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Sample records for pediatric cataract surgery

  1. Cataract Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics ...

  2. ANTERIOR LENS CAPSULE MANAGEMENT IN PEDIATRIC CATARACT SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, M. Edward

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To describe and analyze pediatric anterior capsulotomy techniques and make recommendations. Methods Five anterior capsulotomy techniques were compared using a porcine model. Extensibility was measured by calculating the mean stretch-to-rupture circumference of each capsulotomy (20 eyes per technique) as a percentage of its circumference at rest. Edge characteristics were reviewed using scanning electron microscopy. A 10-year review of consecutive pediatric cataract surgeries performed by the author focused on the anterior capsulotomy results. A worldwide survey was used to determine current practice patterns. Results Manual continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis (CCC) produced the most extensible porcine capsulotomy (185%) with the most regular edge and is preferred by surgeons for patients aged 2 years and older. In the pseudophakic clinical cases reviewed, a radial tear developed in 3 (6.5%) of 46 manual CCC cases. Vitrectorhexis (porcine extensibility, 161%) is preferred by surgeons during the first 2 years of life. A radial tear developed in 16 (7.7%) of 208 vitrectorhexis pseudophakic eyes (29 tears in 284 pseudophakic eyes [10.2%] overall). The Kloti diathermy unit, Fugo plasma blade, and “can-opener” technique produced porcine capsulotomies of 145%, 170%, and 149% extensibility, respectively, and radial tears numbering 4 (21%) of 19, 5 of 8, and 1 of 2, respectively, in the clinical series. Conclusions All five capsulotomy techniques are recommendable for children. Only the vitrectorhexis and manual CCC are commonly used today. Vitrectorhexis is well suited for use in infants and young children; manual CCC is best used beyond infancy, and it produces the most stable edge. PMID:15747769

  3. Pediatric Cataract Surgery in National Eye Centre Kaduna, Nigeria: Outcome and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Murtala M.; Abubakar, Ahmed; Achi, Ibrahim; Alhassan, Mahmoud B.; Hassan, Amina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the outcomes of congenital/developmental cataract from a tertiary eye care hospital in Northwest Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed of all patients diagnosed with congenital or developmental cataract who underwent surgery from January 2008 to December 2009. Data were collected on patient demographics, preoperative characteristics, intraoperative complications, and postoperative outcomes as well as complications. Results: A total of 181 eyes of 102 patients underwent surgery. There were 95 (52.5%) right eyes. There were 64 (62.7%) males. The mean age of the patients was 6.88 ± 7.97 years. Fifty-four (51.3%) patients were below 3 years old. Most (62%) patients had congenital cataract with a history of onset within the first year of life [39 (62.9%) patients]. Amblyopia, nystagmus, and strabismus were the most frequent ocular comorbidities accounting for 50.3%, 36.5%, and 35.4% of eyes respectively. The majority (84.3%) of the patients had surgery within 6 months of presentation. All patients underwent manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Seventy-nine (77.5%) patients underwent simultaneous bilateral surgery. Intraocular lens implantation was performed in 83.4% eyes. The most common early and late postoperative complication was, posterior capsular opacity which occurred in 65 eyes of 43 children. In these cases, moderate visual acuity was predominant visual outcome. Conclusion: Treatment of pediatric cataract in our setting is complicated by demographic factors which results in late presentation and consequently, late treatment of children. Short-term visual outcome is fair. Data on long term postoperative outcomes could not be acquired due to poor follow-up. PMID:25624681

  4. Hydrophilic Acrylic versus PMMA Intraocular Lens Implantation in Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Panahi-Bazaz, Mahmoud-Reza; Zamani, Mitra; Abazar, Bijan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To compare primary implantation of foldable hydrophilic acrylic with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) intraocular lenses (IOLs) in pediatric cataract surgery in terms of short-term complications and visual outcomes. Methods This randomized clinical trial included 40 eyes of 31 consecutive pediatric patients aged 1 to 6 years with unilateral or bilateral congenital cataracts undergoing cataract surgery with primary IOL implantation. Two types of IOLs including foldable hydrophilic acrylic and rigid PMMA were randomly implanted in the capsular bag during surgery. Primary posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitrectomy were performed in all eyes. Patients were followed for at least 1 year. Intra- and postoperative complications, visual outcomes and refractive errors were compared between the study groups. Results Mean age was 3.2±1.8 years in the hydrophilic acrylic group and 3.7±1.3 years in the PMMA group. Mean follow-up period was 19.6±5 (12–29) months. No intraoperative complication occurred in any group. Postoperative uveitis was seen in 2 (10%) eyes in the acrylic group versus 5 (25%) eyes in the PMMA group (P=0.40). Other postoperative complications including pigment deposition (30%), iridocorneal adhesions (10%) and posterior synechiae formation (10%), were seen only in the PMMA group. The visual axis remained completely clear and visual outcomes were generally favorable and comparable in the study groups. Conclusion In pediatric eyes undergoing lensectomy with primary posterior capsulotomy and anterior vitrectomy, hydrophilic acrylic IOLs are comparable to PMMA IOLs in terms of biocompatibility and visual axis clarity, and seem to entail less frequent postoperative complications. PMID:23198075

  5. Ocular Hypertension after Pediatric Cataract Surgery: Baseline Characteristics and First-Year Report

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Jingjing; Lin, Zhuoling; Qu, Bo; Zhan, Jiao; Zheng, Danying; Zhong, Xiaojian; Tian, Zhen; Liu, Yizhi

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring intraocular pressure (IOP) is essential for pediatric cataract treatment but always difficult due to lack of cooperation in young children. We present the baseline characteristics and the first-year results of a long-term prospective cohort study, which are aimed to determine the relationship of the incidence of ocular hypertension (OH) in children after cataract surgery during the first-year period and the risk of developing late-onset glaucoma. Children were included with the following criteria: they were≤10 years old and scheduled to undergo cataract surgery with/without intraocular lens implantation; they were compliant with our follow-up protocol, which included monitoring IOP using a Tono-Pen under sedation or anesthesia. Incidence of OH, peak OH value, OH onset time and OH duration within a 12-month period following surgery were measured. In brief, 206 patients (379 eyes) were included and OH developed in 66 of 379 (17.4%) eyes. The mean follow-up period was 14.0±3.2 months (median, 12 months; range, 10–16 months). Moreover, 33 of 196 (16.8%) aphakic eyes and 33 of 183 (18.0%) IOL eyes were diagnosed with OH. The peak OH onset times were at 1-week (34/66, 51.5%) and 1-month (14/66, 21.2%) appointments postsurgery. The peak IOP value in the OH eyes was 29.9±7.5 mmHg (median, 29 mmHg; range, 21–48 mmHg). The duration of OH was 30.9±31.2 days (median, 30 days; range, 3–150 days). OH recurred in 13 eyes with a history of OH diagnosed within 1 month postsurgery (13/54, 24.1%), which needed temporary or long term use of antiglaucoma medications. In conclusion, the incidence of OH in children after cataract surgery was 17.4% during the first-year period. Children who have suffered elevated IOP in the first year after cataract surgery should be followed closely to determine if there is an increased risk of developing late-onset glaucoma. PMID:23922832

  6. Uveitis-glaucoma-hyphema syndrome caused by posterior chamber intraocular lens--a rare complication in pediatric cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ju; Tan, Chau-Yi; Lin, Szu-Yuan; Jou, Jieh-Ren

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of postoperative uveitis-glaucome-hyphema (UGH) syndrome following pediatric cataract surgery due to posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC-IOL). Slit-lamp examination revealed the optic of PC-IOL migrated into anterior chamber. The PC-IOL explantation was performed and ocular inflammation subsided. PMID:19230361

  7. Cataract surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cataract surgery usually works very well. The operation has few risks, the pain and recovery period are short, ... improved. Ninety-five percent or more of all cataract surgeries result in improved vision.

  8. Cataract surgery - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100079.htm Cataract surgery - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... lens of an eye is normally clear. A cataract is when the lens becomes cloudy as you ...

  9. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  10. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  11. Cataract Surgery in Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Murthy, Somashiela; Ganesh, Sudha K.; Phaik, Chee Soon; Sangwan, Virender; Biswas, Jyotimai

    2012-01-01

    Cataract surgery in uveitic eyes is often challenging and can result in intraoperative and postoperative complications. Most uveitic patients enjoy good vision despite potentially sight-threatening complications, including cataract development. In those patients who develop cataracts, successful surgery stems from educated patient selection, careful surgical technique, and aggressive preoperative and postoperative control of inflammation. With improved understanding of the disease processes, pre- and perioperative control of inflammation, modern surgical techniques, availability of biocompatible intraocular lens material and design, surgical experience in performing complicated cataract surgeries, and efficient management of postoperative complications have led to much better outcome. Preoperative factors include proper patient selection and counseling and preoperative control of inflammation. Meticulous and careful cataract surgery in uveitic cataract is essential in optimizing the postoperative outcome. Management of postoperative complications, especially inflammation and glaucoma, earlier rather than later, has also contributed to improved outcomes. This manuscript is review of the existing literature and highlights the management pearls in tackling complicated cataract based on medline search of literature and experience of the authors. PMID:22518338

  12. Cataract Surgery Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA-McGannon cataract surgery tool is a tiny cutter-pump which liquefies and pumps the cataract lens material from the eye. Inserted through a small incision in the cornea, the tool can be used on the hardest cataract lens. The cutter is driven by a turbine which operates at about 200,000 revolutions per minute. Incorporated in the mechanism are two passages for saline solutions, one to maintain constant pressure within the eye, the other for removal of the fragmented lens material and fluids. Three years of effort have produced a design, now being clinically evaluated, with excellent potential for improved cataract surgery. The use of this tool is expected to reduce the patient's hospital stay and recovery period significantly.

  13. Distribution of Axial Length before Cataract Surgery in Chinese Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Haotian; Lin, Duoru; Chen, Jingjing; Luo, Lixia; Lin, Zhuoling; Wu, Xiaohang; Long, Erping; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hui; Chen, Wan; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Jinchao; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Axial length (AL) is a significant indicator of eyeball development, but reports on the overall status of axial development in congenital cataract (CC) patients and its relationship with patient demographics, such as age, sex, and laterality, are rare. We prospectively investigated the AL of 1,586 patients ≤18 years old and undergoing cataract surgery in China from January 2005 to December 2014. Of these 3,172 eyes, a logarithmic correlation between AL and age in CC patients was calculated, and an age of approximately 2 years was found to be a turning point in the growth rate of AL. A considerable variation was observed in CC patients of the same age. Furthermore, 2–6 years old boys had longer AL than girls. The AL of affected eye in unilateral patients was longer than that of the contralateral eye in 2–6 years age group and longer than that of eye in bilateral CC patients in all age groups. These findings indicate that the development of the length of eyeballs in CC patients is influenced by multiple factors in addition to age. A full understanding of the distribution of AL may provide a useful reference for judging the timing of surgery in CC patients. PMID:27022004

  14. Laser welding in penetrating keratoplasty and cataract surgery of pediatric patients: early results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Francesca; Pini, Roberto; Menabuoni, Luca; Malandrini, Alex; Canovetti, Annalisa; Lenzetti, Ivo; Capozzi, Paolo; Valente, Paola; Buzzonetti, Luca

    2013-03-01

    Diode laser welding of ocular tissues is a procedure that enables minimally invasive closure of a corneal wound. This procedure is based on a photothermal effect: a water solution of Indocyanine Green (ICG) is inserted in the surgical wound, in order to stain the corneal tissue walls. The stained tissue is then irradiated with a low power infrared diode laser, delivering laser light through a 300-μm core diameter optical fiber. This procedure enables an immediate closure of the wounds: it is thus possible to reduce or to substitute the use of surgical threads. This is of particular interest in children, because the immediate closure improves refractive outcome and anti-amblyopic effect; moreover this procedure avoids several general anaesthesia for suture management. In this work, we present the first use of diode laser welding procedure in paediatric patients. 5 selected patients underwent cataract surgery (Group 1), while 4 underwent fs-laserassisted penetrating keratoplasty (Group 2). In Group 1 the conventional surgery procedure was performed, while no stitches were used for the closure of the surgical wounds: these were laser welded and immediately closed. In Group 2 the donor button was sutured upon the recipient by 8 single stitches, instead of 16 single stitches or a running suture. The laser welding procedure was performed in order to join the donor tissue to the recipient bed. Objective observations in the follow up study evidenced a perfect adhesion of the laser welded tissues, no collateral effects and an optimal restoration of the treated tissues.

