended to decrease postoperative troponin T release at both 12 hours [0.60 (0.19–1.94) µg/L vs. 0.48 (0.07–1.84) µg/L] and 24 hours after surgery [0.36 (0.14–1.89) µg/L vs. 0.26 (0.07–0.90) µg/L]. Conclusions We failed to demonstrate efficacy of a RIPC protocol with respect to incidence and severity of POCD and secondary outcome variables in patients undergoing a wide range of cardiac surgery. Therefore, definitive large-scale multicenter trials are needed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00877305 PMID:23741380

  11. Characterization of Cardiac Troponin Elevation in the Setting of Pediatric Supraventricular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jeremy P; Arcilla, Lisa; Wang, Shuo; Lee, Michael S; Shannon, Kevin M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) is currently considered the gold standard biomarker for detection of myocardial necrosis. Patients with supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) often present with symptoms resulting in cTn assessment; however, there are no data on the results of such testing in childhood. We hypothesized that cTn elevation would be common in the pediatric SVT population and would portend a benign prognosis. A retrospective review of all pediatric patients (≤21 years) presenting with SVT was performed. Clinical and electrocardiographic variables from the emergency department (ED) presentation were reviewed and clinical outcomes during subsequent follow-up assessed. Of 128 patients seen in the ED for SVT, cTn was assessed in 48 (38 %). Of patients with cTn assessment, 14 (29 %) patients demonstrated cTn elevation. Univariate predictors of cTn elevation included presentation with respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms (50 vs 12 % and 42 vs 9 %; p = 0.008 and p = 0.01, respectively), lower mean arterial blood pressure (73 vs 85 mm Hg, p = 0.009), higher age-adjusted tachycardia rate (z score 9.3 vs 7.2, p < 0.001), and longer tachycardia duration (4.2 vs 1.0 h, p = 0.02). Multivariate logistic regression confirmed the association of age-adjusted tachycardia rate (odds ratio [OR] 3.8 per heart rate z score, confidence interval [CI] 1.9-11.8, p = 0.003) and duration (OR 1.5 per hour, CI 1.1-2.5, p = 0.03). Clinical outcome was excellent with no adverse sequelae during a median of 2.9 years of follow-up. Cardiac Tn elevation is common in the pediatric population presenting with SVT. Episode severity, characterized by respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms, lower mean blood pressure, and increased tachycardia rate and duration are predictive. Clinical follow-up is favorable. PMID:26481117

  12. Effect of high or low protamine dosing on postoperative bleeding following heparin anticoagulation in cardiac surgery. A randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Meesters, Michael I; Veerhoek, Dennis; de Lange, Fellery; de Vries, Jacob-Willem; de Jong, Jan R; Romijn, Johannes W A; Kelchtermans, Hilde; Huskens, Dana; van der Steeg, Robin; Thomas, Pepijn W A; Burtman, David T M; van Barneveld, Laurentius J M; Vonk, Alexander B A; Boer, Christa

    2016-08-01

    While experimental data state that protamine exerts intrinsic anticoagulation effects, protamine is still frequently overdosed for heparin neutralisation during cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Since comparative studies are lacking, we assessed the influence of two protamine-to-heparin dosing ratios on perioperative haemostasis and bleeding, and hypothesised that protamine overdosing impairs the coagulation status following cardiac surgery. In this open-label, multicentre, single-blinded, randomised controlled trial, patients undergoing on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery were assigned to a low (0.8; n=49) or high (1.3; n=47) protamine-to-heparin dosing group. The primary outcome was 24-hour blood loss. Patient haemostasis was monitored using rotational thromboelastometry and a thrombin generation assay. The low protamine-to-heparin dosing ratio group received less protamine (329 ± 95 vs 539 ± 117 mg; p<0.001), while post-protamine activated clotting times were similar among groups. The high dosing group revealed increased intrinsic clotting times (236 ± 74 vs 196 ± 64 s; p=0.006) and the maximum post-protamine thrombin generation was less suppressed in the low dosing group (38 ± 40 % vs 6 ± 9 %; p=0.001). Postoperative blood loss was increased in the high dosing ratio group (615 ml; 95 % CI 500-830 ml vs 470 ml; 95 % CI 420-530 ml; p=0.021) when compared to the low dosing group, respectively. More patients in the high dosing group received fresh frozen plasma (11 % vs 0 %; p=0.02) and platelet concentrate (21 % vs 6 %; p=0.04) compared to the low dosing group. Our study confirms in vitro data that abundant protamine dosing is associated with increased postoperative blood loss and higher transfusion rates in cardiac surgery. PMID:27277211

  13. Four-Group Classification Based on Fibrinogen Level and Fibrin Polymerization Associated With Postoperative Bleeding in Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shingo; Suzuki, Yuji; Sato, Tsunehisa; Kikura, Mutsuhito; Katoh, Takasumi; Sato, Shigehito

    2016-10-01

    Fibrinogen and fibrin formation have a key role in perioperative hemostasis. The aim of this study is to examine the association of postoperative hemostasis with a combined evaluation of the fibrinogen level and fibrin polymerization in cardiac surgery. We retrospectively classified 215 consecutive cardiac surgery patients into 4 groups (Fuji-san classification) that were divided by fibrinogen level <150 mg/dL (ie, hypofibrinogenemia) and fibrinogen thromboelastometry value at 10 minutes with rotational thromboelastometry <6 mm (ie, low fibrin polymerization) at the warming of cardiopulmonary bypass. Four groups resulted; group I, the acceptable range (n = 85); group II, only hypofibrinogenemia (<150 mg/dL, ≥6 mm, n = 63); group III, hypofibrinogenemia and low fibrin polymerization (<150 mg/dL, <6 mm, n = 60); and group IV, only low fibrin polymerization (≥150 mg/dL, <6 mm, n = 7). The risk of chest tube drainage volume greater than 500 mL within the first 24 hours after surgery (with group I as the reference) was increased in group II (odds ratio [OR], 3.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-7.4; P < .01) and group III (OR, 8.5; 95% CI, 3.5-21.7; P < .01), and the risk greater than 1000 mL (with group I as the reference) was increased in group III (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 1.1-17.3; P = .03) and group IV (OR, 23.1; 95% CI, 3.2-201.0; P < .01). Intraoperative blood transfusions were decreased by 24.5%, after stratifying the starting amount of fresh frozen plasma by the 4-group classification in the recent consecutive 65 (30.2%) patients (P < .01). The 4-group classification is associated with postoperative bleeding and may improve the quality of perioperative blood transfusion in cardiac surgery. PMID:26207020

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of acute kidney injury biomarkers in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Stanislava; Lakic, Dragana; Peco-Antic, Amira; Vulicevic, Irena; Ivanisevic, Ivana; Kotur-Stevuljevic, Jelena; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is significant problem in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) who undergo cardiac surgery. The economic impact of a biomarker-based diagnostic strategy for AKI in pediatric populations undergoing CHD surgery is unknown. The aim of this study was to perform the cost effectiveness analysis of using serum cystatin C (sCysC), urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) and urine liver fatty acid-binding protein (uL-FABP) for the diagnosis of AKI in children after cardiac surgery compared with current diagnostic method (monitoring of serum creatinine (sCr) level). Materials and methods We developed a decision analytical model to estimate incremental cost-effectiveness of different biomarker-based diagnostic strategies compared to current diagnostic strategy. The Markov model was created to compare the lifetime cost associated with using of sCysC, uNGAL, uL-FABP with monitoring of sCr level for the diagnosis of AKI. The utility measurement included in the analysis was quality-adjusted life years (QALY). The results of the analysis are presented as the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). Results Analysed biomarker-based diagnostic strategies for AKI were cost-effective compared to current diagnostic method. However, uNGAL and sCys C strategies yielded higher costs and lower effectiveness compared to uL-FABP strategy. uL-FABP added 1.43 QALY compared to current diagnostic method at an additional cost of $8521.87 per patient. Therefore, ICER for uL-FABP compared to sCr was $5959.35/QALY. Conclusions Our results suggest that the use of uL-FABP would represent cost effective strategy for early diagnosis of AKI in children after cardiac surgery. PMID:26110039

  15. Pediatric Cardiac Shear Wave Elastography for Quantitative Assessment of Myocardial Stiffness: A Pilot Study in Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengfei; Bi, Xiaojun; Mellema, Daniel C; Manduca, Armando; Urban, Matthew W; Pellikka, Patricia A; Chen, Shigao; Greenleaf, James F

    2016-08-01

    The long-term goal of this study is to assess chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity for pediatric cancer patients using cardiac ultrasound shear wave (SW) elastography. This pilot study aimed to systematically investigate the feasibility of using cardiac SW elastography in children and provide myocardial stiffness control data for cancer patients. Twenty healthy volunteers (ages 5-18) were recruited. A novel cardiac SW elastography sequence with pulse-inversion harmonic imaging and time-aligned sequential tracking was developed for this study. Cardiac SW elastography produces and detects transient SWs propagating in the myocardium in late-diastole, which can be used to quantify myocardial stiffness. The parasternal long-axis (L-A) and short-axis (S-A) views of the interventricular septum (IVS) were feasible for pediatric cardiac SW elastography. The L-A and S-A views of the basal and mid IVS provided better success rates than those of the apical IVS. Success rates decreased with increased body mass index (BMI), but did not differ with age or gender. Two-dimensional SW speed measurements were 1.26, 1.22, 1.71 and 1.67 m/s for L-A base, L-A mid, S-A base and S-A mid IVS, respectively. All S-A SW speed values were significantly higher (p < 0.01) than L-A values due to myocardial anisotropy. No SW speed difference was observed for different ages and genders. This pilot study demonstrated, for the first time, the feasibility of using cardiac SW elastography to measure quantitative myocardial stiffness in children, and established control SW speed values for using SW elastography to assess chemo-induced cardiotoxicity for pediatric cancer patients. The results showed that the myocardial anisotropy needs to be accounted for when comparing SW speed from different imaging axes. PMID:27140522

  16. Intracranial Ependymomas in Children: Society of Pediatric Oncology Experience With Postoperative Hyperfractionated Local Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Conter, Cecile Carrie, Christian; Bernier, Valerie; Geoffray, Anne; Pagnier, Anne; Gentet, Jean-Claude; Lellouch-Tubiana, Arielle; Chabaud, Sylvie; Frappaz, Didier

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the role of local hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) after surgical resection in the treatment of intracranial ependymomas in children. Patients and Methods: Postoperative local hyperfractionated RT was proposed for every child (>5 years old at diagnosis) with localized intracranial ependymoma. The planned dose was 60 Gy after complete resection (CR) and 66 Gy after partial resection, delivered in two daily fractions of 1 Gy, according to the early postoperative imaging findings. Results: Between November 1996 and December 2002, 24 children with infratentorial (n = 20) or supratentorial (n = 4) intracranial ependymoma were included. The median age was 8.6 years (range, 5-17). The World Health Organization grade was anaplastic in 10 of the 24 patients (not assessable in 1). After a retrospective central review, a CR was reported in 16 patients, partial resection in 4, and doubtful resection in 4. The radiation dose was 60 Gy in 18 cases (one partial resection), 66 Gy in 5 cases (one CR), and 54 Gy in 1 case (CR). The 5-year overall survival rate was 74.8%, and the progression-free survival rate was 54.2%. Of the 24 patients, 11 developed a relapse: 7 local only and 4 metastatic and local. The histological grade and extent of resection were not prognostic factors. More than 3 in 4 children had no sequelae of RT at a median follow-up of 7 years (95% confidence interval, 66.4-90.0 months). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that hyperfractionated RT is safe but provides no outcome benefit compared with other strategies of RT such as standard fractionated regimens.

  17. Effects of Suppository Acetaminophen, Bupivacaine Wound Infiltration, and Caudal Block With Bupivacaine on Postoperative Pain in Pediatric Inguinal Herniorrhaphy

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini Jahromi, Seyed Abbas; Sadeghi poor, Sadegh; Hosseini Valami, Seyedeh Masoumeh; Javadi, Amir

    2012-01-01

    Background: The control of postoperative pain is important in children, and poor pain control leads to organ dysfunction and behavioral problems. Objectives: We compared the analgesic effects of suppository acetaminophen, bupivacaine wound infiltration, and caudal block with bupivacaine on postoperative pain in pediatric inguinal herniorrhaphy. Patients and Methods: In this double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial, 90 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade I-II, aged between 3 months and 7 years, and scheduled for elective unilateral inguinal herniorrhaphy under general anesthesia were assigned to three equal groups. Patients in the first group received 20 mg/kg of suppository acetaminophen. In the second group, 2 mg/kg of 0.5% bupivacaine was infiltrated in the incisional site, and in the third group, a caudal block was performed with 0.75 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine. The Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) pain scale was applied 30 minutes after operation. Thereafter, the FLACC score was obtained every hour during the next 6 hours. If the FLACC score was 4 or over, we administered 0.5 mg/kg of intravenous meperidine. The data was transferred to SPSS-10 software and analyzed statistically with chi-square and analysis of variance tests. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The mean analgesic duration in the acetaminophen, bupivacaine infiltration, and caudal block groups was 4.07, 5.40, and 5.37 hours, respectively. Significant differences were not observed between the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups (P = 0.9), but the differences between the bupivacaine infiltration and acetaminophen groups (P = 0.034) and the caudal block and acetaminophen groups (P = 0.039) were significant. With regard to meperidine administration, significant differences were not observed between the bupivacaine infiltration and caudal block groups (P = 0.848), but significant differences were observed between these two

  18. Post-operative bleeding risk stratification in cardiac pulmonary bypass patients using artificial neural network.

    PubMed

    Huang, Richard S P; Nedelcu, Elena; Bai, Yu; Wahed, Amer; Klein, Kimberly; Tint, Hlaing; Gregoric, Igor; Patel, Manish; Kar, Biswajit; Loyalka, Pranav; Nathan, Sriram; Radovancevic, Rajko; Nguyen, Andy N D

    2015-01-01

    The prediction of bleeding risk in cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) patients plays a vital role in their postoperative management. Therefore, an artificial neural network (ANN) to analyze intra-operative laboratory data to predict postoperative bleeding was set up. The JustNN software (Neural Planner Software, Cheshire, England) was used. This ANN was trained using 15 intra-operative laboratory parameters paired with one output category - risk of bleeding, defined as units of blood components transfused in 48 hours. The ANN was trained with the first 39 CPB cases. The set of input parameters for this ANN was also determined, and the ANN was validated with the next 13 cases. The set of input parameters include five components: pro-thrombin time, platelet count, thromboelastograph-reaction time, D-Dimer, and thromboelastograph-coagulation index. The validation results show 9 cases (69.2%) with exact match, 3 cases (23.1%) with one-grading difference, and 1 case (7.7%) with two-grading difference between actual blood usage versus predicted blood usage. To the best of our knowledge, ours is the first ANN developed for post-operative bleeding risk stratification of CPB patients. With promising results, we have started using this ANN to risk-stratify our CPB patients, and it has assisted us in predicting post-operative bleeding risk. PMID:25887872

  19. [THE DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC BRONCHOSCOPY IN CARDIAC PATIENTS UNDERGOING MECHANICAL VENTILATION IN THE POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD].

    PubMed

    Titova, I V; Khrustaleva, M V; Eremenko, A A; Babaev, M A

    2016-01-01

    The review presents an analysis of domestic and foreign literature on the use of bronchoscopy in patients with obstructive respiratory failure in the ICU. Separately considered the issue of additional research when performing bronchoscopy and create an algorithmfor the application of diagnostic and therapeutic bronchoscopy in cardiac surgical patients undergoing mechanical ventilation. PMID:27192859

  20. Postoperative Atrial fibrillation in Patients undergoing Non-cardiac Non-thoracic Surgery: A Practical Approach for the Hospitalist

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kirti K.; Tiru, Mihaela; Chin, Thomas; Fox, Marshal T.; Stefan, Mihaela S.

    2016-01-01

    New postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is the most common perioperative arrhythmia and its reported incidence ranges from 0.4%–26% in patients undergoing non-cardiac non-thoracic surgery. The incidence varies according to patient characteristics such as age, presence of structural heart disease and other co-morbidities, as well as the type of surgery performed. POAF occurs as a consequence of adrenergic stimulation, systemic inflammation, or autonomic activation in the intra or postoperative period (e.g. due to pain, hypotension, infection) in the setting of a susceptible myocardium and other predisposing factors (e.g. electrolyte abnormalities). POAF develops between day 1 and day 4 post-surgery and it is often considered a self-limited entity. Its acute management involves many of the same strategies used in non-surgical patients but the optimal long-term management is challenging because of the limited available evidence. Several studies have shown an association between occurrence of POAF and in-hospital morbidity, mortality, and length of stay. Although, traditionally, POAF was considered to have a generally favorable long-term prognosis, recent data have shown an association with an increased risk of stroke at one year after hospitalization. It is unknown, however, whether strategies to prevent POAF or for rate/rhythm control when it does occur, lead to a reduction in morbidity or mortality. This suggests the need for future studies to better understand the risks associated with POAF and to determine optimal strategies to minimize long-term thromboembolic risk. In this article, we summarize the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathophysiology, and short- and long-term management of POAF after non-cardiac non-thoracic surgery with the goal of providing a practical approach to managing these patients for the non-cardiologist clinician. PMID:26414594

  1. Postoperative analgesia in pediatric herniotomy - Comparison of caudal bupivacaine to bupivacaine infiltration with diclofenac suppository

    PubMed Central

    Amminnikutty, C. M.; Karthik, Asish; Kodakkat, Abish K.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Perioperative analgesia in paediatric herniotomies demand safe, effective and less invasive strategies. Local infiltration with Bupivacaine, rectal Diclofenac and caudal Bupivacaine are widely used for pain relief. Aims: To compare the analgesic effects of caudal epidural using 1 mlkg-1 of 0.25% Bupivacaine against a combination of local infiltration 0.25% Bupivacaine 0.5 mlkg-1 with Diclofenac suppository 2 mgkg-1 in the management of post-operative pain following paediatric inguinal herniotomy. Settings and Design: This is an observational study from a tertiary care teaching hospital. Methods and Material: A total of 60 children for elective unilateral inguinal herniotomy were assigned to two groups of 30 each. Patients who received caudal block with 1 mlkg-1 of 0.25% Bupivacaine were allocated to Group A and who received Diclofenac suppository 2 mgkg-1 and infiltration with 0.25% Bupivacaine 0.5 mlkg-1 were allocated to Group B. Post operative Pain was assessed using Hannallah's modified objective pain scale. At score ≥3 rescue analgesic oral Paracetamol 15 mgkg-1 was given. Pain was assessed at 0,15,30,45,60 minutes and half hourly thereafter until 8 hours following surgery or until patient requires rescue analgesic whichever happens first. Statistical Analysis Used: Employed SPSS software. Data was analysed using sample t test and P-value was calculated. Results: The demographic profile was comparable between two groups. The mean analgesic duration in group A and group B was 228.5 and 331.0 minutes respectively and is found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Diclofenac suppository with local infiltration is a less invasive and effective alternative to caudal Bupivacaine for analgesia in paediatric herniotomy. PMID:27212756

  2. Changes of cardiac structure and function in pediatric patients with high altitude pulmonary hypertension in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ri-Li; Ma, Ru-yan; Bao, Hai-hua; Zhao, Xi-peng; Qi, Hai-ning

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the structural and functional cardiac changes in pediatric high altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler echocardiography (Echo). Ten patients with infantile HAPH (aged 12 to 24 months) and eight healthy age-matched children (control group) underwent MRI and Echo studies. All participants were born and living in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (3600 to 4600 m). The studies were performed at the Children's Hospital located in Xining, Qinghai (2260 m). The right and left ventricular end-systolic (RVEST and LVEST, respectively) and end-diastolic (RVEDT and LVEDT, respectively) wall thicknesses were calculated directly from the MRI scans. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was measured using Echo. RVEST was significantly higher in the HAPH group than in the control group (6.8 +/- 0.6 and 3.7 +/- 0.5 mm, respectively; p < 0.001). RVEDT was significantly higher in the HAPH patients when compared with the control group (4.9 +/- 1.1 and 2.1 +/- 0.3 mm, respectively; p < 0.05). Mean PAP in the HAPH group was significantly higher than in the control group (66.8 +/- 6.7 and 33.8 +/- 3.6 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.001) and was positively correlated with RVEDT (r(2) = 0.562, p < 0.001). Right ventricular ejection fraction was significantly lower in the HAPH group when compared with the control group (29.8 +/- 11.8 and 55.5 +/- 9.9%, respectively; p < 0.001); however, left ventricular ejection fraction was similar in both groups. These results indicate that hypoxia-induced infantile HAPH leads to right ventricular hypertrophy in these patients. These structural cardiac changes may lead to right ventricular dysfunction and right heart failure; however, left ventricular function is preserved. PMID:19775214

  3. The Coagulative Profile of Cyanotic Children Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: The Role of Whole Blood Preoperative Thromboelastometry on Postoperative Transfusion Requirement.

    PubMed

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Spiezia, Luca; Bortolussi, Giacomo; Marchetti, Marta E; Campello, Elena; Pittarello, Demetrio; Gregori, Dario; Stellin, Giovanni; Simioni, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the preoperative coagulation pattern and its association to postoperative blood products transfusion in children with congenital heart disease (CHD), focusing on cyanotic patients (oxygen saturation, SATO 2  < 85%). From January to August 2014, preoperative standard coagulation tests and rotational thromboelastometry assays were performed on 81 pediatric patients (<16 years old) who underwent surgery for CHD with the aid of cardiopulmonary bypass. Sixty patients (74%) were acyanotic and 21 (26%) cyanotic. Mean age at time of surgery was 7.9 months (interquartile range 2.9-43.6 months). Cyanotic patients had a significantly higher hematocrit (P < 0.001), a reduced prothrombin activity (PT) (P = 0.01) level, and a lower platelet count (P = 0.02) than acyanotic patients. An inverse linear association was found between patient's SATO2 and clot formation time (CFT) (INTEM, P = 0.001, and EXTEM, P < 0.0001). A direct linear association was found between patient's SATO2 and maximum clot firmness (MCF) (INTEM, P = 0.04, and EXTEM, P = 0.05). Preoperative cyanosis was also associated with a lower median MCF in FIBTEM (P = 0.02). Cyanotic patients required more frequent postoperative transfusions of fibrinogen (7/21 patients, 33% vs. 4/60 patients, 6.7%, P = 0.01) and fresh frozen plasma (14/21, 67% vs. 25/60, 42%, P = 0.08). Patients with a lower presurgery PT and platelet count subsequently required more fibrinogen transfusion P = 0.02 and P = 0.003, respectively); the same goes for patients with a longer CFT (INTEM, P = 0.01 and EXTEM, P = 0.03) and a reduced MCF (INTEM, P = 0.02 and FIBTEM, P = 0.01) as well. Cyanotic patients showed significant preoperative coagulation anomalies and required a higher postoperative fibrinogen supplementation. The preoperative MCF FIBTEM has become an important factor in our postoperative thromboelastometry-guided transfusion

  4. Variation in Outcomes for Risk-Stratified Pediatric Cardiac Surgical Operations: An Analysis of the STS Congenital Heart Surgery Database

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Jeffrey Phillip; O'Brien, Sean M.; Pasquali, Sara K.; Jacobs, Marshall Lewis; Lacour-Gayet, François G.; Tchervenkov, Christo I.; Austin III, Erle H.; Pizarro, Christian; Pourmoghadam, Kamal K.; Scholl, Frank G.; Welke, Karl F.; Gaynor, J. William; Clarke, David R.; Mayer, John E.; Mavroudis, Constantine

    2013-01-01

    Background. We evaluated outcomes for groups of risk-stratified operations in The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database to provide contemporary benchmarks and examine variation between centers. Methods. Patients undergoing surgery from 2005 to 2009 were included. Centers with more than 10% missing data were excluded. Discharge mortality and postoperative length of stay (PLOS) among patients discharged alive were calculated for groups of risk-stratified operations using the five Society of Thoracic Surgeons-European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery Congenital Heart Surgery mortality categories (STAT Mortality Categories). Power for analyzing between-center differences in outcome was determined for each STAT Mortality Category. Variation was evaluated using funnel plots and Bayesian hierarchical modeling. Results. In this analysis of risk-stratified operations, 58,506 index operations at 73 centers were included. Overall discharge mortality (interquartile range among programs with more than 10 cases) was as follows: STAT Category 1 = 0.55% (0% to 1.0%), STAT Category 2 = 1.7% (1.0% to 2.2%), STAT Category 3 = 2.6% (1.1% to 4.4%), STAT Category 4 = 8.0% (6.3% to 11.1%), and STAT Category 5 = 18.4% (13.9% to 27.9%). Funnel plots with 95% prediction limits revealed the number of centers characterized as outliers by STAT Mortality Categories was as follows: Category 1 = 3 (4.1%), Category 2 = 1 (1.4%), Category 3 = 7 (9.7%), Category 4 = 13 (17.8%), and Category 5 = 13 (18.6%). Between-center variation in PLOS was analyzed for all STAT Categories and was greatest for STAT Category 5 operations. Conclusions. This analysis documents contemporary benchmarks for risk-stratified pediatric cardiac surgical operations grouped by STAT Mortality Categories and the range of outcomes among centers. Variation was greatest for the more complex operations. These data may aid in the design and planning of quality assessment and quality improvement

  5. Postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting or cardiac valve surgery: intraoperative use of landiolol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Landiolol hydrochloride is a new β-adrenergic blocker with a pharmacological profile that suggests it can be administered safely to patients who have sinus tachycardia or tachyarrhythmia and who require heart rate reduction. This study aimed to investigate whether intraoperative administration of landiolol could reduce the incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF) after cardiac surgery. Methods Of the 200 consecutive patients whose records could be retrieved between October 2006 and September 2007, we retrospectively reviewed a total of 105 patients who met the inclusion criteria: no previous permanent/persistent AF, no permanent pacemaker, no renal insufficiency requiring dialysis, and no reactive airway disease, etc. Landiolol infusion was started after surgery had commenced, at an infusion rate of 1 μg/kg/min, titrated upward in 3–5 μg/kg/min increments. The patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received intraoperative β-blocker therapy with landiolol (landiolol group) and those who did not receive any β-blockers during surgery (control group). An unpaired t test and Fisher’s exact test were used to compare between-group differences in mean values and categorical data, respectively. Results Seventeen of the 105 patients (16.2%) developed postoperative atrial fibrillation: 5/57 (8.8%) in the landiolol group and 12/48 (25%) in the control group. There was a significant difference between the two groups (P=0.03). The incidence of AF after valve surgery and off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was lower in the landiolol group, although the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Conclusions Our retrospective review demonstrated a marked reduction of postoperative AF in those who received landiolol intraoperatively. A prospective study of intraoperative landiolol for preventing postoperative atrial fibrillation is warranted. PMID:23347432

  6. Post-Operative Benefits of Animal-Assisted Therapy in Pediatric Surgery: A Randomised Study

    PubMed Central

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Palestrini, Clara; De Giorgis, Valentina; Raschetti, Roberto; Tumminelli, Massimiliano; Mencherini, Simonetta; Papotti, Francesca; Klersy, Catherine; Albertini, Riccardo; Ostuni, Selene; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in animal-assisted therapy has been fuelled by studies supporting the many health benefits. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of an animal-assisted therapy program on children response to stress and pain in the immediate post-surgical period. Patients and Methods Forty children (3–17 years) were enrolled in the randomised open-label, controlled, pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to the animal-assisted therapy-group (n = 20, who underwent a 20 min session with an animal-assisted therapy dog, after surgery) or the standard-group (n = 20, standard postoperative care). The study variables were determined in each patient, independently of the assigned group, by a researcher unblinded to the patient’s group. The outcomes of the study were to define the neurological, cardiovascular and endocrinological impact of animal-assisted therapy in response to stress and pain. Electroencephalogram activity, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, cerebral prefrontal oxygenation, salivary cortisol levels and the faces pain scale were considered as outcome measures. Results After entrance of the dog faster electroencephalogram diffuse beta-activity (> 14 Hz) was reported in all children of the animal-assisted therapy group; in the standard-group no beta-activity was recorded (100% vs 0%, p<0.001). During observation, some differences in the time profile between groups were observed for heart rate (test for interaction p = 0.018), oxygen saturation (test for interaction p = 0.06) and cerebral oxygenation (test for interaction p = 0.09). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure were influenced by animal-assisted therapy, though a higher variability in diastolic pressure was observed. Salivary cortisol levels did not show different behaviours over time between groups (p=0.70). Lower pain perception was noted in the animal-assisted group in comparison with the standard-group (p = 0.01). Conclusion Animal-assisted therapy

  7. Radiation exposure of pediatric patients and physicians during cardiac catheterization and balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.R.; Huang, T.Y.; Wu, D.K.; Hsu, P.C.; Weng, P.S. )

    1991-07-15

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were applied to various areas of 61 pediatric patients and physicians to measure radiation doses during routine cardiac catheterization and during 4 cases of balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty. Radiation doses were measured during chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy and cineangiography. Average skin dose to the chest was 121 microGy during chest x-ray, 5,182 microGy during catheterization and 641 mGy during valvuloplasty. For the eyes, thyroid and gonads of the patients, the exposure during routine catheterization was equal to 0.4, 6 and 0.2 chest x-rays, respectively. Radiation dose of the operator was 3 microGy for the eyes and 6 miCroGy in the thyroid. About 56% of the operator's dose could be reduced by thyroid shields, and 80% by lead aprons. The assistant received only 1 microGy outside the thyroid shield. Therefore, the authors have concluded that the patients dose during routine catheterization is largely based on our experimental results, but the dose is acceptable based on the risk factor analysis. The skin dose to the right lateral chest of the patient during valvuloplasty is extremely high, perhaps as high as the equivalent of 1,000 chest x-rays. Besides the clinical benefits of valvuloplasty, the long-term radiation-related hazards to the patient should be carefully monitored.

  8. Improving pediatric cardiac surgical care in developing countries: matching resources to needs.

    PubMed

    Dearani, Joseph A; Neirotti, Rodolfo; Kohnke, Emily J; Sinha, Kingshuk K; Cabalka, Allison K; Barnes, Roxann D; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Cushing, John C

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews a systematic approach to the design and support of pediatric cardiac surgery programs in the developing world with the guidance and strategies of Children's HeartLink, an experienced non-government organization for more than 40 years. An algorithm with criteria for the selection of a partner site is outlined. A comprehensive education strategy from the physician to the allied health care provider is the mainstay for successful program development. In a partner program, the road to successful advancement and change depends on many factors, such as government support, hospital administration support, medical staff leadership, and a committed and motivated faculty with requisite skills, incentives, and resources. In addition to these factors, it is essential that the development effort includes considerations of environment (eg, governmental support, regulatory environment, and social structure) and health system (elements related to affordability, access, and awareness of care) that impact success. Partner programs should be willing to initiate a clinical database with the intent to analyze and critique their results to optimize quality assurance and improve outcomes. PMID:20307859

  9. Hemoglobin and B-type natriuretic peptide preoperative values but not inflammatory markers, are associated with postoperative morbidity in cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Risk stratification in cardiac surgery significantly impacts outcome. This study seeks to define whether there is an independent association between the preoperative serum level of hemoglobin (Hb), leukocyte count (LEUCO), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), or B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and postoperative morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery. Methods Prospective, analytic cohort study, with 554 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in a tertiary cardiovascular hospital and followed up for 12 months. The cohort was distributed according to preoperative values of Hb, LEUCO, hsCRP, and BNP in independent quintiles for each of these variables. Results After adjustment for all covariates, a significant association was found between elevated preoperative BNP and the occurrence of low postoperative cardiac output (OR 3.46, 95% CI 1.53–7.80, p = 0.003) or postoperative atrial fibrillation (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.45–10.38). For the combined outcome (death/acute coronary syndrome/rehospitalization within 12 months), we observed an OR of 1.93 (95% CI 1.00–3.74). An interaction was found between BNP level and the presence or absence of diabetes mellitus. The OR for non-diabetics was 1.26 (95% CI 0.61–2.60) and for diabetics was 18.82 (95% CI 16.2–20.5). Preoperative Hb was also significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of postoperative low cardiac output (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13–0.81, p = 0.016). Both Hb and BNP were significantly associated with the lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stays and the number of transfused red blood cells (p < 0.002). Inflammatory markers, although associated with adverse outcomes, lost statistical significance when adjusted for covariates. Conclusions High preoperative BNP or low Hb shows an association of independent risk with postoperative outcomes, and their measurement could help to stratify surgical risk. The ability to predict the onset of atrial fibrillation or

  10. Quantification of chemotaxis during pediatric cardiac surgery by flow and laser scanning cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnok, Attila; Schmid, Joerg W.; Osmancik, Pavel; Lenz, Dominik; Pipek, Michal; Hambsch, Joerg; Gerstner, Andreas O.; Schneider, Peter

    2002-05-01

    Cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) alters the leukocyte composition of the peripheral blood (PB). This response contributes to the sometimes adverse outcome with capillary leakage. Migration of activated cells to sites of inflammation, driven by chemokines is part of this response. In order to determine the chemotactic activity of patients serum during and after surgery we established an assay for PB leukocytes (PBL). PBL from healthy donors were isolated and 250,000 cells were placed into a migration chamber separated by a filter from a second lower chamber filled with patient serum. After incubation cells from top and bottom chamber were removed and stained with a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies for leukocyte subsets and analyzed on a flow cytometer (FCM). Cells at the bottom of the filter belong to the migrating compartment and were quantified by LSC after staining of nucleated cells. Increased chemotactic activity started at onset of anaesthesia followed by a phase of low activity immediately after surgery and a second phase of a high post-operative activity. The in vitro results correlated with results obtained by immunopenotyping of circulating PBL. Manipulation of the chemokine pattern might prove beneficial to prevent extravasation of cells leading to tissue damage. In chemotaxis assays with low amount of available serum the combined use of FCM and Laser Scanning LSC proved as an appropriate analytical tool.

  11. Lack of difference between continuous versus intermittent heparin infusion on maintenance of intra-arterial catheter in postoperative pediatric surgery: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Maria Carolina; de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P.; Firpo, Cora Maria F.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare two systems of arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery using intermittent or continuous infusion of heparin solution and to analyze adverse events related to the site of catheter insertion and the volume of infused heparin solution. METHODS: Randomized control trial with 140 patients selected for continuous infusion group (CIG) and intermittent infusion group (IIG). The variables analyzed were: type of heart disease, permanence time and size of the catheter, insertion site, technique used, volume of heparin solution and adverse events. The descriptive variables were analyzed by Student's t-test and the categorical variables, by chi-square test, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: The median age was 11 (0-22) months, and 77 (55%) were females. No significant differences between studied variables were found, except for the volume used in CIG (12.0±1.2mL/24 hours) when compared to IIG (5.3±3.5mL/24 hours) with p<0.0003. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion system and the intermittent infusion of heparin solution can be used for intra-arterial catheters maintenance in postoperative pediatric surgery, regardless of patient's clinical and demographic characteristics. Adverse events up to the third postoperative day occurred similarly in both groups. However, the intermittent infusion system usage in underweight children should be considered, due to the lower volume of infused heparin solution [ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01097031]. PMID:24473958

  12. Pediatrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  13. Pediatric cardiac catheterization procedure with dexmedetomidine sedation: Radiographic airway patency assessment

    PubMed Central

    Thimmarayappa, Ashwini; Chandrasekaran, Nivash; Jagadeesh, A. M.; Joshi, Shreedhar S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to measure airway patency objectively during dexmedetomidine sedation under radiographic guidance in spontaneously breathing pediatric patients scheduled for cardiac catheterization procedures. Subjects and Methods: Thirty-five patients in the age group 5–10 years scheduled for cardiac catheterization procedures were enrolled. All study patients were given loading dose of dexmedetomidine at 1 μg/kg/min for 10 min and then maintenance dose of 1.5 μg/kg/h. Radiographic airway patency was assessed at the start of infusion (0 min) and after 30 min. Antero-posterior (AP) diameters were measured manually at the nasopharyngeal and retroglossal levels. Dynamic change in airway between inspiration and expiration was considered a measure of airway collapsibility. Patients were monitored for hemodynamics, recovery time and complications. Statistical Analysis: Student paired t-test was used for data analysis. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Minimum and maximum AP diameters were compared at 0 and 30 min. Nasopharyngeal level showed significant reduction in the minimum (6.27 ± 1.09 vs. 4.26 ± 1.03, P < 0.0001) and maximum (6.51 ± 1.14 vs. 5.99 ± 1.03, P < 0.0001) diameters. Similarly retroglossal level showed significant reduction in the minimum (6.98 ± 1.09 vs. 5.27 ± 1.15, P < 0.0001) and maximum (7.49 ± 1.22 vs. 6.92 ± 1.12, P < 0.0003) diameters. The degree of collapsibility was greater at 30 min than baseline (P < 0.0001). There was a significant decrease in heart rate (P < 0.0001), and the average recovery time was 39.86 ± 12.22 min. Conclusion: Even though airway patency was maintained in all children sedated with dexmedetomidine, there were significant reductions in the upper airway dimensions measured, so all precautions to manage the airway failure should be taken. PMID:25566708

  14. Clinical characteristics and long term post-operative outcome of cardiac myxoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xingli; Yang, Dingyou; Yang, Zhongsu; Li, Jiayue; Zhao, Yusheng; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Ran

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim: Myxoma is the most common type of primary cardiac neoplasm, but the clinical characteristics and long term outcome are less known in the elderly in China. Methods: We analyzed medical records of 112 consecutive patients who underwent operative resection of cardiac myxoma between December 1988 and December 2010 in our hospital. Their data were retrospectively analyzed and the difference between two age groups (< 60 years, n = 87 and ≥ 60 years, n = 25) was compared. Results: The mean age of 112 patients was 48.8 ± 12.5 (range 13 ~ 75) years, and 66 patients (58.9 %) were female. The interval from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was 12 months and the most common presenting symptoms were chest distress (66 patients 58.9 %), followed by palpitations (55 patients, 49.1 %) and dyspnea (47 patients, 42.0 %). Mitral valve diastolic murmur was heard in 67 (59.1 %) patients. The tumor was located in the left atrium in 96 (85.8 %) patients. There were no in-hospital death. During follow-up ranged between one and twenty-one (7.3 ± 5.3) years, there was no malignancy. Myxoma recurred in 3 (2.7 %) patients and deaths occurred in 5 (4.5 %) patients. The 5 and 15 years survival was 97.8 % and 89.5 %, respectively. To compare with the younger patients, the elderly have higher ratios of concomitant hypertension, fewer complaints of dyspnea and chest distress (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The elderly have lower complaints of dyspnea and chest distress, surgical treatment is associated with low long-term mortality and recurrence rate even in the elder patients.