  15. Recovery after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Porela-Tiihonen, Susanna; Kokki, Hannu; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kokki, Merja

    2016-04-01

    Cataract surgery is the most common ophthalmological surgical procedure, and it is predicted that the number of surgeries will increase significantly in the future. However, little is known about the recovery after surgery. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, severity and duration of pain and other ocular discomfort symptoms experienced after cataract surgery. The other objectives were to identify the factors associated with lower postoperative patient satisfaction and to measure the effect of cataract surgery on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and visual function in everyday life. The study design was a prospective follow-up study. The course of the recovery and the presence of ocular symptoms were evaluated by interviewing the patients via a questionnaire at 1 day, 1 week, 6 weeks and one year after surgery The visual functioning in everyday life was measured with Visual Functioning Index VF-7 and Catquest-9SF-questionnaires and furthermore the HRQoL was measured with the 15D-instrument before surgery and at 12 months after surgery. The patients returned the questionnaires by mail and were interviewed in the hospital on the day of the surgery. The same patients filled-in all the questionnaires. The patient reports were used to collect the data on medical history. A total of 303 patients were approached at Kuopio University Hospital in 2010-2011 and of these 196 patients were eligible and willing to participate, with postoperative data being available from 186 (95%) patients. A systematic review article was included in the study procedure and it revealed the wide range in the reported incidence of postoperative ocular pain. Some of the identified randomized controlled studies reported no or only minor pain whereas in some studies significant pain or pain lasting for several weeks has been described in more than 50% of the study patients. In the present study setting, pain was reported by 34% during the first

  16. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltan Z; McAlinden, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser (FSL) cataract surgery is in its infancy but is rapidly gaining popularity due to the improved consistency and predictability for corneal incisions and anterior capsulorhexis. It enables subsequently less phacoemulsification energy and time to be employed, which has gains in terms of reduced corneal oedema. In addition, the FSL allows better circularity of the anterior capsulotomy, capsule overlap, intraocular lens (IOL) placement and centration of the IOL. These advantages have resulted in improved visual and refractive outcomes in the short term. Complication rates are low which reduce with surgeon experience. This review article focuses on the Alcon LenSx system. PMID:26605364

  17. A Meta-analysis on the clinical efficacy and safety of optic capture in pediatric cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Fang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of optic capture in pediatric cataract surgery. METHODS Searches of peer-reviewed literature were conducted in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library. The search terms were “optic capture” and “cataract”. The retrieval period ended in December 2014. Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs), case-control studies and cohort studies were included. Meta-analyses were performed. Pooled weighted mean differences and risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated. RESULTS Ten studies involving 282 eyes were included, 5 of which were RCTs involving 194 eyes. The application of optic capture significantly reduced both opacification of the visual axis (RR: 0.12; 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.85; P=0.03) and occurrence of geometric decentration (RR: 0.09; 95% CI: 0.02 to 0.46; P=0.004). But it did not significantly affect best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (WMD: -0.01; 95%CI: -0.07 to 0.05; P=0.75) and influence the occurrence of posterior synechia (RR: 1.53; 95% CI: 0.84 to 2.77; P=0.17). Deposits in the anterior intraocular lens were significantly increased in the optic capture group early after surgery (RR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.05 to 1.86; P=0.02) and at the last follow-up (RR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.08 to 4.92; P=0.03). The quality of the evidence was assessed as high. CONCLUSION The application of optic capture significantly reduces opacification of visual axis and occurrence of geometric decentration but do not significantly improve BCVA with notable safety. PMID:27162735

  18. Complications of cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsie; Mahroo, Omar A R; Spalton, David J

    2010-11-01

    Modern cataract surgery is safe in more than 95 per cent of patients. In the small number of cases where a serious complication occurs, the most common is an intra-operative posterior capsular rupture. This can lead to vitreous loss or a dropped nucleus and can increase the risk of post-operative cystoid macular oedema or retinal detachment. Post-operatively, posterior capsular opacification is the most common complication and can be readily treated with a YAG capsulotomy. The most devastating complication is endophthalmitis, the rate of which is now significantly decreased through the use of intracameral antibiotics. As a clinician, the most important step is to assess the patient pre-operatively to predict higher risk individuals and to counsel them appropriately. In these patients, various pre- or intra-operative management steps can be taken in addition to routine phacoemulsification to optimise their visual outcome. PMID:20735786

  19. Diplopia as the Complication of Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gawęcki, Maciej; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The authors present systematic review of aetiology and treatment of diplopia related to cataract surgery. The problem is set in the modern perspective of changing cataract surgery. Actual incidence is discussed as well as various modalities of therapeutic options. The authors provide the guidance for the contemporary cataract surgeon, when to expect potential problem in ocular motility after cataract surgery. PMID:26998351

  20. Diplopia as the Complication of Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Gawęcki, Maciej; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The authors present systematic review of aetiology and treatment of diplopia related to cataract surgery. The problem is set in the modern perspective of changing cataract surgery. Actual incidence is discussed as well as various modalities of therapeutic options. The authors provide the guidance for the contemporary cataract surgeon, when to expect potential problem in ocular motility after cataract surgery. PMID:26998351

  1. Astigmatism in cataract surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Luntz, M. H.; Livingston, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    We report on our investigation into astigmatism in 40 eyes following a corneal cataract incision closed with a continuous 10/0 nylon monofilament suture (Ethilon). Immediately after surgery there was astigmatism caused by the nylon suture (suture-induced astigmatism), its severity depending on the tightness of the suture. It ranged from 1 to 10-5 dioptres, the mean value 4-09 dioptres with a standard deviation of +/-2-5. Removing the nylon suture eliminated this astigmatism and within a few weeks the corneal astigmatism correction in 48% of eyes returned to the preoperative level. In 80% of eyes the difference between the final postoperative corneal astigmatism (4 months after removing the continuous suture) and the preoperative astigmatism was 0-75 dioptres or less and the maximum change was 1-5 dioptres. In 40% of eyes the axis of the cylinder changed from a horizontal to an oblique axis but did not change from a with- to against-the-rule axis. The degree of astigmatism remained constant while the suture was in place and in 50% of eyes was equal to or less than 3 dioptres. The mean of the spherical equivalents was 11-31 dioptres with a standard deviation of +/-1-25. A spectacle correction 14 days after operation prescribed either as the mean spherical equivalent (11-50 dioptres) or according to the patient's refraction will give satisfactory vision until the suture is removed 4 months after operation. The degree of astigmatism following a corneal section and continuous nylon suture compares very favourably with astigmatism following other suturing techniques for cataract. Images PMID:326304

  2. [Atraumatic needles for cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Harnisch, J P

    1985-12-01

    The author reports on his experience with spatula needles and cutting needles with micropoint in cataract surgery. Configuration and edge treatment of the different needles were demonstrated by scanning electron microscope. The characteristics of the tested needles seem to depend mainly upon their profile. In cataract surgery the spatula needles proved to be superior to the needles with cutting micropoint due to their ski-shaped design. PMID:3912601

  3. Cataract surgery and intraocular pressure.

    PubMed

    Melancia, Diana; Abegão Pinto, Luis; Marques-Neves, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Cataract surgery is one of the most performed surgeries in the developed world. In addition to its significant impact on visual acuity, phacoemulsification has been hailed as a potential intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering procedure. While current evidence suggests an overall significant and sustained decrease in IOP to exist after cataract surgery, the specific ocular characteristics that could help predict which patients are likely to benefit from this IOP-lowering effect remain unclear. This definition is important in glaucoma patients if this surgery is to be used in the treatment for this disease. Our review aims to summarize the literature on the subject, depicting possible mechanisms behind this IOP decrease, which type of patients are more likely to benefit from this surgery for IOP-lowering purposes and ultimately help optimizing disease management for the increasing number of patients with concomitant glaucoma and cataract. PMID:25765255

  4. Cataract surgery in pseudoexfoliation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sangal, Neha; Chen, Teresa C

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoexfoliation (PXF) syndrome is characterized by the deposition of distinctive fibrillar material in the anterior segment of the eye. It is an age-related process that is associated with open and narrow angle glaucomas and the formation of cataracts. Not only is PXF associated with the formation of dense nuclear cataracts, it is also well known that those presenting with PXF are at a higher risk of developing complications during, and even after, cataract surgery. Complications associated with cataract surgery in PXF can occur from poor pupillary dilation, zonular weakness leading to intraoperative or postoperative lens dislocation and vitreous loss, postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) spikes potentiating glaucomatous damage, capsular phimosis, prolonged inflammation, and postoperative corneal decompensation. The surgeon should be prepared to encounter the various potential intraoperative and postoperative complications in eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome during cataract surgery. In this way, the surgeon can plan his/her surgical technique to help avoid surprises during cataract surgery and be prepared to manage the potential postoperative complications that can occur in pseudoexfoliation eyes. PMID:25325866

  5. Cataract and Cataract Surgery: Nationwide Prevalence and Clinical Determinants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical determinants of cataract and cataract surgery in Korean population. The 2008–2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was analyzed, which included 20,419 participants aged ≥ 40 years. The survey is a multistage, probability-cluster survey, which can produce nationally representative estimates. Prevalence of cataract and cataract surgery was estimated. Clinical determinants for those were investigated using logistic regression analyses (LRAs). The prevalence of cataract was 42.28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.67–43.89); 40.82% (95% CI, 38.97–42.66) for men and 43.62% (95% CI, 41.91–45.33) for women (P = 0.606). The prevalence of cataract surgery was 7.75% (95% CI, 7.30–8.20); 6.38% (95% CI, 5.80–6.96) for men and 9.01% (95% CI, 8.41–9.61) for women (P < 0.001). Cataract was associated with older age (P < 0.001), men (P = 0.032), lower household income (P = 0.031), lower education (P < 0.001), hypertension (P < 0.001), and diabetes mellitus (DM) (P < 0.001). Cataract surgery was consistently associated with older age, occupation, DM, asthma, and anemia in two LRAs, which compared participants with cataract surgery to those without cataract surgery and those having a cataract but without any cataract surgery, respectively. Hypertension, arthritis, and dyslipidemia were associated with cataract surgery at least in one of these LRAs. These results suggest that there are 9.4 million individuals with cataract and 1.7 million individuals with cataract surgery in Korea. Further studies are warranted to reveal the causality and its possible mechanism of developing/exacerbating cataract in novel determinants (i.e., anemia, asthma, and arthritic conditions) as well as well-known determinants. PMID:27247507

  6. Cataract and Cataract Surgery: Nationwide Prevalence and Clinical Determinants.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Jun; Lee, Ju Hyun; Kang, Se Woong; Hyon, Joon Young; Park, Kyu Hyung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical determinants of cataract and cataract surgery in Korean population. The 2008-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was analyzed, which included 20,419 participants aged ≥ 40 years. The survey is a multistage, probability-cluster survey, which can produce nationally representative estimates. Prevalence of cataract and cataract surgery was estimated. Clinical determinants for those were investigated using logistic regression analyses (LRAs). The prevalence of cataract was 42.28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.67-43.89); 40.82% (95% CI, 38.97-42.66) for men and 43.62% (95% CI, 41.91-45.33) for women (P = 0.606). The prevalence of cataract surgery was 7.75% (95% CI, 7.30-8.20); 6.38% (95% CI, 5.80-6.96) for men and 9.01% (95% CI, 8.41-9.61) for women (P < 0.001). Cataract was associated with older age (P < 0.001), men (P = 0.032), lower household income (P = 0.031), lower education (P < 0.001), hypertension (P < 0.001), and diabetes mellitus (DM) (P < 0.001). Cataract surgery was consistently associated with older age, occupation, DM, asthma, and anemia in two LRAs, which compared participants with cataract surgery to those without cataract surgery and those having a cataract but without any cataract surgery, respectively. Hypertension, arthritis, and dyslipidemia were associated with cataract surgery at least in one of these LRAs. These results suggest that there are 9.4 million individuals with cataract and 1.7 million individuals with cataract surgery in Korea. Further studies are warranted to reveal the causality and its possible mechanism of developing/exacerbating cataract in novel determinants (i.e., anemia, asthma, and arthritic conditions) as well as well-known determinants. PMID:27247507

  7. [Keratoplasty combined with cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Muraine, M; Gueudry, J; Retout, A; Genevois, O

    2012-09-01

    Corneal pathologies leading to keratoplasty are often associated with cataract and combined surgery is therefore mandatory. Triple procedure with penetrating keratoplasty and concurrent cataract extraction followed by intra ocular lens (IOL) implantation is usually the preferential choice because visual rehabilitation is theoretically more rapid. Surgeons have to be aware of surgical conditions during open-sky surgery because vitreous pressure is not counterbalanced by anterior chamber pressure. Today, many surgeons prefer non-simultaneous procedures with cataract surgery performed months after grafting because of the improvement in spherical refractive error. More recently, new triple procedures, Descemet's stripping automated keratoplasty and concurrent cataract surgery have gained popularity, especially in patients with Fuchs dystrophy associated with cataract. Surgery starts with phacoemulsification, followed by endothelium exchange through a 3 to 5 mm incision. Advantages against classic triple procedure are quick visual rehabilitation, fewer induced refractive errors, minimal postoperative discomfort and corneal integrity. Surgeons have to consider an eventual postoperative hyperopic shift secondary to corneal lenticule shape when choosing adequate intraocular lens. PMID:22921023

  8. Congenital cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following birth defects: Chondrodysplasia syndrome Congenital rubella Conradi-Hünermann syndrome Down syndrome (trisomy 21) Ectodermal ... Images Eye Cataract - close-up of the eye Rubella syndrome Cataract References Dahan E. Pediatric cataract surgery. ...

  9. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Keane JF, Lock JE, Fyler DC, eds. Nadas' Pediatric Cardiology . 2nd ed. St. Louis, MO; WB Saunders; ...

  10. Cataract Surgery in the Glaucoma Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Jennifer S.; Choi, Daniel Y.; Cheema, Anjum S.; Singh, Kuldev

    2015-01-01

    To summarize the role of cataract surgery in the glaucoma patient, in terms of the effect on intraocular pressure (IOP) as well as diagnostic and therapeutic considerations for those with both conditions. Recent evidence suggests that cataract extraction may produce a significant and sustained IOP reduction in individuals with open-angle glaucoma, ocular hypertension, and angle-closure glaucoma. Cataract removal may improve the practitioner's ability to interpret perimetric testing, and re-establishing perimetric and optic nerve imaging baselines is recommended after cataract surgery. The sequence of cataract surgery relative to glaucoma surgery impacts the likelihood of complications and surgical success. There are multiple benefits to perform cataract surgery prior to glaucoma surgery while cataract surgery after trabeculectomy increases the risk of subsequent filtration failure. As “minimally invasive glaucoma surgeries” continue to improve in terms of efficacy, there is an evolving role for combined cataract and glaucoma surgery in patients with early to moderate stages of glaucoma. PMID:25624668

  11. Emerging Technology in Refractive Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, João; Neatrour, Kristin; Waring IV, George O.