  15. Software development, nomenclature schemes, and mapping strategies for an international pediatric cardiac surgery database system.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2002-01-01

    The field of congenital heart surgery has the opportunity to create the first comprehensive international database for a medical subspecialty. An understanding of the demographics of congenital heart disease and the rapid growth of computer technology leads to the realization that creating a comprehensive international database for pediatric cardiac surgery represents an important and achievable goal. The evolution of computer-based data analysis creates an opportunity to develop software to manage an international congenital heart surgery database and eventually become an electronic medical record. The same database data set for congenital heart surgery is now being used in Europe and North America. Additional work is under way to involve Africa, Asia, Australia, and South America. The almost simultaneous publication of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery/Society of Thoracic Surgeons coding system and the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology coding system resulted in the potential for multiple coding. Representatives of the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery, and European Congenital Heart Surgeons Foundation agree that these hierarchical systems are complementary and not competitive. An international committee will map the two systems. The ideal coding system will permit a diagnosis or procedure to be coded only one time with mapping allowing this code to be used for patient care, billing, practice management, teaching, research, and reporting to governmental agencies. The benefits of international data gathering and sharing are global, with the long-term goal of the continued upgrade in the quality of congenital heart surgery worldwide. PMID:11994876

  16. Clinical Factors Associated with Dose of Loop Diuretics After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Post Hoc Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haiberger, Roberta; Favia, Isabella; Romagnoli, Stefano; Cogo, Paola; Ricci, Zaccaria

    2016-06-01

    A post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing the clinical effects of furosemide and ethacrynic acid was conducted. Infants undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included in order to explore which clinical factors are associated with diuretic dose in infants with congenital heart disease. Overall, 67 patients with median (interquartile range) age of 48 (13-139) days were enrolled. Median diuretic dose was 0.34 (0.25-0.4) mg/kg/h at the end of postoperative day (POD) 0 and it significantly decreased (p = 0.04) over the following PODs; during this period, the ratio between urine output and diuretic dose increased significantly (p = 0.04). Age (r -0.26, p = 0.02), weight (r -0.28, p = 0.01), cross-clamp time (r 0.27, p = 0.03), administration of ethacrynic acid (OR 0.01, p = 0.03), and, at the end of POD0, creatinine levels (r 0.3, p = 0.009), renal near-infrared spectroscopy saturation (-0.44, p = 0.008), whole-blood neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin levels (r 0.30, p = 0.01), pH (r -0.26, p = 0.02), urinary volume (r -0.2755, p = 0.03), and fluid balance (r 0.2577, p = 0.0266) showed a significant association with diuretic dose. At multivariable logistic regression cross-clamp time (OR 1.007, p = 0.04), use of ethacrynic acid (OR 0.2, p = 0.01) and blood pH at the end of POD0 (OR 0.0001, p = 0.03) was independently associated with diuretic dose. Early resistance to loop diuretics continuous infusion is evident in post-cardiac surgery infants: Higher doses are administered to patients with lower urinary output. Independently associated variables with diuretic dose in our population appeared to be cross-clamping time, the administration of ethacrynic acid, and blood pH. PMID:26961571

  17. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) insufficiency protects against the development of systemic inflammatory response after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Pągowska-Klimek, Izabela; Świerzko, Anna S; Michalski, Mateusz; Moll, Maciej; Szala-Poździej, Agnieszka; Sokołowska, Anna; Krajewski, Wojciech R; Cedzyński, Maciej

    2016-02-01

    We investigated MBL2 and MASP2 genotypes, serum MBL (mannose-binding lectin) levels and activities of its complexes with associated serine proteases (MASP-1, MASP -2), in relation to complications following cardiac surgery in 195 children. The incidence of SIRS was lower in patients carrying MBL2 A/O and O/O genotypes (p=0.024). Children with MBL levels <500ng/ml had a lower risk of SIRS (p=0.014) and fever (p=0.044). Median MBL concentration was higher in patients who developed SIRS (p=0.048) but lower in those with post-operative infections (p=0.046). MBL-MASP-2 activities <100mU/ml protected from SIRS (p=0.007), low cardiac output syndrome (p=0.03) and multiorgan failure (p=0.012). In contrast, MBL2 YA/YA genotypes were associated with SIRS (p=0.018), low cardiac output syndrome (p=0.018), fever (p=0.018) and high inotropic score (VIS>30) (p=0.021). Thus, low MBL concentrations and associated genotypes may protect patients from systemic inflammation while high MBL serum levels and corresponding genotypes are risk factors of postoperative complications. PMID:26382056

  18. The effects of positive end-expiratory pressure on respiratory system mechanics and hemodynamics in postoperative cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Auler, J O; Carmona, M J; Barbas, C V; Saldiva, P H; Malbouisson, L M

    2000-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on the respiratory mechanical properties and hemodynamics of 10 postoperative adult cardiac patients undergoing mechanical ventilation while still anesthetized and paralyzed. The respiratory mechanics was evaluated by the inflation inspiratory occlusion method and hemodynamics by conventional methods. Each patient was randomized to a different level of PEEP (5, 10 and 15 cmH2O), while zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP) was established as control. PEEP of 15-min duration was applied at 20-min intervals. The frequency dependence of resistance and the viscoelastic properties and elastance of the respiratory system were evaluated together with hemodynamic and respiratory indexes. We observed a significant decrease in total airway resistance (13.12 +/- 0.79 cmH2O l-1 s-1 at ZEEP, 11.94 +/- 0.55 cmH2O l-1 s-1 (P<0.0197) at 5 cmH2O of PEEP, 11.42 +/- 0.71 cmH2O l-1 s-1 (P<0.0255) at 10 cmH2O of PEEP, and 10.32 +/- 0.57 cmH2O l-1 s-1 (P<0.0002) at 15 cmH2O of PEEP). The elastance (Ers; cmH2O/l) was not significantly modified by PEEP from zero (23.49 +/- 1.21) to 5 cmH2O (21.89 +/- 0.70). However, a significant decrease (P<0.0003) at 10 cmH2O PEEP (18.86 +/- 1.13), as well as (P<0.0001) at 15 cmH2O (18.41 +/- 0.82) was observed after PEEP application. Volume dependence of viscoelastic properties showed a slight but not significant tendency to increase with PEEP. The significant decreases in cardiac index (l min-1 m-2) due to PEEP increments (3.90 +/- 0.22 at ZEEP, 3.43 +/- 0.17 (P<0. 0260) at 5 cmH2O of PEEP, 3.31 +/- 0.22 (P<0.0260) at 10 cmH2O of PEEP, and 3.10 +/- 0.22 (P<0.0113) at 15 cmH2O of PEEP) were compensated for by an increase in arterial oxygen content owing to shunt fraction reduction (%) from 22.26 +/- 2.28 at ZEEP to 11.66 +/- 1.24 at PEEP of 15 cmH2O (P<0.0007). We conclude that increments in PEEP resulted in a reduction of both airway resistance and respiratory elastance

  19. "Baby Heart Project": the Italian project for accreditation and quality management in pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Sonia B; Zannini, Lucio V; Perri, Gianluigi; Crupi, Giancarlo; Turinetto, Bruno; Pongiglione, Giacomo

    2014-10-01

    Optimization of the relationship between the supply and the demand for medical services should ideally be taken into consideration for the planning within each national Health System. Although government national health organizations embrace this policy specifically, the contribution of expert committees (under the scientific societies' guarantee in any specific medical field) should be advocated for their capability to collect and analyze the data reported by the various national institutions. In addition, these committees have the competence to analyze the need for the resources necessary to the operation of these centers. The field of pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery may represent a model of clinical governance of particular interest with regard to programming and to a definition of the quality standards that may be extended to highly specialized institutions and ideally to the entire Health System. The "Baby Heart Project," which represents a model of governance and clinical quality in the field of pediatric cardiology and cardiac surgery, was born from the spontaneous aggregation of a committee of experts, supported by duly appointed Italian Scientific Societies and guided by a national agency for accreditation. The ultimate aim is to standardize both procedures and results for future planning within the national Health System. PMID:24880465

  20. Pediatric sialadenitis.

    PubMed

    Francis, Carrie L; Larsen, Christopher G

    2014-10-01

    Sialadenitis in the pediatric population accounts for up to 10% of all salivary gland disease. Viral parotitis and juvenile recurrent parotitis are the two most common causes. Multiple factors, independently or in combination, can result in acute, chronic, or recurrent acute salivary gland inflammation. Sialendoscopy has emerged as the leading diagnostic technique and intervention for pediatric sialadenitis. Sialendoscopy is a safe and effective gland-preserving treatment of pediatric sialadenitis. Investigational studies are needed to address the impact of steroid instillation, postoperative stenting, and long-term outcomes of pediatric sialendoscopy. This article presents a comprehensive review of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric sialadenitis. PMID:25128215

  1. Accuracy of Intra-arterial and Subcutaneous Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Postoperative Cardiac Surgery Patients in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Sechterberger, Marjolein K.; van der Voort, Peter H. J.; Strasma, Paul J.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2014-01-01

    Background: The GluCath® intra-arterial continuous glucose monitoring (IA-CGM) system uses a novel quenched chemical fluorescence sensing mechanism to optically measure blood glucose when deployed in the radial artery. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of the IA-CGM and the FreeStyle Navigator® subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring (SC-CGM) system with standard care. Methods: After admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), the IA-CGM was inserted via a 20 gauge radial arterial study catheter and the SC-CGM was placed at the abdominal wall of postoperative cardiac surgery patients with an expected ICU length of stay > 24 hours. Each device was calibrated according to manufacturer instructions. Glucose values of both CGM systems were blinded for the clinical staff. Reference blood glucose samples were collected from the study catheter every 1-2 hours for at least 24 hours and analyzed on a Radiometer ABL blood gas analyzer. Results: The IA-CGM and SC-CGM sensors were successfully inserted in 8 subjects. Accuracy assessment was performed with 183 paired points: 85.8% of the IA-CGM measurements and 84.2% of the SC-CGM measurements met ISO 15197:2003 glucometer criteria (within 20%) across a 79-248 mg/dl (4.4-13.8 mmol/L) glucose range. Overall ± SD mean absolute relative difference was 12.3 ± 11.3% for IA-CGM and 11.1 ± 8.3% for SC-CGM (difference −1.2%, 95% CI −3.3 to 0.8; P = .24). Conclusions: The IA-CGM system directly measured arterial blood glucose and did not interfere with clinical care. However, accuracy was similar to that of the less invasive SC-CGM device. PMID:25539652

  2. Epidemiological and Survival Trends of Pediatric Cardiac Arrests in Emergency Departments in Korea: A Cross-sectional, Nationwide Report.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae Yun; Lee, Mi Jin; Kim, Hyun; Yoon, Han Deok; Jang, Hye Young

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) in children is associated with high mortality rates. In Korea, cohort studies regarding the outcomes of pediatric CAs are lacking, especially in emergency departments (EDs) or in-hospital settings. This study was conducted to examine the trends in epidemiology and survival outcomes in children with resuscitation-attempted CAs using data from a cross-sectional, national, ED-based clinical registry. We extracted cases in which cardiopulmonary resuscitation and/or manual defibrillation were performed according to treatment codes using the National Emergency Department Information System (NEDIS) from 2008 to 2012. The total number of ED visits registered in the NEDIS during the 5-yr evaluation period was 20,424,530; among these, there were 2,970 resuscitation-attempted CAs in children. The annual rates of pediatric CAs per 1,000 ED visits showed an upward trend from 2.81 in 2009 to 3.62 in 2012 (P for trend = 0.045). The median number of estimated pediatric CAs at each ED was 7.8 (25th to 75th percentile, 4 to 13) per year. The overall rates for admission survival and discharge survival were 35.2% and 12.8%, respectively. The survival outcome of adults increased substantially over the past 5 yr (11.8% in 2008, 11.7% in 2010, and 13.6% in 2012; P for trend = 0.001); however, the results for children did not improve (13.6% in 2008, 11.4% in 2010, and 13.7% in 2012; P for trend = 0.870). Conclusively, we found that the overall incidence of pediatric CAs in EDs increased substantially over the past 5 yr, but without significantly higher survival outcomes. PMID:26339179

  3. The Effect of Intravenous Administration of Active Recombinant Factor VII on Postoperative Bleeding in Cardiac Valve Reoperations; A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Payani, Narges; Foroughi, Mahnoosh; Dabbagh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative bleeding after cardiac reoperations is among the most complicating problems, both for the physicians and for the patients. Many modalities have been used to decrease its adverse effects and the need for blood products administration. Objectives: In a randomized double-blinded clinical trial of redo cardiac valve surgery in adult, the effect of active recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa) on postoperative bleeding was compared with placebo. Chest tube drainage was used for comparison of bleeding between the two groups. Patients and Methods: Two groups of 18 patients undergoing redo valve surgeries were treated and compared regarding chest tube drainage, need for blood products, prothrombin time (PT), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), hemoglobin and hematocrit, platelet count, and international normalized ratio (INR) in first 24 hours after surgery. Bleeding was assessed at 3rd, 12th, and 24th hour after operation. In rFVIIa group, 40 µg/kg of AryoSeven was administered before end of surgery and same volume of normal saline was administered as placebo in the control group. Results: Study groups showed no difference regarding baseline variables. Three patients in rFVIIa group (16.67%) and 13 in placebo group (72.23%) received blood products (P < 0.01). Chest tube blood drainage at 24th hour after operation was 315 ± 177 mL in rFVIIa group and 557 ± 168 mL in control group (P = 0.03). At third and 12th hour after operation, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.71 and P = 0.22, respectively). Postoperative ICU stay was not different; while extubation was longer in the placebo group (352 ± 57 vs. 287 ± 46 minutes; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Our study demonstrated the efficacy of rFVIIa in controlling postoperative bleeding in redo cardiac valve surgeries regarding subsequent blood loss and transfusion requirement; however, outcome results remains to be defined. PMID:25789239

  4. Incidence, risk factors and prediction of post-operative acute kidney injury following cardiac surgery for active infective endocarditis: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac surgery is frequently needed in patients with infective endocarditis (IE). Acute kidney injury (AKI) often complicates IE and is associated with poor outcomes. The purpose of the study was to determine the risk factors for post-operative AKI in patients operated on for IE. Methods A retrospective, non-interventional study of prospectively collected data (2000–2010) included patients with IE and cardiac surgery with cardio-pulmonary bypass. The primary outcome was post-operative AKI, defined as the development of AKI or progression of AKI based on the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) definition. We used ensemble machine learning (“Super Learning”) to develop a predictor of AKI based on potential risk factors, and evaluated its performance using V-fold cross validation. We identified clinically important predictors among a set of risk factors using Targeted Maximum Likelihood Estimation. Results 202 patients were included, of which 120 (59%) experienced a post-operative AKI. 65 (32.2%) patients presented an AKI before surgery while 91 (45%) presented a progression of AKI in the post-operative period. 20 patients (9.9%) required a renal replacement therapy during the post-operative ICU stay and 30 (14.8%) died during their hospital stay. The following variables were found to be significantly associated with renal function impairment, after adjustment for other risk factors: multiple surgery (OR: 4.16, 95% CI: 2.98-5.80, p<0.001), pre-operative anemia (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.34-2.66, p<0.001), transfusion requirement during surgery (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.55-3.63, p<0.001), and the use of vancomycin (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 2.07-3.34, p<0.001), aminoglycosides (OR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.13-1.83, p=0.004) or contrast iodine (OR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.37-2.12, p<0.001). Post-operative but not pre-operative AKI was associated with hospital mortality. Conclusions Post-operative AKI following cardiopulmonary bypass for IE results from additive hits to the kidney. We

  5. Assessing Caudal Block Concentrations of Bupivacaine With and Without the Addition of Intravenous Fentanyl on Postoperative Outcomes in Pediatric Patients: A Retrospective Review.

    PubMed

    Karkera, Megha M; Harrison, Dale R; Aunspaugh, Jennifer P; Martin, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    Caudal blocks are a significant and efficacious aspect of pediatric anesthesia, especially in urologic and many general surgery cases. This type of regional anesthesia is common because it has a high success rate and provides between 6 and 8 hours of postoperative pain control. The aim of this study was to determine whether the concentration of bupivacaine or the addition of intravascular (i.v.) fentanyl affected the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) discharge time. A retrospective cohort study comparing the outcomes in pediatric patients who have received varying caudal concentrations with and without the addition of i.v. fentanyl was performed. A total of 849 consecutive patients undergoing hypospadias repairs or circumcisions were reviewed and placed in one of the following 3 groups: 0.125% bupivacaine (group 1), 0.25% bupivacaine (group 2), or one of these concentrations of bupivacaine + i.v. fentanyl intraoperatively (group 3). Total PACU time for each group was 46.1 minutes (group 1), 48.9 minutes (group 2), and 49.7 minutes (group 3). Our results revealed that there is no statistically significant difference between concentrations of bupivacaine administered in a caudal block with or without i.v. fentanyl with regard to the outcome of PACU duration (P = 0.16). Overall, based on the retrospective cohort design, there is no difference in primary and secondary outcomes based on the concentration of bupivacaine, when administered at a volume of 1 mL/kg. PMID:24832387

  6. Granisetron versus Granisetron-Dexamethasone for Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Pediatric Strabismus Surgery: A Randomized Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shende, Dilip; Kumar, Neeraj; Ray, Bikash Ranjan; Mohan, Virender Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Efficacy of granisetron and combination of granisetron and dexamethasone was evaluated for prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in children undergoing elective strabismus surgery. Methods. A total of 136 children (1–15 years) were included. Children received either granisetron (40 mcg/kg) [group G] or combination of granisetron (40 mcg/kg) and dexamethasone (150 mcg/kg) [group GD]. Intraoperative fentanyl requirement and incidence and severity of oculocardiac reflex were assessed. PONV severity was assessed for first 24 hours and if score was >2, it was treated with metoclopramide. Postoperative analgesia was administered with intravenous fentanyl and ibuprofen. Results. The demographic profile, muscles operated, and fentanyl requirement were comparable. Complete response to PONV in first 24 hours was observed in 75% (51/68) of children in group G and 76.9% (50/65) of children in group GD, which was comparable statistically (p = 0.96, Fisher exact test; OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.50, 2.46). Incidence of PONV between 0 and 24 hours was comparable. One child in group G required rescue antiemetic in first 24 hours and none of the children had severe PONV in group GD. There was no significant difference in incidence or severity of oculocardiac reflex. Conclusion. Dexamethasone did not increase efficacy of granisetron for prevention of PONV in elective pediatric strabismus surgery. Registration number of clinical trial was CTRI/2009/091/001000. PMID:26925101

  7. Fluid administration, vasopressor use and patient outcomes in a group of high-risk cardiac surgical patients receiving postoperative goal-directed haemodynamic therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Walker, L J C; Young, P J

    2015-09-01

    The role of goal-directed therapy in high-risk cardiac surgical patients has not been determined. This study sought to observe the effect of a postoperative standardised haemodynamic protocol (SHP) on the administration of fluid and vasoactive drugs after high-risk cardiac surgery. This was an interventional pilot study. In 2010 to 2011, the SHP was introduced to the ICU at Wellington Regional Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand, for the perioperative management of patients undergoing high-risk cardiac surgery. A pulmonary artery catheter was inserted in the patients in the study group and fluids and supportive medications were provided in the ICU according to a protocol that targeted a cardiac index ≥ 2 l/min/m², mixed venous oxygen saturation ≥ 60% and a mean arterial pressure of 65 to 75 mmHg. Data from 40 consecutive high-risk cardiac surgical patients assigned to this protocol were compared with a matched cohort of 40 consecutive high-risk cardiac surgical patients receiving 'usual care' in 2009. Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. There was no significant difference in the duration of noradrenaline infusion in the SHP cohort compared to historical controls (median [IQR] 18.5 hours [31.63] versus 18 hours [18.3]; P=0.35), despite patients receiving more fluid in their first 12 hours in the ICU (mean 4687 ml [SD ± 2284 ml] versus 1889 ml [SD ± 1344 ml]; P <0.001). The SHP cohort had a higher rate of reintubation (4 in 37 [10.8%] versus 0 in 40 [0%]; P=0.049). The SHP delivered significantly more fluid, but did not reduce the duration of noradrenaline infusion, compared to usual care. PMID:26310413

  8. Post-operative intra-spinal subdural collections after pediatric posterior fossa tumor resection: Incidence, imaging and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Harreld, Julie H; Mohammed, Noryati; Goldsberry, Grant; Li, Xingyu; Li, Yimei; Boop, Frederick; Patay, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Post-operative intra-spinal subdural collections (PISC) in children after posterior fossa tumor resection may temporarily hinder metastasis detection by MRI or CSF analysis, potentially impacting therapy. We investigated incidence, imaging and clinical features, predisposing factors and time course of PISC after posterior fossa tumor resection. Materials and Methods Retrospective IRB-approved review of post-operative spine MRIs in 243 children (5.5±4.6 years) from our clinical database post-resection of posterior fossa tumors from October 1994-August 2010 yielded 37 (6.0±4.8 years old) PISC+ subjects. Extent and signal properties of PISC were recorded for post-operative (37/37), pre-operative (15/37) and follow-up spine MRIs (35/37). Risk factors were compared to age-matched internal controls (n=37, 5.9±4.5 years). Associations of histology, hydrocephalus and cerebellar tonsillar herniation and post-operative intracranial subdural collections with PISC were assessed by Fisher’s exact test or Chi-square test. Association between pre-operative tumor volume and PISC was assessed by Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results The overall incidence of PISC was 37/243 (15.2%), greatest ≤7 days post-operatively (36%). 97% of PISC were seen 0–41 days post-operatively (12.9±11.0 days). PISC were T2 hyper-intense, iso-intense to CSF on T1WI, homogeneously enhanced and resolved on follow-up MRI (35/35). None were symptomatic. PISC were associated with intracranial subdural collections (p=0.0011) and pre-operative tonsillar herniation (p=0.0228). Conclusion PISC are infrequent, clinically silent and resolve spontaneously, and have a distinctive appearance. Pre-operative tonsillar herniation appears to be a predisposing factor. In this series, repeat MRI by 4 weeks documented improvement or resolution of PISC in 88%. PMID:25614472

  9. Prenatal Detection of Cardiac Anomalies in Fetuses with Single Umbilical Artery: Diagnostic Accuracy Comparison of Maternal-Fetal-Medicine and Pediatric Cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Tasha, Ilir; Brook, Rachel; Frasure, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Aim. To determine agreement of cardiac anomalies between maternal fetal medicine (MFM) physicians and pediatric cardiologists (PC) in fetuses with single umbilical artery (SUA). Methods. A retrospective review of all fetuses with SUA between 1999 and 2008. Subjects were studied by MFM and PC, delivered at our institution, and had confirmation of SUA and cardiac anomaly by antenatal and neonatal PC follow-up. Subjects were divided into four groups: isolated SUA, SUA and isolated cardiac anomaly, SUA and multiple anomalies without heart anomalies, and SUA and multiple malformations including cardiac anomaly. Results. 39,942 cases were studied between 1999 and 2008. In 376 of 39,942 cases (0.94%), SUA was diagnosed. Only 182 (48.4%) met inclusion criteria. Cardiac anomalies were found in 21% (38/182). Agreement between MFM physicians and PC in all groups combined was 94% (171/182) (95% CI [89.2, 96.8]). MFM physicians overdiagnosed cardiac anomalies in 4.4% (8/182). MFM physicians and PC failed to antenatally diagnose cardiac anomaly in the same two cases. Conclusions. Good agreement was noted between MFM physicians and PC in our institution. Studies performed antenatally by MFM physicians and PC are less likely to uncover the entire spectrum of cardiac abnormalities and thus neonatal follow-up is suggested. PMID:24719766

  10. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces.

    PubMed

    Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G D; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar; Adatia, Ian

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  11. Cardiac catheterization in children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease: consensus statement from the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute, Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces

    PubMed Central

    del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Moledina, Shahin; Haworth, Sheila G.; Ivy, Dunbar; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Banjar, Hanaa; Diaz, Gabriel; Heath-Freudenthal, Alexandria; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Humpl, Tilman; Kulkarni, Snehal; Lopes, Antonio; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Puri, G. D.; Rossouw, Beyra; Harikrishnan, S.; Saxena, Anita; Udo, Patience; Caicedo, Lina; Tamimi, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac catheterization is important in the diagnosis and risk stratification of pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease (PHVD) in children. Acute vasoreactivity testing provides key information about management, prognosis, therapeutic strategies, and efficacy. Data obtained at cardiac catheterization continue to play an important role in determining the surgical options for children with congenital heart disease and clinical evidence of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. The Pediatric and Congenital Heart Disease Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute met to develop a consensus statement regarding indications for, conduct of, acute vasoreactivity testing with, and pitfalls and risks of cardiac catheterization in children with PHVD. This document contains the essentials of those discussions to provide a rationale for the hemodynamic assessment by cardiac catheterization of children with PHVD. PMID:27076908

  12. Isolated congenital cardiac diverticulum originating from the left ventricular apex: Report of a pediatric case.

    PubMed

    Uysal, Fahrettin; Bostan, Ozlem Mehtap; Toprak, Muhammed Hamza Halil; Signak, Isik Senkaya; Cil, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Congenital ventricular diverticulum is a rare cardiac anomaly defined as a localized protrusion of the ventricular free wall. Although, it is usually asymptomatic, complications such as embolism, infective endocarditis, and arrhythmias can occur. The diagnosis can be made by echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, or catheter angiography. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice in symptomatic patients, whereas the management of asymptomatic patients often represents a therapeutic dilemma. We report here, a 9-month-old patient with asymptomatic congenital left ventricular (LV) diverticulum associated with epigastric hernia. PMID:27212863

  13. Isolated congenital cardiac diverticulum originating from the left ventricular apex: Report of a pediatric case

    PubMed Central

    Uysal, Fahrettin; Bostan, Ozlem Mehtap; Toprak, Muhammed Hamza Halil; Signak, Isik Senkaya; Cil, Ergun

    2016-01-01

    Congenital ventricular diverticulum is a rare cardiac anomaly defined as a localized protrusion of the ventricular free wall. Although, it is usually asymptomatic, complications such as embolism, infective endocarditis, and arrhythmias can occur. The diagnosis can be made by echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, or catheter angiography. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice in symptomatic patients, whereas the management of asymptomatic patients often represents a therapeutic dilemma. We report here, a 9-month-old patient with asymptomatic congenital left ventricular (LV) diverticulum associated with epigastric hernia. PMID:27212863

  14. Postoperative Fluid Overload is a Useful Predictor of the Short-Term Outcome of Renal Replacement Therapy for Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiarui; Shen, Bo; Fang, Yi; Liu, Zhonghua; Zou, Jianzhou; Liu, Lan; Wang, Chunsheng; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Teng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To analyze the predictive value of postoperative percent fluid overload (PFO) of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for acute kidney injury (AKI) patients after cardiac surgery. Data from 280 cardiac surgery patients between 2005 January and 2012 April were collected for retrospective analyses. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to compare the predictive values of cumulative PFO at different times after surgery for 90-day mortality. The cumulative PFO before RRT initiation was 7.9% ± 7.1% and the median PFO 6.1%. The cumulative PFO before and after RRT initiation in intensive care unit (ICU) was higher in the death group than in the survival group (8.8% ± 7.6% vs 6.1% ± 5.6%, P = 0.001; −0.5[−5.6, 5.1]% vs 6.9[2.2, 14.6]%, P < 0.001). The cumulative PFO during the whole ICU stay was 14.3% ± 15.8% and the median PFO was 10.7%. The areas under the ROC curves to predict the 90-day mortality by PFO at 24 hours, cumulative PFO before and after RRT initiation, and PFO during the whole ICU stay postoperatively were 0.625, 0.627, 0.731, and 0.752. PFO during the whole ICU stay ≥7.2% was determined as the cut-off point for 90-day mortality prediction with a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 64%. Kaplan–Meier survival estimates showed a significant difference in survival among patients with cumulative PFO ≥ 7.2% and PFO < 7.2% after cardiac surgery (log-rank P < 0.001). Postoperative cumulative PFO during the whole ICU stay ≥7.2% would have an adverse effect on 90-day short-term outcome, which may provide a strategy for the volume control of AKI-RRT patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:26287422

  15. Comparison of two technics of cardiopulmonary bypass (conventional and mini CPB) in the trans-and postoperative periods of cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Sergio Nunes; Zumba, Izabelle Balta; Batista, Micheline Sulzbacher; Pieve, Daniela Da; dos Santos, Elisandra; Stuermer, Ralf; de Oliveira, Gerson Pereira; Senger, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the effects of two different perfusion techniques: conventional cardiopulmonary bypass and miniature cardiopulmonary bypass in patients undergoing cardiac surgery at the University Hospital of Santa Maria - RS. Methods We perform a retrospective, cross-sectional study, based on data collected from the patients operated between 2010 and 2013. We analyzed the records of 242 patients divided into two groups: Group I: 149 patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass and Group II - 93 patients undergoing the miniature cardiopulmonary bypass. Results The clinical profile of patients in the preoperative period was similar in the cardiopulmonary bypass and miniature cardiopulmonary bypass groups without significant differences, except in age, which was greater in the miniature cardiopulmonary bypass group. The perioperative data were significant of blood collected for autotransfusion, which were higher in the group with miniature cardiopulmonary bypass than the cardiopulmonary bypass and in transfusion of packed red blood cells, which was higher in cardiopulmonary bypass than in miniature cardiopulmonary bypass. In the immediate, first and second postoperative period the values of hematocrit and hemoglobin were higher and significant in miniature cardiopulmonary bypass than in the cardiopulmonary bypass, although the bleeding in the first and second postoperative days was higher and significant in miniature cardiopulmonary bypass than in the cardiopulmonary bypass. Conclusion The present results suggest that the miniature cardiopulmonary bypass was beneficial in reducing the red blood cell transfusion during surgery and showed slight but significant increase in hematocrit and hemoglobin in the postoperative period. PMID:27163417

  16. Cardiac CT or MRI in pediatric practice: Which one to choose?

    PubMed

    Sorensen, C; Gach, P; Pico, H; Hugues, N; Dabadie, A; Desvignes, C; Bourlière, B; Aschero, A; Colavolpe, N; Petit, P; Gorincour, G

    2016-05-01

    The different factors involved in the choice of the best cardiovascular imaging examination for pediatric patients are justification, radiation protection, sedation, resolutions (spatial and contrast), morphology or function, intervention and contrast enhancement. Computed tomography is preferable for all coronary artery conditions, any arterial or venous abnormalities in newborns and infants and in the preoperative assessment for tetralogy of Fallot. Magnetic resonance imaging is used for any tumoral or functional assessment, cardiomyopathy or arrhythmia or if the child's participation and/or size of the structures being examined allows using this technique. PMID:26969120

  17. Computer simulations to estimate organ doses from clinically validated cardiac, neuro, and pediatric protocols for multiple detector computed tomography scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghita, Monica

    Recent advances in Computed Tomography (CT) technology, particularly that of multiple detector CT (MDCT) scanning, have provided increased utilization and more diverse clinical applications including more advanced vascular and cardiac exams, perfusion imaging, and screening exams. Notwithstanding the benefits to the patient undergoing a CT study, the fundamental concern in radiation protection is the minimization of the radiation exposure delivered as well as the implementation of structures to prevent inappropriate ordering and clinical use of these advanced studies. This research work developed a computational methodology for routine clinical use to assess patient organ doses from MDCT scanners. To support the methodology, a computer code (DXS-Diagnostic X-ray Spectra) was developed to accurately and conveniently generate x-ray spectra in the diagnostic energy range (45-140 keV). The two accepted standard radiation transport calculation methods namely, deterministic and Monte Carlo, have been preliminarily investigated for their capability and readiness to support the proposed goal of the work. Thorough tests demonstrated that the lack of appropriate discrete photon interaction coefficients in the aforementioned diagnostic energy range impedes the applicability of the deterministic approach to routine clinical use; improvements in the multigroup treatment may make it more viable. Thus, the open source Monte Carlo code, MCNP5, was adapted to appropriately model an MDCT scan. For this, a new method, entirely based on routine clinical CT measurements, was developed and validated to generate an "equivalent source and filtration" model that obviates the need of proprietary information for a given CT scanner. Computer simulations employing the Monte Carlo methodology and UF's tomographic human phantoms were performed to assess, compare, and optimize pediatric, cardiac and neuro-imaging protocols for the new 320-slice scanner at Shands/UF based on dose considerations

  18. The Effect of Administration of Ketamine and Paracetamol Versus Paracetamol Singly on Postoperative Pain, Nausea and Vomiting After Pediatric Adenotonsillectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kimiaei Asadi, Hosein; Nikooseresht, Mahshid; Noori, Lida; Behnoud, Fatholah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tonsillectomy is one of the most common surgeries in children and posttonsillectomy pain and agitation management is a great challenge for anesthesiologists. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a single dose of ketamine combined with paracetamol with paracetamol alone in the management of postoperative pain in tonsillectomy. Materials and Methods: In this study, the subjects were randomly allocated into the two groups: the ketamine and control. Intravenous paracetamol infusion (15 mg/kg) was started 15 minutes before the end of surgery in both groups, continued with the IV injection of ketamine (0.25 mg/kg) in the ketamine group and an equal volume of saline in the control group. Using the children’s hospital of eastern Ontario (CHEOPS) pain scale, pain and agitation score and also the incidence of nausea and vomiting after the surgery were recorded in 0.5, 6 and 12 hours after the operation. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 16 and P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant in all cases. Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups considering demographic data (age, sex distribution, weight and height). The CHEOPS pain scales were significantly lower in the ketamine group compared to the control group at 0.5 and 6 hours after the surgery (P = 0.003 and P = 0.023, respectively). There was no significant difference in the CHEOPS scale at 12 hours after the surgery, dose of adjuvant analgesic and the incidence of nausea and vomiting after the surgery between the two groups. Conclusions: According to the results of the current study, postoperative analgesia in children was improved in the ketamine group. Therefore, for better management of posttonsillectomy pain, low-dose ketamine administration with paracetamol is recommended. PMID:27110529

  19. Infant Cardiac CT Angiography with 64-Slice and 256-Slice CT: Comparison of Radiation Dose and Image Quality Using a Pediatric Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2012-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to investigate the image quality and radiation exposure of pediatric protocols for cardiac CT angiography (CTA) in infants under one year of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Cardiac CTA examinations were performed using an anthropomorphic phantom representing a 1-year-old child scanned with non-electrocardiogram-gated (NG), retrospectively electrocardiogram-gated helical (RGH) and prospectively electrocardiogram-gated axial (PGA) techniques in 64-slice and 256-slice CT scanners. The thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) were used for direct organ dose measurement, while dose-length product and effective mAs were also used to estimate the patient dose. For image quality, noise and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) were assessed based on regions-of-interest drawn on the reconstructed CT images, and were compared with the proposed cardiac image quantum index (CIQI). Estimated dose results were in accordant to the measured doses. The NG scan showed the best image quality in terms of noise and SNR. The PGA scan had better image quality than the RGH scan with 83.70% dose reduction. Noise and SNR were also corresponded to the proposed CIQI. Conclusions/Significance The PGA scan protocol was a good choice in balancing radiation exposure and image quality for infant cardiac CTA. We also suggested that the effective mAs and the CIQI were suitable in assessing the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality for cardiac CTA in infants. These results are useful for future implementation of dose reduction strategies in pediatric cardiac CTA protocols. PMID:23185380

  20. Partial esophagogastrostomy with esophagogastric anastomosis below the aortic arch in cardiac carcinoma: characteristics and treatment of postoperative anastomotic leakage

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Bin; Feng, Feiyue

    2015-01-01

    Background Anastomotic leakage is a severe and common complication for surgeries of cardiac cancer. Here we explore the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment strategies of anastomotic leakage in cardiac carcinoma patients after esophagogastric anastomosis. Methods From January 2009 to December 2013, 1,196 patients with cardiac carcinoma underwent esophagectomy and esophagogastric anastomosis in Cancer Hospital, Peking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. Of them, 25 patients developed symptomatic anastomotic leakage. Their clinical data were retrospectively reviewed. Results Among these 25 patients with anastomotic leakage, three died after active treatment and fifteen healed with thoracic drainage time 18-115 days. The left seven patients who did not heal until discharge developed chronic infection sinus of anastomotic leakage. Without infection symptoms, they were discharged 30-100 days after surgery with nasoenteral tube and thoracic drainage. Conclusions Anastomotic leakage in cardiac carcinoma patients after esophagogastric anastomosis can be classified into five subtypes: occult type, left thoracic type, right thoracic type, mediastinal type, and mixd type. Subtyping of anastomotic leakage is useful and convenient for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26716038

  1. Renal Doppler Resistive Index as a Marker of Oxygen Supply and Demand Mismatch in Postoperative Cardiac Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Francesco; Brusasco, Claudia; Paparo, Francesco; Manca, Tullio; Santori, Gregorio; Benassi, Filippo; Molardi, Alberto; Gallingani, Alan; Ramelli, Andrea; Gherli, Tiziano; Vezzani, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective. Renal Doppler resistive index (RDRI) is a noninvasive index considered to reflect renal vascular perfusion. The aim of this study was to identify the independent hemodynamic determinants of RDRI in mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac surgery. Methods. RDRI was determined in 61 patients by color and pulse Doppler ultrasonography of the interlobar renal arteries. Intermittent thermodilution cardiac output measurements were obtained and blood samples taken from the tip of pulmonary artery catheter to measure hemodynamics and mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). Results. By univariate analysis, RDRI was significantly correlated with SvO2, oxygen extraction ratio, left ventricular stroke work index, and cardiac index, but not heart rate, central venous pressure, mean artery pressure, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, systemic vascular resistance index, oxygen delivery index, oxygen consumption index, arterial lactate concentration, and age. However, by multivariate analysis RDRI was significantly correlated with SvO2 only. Conclusions. The present data suggests that, in mechanically ventilated patients after cardiac surgery, RDRI increases proportionally to the decrease in SvO2, thus reflecting an early vascular response to tissue hypoxia. PMID:26605339

  2. Use of central venous saturation monitoring in a patient with pediatric cardiac beriberi.

    PubMed

    Majima, Nozomi; Umegaki, Osamu; Soen, Masako

    2013-09-16

    The patient was a 1-year-and-4-mo-old boy. He had drunk about 1 L of an isotonic drink for infants daily since about 10 mo after birth. He was examined by a local doctor due to anorexia and vomiting, found to have cardiomegaly, and transported to our hospital with suspected myocarditis. After admission, the patient showed polypnea, a decreased level of consciousness, and marked metabolic acidosis and lapsed into circulatory insufficiency, requiring catecholamine administration, endotracheal intubation, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Initially, low-output heart failure due to acute myocarditis was suspected, but the central venous oxygen saturation was high, at 82%. Considering high-output heart failure to be more likely, we evaluated its cause and noted, by urinary organic acid analysis, increases in lactate, pyruvate, 3-OH-butyrate, acetoacetate, metabolic products of branched-chain amino acids, 2-ketoglutarate, 2-OH-glutarate, 2-keto-adipate, and 2-OH-adipate. Since the vitamin B1 level was reduced to 12 ng/mL (normally 20-50 ng/mL), a diagnosis of cardiac beriberi due to vitamin B1 deficiency was made. When unexplained heart failure is observed in children, cardiac beriberi must be excluded as a differential diagnosis of myocarditis and cardiomyopathy. The measurement of the central venous oxygen saturation may be useful for the diagnosis. PMID:24303502

  3. cMRI-BED: A novel informatics framework for cardiac MRI biomarker extraction and discovery applied to pediatric cardiomyopathy classification

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a rare, yet heterogeneous group of pathologies of the myocardium that are routinely examined clinically using Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cMRI). This gold standard powerful non-invasive tool yields high resolution temporal images that characterize myocardial tissue. The complexities associated with the annotation of images and extraction of markers, necessitate the development of efficient workflows to acquire, manage and transform this data into actionable knowledge for patient care to reduce mortality and morbidity. Methods We develop and test a novel informatics framework called cMRI-BED for biomarker extraction and discovery from such complex pediatric cMRI data that includes the use of a suite of tools for image processing, marker extraction and predictive modeling. We applied our workflow to obtain and analyze a dataset of 83 de-identified cases and controls containing cMRI-derived biomarkers for classifying positive versus negative findings of cardiomyopathy in children. Bayesian rule learning (BRL) methods were applied to derive understandable models in the form of propositional rules with posterior probabilities pertaining to their validity. Popular machine learning methods in the WEKA data mining toolkit were applied using default parameters to assess cross-validation performance of this dataset using accuracy and percentage area under ROC curve (AUC) measures. Results The best 10-fold cross validation predictive performance obtained on this cMRI-derived biomarker dataset was 80.72% accuracy and 79.6% AUC by a BRL decision tree model, which is promising from this type of rare data. Moreover, we were able to verify that mycocardial delayed enhancement (MDE) status, which is known to be an important qualitative factor in the classification of cardiomyopathies, is picked up by our rule models as an important variable for prediction. Conclusions Preliminary results show the feasibility of our framework

  4. Comparative study between the effects of dexmedetomidine and propofol on cerebral oxygenation during sedation at pediatric cardiac catheterization

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Murat; Birbicer, Handan; Hallioglu, Olgu; Orekeci, Gulhan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays, assessment of brain oxygen saturation, which is simply appliable and noninvasive method, can provide the anesthesia plans to be optimized according to the needs of the brain, which is the main target organ. Brain may be exposed to hypoxia due to supply-demand imbalance of oxygen not only in general anesthesia procedures but also in sedation practices. The aim of the study is to compare the effects of dexmedetomidine and propofol which are widely used agents for pediatric catheterization procedures on brain oxygen saturation using Fore-Sight. Material and Methods: A total of 44 patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization between 1 and 18 years old were included in the study. All patients, who were randomly divided into two groups, had ASA physical status I-II. In Group Propofol (Group P, n = 22), induction of sedation was made by midazolam (0.5 mg,iv) + propofol (1m/kg,iv), and in Group Dexmedetomidine (Group D, n = 22), induction of sedation was made by midazolam (0.5 mg,iv) +dexmedetomidine (1mcg/kg, iv). Throughout the sedation, cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (SctO2) was recorded by Fore-Sight in addition to routine monitoring. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in terms of demographic data, hemodynamic data and sedation scores. On other hand, statistically significant decreases in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation were detected especially at 5th and 10th minutes, in Group D, while cerebral oxygenation level did not decrease in Group P. Though, statistically significant difference was determined between two groups in terms of cerebral oxygen saturation, the obtained data was not interpreted as cerebral desaturation. Conclusion: As a conclusion, there was a statistically significant but clinically insignificant decrease in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation in dexmedetomidine group compared to propofol group. Although it does not seem to be important in hemodynamic stabilization, we

  5. Comparison of pre- vs. post-incisional caudal bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia in unilateral pediatric herniorrhaphy: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sajedi, Parvin; Yaraghi, Ahmad; Zadeh, Mohammad Taher Dehdari

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: This study was designed to evaluate the pre- vs. post-incisional analgesic efficacy of bupivacaine administered caudally in children undergoing unilateral hernia repair. Methods: Fifty children aged 6 months to 6 years were included in the study. Children were divided blindly between the two groups to receive pre- vs. post-incisional caudal bupivacaine. The preincisional group received 1 ml/kg of 0.125% bupivacaine caudally after induction of anesthesia and the postincisional group received the same dose caudally at the end of surgery. Heart rate, SaO2, end tidal CO2, and noninvasive arterial blood pressure were recorded every 10 min. The duration of surgery, extubation time, and duration of recovery period were also recorded. The pain scores were measured with using an Oucher chart in the recovery room, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery. Time to first analgesia, numbers of supplementary analgesics required by each child in a 24-h period and total analgesic consumptions were recorded. Any local and systemic complications were recorded. Quantitative data were compared using a two-tailed t-test. Sex distribution and frequency of acetaminophen consumption were measured using χ2 test. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The Oucher pain scale at 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery, the total analgesic consumption and the numbers of demand for supplemental acetaminophen were lower statistically in preincisional group (P < 0.05). Extubation time and duration were higher in preincisional group (P < 0.05). Mean changes of heart rates were statistically lower during the anesthesia period and recovery time in preincisional group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Preincisional caudal analgesia with a single injection of 0.125% bupivacaine is more effective than the postincisional one for postoperative pain relief and analgesic consumption in unilateral pediatric herniorrhaphy. PMID:21804795

  6. Alterations in Cardiac and Pulmonary Function in Pediatric Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Disease Progressors

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, William T.; Lipshultz, Steven E.; Easley, Kirk A.; McIntosh, Kenneth; Pitt, Jane; Quinn, Thomas C.; Kattan, Meyer; Goldfarb, Johanna; Cooper, Ellen; Bryson, Yvonne; Kovacs, Andrea; Bricker, Timothy; Peavy, Hannah; Mellins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Infants with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can be divided into rapid progressors (RPs) and non-rapid progressors (non-RPs) based on symptoms and immunologic status, but detailed information about cardiac and pulmonary function in RP and non-RP children needs to be adequately described. Methodology Cardiac, pulmonary, and immunologic data and HIV-1 RNA burden were periodically measured in 3 groups: group I, 205 vertically infected children enrolled from 1990 to 1994 and followed through 1996; group II, a prospectively studied cohort enrolled at birth that included 93 infected (group IIa); and 463 noninfected infants (group IIb). Results Mean respiratory rates were generally higher in group IIa RP than non-RP children throughout the period of follow-up, achieving statistical signifance at 1 month, 12 months, 24 months, 30 months, and 48 months of follow-up. Non-RP and group IIb (HIV-uninfected children) had similar mean respiratory rates from birth to 5 years of age. Significant differences in mean respiratory rates were found between group I RP and non-RP at 7 age intervals over the first 6 years of life. Mean respiratory rates were higher in RP than in non-RP at <1 year, 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, 3.5 years, 4.0 years, and 6.0 years of age. Mean heart rates in group IIa RP, non-RP, and group IIb differed at every age. Rapid progressors had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at all ages through 24 months. Mean heart rates at 30 months through 60 months of age were similar for RP and non-RP children. Non-RP children had higher mean heart rates than did group IIb at 8 months, 24 months, 36 months, 42 months, 48 months, 54 months, and 60 months of age. In group I, RP had higher mean heart rates than non-RP at 2.0 years, 2.5 years, 3.0 years, and 4.0 years of age. After 4 years of age, the non-RP and RP had similar mean heart rates. Mean fractional shortening differed between the 3 group II subsets (RP, non-RP, and IIb) at 4, 8, 12, 16

  7. Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D Concentrations and Postoperative Infections in Cardiac Surgical Patients: The CALCITOP-Study

    PubMed Central

    Zittermann, Armin; Kuhn, Joachim; Ernst, Jana B.; Becker, Tobias; Larisch, Julia; Dreier, Jens; Knabbe, Cornelius; Börgermann, Jochen; Gummert, Jan F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitamin D has immunomodulatory properties and seems to reduce the risk of infections. Whether low vitamin D concentrations are independent risk factors for nosocomial postoperative infections in surgical patients remains to be studied in detail. Methods In 3,340 consecutive cardiac surgical patients, we investigated the association of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD; indicator of nutritional vitamin D status) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25[OH]2D; active vitamin D hormone) with nosocomicial infections. The primary endpoint was a composite of thoracic wound infection, sepsis, and broncho-pulmonary infection. Vitamin D status was measured on the last preoperative day. Infections were assessed until discharge. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the association between vitamin D metabolite concentrations and the composite endpoint. Results The primary endpoint was reached by 5.6% (n = 186). In patients who reached and did not reach the endpoint, in-hospital mortality was 13.4% and 1.5%, respectively (P<0.001). Median (IQR) 25OHD and 1,25(OH)2D concentrations were 43. 2 (29.7–61.9) nmol/l and 58.0 (38.5–77.5) pmol/l, respectively. Compared with the highest 1,25(OH)2D quintile (>81.0 pmol/l), the multivariable–adjusted odds ratio of infection was 2.57 (95%CI:1.47–4.49) for the lowest 1,25(OH)2D quintile (<31.5 pmol/l) and 1.85 (95%CI:1.05–3.25) for the second lowest quintile (31.5–49.0 pmol/l). There was no significant association between 25OHD concentrations and the primary endpoint. Conclusions Our data indicate an independent association of low 1,25(OH)2D levels with the risk of postoperative infections in cardiac surgical patients. Future studies should pay more attention on the clinical relevance of circulating 1,25(OH)2D and its regulation. PMID:27355377

  8. Assessment of hydraulic performance and biocompatibility of a MagLev centrifugal pump system designed for pediatric cardiac or cardiopulmonary support.

    PubMed

    Dasse, Kurt A; Gellman, Barry; Kameneva, Marina V; Woolley, Joshua R; Johnson, Carl A; Gempp, Thomas; Marks, John D; Kent, Stella; Koert, Andrew; Richardson, J Scott; Franklin, Steve; Snyder, Trevor A; Wearden, Peter; Wagner, William R; Gilbert, Richard J; Borovetz, Harvey S

    2007-01-01

    The treatment of children with life-threatening cardiac and cardiopulmonary failure is a large and underappreciated public health concern. We have previously shown that the CentriMag is a magnetically levitated centrifugal pump system, having the utility for treating adults and large children (1,500 utilized worldwide). We present here the PediVAS, a pump system whose design was modified from the CentriMag to meet the physiological requirements of young pediatric and neonatal patients. The PediVAS is comprised of a single-use centrifugal blood pump, reusable motor, and console, and is suitable for right ventricular assist device (RVAD), left ventricular assist device (LVAD), biventricular assist device (BVAD), or extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) applications. It is designed to operate without bearings, seals and valves, and without regions of blood stasis, friction, or wear. The PediVAS pump is compatible with the CentriMag hardware, although the priming volume was reduced from 31 to 14 ml, and the port size reduced from 3/8 to (1/4) in. For the expected range of pediatric flow (0.3-3.0 L/min), the PediVAS exhibited superior hydraulic efficiency compared with the CentriMag. The PediVAS was evaluated in 14 pediatric animals for up to 30 days, demonstrating acceptable hydraulic function and hemocompatibility. The current results substantiate the performance and biocompatibility of the PediVAS cardiac assist system and are likely to support initiation of a US clinical trial in the future. PMID:18043164

  9. Assessment of Hydraulic Performance and Biocompatibility of a MagLev Centrifugal Pump System Designed for Pediatric Cardiac or Cardiopulmonary Support

    PubMed Central

    Dasse, Kurt A.; Gellman, Barry; Kameneva, Marina V.; Woolley, Joshua R.; Johnson, Carl A.; Gempp, Thomas; Marks, John D.; Kent, Stella; Koert, Andrew; Richardson, J. Scott; Franklin, Steve; Snyder, Trevor A.; Wearden, Peter; Wagner, William R.; Gilbert, Richard J.; Borovetz, Harvey S.

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of children with life-threatening cardiac and cardiopulmonary failure is a large and underappreciated public health concern. We have previously shown that the CentriMag is a magnetically levitated centrifugal pump system, having the utility for treating adults and large children (1,500 utilized worldwide). We present here the Pedi-VAS, a pump system whose design was modified from the CentriMag to meet the physiological requirements of young pediatric and neonatal patients. The PediVAS is comprised of a single-use centrifugal blood pump, reusable motor, and console, and is suitable for right ventricular assist device (RVAD), left ventricular assist device (LVAD), biventricular assist device (BVAD), or extracorporeal membrane oxygenator (ECMO) applications. It is designed to operate without bearings, seals and valves, and without regions of blood stasis, friction, or wear. The PediVAS pump is compatible with the CentriMag hardware, although the priming volume was reduced from 31 to 14 ml, and the port size reduced from 3/8 to ¼ in. For the expected range of pediatric flow (0.3–3.0 L/min), the PediVAS exhibited superior hydraulic efficiency compared with the CentriMag. The PediVAS was evaluated in 14 pediatric animals for up to 30 days, demonstrating acceptable hydraulic function and hemocompatibility. The current results substantiate the performance and biocompatibility of the PediVAS cardiac assist system and are likely to support initiation of a US clinical trial in the future. PMID:18043164

  10. A comparative study on the risks of radiogenic second cancers and cardiac mortality in a set of pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with photon or proton craniospinal irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rui; Howell, Rebecca M.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Giebeler, Annelise; Mahajan, Anita; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the risks of radiogenic second cancers and cardiac mortality in 17 pediatric medulloblastoma patients treated with passively scattered proton or field-in-field photon craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Material/ methods Standard of care photon or proton CSI treatment plans were created for all 17 patients in a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) (Eclipse version 8.9; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and prescription dose was 23.4 Gy or 23.4 Gy(RBE) to the age specific target volume at 1.8 Gy/fraction. The therapeutic doses from proton and photon CSI plans were estimated from TPS. Stray radiation doses were determined from Monte Carlo simulations for proton CSI and from measurements and TPS for photon CSI. The Biological Effects of Ionization Radiation VII report and a linear model based on childhood cancer survivor data were used for risk predictions of second cancer and cardiac mortality, respectively. Results The ratios of lifetime attributable risk (RLARs) (proton/photon) ranged from 0.10 to 0.22 for second cancer incidence and ranged from 0.20 to 0.53 for second cancer mortality, respectively. The ratio of relative risk (RRR) (proton/photon) of cardiac mortality ranged from 0.12 to 0.24. The RLARs of both cancer incidence and mortality decreased with patient's age at exposure (e), while the RRRs of cardiac mortality increased with e. Girls had a significantly higher RLAR of cancer mortality than boys. Conclusion Passively scattered proton CSI provides superior predicted outcomes confers lower predicted risks of a second cancer and cardiac mortality than field-in-field photon CSI for all medulloblastoma patients in a large clinically representative sample in the United States, but the magnitude of superiority depend strongly on the patients' anatomical development status. PMID:25128084

  11. Pediatric Hand Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew A; Cogan, Charles J; Adkinson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric hand injuries are extremely common. Although many hand injuries are adequately managed in the emergency department, some may need evaluation and treatment by a pediatric hand surgeon to ensure a good functional outcome. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of the most common pediatric hand maladies: fingertip injuries/amputation, tendon injuries, and phalangeal and metacarpal fractures. The plastic surgery nurse should be familiar with hand injuries that require intervention to facilitate efficient management and optimal postoperative care. PMID:27606586

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Preoperative Screening and Postoperative Care.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Robert M; Pomerantz, Jonathan; Miller, Deborah E; Weiss-Coleman, Rebecca; Solomonides, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has reached epidemic proportions, and it is an often unrecognized cause of perioperative morbidity and mortality. Profound hypoxic injury from apnea during the postoperative period is often misdiagnosed as cardiac arrest due to other causes. Almost a quarter of patients entering a hospital for elective surgery have OSA, and >80% of these cases are undiagnosed at the time of surgery. The perioperative period puts patients at high risk of apneic episodes because of drug effects from sedatives, narcotics, and general anesthesia, as well as from the effects of postoperative rapid eye movement sleep changes and postoperative positioning in the hospital bed. For adults, preoperative screening using the STOP or STOP-Bang questionnaires can help to identify adult patients at increased risk of OSA. In the pediatric setting, a question about snoring should be part of every preoperative examination. For patients with known OSA, continuous positive airway pressure should be continued postoperatively. Continuous pulse oximetry monitoring with an alarm system can help to prevent apneic catastrophes caused by OSA in the postoperative period. PMID:26957384

  13. Plasma cardiac troponin I concentrations in healthy neonates, children and adolescents measured with a high sensitive immunoassay method: High sensitive troponin I in pediatric age.

    PubMed

    Caselli, Chiara; Cangemi, Giuliana; Masotti, Silvia; Ragusa, Rosetta; Gennai, Iulian; Del Ry, Silvia; Prontera, Concetta; Clerico, Aldo

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 10years cardiac troponin (cTn) immunoassays have been improved in analytical sensitivity and precision thereby allowing the measurement of cTn in adult healthy subjects. However, there are currently substantial gaps in our knowledge on circulating levels of cTn in healthy children. The aim of this study is to evaluate the distribution of plasma troponin concentration in apparently healthy pediatric subjects using a high sensitive immunoassay for cTnI measurement (hs-cTnI). Blood samples were obtained from 357 healthy pediatric subjects [204 males; age range 0-18years; mean (SD): 8.7(6) years], including 36 subjects aged <1month (neonates), 57 between 1 and 12months (infants), 65 between 1 and 10years (toddlers), and 223 between 10 and 18years (adolescents). The percentages of healthy population with cTnI values equal or less than the calculated and LOD value were 13.1%. cTnI plasma levels were highest in the first month of life with a progressive decline in the next years and were lower in female. At multivariate analysis, only age was predictor of hs-cTnI plasma levels. The age and sex of children influence normal and physiologically released circulating concentrations of hs-cTnI, suggesting the need of reference intervals specific for age and sex. PMID:27118089

  14. Simple, rapid /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporine double antibody/polyethylene glycol radioimmunoassay used in a pediatric cardiac transplant program

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, L.S.; Webb, G.; Imperio, N.C.; Nehlsen-Cannarella, S.L.; Eby, W.C.

    1986-01-01

    We modified the Sandoz cyclosporine radioimmunoassay because of our need for frequent clinical monitoring of cyclosporine drug levels in allo- and xenograft pediatric cardiac transplant patients. With application of a commercially available (/sup 125/I)cyclosporine label in place of (/sup 3/H)cyclosporine and a second antibody/polyethylene glycol (PEG) method of separation in place of charcoal separation, we simplified and enhanced the speed and precision of assay performance. Studies of 140 whole blood samples comparing this new method to the (/sup 3/H)cyclosporine radioimmunoassay (RIA) method of Berk and colleagues yielded a coefficient of correlation of 0.96 (p less than 0.00001) with means of 626 and 667 ng/ml for (/sup 3/H)RIA and (/sup 125/I)RIA, respectively, and a regression equation of y = 28 + 1.02x. The major advantages are that total assay time is reduced to approximately 1 h; (/sup 125/I)cyclosporine label is used, avoiding the problems associated with liquid scintillation counting; and precision is enhanced by separating bound and free fractions with second antibody/PEG. These modifications should provide for greater ease of assay performance and improved clinical utility of cyclosporine monitoring not only in the pediatric but also in the adult transplant patient.

  15. SU-C-12A-05: Radiation Dose in High-Pitch Pediatric Cardiac CTA: Correlation Between Lung Dose and CTDIvol, DLP, and Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J; Kino, A; Newman, B; Chan, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the radiation dose for pediatric high pitch cardiac CTA Methods: A total of 14 cases were included in this study, with mean age of 6.2 years (ranges from 2 months to 15 years). Cardiac CTA was performed using a dual-source CT system (Definition Flash, Siemens). Tube voltage (70, 80 and 100kV) was chosen based on patient weight. All patients were scanned using a high-pitch spiral mode (pitch ranges from 2.5 to 3) with tube current modulation technique (CareDose4D, Siemens). For each case, the three dimensional dose distributions were calculated using a Monte Carlo software package (IMPACT-MC, CT Image GmbH). Scanning parameters of each exam, including tube voltage, tube current, beamshaping filters, beam collimation, were defined in the Monte Carlo calculation. Tube current profile along projection angles was obtained from projection data of each tube, which included data within the over-scanning range along z direction. The volume of lungs was segmented out with CT images (3DSlicer). Lung doses of all patients were calculated and compared with CTDIvol, DLP, and SSDE. Results: The average (range) of CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE of all patients was 1.19 mGy (0.58 to 3.12mGy), 31.54 mGy*cm (12.56 to 99 mGy*cm), 2.26 mGy (1.19 to 6.24 mGy), respectively. Radiation dose to the lungs ranged from 0.83 to 4.18 mGy. Lung doses correlated with CTDIvol, DLP and SSDE with correlation coefficients(k) at 0.98, 0.93, and 0.99. However, for the cases with CTDIvol less than 1mGy, only SSDE preserved a strong correlation with lung doses (k=0.83), while much weaker correlations were found for CTDIvol (k=0.29) and DLP (k=-0.47). Conclusion: Lung doses to pediatric patients during Cardiac CTA were estimated. SSDE showed the most robust correlation with lung doses in contrast to CTDIvol and DLP.

  16. Pediatric Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jennifer N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: 1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and pre-excitation, 3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25722754

  17. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Antony; Jagannath, Pushpa; Joshi, Shreedhar S.; Jagadeesh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score) in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score) to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC) score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD) of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001) for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]). Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality. PMID:26139742

  18. Blood lactate levels differ significantly between surviving and nonsurviving patients within the same risk-adjusted Classification for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) group after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Molina Hazan, Vered; Gonen, Yael; Vardi, Amir; Keidan, Ilan; Mishali, David; Rubinshtein, Marina; Yakov, Yusim; Paret, Gideon

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the association between lactate levels in the first hours after surgery for congenital heart defects and the results of Risk-Adjusted Classification for Congenital Heart Surgery (RACHS-1) scoring and to evaluate serial lactate levels over time to determine whether they can serve as a supplementary tool for postoperative assessment within the same RACHS-1 group of patients. A retrospective cohort study was performed using data retrieved from a clinical database of 255 children who had surgery for congenital heart defects between 1999 and 2001 at Sheba Medical Center. Lactate levels were measured postoperatively four times (mg/dL units). The last sample was taken at the end of the surgical procedure, and lactate levels were measured at admission to the pediatrics critical care unit, then 6 and 12 h after admission. The lactate level was measured via arterial blood gases. A total of 27 deaths occurred, yielding a mortality rate of 7.4% when Norwood operations were excluded and 10.16% when they were included. The mean initial postoperative lactate level was significantly lower for survivors (42.2 ± 32.0 mg/dL) than for nonsurvivors (85.4 ± 54.1 mg/dL) (p < 0.01). The serial mean lactate levels decreased progressively for all surviving patients (r (2) = 0.96) compared with nonsurvivors (r (2) = 0.02). The lactate levels correlated with the RACHS-1 subgroups at each time point (r (2) > 0.96 for all). The Pearson correlations between postoperative lactate levels (last lactate measurement taken in the operating room) and cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) duration (r = 0.549), clamp duration (r = 0.586), and the inotropic score (r = 0.466) (p < 0.001 for all) were significantly positive. The correlations between the maximum lactate levels (during the first 12 postoperative hours) and CPB duration (r = 0.496), clamp duration (r = 0.509), and the inotropic score (r = 0.633) (p < 0.001 for all) were extremely positive. The early elevation of lactate

  19. Postoperative continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine has comparable analgesic effects and fewer complications as compared to traditional patient-controlled analgesia with sufentanil in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jun; Jin, Li; Li, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine with traditional patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with sufentanil after non-cardiac thoracotomy. Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients undergoing open thoracotomy were recruited into this assessor-blinded, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive analgesia through a wound catheter placed below the fascia and connected to a 2 ml/h ropivacaine 0.5% (RWI group) or sufentanil PCA (SPCA group). Analgesia continued for 48 h. Visual analogue scores (VAS) at rest and movement, Ramsay scores and adverse effects were recorded at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after surgery. Three months after discharge, patient’s satisfaction, residual pain and surgical wound complications were assessed. Results: General characteristics of patients were comparable between two groups. There were no statistical differences in the VAS scores and postoperative pethidine consumption between two groups (P > 0.05). However, when compared with SPCA group, the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness and respiratory depression, ICU stay and hospital expenditure reduced significantly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Patients’ satisfaction with pain management was also improved markedly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine is effective for postoperative analgesia and has comparable effects to traditional PCA with sufentanil. Furthermore, this therapy may also reduce the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness, respiratory depression and decrease the ICU stay and hospital expenditure. PMID:26131121

  20. Successful use of levosimendan as a primary inotrope in pediatric cardiac surgery: An observational study in 110 patients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Reena Khantwal; Aggarwal, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Mridul; Pandey, Rakesh; Dinand, Veronique; Joshi, Raja

    2016-01-01

    Context: Levosimendan is a new generation inotrope with calcium sensitizing properties and proven benefits in adults. Aims: This study investigates the use of levosimendan as a first line inotrope in congenital heart surgery. Settings and Design: Prospective, observational study in a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten patients undergoing congenital cardiac surgery received levosimendan at a loading dose of 12 mcg/kg during rewarming on cardiopulmonary bypass followed by continuous infusion of 0.1 mcg/kg/min for 48 h. Hemodynamic parameters were recorded at the time of admission to Intensive Care Unit, and at 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h thereafter. Statistical Analysis: Categorical variables were compared using Chi-square test. Non-normally distributed quantitative variables were compared between groups using Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: At discharge from operating room (OR), 36 (32.7%) patients required levosimendan alone to maintain optimum cardiac output, 59 (53.6%) patients required the addition of low-dose adrenaline (<0.1 mcg/kg/min) and 15 (13.6%) patients required either increment in adrenaline to high-dose (≥0.1 mcg/kg/min) or starting another inotrope/vasoactive agent. Overall, there were five mortalities. Hypotension leading to discontinuation of levosimendan was not found in any patient. Arrhythmias were observed in three patients. Fifty-four patients were extubated in the OR. Conclusions: Levosimendan-based inotropic regime offers optimized cardiac output with a well-controlled heart rate and a low incidence of arrhythmias in patients undergoing all categories of congenital heart surgeries. PMID:27011685

  1. TAOK3, a novel genome-wide association study locus associated with morphine requirement and postoperative pain in a retrospective pediatric day surgery population

    PubMed Central

    Cook-Sather, Scott D.; Li, Jin; Goebel, Theodora K.; Sussman, Emily M.; Rehman, Mohamed A.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2014-01-01

    Candidate gene studies have revealed limited genetic bases for opioid analgesic response variability. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) facilitate impartial queries of common genetic variants, allowing identification of novel genetic contributions to drug effect. Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays were used to investigate SNP associations with total morphine requirement as a quantitative trait locus and with postoperative pain in a retrospective population of opioid-naïve children age 4 – 18 y who had undergone day surgery tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. In an independent replication cohort, significant GWAS-identified SNPs were assayed using Taqman probes. Among 617 comprehensively phenotyped children, the 277 subjects of European Caucasian (EC) ancestry demonstrated nominal association between morphine dose and a series of novel SNPs (top rs795484, p=1.01×10-6 and rs1277441, p=2.77×10-6) at the TAOK3 locus. Age, body mass index, and physical status were included covariates. Morphine requirement averaged 132.4 mcg/kg (SD 40.9). Each minor allele at rs795484 (G>A) contributed +17.6 mcg/kg (95% CI=10.7-24.4) to dose. Effect direction and magnitude were replicated in an independent cohort of 75 EC children (p<0.05). No association with morphine dose was detected in African Americans (AA) (n=241). Postoperative pain scores ≥ 7/10 were associated with rs795484 (G>A) in the EC cohort (OR=2.35, 95% CI=1.56-3.52, p<0.00005) and this association replicated in AA children (OR=1.76, 95% CI=1.14-2.71, p<0.01). Variants in TAOK3 encoding the serine/threonine-protein kinase, TAO3, are associated with increased morphine requirement in children of EC ancestry and with increased acute postoperative pain in both EC and AA subjects. PMID:24909733

  2. Larger Centers Produce Better Outcomes in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: Regionalization is a Superior Model - The Con Prospective.

    PubMed

    Danton, Mark H D

    2016-01-01

    Regionalization, in the context of congenital heart surgery, describes a process where smaller units close and patients are redistributed to larger centers. Proponents argue this will produce superior patient outcome based primarily on a volume-outcome effect. The potential disadvantage is that, as distance to center increases, access to service is compromised. In this article the volume-outcome effect is appraised and the effect of risk-stratification and threshold volumes explored. Access to service, and how certain congenital lesions and demographics might be disadvantaged, is reviewed. Alternative models are considered including collaborative programing and a standardizing approach of agreed parameters in personnel and infrastructure. Finally the influence of newer developments and quality metrics, including outcome databases, digital technologies and team-cognitive performance, needs to be factored in as the future unfolds. Ultimately, the design of a national congenital cardiac program should aspire to deliver care that is optimal, equitable and economic for the whole population. The solution lies in the distillation of competing variables cognizant of regional demographics and geography. PMID:27060038

  3. POSTOPERATIVE DELIRIUM

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Elizabeth L.; Vannucci, Andrea; Avidan, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Delirium is an unfortunately common complication seen during the postoperative course. Because of its significant association with physical and cognitive morbidity, clinicians should be aware of evidence-based practices relating to the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of postoperative delirium. Here, we review selected recent literature pertaining to the epidemiology and impact of the condition, perioperative risk factors for its development and/or exacerbation, and strategies for management of delirium, with additional attention to the intensive care unit population. PMID:21483389

  4. Preoperative Steroid Treatment Does Not Improve Markers of Inflammation Following Cardiac Surgery in Neonates: Results from a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Eric M.; Atz, Andrew M.; McHugh, Kimberly E.; Butts, Ryan J.; Baker, Nathaniel L.; Stroud, Robert E.; Reeves, Scott T.; Bradley, Scott M.; McGowan, Francis X.; Spinale, Francis G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neonatal cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass results in a heightened inflammatory response. Perioperative glucocorticoid administration is commonly utilized in attempt to reduce the inflammatory cascade, although characterization of the cytokine response to steroids in neonatal cardiac surgery remains elusive due to highly variable approaches in administration. This randomized trial was designed to prospectively evaluate the effect of specific glucocorticoid dosing protocols on inflammatory markers in neonatal cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Neonates scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly assigned to receive either two-dose (8 hours preoperatively and operatively, n=36) or single dose (operatively, n=32) methylprednisolone at 30mg/kg/dose in a prospective double-blind trial. The primary outcome was the effect of these steroid regimens on markers of inflammation. Secondary analyses evaluated the association of specific cytokine profiles with postoperative clinical outcomes. Results Patient demographics, perioperative variables and preoperative indices of inflammation were similar between the single and two-dose groups. Preoperative cytokine response after the two-dose methylprednisolone protocol was consistent with an anti-inflammatory effect, although this did not persist into the postoperative period. Pre-medication baseline levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were predictive of postoperative intensive care unit and hospital length of stay. Only interleukin-8 demonstrated a postoperative response associated with duration of intensive care unit and hospital stay. Conclusions The addition of a preoperative dose of methylprednisolone to a standard intraoperative methylprednisolone dose does not improve markers of inflammation following neonatal cardiac surgery. The routine administration of preoperative glucocorticoids in neonatal cardiac surgery should be

  5. [New possibilities in the postoperative measures to prevent bleeding in cardiac surgery. Will the recombinant activated factor VII improve surgical results?].

    PubMed

    Skalski, Janusz H; Czapla, Jerzy; Nadziakiewicz, Paweł; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Zembala, Marian

    2002-01-01

    The authors present the diagnostic and therapeutic management in bleeding episodes associated with cardiosurgical operations, which constitutes the policy that is employed at Department of Cardiac Surgery and Transplantology, Silesian Academy of Medicine, Zabrze, Poland. The paper also presents a compendium of information on the pathophysiology of coagulation processes, most significant from the standpoint of cardiosurgical practice. Separate issues associated with providing optimal hemostasis in patients operated on using cardiopulmonary bypass are discussed, along with the effect of cardiac procedures on coagulation processes. Further, the authors present their clinical observations and experience in the utilization of the recombinant activated factor VII (NovoSeven, NovoNordisk) in two patients with severe perioperative bleeding. In the first case bleeding was associated heart transplantation procedure in a 37-year old woman, who had previously been twice subjected to operations for valvular heart disease. A dysfunction of two artificial valves implanted 15 years previously resulted in considerable heart muscle damage and an extremenally severe form of cardiac insufficiency. Two months after the heart transplant the patient unfortunately died due to infectious complications. In the second patient the recombinant activated factor VII was employed in an attempt at controlling severe bleeding encountered in a 15-year old boy in the course of reoperation in surgical treatment of a complex congenital heart defect. In this case the treatment was successful. In both described patients who were characterized by a high risk of surgical bleeding, the employment of the recombinant activated factor VII led to significant improvement in coagulation system indices and the hemostatic outcome was regarded positive. The authors state that the introduction of the recombinant activated factor VII to clinical practice in a selected group of patients presenting with most serious

  6. Pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Maggiore, Giuseppe; Cintorino, Davide; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In previous decades, pediatric liver transplantation has become a state-of-the-art operation with excellent success and limited mortality. Graft and patient survival have continued to improve as a result of improvements in medical, surgical and anesthetic management, organ availability, immunosuppression, and identification and treatment of postoperative complications. The utilization of split-liver grafts and living-related donors has provided more organs for pediatric patients. Newer immunosuppression regimens, including induction therapy, have had a significant impact on graft and patient survival. Future developments of pediatric liver transplantation will deal with long-term follow-up, with prevention of immunosuppression-related complications and promotion of as normal growth as possible. This review describes the state-of-the-art in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:19222089

  7. The role of point-of-care platelet function testing in predicting postoperative bleeding following cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Corredor, C; Wasowicz, M; Karkouti, K; Sharma, V

    2015-06-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis appraises the utility of point-of-care platelet function tests for predicting blood loss and transfusion requirements in cardiac surgical patients, and analyses whether their use within a transfusion management algorithm is associated with improved patient outcomes. We included 30 observational studies incorporating 3044 patients in the qualitative assessment, and nine randomised controlled trials including 1057 patients in the meta-analysis. Platelet function tests demonstrated significant variability in their ability to predict blood loss and transfusion requirements. Their use within a blood transfusion algorithm demonstrated a reduction in blood loss at longest follow-up (mean difference -102.9 ml (95% CI -149.9 to -56.1 ml), p < 0.001), and transfusion of packed red cells (RR 0.86 (95% CI 0.78-0.94), p = 0.001) and fresh frozen plasma (RR 0.42 (95% CI 0.30-0.59), p < 0.001). Viscoelastic methods used in combination with other platelet function tests achieved greater reduction in blood loss (mean difference -111.8 ml (95% CI -174.9 to -49.1 ml), p = 0.0005) compared with their use alone (mean difference -90.6 ml (95% CI 166.1-15.0 ml), p = 0.02). We conclude that incorporation of point-of-care platelet function tests into transfusion management algorithms is associated with a reduction in blood loss and transfusion requirements in cardiac surgery patients. PMID:25916344

  8. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator Treatment in a Child with Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hak Ju; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new treatment for refractory heart failure. However, most patients with heart failure treated with CRT are adults, middle-aged or older with idiopathic or ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. We treated a 12-year-old boy, who was transferred after cardiac arrest, with dilated cardiomyopathy, left bundle-branch block, and ventricular tachycardia. We performed cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D). After CRT-D, left ventricular ejection fraction improved from 22% to 44% assessed by echocardiogram 1 year postoperatively. On electrocardiogram, QRS duration was shortened from 206 to 144 ms. The patient’s clinical symptoms also improved. For pediatric patients with refractory heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia, CRT-D could be indicated as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:27525239

  9. Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator Treatment in a Child with Heart Failure and Ventricular Arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hak Ju; Cho, Sungkyu; Kim, Woong-Han

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a new treatment for refractory heart failure. However, most patients with heart failure treated with CRT are adults, middle-aged or older with idiopathic or ischemic dilated cardiomyopathy. We treated a 12-year-old boy, who was transferred after cardiac arrest, with dilated cardiomyopathy, left bundle-branch block, and ventricular tachycardia. We performed cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D). After CRT-D, left ventricular ejection fraction improved from 22% to 44% assessed by echocardiogram 1 year postoperatively. On electrocardiogram, QRS duration was shortened from 206 to 144 ms. The patient's clinical symptoms also improved. For pediatric patients with refractory heart failure and ventricular arrhythmia, CRT-D could be indicated as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:27525239

  10. Pediatric MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the oral medications in the pediatric population. Network of Pediatric MS Centers The National MS Society ... MS Study Group (2004) and established a nationwide network of six Pediatric MS Centers of Excellence (2006) ...

  11. Pediatric Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... common causes, which are 1 , 2 , 3 : Motor vehicle accidents Suffocation (being unable to breathe) Drowning Poisoning ... gov/safechild [top] American Academy of Pediatrics. (2008). Management of pediatric trauma. Pediatrics, 121 , 849–854. [top] ...

  12. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  13. Effects of Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Internal Jugular Bulb Venous Oxygen Saturation, Cerebral Oxygen Saturation, and Bispectral Index in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhiyong; Xu, Lili; Zhu, Zhirui; Seal, Robert; McQuillan, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2), internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation (SjvO2), mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), and bispectral index (BIS) used to monitor cerebral oxygen balance in pediatric patients.Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Class II-III patients aged 1 to 4 years old with congenital heart disease scheduled for elective cardiac surgery were included in this study. Temperature, BIS, rSO2, mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and hematocrit were recorded. Internal jugular bulb venous oxygen saturation and SvO2 were obtained from blood gas analysis at the time points: after induction of anesthesia (T0), beginning of CPB (T1), ascending aortic occlusion (T2), 20 minutes after initiating CPB (T3), coronary reperfusion (T4), separation from CPB (T5), and at the end of operation (T6). The effect of hypothermia or changes in CPP on rSO2, SjvO2, SvO2, and BIS were analyzed.Compared with postinduction baseline values, rSO2 significantly decreased at all-time points: onset of extracorporeal circulation, ascending aortic occlusion, 20 minutes after CPB initiation, coronary reperfusion, and separation from CPB (P < 0.05). Compared with measurements made following induction of anesthesia, SjvO2 significantly increased with initiation of CPB, ascending aortic occlusion, 20 minutes after initiating CPB, coronary reperfusion, and separation from CPB (P < 0.05). Compared with induction of anesthesia, BIS significantly decreased with the onset of CPB, aortic cross clamping, 20 minutes after initiating CPB, and coronary reperfusion (P < 0.05). Bispectral index increased following separation from CPB. There was no significant change in SvO2 during cardiopulmonary bypass (P > 0.05). Correlation analysis demonstrated that rSO2 was positively related to CPP (r = 0.687, P = 0

  14. Comprehensive training for the future pediatric cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    India faces a huge burden of pediatric and adult congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Many acquired valvar, myocardial, and vascular diseases also need treatment in childhood and adolescence. The emergence of pediatric cardiology as an independent specialty has been a relatively recent development. A few centers of excellence in pediatric cardiology have developed. However, the requirement of pediatric cardiac care and pediatric cardiologists is far in excess of what is available. There are no guidelines at present in India for uniform training in pediatric cardiology. Many training programs are nonstructured and do not focus on the regional needs. Both core training and advanced training programs are essential to provide adequate numbers of community-level pediatric cardiologists and academic leaders respectively. This article proposes a detailed plan and curriculum for comprehensive training of future pediatric cardiologists in India. PMID:27011684

  15. Pediatric Coronary Artery Revascularization Surgery: Development and Effects on Survival, Cardiac Events and Graft Patency for Children With Kawasaki Disease Coronary Involvements

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Soichiro

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric coronary artery bypass surgery gained wide acceptance with the introduction of internal thoracic arteries (ITAs) for bypass operations for post Kawasaki disease (KD) lesions. The technique is now established as the standard surgical choice, and its safety even in infancy, graft patency, growth potential, graft longevity and clinical efficacy have been well documented. In this article the author reviews the development of pediatric coronary bypass as the main indication for the treatment of coronary lesions due to KD. I believe that coronary revascularization surgery in pediatric population utilizing uni- or bilateral ITAs is the current gold-standard as the most reliable treatment, although percutaneous coronary intervention with or without a stent has been tried with vague long-term results in children. PMID:26848378

  16. Novel Use of an Ultrafiltration Device as an Alternative Method for Fluid Removal in Critically Ill Pediatric Patients with Cardiac Disease: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Sujata; Al-Qaqaa, Yasir; Faulkner, Meghan; Bhatla, Puneet; Argilla, Michael; Ramirez, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Fluid overload (FO) is a common complication for pediatric patients in the intensive care unit. When conventional therapy fails, hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis is classically used for fluid removal. Unfortunately, these therapies are often associated with cardiovascular or respiratory instability. Ultrafiltration, using devices such as the Aquadex™ system (Baxter Healthcare, Deerfield, IL, USA), is an effective tool for fluid removal in adult patients with congestive heart failure. As compared to hemodialysis, ultrafiltration can be performed using smaller catheters, and the extracorporeal volume and minimal blood flow rates are lower. In addition, there is no associated abdominal distension as is seen in peritoneal dialysis. Consequently, ultrafiltration may be better tolerated in critically ill pediatric patients. We present three cases of challenging pediatric patients with FO in the setting of congenital heart disease in whom ultrafiltration using the Aquadex™ system was successfully utilized for fluid removal while cardiorespiratory stability was maintained. PMID:27433308

  17. Cardiac arrest in children.

    PubMed

    Tress, Erika E; Kochanek, Patrick M; Saladino, Richard A; Manole, Mioara D

    2010-07-01

    Major advances in the field of pediatric cardiac arrest (CA) were made during the last decade, starting with the publication of pediatric Utstein guidelines, the 2005 recommendations by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, and culminating in multicenter collaborations. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of in-hospital and out-of-hospital CA are now well described. Four phases of CA are described and the term "post-cardiac arrest syndrome" has been proposed, along with treatment goals for each of its four phases: immediate post-arrest, early post-arrest, intermediate and recovery phase. Hypothermia is recommended to be considered as a therapy for post-CA syndrome in comatose patients after CA, and large multicenter prospective studies are underway. We reviewed landmark articles related to pediatric CA published during the last decade. We present the current knowledge of epidemiology, pathophysiology and treatment of CA relevant to pre-hospital and acute care health practitioners. PMID:20930971

  18. Postoperative psychosis after heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Sveinsson, I S

    1975-10-01

    One hundred heart surgery patients were followed throughout their postoperative periods to assess the incidence and etiology of postcardiotomy delirium. Factors evaluated were: age, sex, history of previous psychiatric illness, history of cerebrovascular disease, cardiac diagnosis and operation, time of anesthesia, time of bypass, time spent in the intensive-care unit, and amount of sleep during the postoperative period. Six patients developed delirium, five of whom had a lucid postoperative interval; four patients had perceptual disturbances only, without loss of contact with reality; three had neurological symptoms with mild confusion; 87 kept a clear mental state. The following factors tended to be related to the occurrence of delirium and perceptual disturbances: history of preoperative psychiatric illness, advanced age, severity of preoperative and postoperative illness, and time spent in the intensive-care unit. Sleep deprivation consistently preceded onset of these symptoms with one exception. Operative factors did not seem to be of major importance. While postoperative delirium probably has multidetermined causes, the author believes that sleep deprivation superimposed on the other contributory condition is a common precipitating factor. Suggestions about the prevention and treatment of delirium are made. PMID:1177486

  19. OUTCOMES OF THE FIFTH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON PEDIATRIC MECHANICAL CIRCULATORY SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND PEDIATRIC CARDIOPULMONARY PERFUSION

    PubMed Central

    Ündar, Akif

    2009-01-01

    The overall objective of the Conference was to bring together internationally know clinicians, bioengineers, and basic scientists involved in research on pediatric mechanical cardiac support systems and pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. The primary focus was to explicitly describe the problems with current pediatric mechanical circulatory support systems, methods, and techniques during acute and chronic support. The organizers were able to bring together respected international scholars from over 25 different countries at past conferences that has already made a significant impact on the treatment of pediatric cardiac patients during the past three years. Over 1,300 participants (250–300 participants each year) from many countries, including Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States, have participated in the 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 events. To date, The Fifth International Conference on Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Systems and Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Perfusion is the only conference solely dedicated to pediatric cardiac devices used during acute and chronic mechanical circulatory support. There is no other national or international conference to precisely define the problems with pediatric cardiac patients, and to suggest solutions with new methodologies and devices for pediatric patients, but specifically for neonates and infants. PMID:20021466

  20. [Hygienic handling in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Shimasaki, T; Masaoka, T; Hirooka, S; Abe, H; Watanabe, T; Washio, M

    1993-04-01

    Some points regarding the hygienic handling in cardiac surgery are mentioned. The sternal infection or mediastinitis is still one of the most important complications after cardiac operation especially when ITA is used for CABG. After we paid much attention to these points, the postoperative sternal infection has decreased obviously. PMID:8468855

  1. Face lift postoperative recovery.

    PubMed

    Mottura, A Aldo

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe what I have studied and experienced, mainly regarding the control and prediction of the postoperative edema; how to achieve an agreeable recovery and give positive support to the patient, who in turn will receive pleasant sensations that neutralize the negative consequences of the surgery.After the skin is lifted, the drainage flow to the flaps is reversed abruptly toward the medial part of the face, where the flap bases are located. The thickness and extension of the flap determines the magnitude of the post-op edema, which is also augmented by medial surgeries (blepharo, rhino) whose trauma obstruct their natural drainage, increasing the congestion and edema. To study the lymphatic drainage, the day before an extended face lift (FL) a woman was infiltrated in the cheek skin with lynfofast (solution of tecmesio) and the absorption was observed by gamma camera. Seven days after the FL she underwent the same study; we observed no absorption by the lymphatic, concluding that a week after surgery, the lymphatic network was still damaged. To study the venous return during surgery, a fine catheter was introduced into the external jugular vein up to the mandibular border to measure the peripheral pressure. Following platysma plication the pressure rose, and again after a simple bandage, but with an elastic bandage it increased even further, diminishing considerably when it was released. Hence, platysma plication and the elastic bandage on the neck augment the venous congestion of the face. There are diseases that produce and can prolong the surgical edema: cardiac, hepatic, and renal insufficiencies, hypothyroidism, malnutrition, etc. According to these factors, the post-op edema can be predicted, the surgeon can choose between a wide dissection or a medial surgery, depending on the social or employment compromises the patient has, or the patient must accept a prolonged recovery if a complex surgery is necessary. Operative

  2. Postoperative hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Nappo, Robert W; Paugh-Miller, Jennifer L; Ross, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Hyperkalemia occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and is of particular concern for those who have undergone surgery, with postoperative care provided by clinicians of many disciplines. This review describes the normal physiology and how multiple perioperative factors can disrupt potassium homeostasis and lead to severe elevations in plasma potassium concentration. The pathophysiologic basis of diverse causes of hyperkalemia was used to broadly classify etiologies into those with altered potassium distribution (e.g. increased potassium release from cells or other transcellular shifts), reduced urinary excretion (e.g. reduced sodium delivery, volume depletion, and hypoaldosteronism), or an exogenous potassium load (e.g. blood transfusions). Surgical conditions of particular concern involve: rhabdomyolysis from malpositioning, trauma or medications; bariatric surgery; vascular procedures with tissue ischemia; acidosis; hypovolemia; and volume or blood product resuscitation. Certain acute conditions and chronic co-morbidities present particular risk. These include chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, many outpatient preoperative medications (e.g. beta blockers, salt substitutes), and inpatient agents (e.g. succinylcholine, hyperosmolar volume expanders). Clinicians need to be aware of these pathophysiologic mechanisms for developing perioperative hyperkalemia as many of the risks can be minimized or avoided. PMID:25698564

  3. [Cardiac evaluation before non-cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Menzenbach, Jan; Boehm, Olaf

    2016-07-01

    Before non-cardiac surgery, evaluation of cardiac function is no frequent part of surgical treatment. European societies of anesthesiology and cardiology published consensus-guidelines in 2014 to present a reasonable approach for preoperative evaluation. This paper intends to differentiate the composite of perioperative risk and to display the guidelines methodical approach to handle it. Features to identify patients at risk from an ageing population with comorbidities, are the classification of surgical risk, functional capacity and risk indices. Application of diagnostic means, should be used adjusted to this risk estimation. Cardiac biomarkers are useful to discover risk of complications or mortality, that cannot be assessed by clinical signs. After preoperative optimization and perioperative cardiac protection, the observation of the postoperative period remains, to prohibit complications or even death. In consideration of limited resources of intensive care department, postoperative ward rounds beyond intensive care units are considered to be an appropriate instrument to avoid or recognize complications early to reduce postoperative mortality. PMID:27479258

  4. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pediatric Cardiomyopathies Updated:Oct 22,2015 Patient education material ... oxygen or high blood pressure. According to the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, one in every 100,000 children ...

  5. Myocarditis - pediatric

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in an infant or young child. ... infections such as Lyme disease. Other causes of pediatric myocarditis include: Allergic reactions to certain medicines Exposure ...

  6. Pediatric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Goun; Lim, Byung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric stroke is relatively rare but may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Along with the advance of brain imaging technology and clinical awareness, diagnosis of pediatric stroke is increasing wordwide. Pediatric stroke differs from adults in variable risk factor/etiologies, diverse and nonspecific clinical presentation depending on ages. This review will be discussed pediatric stroke focusing on their clinical presentations, diagnosis and etiologies/risk factors. PMID:26180605

  7. Imaging in pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Monti, L; Soglia, G; Tomà, P

    2016-05-01

    Liver transplantation has become an established curative treatment in adult patients with acute or chronic end-stage liver diseases. In pediatric cases the number of cadaveric donor livers is not sufficient and to overcome the shortage of appropriate-sized whole liver grafts, technical variants of liver transplantation have been practiced. Reduced-size cadaveric and split cadaveric allografts have become an important therapeutic option, expanding the availability of size-appropriate organs for pediatric recipients with terminal liver disease. The number of pediatric deaths awaiting liver transplantation has been reduced by the introduction of living-related liver transplantation, developed to overcome the shortage of suitable grafts for children. It is important for radiologists to know that children have distinct imaging of liver transplantation that distinguish them from adults. A multidisciplinary pediatric liver transplantation team should be skilled in pediatric conditions and in associated processes, risks and complications. Radiologists should know the common pediatric liver diseases that lead to liver transplantation, the anastomotic techniques and the expected postoperative imaging findings. The aim of this study is to illustrate the role of non-invasive imaging such us ultrasonography, color Doppler ultrasonography, multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of pediatric liver transplantation and in potential liver donors. PMID:26909515

  8. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  9. Pediatric esophageal substitution by gastric pull-up and gastric tube

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Subhasis Roy; Yadav, Partap Singh; Khan, Niyaz Ahmed; Shah, Shalu; Debnath, Pinaki Ranjan; Kumar, Virendra; Chadha, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to report the results of pediatric esophageal substitution by gastric pull-up (GPU) and gastric tube (GT) from a tertiary care pediatric center. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of the surgical techniques, results, complications, and final outcome of all pediatric patients who underwent esophageal substitution in a single institution was performed. Results: Twenty-four esophageal substitutions were performed over 15-year period. The indications were pure esophageal atresia (EA)-19, EA with distal trachea-esophageal fistula-2, EA with proximal pouch fistula-1, and esophageal stricture in two patients. Mean age and weight at operation were 17 months and 9.5 kg, respectively. GPU was the most common procedure (19) followed by reverse GT (4) and gastric fundal tube (1). Posterior mediastinal and retrosternal routes were used in 17 and 7 cases, respectively. Major complications included three deaths in GPU cases resulting from postoperative tachyarrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest, cervical anastomotic leak-17, and anastomotic stricture in six cases. Perioperative tachyarrhythmias (10/19) and transient hypertension (2/19) were observed in GPU patients, and they were managed with beta blocker drugs. Postoperative ventilation in Intensive Care Unit was performed for all GPU, but none of the GT patients. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 15 years that showed short-term feeding difficulties and no major growth-related problems. Conclusions: Perioperative tachyarrhythmias are common following GPU which mandates close intensive care monitoring with ventilation and judicious use of beta blocking drugs. Retrosternal GT with a staged neck anastomosis can be performed without postoperative ventilation. PMID:27365902

  10. Trending ability and limitations of transpulmonary thermodilution and pulse contour cardiac output measurement in cats as a model for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kutter, Annette P N; Bektas, Rima N; Hofer, Christoph K; Larenza Menzies, M Paula; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula

    2015-06-01

    The present study evaluated transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) and pulse contour cardiac output (PCCO) both measured by the PiCCO Plus™ monitor (Pulsion Medical Systems, Munich, Germany) against pulmonary artery thermodilution (PATD) in cats as a hemodynamic model for small children. A wide range of cardiac outputs (CO) was simultaneously measured. Accuracy and trending abilities were critically evaluated. Three cats were studied under isoflurane anesthesia and 160 CO measurements were performed with 3 mL ice-cold 5 % dextrose with PATD and TPTD. The results were compared with the PCCO measurement before the bolus measurement. Cardiac output was manipulated from 32 to 224 mL/kg/min by dobutamine, dopamine, phenylephrine, medetomidine and increased concentrations of isoflurane. Bland-Altman analysis, concordance and polar plot analysis were performed to assess accuracy and trending ability. TPTD was measuring constantly higher than PATD with a mean bias of 73 mL/kg/min and limits of agreement of 34-112 mL/kg/min, a concordance rate of 94 % and a mean polar angle of -5° with radial limits of agreement (RLOA) of 33°. Concordance rate of the PCCO versus PATD was 82 % with a mean polar angle of -10° and RLOA of 46° and versus TPTD 90 % with a mean polar angle of -6° and RLOA of 46°. Both tested methods constantly overestimated simultaneous PATD measurements. The small size, low flows and the relative short catheter not reaching the abdominal aorta may explain that. However TPTD tracked changes accurately opposed to a poor trending ability of the PCCO measurement. PMID:25228023

  11. Cardiac Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? Cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) is a medically supervised program ... be designed to meet your needs. The Cardiac Rehabilitation Team Cardiac rehab involves a long-term commitment ...