    2016-01-01

    Technology in cataract surgery is constantly evolving to meet the goals of both surgeons and patients. Recent major advances in refractive cataract surgery include innovations in preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics, femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS), and a new generation of intraocular lenses (IOLs). This paper presents the latest technologies in each of these major categories and discusses how these contributions serve to improve cataract surgery outcomes in a safe, effective, and predictable manner. PMID:27433353

  12. Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... has become cloudy, this is called a cataract. Vision problems with cataracts If your vision has become ... regularly for any changes. Cataract surgery for clearer vision When a cataract causes bothersome vision problems that ...

  13. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduced appetite Alternate Names Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - ... of the aorta Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery Patent ductus arteriosus Pediatric heart surgery Tetralogy of Fallot ...

  14. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... after the baby is born. For others, your child may be able to safely wait for months ...

  15. Long term outcomes of bilateral congenital and developmental cataracts operated in Maharashtra, India. Miraj pediatric cataract study III

    PubMed Central

    Gogate, Parikshit M; Sahasrabudhe, Mohini; Shah, Mitali; Patil, Shailbala; Kulkarni, Anil N; Trivedi, Rupal; Bhasa, Divya; Tamboli, Rahin; Mane, Rekha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To study long term outcome of bilateral congenital and developmental cataract surgery. Subjects: 258 pediatric cataract operated eyes of 129 children. Materials and Methods: Children who underwent pediatric cataract surgery in 2004-8 were traced and examined prospectively in 2010-11. Demographic and clinical factors were noted from retrospective chart readings. All children underwent visual acuity estimation and comprehensive ocular examination in a standardized manner. L. V. Prasad Child Vision Function scores (LVP-CVF) were noted for before and after surgery. Statistics: Statistical analysis was done with SPSS version 16 including multi-variate analysis. Results: Children aged 9.1 years (std dev 4.6, range 7 weeks-15 years) at the time of surgery. 74/129 (57.4%) were boys. The average duration of follow-up was 4.4 years (stddev 1.6, range 3-8 years). 177 (68.6%) eyes had vision <3/60 before surgery, while 109 (42.2%) had best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) >6/18 and 157 (60.9%) had BCVA >6/60 3-8 years after surgery. 48 (37.2%) had binocular stereoacuity <480 sec of arc by TNO test. Visual outcome depended on type of cataract (P = 0.004), type of cataract surgery (P < 0.001), type of intra-ocular lens (P = 0.05), age at surgery (P = 0.004), absence of post-operative uveitis (P = 0.01) and pre-operative vision (P < 0.001), but did not depend on delay (0.612) between diagnosis and surgery. There was a statistically significant improvement for all the 20 questions of the LVP-CVF scale (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Pediatric cataract surgery improved the children's visual acuity, stereo acuity and vision function. Developmental cataract, use of phacoemulsification, older children and those with better pre-operative vision had betterlong-termoutcomes. PMID:24618489

  16. Cataract

    MedlinePlus

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens in your eye. It affects your vision. Cataracts are very common in older people. By age ... than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. A cataract can ...

  17. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  18. Intraocular lens employed for cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszkowska, A. M.; Torrisi, L.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the techniques of cataract surgery with implantation of intraocular lenses and some physical properties of the used materials. The new technology, coupled with extensive experience and the studied cases, permits to increase the standardization and accuracy of the engravings, by reducing the use and handling of surgical instruments inside the eye. At present it is possible to replace the cataract with crystalline lenses based on biopolymers such as PMMA, silicone, acrylic hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic. These materials are increasingly able to replace the natural lens and to ensure the fully functional of the eye. The role of femtosecond lasers in cataract surgery, to assist or replace several aspects of the manual cataract surgery, are discussed.

  19. Cataract Surgery in Anterior Megalophthalmos: A Review

    PubMed Central

    GALVIS, Virgilio; TELLO, Alejandro; M. RANGEL, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anterior megalophthalmos is characterized by megalocornea associated with a very broad anterior chamber and ciliary ring elongation. It is also called X-linked megalocornea. It is accompanied by early development of cataracts, zonular anomalies, and, rarely, vitreoretinal disorders. Subluxation of a cataract can occur in cataract surgery because of zonular weakness. In addition, in most patients, standard intraocular lens (IOL) decentration is a risk because of the enlarged sulcus and capsular bag. These unique circumstances make cataract surgery challenging. To date, several approaches have been developed. Implantation of a retropupillary iris-claw aphakic intraocular lens may be a good option because it is easier than suturing the IOL and can have better and more stable anatomic and visual outcomes, compared to other techniques. PMID:27350950

  20. Bimanual microincisional cataract surgery technique and clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Muammar, Abdulrahman

    2009-01-01

    Bimanual microincisional cataract surgery has been introduced recently as a technique for cataract surgery and it is gaining interest of many cataract surgeons in the world. Over the last few years many changes were made in the phacoemulsification machines and the intraocular lenses design which allowed bimanual microincisional cataract surgery to be safer and more efficient. The purpose of this review is to introduce the technique of bimanual microincisional cataract surgery and to review all the prospective randomized studies comparing bimanual microincisional cataract surgery and standard phacoemulsification in term of safety and efficacy parameters. PMID:23960852

  1. Partially coherent interferometric biometry in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Findl, Oliver; Menapace, Rupert; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1999-02-01

    In an earlier study we showed that precise axial eye length measurement on cataract eyes is possible with the dual beam partial coherence interferometry technique (PCI). A high correlation with the standard ultrasound technique has been obtained. Recently, in a prospective study, partially coherent interferometry and ultrasound biometry were compared in cataract surgery using the SRK II formula based on US applanation biometry. Three months after surgery PCI was repeated and refractive outcome was determined. The use of PCI would have improved refractive outcome by about 30%.

  2. The carbon footprint of cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morris, D S; Wright, T; Somner, J E A; Connor, A

    2013-01-01

    Background Climate change is predicted to be one of the largest global health threats of the 21st century. Health care itself is a large contributor to carbon emissions. Determining the carbon footprint of specific health care activities such as cataract surgery allows the assessment of associated emissions and identifies opportunities for reduction. Aim To assess the carbon footprint of a cataract pathway in a British teaching hospital. Methods This was a component analysis study for one patient having first eye cataract surgery in the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff. Activity data was collected from three sectors, building and energy use, travel and procurement. Published emissions factors were applied to this data to provide figures in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2eq). Results The carbon footprint for one cataract operation was 181.8 kg CO2eq. On the basis that 2230 patients were treated for cataracts during 2011 in Cardiff, this has an associated carbon footprint of 405.4 tonnes CO2eq. Building and energy use was estimated to account for 36.1% of overall emissions, travel 10.1% and procurement 53.8%, with medical equipment accounting for the most emissions at 32.6%. Conclusions This is the first published carbon footprint of cataract surgery and acts as a benchmark for other studies as well as identifying areas for emissions reduction. Within the procurement sector, dialogue with industry is important to reduce the overall carbon footprint. Sustainability should be considered when cataract pathways are designed as there is potential for reduction in all sectors with the possible side effects of saving costs and improving patient care. PMID:23429413

  3. Dropped nucleus following phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Tajunisah, I; Reddy, S C

    2007-12-01

    Twenty two cases of dropped nucleus following 1,196 phacoemulsification procedures in cataract surgery were examined retrospectively to determine the incidence, predisposing factors and visual outcomes of this dreaded complication. All the cases underwent pars plana vitrectomy and the lens fragments were removed with phacofragmotome, vitrectomy cutter or delivered through limbus. The incidence of dropped nucleus was 1.84%. The predisposing factors were hard cataracts (13.6%), polar cataracts (9.1%), previously vitrectomized eyes (4.5%) and high myopia (4.5%). The final visual outcome was > or = 6/12 in 10 eyes (45.5%); complications were seen in 5 eyes (22.7%). The interval between initial surgery and vitrectomy, the method of fragment removal and the type of lens implanted, did not influence the final visual outcome. PMID:18705466

  4. [The development of cataract surgery after 1745].

    PubMed

    Pouw, C A M Karin; Zegers, Richard H C

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, cataract surgery is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the Netherlands. This is due to the increasing incidence of cataracts, the changing indication for surgery in our society where good vision is becoming increasingly important, and the quality of the operation. How was this modern procedure developed? Cataracts were treated by couching until the middle of the 18th century. Since then, many discoveries by a number of doctors changed the procedure gradually from couching to lens extraction and through extracapsular to intracapsular extraction with the simultaneous implantation of an intraocular lens. This article outlines the development and also discusses some of the many inventions in the field of instrumentation and materials that have brought this intervention to its current high level; these include the cryo-probe, implantation of artificial lenses, the use of hyaluronic acid, phaco-emulsification, smaller incisions without sutures and the development of foldable intraocular lenses. PMID:23548190

  5. Clear Corneal Incision in Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Al Mahmood, Ammar M.; Al-Swailem, Samar A.; Behrens, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of sutureless clear corneal cataract incisions, the procedure has gained increasing popularity worldwide because it offers several advantages over the traditional sutured scleral tunnels and limbal incisions. Some of these benefits include lack of conjunctival trauma, less discomfort and bleeding, absence of suture-induced astigmatism, and faster visual rehabilitation. However, an increasing incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis after clear corneal cataract surgery has been reported. Different authors have shown a significant increase up to 15-fold in the incidence of endophthalmitis following clear corneal incision compared to scleral tunnels. The aim of this report is to review the advantages and disadvantages of clear corneal incisions in cataract surgery, emphasizing on wound construction recommendations based on published literature. PMID:24669142

  6. Clear corneal incision in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Al Mahmood, Ammar M; Al-Swailem, Samar A; Behrens, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Since the introduction of sutureless clear corneal cataract incisions, the procedure has gained increasing popularity worldwide because it offers several advantages over the traditional sutured scleral tunnels and limbal incisions. Some of these benefits include lack of conjunctival trauma, less discomfort and bleeding, absence of suture-induced astigmatism, and faster visual rehabilitation. However, an increasing incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis after clear corneal cataract surgery has been reported. Different authors have shown a significant increase up to 15-fold in the incidence of endophthalmitis following clear corneal incision compared to scleral tunnels. The aim of this report is to review the advantages and disadvantages of clear corneal incisions in cataract surgery, emphasizing on wound construction recommendations based on published literature. PMID:24669142

  7. A virtual cataract surgery course for ophthalmologists-in-training.

    PubMed

    Li, Emily; Fay, Peter; Greenberg, Paul B

    2013-08-01

    Virtual reality (VR) surgery simulation is an emerging teaching tool to train residents in cataract surgery. The widespread adoption of virtual surgery has been limited, however, by high costs and the absence of standardized curricula and evidence demonstrating the impact of VR training on resident surgical outcomes. We outline a resident virtual cataract surgery course--freely accessible online--that we hope will contribute to the development of a standardized VR cataract surgery curriculum. PMID:23923120

  8. Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery: A Review.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Chang, David F; Muralikrishnan, Radhakrishnan; Hemal, Kenia; Gogate, Pariskshit; Sengupta, Sabyasachi

    2012-01-01

    We aim at reviewing published peer-reviewed studies that evaluate the safety and efficacy of manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Literature searches of the PubMed and the Cochrane Library databases were conducted with no date restrictions; the searches were limited to articles published in English only. All publications with at least level II and III evidence were studied and surgical techniques were analyzed. MSICS was also compared with phacoemulsification and large incision extracapsular cataract surgery (ECCE) with respect to visual outcome, surgery time, cost, intra and postoperative complications and suitability for high volume surgical practices in the developing world.The overall safety profile of MSICS was found to be excellent with intra and postoperative complication rates comparable to phacoemulsification and ECCE. Multiple studies reported the safety and efficacy of MSICS for complicated cases, such as brunescent and white cataract and cataracts associated with phacolytic and phacomorphic glaucoma. Compared to phacoemulsification MSICS was associated with lower and shorter operative times. Visual outcomes were excellent and comparable to phacoemulsification with up to 6 months follow up.The literature provides outcome analysis of a variety of different MSICS techniques. As a whole, MSICS provides excellent outcomes with a low rate of surgical and postoperative complications. Particularly in the developing world, MSICS appears to provide outcomes that are of comparable quality to phacoemulsification at a much lower cost. PMID:26107133

  9. Combined surgery versus cataract surgery alone for eyes with cataract and glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingjuan Lisa; Hirunyachote, Phenpan; Jampel, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Background Cataract and glaucoma are leading causes of blindness worldwide, and their co-existence is common in elderly people. Glaucoma surgery can accelerate cataract progression, and performing both surgeries may increase the rate of postoperative complications and compromise the success of either surgery. However, cataract surgery may independently lower intraocular pressure (IOP), which may allow for greater IOP control among patients with co-existing cataract and glaucoma. The decision between undergoing combined glaucoma and cataract surgery versus cataract surgery alone is complex. Therefore, it is important to compare the effectiveness of these two interventions to aid clinicians and patients in choosing the better treatment approach. Objectives To assess the relative effectiveness and safety of combined surgery versus cataract surgery (phacoemulsification) alone for co-existing cataract and glaucoma. The secondary objectives include cost analyses for different surgical techniques for co-existing cataract and glaucoma. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2014), PubMed (January 1948 to October 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 3 October 2014. We checked the reference lists of the included trials to identify further relevant trials. We used the Science