  12. Pediatric cardiothoracic program in Malaysia: a study based on the outcome of the program.

    PubMed

    Piros Kulandasamy Pillai, Cornelius; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Justin Lawrence, Patrick; Yamamoto, Eiko; Reyer, Joshua A; Hamajima1, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Vulnerable communities in Malaysia have been facing issues of accessibility and availability for pediatric cardiac services for years due to long waiting times, high costs and a lack of pediatric cardiothoracic surgeons. To ease this situation, the government has allocated a certain amount of funds, introduced through the Pediatric Cardiothoracic Program (PCP), in which the patients are transported to the Narayana Health Institute of Cardiac Science (NH) in India to receive a heart operation following an eligibility check at MediAssist4U Sdn Bhd in Selangor, Malaysia, a facility appointed by the NH. This study aimed to determine the demographic incidence of congenital heart diseases of patients in this program and to evaluate the outcome of the program in association with post-operative mortality rate and the beneficial factors of the program. In this study, 241 patients who participated in this program from August 2008 to September 2012 were reviewed. Fisher's exact tests were applied to calculate p-values of categorical data. Out of 241, 11 patients were rejected because of their poor health condition for flight transportation to India, leaving 230 patients for analysis. The majority of patients were 1 to 4 years of age (57.8%), Malays (61.7%), from families of monthly household income less than RM 1,500 (86.5%) and with primary school-educated parents (86.5%). Patients could apply from any government hospital in Malaysia, but 34.8% of the patients were from the state of Johor. The region (Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia) of patients seeking pediatric cardiac services was significantly associated with race (p<0.001), low household income (p<0.001) and low education background of parents (p=0.004). The associations between the age group and diagnosis group (p=0.010) and between duration of hospitalization and outcome of medical management (p=0.013) were significant. Post-operative mortality rate was 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.5-4.4). In conclusion, the

  13. Pediatric cardiothoracic program in Malaysia: a study based on the outcome of the program

    PubMed Central

    Piros Kulandasamy Pillai, Cornelius; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Justin Lawrence, Patrick; Yamamoto, Eiko; Reyer, Joshua A.; Hamajima1, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vulnerable communities in Malaysia have been facing issues of accessibility and availability for pediatric cardiac services for years due to long waiting times, high costs and a lack of pediatric cardiothoracic surgeons. To ease this situation, the government has allocated a certain amount of funds, introduced through the Pediatric Cardiothoracic Program (PCP), in which the patients are transported to the Narayana Health Institute of Cardiac Science (NH) in India to receive a heart operation following an eligibility check at MediAssist4U Sdn Bhd in Selangor, Malaysia, a facility appointed by the NH. This study aimed to determine the demographic incidence of congenital heart diseases of patients in this program and to evaluate the outcome of the program in association with post-operative mortality rate and the beneficial factors of the program. In this study, 241 patients who participated in this program from August 2008 to September 2012 were reviewed. Fisher’s exact tests were applied to calculate p-values of categorical data. Out of 241, 11 patients were rejected because of their poor health condition for flight transportation to India, leaving 230 patients for analysis. The majority of patients were 1 to 4 years of age (57.8%), Malays (61.7%), from families of monthly household income less than RM 1,500 (86.5%) and with primary school-educated parents (86.5%). Patients could apply from any government hospital in Malaysia, but 34.8% of the patients were from the state of Johor. The region (Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia) of patients seeking pediatric cardiac services was significantly associated with race (p<0.001), low household income (p<0.001) and low education background of parents (p=0.004). The associations between the age group and diagnosis group (p=0.010) and between duration of hospitalization and outcome of medical management (p=0.013) were significant. Post-operative mortality rate was 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.5–4.4). In

  14. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  15. Aneurysm of the Left Coronary Artery in Postoperative Bland-White-Garland Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Valenzuela, Nathalie Jeanne Magioli; Silva, Guilherme Ricardo Nunes

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) or Bland-White-Garland syndrome, present the challenges of performing a differential diagnosis, and discuss the treatment of the syndrome. Although ALCAPA is a rare congenital heart disease, it is one of the most common causes of myocardial ischemia in childhood and presents a diagnostic challenge. A four-year-old girl was referred to a pediatric cardiologist for evaluation of mitral valve regurgitation murmur and heart failure. The transthoracic echocardiogram demonstrated the left coronary artery (LCA) not arising from the aorta, presence of coronary collateral circulation, and moderate mitral valve regurgitation. ALCAPA was confirmed using angiotomography. The LCA was surgically reimplanted into the aorta. After 3 years of postoperative follow-up, the patient developed an LCA aneurysm. Diagnosis of cardiac ischemia in childhood remains a challenge, and careful evaluation of coronary arteries on the echocardiogram is an important tool. In this report, we present a case of ALCAPA with an uncommon postoperative outcome. PMID:26770839

  16. Aneurysm of the Left Coronary Artery in Postoperative Bland-White-Garland Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Valenzuela, Nathalie Jeanne Magioli; Silva, Guilherme Ricardo Nunes

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of anomalous left coronary artery from the pulmonary artery (ALCAPA) or Bland-White-Garland syndrome, present the challenges of performing a differential diagnosis, and discuss the treatment of the syndrome. Although ALCAPA is a rare congenital heart disease, it is one of the most common causes of myocardial ischemia in childhood and presents a diagnostic challenge. A four-year-old girl was referred to a pediatric cardiologist for evaluation of mitral valve regurgitation murmur and heart failure. The transthoracic echocardiogram demonstrated the left coronary artery (LCA) not arising from the aorta, presence of coronary collateral circulation, and moderate mitral valve regurgitation. ALCAPA was confirmed using angiotomography. The LCA was surgically reimplanted into the aorta. After 3 years of postoperative follow-up, the patient developed an LCA aneurysm. Diagnosis of cardiac ischemia in childhood remains a challenge, and careful evaluation of coronary arteries on the echocardiogram is an important tool. In this report, we present a case of ALCAPA with an uncommon postoperative outcome. PMID:26770839

  17. Radiofrequency catheter ablation in pediatric patients with supraventricular arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, L A; Lobban, J H; Schmidt, S B

    1995-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) ablation of foci leading to abnormal cardiac rhythms is rapidly becoming the procedure of choice in the management of arrhythmias in adults. This report reviews our initial experience with RF ablation in the pediatric population. PMID:8533398

  18. Ventricular assist devices in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, A; Netz, H

    2001-01-01

    The implantation of a mechanical circulatory device for end-stage ventricular failure is a possible therapeutic approach in adult and pediatric cardiac surgery and cardiology. The aim of this article is to present mechanical circulatory assist devices used in infants and children with special emphasis on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, Berlin Heart assist device, centrifugal pump and Medos assist device. The success of long-term support with implantable ventricular assist devices in adults and children has led to their increasing use as a bridge to transplantation in patients with otherwise non-treatable left ventricular failure, by transforming a terminal phase heart condition into a treatable cardiopathy. Such therapy allows rehabilitation of patients before elective cardiac transplantation (by removing contraindications to transplantation mainly represented by organ impairment) or acting as a bridge to recovery of the native left ventricular function (depending on underlying cardiac disease). Treatment may also involve permanent device implantation when cardiac transplantation is contraindicated. Indications for the implantation of assisted circulation include all states of cardiac failure that are reversible within a variable period of time or that require heart transplantation. This article will address the current status of ventricular assist devices by examining historical aspects of its development, current technical issues and clinical features of pediatric ventricular assist devices, including indications and contraindications for support. PMID:22368605

  19. History of German pediatric cardiology.

    PubMed

    Heintzen, P

    2002-01-01

    Due to the isolation of German medicine in World War II accompanied by the destruction of many hospitals, German pediatricians did not show any serious interest in the treatment of children with congenital heart diseases, nor did they take notice of the progress achieved by Helen Taussig, Alfred Blalock and other cardiologists and surgeons in the western world. This problem was even worse in East Germany. Only a few German internists and forward-looking surgeons were able and ready to take care of this group of principally operable children in places like Bonn/Düsseldorf, Marburg/Munich, Berlin, and Hamburg. However, in the early 1950s some directors of pediatrics at university hospitals--largely motivated by the cardiac surgeons--allowed or even encouraged younger colleagues to concentrate on pediatric cardiology and to begin application of heart catheterization and angiocardiography. In 1960 a group of colleagues interested in pediatric cardiology met for the first time in Frankfurt and became the nucleus of the future "working group" (1969) and finally the "German Society of Pediatric Cardiology" (1974). By 1972 pediatric cardiology had been approved as an independent (sub)specialty. Colleagues and friends from surrounding countries (Austria, Great Britain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the Netherlands) and also from the US and some eastern countries were either members or regular guests during or between the meetings. Pediatric cardiology is now represented in Germany by specialized practitioners, trainees and assistants who work in both community and university hospitals, and in specialized departments. Due to the foresightedness of the Chief of Pediatrics, Prof. G. Joppich, the first Chair of Pediatric Cardiology was founded in Göttingen in 1960 under the direction of A. Beuren. Another model of interdisciplinary cooperation between pediatric cardiologists, bioengineers, mathematicians and computer scientists was established in Kiel in 1966. In other places

  20. Pain management in the pediatric surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vance Y; Zenger, David; Steele, Scott R

    2012-06-01

    Surgeons performing painful, invasive procedures in pediatric patients must be cognizant of both the potential short- and long-term detrimental effects of inadequate analgesia. This article reviews the available tools, sedation procedures, the management of intraoperative, postoperative, and postprocedural pain, and the issues surrounding neonatal addiction. PMID:22595704

  1. Cardiac Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Cardiac Catheterization? Cardiac catheterization (KATH-eh-ter-ih-ZA-shun) is a ... disease. Doctors also can use ultrasound during cardiac catheterization to see blockages in the coronary arteries. Ultrasound ...

  2. Pediatric Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  3. Pediatric Terminology

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is working with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other resea

  4. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... Untreated pediatric sleep apnea may lead to: High blood pressure Heart or lung problems Slow growth and development

  5. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Last revised on February 12, 2016 Related Digital Libraries Pediatric GeneralPediatrics.com - the general pediatrician's view of the Internet PediatricEducation.org - a pediatric digital library and learning collaboratory intended to serve as a ...

  6. Cardiac advanced life support-surgical guideline: overview and implementation.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac arrest in the immediate postoperative recovery period in a patient who underwent cardiac surgery is typically related to reversible causes-tamponade, bleeding, ventricular arrhythmias, or heart blocks associated with conduction problems. When treated promptly, 17% to 79% of patients who experience cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery survive to discharge. The Cardiac Advanced Life Support-Surgical (CALS-S) guideline provides a standardized algorithm approach to resuscitation of patients who experience cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery. The purpose of this article is to discuss the CALS-S guideline and how to implement it. PMID:24752025

  7. Pediatric Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinich, Kathleen D.; Reed, Matthew P.

    Anthropometry is the measurement of human size, shape, and physical capabilities. Most pediatric anthropometry data are gathered to describe child growth patterns, but data on body size, mass distribution, range of motion, and posture are used to develop crash test dummies and computational models of child occupants. Pediatric anthropometry data are also used to determine child restraint dimensions, so they will accommodate the applicable population of child occupants.

  8. Prediction error and accuracy of intraocular lens power calculation in pediatric patient comparing SRK II and Pediatric IOL Calculator

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite growing number of intraocular lens power calculation formulas, there is no evidence that these formulas have good predictive accuracy in pediatric, whose eyes are still undergoing rapid growth and refractive changes. This study is intended to compare the prediction error and the accuracy of predictability of intraocular lens power calculation in pediatric patients at 3 month post cataract surgery with primary implantation of an intraocular lens using SRK II versus Pediatric IOL Calculator for pediatric intraocular lens calculation. Pediatric IOL Calculator is a modification of SRK II using Holladay algorithm. This program attempts to predict the refraction of a pseudophakic child as he grows, using a Holladay algorithm model. This model is based on refraction measurements of pediatric aphakic eyes. Pediatric IOL Calculator uses computer software for intraocular lens calculation. Methods This comparative study consists of 31 eyes (24 patients) that successfully underwent cataract surgery and intraocular lens implantations. All patients were 12 years old and below (range: 4 months to 12 years old). Patients were randomized into 2 groups; SRK II group and Pediatric IOL Calculator group using envelope technique sampling procedure. Intraocular lens power calculations were made using either SRK II or Pediatric IOL Calculator for pediatric intraocular lens calculation based on the printed technique selected for every patient. Thirteen patients were assigned for SRK II group and another 11 patients for Pediatric IOL Calculator group. For SRK II group, the predicted postoperative refraction is based on the patient's axial length and is aimed for emmetropic at the time of surgery. However for Pediatric IOL Calculator group, the predicted postoperative refraction is aimed for emmetropic spherical equivalent at age 2 years old. The postoperative refractive outcome was taken as the spherical equivalent of the refraction at 3 month postoperative follow-up. The

  9. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care. PMID:24247310

  10. Postoperative Spine Infections.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit Yuvaraj; Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  11. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  12. Postoperative ventilatory and circulatory effects of heating after aortocoronary bypass surgery. Postoperative external heat supply.

    PubMed

    Joachimsson, P O; Nyström, S O; Tydén, H

    1987-08-01

    The effects of postoperative external heat supply on shivering, oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, ventilatory requirements and haemodynamic variables were studied postoperatively after aortocoronary bypass surgery in 24 men with stable angina pectoris. After hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) at 25 degrees C, the patients were rewarmed to a nasopharyngeal temperature of at least 38 degrees C, resulting in a rectal temperature of about 34 degrees C before termination of CPB. Twelve patients, forming the control group, were given no other external heat supply. In another group (n = 12), the "radiant heat supply group", additional external heat was provided postoperatively, the main source of which was a thermal ceiling supplemented with heated, humidified respiratory gases. In this latter group the postoperative rewarming was accomplished earlier and was converted into a mainly passive process. Shivering, oxygen uptake, CO2 production and ventilation volumes were significantly reduced compared with the control group. Cardiac index and stroke index were higher and systemic oxygen extraction was lower in the radiant heat supply group. Postoperative hypertension and vasoconstriction were greatly decreased, suggesting that residual hypothermia is an important cause of the postoperative vasoconstriction. PMID:3115049

  13. Impact of Postoperative Venous Thromboembolism on Postoperative Morbidity, Mortality, and Resource Utilization after Hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Newhook, Timothy E; LaPar, Damien J; Walters, Dustin M; Gupta, Shruti; Jolissaint, Joshua S; Adams, Reid B; Brayman, Kenneth L; Zaydfudim, Victor M; Bauer, Todd W

    2015-12-01

    The impact of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after hepatectomy on patient morbidity, mortality, and resource usage remains poorly defined. Better understanding of thromboembolic complications is needed to improve perioperative management and overall outcomes. About 3973 patients underwent hepatectomy within NSQIP between 2005 and 2008. Patient characteristics, operative features, and postoperative correlates of VTE were compared with identify risk factors for VTE and to assess its overall impact on postoperative outcomes. Overall incidence of postoperative VTE was 2.4 per cent. Risk factors for postoperative VTE included older age, male gender, compromised functional status, degree of intraoperative blood transfusion, preoperative albumin level (all P < 0.05), and extent of hepatectomy (P = 0.004). Importantly, major postoperative complications, including acute renal failure, pneumonia, sepsis, septic shock, reintubation, prolonged ventilation, cardiac arrest, and reoperation were all associated with higher rates of VTE (all P < 0.05). Operative mortality was increased among patients with VTE (6.5% vs 2.4%, P = 0.03), and patients with VTE had a 2-fold increase in hospital length of stay (12.0 vs 6.0 days, P < 0.001). Postoperative VTE remains a significant source of morbidity, mortality, and increased resource usage after hepatectomy in the United States. Routine aggressive VTE prophylaxis measures are imperative to avoid development of VTE among patients requiring hepatectomy. PMID:26736156

  14. Pediatric sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Adrienne G; McCulloh, Russell J

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in children worldwide. Although the diagnosis and management of sepsis in infants and children is largely influenced by studies done in adults, there are important considerations relevant for pediatrics. This article highlights pediatric-specific issues related to the definition of sepsis and its epidemiology and management. We review how the capacity of the immune system to respond to infection develops over early life. We also bring attention to primary immune deficiencies that should be considered in children recurrently infected with specific types of organisms. The management of pediatric sepsis must be tailored to the child’s age and immune capacity, and to the site, severity, and source of the infection. It is important for clinicians to be aware of infection-related syndromes that primarily affect children. Although children in developed countries are more likely to survive severe infections than adults, many survivors have chronic health impairments. PMID:24225404

  15. Postoperative Care of the Transplanted Patient

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Gajarski, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    The successful delivery of optimal peri-operative care to pediatric heart transplant recipients is a vital determinant of their overall outcomes. The practitioner caring for these patients must be familiar with and treat multiple simultaneous issues in a patient who may have been critically ill preoperatively. In addition to the complexities involved in treating any child following cardiac surgery, caretakers of newly transplanted patients encounter multiple transplant-specific issues. This chapter details peri-operative management strategies, frequently encountered early morbidities, initiation of immunosuppression including induction, and short-term outcomes. PMID:22548034

  16. Postoperative analgesia in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Elisabeth; Hoffmann, Clément; Keita, Hawa

    2013-02-01

    Elderly people represent the fastest-growing segment of our society and undergo surgery more frequently than other age groups. Effective postoperative analgesia is essential in these patients because inadequate pain control after surgery is associated with adverse outcomes in elderly patients. However, management of postoperative pain in older patients may be complicated by a number of factors, including a higher risk of age- and disease-related changes in physiology and disease-drug and drug-drug interactions. Physiological changes related to aging need to be carefully considered because aging is individualized and progressive. Assessment of pain management needs to include chronological age, biological age with regard to renal, liver and cardiac functions, and the individual profile of pathology and prescribed medications. In addition, ways in which pain should be assessed, particularly in patients with cognitive impairment, must be considered. Cognitively intact older patients can use most commonly used unidimensional pain scales such as the visual analogue scale (VAS), verbal rating scale (VRS), numeric rating scale (NRS) and facial pain scale (FPS). VRS and NRS are the most appropriate pain scales for the elderly. In older patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment, the VRS is a better tool. For severe cognitively impaired older patients, behavioural scales validated in the postoperative context, such as Doloplus-2 or Algoplus, are appropriate. For postoperative pain treatment, most drugs (e.g. paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, nefopam, tramadol, codeine, morphine, local anaesthetics), techniques (e.g. intravenous morphine titration, subcutaneous morphine, intravenous or epidural patient-controlled analgesia, intrathecal morphine, peripheral nerve block) and strategies (e.g. anticipated intraoperative analgesia or multimodal analgesia) used for acute pain management can be used in older patients. However, in view of pharmacokinetic

  17. Pediatric rosacea.

    PubMed

    Kellen, Roselyn; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2016-07-01

    Because rosacea is uncommon in the pediatric population, care must be taken to exclude other papulopustular disorders. Children can present with vascular, papulopustular, and/or ocular findings. Importantly, ocular symptoms can appear before the cutaneous symptoms of rosacea, leading to misdiagnosis. Rosacea is a clinical diagnosis, but histopathologic examination typically reveals dilated vessels, perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates in the upper dermis, elastosis, and disorganization of the upper dermal connective tissue. Treatment involves avoiding known triggers and utilizing topical and/or systemic therapies. Although treatment can control flares, pediatric rosacea often persists into adulthood. PMID:27529708

  18. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:27542645

  19. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The key elements of pathophysiology that impact and match the timing, intensity, duration, and variability of the hypoxic-ischemic insult to evidence-based interventions are reviewed. Exciting discoveries in basic and applied-science laboratories are now relevant for specific subpopulations of pediatric cardiac arrest victims and circumstances (eg, ventricular fibrillation, neonates, congenital heart disease, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Improving the quality of interventions is increasingly recognized as a key factor for improving outcomes. Evolving training strategies include simulation training, just-in-time and just-in-place training, and crisis-team training. The difficult issue of when to discontinue resuscitative efforts is addressed. Outcomes from pediatric cardiac arrests are improving. Advances in resuscitation science and state-of-the-art implementation techniques provide the opportunity for further improvement in outcomes among children after cardiac arrest. PMID:18977991

  20. Stem Cell Therapy for Pediatric Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Selem, Sarah M.; Kaushal, Sunjay; Hare, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy is a serious and life-threatening disorder in children. It is the most common form of pediatric cardiomyopathy. Therapy for this condition has varied little over the last several decades and mortality continues to be high. Currently, children with dilated cardiomyopathy are treated with pharmacological agents and mechanical support, but most require heart transplantation and survival rates are not optimal. The lack of common treatment guidelines and inadequate survival rates after transplantation necessitates more therapeutic clinical trials. Stem cell and cell-based therapies offer an innovative approach to restore cardiac structure and function towards normal, possibly reducing the need for aggressive therapies and cardiac transplantation. Mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac stem cells may be the most promising cell types for treating children with dilated cardiomyopathy. The medical community must begin a systematic investigation of the benefits of current and novel treatments such as stem cell therapies for treating pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:23666883

  1. Circadian variation in unexpected postoperative death.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H; Ramsing, T; Kehlet, H

    1992-12-01

    Unexpected deaths still occur following major surgical procedures. The cause is often unknown but may be cardiac or thromboembolic in nature. Postoperative ischaemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death may be triggered by episodic or constant arterial hypoxaemia, which increases during the night. This study examined the circadian variation of sudden unexpected death following abdominal surgery between 1985 and 1989 inclusive. Deaths were divided into those occurring during the day (08.00-16.00 hours), evening (16.00-24.00 hours) and night (24.00-08.00 hours). Twenty-three deaths were considered to have been totally unexpected. Of 16 such patients undergoing autopsy, pulmonary embolism was the cause of death in five. In the remaining 11 patients, death occurred at night in eight (P < 0.005). Five of the seven patients without an autopsy died at night (P < 0.04); overall, 13 of 18 unexpected deaths occurred at night-time. These results suggest a need for further studies of sleep- and respiration-related effects on postoperative nocturnal cardiac function. The efficacy of monitoring during this apparent high-risk period should be evaluated. PMID:1486424

  2. Pediatric Cardiovascular Drug Trials, Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jennifer S.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Pasquali, Sara K.

    2011-01-01

    Few drugs have been labeled for pediatric cardiovascular indications and many children with cardiac disease are prescribed drugs off-label. Recent initiatives have narrowed this gap and as a result there are an increasing number of cardiology trials in the pediatric population. Many studies, however, have either failed to show a dose response in children or have not shown efficacy in children when they have established efficacy in adults. Clinical trials are challenging in children; many factors such as lack of development of a liquid formulation, failure to fully incorporate pharmacokinetic information into trial design, poor dose selection, the lack of clinical equipoise, and the use of difficult surrogate and composite primary endpoints have led to the difficulties and failures observed in several pediatric cardiovascular trials. These lessons learned may help to inform future pediatric clinical trial development. PMID:21242809

  3. Ultrasonography: Applications in Pediatric Abdomen.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a valuable imaging tool for evaluation of different clinical conditions in children, in general and abdominal conditions, in particular. The interest in US derives primarily from the lack of ionizing radiation exposure, low cost, portability, real-time imaging and Doppler capabilities. In addition, US application requires no preparation or sedation, making it particularly attractive in the pediatric population. Because of these advantages, US has been adopted as the primary imaging tool for evaluation of a number of pediatric abdominal conditions that would have involved the use of ionising radiation in the past, e.g., pyloric stenosis, intussusception and various renal and bladder abnormalities, to name a few. Certain limitations, however, are inherent to US including large body habitus, excessive bowel gas, postoperative state and the learning curve. In addition, pediatric US is particularly challenging as the children are frequently unable to co-operate for breath holding and many of them are crying during the scanning. In the present review, the authors discuss the various applications of US in the evaluation of pediatric abdomen. PMID:26973334

  4. Myocardial ischemia--association with perioperative cardiac morbidity.

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The development of ambulatory electrocardiographic recorders and analysers and the application of transesophageal echocardiography in the mid-1980's enabled investigators to quantify and describe the occurrence of silent as well as symptomatic ischemia in the perioperative period. Several technical advances which have recently occurred in ECG monitoring include the use of miniaturized digital computing equipment to store and analyze data. In addition, real time ST-segment analysis has become widely available on multicomponent monitors in both the operating room and intensive care units. The incidence of perioperative myocardial ischemia depends on the patient population, the surgical procedure, and the monitoring technique used. Several studies in the early 1990's have shown that cardiac morbidity in patients undergoing major, noncardiac surgery is best predicted by postoperative myocardial ischemia, rather than tradition preoperative clinical predictors. Long duration postoperative ischemia may be the factor most significantly associated with adverse cardiac outcome. Postoperative pain, physiological and emotional stress may all combine to cause tachycardia, hypertension, increase in cardiac output, and fluid shifts which, in high risk patients, might result in subendocardial ischemia and eventual myocardial infarction. If postoperative myocardial ischemia is the cause of late postoperative myocardial infarction in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, then treatment of postoperative myocardial ischemia should reduce morbidity. In addition, reducing pain and stress and avoiding postoperative hypoxemia might prevent postoperative myocardial ischemia and minimize the need for extensive preoperative cardiac evaluation. PMID:7825338

  5. Pediatric ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two leading experts explore the benefits and limitations of pediatric ultrasonography, explaining the latest techniques for optimal imaging of specific body regions: the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, extremities, and soft tissues. Numerous illustrations emphasize significant points and combine with the text to show specifically what to look for when imaging children.

  6. Pediatric Trichotillomania

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Julie P.; Franklin, Martin E.

    2012-01-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is an impulse control disorder characterized by chronic hair-pulling, distress, and impairment. Although the negative effects of TTM are documented and often readily evident, there remains a paucity of psychopathology and treatment research on this disorder, particularly in pediatric populations. In an effort to improve assessment of pediatric TTM, several TTM-specific instruments for youth have now been developed to reliably identify symptoms and examine related phenomenology. Instrument development has now yielded instruments to evaluate TTM and related symptoms in the context of clinical trials of youth, and the first randomized controlled trial of any treatment for pediatric TTM was recently published. Using the initial pediatric TTM studies as building blocks, future research is now needed to create a stronger body of knowledge about the relative and combined efficacy of potential interventions for TTM in youth, as well as to examine the effects of TTM phenomenology and comorbidity on treatment outcome. Dissemination efforts must also be heightened for this knowledge to best reach these vulnerable populations. PMID:22437627

  7. Pediatric heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Stiasny, Brian; Dave, Hitendu; Cavigelli-Brunner, Anna; Balmer, Christian; Kretschmar, Oliver; Bürki, Christoph; Klauwer, Dietrich; Hübler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric heart transplantation (pHTx) represents a small (14%) but very important and particular part in the field of cardiac transplantation. This treatment has lifelong impact on children. To achieve the best short and especially long-term survival with adequate quality of life, which is of crucial importance for this young patient population, one has to realize and understand the differences with adult HTx. Indication for transplantation, waitlist management including ABO incompatible (ABOi) transplantation and immunosuppression differ. Although young transplant recipients are ultimately likely to be considered for re-transplantation. One has to distinguish between myopathy and complex congenital heart disease (CHD). The differences in anatomy and physiology make the surgical procedure much more complex and create unique challenges. These recipients need a well-organized and educated team with pediatric cardiologists and intensivists, including a high skilled surgeon, which is dedicated to pHTx. Therefore, these types of transplants are best concentrated in specialized centers to achieve promising outcome. PMID:25922739

  8. Postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Nett, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Although the long-term results following traditional total joint arthroplasty are excellent, postoperative pain management has been suboptimal. Under-treatment of pain is a focus of growing concern to the orthopedic community. Poorly controlled postoperative pain leads to undesirable outcomes, including immobility, stiffness, myocardial ischemia, atelectasis, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain. Over the past decade, the attempt to minimize postoperative complications, combined with the move toward minimally invasive surgery and early postoperative mobilization, has made pain management a critical aspect of joint replacement surgery. Effective protocols are currently available; all include a multimodal approach. Debate continues regarding the ideal approach; however, reliance on narcotic analgesia alone is suboptimal. PMID:20839719

  9. The Effects of Perioperative Music Interventions in Pediatric Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Marianne J. E.; Oliai Araghi, Sadaf; van Dijk, Monique; Jeekel, Johannes; Hunink, M. G. Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Objective Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing invasive surgery. Data Sources We searched 25 electronic databases from their first available date until October 2014. Study Selection Included were all randomized controlled trials with a parallel group, crossover or cluster design that included pediatric patients from 1 month to 18 years old undergoing minimally invasive or invasive surgical procedures, and receiving either live music therapy or recorded music. Data Extraction and Synthesis 4846 records were retrieved from the searches, 26 full text reports were evaluated and data was extracted by two independent investigators. Main Outcome Measures Pain was measured with the Visual Analogue Scale, the Coloured Analogue Scale and the Facial Pain Scale. Anxiety and distress were measured with an emotional index scale (not validated), the Spielberger short State Trait Anxiety Inventory and a Facial Affective Scale. Results Three RCTs were eligible for inclusion encompassing 196 orthopedic, cardiac and day surgery patients (age of 1 day to 18 years) receiving either live music therapy or recorded music. Overall a statistically significant positive effect was demonstrated on postoperative pain (SMD -1.07; 95%CI-2.08; -0.07) and on anxiety and distress (SMD -0.34 95% CI -0.66; -0.01 and SMD -0.50; 95% CI -0.84; - 0.16. Conclusions and Relevance This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that music interventions may have a statistically significant effect in reducing post-operative pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing a surgical procedure. Evidence from this review and other reviews suggests music therapy may be considered for clinical use. PMID:26247769

  10. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Keane JF, Lock JE, Fyler DC, eds. Nadas' Pediatric Cardiology . 2nd ed. St. Louis, MO; WB Saunders; ...

  11. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  12. Radioguided Parathyroidectomy Effective in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jocelyn F.; Jacobson, Kaitlin; Gosain, Ankush; Sippel, Rebecca S.; Chen, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Radioguided parathyroidectomy (RGP) has been shown to be effective in adult patients with hyperparathyroidism (HPT), but the utility of RGP in pediatric patients has not been systematically examined. It is not known if adult criteria for radioactive counts can accurately detect hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands in pediatric patients. The purpose of our study was to determine the utility of RGP in children with primary hyperparathyroidism. Materials and Methods A retrospective review of our prospectively maintained single-institution database for patients who underwent a RGP for primary HPT identified 1694 adult and 19 pediatric patients age 19 years or younger. From the adult population, we selected a control group matched 3 to 1 for gland weight and gender, and compared pre- and post-operative lab values, surgical findings, pathology, and radioguidance values between this and the pediatric group. Results Excised glands from pediatric patients were smaller than those in the total adult population (437 ± 60 mg vs. 718 ± 31 mg, p=0.0004). When controlled for gland weight, ex vivo counts as a percentage of background were lower in the pediatric group (51 ± 5% vs. 91 ± 11%, p=0.04). However, ex vivo radionuclide counts >20% of the background were found in 100% of pediatric patients and 95% of the adult matched control group. Conclusions All pediatric patients met the adult detection criteria for parathyroid tissue removal when a RGP was performed, and 100% cure was achieved. We conclude RGP is a useful treatment option for pediatric patients with primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:23827790

  13. Pediatric Abdominal Organ Transplantation: Current Indications, Techniques, and Imaging Findings.

    PubMed

    Stanescu, A Luana; Hryhorczuk, Anastasia L; Chang, Patricia T; Lee, Edward Y; Phillips, Grace S

    2016-03-01

    The anatomy, normal postoperative radiological appearance, and imaging features of common postoperative complications of pediatric abdominal transplants are reviewed, including renal, liver, and intestinal transplants. Doppler ultrasound is the mainstay of imaging after transplantation. Computed tomography (CT) and CT angiography, MR imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, MR cholangiopancreatography, conventional angiography, and nuclear medicine imaging may be used for problem-solving in pediatric transplant patients. Accurate and timely radiological diagnosis of transplant complications facilitates appropriate treatment and minimizes morbidity and mortality. PMID:26896225

  14. Pediatric Neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Nithya; Ramaiah, Ramesh; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children over 1 year of age. Knowledge about the age-specific types of injury and how to manage children with neurotrauma is essential to understanding and recognizing the extent and degree of injury and to optimize outcomes. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of pediatric neurotrauma. PMID:25024940

  15. Pediatric Virology

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Bernard

    1965-01-01

    Pediatric virology is not an isolàted discipline. Rather, the syndromes associated with viral infection are modified by the unique characteristics of infancy and childhood. Fortunately for the pediatrician, and certainly for children, viral infections in childhood are rarely fatal, and are almost never serious. Future efforts of the pediatrician and virologist should be directed toward increased fetal salvage as with rubella and the prevention of severe, viral lower respiratory tract disease. PMID:14298871

  16. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed. PMID:24580990

  17. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  18. Repair of congenital heart disease with associated pulmonary hypertension in children: what are the minimal investigative procedures? Consensus statement from the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces, Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Standardization of the diagnostic routine for children with congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-CHD) is crucial, in particular since inappropriate assignment to repair of the cardiac lesions (e.g., surgical repair in patients with elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) may be detrimental and associated with poor outcomes. Thus, members of the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute decided to conduct a survey aimed at collecting expert opinion from different institutions in several countries, covering many aspects of the management of PAH-CHD, from clinical recognition to noninvasive and invasive diagnostic procedures and immediate postoperative support. In privileged communities, the vast majority of children with congenital cardiac shunts are now treated early in life, on the basis of noninvasive diagnostic evaluation, and have an uneventful postoperative course, with no residual PAH. However, a small percentage of patients (older at presentation, with extracardiac syndromes or absence of clinical features of increased pulmonary blood flow, thus suggesting elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) remain at a higher risk of complications and unfavorable outcomes. These patients need a more sophisticated diagnostic approach, including invasive procedures. The authors emphasize that decision making regarding operability is based not only on cardiac catheterization data but also on the complete diagnostic picture, which includes the clinical history, physical examination, and all aspects of noninvasive evaluation. PMID:25006452

  19. Repair of congenital heart disease with associated pulmonary hypertension in children: what are the minimal investigative procedures? Consensus statement from the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces, Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Antonio Augusto; Barst, Robyn J; Haworth, Sheila Glennis; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Ivy, Dunbar; Kashour, Tarek; Kumar, Krishna; Harikrishnan, S; D'Alto, Michele; Thomaz, Ana Maria; Zorzanelli, Leína; Aiello, Vera D; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Santana, Maria Virginia T; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Banjar, Hanaa; Tamimi, Omar; Heath, Alexandra; Flores, Patricia C; Diaz, Gabriel; Sandoval, Julio; Kothari, Shyam; Moledina, Shahin; Gonçalves, Rilvani C; Barreto, Alessandra C; Binotto, Maria Angélica; Maia, Margarida; Al Habshan, Fahad; Adatia, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Standardization of the diagnostic routine for children with congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-CHD) is crucial, in particular since inappropriate assignment to repair of the cardiac lesions (e.g., surgical repair in patients with elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) may be detrimental and associated with poor outcomes. Thus, members of the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute decided to conduct a survey aimed at collecting expert opinion from different institutions in several countries, covering many aspects of the management of PAH-CHD, from clinical recognition to noninvasive and invasive diagnostic procedures and immediate postoperative support. In privileged communities, the vast majority of children with congenital cardiac shunts are now treated early in life, on the basis of noninvasive diagnostic evaluation, and have an uneventful postoperative course, with no residual PAH. However, a small percentage of patients (older at presentation, with extracardiac syndromes or absence of clinical features of increased pulmonary blood flow, thus suggesting elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) remain at a higher risk of complications and unfavorable outcomes. These patients need a more sophisticated diagnostic approach, including invasive procedures. The authors emphasize that decision making regarding operability is based not only on cardiac catheterization data but also on the complete diagnostic picture, which includes the clinical history, physical examination, and all aspects of noninvasive evaluation. PMID:25006452

  20. Total artificial heart in the pediatric patient with biventricular heart failure.

    PubMed

    Park, S S; Sanders, D B; Smith, B P; Ryan, J; Plasencia, J; Osborn, M B; Wellnitz, C M; Southard, R N; Pierce, C N; Arabia, F A; Lane, J; Frakes, D; Velez, D A; Pophal, S G; Nigro, J J

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support emerged for the pediatric population in the late 1980s as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. The Total Artificial Heart (TAH-t) (SynCardia Systems Inc., Tuscon, AZ) has been approved for compassionate use by the Food and Drug Administration for patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation since 1985 and has had FDA approval since 2004. However, of the 1,061 patients placed on the TAH-t, only 21 (2%) were under the age 18. SynCardia Systems, Inc. recommends a minimum patient body surface area (BSA) of 1.7 m(2), thus, limiting pediatric application of this device. This unique case report shares this pediatric institution's first experience with the TAH-t. A 14-year-old male was admitted with dilated cardiomyopathy and severe biventricular heart failure. The patient rapidly decompensated, requiring extracorporeal life support. An echocardiogram revealed severe biventricular dysfunction and diffuse clot formation in the left ventricle and outflow tract. The decision was made to transition to biventricular assist device. The biventricular failure and clot formation helped guide the team to the TAH-t, in spite of a BSA (1.5 m(2)) below the recommendation of 1.7 m(2). A computed tomography (CT) scan of the thorax, in conjunction with a novel three-dimensional (3D) modeling system and team, assisted in determining appropriate fit. Chest CT and 3D modeling following implantation were utilized to determine all major vascular structures were unobstructed and the bronchi were open. The virtual 3D model confirmed appropriate device fit with no evidence of compression to the left pulmonary veins. The postoperative course was complicated by a left lung opacification. The left lung anomalies proved to be atelectasis and improved with aggressive recruitment maneuvers. The patient was supported for 11 days prior to transplantation. Chest CT and 3D modeling were crucial in assessing whether the device would

  1. Intraosseous infusion in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Neal, C J; McKinley, D F

    1994-01-01

    In traumatically injured or medically unstable pediatric patients requiring resuscitation, gaining intravenous access often is frustrating for the physician and agonizing for the patient. Even when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is performed by trained professionals, cardiac arrests in children in the prehospital setting have a mortality of 79% to 100%. Immediate vascular access such as that obtained by intraosseous infusion improves survival. The intraosseous infusion technique uses the medullary cavity in the tibia as a "noncollapsible vein" for parenteral infusion. It is indicated in a child in shock or cardiac arrest when two attempts to access peripheral vasculature have failed or when more than 2 minutes have elapsed in the attempt to gain access. Epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, lidocaine, and volume expanders can be infused via the intraosseous route. Complications rarely occur. The technique described here is gaining acceptance in both prehospital and emergency department settings. PMID:8169160

  2. Odontogenic lesions in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qi-Gen; Shi, Shuang; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-05-01

    The purpose was to evaluate our 20-year experience of pediatric odontogenic lesions. Pediatric patients with a diagnosis of odontogenic lesion were identified. Three hundred ten patients were odontogenic; dentigerous cyst was seen in 62.0% of the cases. Most (70.2%) of them occurred in mixed dentition period, and it had a male preponderance. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor occurred in the permanent dentition period. It had an equal site distribution. Odontoma was seen in 20.0% of the cases. Its site of predilection was the mandible. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor. Most of the cases occurred in the permanent dentition period. It affected the male and female equally. Calcifying epithelioma odontogenic tumor was seen in 11.8% of the cases. All the lesions occurred in the primary dentition period. It had no sex or site preponderance. Myxoma was seen in 3.6% of the cases. It was most common in the permanent dentition period, and it was more frequent in the male. Iliac crest bone graft was successfully performed in 28 patients, postoperative infection occurred in 2 patients, and no donor-site dysfunctions were reported. The observed differences in lesion type and distribution in this study compared with previous researches may be attributable to genetic and geographic variation in the populations studied. Iliac crest bone graft was suggested for pediatric mandible reconstruction. PMID:24785745

  3. Cardiac surgery outcomes.

    PubMed

    Halpin, Linda S; Barnett, Scott D; Beachy, Jim

    2003-01-01

    Accrediting organizations and payers are demanding valid and reliable data that demonstrate the value of services. Federal agencies, healthcare industry groups, and healthcare watchdog groups are increasing the demand for public access to outcomes data. A new and growing outcomes dynamic is the information requested by prospective patients in an increasingly consumer-oriented business. Patients demand outcomes, and resources are developing to meet these demands. Physicians are increasingly confronted with requests for information about their mortality and morbidity rates, malpractice suits, and disciplinary actions received. For example, in Virginia, prospective patients have access to data provided by the nonprofit group Virginia Health Information. After numerous resolutions by the Virginia Senate since 1999, the prospective Virginia medical consumer now has access to several annual publications: Virginia Hospitals: A Consumer's Guide, 1999 Annual Report and Strategic Plan Update, and the 1999 Industry Report: Virginia Hospitals and Nursing Facilities. Consumers have access to cardiac outcomes data stratified by hospital, gender, and cardiac service line (cardiac surgery, noninvasive cardiology, and invasive cardiology). This is particularly relevant to IHI because Virginia Health Information specifically targets cardiac care. IHI has a sizable investment in cardiovascular outcomes and has found outcomes measurement and research are key to providing quality care. IHI's goal is to move from an outcomes management model to a disease management model. The hope is to incorporate all aspects of the patient's continuum of care, from preoperative and diagnostic services through cardiac interventions to postoperative rehabilitation. Furthermore, every step along the way will be supported with functional status and quality of life assessments. Although these goals are ambitious and expensive, the return on investment is high. PMID:14618772

  4. Pediatric Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kelly M; Malow, Beth A

    2016-05-01

    Insomnia in children is complex and frequently multifactorial. This review discusses the major categories of insomnia as well as common causes. The consequences of insomnia, including issues with mood, behavior, and cognition, are discussed. Sleep disorders are much more prevalent in certain pediatric populations, such as children with autism spectrum disorders. The evaluation of insomnia in children includes a focused history and examination and occasionally actigraphy or polysomnography. Behavioral and pharmacological therapies are discussed, as are future directions for research and clinical practice. PMID:26378738

  5. Pediatric radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton. (KRM)

  6. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. PMID:26515943

  7. Aortic Involvement in Pediatric Marfan syndrome: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ekhomu, Omonigho; Naheed, Zahra J

    2015-06-01

    Outlining specific protocols for the management of pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome has been challenging. This is mostly due to a dearth of clinical studies performed in pediatric patients. In Marfan syndrome, the major sources of morbidity and mortality relate to the cardiovascular system. In this review, we focus on aortic involvement seen in pediatric patients with Marfan syndrome, ranging from aortic dilatation to aortic rupture and heart failure. We discuss the histological, morphological, and pathogenetic basis of the cardiac manifestations seen in pediatric Marfan syndrome and use a specific case to depict our experienced range of cardiovascular manifestations. The survival for patients with Marfan syndrome may approach the expected survival for non-affected patients, with optimal management. With this potentiality in mind, we explore possible and actual management considerations for pediatric Marfan syndrome, examining both medical and surgical therapy modalities that can make the possibility of improved survival a reality. PMID:25669767

  8. Hemodynamics in a Pediatric Ascending Aorta Using a Viscoelastic Pediatric Blood Model.

    PubMed

    Good, Bryan C; Deutsch, Steven; Manning, Keefe B

    2016-04-01

    Congenital heart disease is the leading cause of infant death in the United States with over 36,000 newborns affected each year. Despite this growing problem there are few mechanical circulatory support devices designed specifically for pediatric and neonate patients. Previous research has been done investigating pediatric ventricular assist devices (PVADs) assuming blood to be a Newtonian fluid in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, ignoring its viscoelastic and shear-thinning properties. In contrast to adult VADs, PVADs may be more susceptible to hemolysis and thrombosis due to altered flow into the aorta, and therefore, a more accurate blood model should be used. A CFD solver that incorporates a modified Oldroyd-B model designed specifically for pediatric blood is used to investigate important hemodynamic parameters in a pediatric aortic model under pulsatile flow conditions. These results are compared to Newtonian blood simulations at three physiological pediatric hematocrits. Minor differences are seen in both velocity and wall shear stress (WSS) during early stages of the cardiac cycle between the Newtonian and viscoelastic models. During diastole, significant differences are seen in the velocities in the descending aorta (up to 12%) and in the aortic branches (up to 30%) between the two models. Additionally, peak WSS differences are seen between the models throughout the cardiac cycle. At the onset of diastole, peak WSS differences of 43% are seen between the Newtonian and viscoelastic model and between the 20 and 60% hematocrit viscoelastic models at peak systole of 41%. PMID:26159560

  9. Better outcome after pediatric resuscitation is still a dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Kishore, Kamal; Lata, Indu

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric cardiac arrest is not a single problem. Although most episodes of pediatric cardiac arrest occur as complications and progression of respiratory failure and shock. Sudden cardiac arrest may result from abrupt and unexpected arrhythmias. With a better-tailored therapy, we can optimize the outcome. In the hospital, cardiac arrest often develops as a progression of respiratory failure and shock. Typically half or more of pediatric victims of in-hospital arrest have pre-existing respiratory failure and one-third or more have shock, although these figures vary somewhat among reporting hospitals. When in-hospital respiratory arrest or failure is treated before the development of cardiac arrest, survival ranges from 60% to 97%. Bradyarrthmia, asystole or pulseless electric activity (PEA) were recorded as an initial rhythm in half or more of the recent reports of in-hospital cardiac arrest, with survival to hospital discharge ranging from 22% to 40%. Data allowing characterization of out of hospital pediatric arrest are limited, although existing data support the long-held belief that as with hospitalized children, cardiac arrest most often occurs as a progression of respiratory failure or shock to cardiac arrest with bradyasystole rhythm. Although VF (Ventricular fibrillation, is a very rapid, uncoordinated, ineffective series of contractions throughout the lower chambers of the heart. Unless stopped, these chaotic impulses are fatal) and VT (Ventricular tachycardia is a rapid heartbeat that originates in one of the ventricles of the heart. To be classified as tachycardia, the heart rate is usually at least 100 beats per minute) are not common out-of-cardiac arrest in children, they are more likely to be present with sudden, witnessed collapse, particularly among adolescents. Pre-hospital care till the late 1980s was mainly concerned with adult care, and the initial focus for pediatric resuscitation was provision of oxygen and ventilation, with initial rhythm at

  10. Cardiac metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, R; De‐Giorgio, F; Abbate, A; Silvestri, F

    2007-01-01

    Tumours metastatic to the heart (cardiac metastases) are among the least known and highly debated issues in oncology, and few systematic studies are devoted to this topic. Although primary cardiac tumours are extremely uncommon (various postmortem studies report rates between 0.001% and 0.28%), secondary tumours are not, and at least in theory, the heart can be metastasised by any malignant neoplasm able to spread to distant sites. In general, cardiac metastases are considered to be rare; however, when sought for, the incidence seems to be not as low as expected, ranging from 2.3% and 18.3%. Although no malignant tumours are known that diffuse preferentially to the heart, some do involve the heart more often than others—for example, melanoma and mediastinal primary tumours. This paper attempts to review the pathophysiology of cardiac metastatic disease, epidemiology and clinical presentation of cardiac metastases, and pathological characterisation of the lesions. PMID:17098886

  11. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  12. Fast-tracking in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Aps, C

    Fast-tracking in cardiac surgery evolved as the pressure on bed space in intensive therapy units (ITU) grew and clinical management improved. It relies on achieving a patient condition that allows for earlier extubation and postoperative management in alternative facilities to the ITU. PMID:7582363

  13. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  14. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  15. Pediatric tracheomalacia.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jose Carlos; Jennings, Russell W; Kim, Peter C W

    2016-06-01

    Tracheomalacia (TM) is defined as an increased collapsibility of the trachea due to structural anomalies of the tracheal cartilage and/or posterior membrane. Tracheomalacia has a wide range of etiologies but is most commonly present in children born with esophageal atresia and tracheal esophageal fistula. Clinical symptoms can range from minor expiratory stridor with typical barking cough to severe respiratory distress episodes to acute life-threatening events (ALTE). Although the majority of children have mild-to-moderate symptoms and will not need surgical intervention, some will need life-changing surgical treatment. This article examines the published pediatric literature on TM, discusses the details of clinical presentation, evaluation, diagnosis, and a variety of treatments. PMID:27301602

  16. Adolescent and Pediatric Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... abta.org Donate Now Menu Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ... or Complete our contact form Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ...