  10. Femtosecond laser in refractive and cataract surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han-Han; Hu, Ying; Cui, Hong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, 9 unique laser platforms have been brought to the market. As femtosecond (FS) laser-assisted ophthalmic surgery potentially improves patient safety and visual outcomes, this new technology indeed provides ophthalmologists a reliable new option. But this new technology also poses a range of new clinical and financial challenges for surgeons. We provide an overview of the evolution of FS laser technology for use in refractive and cataract surgeries. This review describes the available laser platforms and mainly focuses on discussing the development of ophthalmic surgery technologies. PMID:25938066

  11. Cost-utility of routine cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Räsänen, Pirjo; Krootila, Kari; Sintonen, Harri; Leivo, Tiina; Koivisto, Anna-Maija; Ryynänen, Olli-Pekka; Blom, Marja; Roine, Risto P

    2006-01-01

    Background If decisions on health care spending are to be as rational and objective as possible, knowledge on cost-effectiveness of routine care is essential. Our aim, therefore, was to evaluate the cost-utility of routine cataract surgery in a real-world setting. Methods Prospective assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients undergoing cataract surgery. 219 patients (mean (SD) age 71 (11) years) entering cataract surgery (in 87 only first eye operated, in 73 both eyes operated, in 59 first eye had been operated earlier) filled in the 15D HRQoL questionnaire before and six months after operation. Direct hospital costs were obtained from a clinical patient administration database and cost-utility analysis performed from the perspective of the secondary care provider extrapolating benefits of surgery to the remaining statistical life-expectancy of the patients. Results Mean (SD) utility score (on a 0–1 scale) increased statistically insignificantly from 0.82 (0.13) to 0.83 (0.14). Of the 15 dimensions of the HRQoL instrument, only seeing improved significantly after operation. Mean utility score improved statistically significantly only in patients reporting significant or major preoperative seeing problems. Of the subgroups, only those whose both eyes were operated during follow-up showed a statistically significant (p < 0.001) improvement. Cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained was €5128 for patients whose both eyes were operated and €8212 for patients with only one eye operated during the 6-month follow-up. In patients whose first eye had been operated earlier mean HRQoL deteriorated after surgery precluding the establishment of the cost per QALY. Conclusion Mean utility gain after routine cataract surgery in a real-world setting was relatively small and confined mostly to patients whose both eyes were operated. The cost of cataract surgery per quality-adjusted life year gained was much higher than previously reported and

  12. High-fidelity cataract surgery simulation and third world blindness.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajay; Strauss, Glenn H

    2015-04-01

    The burden of global cataract blindness continues to rise, because the number of surgical ophthalmologists is insufficient, and they are unevenly distributed. There is an urgent need to train surgeons quickly and comprehensively in high-quality, low-cost cataract removal techniques. The authors suggest manual small-incision cataract surgery as a safe alternative to phacoemulsification cataract surgery in the developing world. They discuss the development of a novel, full-immersion, physics-based surgical training simulator as the centerpiece of a scalable, comprehensive training system for manual small-incision cataract surgery. PMID:24996918

  13. High-Fidelity Cataract Surgery Simulation and Third World Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    The burden of global cataract blindness continues to rise, because the number of surgical ophthalmologists is insufficient, and they are unevenly distributed. There is an urgent need to train surgeons quickly and comprehensively in high-quality, low-cost cataract removal techniques. The authors suggest manual small-incision cataract surgery as a safe alternative to phacoemulsification cataract surgery in the developing world. They discuss the development of a novel, full-immersion, physics-based surgical training simulator as the centerpiece of a scalable, comprehensive training system for manual small-incision cataract surgery. PMID:24996918

  14. Cataract.

    PubMed

    Lam, Dennis; Rao, Srinivas K; Ratra, Vineet; Liu, Yizhi; Mitchell, Paul; King, Jonathan; Tassignon, Marie-José; Jonas, Jost; Pang, Chi P; Chang, David F

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of reversible blindness and visual impairment globally. Blindness from cataract is more common in populations with low socioeconomic status and in developing countries than in developed countries. The only treatment for cataract is surgery. Phacoemulsification is the gold standard for cataract surgery in the developed world, whereas manual small incision cataract surgery is used frequently in developing countries. In general, the outcomes of surgery are good and complications, such as endophthalmitis, often can be prevented or have good ouctomes if properly managed. Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery, an advanced technology, can automate several steps; initial data show no superiority of this approach over current techniques, but the results of many large clinical trials are pending. The greatest challenge remains the growing 'backlog' of patients with cataract blindness in the developing world because of lack of access to affordable surgery. Efforts aimed at training additional cataract surgeons in these countries do not keep pace with the increasing demand associated with ageing population demographics. In the absence of strategie that can prevent or delay cataract formation, it is important to focus efforts and resources on developing models for efficient delivery of cataract surgical services in underserved regions. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/eQkKll. PMID:27188414

  15. [Objective evaluation the application of femtosecond laser in cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y Z

    2016-02-01

    Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is a novel technology and the biggest revolution in the field of cataract in the latest several years. However, increasing large-scale population randomized controlled trials (RCT) have demonstrated that FLACS does not provide significant advantages over conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPCS) for common cataract patients. Furthermore, the cost and space requirement of the femtosecond equipment are another two limitations for the universal application of FSL in cataract surgery. However, FLACS may be beneficial for complex cataract situations, such as lens dislocation, zonular laxity, traumatic cataract, low preoperative endothelial cell values, and significant corneal astigmatism. With the progress of science and technology, FLACS can be expected to achieve integration with phacoemulsification systems, and equipment costs can be reduced, making it more widely used in clinical practice in the future. PMID:26906700

  16. Are Entry Criteria for Cataract Surgery Justified?

    PubMed Central

    Böhringer, Daniel; Vach, Werner; Hagenlocher, Kai; Eberwein, Philipp; Maier, Philip; Reinhard, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The German Ophthalmological Society (GOS) recently proposed surgical entry criteria, i.e. 300 cataract surgeries. We herein correlate the surgical hands-on experience with the risk of posterior capsule ruptures in order to assess whether this number is appropriate. Methods We identified all cataract operations that had been performed at the University Eye Hospital Freiburg since 1995. For each surgeon, we assigned a running number to his/her procedures in the order they had been performed. Thereafter, we excluded all combined procedures and the second eyes. We then selected the 5475 surgical reports between November 2008 and November 2012 for detailed review. We additionally classified each surgery into low- vs. high- à priori risk for posterior capsule ruptures. We fitted a multifactorial logistic regression model to assess the GOS recommendation of 300 surgeries under supervision. In the low-risk group, we additionally visualized the 'typical' learning curve by plotting the posterior capsule ruptures against the respective rank numbers. Results The odds ratio for posterior capsule ruptures of 'learning-mode' (one of the respective surgeon's 300 first procedures) vs. the non-learning-mode was 3.8 (p<0.0001). By contrast, classification into the low-risk group lowered the risk of posterior capsule ruptures three fold (p<0.0001). According to the low-risk plot, the surgeons started with a complication rate of 4% and continuously improved towards 0.5% after 1500 operations. Thereafter, the rate increased again and stabilized around one percent. Conclusion The learning curve with respect to posterior capsule ruptures is surprisingly flat. The GOS entry criterion of 300 cataract procedures is therefore most likely justified. Careful selection of low-risk patients for the training surgeons may help in reducing the rate of posterior capsule ruptures during training. PMID:25401738

  17. Cataract surgery during active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Salti, Haytham I

    2014-01-01

    We present two patients with active, foul-smelling, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) wounds of the forehead and sternum following craniotomy or open heart surgery. Both had debilitating cataracts and were told by the infectious diseases team that cataract surgery is very risky. Both underwent sequential bilateral phacoemulsification with no sign of infection. Patients with active MRSA wound infections may safely undergo cataract surgery with additional precautions observed intraoperatively (good wound construction) and postoperatively (topical antibiotics and close observation). Banning such surgeries can unnecessarily jeopardize the lifestyles of such patients. PMID:24790402

  18. Chandelier retroillumination-assisted cataract surgery during vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, S; Kayikcioglu, O

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo present an alternative cataract surgical technique in patients with cataract and intravitreal hemorrhage.MethodsTwelve cases with poor fundus reflex caused by severe vitreus hemorrhage were included in the study. All patients underwent combined phaco surgery and 23-gauge vitrectomy. Chandelier retroillumination was inserted into the infusion trochar during the cataract operations and was used with low power (50-75%) in necessary steps.ResultsWe did not experience phaco complications or complications due to technique during surgery. Retroillumination assistance was especially useful during final stages of cataract surgery, particularly irrigation-aspiration of cortical material.ConclusionRetroillumination in absence of red fundus reflex may be helpful and can be practiced more often in cataract surgery combined with vitrectomy. PMID:27256306

  19. Visual and refractive outcomes of laser cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heather; Hyatt, Thomas; Afshari, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Femtosecond laser is a promising new technology for the field of cataract surgery. Early studies have investigated many factors including visual outcomes, complication rates, and financial overhead costs. This review analyzes the most recent clinical studies of visual and refractive outcomes in laser cataract surgery, including those that make comparisons to outcomes found in conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Recent findings As femtosecond laser cataract surgery has only emerged recently, there is limited literature available regarding visual outcomes. Most but not all existing studies showed no statistically significant difference in visual acuity and mean absolute refractive error between laser and conventional cataract surgery cases. Summary The majority of studies examined found visual acuity or refractive outcomes of femtosecond laser to be statistically equivalent to those of conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery. However, the learning curve involved with laser use may account for these early results, which could potentially improve as better technology and surgical techniques are developed. Further long-term outcomes studies are necessary to more accurately evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of femtosecond laser cataract surgery. PMID:24285124

  20. Posterior Iris Fixated Intraocular Lens for Pediatric Traumatic Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Kavitha, V.; Balasubramanian, Preethi; Heralgi, Mallikarjun M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the postoperative visual outcomes and complications of posterior iris fixated intraocular lens (IFIOL) implantation for pediatric traumatic cataract. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was performed of all the pediatric traumatic cataract patients who underwent lens removal and iris fixated lens implantation due to inadequate capsular support with or without corneal tear repair between January 2009 and December 2013. Data were collected and analyzed on the preoperative and postoperative visual outcomes and complications. Results: Twenty-five children (25 eyes; 21 males and 4 females) were enrolled with the mean age of 11 ± 4.0 years. There were 72% of eyes that underwent primary cataract removal with IFIOL implantation. Twenty-eight percent of eyes underwent corneal tear repair prior to intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was hand motion in 32% eyes, counting fingers in 24%, and perception of light in 44%. Postoperative BCVA of 0-0.2 logarithm of minimum angle of resolution was reported in the 64% of eyes. One eye developed secondary glaucoma, one eye underwent re-enclavation, and none developed retinal complications. Conclusion: Posterior IFIOL implantation resulted in an improved visual outcome, low incidence of postoperative complications, and is a good alternative to other IOL, in the cases of pediatric traumatic cataract without adequate capsular support. PMID:27162456

  1. [Developments in modern cataract surgery – a critical overview].

    PubMed

    Menapace, Rupert

    2016-01-01

    Cataract surgery has tremendously evolved in recent years. Innovations include micro-incision cataract surgery through incisions smaller than 2mm, high-fluidics phacoaspiration and laser phacoemulsification to minimize or replace the use of ultrasound, the advent of femtolasers for high-precision incisions in the cornea, the lens capsule and the cataractous lens, aspheric intraocular lenses (IOLs) to enhance the quality and contrast of the image, multifocal and enhanced-depth-of-focus IOLs to correct presbyopia, advancements in biometry and IOL power calculation, prevention of secondary capsule opacification by improvements in the design and material of the IOLs and surgical techniques like capsule polishing and posterior capsulorhexis, and pharmacological prophylaxis and possible future treatment of the cataract itself. Finally, cost-effectiveness and future potential of same-session bilateral cataract surgery are discussed. PMID:26982642

  2. Ocular safety limits for 1030nm femtosecond laser cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel V.

    2013-03-01

    Application of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has added unprecedented precision and reproducibility but ocular safety limits for the procedure are not well-quantified. We present an analysis of safety during laser cataract surgery considering scanned patterns, reduced blood perfusion, and light scattering on residual bubbles formed during laser cutting. Experimental results for continuous-wave 1030 nm irradiation of the retina in rabbits are used to calibrate damage threshold temperatures and perfusion rate for our computational model of ocular heating. Using conservative estimates for each safety factor, we compute the limits of the laser settings for cataract surgery that optimize procedure speed within the limits of retinal safety.