  17. Urinary tract infection in children after cardiac surgery: Incidence, causes, risk factors and outcomes in a single-center study.

    PubMed

    Kabbani, Mohamed S; Ismail, Sameh R; Fatima, Anis; Shafi, Rehana; Idris, Julinar A; Mehmood, Akhter; Singh, Reetam K; Elbarabry, Mahmoud; Hijazi, Omar; Hussein, Mohamed A

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infection (UTI) increases hospitalization, cost and morbidity. In this cohort study, we aimed to determine the incidence, risk factors, etiology and outcomes of UTIs in post-operative cardiac children. To this end, we studied all post-operative patients admitted to the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (PCICU) in 2012, and we divided the patients into two groups: the UTI (UTI group) and the non-UTI (control group). We compared both groups for multiple peri-operative risk factors. We included 413 children in this study. Of these, 29 (7%) had UTIs after cardiac surgery (UTI group), and 384 (93%) were free from UTIs (control group). All UTI cases were catheter-associated UTIs (CAUTIs). A total of 1578 urinary catheter days were assessed in this study, with a CAUTI density rate of 18 per 1000 catheter days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following risk factors for CAUTI development: duration of urinary catheter placement (p<0.001), presence of congenital abnormalities of kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) (p<0.0041) and the presence of certain syndromes (Down, William, and Noonan) (p<0.02). Gram-negative bacteria accounted for 63% of the CAUTI. The main causes of CAUTI were Klebsiella (27%), Candida (24%) and Escherichia coli (21%). Resistant organisms caused 34% of CAUTI. Two patients (7%) died in the UTI group compared with the one patient (0.3%) who died in the control group (p<0.05). Based on these findings, we concluded that an increased duration of the urinary catheter, the presence of CAKUT, and the presence of syndromes comprised the main risk factors for CAUTI. Gram-negative organisms were the main causes for CAUTI, and one-third of them found to be resistant in this single-center study. PMID:26829892

  18. Cardiac Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, Jean; Burke, Allen P; Frazier, Aletta Ann

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma of the heart and pericardium may develop in up to 25% of patients with disseminated nodal disease, but primary cardiac lymphoma is rare. The majority are diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, which arise in immunocompetent older individuals, men twice as often as women. Subsets are found in immunocompromised patients, including those with HIV-AIDS or allograft recipients. Cardiac lymphomas tend to arise in the wall of the right heart, especially right atrium, with contiguous infiltration of epicardium and pericardium. Pericardial implants and effusions are common. The disease is often multifocal in the heart, but cardiac valves are usually spared. PMID:27265603

  19. Debriefing in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Debriefing is a conversational session that revolves around the sharing and examining of information after a specific event has taken place. Debriefing may follow a simulated or actual experience and provides a forum for the learners to reflect on the experience and learn from their mistakes. Originating from the military and aviation industry, it is used on a daily basis to reflect and improve the performance in other high-risk industries. Expert debriefers may facilitate the reflection by asking open-ended questions to probe into the framework of the learners and apply lessons learned to future situations. Debriefing has been proven to improve clinical outcomes such as the return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest and the teaching of teamwork and communication in pediatrics. Incorporating debriefing into clinical practice would facilitate the cultural change necessary to talk more openly about team performance and learn from near misses, errors, and successes that will improve not only clinical outcome but also patient safety. PMID:25774195

  20. Postoperative circadian disturbances.

    PubMed

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-12-01

    An increasing number of studies have shown that circadian variation in the excretion of hormones, the sleep wake circle, the core body temperature rhythm, the tone of the autonomic nervous system and the activity rhythm are important both in health and in disease processes. An increasing attention has also been directed towards the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms in relation to surgery. The attention has been directed to the question whether the circadian variation in endogenous rhythms can affect postoperative recovery, morbidity and mortality. Based on the lack of studies where these endogenous rhythms have been investigated in relation to surgery we performed a series of studies exploring different endogenous rhythms and factors affecting these rhythms. We also wanted to examine whether the disturbances in the postoperative circadian rhythms could be correlated to postoperative recovery parameters, and if pharmacological administration of chronobiotics could improve postoperative recovery. Circadian rhythm disturbances were found in all the examined endogenous rhythms. A delay was found in the endogenous rhythm of plasma melatonin and excretion of the metabolite of melatonin (AMT6s) in urine the first night after both minor and major surgery. This delay after major surgery was correlated to the duration of surgery. The amplitude in the melatonin rhythm was unchanged the first night but increased in the second night after major surgery. The amplitude in AMT6s was reduced the first night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with preoperatively. There was also a shift in the autonomic nervous balance after major surgery with a significantly increased number of myocardial ischaemic episodes during the nighttime period. The

  1. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. PMID:27041258

  2. Cardiac arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment for cardiac arrest. It is a medical device that gives an electrical shock to the heart. The shock can get the heart beating normally again. Small, portable defibrillators are often available in public areas for ...

  3. Cardiac amyloidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way electrical signals move through the heart (conduction system). This can lead to abnormal heart beats ( ... due to medication) Sick sinus syndrome Symptomatic cardiac conduction system disease (arrhythmias related to abnormal conduction of ...

  4. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... 123-210. Thomas PD. Exercise-Based, Comprehensive Cardiac Rehabilitation. In: Bonow RO, Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011: ...

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... goal of cardiac rehab is to: Improve your cardiovascular function Improve your overall health and quality of ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  6. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  7. Pediatric imaging/doppler ultrasound of the chest: Extracardiac diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Huhta, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    In this book the author spells out new diagnostic applications in pediatrics for high resolution cross-sectional ultrasonography, and demonstrates the ways in which Doppler techniques complement the cross-sectional method. This reference presents practical, step-by-step methods for non-invasive ultrasound examination of extra-cardiac anatomy and assessment of vascular blood flow.

  8. Pediatric diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gyll, C.; Blake, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book treats the practical problems of pediatric radiography and radiological procedures. Written jointly by a radiographer and a radiologist, it covers pediatric positioning and procedures. An extended chapter covers neonatal radiography and radiology.

  9. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... International Welcome to PENS The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) is committed to the development and advancement ... PENS@kellencompany.com • Copyright © 2016 Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society • ALL RIGHTS RESERVED • Privacy Policy • Admin

  10. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed.

  11. Postoperative pain in children.

    PubMed

    Goddard, J M; Pickup, S E

    1996-06-01

    An audit project was designed to assess and improve the provision of postoperative analgesia in a children's hospital. Pain assessment for all children and analgesia standards for our institution were introduced prior to data collection. Data were collected on consecutive samples of 316 and 325 children undergoing surgery as inpatients during 10-week periods. Change was initiated between the two periods in response to our findings; our action plan involved education, changes to documentation, the widespread use of diclofenac in children over 2 years of age and recommendations for the prescription of analgesia. The initial prescription of analgesia increased from 95% to 98% (p = 0.019), administration of analgesia to children experiencing bad or severe pain increased from 57% to 71% (p = 0.032) and the number of children experiencing severe pain reduced from 17% to 11% (p = 0.050). Application of audit, by a clinical nurse specialist, enabled us to achieve and demonstrate improvements in the prescription, administration and effectiveness of postoperative analgesia. PMID:8694218

  12. [Retroperitoneal postoperative necrotizing fasciitis].

    PubMed

    Fichev, G; Poromanski, I; Marina, M

    2000-01-01

    This is a report on clinical experience had with 17 patients presenting necrotizing fasciitis--a complication ever more frequently encountered. The case material is distributed in two group differing by origin and clinical course of the complication. In group one (n = 11) it is a matter of postoperative development of postoperative complication, consistent with the classical "per continuitatem" and "per contiguitatem" mechanisms, while in group two (n = 6) the process originates, evolves and speads within the retroperitoneal space proper. Comprehensive microbiological examinations performed in 13 cases show that in either group different microorganisms are identified. In group one aerobic-anaerobic mixed infection is documented in all patients, with predominance of Enterobacteroidaceae among aerobic ones. In group two, anaerobic bacterial species, mainly Clostridium sp, prevail in all the isolates. The clinical study points to a substantial difference in the time of septic complication occurrence, as well as between the clinical picture of the two species. Accordingly, the final results are radically different--in group one survivorship amounts to 62.6%, whereas in group two--to 16.6% only. PMID:11692928

  13. A five-year experience with the use of BiPAP in a pediatric intensive care unit population.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gayatri; Tobias, Joseph D

    2007-01-01

    The authors retrospectively reviewed their experience with bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) to treat respiratory insufficiency in pediatric patients over a 5-year period. After excluding patients on chronic home BiPAP and those in whom BiPAP was used to facilitate tracheal extubation (because there were no pre-BiPAP values on which to judge its efficacy), the study cohort included 45 patients (1.5 to 22 years) in whom BiPAP was used for acute respiratory insufficiency. The primary indication for BiPAP was a primary pulmonary parenchymal process in 29 patients and postoperative atelectasis with respiratory insufficiency following cardiac or upper abdominal surgery in 16 patients. There were no differences in the pre-BiPAP values of oxygen requirement, PCO2, oxygen saturation, and respiratory rate between the 2 groups. With the application of BiPAP in patients with primary pulmonary parenchymal disease, there was a decreased oxygen requirement, PCO2, and respiratory rate. No change in oxygen saturation was noted. In patients with postoperative respiratory insufficiency, there was an improvement in all 4 parameters. There was no difference in post-BiPAP values of oxygen requirement, respiratory rate, or PCO2 between the 2 groups. The post-BiPAP oxygen saturation was greater in patients with postoperative respiratory insufficiency (96% +/- 4%) than in patients with primary pulmonary parenchymal disease (92% +/- 6%, P = .02). Endotracheal intubation was required in 11 of 29 patients with primary pulmonary parenchymal pathology versus 1 of 16 patients with postoperative atelectasis and/or respiratory insufficiency (P = .03). The chances of requiring intubation were greater in patients < or = 6 years of age (relative risk 1.9), if the oxygen requirement did not decrease to less than 60% within the first 24 hours of BiPAP use (relative risk 3.3) and if there were any PCO2 values > or = 55 mmHg during the first 24 hours of BiPAP use (relative risk 9.8). No severe

  14. Postoperative delirium in the elderly surgical patient.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Frederick E

    2009-09-01

    Delirium is a common complication in the geriatric population following cardiac and noncardiac procedures. Postoperative delirium is a significant financial burden on the United States health care system and is independently associated with prolonged hospital stay, increased risk of early and long term mortality, increased physical dependence, and an increased rate of nursing home placement. The Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) is a bedside rating scale developed to assist nonpsychiatrically trained clinicians in the rapid and accurate diagnosis of delirium. The CAM has been adapted for use in ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients in the form of the CAM-ICU. The onset of delirium involves an interaction between predisposing and precipitating risk factors for delirium. The mainstay of delirium management is prevention. The approach involves control or elimination of modifiable risk factors. It is controversial whether anesthetic technique determines delirium. However, important modifiable risk factors under the anesthesiologist's control include adequate postoperative pain management, careful drug selection, and embracing and participating in a multidisciplinary care model for these complicated patients. PMID:19825486

  15. Keratoplasty postoperative treatment update.

    PubMed

    Shimmura-Tomita, Machiko; Shimmura, Shigeto; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Shimazaki-Den, Seika; Omoto, Masahiro; Tsubota, Kazuo; Shimazaki, Jun

    2013-11-01

    Immunosuppressive therapy is the main postoperative treatment for keratoplasty, but there are considerable differences in protocols for the use of steroids and other immunosuppressants. Therefore, we conducted 2 prospective randomized clinical trials and 1 prospective nonrandomized clinical trial on keratoplasty postoperative treatment. One study evaluated the efficacy and safety of long-term topical corticosteroids after a penetrating keratoplasty was performed. Patients who underwent keratoplasty and maintained graft clarity for >1 year were randomly assigned to either a steroid or a no-steroid group. At the 12-month follow-up, the no-steroid group developed significantly more endothelial rejection than did the steroid group. A second study elucidated the effectiveness and safety of systemic cyclosporine in high-risk corneal transplantation. The patients were assigned to a systemic cyclosporine or control group. At a mean follow-up of 42.7 months, no difference was observed in the endothelial rejection rates and graft clarity loss between the 2 groups. A third study elucidated the effectiveness and the safety of systemic tacrolimus in high-risk corneal transplantation. Of 11 consecutive eyes decompensated despite systemic cyclosporine treatment, there was no irreversible rejection in eyes treated with tacrolimus, which was significantly better than in previous penetrating keratoplasty with systemic cyclosporine treatment. Prognosis after keratoplasty in patients with keratoconus is relatively good, but special attention is required for patients with atopic dermatitis. Postkeratoplasty atopic sclerokeratitis (PKAS) is a severe form of sclerokeratitis after keratoplasty in atopic patients. Our retrospective study showed that 35 eyes of 29 patients from a total of 247 keratoconus eyes undergoing keratoplasty were associated with atopic dermatitis, of which 6 eyes of 5 patients developed PKAS. Eyes with PKAS had a significantly higher incidence of atopic blepharitis

  16. Cardiac Surgery-Associated Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Huijuan; Katz, Nevin; Ariyanon, Wassawon; Blanca-Martos, Lourdes; Adýbelli, Zelal; Giuliani, Anna; Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Kim, Jeong Chul; Nayak, Akash; Neri, Mauro; Virzi, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; Scalzotto, Elisa; Salvador, Loris; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a common and serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and it is the second most common cause of AKI in the intensive care unit. Although the complication has been associated with the use of CPB, the etiology is likely multifactorial and related to intraoperative and early postoperative management including pharmacologic therapy. To date, very little evidence from randomized trials supporting specific interventions to protect from or prevent AKI in broad cardiac surgery populations has been found. The definition of AKI employed by investigators influences not only the incidence of CSA-AKI, but also the identification of risk variables. The advent of novel biomarkers of kidney injury has the potential to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of CSA-AKI, the assessment of its severity and prognosis, and the early institution of interventions to prevent or reduce kidney damage. Further studies are needed to determine how to optimize cardiac surgical procedures, CPB parameters, and intraoperative and early postoperative blood pressure and renal blood flow to reduce the risk of CSA-AKI. No pharmacologic strategy has demonstrated clear efficacy in the prevention of CSA-AKI; however, some agents, such as the natriuretic peptide nesiritide and the dopamine agonist fenoldopam, have shown promising results in renoprotection. It remains unclear whether CSA-AKI patients can benefit from the early institution of such pharmacologic agents or the early initiation of renal replacement therapy. PMID:24454314

  17. Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Mao, Huijuan; Katz, Nevin; Ariyanon, Wassawon; Blanca-Martos, Lourdes; Adýbelli, Zelal; Giuliani, Anna; Danesi, Tommaso Hinna; Kim, Jeong Chul; Nayak, Akash; Neri, Mauro; Virzi, Grazia Maria; Brocca, Alessandra; Scalzotto, Elisa; Salvador, Loris; Ronco, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac surgery-associated acute kidney injury (CSA-AKI) is a common and serious postoperative complication of cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and it is the second most common cause of AKI in the intensive care unit. Although the complication has been associated with the use of CPB, the etiology is likely multifactorial and related to intraoperative and early postoperative management including pharmacologic therapy. To date, very little evidence from randomized trials supporting specific interventions to protect from or prevent AKI in broad cardiac surgery populations has been found. The definition of AKI employed by investigators influences not only the incidence of CSA-AKI, but also the identification of risk variables. The advent of novel biomarkers of kidney injury has the potential to facilitate the subclinical diagnosis of CSA-AKI, the assessment of its severity and prognosis, and the early institution of interventions to prevent or reduce kidney damage. Further studies are needed to determine how to optimize cardiac surgical procedures, CPB parameters, and intraoperative and early postoperative blood pressure and renal blood flow to reduce the risk of CSA-AKI. No pharmacologic strategy has demonstrated clear efficacy in the prevention of CSA-AKI; however, some agents, such as the natriuretic peptide nesiritide and the dopamine agonist fenoldopam, have shown promising results in renoprotection. It remains unclear whether CSA-AKI patients can benefit from the early institution of such pharmacologic agents or the early initiation of renal replacement therapy. PMID:24454314

  18. Normothermia for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: An Expanded Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, Ahmad Mahir; Nikman, Ahmad Mohd; Ali, Saedah; Zain, Mohd Rizal Mohd; Wong, Abdul Rahim; Corno, Antonio Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in pediatric cardiac surgery is generally performed with hypothermia, flow reduction and hemodilution. From October 2013 to December 2014, 55 patients, median age 6 years (range 2 months to 52 years), median weight 18.5 kg (range 3.2–57 kg), underwent surgery with normothermic high flow CPB in a new unit. There were no early or late deaths. Fifty patients (90.9%) were extubated within 3 h, 3 (5.5%) within 24 h, and 2 (3.6%) within 48 h. Twenty-four patients (43.6%) did not require inotropic support, 31 (56.4%) received dopamine or dobutamine: 21 ≤5 mcg/kg/min, 8 5–10 mcg/kg/min, and 2 >10 mcg/kg/min. Two patients (6.5%) required noradrenaline 0.05–0.1 mcg/kg/min. On arrival to ICU and after 3 and 6 h and 8:00 a.m. the next morning, mean lactate levels were 1.9 ± 09, 2.0 ± 1.2, 1.6 ± 0.8, and 1.4 ± 0.7 mmol/L (0.6–5.2 mmol/L), respectively. From arrival to ICU to 8:00 a.m. the next morning mean urine output was 3.8 ± 1.5 mL/kg/h (0.7–7.6 mL/kg/h), and mean chest drainage was 0.6 ± 0.5 mL/kg/h (0.1–2.3 mL/kg/h). Mean ICU and hospital stay were 2.7 ± 1.4 days (2–8 days) and 7.2 ± 2.2 days (4–15 days), respectively. In conclusion, normothermic high flow CPB allows pediatric and congenital heart surgery with favorable outcomes even in a new unit. The immediate post-operative period is characterized by low requirement for inotropic and respiratory support, low lactate production, adequate urine output, minimal drainage from the chest drains, short ICU, and hospital stay. PMID:25973411

  19. Posterior Iris Fixated Intraocular Lens for Pediatric Traumatic Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, V.; Balasubramanian, Preethi; Heralgi, Mallikarjun M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the postoperative visual outcomes and complications of posterior iris fixated intraocular lens (IFIOL) implantation for pediatric traumatic cataract. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was performed of all the pediatric traumatic cataract patients who underwent lens removal and iris fixated lens implantation due to inadequate capsular support with or without corneal tear repair between January 2009 and December 2013. Data were collected and analyzed on the preoperative and postoperative visual outcomes and complications. Results: Twenty-five children (25 eyes; 21 males and 4 females) were enrolled with the mean age of 11 ± 4.0 years. There were 72% of eyes that underwent primary cataract removal with IFIOL implantation. Twenty-eight percent of eyes underwent corneal tear repair prior to intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was hand motion in 32% eyes, counting fingers in 24%, and perception of light in 44%. Postoperative BCVA of 0-0.2 logarithm of minimum angle of resolution was reported in the 64% of eyes. One eye developed secondary glaucoma, one eye underwent re-enclavation, and none developed retinal complications. Conclusion: Posterior IFIOL implantation resulted in an improved visual outcome, low incidence of postoperative complications, and is a good alternative to other IOL, in the cases of pediatric traumatic cataract without adequate capsular support. PMID:27162456

  20. Cardiac Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Birnie, David H; Nery, Pablo B; Ha, Andrew C; Beanlands, Rob S B

    2016-07-26

    Clinically manifest cardiac involvement occurs in perhaps 5% of patients with sarcoidosis. The 3 principal manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis (CS) are conduction abnormalities, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart failure. An estimated 20% to 25% of patients with pulmonary/systemic sarcoidosis have asymptomatic cardiac involvement (clinically silent disease). In 2014, the first international guideline for the diagnosis and management of CS was published. In patients with clinically manifest CS, the extent of left ventricular dysfunction seems to be the most important predictor of prognosis. There is controversy in published reports as to the outcome of patients with clinically silent CS. Despite a paucity of data, immunosuppression therapy (primarily with corticosteroids) has been advocated for the treatment of clinically manifest CS. Device therapy, primarily with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, is often recommended for patients with clinically manifest disease. PMID:27443438

  1. Regional anesthesia alone for pediatric free flaps.

    PubMed

    Bjorklund, Kim A; Venkatramani, Hari; Venkateshwaran, Govindaswamy; Boopathi, Vadivel; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular surgery plays an important reconstructive role in the pediatric population. Successful outcomes rely on surgical technique as well as anesthesia. Regional anesthesia contributes to successful free tissue transfer through sympathetic blockade, postoperative pain control, and elimination of risks and costs associated with general anesthesia. While regional anesthesia in microsurgery is discussed in the literature for adult and elderly patients, no studies focus on the pediatric population. Accordingly, this paper reviews 20 pediatric patients undergoing microvascular surgery (anterolateral thigh, n = 9; gracilis, n = 3; toe transfer, n = 6; and fibula, n = 2) with regional anesthesia and sedation. All patients underwent spinal epidural anesthesia, and seven also received brachial plexus blocks. The average duration of anesthesia was 3-4 h (anterolateral thigh (ALT) and gracilis) and 6-8 h (toe transfer and fibula). No anesthesia-related complications or flap failures occurred. We conclude that regional anesthesia has important benefits in pediatric microsurgery and it is a safe and cost-effective alternative to general anesthesia. PMID:25858275

  2. Cardiac sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Smedema, J.P.; Zondervan, P.E.; van Hagen, P.; ten Cate, F.J.; Bresser, P.; Doubell, A.F.; Pattynama, P.; Hoogsteden, H.C.; Balk, A.H.M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multi-system granulomatous disorder of unknown aetiology. Symptomatic cardiac involvement occurs in approximately 5% of patients. The prevalence of sarcoidosis in the Netherlands is unknown, but estimated to be approximately 20 per 100,000 population (3200 patients). We report on five patients who presented with different manifestations of cardiac sarcoidosis, and give a brief review on the current management of this condition. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be of great help in diagnosing this condition as well as in the follow-up of the response to therapy. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:25696121

  3. Postoperative analgesia for cleft lip and palate repair in children

    PubMed Central

    Reena; Bandyopadhyay, Kasturi Hussain; Paul, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Acute pain such as postoperative pain during infancy was ignored approximately three decades ago due to biases and misconceptions regarding the maturity of the infant's developing nervous system, their inability to verbally report pain, and their perceived inability to remember pain. More recently, these misconceptions are rarely acknowledged due to enhanced understanding of the developmental neurobiology of infant pain pathways and supraspinal processing. Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common congenital abnormalities requiring surgical treatment in children and is associated with intense postoperative pain. The pain management gets further complicated due to association with postsurgical difficult airway and other congenital anomalies. Orofacial blocks like infraorbital, external nasal, greater/lesser palatine, and nasopalatine nerve blocks have been successively used either alone or in combinations to reduce the postoperative pain. Since in pediatric population, regional anesthesia is essentially performed under general anesthesia, association of these two techniques has dramatically cut down the risks of both procedures particularly those associated with the use of opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Definitive guidelines for postoperative pain management in these patients have not yet been developed. Incorporation of multimodal approach as an institutional protocol can help minimize the confusion around this topic. PMID:27006533

  4. Pharmacological Risk Factors for Delirium after Cardiac Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Lurdes; Schwarz, Stephan KW; Bowering, John B; Moore, Randell L; Burns, Kyle D; Richford, Carole M; Osborn, Jill A; Barr, Alasdair M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this review is to evaluate the literature on medications associated with delirium after cardiac surgery and potential prophylactic agents for preventing it. Source: Articles were searched in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health, and EMBASE with the MeSH headings: delirium, cardiac surgical procedures, and risk factors, and the keywords: delirium, cardiac surgery, risk factors, and drugs. Principle inclusion criteria include having patient samples receiving cardiac procedures on cardiopulmonary bypass, and using DSM-IV-TR criteria or a standardized tool for the diagnosis of delirium. Principal Findings: Fifteen studies were reviewed. Two single drugs (intraoperative fentanyl and ketamine), and two classes of drugs (preoperative antipsychotics and postoperative inotropes) were identified in the literature as being independently associated with delirium after cardiac surgery. Another seven classes of drugs (preoperative antihypertensives, anticholinergics, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, opioids, and statins, and postoperative opioids) and three single drugs (intraoperative diazepam, and postoperative dexmedetomidine and rivastigmine) have mixed findings. One drug (risperidone) has been shown to prevent delirium when taken immediately upon awakening from cardiac surgery. None of these findings was replicated in the studies reviewed. Conclusion: These studies have shown that drugs taken perioperatively by cardiac surgery patients need to be considered in delirium risk management strategies. While medications with direct neurological actions are clearly important, this review has shown that specific cardiovascular drugs may also require attention. Future studies that are methodologically consistent are required to further validate these findings and improve their utility. PMID:23449337

  5. Massage therapy after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Amy T; Sundt, Thoralf M; Cutshall, Susanne M; Bauer, Brent A

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac surgery presents a life-saving and life-enhancing opportunity to hundreds of thousands of patients each year in the United States. However, many patients face significant challenges during the postoperative period, including pain, anxiety, and tension. Mounting evidence demonstrates that such challenges can impair immune function and slow wound healing, in addition to causing suffering for the patient. Finding new approaches to mitigate these challenges is necessary if patients are to experience the full benefits of surgery. Massage therapy is a therapy that has significant evidence to support its role in meeting these needs. This paper looks at the data surrounding the use of massage therapy in cardiac surgery patients, with a special focus on the experience at Mayo Clinic. PMID:21167456

  6. Postoperative Peritoneal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Graeme B.; Grobéty, Jocelyne; Majno, Guido

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental model of peritoneal adhesions, in the rat, based on two relatively minor accidents that may occur during abdominal surgery in man: drying of the serosa, and bleeding. Drying alone had little effect; drying plus bleeding consistently produced adhesions to the dried area. Fresh blood alone produced adhesions between the three membranous structures [omentum and pelvic fat bodies (PFBs)]. The formation of persistent adhesions required whole blood. Preformed clots above a critical size induced adhesions even without previous serosal injury; they were usually captured by the omentum and PFBs. If all three membranous structures were excised, the clots caused visceral adhesions. The protective role of the omentum, its structure, and the mechanism of omental adhesions, are discussed. These findings are relevant to the pathogenesis of post-operative adhesions in man. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 12Fig 13Fig 1Fig 2Fig 14Fig 15Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:5315369

  7. Selected concepts and controversies in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Although more than 80 years of research in cardiac resuscitation produced many important findings and greatly enhanced our understanding of the arrest state, outcome following pediatric cardiac arrest remains poor. Resuscitation guidelines have recently been published, but they may not reflect optimal therapy. Closed-chest compression-induced cardiac output may be higher in pediatric patients, particularly infants, than that previously reported in adults. To achieve higher cardiac outputs, direct cardiac compression is important; the recommended compression location has therefore been changed based on recent data. The optimal rate of compression, however, is uncertain, so further research is needed. Alternative vascular access sites, such as the endotracheal and intraosseous route for drug administration may permit more rapid drug delivery, but data suggest that a larger epinephrine dose than currently recommended should be used. It may also be helpful to dilute the drug in normal saline before endotracheal administration. Although experimental data suggest that a pure alpha-adrenergic agonist may be beneficial in a cardiac arrest, recent data show that epinephrine remains the drug of choice. Finally, the role of sodium bicarbonate in both the arrest and postarrest setting has become controversial. Recent data suggest that bicarbonate may be detrimental and that therapy of acidosis is best directed at improving perfusion, oxygenation, and ventilation. Alternative forms of therapy for acidosis, such as THAM and dichloroacetate may prove beneficial in the postarrest setting. PMID:3052707

  8. Rare Intracardiac Tumor: Primary Cardiac Lymphoma Presenting as Atypical Angina.

    PubMed

    Aimanan, Karthigesu; Kumar, K Saravana; Mohd Arif, M N; Noor Zuraini, Md; Ramdzan, Md Jamil; Hamdan, L

    2016-01-01

    Primary lymphomas of the heart are extremely rare, accounting for 2% of all primary cardiac tumors. Due to the rare presentation, there is no proper consensus available on treatment strategy. Preoperative confirmation of the pathology is fundamental in guiding an early treatment plan, which allows for improved prognosis. Unfortunately, in most cases, primary cardiac lymphoma is only identified on postoperative histopathological analyses, which affect the treatment plan and outcome. Here, we report a unique case of primary cardiac lymphoma presented with dyspnea and reduced effort tolerance. Young age, rapid onset of symptom, and absence of cardiac risk factors prompted us towards further imaging and emergency resection. The patient received a course of postoperative chemotherapy and was disease-free on six months of follow-up. PMID:26904128

  9. Cardiac optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetics is an emerging technology for optical interrogation and control of biological function with high specificity and high spatiotemporal resolution. Mammalian cells and tissues can be sensitized to respond to light by a relatively simple and well-tolerated genetic modification using microbial opsins (light-gated ion channels and pumps). These can achieve fast and specific excitatory or inhibitory response, offering distinct advantages over traditional pharmacological or electrical means of perturbation. Since the first demonstrations of utility in mammalian cells (neurons) in 2005, optogenetics has spurred immense research activity and has inspired numerous applications for dissection of neural circuitry and understanding of brain function in health and disease, applications ranging from in vitro to work in behaving animals. Only recently (since 2010), the field has extended to cardiac applications with less than a dozen publications to date. In consideration of the early phase of work on cardiac optogenetics and the impact of the technique in understanding another excitable tissue, the brain, this review is largely a perspective of possibilities in the heart. It covers the basic principles of operation of light-sensitive ion channels and pumps, the available tools and ongoing efforts in optimizing them, overview of neuroscience use, as well as cardiac-specific questions of implementation and ideas for best use of this emerging technology in the heart. PMID:23457014

  10. Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Weisse, Allen B.

    2011-01-01

    Well into the first decades of the 20th century, medical opinion held that any surgical attempts to treat heart disease were not only misguided, but unethical. Despite such reservations, innovative surgeons showed that heart wounds could be successfully repaired. Then, extracardiac procedures were performed to correct patent ductus arteriosus, coarctation of the aorta, and tetralogy of Fallot. Direct surgery on the heart was accomplished with closed commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. The introduction of the heart-lung machine and cardiopulmonary bypass enabled the surgical treatment of other congenital and acquired heart diseases. Advances in aortic surgery paralleled these successes. The development of coronary artery bypass grafting greatly aided the treatment of coronary heart disease. Cardiac transplantation, attempts to use the total artificial heart, and the application of ventricular assist devices have brought us to the present day. Although progress in the field of cardiovascular surgery appears to have slowed when compared with the halcyon times of the past, substantial challenges still face cardiac surgeons. It can only be hoped that sufficient resources and incentive can carry the triumphs of the 20th century into the 21st. This review covers past developments and future opportunities in cardiac surgery. PMID:22163121

  11. [Role of antithrombin iii in cardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Muedra, V; Barettino, D; D'Ocón, P

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation of blood is of multidisciplinary interest. Cardiac surgery produces major changes in the delicate balance between pro-and anti-coagulant serum factors. The role of antithrombin iii has been analysed after finding evidence that associated decreased levels of protein activity to postoperative morbidity and mortality. Supplementing exogenous antithrombin is considered with the aim of optimising outcomes. Its intrinsic anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties have stimulated a growing interest, and suggests new lines of research. PMID:23228672

  12. Cardiac varix in the right atrium

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Manabu; Kimura, Chieri; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Adachi, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year old man underwent transthoracic and transoesophageal echocardiography and computed tomography, which revealed what appeared to be an asymptomatic primary mobile tumour located in the right atrium. During surgery, the mass was found to be associated with the right atrial septum and was subsequently resected. Histopathology of the mass revealed a cardiac varix with phleboliths. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course and no signs of recurrence at the 10-month follow-up. PMID:22314009

  13. The Relation between Nonverbal IQ and Postoperative CI Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Users: Preliminary Result.

    PubMed

    Park, Mina; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Seo Jin; Shin, Min-Sup; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed the correlation between performance intelligence and the postoperative cochlear implant (CI) outcome in Korean-speaking children. In addition, the relationship between the performance intelligence subscales and the post-CI speech outcome was evaluated. Materials and Methods. Thirteen pediatric CI users (five males, eight females; median age at implantation 6.2 (range 1.3-14.2) years; median age at intelligence test 9.3 (range 5-16) years) who were tested using the Korean Educational Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children were studied. The correlations between the intelligence scores and 1-2 years postoperative Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) scores and between subscales of performance and 1-2 years postoperative CAP scores were analyzed. Results. There was no correlation between the categories of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) and performance IQ for "mentally retarded" and "average," respectively (Spearman's rho = 0.42, P = 0.15). There was a strong correlation between performance IQ and the postoperative CAP scale (Spearman's rho = 0.8977, P = 0.0008). "Picture arrangement" and "picture completion," reflecting social cognition, were strongly correlated with the postoperative CAP scales. Conclusion. Performance intelligence, especially social cognition, was strongly related to the postoperative CI outcome of cochlear implant users. Therefore, auditory rehabilitation, including social rehabilitation, should maximize the postoperative CI outcomes. PMID:26236723

  14. The Relation between Nonverbal IQ and Postoperative CI Outcomes in Cochlear Implant Users: Preliminary Result

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mina; Song, Jae-Jin; Oh, Seo Jin; Shin, Min-Sup; Lee, Jun Ho; Oh, Seung Ha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed the correlation between performance intelligence and the postoperative cochlear implant (CI) outcome in Korean-speaking children. In addition, the relationship between the performance intelligence subscales and the post-CI speech outcome was evaluated. Materials and Methods. Thirteen pediatric CI users (five males, eight females; median age at implantation 6.2 (range 1.3–14.2) years; median age at intelligence test 9.3 (range 5–16) years) who were tested using the Korean Educational Development Institute-Wechsler Intelligence Scale for children were studied. The correlations between the intelligence scores and 1-2 years postoperative Categories of Auditory Performance (CAP) scores and between subscales of performance and 1-2 years postoperative CAP scores were analyzed. Results. There was no correlation between the categories of verbal intelligence quotient (IQ) and performance IQ for “mentally retarded” and “average,” respectively (Spearman's rho = 0.42, P = 0.15). There was a strong correlation between performance IQ and the postoperative CAP scale (Spearman's rho = 0.8977, P = 0.0008). “Picture arrangement” and “picture completion,” reflecting social cognition, were strongly correlated with the postoperative CAP scales. Conclusion. Performance intelligence, especially social cognition, was strongly related to the postoperative CI outcome of cochlear implant users. Therefore, auditory rehabilitation, including social rehabilitation, should maximize the postoperative CI outcomes. PMID:26236723

  15. Cardiac Abnormalities in Youth with Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bacha, Fida; Gidding, Samuel S

    2016-07-01

    Childhood obesity has been linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adulthood. Of great concern is the expected increase in the population's CVD burden in relation to childhood obesity. This is compounded by the risk related to chronic hyperglycemia exposure in youth with type 2 diabetes. We herein provide an overview of the spectrum of early cardiovascular disease manifestation in youth with obesity and type 2 diabetes, in particular abnormalities in cardiac structure and function. Cardiac remodeling and adverse target organ damage is already evident in the pediatric age group in children with obesity and type 2 diabetes. This supports the importance of intensifying obesity prevention efforts and early intervention to treat comorbidities of obesity in the pediatric age group to prevent cardiac events in early adulthood. PMID:27168062

  16. Sufficient myocardial protection of del Nido cardioplegia regardless of ventricular mass and myocardial ischemic time in adult cardiac surgical patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Seong; Jeong, Jin Hee; Moon, Sin Ju; Ahn, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Background Del Nido (DN) cardioplegic solution (CPS) has been widely used during pediatric cardiac surgery. However, its use in the field of adult cardiac surgery is not popular yet. We evaluated efficacy of DN cardioplegia in adult cardiac surgical patients. Methods Fifty-three adult patients (mean age, 54±16 years) who underwent cardiovascular surgery using DN cardioplegia were enrolled. Myocardial troponin I (TnI) level up to three days after surgery and early clinical outcomes were evaluated. Propensity score matching was performed to compare these results with those after surgery using blood cardioplegia (BC). Results DN cardioplegia was infused with an initial dose of 1,126±221 mL, and an additional 500 mL was reinfused in 15 patients 91 minutes after initial infusion. After release of aortic cross clamp (ACC), spontaneous defibrillation was achieved in 94.3% (50/53). The peak TnI level after surgery was 9.8 ng/mL (range, 2.0–90.2 ng/mL). Linear regression models demonstrated that neither left ventricular mass (LVM) nor ACC time was associated with increased level of peak TnI (P=0.928 and 0.595, respectively). Early mortality occurred in one patient (1.9%). Postoperative complications included atrial fibrillation (n=18, 34.0%), acute kidney injury (n=4, 7.5%), low cardiac output syndrome (n=1, 1.9%), and respiratory complications (n=1, 1.9%). Propensity score matching extracted 39 pairs. Spontaneous defibrillation was achieved more frequently in the DN than BC groups (37/39 vs. 12/39, P<0.001). Peak level and serial changes of TnI were not statistically different between the two groups (P=0.085 and 0.959, respectively). There were also no significant differences in early mortality and postoperative complication rates between the two groups. Conclusions DN cardioplegia is as effective as BC for adult patients in terms of myocardial protection and early clinical outcomes.

  17. Teaching Prevention in Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tina L.; Greenberg, Larrie; Loeser, Helen; Keller, David

    2000-01-01

    Reviews methods of teaching preventive medicine in pediatrics and highlights innovative programs. Methods of teaching prevention in pediatrics include patient interactions, self-directed learning, case-based learning, small-group learning, standardized patients, computer-assisted instruction, the Internet, student-centered learning, and lectures.…

  18. Economics of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures. PMID:18650705

  19. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H. Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited to the evaluation of the pediatric musculoskeletal system because of the increased ratio of cartilage to bone in the immature skeleton. The purpose of this article is to review the current uses of musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric patients. Hip sonography is widely accepted; other applications are increasing in popularity. PMID:11387111

  20. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. PMID:26614700

  1. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. PMID:26614703

  2. Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Unique Concerns for the Critical Care Team.