  3. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery: technology and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy V; Lawless, Michael; Chan, Colin Ck; Jacobs, Mark; Ng, David; Bali, Shveta J; Hodge, Chris; Sutton, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    The recent introduction of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has generated much interest among ophthalmologists around the world. Laser cataract surgery integrates high-resolution anterior segment imaging systems with a femtosecond laser, allowing key steps of the procedure, including the primary and side-port corneal incisions, the anterior capsulotomy and fragmentation of the lens nucleus, to be performed with computer-guided laser precision. There is emerging evidence of reduced phacoemulsification time, better wound architecture and a more stable refractive result with femtosecond cataract surgery, as well as reports documenting an initial learning curve. This article will review the current state of technology and discuss our clinical experience. PMID:22788831

  4. The Safety and Efficacy of Day Care Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cabric, Emir; Zvornicanin, Jasmin; Jusufovic, Vahid

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate safety and efficacy of day care cataract surgery in developing country. Patients and Methods: This prospective study included 200 patients planned for cataract surgery during October and November 2012 divided in to two groups, day care cataract surgery (DCCS) and inpatient cataract surgery (ICS), with same number of male and female patients right and left eyes. All patients had same operative conditions and postoperative follow up. Results: The average age of patients in this study was 68.4 ± 7.47 years. Visual acuity before cataract extraction was 0.1754 where 44.5% of patients had severe visual impairment and another 23% had complicated cataract. Posterior capsule rupture was noted in 4.5% of cases. The main risk factors in both groups were: higher age, female gender, left side, complicated cataract, higher dioptric power of IOL and ECCE. Regular control opthalmologic examinations 30, 90 and 180 days after the cataract extraction did not reveal signs bullous keratopathy, wound dehiscence, cystoid macular edema and endophtalmitis in any of patients. Postoperative visual acuity 180 days after the operation in DCCS was 0.920 ± 0.154 and 0.928 ± 0.144 in ICS. Visual acuity less than 0.5 was noted in 4.5% due to posterior eye segment changes. Patients in DCCS group had 30 control examinations more and 95 days of hospitalization less than ICS with 16.5% cost reduction. Conclusion: The concept of day care cataract surgery is equally safe and more cost effective than inpatient cataract surgery. PMID:24937936

  5. Rate of intraoperative complications during cataract surgery following intravitreal injections.

    PubMed

    Hahn, P; Jiramongkolchai, K; Stinnett, S; Daluvoy, M; Kim, T

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo investigate the effect of prior intravitreal injections on intraoperative and postoperative complication rates associated with cataract surgery.MethodsA retrospective cohort analysis reviewed 10 105 cataract surgery procedures performed by experienced surgeons at the Duke Eye Center from 1 January 2005 to 10 December 2012. A group of 197 eyes with prior intravitreal injections was compared with an equal number of matched control eyes without prior injection using the Fisher's exact test of difference in proportions and the Wilcoxon rank-sum test of difference in means. Outcomes analyzed included baseline demographic information, preoperative clinical characteristics, prevalence of intraoperative complications, and postoperative intraocular pressure, glaucoma surgery, and glaucoma medication requirement through 1 year following cataract surgery.ResultsAn increased rate of intraoperative complications was identified during cataract surgery in eyes with prior intravitreal injections compared with control eyes (3 vs 0%, P=0.030). Injection eyes required more glaucoma medications at 1 year, but no difference was identified if steroid injections were excluded. No difference in postoperative IOP or glaucoma surgery was identified. No cases of endophthalmitis were reported.ConclusionsA history of intravitreal injections may be a risk factor for cataract surgery-related intraoperative complications. We hypothesize this may be due to unidentified iatrogenic lens trauma during intravitreal injections. Particular attention to the posterior capsule during preoperative assessment and intraoperatively is recommended in eyes undergoing cataract surgery with a prior history of intravitreal injections. PMID:27229705

  6. Small incision cataract surgery: Complications and mini-review.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parikshit M

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) and its complications. Various articles on MSICS published in indexed journals were reviewed, as well as the sections on complications of MSICS. The Pubmed search engine on the Internet was used to find out articles published since 1985 on MSICS in any language in indexed journals. Books published by Indian authors and the website of Indian Journal of Ophthalmology were also referred to. MSICS has become very popular technique of cataract surgery in India, and it is often used as an alternative to phacoemulsification. Studies on its efficacy and safety for cataract surgery show that, being a variant of extracapsular cataract surgery, MSICS also has similar intraoperative and postoperative complications. The considerable handling inside the anterior chamber during nucleus delivery increase the chances of iris injury, striate keratitis, and posterior capsular rupture. The surgeon has to be extra careful in the construction of the scleral tunnel and to achieve a good capsulorrhexis. Postoperative inflammation and corneal edema are rare if surgeons have the expertise and patience. The final astigmatism is less than that in the extracapsular cataract surgery and almost comparable to that in phacoemulsification. There is, however, a concern of posterior capsular opacification in the long term, which needs to be addressed. Although MSICS demands skill and patience from the cataract surgeon, it is a safe, effective, and economical alternative to competing techniques and can be the answer to tackle the large backlog of blindness due to cataract. PMID:19075410

  7. Cataract surgery in a case of carotid cavernous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Praveen, Smita Vittal; Noronha, Veena Olma

    2014-01-01

    A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The ocular manifestations include conjunctival chemosis, proptosis, globe displacement, raised intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy. Although management of CCF in these patients is necessary, the ophthalmologist may also have to treat other ocular morbidities such as cataract. Cataract surgery in patients with CCF may be associated with many possible complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage. We describe cataract extraction surgery in 60-year-old female with bilateral spontaneous low-flow CCF. She underwent phacoemulsification via a clear corneal route under topical anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative phase and recovered successfully. Given the various possible ocular changes in CCF, one must proceed with an intraocular surgery with caution. In this communication, we wish to describe the surgical precautions and the possible pitfalls in cataract surgery in patients with CCF. PMID:25370401

  8. Femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery, beginning of a new era in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad Hassaan; Javaid, Mamoona; Jamal, Samreen; Butt, Nadeem Hafeez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze and understand the mechanism of action, effectiveness, cost and time benefits, advantages and disadvantages of the femtosecond laser (FSL) assisted cataract surgery. A PubMed search was done using the topic and the keywords. Research shows considerable improvements in corneal incisions, anterior capsulotomy, and phacofragmentation using FSL. We will also discuss and compare FSL with conventional cataract extraction techniques in terms of both short-term and long-term advantages and disadvantages. Limitations of the studies reviewed include small sample size and short-term follow-up. The major dilemma is still considered to be its heavy financial feasibility to date. PMID:26903717

  9. Femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery, beginning of a new era in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad Hassaan; Javaid, Mamoona; Jamal, Samreen; Butt, Nadeem Hafeez

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze and understand the mechanism of action, effectiveness, cost and time benefits, advantages and disadvantages of the femtosecond laser (FSL) assisted cataract surgery. A PubMed search was done using the topic and the keywords. Research shows considerable improvements in corneal incisions, anterior capsulotomy, and phacofragmentation using FSL. We will also discuss and compare FSL with conventional cataract extraction techniques in terms of both short-term and long-term advantages and disadvantages. Limitations of the studies reviewed include small sample size and short-term follow-up. The major dilemma is still considered to be its heavy financial feasibility to date. PMID:26903717

  10. Excimer Laser Application For Cataract Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bath, Patricia E.; Mueller, Gerhard; Apple, David J.; Stolzenburg, Norbert M.

    1988-06-01

    The ablation threshold of bovine lenses was determined for excimer laser radiatiF at 308 nanreters. The ablation th5eshold for bovine lenses was approximately 0.6J/cm +/-0.1J/cm , for cortex and 1J/cm for nucleus. The threshold for bovine nucleus was higher than the threshold for cortex and difference was statistically significant at the 0.05 level. The relatively low ablation threshold for bovine lenses demonstrates the potential effectiveness of excimer laser radiation at 308 nm for cataract surgery. An experimental prototype has been developed and results of its application demonstrated. Further experiments to demonstrate safety for the retina and adjacent ocular structures are necessary because of the well known hazards of ultraviolet radiation. The potential of theleymir laser for keratorefractive surgery is currently under intensive investigation. In preliminary studies the ablation behavior of bovine lenses was investigated. The objective of this study was to quantify ablation rates as the first step in determining the specification for a laser system which would be practical in the clinical setting. Although excimer laser systems are available at 193 nm (ArF), 248 (KrF) and 351 (xeF) we selected 308 nm because of the availability of fiberoptics for the transmission of 308 nm as well as the known absorbance of human lenses in the 280 nm region.

  11. Topical Anesthesia for Cataract Surgery: The Patients' Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Apil, Aytekin; Ekinci, Metin; Cagatay, Halil Huseyin; Keles, Sadullah; Ceylan, Erdinc; Cakici, Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of 0.5% propacaine hydrochloride as topical anesthesia during phacoemulsification surgery. Methods. Intraoperative pain intensity was assessed using a 5-category verbal rating scale during each of three surgical stages. Pain scores from each surgical stage and total pain scores were compared for the factors of patient age, gender, cataract laterality, and type. Results. In comparison of cataract type subgroups, the mean total pain scores and mean stage 2 pain scores in both white mature cataract (WMC) and corticonuclear plus posterior subcapsular cataract (CN + PSC) groups were significantly higher than in the PSC-only (PSC) group (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Phacoemulsification with topical anesthesia is not a completely painless procedure. Pain intensity varies with cataract type and stage of surgery. PMID:25050180

  12. Reducing older driver motor vehicle collisions via earlier cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Mennemeyer, Stephen T; Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2013-12-01

    Older adults who undergo cataract extraction have roughly half the rate of motor vehicle collision (MVC) involvement per mile driven compared to cataract patients who do not elect cataract surgery. Currently in the U.S., most insurers do not allow payment for cataract surgery based upon the findings of a vision exam unless accompanied by an individual's complaint of visual difficulties that seriously interfere with driving or other daily activities and individuals themselves may be slow or reluctant to complain and seek relief. As a consequence, surgery tends to occur after significant vision problems have emerged. We hypothesize that a proactive policy encouraging cataract surgery earlier for a lesser level of complaint would significantly reduce MVCs among older drivers. We used a Monte Carlo model to simulate the MVC experience of the U.S. population from age 60 to 89 under alternative protocols for the timing of cataract surgery which we call "Current Practice" (CP) and "Earlier Surgery" (ES). Our base model finds, from a societal perspective with undiscounted 2010 dollars, that switching to ES from CP reduces by about 21% the average number of MVCs, fatalities, and MVC cost per person. The net effect on total cost - all MVC costs plus cataract surgery expenditures - is a reduction of about 16%. Quality Adjusted Life Years would increase by about 5%. From the perspective of payers for healthcare, the switch would increase cataract surgery expenditure for ages 65+ by about 8% and for ages 60-64 by about 47% but these expenditures are substantially offset after age 65 by reductions in the medical and emergency services component of MVC cost. Similar results occur with discounting at 3% and with various sensitivity analyses. We conclude that a policy of ES would significantly reduce MVCs and their associated consequences. PMID:23369786

  13. Cataract surgery without anaesthesia: two descriptions by Arthur Jacob.

    PubMed

    Haridas, R P

    2009-07-01

    Dr Arthur Jacob (1790-1874), of Dublin, Ireland, was one of the leading ophthalmologists of his time. He was the first to describe the membrane that contains the rods and cones in the eye (membrana Jacobi) and basal cell carcinoma (Jacob's ulcer). He made a curved needle for cataract surgery from a sewing needle (Jacob's needle). Two descriptions of cataract surgery without anaesthesia are presented. PMID:19705632

  14. Effect of air bubble on inflammation after cataract surgery in rabbit eyes

    PubMed Central

    Demirci, Goktug; Karabaş, Levent; Maral, Hale; Ozdek, Şengül; Gülkılık, Gökhan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Intense inflammation after cataract surgery can cause cystoid macular edema, posterior synechia and posterior capsule opacification. This experimental study was performed to investigate the effect of air bubble on inflammation when given to anterior chamber of rabbit eyes after cataract surgery. Materials and Methods: 30 eyes of 15 rabbits were enrolled in the study. One of the two eyes was in the study group and the other eye was in the control group. After surgery air bubble was given to the anterior chamber of the study group eye and balanced salt solution (BSS; Alcon) was left in the anterior chamber of control eye. Results: On the first, second, fourth and fifth days, anterior chamber inflammations of the eyes were examined by biomicroscopy. On the sixth day anterior chamber fluid samples were taken for evaluation of nitric oxide levels as an inflammation marker. When the two groups were compared, in the air bubble group there was statistically less inflammation was seen. (1, 2, 4. days P = 0,001, and 5. day P = 0,009). Conclusions: These results have shown that when air bubble is left in anterior chamber of rabbits’ eyes after cataract surgery, it reduced inflammation. We believe that, air bubble in the anterior chamber may be more beneficial in the cataract surgery of especially pediatric age group, uveitis patients and diabetics where we see higher inflammation. However, greater and long termed experimental and clinical studies are necessary for more accurate findings. PMID:23571264

  15. Surgery for sight: outcomes of congenital and developmental cataracts operated in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Gogate, P; Parbhoo, D; Ramson, P; Budhoo, R; Øverland, L; Mkhize, N; Naidoo, K; Levine, S; du Bryn, A; Benjamin, L

    2016-03-01

    PurposeTo study the visual outcomes of congenital and developmental cataract surgery and determine variables for presentation for pediatric cataract surgery in KwaZulu Natal province of South Africa.MethodsCare-givers of children presenting with cataract to a quaternary centre were asked when they first detected the condition. The reasons for delay between detection and surgery were studied. The children underwent a comprehensive eye examination and then appropriate surgery. They were prospectively followed up for 3 months and visual acuity and stereopsis were noted. Delay in presentation for surgery and visual outcomes were co-related with demographic and clinical factors.ResultsEighty-three non-traumatic cataract surgeries in 50 children were studied. Twenty-six (52%) were males, mean age was 3 years 10 months (SD 3yrs 4 months). The mean delay between identification and surgery was 20.7 months (SD 18 months). Twenty-six (52%) children had >15 months interval between diagnosis and surgery. Only mother's occupation was significantly associated with delay (P=0.017). Post-surgery 17/69 (24.7%) had visual acuity ≥6/18, 20/69 (29.0%) had vision between 6/24-6/60, whereas 32/69 (46.3%) had visual acuity ≤6/60. The final vision was associated with age (P=0.031), delay between diagnosis and surgery (P<0.001), type of surgery (P=0.046) and preoperative vision (P<0.001).ConclusionAlthough the children's vision improved substantially, a longer follow-up and amblyopia treatment would be necessary to optimize the visual outcome, which depended on age and preoperative vision. Health promotion activities aimed at mothers are important in improving visual outcomes. PMID:26611841

  16. Optimising biometry for best outcomes in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sheard, R

    2014-01-01

    Biometry has become one of the most important steps in modern cataract surgery and, according to the Royal College of Ophthalmologists Cataract Surgery Guidelines, what matters most is achieving excellent results. This paper is aimed at the NHS cataract surgeon and intends to be a critical review of the recent literature on biometry for cataract surgery, summarising the evidence for current best practice standards and available practical strategies for improving outcomes for patients. With modern optical biometry for the majority of patients, informed formula choice and intraocular lens (IOL) constant optimisation outcomes of more than 90% within ±1 D and more than 60% within ±0.5 D of target are achievable. There are a number of strategies available to surgeons wishing to exceed these outcomes, the most promising of which are the use of strict-tolerance IOLs and second eye prediction refinement. PMID:24310239

  17. Prednisolone acetate-gentamicin combination following cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Carriker, F; Liebowitz, S; Nees, O; Siegel, E; Duzman, E; Cheetham, J K; DeGryse, R

    1987-07-01

    One-hundred-eleven patients participated in a 21-day, open-label study to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of a prednisolone acetate 1%-gentamicin 0.3% ophthalmic suspension to control inflammation and prevent infection after cataract surgery. Beginning the day after surgery, the medication was instilled qid for the next 21 days. No postoperative infection was noted, and postoperative inflammation, which was mild immediately after surgery, decreased steadily during follow-up. The results of this study suggest that a prednisolone acetate-gentamicin combination used for three weeks after cataract surgery is safe and has a positive therapeutic effect on postoperative inflammation and infection. PMID:3307591

  18. Wound construction in manual small incision cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haldipurkar, S S; Shikari, Hasanain T; Gokhale, Vishwanath

    2009-01-01

    The basis of manual small incision cataract surgery is the tunnel construction for entry to the anterior chamber. The parameters important for the structural integrity of the tunnel are the self-sealing property of the tunnel, the location of the wound on the sclera with respect to the limbus, and the shape of the wound. Cataract surgery has gone beyond just being a means to get the lens out of the eye. Postoperative astigmatism plays an important role in the evaluation of final outcome of surgery. Astigmatic consideration, hence, forms an integral part of incisional considerations prior to surgery. PMID:19075401

  19. [Simultaneous bilateral cataract surgery--advantages and disadvantages].

    PubMed

    Obuchowska, Iwona; Mariak, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    During the past decade, advances in techniques and technology led to major changes in cataract surgical practice patterns. In this progression towards ever faster eye rehabilitation after surgery, simultaneous bilateral cataract surgery (SBCS) may be the next and ultimate step. It is not routinely performed: however, there are certain situations in which SBCS might be beneficial to the patients. It has been considered a good option in patients who have significant cataract in both eyes and are not good candidates for having anesthesia and surgery twice. The question is, if the benefits by bilateral surgery justify the risk of simultaneous complications, in particular endophthalmitis. In this perspective we present the clinical, social and economic advantages and disadvantages of such surgical procedures. PMID:17290841

  20. Spontaneous dislocation of lens bag with acrylic lens after uneventful cataract surgery – unusual complication of cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mehul A.; Shah, Shreya M.; Mehta, Ruchir; Shah, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lens with bag is rare. Methods: We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with spontaneous anterior dislocation of an in-the-bag intraocular lens 3 years after manual small incision cataract surgery. He had undergone manual small incision cataract surgery with foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation, and 18 months after cataract surgery ND: YAG capsulotomy with uneventful post capsulotomy follow-up. 17 months after capsulotomy, the patient presented with sudden decrease of vision. On anterior segment examination, the intraocular lens with bag was dislocated into the anterior chamber. Result: It was managed with intraocular lens explantation with bag, anterior vitrectomy and sclera fixated intraocular lens. Conclusion: Spontaneous intraocular lens dislocation with bag is possible after 1.5 years of uneventful surgery which may be managed using different techniques.

  1. A prospective study on postoperative pain after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Porela-Tiihonen, Susanna; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kokki, Merja; Purhonen, Sinikka; Kokki, Hannu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate postoperative pain and early recovery in cataract patients. Patients and methods A total of 201 patients who underwent elective first eye cataract extraction surgery were enrolled, and 196 were included in the final analysis. The study design was a single-center, prospective, follow-up study in a tertiary hospital in eastern Finland. Postoperative pain was evaluated with the Brief Pain Inventory at four time points: at baseline, and at 24 hours, 1 week, and 6 weeks postsurgery. Results Postoperative pain was relatively common during the first hours after surgery, as it was reported by 67 (34%) patients. After hospital discharge, the prevalence decreased; at 24 hours, 1 week, and 6 weeks, 18 (10%), 15 (9%) and 12 (7%) patients reported having ocular pain, respectively. Most patients with eye pain reported significant pain, with a score of ≥4 on a pain scale of 0–10, but few had taken analgesics for eye pain. Those who had used analgesics rated the analgesic efficacy of paracetamol and ibuprofen as good or excellent. Other ocular irritation symptoms were common after surgery; as a new postoperative symptom, foreign-body sensation was reported by 40 patients (22%), light sensitivity by 29 (16%), burning by 15 (8%), and itching by 15 (8%). Conclusion Moderate or severe postoperative pain was relatively common after cataract surgery. Thus, all patients undergoing cataract surgery should be provided appropriate counseling on pain and pain management after surgery. PMID:23885165

  2. Initial experience using a femtosecond laser cataract surgery system at a UK National Health Service cataract surgery day care centre

    PubMed Central

    Dhallu, Sandeep K; Maurino, Vincenzo; Wilkins, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To describe the initial outcomes following installation of a cataract surgery laser system. Setting National Health Service cataract surgery day care unit in North London, UK. Participants 158 eyes of 150 patients undergoing laser-assisted cataract surgery. Interventions Laser cataract surgery using the AMO Catalys femtosecond laser platform. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome measure: intraoperative complications including anterior and posterior capsule tears. Secondary outcome measures: docking to the laser platform, successful treatment delivery, postoperative visual acuities. Results Mean case age was 67.7±10.8 years (range 29–88 years). Docking was successful in 94% (148/158 cases), and in 4% (6/148 cases) of these, the laser delivery was aborted part way during delivery due to patient movement. A total of 32 surgeons, of grades from junior trainee to consultant, performed the surgeries. Median case number per surgeon was 3 (range from 1–20). The anterior capsulotomy was complete in 99.3% of cases, there were no anterior capsule tears (0%). There were 3 cases with posterior capsule rupture requiring anterior vitrectomy, and 1 with zonular dialysis requiring anterior vitrectomy (4/148 eyes, 2.7%). These 4 cases were performed by trainee surgeons, and were either their first laser cataract surgery (2 surgeons) or their first and second laser cataract surgeries (1 surgeon). Conclusions Despite the learning curve, docking and laser delivery were successfully performed in almost all cases, and surgical complication rates and visual outcomes were similar to those expected based on national data. Complications were predominately confined to trainee surgeons, and with the exception of intraoperative pupil constriction appeared unrelated to the laser-performed steps. PMID:27466243

  3. Evolving trends in cataract surgery techniques and timing.

    PubMed

    Koch, P S

    1997-02-01

    Evolution in cataract surgery developed along two fronts: technique and timing. New cannulae with very wide aspiration ports permit nucleosuction; a manual small incision method that fractionates and aspirates the nucleus. Phacoemulsification is made easier and safer with phaco sweep. Posterior capsule polishing is gentle if the only vacuum is generated by the infusion passing through the system and the aspiration tubing is not used. Fibrin glue may make long corneal incisions as stable as short ones. Several studies challenge our conventional thoughts simultaneous bilateral cataract surgery and whether patients need to be examined on the first postoperative day. PMID:10168267

  4. Central corneal thickness changes following manual small incision cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Aribaba, Olufisayo Temitayo; Adenekan, Olusesan Adetunji; Onakoya, Adeola Olukorede; Rotimi-Samuel, Adekunle; Olatosi, John Olutola; Musa, Kareem Olatunbosun; Oyefeso, Akinyele Oyedele; Akinsola, Folashade Bolanle

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine changes in post-cataract surgery central corneal thickness (CCT) at Lagos University Teaching Hospital by assessing the time it takes for the cornea to return to its preoperative thickness value. Methods This study is a prospective, hospital-based open within-patient controlled study with the unoperated eye controlling for the operated one. Results Two hundred patients with 400 eyes were analyzed, with bilateral mature cataract in 47.0%. All the patients had manual small incision cataract surgery with posterior chamber intraocular lens implant. There is an increase in mean baseline CCT from 520.6±20.3 μm by 76.9 μm (597.9±30.4 μm) 24 hours after cataract surgery followed by relative reduction in the mean CCT to 555.2±24.7 μm and 525.1±19.7 μm at 2 weeks and 12 weeks, respectively. Increase in mean CCT in the unoperated and contralateral eyes were recorded in this study. Conclusion There was a transient increase in corneal thickness following cataract surgery with subsequent decrease to preoperative thickness by 12th and fourth week in the operated and unoperated eyes, respectively. Corneal manipulations during cataract surgery must be minimal to reduce visual rehabilitation time to barest minimum. Postoperative refraction will be better at eighth week to 12th week considering the time it takes for the CCT to return to its stable preoperative values. PMID:25653497

  5. Monitoring visual outcome of cataract surgery in India.

    PubMed Central

    Limburg, H.; Foster, A.; Vaidyanathan, K.; Murthy, G. V.

    1999-01-01

    Two simple methods of assessing visual outcome following cataract surgery were evaluated in India. The first used data obtained from standardized patient records of cataract surgery. The second used data from population-based rapid epidemiological assessments. Analysis of 4168 hospital and eye camp records showed that, with the available standard correction, a good outcome (visual acuity > or = 6/18) was achieved in 37.8%, a borderline outcome (visual acuity 6/246-6/60) in 45.6% and a poor outcome (visual acuity 6/60) in 16.6% of instances. Of 2401 aphakic/pseudophakic eyes examined in a cross-sectional population-based study, outcome was good in 43.5% and poor in 26.4%. For 776 eyes examined in a similar study in a different state, outcome was good in 49.9% and poor in 23.9%. These assessments indicate that outcome with available correction was poor in 15-25% of eyes following cataract surgery. Visual outcome is likely to improve when better correction for aphakia can be provided. Further assessment of the causes of poor visual outcome is needed. The visual outcome following cataract surgery could be monitored on a regular basis by ophthalmologists, using either of the methods evaluated, an exercise which in itself is likely to improve the outcome of surgery. When the proportion of poor outcomes is high (> 10%) further investigation into the causes is warranted. PMID:10427929

  6. Pediatric Sleep Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sulman, Cecille G.

    2014-01-01

    Adenotonsillectomy is the most common surgery performed for sleep disordered breathing with good outcomes. Children with obesity, craniofacial disorders, and neurologic impairment are at risk for persistent sleep apnea after adenotonsillectomy. Techniques exist to address obstructive lesions of the palate, tongue base, or craniofacial skeleton in children with persistent sleep apnea. Children with obstructive sleep apnea have a higher rate of peri-operative complications. PMID:24926473

  7. Cataract Surgery with a Refractive Corneal Inlay in Place

    PubMed Central

    Stojanovic, N. R.; Panagopoulou, S. I.; Pallikaris, I. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case of cataract surgery performed in a patient with a refractive corneal inlay in place. Methods. A 48-year-old female patient presented to our institute with bilateral cataract. The patient had undergone refractive corneal inlay implantation three years ago in her right, nondominant eye for presbyopia correction. Biometry and intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation were performed without removing the inlay. Phacoemulsification and IOL insertion were carried out in both eyes in a usual manner. Results. On day one postoperatively, the patient achieved binocular uncorrected distance visual acuity 20/20 and uncorrected near visual acuity J1. The vision remained stable during the one-year follow-up period. Conclusion. Cataract surgery was performed in a standard manner in a patient with Presbia Microlens corneal inlay in place. Visual outcomes for both near and distance vision were satisfactory. PMID:26171265