    PubMed

    Bilhartz, Jacob L; Shieck, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation originated in children more than 50 years ago, and these youngest patients, while comprising the minority of liver transplant recipients nationwide, can have some of the best and most rewarding outcomes. The indications for liver transplantation in children are generally more diverse than those seen in adult patients. This diversity in underlying cause of disease brings with it increased complexity for all who care for these patients. Children, still being completely dependent on others for survival, also require a care team that is able and ready to work with parents and family in addition to the patient at the center of the process. In this review, we aim to discuss diagnoses of particular uniqueness or importance to pediatric liver transplantation. We also discuss the evaluation of a pediatric patient for liver transplant, the system for allocating them a new liver, and also touch on postoperative concerns that are unique to the pediatric population. PMID:27254643

  3. Pediatric Care Online: A Pediatric Point-of-Care Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Care Online is the American Academy of Pediatrics' point-of-care tool designed for health care providers. Pediatric Care Online builds on content from Red Book Online and Pediatric Patient Education and features Quick Reference topic pages for more than 250 pediatric health care topics. The multitude of resources available within Pediatric Care Online will be reviewed in this column, and a sample search will be used to illustrate the type of information available within this point-of-care pediatric resource. PMID:27054536

  4. Delayed aortic rupture resulting from postoperative superficial sternal wound infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Wan; Chang, Jee Won

    2016-01-01

    While deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) after cardiac surgery is a significant contributor to patient morbidity and mortality, superficial sternal wound infection (SSWI) mostly has a benign course. We report a mortality case of aortic rupture resulting from SSWI after cardiac surgery. A 50-year-old male underwent an aortic valve replacement (AVR). Three months after the valve operation, he presented with severe dyspnea, which had never before been observed, and chest computed tomography revealed an ascending aortic rupture with large hematoma compressing the main pulmonary artery. We performed an emergent operation for aortic rupture that possibly originated from the SSWI. Postoperatively, the patient died of hypovolemic shock due to recurrent aortic rupture despite efforts to resuscitate him. PMID:27499988

  5. Postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Peiling; Wang, Tuanjie; Gao, Jun; Yao, Jinhua; Li, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease. Methods: Three hundreds children with congenital heart disease admitted to our hospital to receive surgeries from February 2010 to February 2013 were selected. Results: A total of 120 children were tested as positive by sputum culture, with the infection rate of 40.0%. The top five most common pathogenic microorganisms included Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. S. epidermidis, S. aureus and Enterococcus were highly resistant to penicillin, azithromycin and erythromycin, moderately susceptible to levofloxacin and cefazolin, and completely susceptible to vancomycin. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that hospitalization stay length, combined use of antibiotics, systemic use of hormones, mechanical ventilation and catheter indwelling were the independent risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections (P<0.05). Conclusion: Nosocomial infection, which was the most frequent postoperative complication of pediatric congenital heart disease, was predominantly induced by Gram-positive bacteria that were highly susceptible to cephalosporins and vancomycin. Particular attention should be paid to decrease relevant risk factors to improve the prognosis. PMID:24948978

  6. Thrombotic cardiac apex hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Madani, Hamid; Dabiri, Samsam; Pormotabed, Alireza; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cyst (HC) is an endemic infestation in the cattle-breading countries such as in Iran. The involvement of heart by HC is rare; however, nesting of larva in the left ventricular apex with subsequent rupture to the systemic circulation and thrombus formation in the remaining cyst cavity is an exceedingly rare phenomenon. A 45-year-old man referred to our emergency cardiac room with chest pain and a transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) that showed a cardiac apex cystic lesion. The differential diagnosis of a cystic tumor, a HC, or aneurysm in the apex of the left ventricular walls was considered and evaluated by TTE and magnetic resonance imaging. However, the thrombotic HC was confirmed at the surgery. The cyst with its thrombotic component was excised surgically by on-pump cardiac surgery. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged to home and treated with a full course of Albendazole therapy for 4 weeks. Six-month follow-up with TTE revealed complete healing of the apex defect without recurrence of the cyst. PMID:26702690

  7. Respiratory physiotherapy and its application in preoperative period of cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Regina Coeli Vasques de; Padulla, Susimary Aparecida Trevizan; Bortolatto, Carolina Rodrigues

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac surgical procedures change respiratory mechanics, defecting in lung dysfunction. The physical therapists play an important role in the preparation and rehabilitation of individuals who are undergoing cardiac surgery, as they have a large quantity of techniques. The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of breathing exercises with and without the use of devices, and respiratory muscle training in preoperative period of cardiac surgery in reducing postoperative pulmonary complications. Although there are controversies as to which technique to use, studies show the effectiveness of preoperative physiotherapy in the prevention and reduction of postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:22358282

  8. Cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, A A

    1984-02-01

    Exercise training is a major, and the most important, component of cardiac rehabilitation. Besides providing psychological benefits and promoting a "sense of well being," it elicits a number of adaptations in patients with ischemic heart disease. Among the clinically important adaptations are changes in the trained skeletal muscles and autonomic nervous system, resulting not only in increased maximum exercise capacity but also a slower heart rate and, at times, a lower systolic blood pressure during submaximal exercise. The reduction in the rate pressure product decreases myocardial O2 demand at any given submaximal exercise intensity and may thus alleviate myocardial ischemia and angina in patients with coronary artery disease. These adaptive responses occur even with a relatively modest exercise intensity. Although short-term exercise training of moderate intensity has not been reported to result in improvement in left ventricular performance, recent data suggest that exercise training of higher intensity and longer duration (12 months or longer) than has conventionally been used in cardiac rehabilitation programs may favorably affect the heart. This is characterized by improvements in left ventricular function, diminished electrocardiographic criteria of myocardial ischemia and increased stroke volume during exercise. Modest weight reduction accompanies regularly performed prolonged exercise training. It is important, however, to recognize that high-intensity exercise programs are suitable for only some patients with coronary artery disease who are stable and should be used only under strict medical supervision. PMID:6400004

  9. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Y; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory neurologic disease that is challenging to diagnose and treat. Although there are many clinical parallels between pediatric-onset MS and adult-onset MS, there is also accumulating evidence of distinguishing clinical features that may, in part, arise from development-specific, neuroimmune processes governing MS pathogenesis in children. Here the authors describe the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric MS, with a particular focus on describing clinical features and highlighting new developments that promise a better understanding of pediatric MS pathogenesis. An important task that lies ahead for pediatric neurologists is better understanding the early gene-environment interaction that precipitates the first demyelinating event in pediatric MS. This area is of particular importance for understanding the MS etiology and the natural history of pediatric MS. Such understanding should in turn inform new developments in diagnostic tools, long-term therapies, and much-needed biomarkers. Such biomarkers are not only valuable for defining the disease onset, but also for monitoring both the treatment response and a disease evolution that spans multiple decades in children with MS. PMID:27116721

  10. Cardiac operations in patients with severe pulmonary impairment.

    PubMed

    Yamashiro, S; Sakata, R; Nakayama, Y; Ura, M; Arai, Y; Morishima, Y

    2000-04-01

    Many reviews concerning pulmonary complications after cardiac surgical procedures in patients with serious pulmonary disease have been published. However, no strict pulmonary function guidelines were proposed to help the clinician identify the patients at greater risk. We considered whether a low pulmonary function became a risk factor of cardiac operations. We conducted a retrospective analysis of records of 32 patients with severely impaired preoperative pulmonary function who had undergone cardiac operations between July 1988 and March 1999. There was 1 hospital death. The over-all mortality rate was 3.1% (1 of 32). However, this death could not be directly attributed to postoperative pulmonary complications. Postoperative pulmonary complications were seen in 2 patients (6.3%) who required tracheostomy due to atelectasis and pneumonia. No late deaths due to pulmonary complications were observed during the follow-up period. The actual survival rate is 68% at 7 years. A low pulmonary function did not, by itself, become a risk factor of cardiac operations, although a pulmonary function test can be used to alert the clinician to possible postoperative complications, including the requirement of tracheostomy. Especially strict control of postoperative respiration is necessary in patients with forced expiratory volume (FEV) of 1.0 <= 800 ml and/or FEV1.0/BSA <= 600 ml/m2. PMID:10870003

  11. Pediatric cardiomyopathies: causes, epidemiology, clinical course, preventive strategies and therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lipshultz, Steven E; Cochran, Thomas R; Briston, David A; Brown, Stefanie R; Sambatakos, Peter J; Miller, Tracie L; Carrillo, Adriana A; Corcia, Liat; Sanchez, Janine E; Diamond, Melissa B; Freundlich, Michael; Harake, Danielle; Gayle, Tamara; Harmon, William G; Rusconi, Paolo G; Sandhu, Satinder K; Wilkinson, James D

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies, which are rare but serious disorders of the muscles of the heart, affect at least one in every 100,000 children in the USA. Approximately 40% of children with symptomatic cardiomyopathy undergo heart transplantation or die from cardiac complications within 2 years. However, a significant number of children suffering from cardiomyopathy are surviving into adulthood, making it an important chronic illness for both pediatric and adult clinicians to understand. The natural history, risk factors, prevalence and incidence of this pediatric condition were not fully understood before the 1990s. Questions regarding optimal diagnostic, prognostic and treatment methods remain. Children require long-term follow-up into adulthood in order to identify the factors associated with best clinical practice including diagnostic approaches, as well as optimal treatment approaches. In this article, we comprehensively review current research on various presentations of this disease, along with current knowledge about their causes, treatments and clinical outcomes. PMID:24180540

  12. Update on Pediatric Perfusion Practice in North America: 2005 Survey

    PubMed Central

    Groom, Robert C.; Froebe, Shane; Martin, Janine; Manfra, Michael J.; Cormack, John E.; Morse, Catherine; Taenzer, Andreas H.; Quinn, Reed D.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: The devices and techniques used for pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) undergo continuous change. New techniques and clinical comparisons of devices are frequently reported in the literature; however, information about the extent to which these techniques and devices are adopted into clinical practice at pediatric heart centers are not well described. We conducted a mail survey of North American pediatric cardiac surgery centers to gain perspective on the extent to which various devices and techniques were used for CPB along with program demographic data. In January 2005, surveys were mailed to 180 North American open heart centers. The survey was nearly identical in format and content to three earlier surveys completed in 1989, 1994, and 1999, with the exception that new questions were added to address new techniques and devices that have emerged over the years. Responses were received from 76 hospitals, for an overall response rate of 42%. Of the responding centers, 53 were performing pediatric open heart surgery and 23 were not. Twenty centers performed only pediatric open heart surgery, and 33 performed both pediatric and adult open heart surgery. The mean pediatric annual caseload of responding centers was 195 procedures/yr (range, 20–650 procedures/yr; median, 154 procedures/yr). A total of 9943 pediatric open heart procedures were performed at responding centers in 2004. Most of the centers surveyed reported use of an open venous reservoir system (88%), use of roller pumps (90%), and use of arterial line filtration (98%). Most centers used circuits that have surface treatments with heparin or some other surface-modifying agent (74%). There has been an increase in the use of all types of safety devices. Modified ultrafiltration is used at 75% of the centers surveyed. Centers reported an increase in the availability of all types of cardiac support devices including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for postcardiotomy cardiac support (90

  13. Update on pediatric perfusion practice in North America: 2005 survey.

    PubMed

    Groom, Robert C; Froebe, Shane; Martin, Janine; Manfra, Michael J; Cormack, John E; Morse, Catherine; Taenzer, Andreas H; Quinn, Reed D

    2005-12-01

    The devices and techniques used for pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) undergo continuous change. New techniques and clinical comparisons of devices are frequently reported in the literature; however, information about the extent to which these techniques and devices are adopted into clinical practice at pediatric heart centers are not well described. We conducted a mail survey of North American pediatric cardiac surgery centers to gain perspective on the extent to which various devices and techniques were used for CPB along with program demographic data. In January 2005, surveys were mailed to 180 North American open heart centers. The survey was nearly identical in format and content to three earlier surveys completed in 1989, 1994, and 1999, with the exception that new questions were added to address new techniques and devices that have emerged over the years. Responses were received from 76 hospitals, for an overall response rate of 42%. Of the responding centers, 53 were performing pediatric open heart surgery and 23 were not. Twenty centers performed only pediatric open heart surgery, and 33 performed both pediatric and adult open heart surgery. The mean pediatric annual caseload of responding centers was 195 procedures/yr (range, 20-650 procedures/yr; median, 154 procedures/yr). A total of 9943 pediatric open heart procedures were performed at responding centers in 2004. Most of the centers surveyed reported use of an open venous reservoir system (88%), use of roller pumps (90%), and use of arterial line filtration (98%). Most centers used circuits that have surface treatments with heparin or some other surface-modifying agent (74%). There has been an increase in the use of all types of safety devices. Modified ultrafiltration is used at 75% of the centers surveyed. Centers reported an increase in the availability of all types of cardiac support devices including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for postcardiotomy cardiac support (90%). This survey

  14. Pediatric ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Iki; Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-12-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children-HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  15. Pediatric ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-01-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children—HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  16. [Surgical controversy. Limiting postoperative scarring].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2005-06-01

    Postoperative follow-up of glaucoma surgery must be rigorous and carried out over the long term. Data acquired on the make-up of the filtering bleb justifies using postoperative anti-inflammatory drugs, even if the eye is clinically quiet. When using antimetabolites, the risk factors for failure must be well known and either 5-fluorouracile or mitomycin should be chosen depending on the level of risk of scarring. Their use in needle revision must be adapted case by case. anti-TGF-beta-2 antibody, currently being investigated, may prove advantageous in the very near future. PMID:16208245

  17. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  18. Pediatric autonomic disorders.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Chelimsky, Gisela G; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2006-07-01

    The scope of pediatric autonomic disorders is not well recognized. The goal of this review is to increase awareness of the expanding spectrum of pediatric autonomic disorders by providing an overview of the autonomic nervous system, including the roles of its various components and its pervasive influence, as well as its intimate relationship with sensory function. To illustrate further the breadth and complexities of autonomic dysfunction, some pediatric disorders are described, concentrating on those that present at birth or appear in early childhood. PMID:16818580

  19. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high.

  20. Template of patient-specific summaries facilitates education and outcomes in paediatric cardiac surgery units

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Hemant S.; Wolfram, Karen B.; Slayton, Jennifer M.; Saville, Benjamin R.; Cutrer, William B.; Bichell, David P.; Harris, Zena L.; Barr, Frederick E.; Deshpande, Jayant K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Few educational opportunities exist in paediatric cardiac critical care units (PCCUs). We introduced a new educational activity in the PCCU in the form of of patient-specific summaries (TPSS). Our objective was to study the role of TPSS in the provision of a positive learning experience to the multidisciplinary clinical team of PCCUs and in improving patient-related clinical outcomes in the PCCU. METHODS Prospective educational intervention with simultaneous clinical assessment was undertaken in PCCU in an academic children's hospital. TPSS was developed utilizing the case presentation format for upcoming week's surgical cases and delivered once every week to each PCCU clinical team member. Role of TPSS to provide clinical education was assessed using five-point Likert-style scale responses in an anonymous survey 1 year after TPSS provision. Paediatric cardiac surgery patients admitted to the PCCU were evaluated for postoperative outcomes for TPSS provision period of 1 year and compared with a preintervention period of 1 year. RESULTS TPSS was delivered to 259 clinical team members including faculty, fellows, residents, nurse practitioners, nurses, respiratory therapists and others from the Divisions of Anesthesia, Cardiology, Cardio-Thoracic Surgery, Critical Care, and Pediatrics working in the PCCU. Two hundred and twenty-four (86%) members responded to the survey and assessed the role of TPSS in providing clinical education to be excellent based on mean Likert-style scores of 4.32 ± 0.71 in survey responses. Seven hundred patients were studied for the two time periods and there were no differences in patient demographics, complexity of cardiac defect and surgical details. The length of mechanical ventilation for the TPSS period (57.08 ± 141.44 h) was significantly less when compared with preintervention period (117.39 ± 433.81 h) (P < 0.001) with no differences in length of PCICU stay, hospital stay and mortality for the two time periods

  1. Bloodless Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Bypass for a 3.2-kg Patient Whose Parents are of Jehovah’s Witness Faith

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, Todd M.; Hodge, Ashley B.; Preston, Thomas J.; Galantowicz, Mark; Naguib, Aymen; Gomez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Patients and parents of Jehovah’s Witness (JW) faith present multiple challenges to a medical team, especially in the neonatal and pediatric population. The medical team must balance honoring the parents’ request of not receiving blood products and fulfilling our commitment as advocates for the child’s wellbeing. A multidisciplinary approach to cardiac surgery must be embraced for bloodless cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to be successful. At our institution, we have developed strategies and techniques for blood conservation that are used preoperatively, intraoperatively, and postoperatively for every CPB case with the goal of a bloodless procedure. These protocols include: preoperative erythropoietin, preoperative iron administration, selection of a CPB circuit specific to the patient’s height and weight, acute normovolemic hemodilution, retrograde autologous prime and venous autologous prime, tranexamic acid administration, zerobalance ultrafiltration, flushing of the pump suckers post-CPB, modified ultrafiltration, and cell salvage. We present an 8-day-old, 3.2-kg patient of JW faith with aortic valve stenosis and regurgitation and a patent foramen ovale who underwent a bloodless left ventricle-to-aorta tunnel repair and aortic valve repair on CPB. PMID:25208437

  2. Controversies in intraocular lens implantation in pediatric uveitis.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Sumita; Lowder, Careen; Pavesio, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Cataract is one of the most common and visually debilitating complications of pediatric uveitis. It develops as a consequence of chronic inflammation and steroid use and is seen most often in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. Cataract extraction with intraocular lens (IOL) insertion has been carried out with a measure of success in non-uveitic pediatric eyes, but in cases of uveitis, multiple factors affect the final outcome. Chronic inflammation and its sequelae such as band keratopathy, posterior synechiae, and cyclitic membranes make surgical intervention more challenging and outcome less certain. Postoperative complications like increased inflammation, glaucoma, posterior capsular opacification, retrolental membranes, and hypotony may compromise the visual outcome. Early refractive correction is imperative in pediatric eyes to prevent amblyopia. The use of contact lenses and intraocular lenses in pediatric uveitic eyes were fraught with complications in the past. Surgical interventions such as vitreo-lensectomy followed by contact lens fitting and small incision cataract surgery followed by different types of intraocular lenses have been utilized, and many reports have been published, albeit in small patient groups. This review analyzes and discusses the existing literature on intraocular lens implantation in cases of pediatric uveitic cataract surgery. PMID:27009616

  3. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduced appetite Alternate Names Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - ... of the aorta Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery Patent ductus arteriosus Pediatric heart surgery Tetralogy of Fallot ...

  4. American Academy of Pediatrics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bright Futures Medical Home Clinical Support Pediatric Care Online Patient Education Online Bright Futures Medical Home Connected Kids Red Book ... Finding a Job Career Support Professional Education PediaLink/Online Education Maintenance of Certification Professional Education Publications MOC | ...

  5. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  6. Pediatric oncology in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Shamvil

    2012-03-01

    Pediatric oncology in Pakistan has developed over last decade with substantial increase in the facility for treatment and number of expertise. Though large numbers of children still do not reach treatment center more children have now access to quality cancer treatment. There has been gradual improvement in Pediatric oncology nursing and allied services. Pediatric Palliative care in Pakistan is in initial phase of development. Pediatric Oncology services are largely supported by philanthropists. Children Cancer Hospital a project of Children Cancer Foundation Pakistan Trust is not only providing quality treatment to every child regardless of paying ability but also playing a pivotal role in capacity building and creating awareness about childhood cancer in Pakistan. PMID:22357147

  7. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... to make progress in “immunogenomics” Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  8. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  9. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprue Association/USA Gluten Intoloerance Group of North America NASPGHAN Foundation Supporters Educational support for the NASPGHAN ... NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pediatric IBD Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Research & Grants Our Supporters Site Map © ...

  10. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... after the baby is born. For others, your child may be able to safely wait for months ...

  11. NIH Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients without discrimination on the basis of race, religion, ethnic group, citizenship, or residence. We can provide ... studies to help understand pediatric rheumatic diseases. Natural history studies, for example, are designed to study how ...

  12. Epidemiology and Outcomes from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in Children: The ROC Epistry-Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Dianne L.; Everson-Stewart, Siobhan; Sears, Gena K.; Daya, Mohamud; Osmond, Martin H.; Warden, Craig R.; Berg, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Population-based data for pediatric cardiac arrest are scant and largely from urban areas. The Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) Epistry-Cardiac Arrest is a population-based emergency medical services (EMS) registry of out-of-hospital non-traumatic cardiac arrest (OHCA). This study examined age-stratified incidence and outcomes of pediatric OHCA. We hypothesized that survival to hospital discharge is less frequent from pediatric OHCA than adult OHCA. METHODS AND RESULTS Design Prospective population-based cohort study. Setting Eleven US and Canadian ROC sites. Population Persons <20 years who a) receive CPR or defibrillation by emergency medical services (EMS) providers and/or receive bystander AED shock or b) pulseless but receive no EMS resuscitation between December 2005 and March 2007. Patients were a priori stratified into 3 groups: <1 year (infants, n = 277), 1–11 years (children, n = 154), and 12–19 years (adolescents, n = 193). The incidence of pediatric OHCA was 8.04/100,000 person-years (72.71 in infants, 3.73 in children, and 6.37 in adolescents) versus 126.52 for adults. Survival for all pediatric OHCA was 6.4% (3.3% for infants, 9.1% for children and 8.9% for adolescents) versus 4.5% for adults (P=0.03). Unadjusted odds ratio (95% CI) for pediatric survival to discharge compared with adults was 0.71 (0.37, 1.39) for infants, 2.11 (1.21, 3.66) for children, and 2.04 (1.24, 3.38) for adolescents. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that the incidence of OHCA in infants approaches that observed in adults but is lower among children and adolescents. Survival to discharge was more common among children and adolescents than infants or adults. PMID:19273724

  13. Integrative Nutrition for Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, Jessi; Hall, Amanda; Dean, Amy; Godwin, Bridget; Mascarenhas, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Food is essential for life. Yet, poor food choices may cause poor health. Dietary manipulation is frequently integrated into the management of common chronic pediatric conditions. Parents seek dietary information to have more control over child's condition and to avoid side effects of medicine. This article reviews selected diets for a few common pediatric disorders including eczema, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, headache and migraine, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:26832886

  14. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Treves, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the diagnostic techniques of nuclear medicine as applied in pediatric patients. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of scintigraphy of organ systems for diagnostic purposes. The topics covered are: scintigraphy of skeleton, bone marrow spleen, liver, thyroid, lungs, urinary tract, brain, heart and cerebrospinal fluid. The pathology and scintigraphy of lacrimal glands is also covered. Other diagnostic techniques of radiology in pediatrics are also briefly discussed for comparative evaluation.

  15. Correlative pediatric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, I.; Delbeke, D.; Sandler, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear medicine, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered ideal imaging modalities for pediatric patients. The future is even more promising for pediatric imaging with the development of newer and improved radiopharmaceuticals, instrumentation and diagnostic modalities such as positron emission tomography, labeled monoclonal antibodies, and faster dynamic and contrast enhanced MRI methods. However, correlation of more conventional imaging modalities with nuclear medicine, ultrasound and MRI remain essential for optimal patient care. 43 references.

  16. Pediatric Open Fractures.

    PubMed

    Trionfo, Arianna; Cavanaugh, Priscilla K; Herman, Martin J

    2016-07-01

    Open fractures in children are rare and are typically associated with better prognoses compared with their adult equivalents. Regardless, open fractures pose a challenge because of the risk of healing complications and infection, leading to significant morbidity even in the pediatric population. Therefore, the management of pediatric open fractures requires special consideration. This article comprehensively reviews the initial evaluation, classification, treatment, outcomes, and controversies of open fractures in children. PMID:27241379

  17. Pediatric upper gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Odgren, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal examinations are common procedures in many radiology departments. Performing this examination on pediatric patients requires understanding the formation of the gastrointestinal tract and the various disease processes and anatomical variances that can occur. The examination also requires a thorough patient history. This article discusses embryologic development and anatomy of the small bowel and colon, disease processes and conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal tract examinations performed on the pediatric and neonatal patient. PMID:24806054

  18. Imaging of cardiac sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Erthal, Fernanda; Juneau, Daniel; Lim, Siok P; Dwivedi, Girish; Nery, Pablo B; Birnie, David; Beanlands, Rob S

    2016-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease. Cardiac involvement is described in up to 50% of the cases. The disease spectrum is wide and cardiac manifestations ranges from being asymptomatic to heart failure, arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. The diagnosis of cardiac sarcoidosis can be challenging due to its non-specific nature and the focal involvement of the heart. In this review, we discuss the utility of a stepwise approach with multimodality cardiac imaging in the diagnosis and management of CS. PMID:27225318

  19. [Neuropsychological and psychopathologic changes following cardiac surgical procedures].

    PubMed

    Walzer, T A; Herrmann, M

    1998-02-01

    Neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric disorders following open heart surgery are estimated to occur in as many as 80 per cent of all patients. They have been recognised from the very beginning of modern heart surgery. Despite a huge amount of scientific literature, data concerning incidence, the phenomenology and duration of symptoms diverge. This finding may be explained by heterogeneous aetiopathogenetic concepts and methodological and terminological problems associated with the investigation of postoperative delirium or neuropsychological and psychopathological sequelae of cardiac surgery. Nowadays, most authors agree in respect of a multifactorial pathogenesis of cognitive deficits following cardiac surgery. Factors influencing the psychopathological and neuropsychological outcome of cardiac surgery can be divided into pre-, intra- and postoperative variables. Advanced age, degree of cardiovascular impairment and other case histories, as well as history of drug abuse, are those preoperative variables that may be responsible for a postoperative cognitive decline. The predictive value of personality traits (depression and/or anxiety), however, is most controversial. Among the intraoperative variables related to the postoperative cognitive state, are e.g. the type of operation and technical procedure (micro-/macroembolism due to the way of oxygenation, pulsatile/-non-pulsatile flow) and duration of extracorporeal circulation. In the postoperative period, the duration of intubation or ICU stay and related variables (like sleep or sensory deprivation/hyperstimulation) were identified as significant predictors of neuropsychological and psychopathological alterations. Modern research focusses on neurobiochemical markers of brain injury which may serve as early predictors of a postoperative cognitive decrease. These parameters may indicate an early postoperative diagnosis and neuroprotective treatment in patients at risk. PMID:9512983

  20. Postoperative complications and mortality after surgery for gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Viste, A; Haùgstvedt, T; Eide, G E; Søreide, O

    1988-01-01

    Complication rates and postoperative mortality were studied in 1010 consecutive patients entered into the Norwegian Stomach Cancer Trial. Twenty-eight per cent of the patients had one or more complications (31% of the men and 21% of the women). General complications (pneumonia, thromboembolic, and cardiac) were most frequent. The postoperative mortality rate for resected patients was 8.3% (63 of 763). Complication and mortality rates were highest for proximal resections (52% and 16%) followed by total gastrectomy (38% and 8%), subtotal resection (28% and 10%), and distal resection (19% and 7%). By logistic regression analysis it was found that age, sex, operative procedure, prophylactic antibiotics, and splenectomy were significantly related to postoperative complications. The odds ratio for complication for men versus women was 1.75: for no antibiotics versus antibiotic prophylaxis it was 2.5. Relative to distal resection the odds ratio for complications after subtotal resection was 2.2, for total gastrectomy was 3.9, and for proximal resection was 7.6. Age and sex were the only factors that affected operative mortality. The odds ratio for mortality for men versus women was 2.3. The odds ratio for operative mortality was 2.2 when the age of the patient increased with 10 years. PMID:3337564

  1. Coagulopathy and transfusion therapy in pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nacoti, Mirco; Corbella, Davide; Fazzi, Francesco; Rapido, Francesca; Bonanomi, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding and coagulopathy are critical issues complicating pediatric liver transplantation and contributing to morbidity and mortality in the cirrhotic child. The complexity of coagulopathy in the pediatric patient is illustrated by the interaction between three basic models. The first model, “developmental hemostasis”, demonstrates how a different balance between pro- and anticoagulation factors leads to a normal hemostatic capacity in the pediatric patient at various ages. The second, the “cell based model of coagulation”, takes into account the interaction between plasma proteins and cells. In the last, the concept of “rebalanced coagulation” highlights how the reduction of both pro- and anticoagulation factors leads to a normal, although unstable, coagulation profile. This new concept has led to the development of novel techniques used to analyze the coagulation capacity of whole blood for all patients. For example, viscoelastic methodologies are increasingly used on adult patients to test hemostatic capacity and to guide transfusion protocols. However, results are often confounding or have limited impact on morbidity and mortality. Moreover, data from pediatric patients remain inadequate. In addition, several interventions have been proposed to limit blood loss during transplantation, including the use of antifibrinolytic drugs and surgical techniques, such as the piggyback and lowering the central venous pressure during the hepatic dissection phase. The rationale for the use of these interventions is quite solid and has led to their incorporation into clinical practice; yet few of them have been rigorously tested in adults, let alone in children. Finally, the postoperative period in pediatric cohorts of patients has been characterized by an enhanced risk of hepatic vessel thrombosis. Thrombosis in fact remains the primary cause of early graft failure and re-transplantation within the first 30 d following surgery, and it occurs despite prolongation

  2. Postoperative small bowel obstruction in infants and children.

    PubMed Central

    Festen, C

    1982-01-01

    In the Pediatric Surgical Department of The St Radboud Hospital, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, between January 1970 and December 1980, 1476 laparotomies were performed on neonates, infants, and children. In 33 of these patient the abdominal surgery was complicated by a postoperative small bowel obstruction (SBO), for which a second laparotomy had to be performed. In 80% of patients this SBO developed within three months of the prior operation. The risk of developing an adhesive SBO was greater when there was more than one prior peritoneal procedure, and when, during this prior procedure, there was already a peritonitis. There was no obvious relation with the nature of the original operation. In more than 70% of patients a single adhesion caused the obstruction, while in many of these cases there were already circulatory disturbances, even by early reintervention. The mortality was 6%. PMID:7125744

  3. A Review of Current Analgesic Techniques in Cardiac Surgery. Is Epidural Worth it?

    PubMed Central

    Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Azarfarin, Rasoul; Golzari, Samad EJ

    2014-01-01

    In this review we addressed the various analgesic techniques in cardiac surgery, especially regional methods such as thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA). There are many techniques available for management of postoperative pain after cardiac operation including intravenous administration of analgesic drugs, infiltration of local anesthetics, nerve blocks, and neuroaxial techniques. Although there are many evidences declaring the benefits of neuroaxial blockade in improving postoperative well-being and quality of care in these patients, some studies have revealed limited effect of TEA on overall morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. On the other hand, some investigators have raised the concern about epidural hematoma in altered coagulation and risks of infection and local anesthetics toxicity during and after cardiac procedures. In present review, we tried to discuss the most recent arguments in the field of this controversial issue. The final conclusion about either using regional anesthesia in cardiac surgery or not has been assigned to the readers. PMID:25320659

  4. Complications of tracheal intubation in critically ill pediatric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Suhail Sarwar; Janarthanan, S.; Harish, M. M.; Chaudhari, Harish; Prabu, R. Natesh; Divatia, Jigeeshu V.; Kulkarni, Atul Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The oncologists are treating cancer more aggressively, leading to increase in number of pediatric admissions to the ICU. Due to anatomical and physiological differences, pediatric patients are at high risk of complications during intubation. We evaluated the incidence of complications during intubations in pediatric patients in our ICU. Subjects and Methods: We performed retrospective analysis of complications occurring during intubation in 42 pediatric patients. All intubations were orotracheal. We recorded number of attempts at intubation, need for use of intubation adjuncts and complications during laryngoscopy and intubation. The incidence of difficult intubation, hypoxia, and severe cardiovascular collapse was also noted. Results: Complications occurred during 13 (31%) intubations. Hypoxia and severe cardiovascular collapse occurred in during 7 (16.7%) intubations each, while 4 patients (9.5%) (n=4) had cardiac arrest during intubation. Thirty three (78.6%) intubations were successful in first attempt and difficult intubation was recorded in 4 patients. Conclusion: Critically ill pediatric cancer patients have a high rate of complications during intubation. PMID:27555695

  5. Pediatric integrative medicine: pediatrics' newest subspecialty?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine is defined as relationship-centered care that focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing, including evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine. Pediatric integrative medicine (PIM) develops and promotes this approach within the field of pediatrics. We conducted a survey to identify and describe PIM programs within academic children’s hospitals across North America. Key barriers and opportunities were identified for the growth and development of academic PIM initiatives in the US and Canada. Methods Academic PIM programs were identified by email and eligible for inclusion if they had each of educational, clinical, and research activities. Program directors were interviewed by telephone regarding their clinical, research, educational, and operational aspects. Results Sixteen programs were included. Most (75%) programs provided both inpatient and outpatient services. Seven programs operated with less than 1 FTE clinical personnel. Credentialing of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers varied substantially across the programs and between inpatient and outpatient services. Almost all (94%) programs offered educational opportunities for residents in pediatrics and/or family medicine. One fifth (20%) of the educational programs were mandatory for medical students. Research was conducted in a range of topics, but half of the programs reported lack of research funding and/or time. Thirty-one percent of the programs relied on fee-for-service income. Conclusions Pediatric integrative medicine is emerging as a new subspecialty to better help address 21st century patient concerns. PMID:22894682

  6. Analysis of steps adapted protocol in cardiac rehabilitation in the hospital phase

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Dallazen, Fernanda; Bronzatti, Angela Beerbaum Steinke; Lorenzoni, Juliara Cristina Werner; Windmöller, Pollyana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze a cardiac rehabilitation adapted protocol in physical therapy during the postoperative hospital phase of cardiac surgery in a service of high complexity, in aspects regarded to complications and mortality prevalence and hospitalization days. Methods This is an observational cross-sectional, retrospective and analytical study performed by investigating 99 patients who underwent cardiac surgery for coronary artery bypass graft, heart valve replacement or a combination of both. Step program adapted for rehabilitation after cardiac surgery was analyzed under the command of the physiotherapy professional team. Results In average, a patient stays for two days in the Intensive Care Unit and three to four days in the hospital room, totalizing six days of hospitalization. Fatalities occurred in a higher percentage during hospitalization (5.1%) and up to two years period (8.6%) when compared to 30 days after hospital discharge (1.1%). Among the postoperative complications, the hemodynamic (63.4%) and respiratory (42.6%) were the most prevalent. 36-42% of complications occurred between the immediate postoperative period and the second postoperative day. The hospital discharge started from the fifth postoperative day. We can observe that in each following day, the patients are evolving in achieving the Steps, where Step 3 was the most used during the rehabilitation phase I. Conclusion This evolution program by steps can to guide the physical rehabilitation at the hospital in patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:25859866

  7. Acute Kidney Injury Subsequent to Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Robert S.; Herron, Crystal R.; Groom, Robert C.; Brown, Jeremiah R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and underappreciated syndrome that is associated with poor short- and long-term outcomes. AKI after cardiac surgery may be epiphenomenon, a signal for adverse outcomes by virtue of other affected organ systems, and a consequence of multiple factors. Subtle increases in serum creatinine (SCr) postoperatively, once considered inconsequential, have been shown to reflect a kidney injury that likely occurred in the operating room during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and more often in susceptible individuals. The postoperative elevation in SCr is a delayed signal reflecting the intraoperative injury. Preoperative checklists and the conduct of CPB represent opportunities for prevention of AKI. Newer definitions of AKI provide us with an opportunity to scrutinize perioperative processes of care and determine strategies to decrease the incidence of AKI subsequent to cardiac surgery. Recognizing and mitigating risk factors preoperatively and optimizing intraoperative practices may, in the aggregate, decrease the incidence of AKI. This review explores the pathophysiology of AKI and addresses the features of patients who are the most vulnerable to AKI. Preoperative strategies are discussed with particular attention to a readiness for surgery checklist. Intraoperative strategies include minimizing hemodilution and maximizing oxygen delivery with specific suggestions regarding fluid management and plasma preservation. PMID:26390675

  8. Acute Kidney Injury Subsequent to Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Robert S; Herron, Crystal R; Groom, Robert C; Brown, Jeremiah R

    2015-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is a common and underappreciated syndrome that is associated with poor shortand long-term outcomes. AKI after cardiac surgery may be epiphenomenon, a signal for adverse outcomes by virtue of other affected organ systems, and a consequence of multiple factors. Subtle increases in serum creatinine (SCr) postoperatively, once considered inconsequential, have been shown to reflect a kidney injury that likely occurred in the operating room during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and more often in susceptible individuals. The postoperative elevation in SCr is a delayed signal reflecting the intraoperative injury. Preoperative checklists and the conduct of CPB represent opportunities for prevention of AKI. Newer definitions of AKI provide us with an opportunity to scrutinize perioperative processes of care and determine strategies to decrease the incidence of AKI subsequent to cardiac surgery. Recognizing and mitigating risk factors preoperatively and optimizing intraoperative practices may, in the aggregate, decrease the incidence of AKI. This review explores the pathophysiology of AKI and addresses the features of patients who are the most vulnerable to AKI. Preoperative strategies are discussed with particular attention to a readiness for surgery checklist. Intraoperative strategies include minimizing hemodilution and maximizing oxygen delivery with specific suggestions regarding fluid management and plasma preservation. PMID:26390675

  9. Postoperative Care of the Facial Laceration

    PubMed Central

    Medel, Nicholas; Panchal, Neeraj; Ellis, Edward

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine factors involved in the postoperative care of traumatic lacerations. An evidence-based comprehensive literature review was conducted. There are a limited number of scientifically proven studies that guide surgeons and emergency room physicians on postoperative care. Randomized controlled trials must be conducted to further standardize the postoperative protocol for simple facial lacerations. PMID:22132257

  10. Anesthesia for a pediatric patient with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lam, Humphrey; Dare, Shannon; Nguyen, Thanh; Austin, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome is a rare syndrome that is characterized by distinct craniofacial features, cardiac abnormalities, and multiple organ involvement. Patients may present with pulmonary stenosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, micrognathia, a short neck, laryngomalacia, and tracheomalacia; all of which may significantly impact the perioperative course of these patients. We describe a 6-year-old child with cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome presenting for an orthopedic procedure. He had an uneventful perioperative and postoperative course. PMID:25827862

  11. Neuroimaging of the Postoperative Spine.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Matteo; Ferrara, Marco; Grazzini, Irene; Cerase, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    Operative treatments of the spine are becoming increasingly more common for the availability of a wide range of surgical and minimally invasive procedures. MR imaging allows for excellent evaluation of both normal and abnormal findings in the postoperative spine. This article provides the basic tools to evaluate complications after different operative procedures and offers an overview on the main topics a radiologist may encounter during his or her professional carrier. PMID:27417403

  12. Cardiac perception and cardiac control. A review.

    PubMed

    Carroll, D

    1977-12-01

    The evidence regarding specific cardiac perception and discrimination, and its relationship to voluntary cardiac control, is critically reviewed. Studies are considered in three sections, depending on the method used to assess cardiac perception: questionnaire assessment, discrimination procedures, and heartbeat tracking. The heartbeat tracking procedure would appear to suffer least from interpretative difficulties. Recommendations are made regarding the style of analysis used to assess heartbeat perception in such tracking tasks. PMID:348240

  13. Therapeutic Hypothermia and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in a Child with Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Spurkeland, Nancy; Bennett, Gregory; Alexander, Chandran; Chang, Dennis; Ceneviva, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Neurologic outcomes following pediatric cardiac arrest are consistently poor. Early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation has been shown to have positive effects on both survival to hospital discharge, and improved neurological outcomes after cardiac arrest. Additionally, the use of therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival in pediatric cardiac arrest patients admitted to the intensive care unit. We report a child with congenital hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy and an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, in whom the early initiation of effective prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation and subsequent administration of therapeutic hypothermia contributed to a positive outcome with no gross neurologic sequelae. Continuing efforts should be made to promote and employ high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation, which likely contributed to the positive outcome of this case. Further research will be necessary to develop and solidify national guidelines for the implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in selected subpopulations of children with OHCA. PMID:25861505

  14. Risk factors for postoperative ileus

    PubMed Central

    Kutun, Suat; Ulucanlar, Haluk; Tarcan, Oguz; Demir, Abdullah; Cetin, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to examine extended postoperative ileus and its risk factors in patients who have undergone abdominal surgery, and discuss the techniques of prevention and management thereof the light of related risk factors connected with our study. Methods This prospective study involved 103 patients who had undergone abdominal surgery. The effects of age, gender, diagnosis, surgical operation conducted, excessive small intestine manipulation, opioid analgesic usage time, and systemic inflammation on the time required for the restoration of intestinal motility were investigated. The parameters were investigated prospectively. Results Regarding the factors that affected the restoration of gastrointestinal motility, resection operation type, longer operation period, longer opioid analgesics use period, longer nasogastric catheter use period, and the presence of systemic inflammation were shown to retard bowel motility for 3 days or more. Conclusion Our study confirmed that unnecessary analgesics use in patients with pain tolerance with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs, excessive small bowel manipulation, prolonged nasogastric catheter use have a direct negative effect on gastrointestinal motility. Considering that an exact treatment for postoperative ileus has not yet been established, and in light of the risk factors mentioned above, we regard that prevention of postoperative ileus is the most effective way of coping with intestinal dysmotility. PMID:22111079

  15. Abdominal compartment syndrome: an underrated complication in pediatric kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Bertocchi, M; Centanaro, M; Varotti, G; Santori, G; Mondello, R; Tagliamacco, A; Cupo, P; Barabani, C; Palombo, D

    2014-09-01

    The transplantation of a large kidney in small children can lead to many complications, including an underrated complication known as abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), which is defined as intra-abdominal pressure (IAP)≥20 mm Hg with dysfunction of at least one thoracoabdominal organ. Presenting signs of ACS include firm tense abdomen, increased peak inspiratory pressures, oliguria, and hypotension. Between June 1, 1985, and September 30, 2013, our center performed 420 kidney transplants (deceased/living related donors: 381/39) in 314 pediatric recipients (female/male: 147/167). ACS occurred in 9 pediatric patients (weight<15 kg) who received a large kidney from adult donors. In 1 case, the patient underwent abdominal decompression with re-exploration and closure with mesh in the immediate postoperative period. In a second case, the patient developed a significant respiratory compromise with hemodynamic instability necessitating catecholamines, sedation, and assisted ventilation. For small children transplanted with a large kidney, an early diagnosis of ACS represents a critical step. From 2005 we have measured IAP during transplantation via urinary bladder pressure, and immediately after wound closure we use intraoperative and postoperative duplex sonography to value flow dynamics changes. We recommend that bladder pressure should be routinely checked in small pediatric kidney recipients who are transplanted with a large graft. PMID:25242763

  16. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Mieke M P; Breur, Johannes M P J; Budde, Ricardo P J; van Oorschot, Joep W M; van Kimmenade, Roland R J; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Meijboom, Folkert J; Leiner, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. PMID:25552386

  17. The preoperative and intraoperative hemodynamic predictors of postoperative myocardial infarction or ischemia in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Charlson, M E; MacKenzie, C R; Gold, J P; Ales, K L; Topkins, M; Fairclough, G P; Shires, G T

    1989-01-01

    Among hypertensive and diabetic patients undergoing elective noncardiac surgery, preoperative status and intraoperative changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) were evaluated as predictors of postoperative ischemic complications. Of 254 patients evaluated before operation and monitored during operation, 30 (12%) had postoperative cardiac death, ischemia, or infarction. Twenty-four per cent of patients with a previous myocardial infarction or cardiomegaly had an ischemic postoperative cardiac complication. Only 7% of those without either of these conditions sustained an ischemic complication. No other preoperative characteristics, including the presence of angina, predicted ischemic cardiac risk. Nineteen per cent of patients who had 20 mm Hg or more intraoperative decreases in MAP lasting 60 minutes or more had ischemic cardiac complications. Patients who had more than 20 mm Hg decreases in MAP lasting 5 to 59 minutes and more than 20 mm Hg increases lasting 15 minutes or more also had increased complications (p less than 0.03). Changes in pulse were not independent predictors of complications and the use of the rate-pressure product did not improve prediction based on MAP alone. In conclusion patients with a previous infarction or radiographic cardiomegaly are at high risk for postoperative ischemic complications. Prolonged intraoperative increases or decreases of 20 mm or more in MAP also resulted in a significant increase in these potentially life-threatening surgical complications. PMID:2530940

  18. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... dealing with children and in treating children with endocrine disorders and hormonal problems. If your pediatrician suggests that your child see a pediatric endocrinologist, you can be assured that your child will receive the best possible care. To find a pediatrician or pediatric specialist in ... © Copyright 2016 American Academy of Pediatrics. All rights reserved.

  19. Pediatric radiology in oto-rhino-laryngology.

    PubMed

    von Kalle, Thekla; Koitschev, Assen

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck diseases in children and adolescents present special diagnostic and differential diagnostic challenges to ENT surgeons as well as to radiologists. Both disciplines have to adapt the latest radiological and interventional technologies to the needs of the pediatric patient in order to enable a minimally invasive but successful diagnostic procedure. High quality sonography by an experienced examiner is often the only imaging technique that is necessary in children and adolescents. Radiographs are rarely indicated in pediatric head and neck diseases. MRI, compared to computed tomography, has the advantage of absent radiation exposure. Additionally, due to current advances in high resolution techniques to delineate very small details or in visualization of different tissue characteristics, it has become an integral part of pre- and postoperative imaging. However, children should not be denied an adequate diagnostic procedure even if it includes sedation, intervention, or exposure to radiation. The responsible use of the diagnostic options under consideration of the therapeutic consequences is essential. It is most likely to be successful in a close interdisciplinary cooperation of pediatric ENT specialists and radiologists as well as pediatric anesthesiologists in selected cases. Although benign diseases predominate in children and adolescents, the possibility of malignancy has to be considered in cases of atypical clinical and radiological findings. In many of these young patients, the outcome and the probability of survival are directly associated with the initial diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, which should therefore be in accordance with the current guidelines of pediatric oncology therapy studies. Our collection of clinical cases consists of representative examples of useful diagnostic approaches in common and age specific diagnoses as well as in rare diseases and malformations. It shows the significance of a special knowledge in embryology and

  20. Pediatric radiology in oto-rhino-laryngology

    PubMed Central

    von Kalle, Thekla; Koitschev, Assen

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck diseases in children and adolescents present special diagnostic and differential diagnostic challenges to ENT surgeons as well as to radiologists. Both disciplines have to adapt the latest radiological and interventional technologies to the needs of the pediatric patient in order to enable a minimally invasive but successful diagnostic procedure. High quality sonography by an experienced examiner is often the only imaging technique that is necessary in children and adolescents. Radiographs are rarely indicated in pediatric head and neck diseases. MRI, compared to computed tomography, has the advantage of absent radiation exposure. Additionally, due to current advances in high resolution techniques to delineate very small details or in visualization of different tissue characteristics, it has become an integral part of pre- and postoperative imaging. However, children should not be denied an adequate diagnostic procedure even if it includes sedation, intervention, or exposure to radiation. The responsible use of the diagnostic options under consideration of the therapeutic consequences is essential. It is most likely to be successful in a close interdisciplinary cooperation of pediatric ENT specialists and radiologists as well as pediatric anesthesiologists in selected cases. Although benign diseases predominate in children and adolescents, the possibility of malignancy has to be considered in cases of atypical clinical and radiological findings. In many of these young patients, the outcome and the probability of survival are directly associated with the initial diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, which should therefore be in accordance with the current guidelines of pediatric oncology therapy studies. Our collection of clinical cases consists of representative examples of useful diagnostic approaches in common and age specific diagnoses as well as in rare diseases and malformations. It shows the significance of a special knowledge in embryology and

  1. Early Experience with Biodegradable Fixation of Pediatric Mandibular Fractures.

    PubMed

    Mazeed, Ahmed Salah; Shoeib, Mohammed Abdel-Raheem; Saied, Samia Mohammed Ahmed; Elsherbiny, Ahmed

    2015-09-01

    This clinical study aims to evaluate the stability and efficiency of biodegradable self-reinforced poly-l/dl-lactide (SR-PLDLA) plates and screws for fixation of pediatric mandibular fractures. The study included 12 patients (3-12 years old) with 14 mandibular fractures. They were treated by open reduction and internal fixation by SR-PLDLA plates and screws. Maxillomandibular fixation was maintained for 1 week postoperatively. Clinical follow-up was performed at 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively. Radiographs were done at 1 week, 3 months, and 12 months postoperatively to observe any displacement and fracture healing. All fractures healed both clinically and radiologically. No serious complications were reported in the patients. Normal occlusion was achieved in all cases. Biodegradable osteofixation of mandibular fractures offers a valuable clinical solution for pediatric patients getting the benefit of avoiding secondary surgery to remove plates, decreasing the hospital stay, further painful procedures, and psychological impact. PMID:26269728

  2. [Postoperative pulmonary complications: prophylaxis after noncardiac surgery].

    PubMed

    Hofer, S; Plachky, J; Fantl, R; Schmidt, J; Bardenheuer, H J; Weigand, M A

    2006-04-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are a major problem after upper abdominal or thoracoabdominal surgery. They lead to a prolonged ICU stay as well as increased costs and are one of the main causes of early postoperative mortality. Even after uncomplicated operations, postoperative hypoxemia occurs in 30-50% of patients. Acute respiratory failure involves a disturbance in gas exchange. The mortality ranges from 10 to 60% according to the severity of respiratory failure. The most important complications are interstitial and alveolar pulmonary edema, atelectasis, postoperative pneumonia, hypoventilation, and aspiration. Preoperative optimization, postoperative prophylaxis according to a stepwise approach, and early mobilization decrease the rate of complications. PMID:16575614

  3. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  4. Integrative Pediatrics: Looking Forward

    PubMed Central

    McClafferty, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Increase in the prevalence of disease and illness has dramatically altered the landscape of pediatrics. As a result, there is a demand for pediatricians with new skills and a sharper focus on preventative health. Patient demand and shifting pediatric illness patterns have accelerated research in the field of pediatric integrative medicine. This emerging field can be defined as healing-oriented medicine that considers the whole child, including all elements of lifestyle and family health. It is informed by evidence and carefully weighs all appropriate treatment options. This Special Issue of Children, containing a collection of articles written by expert clinicians, represents an important educational contribution to the field. The goal of the edition is to raise awareness about integrative topics with robust supporting evidence, and to identify areas where more research is needed.

  5. Ethics in pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John B; Makkar, Hanspaul S

    2012-01-01

    The patient-parent-physician relationship is central to studying medical ethics in pediatric dermatology. The rights of children in medical decision making are ambiguous, and parents and physicians will often override the autonomy of a child when a particular treatment is deemed to be in the child's best interest. The use of physical restraint to enforce a treatment should be justified, and a reasonable attempt should be made to ensure the cooperation of the child, if possible. Medical photography is central to the practice of pediatric dermatology in that it allows for serial observation of cutaneous lesions over time. Established guidelines and standards should be followed. Pediatric dermatologists frequently prescribe medications off-label; if following established professional standards, and prescribing with good intention, off-label prescribing can be appropriate and rational. PMID:22902215

  6. Causes and managements of postoperative complications after degenerative scoliosis treatments with internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong-Hong; Zheng, Jie; Lou, Shu-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the causes and managements of early postoperative complications of degenerative scoliosis (DS) treated with internal pedicle screw fixation. Methods: From Jan 2000 to Apr 2013, 325 DS patients treated with internal pedicle screw fixation in our hospital were retrospectively involved. The categories, causes, managements and outcomes of early postoperative complications were statistically analyzed. Results: Early postoperative complications occurred in 10.76% of the patients including 16 cases of lower limb numb or pain, 6 cases of decreased lower limb sensitivity and motor functions, which accounted for 62.86% of all complications, followed by incision infections (4/35, 11.43%) and rare cases of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, cardiac and renal inadequacy, urinary system and pulmonary infections. The incidence of overall complications (19.79%, p = 0.001) and nerve injuries (11.46%, p = 0.000) were significantly higher in long-segment than in short-segment fixations. Improper screw implanting, over correction of scoliosis and insufficient blood supply of the spinal cord during operation were risk factors for early postoperative complications and most of them were cured by anti-infection medication, incision dressing change, nerve nourishment, adjusting the screws and anti-osteoporosis treatments within 6 months after surgery. Only three cases with severe nerve injury did not improve until the 6 months postoperative follow-up. Conclusions: Most of the postoperative complications in our DS patients disappeared within 6 months after surgery and more than half of complications were nerve injuries. PMID:25550945

  7. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  8. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  9. Pharmacokinetics of paracetamol after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, C S; Underhill, S; Booker, P D

    1990-01-01

    Plasma concentration was measured after rectal and nasogastric administration of paracetamol 15 mg/kg to 28 febrile children aged between 9 days to 7 years who had undergone cardiac surgery. After equivalent doses, rectal administration in neonates and children on the first postoperative day was found to produce plasma concentrations below the therapeutic range with higher concentrations after nasogastric paracetamol on the second postoperative day. There was less variance in plasma paracetamol concentrations in neonates. Both plasma elimination half life and area under the plasma concentration time curve were significantly increased in neonates after suppository dosing compared with older children. There was no difference in antipyretic effect between the two routes of administration, but this was much lower than that previously reported in febrile children. PMID:2221970

  10. Pediatric Cardiology Boot Camp: Description and Evaluation of a Novel Intensive Training Program for Pediatric Cardiology Trainees.

    PubMed

    Ceresnak, Scott R; Axelrod, David M; Motonaga, Kara S; Johnson, Emily R; Krawczeski, Catherine D

    2016-06-01

    The transition from residency to subspecialty fellowship in a procedurally driven field such as pediatric cardiology is challenging for trainees. We describe and assess the educational value of a pediatric cardiology "boot camp" educational tool designed to help prepare trainees for cardiology fellowship. A two-day intensive training program was provided for pediatric cardiology fellows in July 2015 at a large fellowship training program. Hands-on experiences and simulations were provided in: anatomy, auscultation, echocardiography, catheterization, cardiovascular intensive care (CVICU), electrophysiology (EP), heart failure, and cardiac surgery. Knowledge-based exams as well as surveys were completed by each participant pre-training and post-training. Pre- and post-exam results were compared via paired t tests, and survey results were compared via Wilcoxon rank sum. A total of eight participants were included. After boot camp, there was a significant improvement between pre- and post-exam scores (PRE 54 ± 9 % vs. POST 85 ± 8 %; p ≤ 0.001). On pre-training survey, the most common concerns about starting fellowship included: CVICU emergencies, technical aspects of the catheterization/EP labs, using temporary and permanent pacemakers/implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs), and ECG interpretation. Comparing pre- and post-surveys, there was a statistically significant improvement in the participants comfort level in 33 of 36 (92 %) areas of assessment. All participants (8/8, 100 %) strongly agreed that the boot camp was a valuable learning experience and helped to alleviate anxieties about the start of fellowship. A pediatric cardiology boot camp experience at the start of cardiology fellowship can provide a strong foundation and serve as an educational springboard for pediatric cardiology fellows. PMID:26961569

  11. Cardiac conduction system

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cardiac muscle cells in the walls of the heart that send signals to the heart muscle causing it to contract. The main components ... the cardiac conduction system’s electrical activity in the heart.

  12. What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Is Cardiac Rehabilitation? A cardiac rehabilitation (rehab) program takes place in a hospital or ... special help in making lifestyle changes. During your rehabilitation program you’ll… • Have a medical evaluation to ...

  13. Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    MedlinePlus

    ... from American Heart Association Aneurysms and Dissections Angina Arrhythmia Bundle Branch Block Cardiomyopathy Carotid Artery Disease Chronic ... terms: SCA, sudden cardiac death (SCD), sudden death, arrhythmias, ... ventricular fibrillation, defibrillator, automatic cardiac defibrillator ( ...

  14. Current developments in pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hackl, Christina; Schlitt, Hans J; Melter, Michael; Knoppke, Birgit; Loss, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In 1953, the pioneer of human orthotopic liver transplantation (LT), Thomas E Starzl, was the first to attempt an orthotopic liver transplant into a 3 years old patient suffering from biliary atresia. Thus, the first LT in humans was attempted in a disease, which, up until today, remains the main indication for pediatric LT (pLT). During the last sixty years, refinements in diagnostics and surgical technique, the introduction of new immunosuppressive medications and improvements in perioperative pediatric care have established LT as routine procedure for childhood acute and chronic liver failure as well as inherited liver diseases. In contrast to adult recipients, pLT differs greatly in indications for LT, allocation practice, surgical technique, immunosuppression and post-operative life-long aftercare. Many aspects are focus of ongoing preclinical and clinical research. The present review gives an overview of current developments and the clinical outcome of pLT, with a focus on alternatives to full-size deceased-donor organ transplantation. PMID:26085910

  15. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored. PMID:27265605

  16. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie

    2011-06-01

    Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included. PMID:21628042

  17. Psychological issues in pediatric obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Gurvinder; De Sousa, Avinash; Sonavane, Sushma; Shah, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric obesity is a major health problem and has reached epidemiological proportions today. The present paper reviews major psychological issues in pediatric obesity from a developmental perspective. Research and literature has shown that a number of developmental, family, maternal and child factors are responsible in the genesis of pediatric obesity. Family food habits, early developmental lifestyle of the child, parenting, early family relationships and harmony all contribute towards the growth and development of a child. The present review focuses on the role of developmental psychological factors in the pathogenesis of pediatric obesity and highlights the developmental factors that must be kept in mind when evaluating a case of pediatric obesity. PMID:23766572

  18. Mechanical circulatory support: strategies and outcomes in pediatric congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kirklin, James K; Bennett Pearce, F; Dabal, Robert J; Carlo, Waldemar F

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acute or progressive heart failure in the setting of congenital heart disease may need mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to enhance survival while awaiting cardiac transplantation. Because the majority of MCS devices are implanted after prior cardiac operations, special precautions are necessary at the time of implant. MCS in single ventricle patients usually requires ventricular and aortic cannulation, with a systemic to pulmonary artery shunt for pulmonary blood flow. Limited outcomes data is available, with less than 15% of pediatric MCS patients having congenital heart disease. The Berlin EXCOR is the only durable device currently available for infants. Neurologic complications are the major cause of mortality, and survival during support is poor for infants <5 kg. Patients post-Fontan with acute cardiac failure and/or respiratory failure are at high risk for death before transplant and should be considered for MCS therapy. Several emerging miniature continuous flow devices will soon broaden the landscape of available pediatric devices. PMID:24725719

  19. Cardiac Biomarkers: a Focus on Cardiac Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Forough, Reza; Scarcello, Catherine; Perkins, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Historically, biomarkers have been used in two major ways to maintain and improve better health status: first, for diagnostic purposes, and second, as specific targets to treat various diseases. A new era in treatment and even cure for the some diseases using reprograming of somatic cells is about to be born. In this approach, scientists are successfully taking human skin cells (previously considered terminally-differentiated cells) and re-programming them into functional cardiac myocytes and other cell types in vitro. A cell reprograming approach for treatment of cardiovascular diseases will revolutionize the field of medicine and significantly expand the human lifetime. Availability of a comprehensive catalogue for cardiac biomarkers is necessary for developing cell reprograming modalities to treat cardiac diseases, as well as for determining the progress of reprogrammed cells as they become cardiac cells. In this review, we present a comprehensive survey of the cardiac biomarkers currently known. PMID:23074366

  20. Cardiac tumors: leiomyosarcoma – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Syska-Sumińska, Joanna; Zieliński, Piotr; Dłużniewski, Mirosław; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a long history of leiomyosarcoma in different locations. She was admitted to the clinic due to a left ventricular tumor diagnosed in ECHO examination. The patient was qualified for radical tumor resection. The early postoperative period was complicated due to low cardiac output syndrome and bradyarrhythmia requiring temporary cardiac pacing. Optimized pharmacological therapy resulted in a gradual reduction of symptoms and a clinical improvement of congestive heart failure (NYHA III – NYHA II). Due to the radical nature of the surgery, the patient was not referred for supplementary treatment. The follow-up currently exceeds 12 months – no new metastases have been found. This case provides an example of how to diagnose and treat heart tumors. PMID:26702284

  1. The future of pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Boat, Thomas F

    2007-11-01

    The future of pediatric research will be enhanced by strengthening traditional biomedical approaches and embracing emerging opportunities. Biomedical discovery and translation of new knowledge, concepts, and devices into better diagnostic and therapeutic options will require more pediatric physician-scientists, rapid adoption of enabling technologies, increased funding for research and research training (including the creation of federally funded pediatric translational research centers), and a broader distribution of research activities across the academic pediatric community. Rapid improvement of child health outcomes also will be realized through robust health services research in pediatrics, including the application of rigorous quality improvement science that documents and disseminates successful interventions, leading to better access and effectiveness of care. Improving the value of pediatric care is a realistic goal. Achieving better outcomes through individually tailored (personalized) care for children should be tested experimentally. The future of pediatrics is bright, but will depend on the recognition of and response to a growing array of exciting opportunities. PMID:17950318

  2. Pediatric hydrocephalus: Does the shunt device pressure selection affect the outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Arvind; Sharma, Anuj; Gupta, Charitesh

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To compare the efficacy of low- versus medium-pressure shunts in pediatric hydrocephalus in a randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: Forty patients of pediatric hydrocephalus were randomized into two groups. The Chhabra differential pressure VP shunt (low or medium) was inserted in every patient. Postoperative follow-up was performed for symptomatic improvement and radiological evaluation (by sonography or computed tomography scan) for ventricle hemispheric ratio (VHR). Comparative analysis of pre- and postoperative VHR and need of redo surgery for shunt malformation were carried out to establish outcomes. Results: Nineteen patients had a low-pressure and 21 patients had a medium-pressure shunt inserted. The age of the patients ranged from 1 day to 10 years. The average preoperative VHR in group A was 55.37%, which reduced to 40% postoperatively (P = 0.00005); likewise, the pre- and postoperative VHR in group B were 61.57% and 42%, respectively, which was statistically significant (P = 0.0006). The complications of shunts and incidence of redo shunt surgery in both groups were not found to be statistically significant (P = 0.5614). Conclusions: The study found no significant difference in the outcome of patients with low- or medium-pressure shunt placement in pediatric hydrocephalus. PMID:22529548

  3. Efficacy of Analgesic Treatments to Manage Children's Postoperative Pain After Laparoscopic Appendectomy: Retrospective Medical Record Review.

    PubMed

    Manworren, Renee C B; McElligott, Connor D; Deraska, Peter V; Santanelli, James; Blair, Sherry; Ruscher, Kimberly A; Weiss, Richard; Rader, Christine; Finck, Christine; Bourque, Michael; Campbell, Brendan

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of the effectiveness of multimodal analgesic treatments to manage children's postoperative pain during hospital stays is limited. Our retrospective chart review of a convenience sample of 200 pediatric surgical patients' pain experiences during the first 24 hours after laparoscopic appendectomy demonstrates the benefits of a multimodal analgesic approach. We found that pediatric patients who received perioperative IV ketorolac in addition to opioids reported statistically significantly lower mean pain intensity (n = 134, mean [M] = 2.9, standard deviation [SD] = 1.7) during the first 24 hours after surgery when compared with the pain intensity of patients who did not receive perioperative IV ketorolac (n = 66, M = 3.7, SD = 1.7, t = 3.14, P = .002). Patients who received perioperative IV ketorolac (M = 0.94, SD = 0.71) also received significantly fewer morphine equivalents of postoperative opioids during the first 24 hours after surgery than those who did not (M = 1.21, SD = 0.78, t = 2.41, P = .02). We will use data from these patients to introduce the potential for a personalized medicine approach to postoperative pain. PMID:26924376

  4. An Overview of Perioperative Care for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Derieg, Sarah

    2016-07-01

    Care of pediatric surgical patients is not limited to pediatric facilities, and all perioperative RNs should have a basic understanding of the specialized care that children require. This knowledge set includes an understanding of the basic terminology used to describe this patient population as well as the developmental stages of pediatric patients. Preoperatively, the nurse should conduct a thorough assessment and evaluation and address the anxieties and questions of the patient and his or her parent or guardian. Intraoperatively, the nurse should be prepared to help manage difficult intubation, laryngospasm during induction and extubation, difficult IV access, positioning, skin care, surgical site preparation, and thermoregulation. Postoperative care considerations include addressing airway differences, vital signs, pain assessment and management, fluid management, and preparation for discharge. Awareness of the anatomic and physiologic differences, developmental stages, and surgical needs of children will allow the perioperative RN to provide high-quality, safe care to the pediatric surgical patient. PMID:27350350

  5. Special considerations for the use of lung transplantation in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Florian A; Benden, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Lung transplantation has become an accepted therapy in infants, children and adolescents suffering from end-stage lung diseases, an impaired quality of life as well as a reduced life expectancy. Within Europe, pediatric lung transplantation is largely performed in predominantly adult centers due to a relatively low overall case volume. Children do represent a specific and challenging cohort facing a transplant procedure, where the selection of potential candidates becomes a crucial step to maximize net survival benefit. Therefore, interdisciplinary evaluation and early listing in view of current indications and contraindications, adequate preoperative education of the child and family members, discussion of possibly required bridging procedures in case of deterioration, appropriate technical planning of the operation, adherence to postoperative medical treatment and follow-up are all crucial steps in this demanding puzzle. In this article, the authors review recent advances in the field of pediatric lung transplantation and outline challenges in the future. PMID:26998955

  6. Central nervous system infection in the pediatric population

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Kumar, Raj; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    Infection of the central nervous system is a life-threatening condition in the pediatric population. Almost all agents can cause infection within the central nervous system and the extent of infection ranges from diffuse involvement of the meninges, brain, or the spinal cord to localized involvement presenting as a space-occupying lesion. Modern imaging techniques define the anatomic region infected, the evolution of the disease, and help in better management of these patients. Acute bacterial meningitis remains a major cause of mortality and long-term neurological disability. Fortunately, the incidence of infection after clean craniotomy is < 5%, but it leads to significant morbidity as well as fiscal loss. The most significant causative factor in postcraniotomy infections is postoperative CSF leak. Cerebral abscess related to organic congenital heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the pediatric population. The administration of prophylactic antibiotics is indicated for contaminated and clean-contaminated wounds. PMID:21887170

  7. Pediatric nurses' thinking in response to vignettes on administering analgesics.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle Vincent, Catherine; Gaddy, Erica J

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric nurses are not administering available and recommended analgesics to hospitalized children after surgery. This descriptive study was conducted to examine 30 pediatric nurses' thinking-in response to case study vignettes-about pain assessment and morphine administration for children experiencing postoperative pain. Nurses considered numerous factors when assessing and managing children's pain, including pain level, vital signs, and facial expression. Nurses frequently relied, however, on behavioral and physiological manifestations, as opposed to self-report, when choosing whether to administer morphine. Nurses demonstrated misconceptions about pharmacokinetics and unwarranted concerns about the adverse effects of morphine. These findings partly explain why children continue to report high levels of pain after surgery and why nurses may not administer adequate analgesics to relieve children's pain. PMID:19504564

  8. Perioperative Ventilatory Management in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Courteille, Benoît; Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire; Dupont, Hervé; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Protective ventilation is associated with a lower incidence of pulmonary complications. However, there are few published data on routine pulmonary management in adult cardiac surgery. The present study's primary objective was to survey pulmonary management in this high-risk population, as practiced by anesthesiologists in France. All 460 registered France-based cardiac anesthesiologists were invited (by e-mail) to participate in an online survey in January–February 2015. The survey's questionnaire was designed to assess current practice in pre-, per-, and postoperative pulmonary management. In all, 198 anesthesiologists (43% of those invited) participated in the survey. Other than during the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) per se, 179 anesthesiologists (91% of respondees) [95% confidence interval (CI): 87–95] used a low-tidal-volume approach (6–8 mL/kg), whereas techniques based on positive end-expiratory pressure and recruitment maneuvers vary greatly from 1 anesthesiologist to another. During CPB, 104 (53%) [95% CI: 46–60] anesthesiologists withdrew mechanical ventilation (with disconnection, in some cases) and 97 (49%) [95% CI: 42–56] did not prescribe positive end-expiratory pressure. One hundred sixty-five (83%) [95% CI: 78–88] anesthesiologists stated that a written protocol for peroperative pulmonary management was not available. Twenty (10%) [95% CI: 6–14] and 11 (5%) [95% CI: 2–8] anesthesiologists stated that they did use protocols for ventilator use and recruitment maneuvers, respectively. The preoperative period (pulmonary examinations and prescription of additional assessments) and the postoperative period (extubation, and noninvasive ventilation) periods vary greatly from 1 anesthesiologist to another. The great majority of French cardiac anesthesiologists use a low tidal volume during cardiac surgery (other than during CPB per se). However, pulmonary management procedures varied markedly from 1 anesthesiologist to another

  9. Histotripsy for Pediatric Cardiac Applications: In Vivo Neonatal Pig Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ryan M.; Owens, Gabe; Ensing, Gregory; Ludomirsky, Achiau; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2010-03-01

    This study investigated the in vivo feasibility of using histotripsy to non-invasively create a flow channel between the ventricles by generating a perforation of the ventricular septum, clinically referred to as a ventricular septum defect (VSD). The overall goal is to develop a non-invasive procedure to aid in the treatment of neonatal patients with complex congenital heart diseases such as Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS). Histotripsy is a therapeutic ultrasound technique that produces mechanical fractionation of soft tissue through controlled cavitation. The study was conducted in a live and intact neonatal pig model. The ventricular septum in the neonatal pig heart was treated with histotripsy delivered by a spherically focused 1 MHz transducer positioned outside the chest wall. Histotripsy treatment was applied using 5-cycle ultrasound pulses at 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency with 12-18 MPa peak negative pressure. The treatment was guided and monitored with ultrasound imaging. In all nine subjects treated, a bubble cloud was generated on the ventricular septum using histotripsy, and visualized with ultrasound imaging. Within 20 seconds to 4 minutes following the initiation of a bubble cloud, a VSD was created in all nine pigs and confirmed by the detection of blood flow through the ventricular septum with color Doppler ultrasound. Gross morphology and histology on all hearts showed a demarcated perforation in the ventricular septum. This study shows that a VSD can be created in an intact neonatal animal using extracorporeal histotripsy under real-time ultrasound guidance.

  10. Pediatric Low Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Pediatric Low Vision What is Low Vision? Partial vision loss that cannot be corrected causes ... and play. What are the signs of Low Vision? Some signs of low vision include difficulty recognizing ...

  11. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  12. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  13. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  14. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  15. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  16. Pediatric head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, George A; Sfakianos, George; Prodromou, Neofytos

    2011-01-01

    Head injury in children accounts for a large number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions. Falls are the most common type of injury, followed by motor-vehicle-related accidents. In the present study, we discuss the evaluation, neuroimaging and management of children with head trauma. Furthermore, we present the specific characteristics of each type of pediatric head injury. PMID:21887034

  17. Pediatric Glaucoma: Pharmacotherapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Samant, Monica; Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2016-06-01

    Childhood glaucoma is a major therapeutic challenge for pediatric ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialists worldwide. Management depends on the etiology and age at presentation. A variety of drugs are available for the control of intraocular pressure in children; however, none of these drugs have been licensed by the regulatory agencies for use in children. Furthermore, evidence gained from randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population is sparse, and little is known regarding the use of newer anti-glaucoma preparations. This evidence-based review aims to discuss the available pharmacotherapeutic options for glaucoma in children. Topical adrenoceptor blockers, topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin (PG) analogs, adrenoceptor agonists, parasympathomimetics, and combined preparations are available for use in children, but usually as an off-label indication. Therefore, it is important to recognize that serious side effects have been reported, even with topical drops, and measures to reduce systemic absorption should be taken. Most drugs have been shown to have comparable ocular hypotensive effects, with the lowest occurrence of systemic side effects with PG analogs. Whereas a newly introduced prostaglandin analog, tafluprost, and some other preservative-free preparations have shown promising results in adult glaucoma patients, no pediatric reports are available as yet. Future studies may describe their role in treating pediatric glaucoma. This review also shares some suggested treatment pathways for primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), juvenile open angle glaucoma (JOAG), developmental glaucoma, aphakic/pseudophakic glaucoma, and uveitic glaucoma. PMID:27093864

  18. Pediatric psoriasis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric psoriasis consists broadly of 3 age groups of psoriatic patients: infantile psoriasis, a self-limited disease of infancy, psoriasis with early onset, and pediatric psoriasis with psoriatic arthritis. About one-quarter of psoriasis cases begin before the age of 18 years. A variety of clinical psoriasis types are seen in childhood, including plaque-type, guttate, erythrodermic, napkin, and nail-based disease. Like all forms of auto-immunity, susceptibility is likely genetic, but environmental triggers are required to initiate disease activity. The most common trigger of childhood is an upper respiratory tract infection. Once disease has occurred, treatment is determined based on severity and presence of joint involvement. Topical therapies, including corticosteroids and calcipotriene, are the therapies of choice in the initial care of pediatric patients. Ultraviolet light, acitretin and cyclosporine can clear skin symptoms, while methotrexate and etanercept can clear both cutaneous and joint disease. Concern for psychological development is required when choosing psoriatic therapies. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric psoriasis and a rational approach to therapeutics. PMID:19898649

  19. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, A. V.; Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Pokushalov, E. A.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Lotkov, A. I.; Kurlov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using 123I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  20. Neurohumoral indicators of efficacy radiofrequency cardiac denervation

    SciTech Connect

    Evtushenko, A. V. Evtushenko, V. V.; Saushkina, Yu. V.; Gusakova, A. M.; Suslova, T. E.; Dymbrylova, O. N.; Smyshlyaev, K. A.; Kurlov, I. O.; Lishmanov, Yu. B.; Anfinogenova, Ya. D.; Sergeevichev, D. S.; Bykov, A. N.; Syryamkin, V. I.; Kistenev, Yu. V.; Lotkov, A. I.; Pokushalov, E. A.

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we compared pre- and postoperative parameters of the cardiac sympathetic innervation. The aim of the study was to examine the approaches to evaluating the quality of radiofrequency (RF)-induced cardiac denervation by using non-invasive and laboratory methods. The study included 32 people with long-lasting persistent atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the objectives of the study: group 1 (main) - 21 patients with mitral valve diseases, which simultaneously with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) AF carried out on the effects of the paraganglionic nervous plexuses by C. Pappone (2004) and N. Doll (2008) schemes. The second group (control) contained 11 patients with heart diseases in sinus rhythm (the RF denervation not been performed). All patients, who underwent surgical treatment, were received examination of cardiac sympathetic tone by using {sup 123}I-MIBG. All of them made blood analysis from ascending aorta and coronary sinus to determine the level of norepinephrine and its metabolites before and after cardiac denervation. Data of radionuclide examination are correlating with laboratory data.

  1. Comparison of three techniques in pediatric tonsillectomy.

    PubMed

    Ozkırış, Mahmut

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the thermal welding technique (TWT), classic dissection (CD) tonsillectomy and bipolar cautery dissection (BCD) for pediatric tonsillectomy. Three hundred and five consecutive children with chronic tonsillitis and/or upper airway obstruction were alternately assigned to the TWT, CD, or BCD tonsillectomy groups. Age, gender, operation time, intraoperative blood loss, early postoperative pain, time to regain normal diet, and extent of healing of the tonsillar fossa on the tenth postoperative day were evaluated. The rate of intraoperative blood loss was significantly lower in the thermal welding and BCD groups (p < 0.001). The difference between mean operative time of TWT and BCD groups was not statistically significant (p > 0.001). The difference between mean operative time of the two groups against cold dissection group was statistically significant (p < 0.001). No significant difference was found in the incidence of posttonsillectomy hemorrhage between the three patient groups (p > 0.001). The mean pain score was 4.8 ± 1.2 (median 5, range 4-6) in the TWT group, 8.3 ± 1.3 (median 8, range 7-10) in the BCD group, and 5.1 ± 1.2 (median 5, range 4-7) in the CD group 6 h to 7 days post-surgery. The difference between mean pain score between TWT and CD was not statistically significant (p > 0.001). The difference between mean pain score of the two groups against BCD group was statistically significant (p < 0.001). The results showed TWT as a new tonsillectomy technique with advantages such as shorter operation time and minimal intraoperative blood loss for children patient's post operative comfort. When we compared TWT with the cold dissection and bipolar cautery tonsillectomy, we found that TWT tonsillectomy offered an innovative new tonsillectomy method with significantly reduced blood loss and reduced surgical time and without any increase in the postoperative pain. PMID:21952795

  2. Postoperative endophthalmitis by Flavimonas oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chien-Kuang; Liu, Chi-Chang; Kuo, Hsi-Kung

    2004-11-01

    A 55-year-old man suffered from blurred vision of the left eye (visual acuity was counting fingers/5-10 cm) 8 days after undergoing cataract surgery. After thorough ophthalmologic examinations with gram-negative bacillus justified on smear of vitreous specimen, postoperative endophthalmitis (os) was impressed. Intravitreous injection of 1.0 mg of vancomycin, 0.4 mg of amikacin, and 0.4 mg of dexamethasone was given twice and vitreous fluid culture was also performed. However, the inflammatory condition was not well controlled. Because the results of vitreous fluid culture revealed Flavimonas oryzihabitans infection which is sensitive to piperacillin, we performed the 3rd intravitreous injection of 1.0 mg of piperacillin and 0.4 mg of dexamethasone. The inflammatory condition was under control and the visual acuity of left eye improved. For patients with ocular diseases, postoperative endophthalmitis by Flavimonas oryzihabitans is a rare condition. According to the results of this case, intravitreous injection of piperacillin was effective against the pathogen. PMID:15796259

  3. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery. PMID:25195116

  4. Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome caused by posterior chamber intraocular lens--a rare complication in pediatric cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ju; Tan, Chau-Yi; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Jou, Jieh-Ren

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of postoperative uveitis-glaucome-hyphema (UGH) syndrome following pediatric cataract surgery due to posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL). Slit-lamp examination revealed the optic of PC-IOL migrated into anterior chamber. The PC-IOL explantation was performed and ocular inflammation subsided. PMID:19230361

  5. Pediatric Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Ariel U.; Neaga, Andreea; West, Brady; Safran, Jared; Brown, Pamela; Btaiche, Imad; Kuzma-O'Reilly, Barbara; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine predictors of survival and of weaning off parenteral nutrition (PN) in pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients. Summary Background Data: Pediatric SBS carries extensive morbidity and high mortality, but factors believed to predict survival or weaning from PN have been based on limited studies. This study reviews outcomes of a large number of SBS infants and identifies predictors of success. Methods: Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted on 80 pediatric SBS patients. Primary outcome was survival; secondary outcome was ability to wean off PN. Nonsignificant covariates were eliminated. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Over a mean of 5.1 years of follow-up, survival was 58 of 80 (72.5%) and 51 weaned off PN (63.8%). Cholestasis (conjugated bilirubin ≥2.5 mg/dL) was the strongest predictor of mortality (relative risk [RR] 22.7, P = 0.005). Although absolute small bowel length was only slightly predictive, percentage of normal bowel length (for a given infant's gestational age) was strongly predictive of mortality (if <10% of normal length, RR of death was 5.7, P = 0.003) and of weaning PN (if ≥10% of normal, RR of weaning PN was 11.8, P = 0.001). Presence of the ileocecal valve (ICV) also strongly predicted weaning PN (RR 3.9, P < 0.0005); however, ICV was not predictive of survival. Conclusions: Cholestasis and age-adjusted small bowel length are the major predictors of mortality in pediatric SBS. Age-adjusted small bowel length and ICV are the major predictors of weaning from PN. These data permit better prediction of outcomes of pediatric SBS, which may help to direct future management of these challenging patients. PMID:16135926

  6. The role of epidural anesthesia and analgesia in postoperative outcome.

    PubMed

    Grass, J A

    2000-06-01

    There is increasing evidence to support the hypothesis that epidural anesthesia and analgesia (EAA) can improve surgical outcome by reducing postoperative morbidity and hastening recovery. Likely benefits include decreased incidence of cardiac complications in high-risk patients; lower incidence of pulmonary complications, specifically pneumonia, atelectasis, and hypoxemia in patients at risk for pulmonary complications; lower incidence of vascular graft occlusion after lower extremity revascularization; lower incidence of DVT and pulmonary embolus; suppression of the neuroendocrine stress response; and earlier return of gastrointestinal function. Nonetheless, large multicenter prospective randomized studies are required to more definitively assess the impact of EAA on morbidity and mortality, ICU time, length of hospitalization, and cost of healthcare. PMID:10935017

  7. Emergency Pulmonary Embolectomy Using Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kodani, Noriko; Ohashi, Takeki; Iida, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Souichirou; Furui, Masato; Uchino, Gaku

    2016-04-01

    A 78-year-old man who had undergone operation for acute type A aortic dissection presented with dyspnea and shock. Chest computed tomography revealed pulmonary embolism. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery was performed through a right fourth intercostal skin incision using cardiopulmonary bypass through the right femoral artery and vein. The right pulmonary artery below the superior vena cava was incised vertically, and the thrombus was extracted directly by balloon catheter. The patient was weaned off cardiopulmonary bypass uneventfully. The postoperative course was also uneventful. In redo cardiac surgery, pulmonary embolectomy through minimally invasive right thoracotomy can be easily performed, with quick recovery. PMID:27000575

  8. [Perioperative management of patients equipped with cardiac implanted electronic devices].

    PubMed

    Booke, Michael; Casu, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Anaesthetists are in increasing frequency confronted with patients equipped with cardiac implantable electrical devices. A consensus conference standardized the handling of such patients for elective cases. However, this multidisciplinary approach is characterized by a complexity, which is hard to handle in emergency cases and even in nowadays clinical routine. However, risks associated with electrocautery or electromagnetic interference can be easily handled applying a significantly easier approach. Telemetric reprogramming and/or postoperative interrogation of the cardiac implanted eletronical device can be avoided in most cases. PMID:27070514

  9. Pediatric retroperitoneoscopic nephrectomy: An initial experience of 15 cases

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Souvik; Khanna, Puneet; Baidya, Dalim Kumar; Pawar, Dilip Kumar; Baipai, Minu; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Retroperitoneoscopic approach of nephrectomy in pediatric patients is a debatable issue from surgical point of view. Experience of anesthetic management of 15 such patients from a tertiary care teaching hospital has been described here. We found that capno-retroperitoneum increases end-tidal carbon-di-oxide, but normocapnea was achieved in the most of the patients. No significant hemodynamic changes were noted in any patients. However, subcutaneous emphysema was common, but self-limiting without any serious consequence. Postoperative pain after this procedure is usually manageable by nonopioid analgesics. PMID:25788784

  10. Cardiac gated ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart.

  11. Cardiac gated ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, C. William, III; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1995-05-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. We evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50msec scan aperture. Multislice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. We observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a nonfailing model of the heart.

  12. Temozolomide Treatment for Pediatric Refractory Anaplastic Ependymoma with Low MGMT Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Komori, Kazutoshi; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Miyairi, Yosuke; Sakashita, Kazuo; Shiohara, Masaaki; Fujihara, Ikuko; Morita, Daisuke; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Ogiso, Yoshifumi; Sano, Kenji; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Fukuoka, Kohei; Ichimura, Koichi; Shigeta, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    The benefit of postoperative chemotherapy for anaplastic ependymoma remains unknown. We report two pediatric patients with refractory anaplastic ependymoma treated with temozolomide (TMZ). We did not detect O(6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation in tumor samples; however, MGMT protein expression was low. With TMZ treatment, one patient had a 7-month complete remission; the other, stable disease for 15 months. Three other patients did not respond to TMZ; two had high and one low MGMT expression, and two showed no MGMT promoter methylation. These findings suggest that TMZ may be effective for pediatric refractory anaplastic ependymoma with low MGMT protein expression. PMID:26305586

  13. Risk factors for transient dysfunction of gas exchange after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Cristiane Delgado Alves; Moreira, Marcos Mello; Lima, Núbia Maria Freire Vieira; de Figueirêdo, Luciana Castilho; Falcão, Antônio Luis Eiras; Petrucci, Orlando; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2015-01-01

    Objective A retrospective cohort study was preformed aiming to verify the presence of transient dysfunction of gas exchange in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and determine if this disorder is linked to cardiorespiratory events. Methods We included 942 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery and cardiac procedures who were referred to the Intensive Care Unit between June 2007 and November 2011. Results Fifteen patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (2%), 199 (27.75%) had mild transient dysfunction of gas exchange, 402 (56.1%) had moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange, and 39 (5.4%) had severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange. Hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the emergence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange postoperatively (P=0.02 and P=0.019, respectively) and were risk factors for this dysfunction (P=0.0023 and P=0.0017, respectively). Diabetes mellitus was also a risk factor for transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.03). Pneumonia was present in 8.9% of cases and correlated with the presence of moderate transient dysfunction of gas exchange (P=0.001). Severe transient dysfunction of gas exchange was associated with patients who had renal replacement therapy (P=0.0005), hemotherapy (P=0.0001), enteral nutrition (P=0.0012), or cardiac arrhythmia (P=0.0451). Conclusion Preoperative hypertension and cardiogenic shock were associated with the occurrence of postoperative transient dysfunction of gas exchange. The preoperative risk factors included hypertension, cardiogenic shock, and diabetes. Postoperatively, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, renal replacement therapy, hemotherapy, and cardiac arrhythmia were associated with the appearance of some degree of transient dysfunction of gas exchange, which was a risk factor for reintubation, pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and renal replacement therapy in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery and cardiac

  14. Diagnosis and management of Transposition of great arteries within a pediatric cardiology network with the aid of telemedicine: A case report from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Galdino, Millena M; Hazin, Sheila Mv; de Araújo, Juliana Ss; Regis, Cláudio T; Rodrigues, Klecida N; Mourato, Felipe A; Mattos, Sandra da Silva

    2016-04-01

    We present a case of a newborn from a remote, underserved area in the inland of Paraíba, a state from Northeast Brazil. She presented with clinical cyanosis at birth. With the aid of telemedicine, a neonatologist under online cardiology supervision performed a screening echocardiogram. The session established the diagnosis of simple transposition of the great vessels in the baby's first few hours of life. During the same telemedicine session, the necessary arrangements for transferal to a larger maternity center took place. The baby was maintained stable on prostaglandins and was subsequently transferred to a tertiary cardiac center in the neighboring State, Pernambuco. She underwent anatomical correction at day 10, presented no surgical or postoperative complications, and was discharged home at the age of 21 days. She is now over three years old and continues her follow-up care mostly at her hometown, with local pediatricians under online supervision by a cardiologist in a virtual outpatient clinic. The establishment of a Pediatric Cardiology Network, with the aid of telemedicine, can produce a major impact on the access to specialized health care for poor regions of developing countries. PMID:26159438

  15. Computational analysis of an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Throckmorton, Amy L; Untaroiu, Alexandrina; Allaire, Paul E; Wood, Houston G; Matherne, Gaynell Paul; Lim, David Scott; Peeler, Ben B; Olsen, Don B

    2004-10-01

    Longer-term (>2 weeks) mechanical circulatory support will provide an improved quality of life for thousands of pediatric cardiac failure patients per year in the United States. These pediatric patients suffer from severe congenital or acquired heart disease complicated by congestive heart failure. There are currently very few mechanical circulatory support systems available in the United States as viable options for this population. For that reason, we have designed an axial flow pediatric ventricular assist device (PVAD) with an impeller that is fully suspended by magnetic bearings. As a geometrically similar, smaller scaled version of our axial flow pump for the adult population, the PVAD has a design point of 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg to meet the full physiologic needs of pediatric patients. Conventional axial pump design equations and a nondimensional scaling technique were used to estimate the PVAD's initial dimensions, which allowed for the creation of computational models for performance analysis. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of the axial flow PVAD, which measures approximately 65 mm in length by 35 mm in diameter, shows that the pump will produce 1.5 L/min at 65 mm Hg for 8000 rpm. Fluid forces (approximately 1 N) were also determined for the suspension and motor design, and scalar stress values remained below 350 Pa with maximum particle residence times of approximately 0.08 milliseconds in the pump. This initial design demonstrated acceptable performance, thereby encouraging prototype manufacturing for experimental validation. PMID:15384993

  16. Nurses management of post-operative pain.

    PubMed

    Buckley, H

    2000-06-01

    Nurses have the responsibility of adequately managing patients' post-operative pain. This literature review assesses whether nurses' management of post-operative pain is adequate or not, according to the literature findings. The findings reveal that nurses' management of patients' post-operative pain is not adequate and implies the concurrent need for improved nurse education and practice. The findings also indicate a need for ongoing research of this phenomenon. PMID:11855003

  17. Predictors of in-hospital mortality following redo cardiac surgery: Single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Isa; Cayli, Murat; Gulcan, Oner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Redo cardiac operations represent one of the main challenges in heart surgery. The purpose of the study was to analyze the predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients undergoing reoperative cardiac surgery by a single surgical team. Methods A total of 1367 patients underwent cardiac surgical procedures and prospectively entered into a computerized database. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on the reoperative cardiac surgery (n = 109) and control group (n = 1258). Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the possible predictors of hospital mortality. Results Mean age was 56 ± 13, and 46% were female in redo group. In-hospital mortality was 4.6 vs. 2.2%, p = 0.11. EuroSCORE (6 vs. 3; p < 0.01), cardiopulmonary bypass time (90 vs. 71 min; p < 0.01), postoperative bleeding (450 vs. 350 ml; p < 0.01), postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) (29 vs. 16%; p < 0.01), and inotropic support (58 vs. 31%; p = 0.001) were significantly different. These variables were entered into uni- and multivariate regression analysis. Postoperative AF (OR1.76, p = 0.007) and EuroSCORE (OR 1.42, p < 0.01) were significant risk factors predicting hospital mortality. Conclusions Reoperative cardiac surgery can be performed under similar risks as primary operations. Postoperative AF and EuroSCORE are predictors of in-hospital mortality for redo cases. PMID:26527452

  18. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, Hannah Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P.; Minhas, Anum; Frush, D.; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  19. A set of 4D pediatric XCAT reference phantoms for multimodality research

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Hannah; Zhang, Yakun; Bond, Jason; Sturgeon, Gregory M.; Minhas, Anum; Tward, Daniel J.; Ratnanather, J. T.; Miller, M. I.; Frush, D.; Samei, E.; Segars, W. P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors previously developed an adult population of 4D extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms for multimodality imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a reference set of 4D pediatric XCAT phantoms consisting of male and female anatomies at ages of newborn, 1, 5, 10, and 15 years. These models will serve as the foundation from which the authors will create a vast population of pediatric phantoms for optimizing pediatric CT imaging protocols. Methods: Each phantom was based on a unique set of CT data from a normal patient obtained from the Duke University database. The datasets were selected to best match the reference values for height and weight for the different ages and genders according to ICRP Publication 89. The major organs and structures were segmented from the CT data and used to create an initial pediatric model defined using nonuniform rational B-spline surfaces. The CT data covered the entire torso and part of the head. To complete the body, the authors manually added on the top of the head and the arms and legs using scaled versions of the XCAT adult models or additional models created from cadaver data. A multichannel large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping algorithm was then used to calculate the transform from a template XCAT phantom (male or female 50th percentile adult) to the target pediatric model. The transform was applied to the template XCAT to fill in any unsegmented structures within the target phantom and to implement the 4D cardiac and respiratory models in the new anatomy. The masses of the organs in each phantom were matched to the reference values given in ICRP Publication 89. The new reference models were checked for anatomical accuracy via visual inspection. Results: The authors created a set of ten pediatric reference phantoms that have the same level of detail and functionality as the original XCAT phantom adults. Each consists of thousands of anatomical structures and includes parameterized models

  20. Anxiolytic use in the postoperative care unit.

    PubMed

    Jellish, W Scott; O'Rourke, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Postoperative anxiety has received less attention historically than preoperative anxiety. Recognition that anxiety occurs throughout the perioperative period has led to increased interest in identifying and treating anxiety in the postoperative period. This article outlines the causes of postoperative anxiety, how it is classified, the effects of anxiety on outcomes after surgery, and some of the clinical procedures that produce the highest levels of anxiety for patients. In addition, an attempt is made to delineate the major risk factors for developing postoperative anxiety and the classic therapeutic modalities used to reduce symptoms and treat the psychological manifestations of anxiety. PMID:22989589

  1. Effect of fish oil on monoepoxides derived from fatty acids during cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Akintoye, Emmanuel; Wu, Jason H Y; Hou, Tao; Song, Xiaoling; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-03-01

    Our objective was to assess the dynamics of monoepoxides derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (MEFAs), and their response to n-3 PUFA supplementation, in the setting of acute tissue injury and inflammation (cardiac surgery) in humans. Patients (479) undergoing cardiac surgery in three countries were randomized to perioperative fish oil (EPA + DHA; 8-10 g over 2-5 days preoperatively, then 2 g/day postoperatively) or placebo (olive oil). Plasma MEFAs derived from n-3 and n-6 PUFAs were measured 2 days postoperatively. Based on serial measures in a subset of the placebo group, levels of all MEFAs declined substantially following surgery (at postoperative day 2), with declines ranging from 37% to 63% (P < 0.05 each). Compared with placebo at postoperative day 2, levels of EPA- and DHA-derived MEFAs were 40% and 18% higher, respectively (P ≤ 0.004). The n-3 PUFA supplementation did not significantly alter the decline in n-6 PUFA-derived MEFAs. Both enrollment level and changes in plasma phospholipid EPA and DHA were associated with their respective MEFAs at postoperative day 2 (P < 0.001). Under the acute stress of cardiac surgery, n-3 PUFA supplementation significantly ameliorated the reduction in postoperative n-3 MEFAs, but not n-6 MEFAs, and the degree of increase in n-3 MEFAs related positively to the circulating level of their n-3 PUFA precursors. PMID:26749073

  2. [Primary Cardiac Angiosarcoma with Superior Vena Cava Syndrome].