  8. Simultaneous Penetrating Keratoplasty and Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Mohammad-Ali; Feizi, Sepehr; Moein, Hamid-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the clinical outcomes of simultaneous penetrating keratoplasty (PK), cataract removal and intraocular lens implantation (triple procedure), and to compare the safety and efficacy of two different cataract extraction techniques during the course of PK. Methods This retrospective comparative study was conducted on patients who had undergone a triple procedure. The technique of cataract extraction was either open- sky extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) or phacoemulsification (PE). In the ECCE group, the posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) was implanted in the ciliary sulcus, while in the PE group PCIOLs were fixated within the capsular bag. Outcome measures included best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA), refractive results, graft clarity and complications. Results Seventy-six eyes of 69 consecutive patients with mean age of 61.4±14.2 years were enrolled. Mean follow-up period was 61.4±37.2 months over which mean BSCVA was significantly improved from 1.40±0.68 to 0.44±0.33 LogMAR (P<0.001). Mean postoperative spherical equivalent refractive error was -2.13±3.02 D, which significantly differed from the target refraction (-0.73±0.29 D, P=0.004). At final follow-up, 89.5% of the corneal grafts remained clear. Conclusion The triple procedure is a safe and effective approach to restore vision in patients with coexisting corneal pathologies and cataracts. However, unacceptable postoperative refractive error can be anticipated. PMID:23825711

  9. Economic and social factors that influence households not willing to undergo cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Muralikrishnan; Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Valaguru, Vijayakumar; Frick, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Literature investigating barriers to cataract surgery is mostly done from the patient's point of view. However, many medical decisions are jointly taken by household members, especially in developing countries such as India. We investigated from the household head's (or representative's) perspective, households’ view on those not willing to undergo cataract surgery along with the economic and social factors associated with it. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of four randomly selected village clusters in rural areas of Theni district, Tamil Nadu, India, was conducted to elicit the willingness to pay for cataract surgery by presenting “scenarios” that included having or not having free surgery available. The presentation of scenarios allowed the identification of respondents who were unwilling to undergo surgery. Logistic regression was used to estimate relationships between economic and social factors and unwillingness to undergo cataract surgery. Results: Of the 1271 respondents, 49 (3.85%) were not willing to undergo surgery if they or their family members have cataract even if free surgery were available. In the regression results, those with good understanding of cataract and its treatment were less likely to be unwilling to undergo cataract surgery. Those not reporting household income were more likely to be unwilling to undergo cataract surgery. Conclusions: As a good understanding of cataract was an important predictor of willingness to undergo cataract surgery, health education on cataract and its intervention can improve uptake. PMID:26458477

  10. Conjunctival inclusion cysts following small incision cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Narayanappa, Shylaja; Dayananda, S; Dakshayini, M; Gangasagara, Suresh Babu; Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of acquired conjunctival inclusion cysts following various ophthalmic surgeries such as strabismus surgery, scleral buckling, pars plana vitrectomy, ptosis surgery and phacoemulsification has been reported. We report two cases of conjunctival inclusion cysts following manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (SICS) in two male patients aged 65 and 67 years. The cysts originated from the scleral tunnel used for manual SICS. Both were treated by excision and confirmed histopathologically. No recurrence was noted at three months follow-up. To our knowledge, conjunctival inclusion cysts following SICS have not been reported previously. Careful reflection of conjunctiva during tunnel construction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation may prevent their occurrence. PMID:20689201

  11. Volume of Cataract Surgery and Surgeon Gender: The Florida Ambulatory Surgery Center Experience 2005 Through 2012.

    PubMed

    French, Dustin D; Margo, Curtis E; Campbell, Robert R; Greenberg, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Cataract is the most common surgically reversible cause of vision loss and the most common major surgical procedure performed in the United States. To understand how gender composition might affect differences in health services, we examined the surgeon gender-specific rates of routine cataract surgery performed in ambulatory surgical centers in Florida. Routine cataract surgeries were identified through the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) ambulatory surgery center dataset. The background of individual surgeons was determined by linking license numbers in the dataset to physician profiles publicly available from AHCA. From 2005 through 2012, women ophthalmologists in Florida performed roughly half the annual rate of cataract surgery as their male counterparts. This difference is not explained by greater time in clinical practice for men. Further investigation into the causes of this gender-volume disparity is warranted to determine what roles choice and barriers may play. PMID:27249881

  12. Long-term renormalization of chromatic mechanisms following cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Delahunt, Peter B.; Webster, Michael A.; Ma, Lei; Werner, John S.

    2008-01-01

    The optical density of the human crystalline lens progressively increases with age, the greatest increase in the visible spectrum being at short wavelengths. This produces a gradual shift in the spectral distribution of the light reaching the retina, yet color appearance remains relatively stable across the life span, implying that the visual system adapts to compensate for changes in spectral sensitivity. We explored properties of this adaptive renormalization by measuring changes in color appearance following cataract surgery. When the lens is removed, cataract patients often report a large perceptual shift in color appearance that can last for months. This change in color appearance was quantified for four cataract patients (63–84 years) by determining the chromaticity of stimuli that appeared achromatic before surgery, and at various intervals after surgery for up to 1 year. Stimuli were presented on a calibrated CRT as 9.5-deg spots, with 3-s duration and 3-s interstimulus intervals (ISIs). Chromaticity was adjusted by the subjects in CIE L*a*b* color space with luminance fixed at 32 cd/m2, on a dark background. We also estimated the optical density of the cataractous lens by comparing absolute scotopic thresholds from 410 nm to 600 nm before and after surgery. The results demonstrated that immediately following surgery there is a large increase in the short-wave light reaching the retina, mainly below 500 nm. The achromatic settings generally showed an initial large shift in the “yellow” direction after surgery that gradually (but never fully) returned to the original achromatic point before surgery. The shifts in the achromatic point occur over a number of months and appear to occur independently of the fellow eye. PMID:15518204

  13. [The Use of Polymers for Intraocular Lenses in Cataract Surgery].

    PubMed

    Fizia-Orlicz, Anna; Misiuk-Hojło, Marta

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, cataract remains the leading cause of the curable visual impairment worldwide. Cataract can only be cured by surgery during which the cloudy lens is replaced with an artificial intraocular lens. It is one of the most common surgeries being performed worldwide. There are age-related, congenital, traumatic and metabolic types of cataract which have been distinguished. Age-related cataract is the most common one and it affects people over 60 with the greatest frequency. In reference to patients whose cornea does not fulfill the requirements for a standard refractive surgery, the number of refractive intraocular lens replacement is increasing. Manufacturers aim to enhance materials in order to minimize surgical complication while increasing the patient’s eyesight. The increase in average lifespan along with patients’ expectations stimulate competition among manufacturers who bring new products and solutions into to the market. There is an augmented demand for premium lenses such as toric, multifocal or accommodating. These lenses bring patients the promise of life without the need for wearing glasses. As far as the main materials used in the production of intraocular lens are concerned, there are hydrophobic, hydrophilic, acrylic and silicone lenses in use. In this paper the author discusses characteristics as well as advantages and disadvantages of the above-mentioned materials. The associated surgical complications and the new areas of development regarding the materials used in lenses manufacturing are also examined. PMID:26994891

  14. Adjuvant treatment modalities to control macular edema in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Ebru Nevin; Yıldırım, Cem

    2013-10-01

    Cataract surgical outcomes in diabetic patients has been subject to changes with the advances in the surgical techniques. Recent studies suggest that cataract surgery does not cause the progression of diabetic retinopathy and intravitreal bevacizumab and/or triamcinolone injections combined with cataract surgery may contribute in short term improvement of macular edema in diabetic patients. This article reviews the progression of diabetic retinopathy after cataract surgery with phacoemulsification and the use of adjuvant intravitreal treatments combined with phacoemusification in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery. PMID:23248073

  15. New technology update: femtosecond laser in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Zoltan Z

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers represent a new frontier in cataract surgery. Since their introduction and first human treatment in 2008, a lot of new developments have been achieved. In this review article, the physical principle of femtolasers is discussed, together with the indications and side effects of the method in cataract surgery. The most important clinical results are also presented regarding capsulotomy, fragmentation of the crystalline lens, corneal wound creation, and refractive results. Safety issues such as endothelial and macular changes are also discussed. The most important advantage of femtolaser cataract technology at present is that all the important surgical steps of cataract surgery can be planned and customized, delivering unparalleled accuracy, repeatability, and consistency in surgical results. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used in visual and presbyopia restoration as well. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used, not only in visual, but in presbyopia restoration as well. Quality of vision can be improved with less posterior chamber lens (PCL) tilt, more centralized position of the PCL, possibly less endothelial damage, less macular edema, and less posterior capsule opacification (PCO) formation. This technological achievement should be followed by other technical developments in the lens industry. Hopefully this review article will help us to understand the technology and the results to demonstrate the differences between the use of femtolasers and phacoemulsification-based cataract surgery. The most important data of the literature are summarized to show ophthalmologists the benefits of the technology in order to provide the best refractive results to the patient. PMID:24970994

  16. New technology update: femtosecond laser in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltan Z

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers represent a new frontier in cataract surgery. Since their introduction and first human treatment in 2008, a lot of new developments have been achieved. In this review article, the physical principle of femtolasers is discussed, together with the indications and side effects of the method in cataract surgery. The most important clinical results are also presented regarding capsulotomy, fragmentation of the crystalline lens, corneal wound creation, and refractive results. Safety issues such as endothelial and macular changes are also discussed. The most important advantage of femtolaser cataract technology at present is that all the important surgical steps of cataract surgery can be planned and customized, delivering unparalleled accuracy, repeatability, and consistency in surgical results. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used in visual and presbyopia restoration as well. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used, not only in visual, but in presbyopia restoration as well. Quality of vision can be improved with less posterior chamber lens (PCL) tilt, more centralized position of the PCL, possibly less endothelial damage, less macular edema, and less posterior capsule opacification (PCO) formation. This technological achievement should be followed by other technical developments in the lens industry. Hopefully this review article will help us to understand the technology and the results to demonstrate the differences between the use of femtolasers and phacoemulsification-based cataract surgery. The most important data of the literature are summarized to show ophthalmologists the benefits of the technology in order to provide the best refractive results to the patient. PMID:24970994

  17. Femtosecond-laser assisted cataract surgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Abouzeid, Hana; Ferrini, Walter

    2014-11-01

    Introduced in 2008, the femtosecond laser is a promising new technological advance which plays an ever increasing role in cataract surgery where it automates the three main surgical steps: corneal incision, capsulotomy and lens fragmentation. The proven advantages over manual surgery are: a better quality of incision with reduced induced astigmatism; increased reliability and reproducibility of the capsulotomy with increased stability of the implanted lens; a reduction in the use of ultrasound. Regarding refractive results or safety, however, no prospective randomized study to date has shown significant superiority compared with standard manual technique. The significant extra cost generated by this laser, undertaken by the patient, is a limiting factor for both its use and study. This review outlines the potential benefits of femtosecond-laser-assisted cataract surgery due to the automation of key steps and the safety of this new technology. PMID:24835818

  18. [Cost of cataract surgery in a public hospital].

    PubMed

    Malot, J; Combe, C; Moss, A; Savary, P; Hida, H; Ligeon-Ligeonnet, P

    2011-01-01

    With more than 500,000 operations per year, cataract surgery is currently the most frequently performed surgical operation in France. Several procedural techniques are described, but phacoemulsification after micro-incision is the most common. The cost and reimbursement by the French social security depend on whether the procedure is conducted on an inpatient or outpatient basis. The objectives of this prospective study were to evaluate the cost of cataract surgery in a public hospital setting and to correlate differences in surgical practice with financial impact. One hundred twenty-five operations were observed in the operating room and many data points were recorded for analysis. Topical anesthesia was administered in 87.2% of cases; the mean duration of the surgery was 42minutes. The mean direct cost was 366 € (drugs, sterilization of reused equipment, medical devices, etc). The extended cost of the surgery (infrastructure, hospitalization, food and laundry, etc.) was computed to be 1130 € for outpatients and 1335 € for inpatients assuming a one-night stay in the hospital. In view of the reimbursement provided by social security, this innovative study in a public hospital demonstrates that cataract surgery is a profitable activity, reinforcing our strategic plans. PMID:21145129

  19. Cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Cataract What Is a Cataract? Click for more information A Clouding of the ... cannot spread from one eye to the other. Cataracts and Aging Most cataracts are related to aging. ...

  20. Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevalent Cases of Cataract (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Cataract is more likely to ... Prevalent Cases of Cataract (in thousands) by Age, Gender, and Race/Ethnicity Projections for Cataract (2010-2030- ...

  1. Retinal safety of near-infrared lasers in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Femtosecond lasers have added unprecedented precision and reproducibility to cataract surgery. However, retinal safety limits for the near-infrared lasers employed in surgery are not well quantified. We determined retinal injury thresholds for scanning patterns while considering the effects of reduced blood perfusion from rising intraocular pressure and retinal protection from light scattering on bubbles and tissue fragments produced by laser cutting. We measured retinal damage thresholds of a stationary, 1030-nm, continuous-wave laser with 2.6-mm retinal spot size for 10- and 100-s exposures in rabbits to be 1.35 W (1.26 to 1.42) and 0.78 W (0.73 to 0.83), respectively, and 1.08 W (0.96 to 1.11) and 0.36 W (0.33 to 0.41) when retinal perfusion is blocked. These thresholds were input into a computational model of ocular heating to calculate damage threshold temperatures. By requiring the tissue temperature to remain below the damage threshold temperatures determined in stationary beam experiments, one can calculate conservative damage thresholds for cataract surgery patterns. Light scattering on microbubbles and tissue fragments decreased the transmitted power by 88% within a 12 deg angle, adding a significant margin for retinal safety. These results can be used for assessment of the maximum permissible exposure during laser cataract surgery under various assumptions of blood perfusion, treatment duration, and scanning patterns.