    PubMed

    Shimada, Naohiro; Shiomi, Daisuke; Kaki, Nobuaki; Kiyama, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Primary cardiac angiosarcoma is rare and its prognosis very poor. A 34-year-old woman complained of facial edema and dyspnea. Echocardiography, chest computed tomography scan and chest magnetic resonance imaging showed a huge tumor arising in the right atrium. Surgical excision of the tumor was performed for the purpose of relieving superior vena cava syndrome and making diagnosis of the tumor. The right atrial wall, including the tumor, was resected and reconstructed with Gore Tex patch under cardiopulmonary bypass. The tumor was diagnosed as angiosarcoma. Doxorubicin hydrochloride/ifosfamide were used to treat postoperative cardiac recurrence and lung metastasis. These drugs were effective to a certain degree, but she died of brain metastasis of the tumor in the 14th postoperative month. PMID:27220927

  3. Radiographic findings in the chest of patients following cardiac transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Shirazi, K.K.; Amendola, M.A.; Tisnado, J.; Cho, S.R.; Beachley, M.C.; Lower, R.R.

    1983-04-01

    The postoperative chest radiographic findings in 38 patients undergoing orthotopic (37 patients) and heterotopic (1 patient) cardiac transplantation were evaluated. Findings were correlated with those of echocardiograms, sputum and blood cultures, and lung and heart biopsies. The radiographic manifestations in the chest of these patients are classified in the following three main categories: 1) newly formed cardiac silhouette findings due to the transplanted heart itself, i.e., changes in size and shape of the new heart and pericardial effusion resulting from the placement of a smaller heart in a larger pericardial sac. 2) infectious complications due to bacteria, fungal, and other opportunistic agents secondary to immunosuppressive therapy, and 3) usual postoperative complications following thoracomoty and open-heart surgery.

  4. Pediatric heart sound segmentation using hidden Markov model.

    PubMed

    Sedighian, Pouye; Subudhi, Andrew W; Scalzo, Fabien; Asgari, Shadnaz

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have enabled automatic cardiac auscultation using digital stethoscopes. This in turn creates the need for development of algorithms capable of automatic segmentation of heart sounds. Pediatric heart sound segmentation is a challenging task due to various confounding factors including the significant influence of respiration on children's heart sounds. The current work investigates the application of homomorphic filtering and Hidden Markov Model for the purpose of segmenting pediatric heart sounds. The efficacy of the proposed method is evaluated on the publicly available Pascal Challenge dataset and its performance is compared with those of three other existing methods. The results show that our proposed method achieves an accuracy of 92.4%±1.1% and 93.5%±1.1% in identifying the first and second heart sound components, respectively, and is superior to three other existing methods in terms of accuracy or computational complexity. PMID:25571237

  5. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists are medical ...

  6. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists are medical ...

  7. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists are medical ...

  8. Ethics of treating postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, James W; McCullough, Laurence B

    2012-02-01

    You received a call advising that Mr S. H. Irk was in the emergency room having considerable wound pain following an above-knee amputation you performed 6 months ago. You discharged him from your clinic 6 weeks postoperatively to his primary care physician, still complaining of more pain than usual. Your examination, clinical lab tests, and X-rays do not reveal any serious problems, but he is writhing in pain and begging for relief. Mr Irk has been to a number of different physicians in the interlude including a chiropractor, a pain specialist, several primary care physicians, and a psychiatrist without relief. He has braced up with increasing amounts of analgesics, the latest of which was oral Dilaudid. His last source of pain meds on the street has dried up. You admit him with orders for analgesics. What should your treatment plan be? PMID:22264808

  9. Stimulating endogenous cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Amanda; Richard, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration, a combination of these approaches could ameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation of multiple cellular players. PMID:26484341

  10. Association of postoperative furosemide use with a reduced blood transfusion rate in sagittal craniosynostosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Harroud, Adil; Weil, Alexander G; Turgeon, Jean; Mercier, Claude; Crevier, Louis

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT A major challenge in sagittal craniosynostosis surgery is the high transfusion rate (50%-100%) related to blood loss in small pediatric patients. Several approaches have been proposed to prevent packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion, including endoscopic surgery, erythropoietin ortranexamic acid administration, and preoperative hemodilution. The authors hypothesized that a significant proportion of postoperative anemia observed in pediatric patients is actually dilutional. Consequently, since 2005, at CHU Sainte-Justine, furosemide has been administered to correct the volemic status and prevent PRBC transfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of postoperative furosemide administration on PRBC transfusion rates. METHODS This was a retrospective study of 96 consecutive patients with sagittal synostosis who underwent surgery at CHU Sainte-Justine between January 2000 and May 2012. The mean age at surgery was 4.9 ± 1.5 months (range 2.8-8.7 months). Patients who had surgery before 2005 constituted the control group. Those who had surgery in 2005 or 2006 were considered part of an implementation phase because furosemide administration was not routine. Patients who had surgery after 2006 were part of the experimental (or furosemide) group. Transfusion rates among the 3 groups were compared. The impact of furosemide administration on transfusion requirement was also measured while accounting for other variables of interest in a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS The total transfusion rate was significantly reduced in the furosemide group compared with the control group (31.3% vs 62.5%, respectively; p = 0.009), mirroring the decrease in the postoperative transfusion rate between the groups (18.3% vs 50.0%, respectively; p = 0.003). The postoperative transfusion threshold remained similar throughout the study (mean hemoglobin 56.0 g/dl vs 60.9 g/dl for control and furosemide groups, respectively; p = 0.085). The proportion of

  11. Comparing the Effect of Preoperative Administration of Methylprednisolone and its Administration Before and During Surgery on the Clinical Outcome in Pediatric Open Heart Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Ghasem; Abbasi Tashnizi, Mohammad; Moeinipour, Ali Asghar; Ganjifard, Mahmoud; Esfahanizadeh, Jamil; Sepehri Shamloo, Alireza; Purafzali Firuzabadi, Seyed Javad; Zirak, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    Background Cardiac surgery under Cardiopulmonary bypass causes a systemic inflammatory response with a multifactorial etiology including direct tissue damage, ischemia and stimulation of immune system induced by cardiopulmonary bypass. This study was designed due to the high prevalence and complications of this stimulated immune system in mortality, morbidity, length of ICU stay, and mechanical ventilation. Objectives This study was aimed to compare preoperative and intraoperative methylprednisolone (MP) to intraoperative MP alone with respect to postbypass inflammation and clinical outcome. Patients and Methods Sixty pediatric patients (age < 5years) undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery between September 2011-2012 at Imam Reza hospital-Mashhad were randomly assigned to receive preoperative and intraoperative MP (group 1: 30 mg/kg, 4 hours before bypass and in bypass prime, n = 30) or intraoperative MP only (group 2: 30 mg/kg, n = 30). Postoperative temperature (peak temperature and average temperature during the first 24 hours), amount of inotropic, duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, WBC, BUN, creatinine, and CRP were recorded and compared in both groups. Data were analyzed with SPSS version 13 by T-test, Mann-Whitney test if necessary, and Chi-squared distribution. Results Patient characteristics including age, weight, gender, and duration of bypass were almost similar in both groups (P > 0.05). No significant difference in amount of inotropic medications used for hemodynamic supports, duration of mechanical ventilation, peak and average temperature and length of ICU stay was observed. Among the laboratory tests (WBC, BUN, creatinine, CRP) only WBC counts raised more in group 2 when compared to group 1(P < 0.05). Conclusions There was no difference in clinical outcome after cardiac surgery when we administered an additional dose of methylprednisolone compared to a single dose of methylprednisolone. PMID:24349746

  12. Cardiac Innervation and Sudden Cardiac Death

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Keiichi; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Ardell, Jeffrey L.; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2015-01-01

    Afferent and efferent cardiac neurotransmission via the cardiac nerves intricately modulates nearly all physiological functions of the heart (chronotropy, dromotropy, lusitropy and inotropy). Afferent information from the heart is transmitted to higher levels of the nervous system for processing (intrinsic cardiac nervous system, extracardiac-intrathoracic ganglia, spinal cord, brain stem and higher centers) which ultimately results in efferent cardiomotor neural impulses (via the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves). This system forms interacting feedback loops that provide physiological stability for maintaining normal rhythm and life-sustaining circulation. This system also ensures that there is fine-tuned regulation of sympathetic-parasympathetic balance in the heart under normal and stressed states in the short (beat to beat), intermediate (minutes-hours) and long term (days-years). This important neurovisceral /autonomic nervous system also plays a major role in the pathophysiology and progression of heart disease, including heart failure and arrhythmias leading to sudden cardiac death (SCD). Transdifferentiation of neurons in heart failure, functional denervation, cardiac and extra-cardiac neural remodeling have also been identified and characterized during the progression of disease. Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular processes governing innervation and the functional control of the myocardium in health and disease provides a rational mechanistic basis for development of neuraxial therapies for preventing SCD and other arrhythmias. Advances in cellular, molecular, and bioengineering realms have underscored the emergence of this area as an important avenue of scientific inquiry and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26044253

  13. Repair of Postoperative Abdominal Hernia in a Child with Congenital Omphalocele Using Porcine Dermal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Lambropoulos, V; Mylona, E; Mouravas, V; Tsakalidis, C; Spyridakis, I; Mitsiakos, G; Karagianni, P

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Incisional hernias are a common complication appearing after abdominal wall defects reconstruction, with omphalocele and gastroschisis being the most common etiologies in children. Abdominal closure of these defects represents a real challenge for pediatric surgeons with many surgical techniques and various prosthetic materials being used for this purpose. Case Report. We present a case of repair of a postoperative ventral hernia occurring after congenital omphalocele reconstruction in a three-and-a-half-year-old child using an acellular, sterile, porcine dermal mesh. Conclusion. Non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix is an appropriate mesh used for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects and their postoperative complications like large ventral hernias with success and preventing their recurrence. PMID:27110247

  14. Repair of Postoperative Abdominal Hernia in a Child with Congenital Omphalocele Using Porcine Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Mylona, E.; Tsakalidis, C.; Spyridakis, I.; Mitsiakos, G.; Karagianni, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Incisional hernias are a common complication appearing after abdominal wall defects reconstruction, with omphalocele and gastroschisis being the most common etiologies in children. Abdominal closure of these defects represents a real challenge for pediatric surgeons with many surgical techniques and various prosthetic materials being used for this purpose. Case Report. We present a case of repair of a postoperative ventral hernia occurring after congenital omphalocele reconstruction in a three-and-a-half-year-old child using an acellular, sterile, porcine dermal mesh. Conclusion. Non-cross-linked acellular porcine dermal matrix is an appropriate mesh used for the reconstruction of abdominal wall defects and their postoperative complications like large ventral hernias with success and preventing their recurrence. PMID:27110247

  15. Acute Cardiac Tamponade: An Unusual Cause of Acute Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Gautam; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Dalal, Pranavkumar; Markley, John; Rich, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We are reporting a case of acute renal failure after cardiac surgery due to acute pericardial effusion. The patient had normal baseline renal function but developed acute oliguric renal failure with a significant increase in serum creatinine postoperatively. Pericardiotomy led to an improvement in blood pressure, immediate diuresis and quick recovery of renal function back to baseline. Pericardial tamponade should be included in the consideration of causes of the cardiorenal syndrome. PMID:22619656

  16. Benign Pediatric Salivary Gland Lesions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric R; Ord, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland lesions are rare in pediatric patients. In addition, the types of salivary gland tumors are different in their distribution in specific sites in the major and minor salivary glands in children compared with adults. This article reviews benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic salivary gland disorders in pediatric patients to help clinicians to develop an orderly differential diagnosis that will lead to expedient treatment of pediatric patients with salivary gland lesions. PMID:26614702

  17. Sonography of the Pediatric Chest.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yonggeng; Kapur, Jeevesh

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, pediatric chest diseases are evaluated with chest radiography. Due to advancements in technology, the use of sonography has broadened. It has now become an established radiation-free imaging tool that may supplement plain-film findings and, in certain cases, the first-line modality for evaluation of the pediatric chest. This pictorial essay will demonstrate the diagnostic potential of sonography, review a spectrum of pediatric chest conditions, and discuss their imaging features and clinical importance. PMID:27009313

  18. Medical Comorbidities in Pediatric Headache.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Howard; Singhi, Samata; Gladstein, Jack

    2016-02-01

    Comorbid conditions frequently occur in pediatric headaches and may significantly affect their management. Comorbidities that have been associated with pediatric headaches include attention-deficit or hyperactivity disorder, autism, developmental disabilities, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, obesity, infantile colic, atopic disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. The goal of this article is to review these comorbidities associated with pediatric headache, thereby empowering child neurologists to identify common triggers and tailor management strategies that address headache and its comorbidities. PMID:27017024

  19. Recent advances in paediatric cardiac anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Vakamudi, Mahesh; Ravulapalli, Harish; Karthikeyan, Ranjith

    2012-09-01

    Paediatric cardiac anaesthesia involves anaesthetizing very small children with complex congenital heart disease for major surgical procedures. The unique nature of this patient population requires considerable expertise and in-depth knowledge of the altered physiology. There have been several developments in the last decade in this subspecialty that has contributed to better care and improved outcome in this vulnerable group of patients. The purpose of this review is to present some of the recent advances in the anesthetic management of these children from preoperative evaluation to postoperative care. This article reviews the role of magnetic resonance imaging and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in preoperative evaluation, the use of ultrasound to secure vascular access, the use of cuffed endotracheal tubes, the optimal haematocrit and the role of blood products, including the use of recombinant factor VIIa. It also deals with the advances in technology that have led to improved monitoring, the newer developments in cardiopulmonary bypass, the use of centrifugal pumps and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the role of DHCA. The role of new drugs, especially the α-2 agonists in paediatric cardiac anesthetic practice, fast tracking and effective postoperative pain management have also been reviewed. PMID:23293388

  20. Efficacy of intrathecal esmolol on heat-evoked responses in a postoperative pain model.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hitomi; Ohtani, Norimasa; Matoba, Atsuko; Kido, Kanta; Yasui, Yutaka; Masaki, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Perioperative tachycardia and hypertension are often treated with esmolol, a short-acting β1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Besides its cardiac effect, esmolol is reported to exert antinociceptive effects. This study examined the efficacy of intrathecal (IT) esmolol on pain responses in a postoperative pain model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were anesthetized with sevoflurane and an IT catheter was implanted. Six days after catheter implantation, a postoperative pain model was established by plantar incision under sevoflurane anesthesia. Withdrawal latencies were assessed by applying a focused radiant heat source before plantar incision; 1 day after the incision (before esmolol administration); and 5, 10, and 15 minutes after bolus administration of IT esmolol. Plantar incision produced hypersensitivity in the postoperative pain model expressed as decreased withdrawal latency to heat stimulation (before incision: 13.9 ± 0.29 seconds and 1 day after incision: 6.3 ± 0.26 seconds). These decreased latencies caused by incision were significantly increased by esmolol administration (40 μg, 80 μg) at 5 minutes (10.7 ± 1.16 seconds, 10.5 ± 1.16 seconds). No postoperative antinociceptive effects of esmolol were observed at 10 or 15 minutes. IT administration of esmolol produced antinociceptive effects of short duration in a rat postoperative pain model. These results suggest that IT esmolol could offer a new strategy for managing perioperative pain, although an alternative approach is necessary to lengthen the duration of the analgesia. PMID:23411610

  1. A Targeted Swallow Screen for the Detection of Postoperative Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Gee, Erica; Lancaster, Elizabeth; Meltzer, Jospeh; Mendelsohn, Abie H; Benharash, Peyman

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative dysphagia leads to aspiration pneumonia, prolonged hospital stay, and is associated with increased mortality. A simple and sensitive screening test to identify patients requiring objective dysphagia evaluation is presently lacking. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of a novel targeted swallow screen evaluation. This was a prospective trial involving all adult patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass at our institution over an 8-week period. Within 24 hours of extubation and before the initiation of oral intake, all postsurgical patients were evaluated using the targeted swallow screen. A fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing was requested for failed screenings. During the study, 50 postcardiac surgery patients were screened. Fifteen (30%) failed the targeted swallow screen, and ten of the fifteen (66%) failed the subsequent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing exam and were confirmed to have dysphagia. The screening test had 100 per cent sensitivity for detecting dysphagia in our patient population, and a specificity of 87.5 per cent. The overall incidence of dysphagia was 20 per cent. We have shown that a targeted swallow evaluation can efficiently screen patients during the postcardiac surgery period. Furthermore, we have shown that the true incidence of dysphagia after cardiac surgery is significantly higher than previously recognized in literature. PMID:26463293

  2. Pediatric genetic ocular tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rouhani, Behnaz; Ramasubramanian, Aparna

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic ocular tumors include malignancies like retinoblastoma and phakomatosis like neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. It is important to screen for ocular tumors both for visual prognosis and also for systemic implications. The phakomatosis comprise of multitude of benign tumors that are aysmptomatic but their detection can aid in the diagnosis of the syndrome. Retinoblastoma is the most common malignant intraocular tumor in childhood and with current treatment modalities, the survival is more than 95%. It is transmitted as an autosomal dominant fashion and hence the offsprings of all patients with the germline retinoblastoma need to be screened from birth. This review discusses the various pediatric genetic ocular tumors discussing the clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  4. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia. PMID:26058689

  5. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  6. Pediatric Biliary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Atchie, Benjamin; Kalva, Sanjeeva; Josephs, Shellie

    2015-12-01

    An interventional radiologist is frequently called to evaluate and treat biliary diseases in children; a tailored approach specific to this population is required. Imaging with an emphasis on minimizing ionizing radiation is used not only in the initial workup but also to guide interventions. The most common form of intervention generally consists of transhepatic biliary drainage to treat either biliary obstruction or bile leakage, a scenario frequently encountered after pediatric liver transplantation. Other pathologies referred for evaluation and management include biliary atresia and, rarely, symptomatic choledochal cysts. Biliary complications caused by an underlying malignancy are not a frequently encountered problem in the pediatric population. The initial evaluation, role of preprocedural imaging, and interventional management with an emphasis on technique are discussed regarding these common biliary pathologies in children. PMID:26615168

  7. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail. PMID:25836737

  8. Pediatric parafalcine empyemas

    PubMed Central

    Niklewski, Franziska; Petridis, Athanasios K.; Al Hourani, Jasmin; Blaeser, Klaus; Ntoulias, Georgios; Bitter, Andrej; Rosenbaum, Thorsten; Scholz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Subdural intracranial empyemas and brain abscesses are a rare complication of bacterial sinusitis. Pediatric parafalcine abscesses are a rare entity with different treatment compared with other brain abscesses. We present two pediatric cases with falcine abscess as a sinusitis complication and introduce our department’s treatment management. In addition a review of literature is performed. Surgical cases of our department and their management are compared with the current literature. In our cases, both of the children showed a recurrent empyema after the first surgical treatment and antibiotic therapy. A second surgical evacuation was necessary. The antibiotic therapy was given for 3 months. Short-time follow-up imaging is necessary irrespective of infection parameters in blood and patient's clinical condition. Especially in parafalcine abscesses a second look may be an option and surgical treatment with evacuation of pus is the treatment of choice if abscess remnants are visualized. PMID:24964473

  9. Pediatric parafalcine empyemas.

    PubMed

    Niklewski, Franziska; Petridis, Athanasios K; Al Hourani, Jasmin; Blaeser, Klaus; Ntoulias, Georgios; Bitter, Andrej; Rosenbaum, Thorsten; Scholz, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Subdural intracranial empyemas and brain abscesses are a rare complication of bacterial sinusitis. Pediatric parafalcine abscesses are a rare entity with different treatment compared with other brain abscesses. We present two pediatric cases with falcine abscess as a sinusitis complication and introduce our department's treatment management. In addition a review of literature is performed. Surgical cases of our department and their management are compared with the current literature. In our cases, both of the children showed a recurrent empyema after the first surgical treatment and antibiotic therapy. A second surgical evacuation was necessary. The antibiotic therapy was given for 3 months. Short-time follow-up imaging is necessary irrespective of infection parameters in blood and patient's clinical condition. Especially in parafalcine abscesses a second look may be an option and surgical treatment with evacuation of pus is the treatment of choice if abscess remnants are visualized. PMID:24964473

  10. Pediatric epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wirrell, Elaine; Nickels, Katherine C

    2010-06-01

    Epilepsy syndromes denote specific constellations of clinical seizure type(s), EEG findings, and other characteristic clinical features. Most syndromes recognized in epilepsy are genetic and developmental disorders that begin in the pediatric years. Epilepsy syndromes are divided into idiopathic (primary) types, in which the presumed etiology is genetic, versus symptomatic (secondary) types, in which there is either an underlying etiology that is known or presumed based on other evidence of brain dysfunction. Epilepsies are also classified by those with generalized seizures and those with localization-related seizures. Identification of a specific syndrome is important to define the best treatment and accurately prognosticate long-term outcome for children with epilepsy. In this chapter, clinical and electrographic features as well as inheritance patterns of common pediatric epilepsy syndromes are discussed. PMID:22810315

  11. Immunotherapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nirali N.; Dave, Hema; Wayne, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the treatment of leukemia in childhood. Despite this, leukemia remains a leading cause of pediatric cancer-related mortality and the prognosis is guarded for individuals with relapsed or refractory disease. Standard therapies are associated with a wide array of acute and long-term toxicities and further treatment intensification may not be tolerable or beneficial. The curative potential of allogeneic stem cell transplantation is due in part to the graft-versus-leukemia effect, which provides evidence for the therapeutic capacity of immune-based therapies. In recent years there have been significant advances in the development and application of immunotherapy in the treatment of leukemias, including the demonstration of activity in chemotherapy-resistant cases. This review summarizes immunotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of pediatric leukemia including current results and future directions. PMID:23847759

  12. Cardiac evaluation and risk reduction in patients undergoing major vascular operations.

    PubMed Central

    Potyk, D K

    1994-01-01

    Occult coronary artery disease often accompanies symptomatic peripheral vascular disease and has an important effect on survival. Most perioperative and late fatalities after peripheral vascular operations are due to cardiac causes. Noninvasive cardiac testing can identify patients at increased risk for postoperative cardiac complications, although controversy exists regarding the optimal preoperative evaluation. Risk reduction strategies for patients known to be at high risk are also controversial. Some authors advocate coronary revascularization with coronary artery bypass grafting or percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty before the vascular procedure. Others believe that the combined morbidity and mortality of 2 operations exceed those of a peripheral vascular operation performed with aggressive monitoring and medical therapy. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring after an operation has identified silent myocardial ischemia as a powerful predictor of cardiac complications. Ongoing research is likely to provide insights into the pathogenesis of postoperative cardiac complications and may lead to specific therapeutic interventions. Few prospective studies have been done in this area, and the threshold for preoperative and postoperative intervention is unknown. I review the literature and present an algorithm to guide cardiac testing and risk reduction in patients undergoing elective vascular surgical procedures. PMID:7941507

  13. MR in pediatric neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolpert, S.M. ); Barnes, P.; Strand, R. )

    1990-01-01

    The multitude of modern imaging techniques has made pediatric neuroradiology increasingly complex. The practitioner must have a thorough understanding of each possible diagnostic study in order to achieve the best results at the least expense and with minimal risk. In this book, MRI is emphasized; correlative CT, ultrasound, angiographic, and conventional x-ray studies assist in establishing effective diagnostic protocols and reaching accurate diagnoses.

  14. Modelling Pediatric Kinematics

    PubMed Central

    van Ratingen, M.R.; Wismans, J.

    1998-01-01

    In the field of pediatric biomechanics, crash dummy and numerical model development suffers from too limited human subject data to directly establish response and injury values. In order to create child crash dummies and numerical models it is necessary to combine the results from real world accident and reconstruction data, scaled adult data and data from animal testing with limited child volunteer data. This paper presents the functional and biomechanical targets for child crash dummies and numerical models.

  15. Common Pediatric Urological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Robson, Wm. Lane M.; Leung, Alexander K.C.; Boag, Graham S.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical and radiological presentations of 12 pediatric urological disorders are described. The described disorders include pyelonephritis, vesicoureteral reflux, ureteropelvic obstruction, ureterovesical obstruction, ectopic ureterocele, posterior urethral valves, multicystic dysplastic kidney, polycystic kidney disease, ectopic kidney, staghorn calculi, urethral diverticulum, and urethral meatal stenosis. ImagesFigure 1-2Figure 3Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6-7Figure 8-9Figure 10Figure 11-12 PMID:21229068

  16. Psittacine incubation and pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Romagnano, April

    2012-05-01

    Psittacine pediatric medicine and surgery can only continue to be practiced by avian veterinarians if psittacine aviculture (the successful captive breeding of parrot species) is active and thriving. Although beautiful, intelligent parrots are popular as beloved pets and reside in zoo and private collections around the world, private psittacine aviculture is in a transition period recovering from difficult economic times. Many of the larger aviculturists have left and the rise of the small aviculturist has significantly changed the industry. PMID:22640534

  17. Pediatric palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Benini, Franca; Spizzichino, Marco; Trapanotto, Manuela; Ferrante, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The WHO defines pediatric palliative care as the active total care of the child's body, mind and spirit, which also involves giving support to the family. Its purpose is to improve the quality of life of young patients and their families, and in the vast majority of cases the home is the best place to provide such care, but for cultural, affective, educational and organizational reasons, pediatric patients rarely benefit from such an approach. In daily practice, it is clear that pediatric patients experience all the clinical, psychological, ethical and spiritual problems that severe, irreversible disease and death entail. The international literature indicates a prevalence of incurable disease annually affecting 10/10,000 young people from 0 to 19 years old, with an annual mortality rate of 1/10,000 young people from birth to 17 years old. The needs of this category of patients, recorded in investigations conducted in various parts of the world, reveal much the same picture despite geographical, cultural, organizational and social differences, particularly as concerns their wish to be treated at home and the demand for better communications between the professionals involved in their care and a greater availability of support services. Different patient care models have been tested in Italy and abroad, two of institutional type (with children staying in hospitals for treating acute disease or in pediatric hospices) and two based at home (the so-called home-based hospitalization and integrated home-based care programs). Professional expertise, training, research and organization provide the essential foundations for coping with a situation that is all too often underestimated and neglected. PMID:19490656

  18. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  19. [Opportunistic mycoses in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Dupont, B

    1985-12-01

    The two most important pathologic conditions leading to mycotic opportunistic infections in children are impairment of mechanisms of defense due to immunosuppressive drugs and congenital defects of immunity. Other circumstances belong to pediatrics such as prematurity or cystic fibrosis. A few examples are chosen to illustrate these situations: congenital candidiasis, chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, chronic dermatophytic disease, neonatal candidemia, mycotic infections in chronic granulomatous disease and aspergillosis in cystic fibrosis. PMID:3833106

  20. Acupuncture in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Brittner, Mindy; Le Pertel, Noemie; Gold, Melanie A

    2016-06-01

    There has been extensive research on the use of acupuncture in adults with a wide array of conditions. Much less research has been conducted on the use of acupuncture in children. In this article, we review the history and philosophy of acupuncture, and the literature on its effectiveness and safety in children and adolescents, giving special attention to the pediatric and adolescent conditions that have been most studied in high-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PMID:26867822

  1. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result. PMID:26652336

  2. Imaging of Pediatric Stroke.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Aashim; Pruthi, Sumit

    2016-09-01

    Despite being as common as brain tumors in children, lack of awareness of pediatric stroke presents unique challenges, both in terms of diagnosis and management. Due to diverse and overlapping risk factors, as well as variable clinical presentations, the diagnosis can be either missed or frequently delayed. Early recognition and treatment of pediatric stroke is however critical in optimizing long-term functional outcomes, reducing morbidity and mortality, and preventing recurrent stroke. Neuroimaging plays a vital role in achieving this goal. The advancements in imaging over the last two decades have allowed for multiple modality options for suspected stroke with more accurate diagnosis, as well as quicker turnaround time in imaging diagnosis, especially at primary stroke centers. However, with the multiple imaging possibilities, referring physicians can be overwhelmed with the best option for each clinical situation and what the literature recommends. Here the authors review the etiology of pediatric stroke in the settings of arterial ischemia, hemorrhage, and cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT), with emphasis on the best diagnostic tools available, including advanced imaging techniques. PMID:26920396

  3. Pediatric suprasellar lesions

    PubMed Central

    Deopujari, C. E.; Kumar, Ashish; Karmarkar, V. S.; Biyani, N. K.; Mhatre, M.; Shah, N. J.

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric brain tumors have always been challenging as well as intriguing in their anatomical, surgical, and postsurgical management-related issues. They are a heterogeneous set of pathologies involving different age groups in childhood and also differ widely from their adult counterparts as far as adjuvant therapies are concerned. Though neurosurgeons across the world are radical in surgery for most of the pediatric tumors, it can often be at the cost of future quality of life in suprasellar tumors. As the time has gone by, the pendulum has swung toward rather conservative and maximal safe surgical resections with adjuvant therapies coming to the forefront. Hence, the aim is to achieve a good quality of life for these children along with a control of tumor growth (rather than cure) and to again tackle the tumors, if required, once these children reach adolescence or adulthood. We have reviewed the literature for different pediatric suprasellar tumors and discussed their current management giving our perspective with illustrative cases. PMID:22069431

  4. Principles of postoperative anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Saka, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    It is known that anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction needs to be combined with detailed postoperative rehabilitation in order for patients to return to their pre-injury activity levels, and that the rehabilitation process is as important as the reconstruction surgery. Literature studies focus on how early in the postoperative ACL rehabilitation period rehabilitation modalities can be initiated. Despite the sheer number of studies on this topic, postoperative ACL rehabilitation protocols have not been standardized yet. Could common, “ossified” knowledge or modalities really prove themselves in the literature? Could questions such as “is postoperative brace use really necessary?”, “what are the benefits of early restoration of the range of motion (ROM)?”, “to what extent is neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) effective in the protection from muscular atrophy?”, “how early can proprioception training and open chain exercises begin?”, “should strengthening training start in the immediate postoperative period?” be answered for sure? My aim is to review postoperative brace use, early ROM restoration, NMES, proprioception, open/closed chain exercises and early strengthening, which are common modalities in the very comprehensive theme of postoperative ACL rehabilitation, on the basis of several studies (Level of Evidence 1 and 2) and to present the commonly accepted ways they are presently used. Moreover, I have presented the objectives of postoperative ACL rehabilitation in tables and recent miscellaneous studies in the last chapter of the paper. PMID:25232521

  5. Improving the management of postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Layzell, Mandy

    Despite developments in knowledge of pain control, many patients still experience unnecessary postoperative pain. This article reports on an audit of postoperative pain and its management in one trust. The results led to the development of a new system using standard prescriptions to empower nurses to manage patients' pain. PMID:16010842

  6. Cardiac Conduction through Engineered Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Stamm, Christof; Hammer, Peter E.; Kwaku, Kevin F.; Marler, Jennifer J.; Friehs, Ingeborg; Jones, Mara; Rader, Christine M.; Roy, Nathalie; Eddy, Mau-Thek; Triedman, John K.; Walsh, Edward P.; McGowan, Francis X.; del Nido, Pedro J.; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    In children, interruption of cardiac atrioventricular (AV) electrical conduction can result from congenital defects, surgical interventions, and maternal autoimmune diseases during pregnancy. Complete AV conduction block is typically treated by implanting an electronic pacemaker device, although long-term pacing therapy in pediatric patients has significant complications. As a first step toward developing a substitute treatment, we implanted engineered tissue constructs in rat hearts to create an alternative AV conduction pathway. We found that skeletal muscle-derived cells in the constructs exhibited sustained electrical coupling through persistent expression and function of gap junction proteins. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction analyses, myogenic cells in the constructs were shown to survive in the AV groove of implanted hearts for the duration of the animal’s natural life. Perfusion of hearts with fluorescently labeled lectin demonstrated that implanted tissues became vascularized and immunostaining verified the presence of proteins important in electromechanical integration of myogenic cells with surrounding recipient rat cardiomyocytes. Finally, using optical mapping and electrophysiological analyses, we provide evidence of permanent AV conduction through the implant in one-third of recipient animals. Our experiments provide a proof-of-principle that engineered tissue constructs can function as an electrical conduit and, ultimately, may offer a substitute treatment to conventional pacing therapy. PMID:16816362

  7. Do Elderly Patients Experience Increased Perioperative or Postoperative Morbidity or Mortality When Given Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Before Esophagectomy?

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, Shannon E.; Yu, Anthony; Kubicek, Gregory J.; Scott, Walter; Mitchell, Edith; Rosato, Ernest L.; Berger, Adam C.

    2011-08-01

    Background: The use of induction chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery has been widely used for the treatment of esophageal cancer. The presumed risk of increased postoperative morbidity and mortality with this regimen has led to reluctance to offer this therapy to elderly patients. We compared the perioperative morbidity and mortality of patients 70 years old and older with those of patients younger than 70 who received CRT followed by esophagectomy and sought to identify preoperative risk factors that may predict higher risk of postoperative death or complications. Methods and Materials: We identified 260 patients who underwent preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy. The association of age with postoperative death and complications was evaluated. The Charlson index, prior cardiac history, and diabetes were identified as preoperative risk factors and were evaluated as potential confounders or effect modifiers. Results: Cardiac disease and the Charlson index were potential modifiers of the effect of age on length of hospital stay (p = 0.08 and p = 0.07, respectively) and postoperative complications (p = 0.1 and p = 0.2) but were not statistically significant. There was a slight nonsignificant decrease in the risk of death in elderly patients after adjustment for the Charlson index (p = 0.2). Conclusion: No significant differences were detected with respect to morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. The presence of cardiac disease, higher scores on the Charlson index, or diabetes did not significantly influence length of stay, postoperative complications, or postoperative death. Given the potential to improve outcomes, this regimen should not be discounted in elderly patients.

  8. Identifying pediatric emergence delirium by using the PAED Scale: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Stamper, Matthew J; Hawks, Sharon J; Taicher, Brad M; Bonta, Juliet; Brandon, Debra H

    2014-04-01

    Pediatric emergence delirium is a postoperative phenomenon characterized by aberrant cognitive and psychomotor behavior, which can place the patient and health care personnel at risk for injury. A common tool for identifying emergence delirium is the Level of Consciousness-Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale (LOC-RASS), although it has not been validated for use in the pediatric population. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium Scale (PAED) is a newly validated tool to measure emergence delirium in children. We chose to implement and evaluate the effectiveness and fidelity of using the PAED Scale to identify pediatric emergence delirium in one eight-bed postanesthesia care unit in comparison with the traditional LOC-RASS. The overall incidence of pediatric emergence delirium found by using the LOC-RASS with a retrospective chart review (3%) was significantly lower than the incidence found by using the LOC-RASS (7.5%) and PAED Scale (11.5%) during the implementation period. Our findings suggest that the PAED Scale may be a more sensitive measure of pediatric emergence delirium, and, in the future, we recommend that health care personnel at our facility use the PAED Scale rather than the LOC-RASS. PMID:24674794

  9. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing. PMID:22276376

  10. Trends in pediatric rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Burkett, K W

    1989-03-01

    The 1980s have been declared the decade of the disabled. Surgeon General Koop has stated that "it is profoundly important for our own society that we tend to these issues of disabled children, that these children not be forgotten or pushed aside, and that we retain our belief in the strength of the American family". The field of pediatric rehabilitation, unheard of as recently as the late 1970s, has become a recognized specialty. The definition of pediatric rehabilitation has expanded to include the care and treatment of children with congenital and acquired disabilities. The pediatric rehabilitation nurse is challenged to keep abreast of new developments in the field while seeking and implementing innovative ways to assist the child and family in their adjustment to the child's disability. A knowledge base of normal growth and development is essential when assessing abnormal patterns in the child with a disability. Complete assessment of the child with a disability includes a parent-child interview and physical assessment, with particular focus on the child's developmental age, movement patterns, and functional activities of daily living. The reaction of the child and family to the disability is all too often viewed as lack of "acceptance" of the child's disability. A continuum of "adjustment" to the disability for both family and child describes normal coping mechanisms for living with and managing the needs of a disabled child. It is important for the pediatric rehabilitation nurse to develop a partnership with parents in which they serve as consultants to families, not as directors of the child's care. Cerebral palsy and spina bifida are the two most common childhood disabilities. With advanced technologic equipment and refined surgical procedures, the child's potential for independence is reaching new heights. Computerized technology has aided the motor-impaired child to progress through normal developmental processes of exploration and discovery. Specialized

  11. Renal insufficiency in neonates after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Asfour, B; Bruker, B; Kehl, H G; Fründ, S; Scheld, H H

    1996-07-01

    Renal failure after cardiac surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is well understood for infants, children and adults. The perioperative risk factors after CPB for immature kidneys in newborns are not well known. This retrospective study investigates perioperative risk factors for renal insufficiency in neonates. I) Preoperative: Age; weight, performed angiography, amount of dye used in angiography, renal disease and creatinine. II) Intraoperative: Duration of operation, duration of MAP < 40 mmHg, use of deep hypothermia, in-out fluid balance, duration of CPB, duration of circulatory arrest and cross-clamp time. III) Postoperative: Creatinine, use of catecholamines, use of nitroglycerine (NG) or phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDI) and additional antibiotics. From Jan. 1990 to Dec. 1994 50 neonates underwent cardiac surgery using CPB (n = 23 transposition of the great arteries; n = 4 pulmonary atresia; n = 6 critical pulmonary stenosis; n = 5 hypoplastic left heart syndrome; n = 3 Ebstein's anomaly; n = 2 interrupted arch with hypoplastic left ventricle; n = 2 single ventricle; n = 1 each: double outlet right ventricle, tricuspid atresia, critical aortic stenosis, rhabdo-myosarkoma, corrected transposition of the great arteries.) Thirty-one patients entered the study. Depending on the postoperative creatinine level two groups (group I: creatinine <1 mg/dl and group II: >1 mg/dl) were created. The diureses between the two groups did not differ. Comparing the patients of group I vs. group II, patients of group I were younger (mean age: 7.7 d. vs. 11.4 d), lighter (mean weight: 3260 g vs. 3430 g), less had angiography (44% vs. 77%), received more dye (mean amount: 14 ml vs. 7 ml), the duration of MAP < 40 mmHg while on CPB was longer (mean duration 3 min vs. 21 min), more patients were operated on using deep hypothermia (55% vs. 27%), the postoperative in-out-fluid balance was more positive (mean balance +413 ml vs. +221 ml), received postop. more frequently high

  12. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  13. Laparoscopic appendectomy in a pediatric patient with type 1 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Heller, Joshua A; Marn, Richard Y

    2015-12-01

    A pediatric patient with type 1 Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease-a disorder associated with a demyelinating polyneuropathy-presented for laparoscopic appendectomy in the setting of acute appendicitis. Induction and maintenance of anesthesia were successfully managed without the use of any depolarizing or nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents. The patient was successfully extubated at the completion of the procedure without any respiratory or neuromuscular sequelae, with excellent pain control and no postoperative nausea or vomiting. PMID:26403061

  14. Postoperative amnesia in a patient undergoing general anesthesia for electro-physiologic (EP) catheter ablation of an irritable atrial focus.

    PubMed

    Sophocles, Aris; Chen, Linda; Lin, David; Liu, Renyu

    2014-10-31

    This case report describes the anesthetic management of a 67-year-old who underwent a catheter based pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) of long-standing, persistent atrial fibrillation. When the patient awoke from the 6.5 hour procedure, he was found to have a transient retrograde and anterograde amnesia that persisted for 18-24 hours postoperatively. This is a unique instance of global amnesia following a cardiac ablation procedure under prolonged general anesthesia. This case study highlights important topics in postoperative cognitive deficits including the differential diagnosis, risk factors, and strategies for optimizing patient outcomes in high risk procedures. PMID:25429367

  15. Postoperative amnesia in a patient undergoing general anesthesia for electro-physiologic (EP) catheter ablation of an irritable atrial focus

    PubMed Central

    Sophocles, Aris; Chen, Linda; Lin, David; Liu, Renyu

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the anesthetic management of a 67-year-old who underwent a catheter based pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) of long-standing, persistent atrial fibrillation. When the patient awoke from the 6.5 hour procedure, he was found to have a transient retrograde and anterograde amnesia that persisted for 18–24 hours postoperatively. This is a unique instance of global amnesia following a cardiac ablation procedure under prolonged general anesthesia. This case study highlights important topics in postoperative cognitive deficits including the differential diagnosis, risk factors, and strategies for optimizing patient outcomes in high risk procedures. PMID:25429367

  16. Postoperative recurrence of cystic hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Prousalidis, John; Kosmidis, Christophoros; Anthimidis, Georgios; Kapoutzis, Konstantinos; Karamanlis, Eleutherios; Fachantidis, Epaminondas

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgical management is the basic treatment for hydatid disease. Overall, the recurrence rate appears to be high (4.6%–22.0%). The purpose of this study was to report our results in the management of recurrent hydatid disease, evaluating the methods for identifying recurrence, prognostic factors and therapeutic options. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent surgery for cystic hydatidosis between 1970 and 2003. Results Of the 584 patients who underwent surgery during our study period, follow-up was complete for 484 (82.8%). Cysts recurred in 51 patients (8.7%). Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography appeared to be efficient for diagnosing recurrence. The 2 most important determinants for recurrence were minute spillage of the hydatid cyst and inadequate treatment owing to missing cysts or incomplete pericystectomy. All but 2 recurrences required surgery. There were 14 postoperative complications for a rate of 27.0%. Thirteen re-recurrences were observed in the follow-up of these patients and also required surgery. Conclusion Avoidance of minute spillage of cyst contents and cautious removal of the parasite with as much of the pericyst as possible are fundamental objectives of primary hydatid surgery. Conservative surgery (removal of the cyst contents plus partial pericystectomy with drainage when necessary) plus chemotherapy and local sterilization is suggested for both primary and secondary operations and appears to achieve satisfactory long-term results. Radical surgery (resection, cystopericystectomy) is preferred only in select patients. PMID:21939605

  17. CRITICAL CARE ECHO ROUNDS: Echo in cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Asrress, Kaleab; Redwood, Simon; Gillon, Stuart; Walker, David

    2014-01-01

    Management of medical cardiac arrest is challenging. The internationally agreed approach is highly protocolised with therapy and diagnosis occurring in parallel. Early identification of the precipitating cause increases the likelihood of favourable outcome. Echocardiography provides an invaluable diagnostic tool in this context. Acquisition of echo images can be challenging in cardiac arrest and should occur in a way that minimises disruption to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this article, the reversible causes of cardiac arrest are reviewed with associated echocardiography findings. Case A 71-year-old patient underwent right upper lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. On the 2nd post-operative day, he developed respiratory failure with rising oxygen requirement and right middle and lower lobe collapse and consolidation on chest X-ray. He was commenced on high-flow oxygen therapy and antibiotics. His condition continued to deteriorate and on the 3rd post-operative day he was intubated and mechanically ventilated. Six hours after intubation, he became suddenly hypotensive with a blood pressure of 50 systolic and then lost cardiac output. ECG monitoring showed pulseless electrical activity. CPR was commenced and return of circulation occurred after injection of 1 mg of adrenaline. Focused echocardiography was performed, which demonstrated signs of massive pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy with tissue plasminogen activator was given and his condition stabilised. PMID:26693304

  18. Educational Preparation of Pediatric Audiologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric audiologists play a vital role in detection, diagnosis, and intervention for young children with hearing loss and their families. Preparing the next generation of pediatric audiologists necessitates a creative approach that balances the requirements of a broad curriculum with the special skills needed to serve a unique and varied…

  19. Pediatric imaging for the technologist

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmot, D.M.; Sharko, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This manual provides an accessible store of information on pediatric imaging procedures, with clearly described techniques and instructions. The aim is to simplify the pediatric examination. Extensively illustrated, this work describes in detail correct positioning, radiation protection, and methods of immobilization. The concluding chapters clarify what is required in the final image for accurate diagnosis.

  20. Intravenous acetaminophen use in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shastri, Nirav

    2015-06-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly used pediatric medication that has recently been approved for intravenous use in the United States. The purpose of this article was to review the pharmacodynamics, indications, contraindications, and precautions for the use of intravenous acetaminophen in pediatrics. PMID:26035501