  2. Cataract Surgery Audit at a Private Hospital in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alasbali, Tariq; Lofty, Nancy Maher; Al-Gehaban, Saeed; Alkuraya, Hisham S.; Alsharif, Abdulrahman M.; Khandekar, Rajiv

    2015-01-01

    Background: To assess the visual outcomes following cataract surgeries at a Private Eye Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods: This was a cohort study of cataract surgeries performed from January to June 2014. Preoperative data were collected on patient demographics presenting and best corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA) and ocular comorbidity. Data were also collected on the type of surgery, type of intraocular lens (IOLs) implanted, and complications. BCVA and refractive status at 6–8 weeks postoperatively were noted. The predictors of vision ≥6/18 were identified. Results: Four hundred eyes of 400 patients underwent cataract surgery. There were 235 (59%) males. Presenting preoperative vision was <6/60 in 52 (13%) eyes. There were 395 (99%) eyes that underwent IOL implantation following phacoemulsification and 4 eyes received a sulcus fixated IOL. A single piece aspheric IOL was implanted in 358 (90%) eyes and a toric IOL was implanted in 31 (8%) eyes. Postoperative BCVA was classified as a “good outcome” (≥6/18) in 320 (80%) and a “poor outcome” (<6/60) in 24 (6%) eyes. Young age (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.97, P = 0.01), male (adjusted OR = 2.4, P = 0.002), and ocular co-morbidities (adjusted OR = 0.2, P < 0.001) were predictors of vision ≥6/18. Complications included a dropped nucleus and a posterior capsular tear in 2 eyes each. Two hundred and fifty-two (63%) eyes were emmetropic or intentionally myopic for distance. Astigmatism <2 D was present in 264 (66%) eyes and astigmatism >2 D was present in 33 (8%) eyes. Conclusion: The recent trend of intentional overcorrection in one eye following modern cataract surgery in order to provide some functional near vision indicates that benchmark for success in getting “good visual outcomes” postoperatively (vision of ≥6/18) may need to be revised. PMID:26692725

  3. Manual Suture Less Small Incision Cataract Surgery in Patients with Uveitic Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rahul; Kumar, Prachi; Bashir, Hafsa; Sharma, Shiv Kumar; Mishra, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS) in eyes with uveitic cataract. Setting: Medical college hospital of the subcontinent. Design: Retrospective case series. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, patients who underwent SICS with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation for uveitic cataract from 2006 to 2009 were evaluated. Patients with less than 3 months follow-up were excluded. Post-operative vision and complications were analyzed. Results: A total of 54 patients completed the study. The mean age was 52.3 ± 9.3 years. The mean follow-up was 11.53 ± 5.05 months. The mean surgical time was (10.2 ± 3.8 min). Etiological diagnosis was possible in 31.41% (17/54) of patients. There was a statistically significant improvement in vision after surgery (P < 0.001). When uveitis was well-controlled, pre-operative corticosteroids did not change post-operative inflammation (P = 0.796). However, pre-operative corticosteroids were statistically significantly associated to final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) (P = 0.010). Conclusion: SICS with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation is safe in most cataracts due to uveitis and improves BCVA at 6 months. Inflammation should be well-controlled pre-operatively for at least 3 months. Posterior capsule opacification, macular edema and persistent uveitis were the main factors affecting visual outcome. SICS requires minimal instrumentation, surgical time is short and can also be performed in rural clinics and eye-camps, where phacoemulsification machines are unavailable. SICS may be a more practical and cost-effective technique for uveitic cataract, in such circumstances. PMID:24669151

  4. [Recent advances in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Yu, Yin-hui; Yao, Ke

    2013-05-01

    As the leading cause of blindness, the type of surgery performed to remove cataracts has evolved from Intracapsular to Extracapsular and to phacoemulsification. Advantages of femtosecond laser include high instantaneous power, strong penetration, short pulse-duration and micro-precision present superior accuracy, predictability and safety to cataract surgery, while also minimizing injury to surrounding ocular tissue. It mainly assists in the procedures of anterior capsulotomy, lens fragmentation, clear corneal incision and limbal relaxing incision creation. However, compared to conventional phacoemulsification, problems such as the minimization of complications and difficulties in conducting peer-reviewed studies with a longer follow-up period and large sample, as well as coverage of added costs remain untracked.The purpose of this review is to outline the advantages and disadvantages as well as clinical value of this evolving technology compared to conventional phacoemulsification. PMID:24021187

  5. Anaesthetic Management for Cataract Surgery in VACTERL Syndrome Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Khatavkar, Sonal S; Jagtap, S R

    2009-01-01

    Summary Eight year old girl, weighing 14 kg with VACTERL syndrome V: Vertebral anomalies, A: Anal malformation, C: Cardiovascular defect, TE: Tracheal and esophageal malformation, R: Renal agenesis, L: Limb anomalies. underwent cataract surgery under general anaesthesia. She had multiple congenital anomalies like esophageal atresia, imperforate anus (corrected), single kidney & radial aplasia. Anticipating problems of gastro-esophageal reflux & chronic renal failure, successful management was done. PMID:20640087

  6. Cataract surgery and methods of wound closure: a review

    PubMed Central

    Matossian, Cynthia; Makari, Sarah; Potvin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Clear corneal incisions are routinely used in cataract surgery, but watertight wound closure may not always be achieved, which can increase the risk for anterior chamber fluid egress or ocular surface fluid ingress. A new US Food and Drug Administration-approved ocular sealant appears to have good efficacy in sealing clear corneal incisions; its use may be indicated when wound integrity is in question. PMID:26045656

  7. [Incisions for biaxial and coaxial microincision cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Müller, M; Kohnen, T

    2010-02-01

    Microincision cataract surgery (MICS) represents a new level in the development of cataract surgery. Phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation via incisions of cataract surgery, the advantages of MICS are less corneal astigmatism and fewer corneal surface irregularities, with favorable implications for visual quality and early rehabilitation. In the effort toward smaller incisions, special interest should be given to wound integrity, especially regarding the risk of endophthalmitis. With limited corneal elastic capacity, irreversible expansion of the incision with tissue laceration may occur. Smaller incisions are superior only if they cause less trauma. This requires an optimized relationship between incision size and manipulation during IOL implantation as well as attention to safety issues. MICS offers a platform for new benchmarks in phacoemulsification. PMID:20107810

  8. Endophthalmitis caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans following Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victor M.; Emanuelli, Andres; Flynn, Harry W.; Berrocal, Audina M.; Miller, Darlene; Kao, Andrew A.; Dubovy, Sander R.; Alfonso, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report Achromobacter xylosoxidans as a cause of both acute-onset and delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Methods A non-comparative, consecutive case series of patients with culture-proven A. xylosoxidans endophthalmitis between 1970 and 2012. Cataract surgery and intraocular lens placement were performed in all patients prior to endophthalmitis. Positive cultures were obtained from the vitreous, capsular bag, and/or the removed intraocular lens. Results The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in 4 patients with positive cultures. Two endophthalmitis patients had a preliminary culture report of Pseudomonas species. In addition to receiving intravitreal antibiotics, all patients underwent capsulectomy and intraocular lens removal at the time of pars plana vitrectomy. Visual acuity at last follow up was 20/40 or better in 2 of 4 (50%) but the remaining 2 patients were 20/200 or worse. Conclusion A. xylosoxidans may be a cause of acute, recurrent, and delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Complete capsulectomy and intraocular lens removal can be considered in recurrent and recalcitrant patients. PMID:24150240

  9. Transient Tear Film Dysfunction after Cataract Surgery in Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tongsheng; Mashaghi, Alireza; Liu, Qinghuai; Hong, Jiaxu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly common systemic disease. Many diabetic patients seek cataract surgery for a better visual acuity. Unlike in the general population, the influence of cataract surgery on tear film function in diabetic patients remains elusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the tear function in diabetic and nondiabetic patients following cataract surgery. Methods In this prospective, interventional case series, 174 diabetic patients without dry eye syndrome (DES) and 474 age-matched nondiabetic patients as control who underwent phacoemulsification were enrolled at two different eye centers between January 2011 and January 2013. Patients were followed up at baseline and at 7 days, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Ocular symptom scores (Ocular Surface Disease Index, OSDI) and tear film function including tear film stability (tear film break-up time, TBUT), corneal epithelium integrity (corneal fluorescein staining, CFS), and tear secretion (Schirmer’s I test, SIT) were evaluated. Results In total, 83.9% of the diabetic patients (146 cases with 185 eyes) and 89.0% of the nondiabetic patients (422 cases with 463 eyes) completed all check-ups after the interventions (P = 0.095). The incidence of DES was 17.1% in the diabetic patients and 8.1% in the nondiabetic patients at 7 days after cataract surgery. In the diabetic patients, the incidence of DES remained 4.8% at 1 month postoperatively and decreased to zero at 3 months after surgery. No DES was diagnosed in nondiabetic patients at either the 1-month or 3-month follow-up. Compared with the baseline, the diabetic patients had worse symptom scores and lower TBUT values at 7 days and 1 month but not at 3 months postoperatively. In the nondiabetic patients, symptom scores and TBUT values had returned to preoperative levels at 1-month check-up. CFS scores and SIT values did not change significantly postoperatively in either group (P = 0.916 and P = 0.964, respectively

  10. Bilateral photic maculopathy after extracapsular cataract surgery: a case report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalfin, Steven

    1997-05-01

    A 42 year old Caucasian female underwent uncomplicated extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber lens implantation in the left eye, using a Zeiss model OpMi-6 operating microscope. Her postoperative course was unremarkable and she achieved a corrected visual acuity of 20/15+3. A lesion consistent with a photoretinal injury was noted inferior to the fovea. Seven months later the patient underwent cataract extraction in the right eye. Special care was taken to minimize light exposure during the procedure, including reducing the microscope illumination, minimizing operating time, intraoperative pharmacologic miosis, and using a corneal light shield. Despite these precautions, the patient developed a photoretinal injury almost identical to that in the contralateral eye. Postoperative corrected visual acuity was 20/15+3. Recent studies have reported incidences of retinal photic injuries from operating microscopes between 0 and 28 percent of patients. Several risk factors have been identified, including light intensity, intensity of the blue light component, and exposure time. The occurrence of a retinal photic injury in this patient despite precautions, development of bilateral cataracts at a young age, and a strong family history of early cataracts may indicate an inherited susceptibility to light induced damage. The American National Standards Institute is developing a product performance standard which will be applicable to operating microscopes used in ophthalmic surgery. The as yet undetermined role of individual susceptibility to retinal photic injury should be considered in the formulation of this standard.

  11. 42 CFR 1001.1701 - Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Billing for services of assistant at surgery during... PROGRAMS Permissive Exclusions § 1001.1701 Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract... surgery during a cataract operation, or (ii) Charges that include a charge for an assistant at...

  12. 42 CFR 1001.1701 - Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Billing for services of assistant at surgery during... PROGRAMS Permissive Exclusions § 1001.1701 Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract... surgery during a cataract operation, or (ii) Charges that include a charge for an assistant at...

  13. 42 CFR 1001.1701 - Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Billing for services of assistant at surgery during... PROGRAMS Permissive Exclusions § 1001.1701 Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract... surgery during a cataract operation, or (ii) Charges that include a charge for an assistant at...

  14. 42 CFR 1001.1701 - Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Billing for services of assistant at surgery during... PROGRAMS Permissive Exclusions § 1001.1701 Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract... surgery during a cataract operation, or (ii) Charges that include a charge for an assistant at...

  15. 42 CFR 1001.1701 - Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Billing for services of assistant at surgery during... PROGRAMS Permissive Exclusions § 1001.1701 Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract... surgery during a cataract operation, or (ii) Charges that include a charge for an assistant at...

  16. Effects of Cataract Surgery on Endothelium in Transplanted Corneal Grafts: Comparison of Extracapsular Cataract Extraction and Phacoemulsification for Complicated Cataract after Penetrating Keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Wei; Xie, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Background: The endothelium should be carefully evaluated when choosing a surgical technique for cataract removal. Therefore, we aimed to study the effects of different cataract surgery techniques on endothelial cell loss in transplanted corneal grafts. Methods: A total of 54 patients who received complicated cataract surgery in post-penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) eyes at the Shandong Eye Institute between February 2001 and June 2014 were included, and clinical records were reviewed. Baseline demographic details, clinical characteristics, endothelial cell density (ECD), and best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) were recorded. Wilcoxon rank-sum test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to test the equality of medians. A regression model was constructed to compare the reduced rate of ECD. Results: Of the 54 eyes included in this study, extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) was performed in 34 eyes of 33 patients (ECCE group) whereas phacoemulsification was performed in 20 eyes of 20 patients (phacoemulsification group). There was no significant difference in the median age (P = 0.081) or preoperative ECD (P = 0.585) between the two groups. At 6 months after cataract surgery, ECD in ECCE group was significantly higher than that in phacoemulsification group (P = 0.043). In addition, the endothelial cell loss rate in ECCE group was significantly lower than that in phacoemulsification group at 2 months (P = 0.018), 4 months (P < 0.001), and 6 months (P < 0.001) after cataract surgery. Endothelial cell loss rate after cataract surgery increased over the 6-month study duration in both ECCE group (P < 0.001) and phacoemulsification group (P < 0.001), but phacoemulsification resulted in a greater reduction in ECD than that of ECCE in transplanted corneal grafts (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in postoperative BCVA between the two groups (P = 0.065). Conclusion: ECCE is more suitable than phacoemulsification in cataract surgery in complicated cataract

  17. Delayed Versus Acute-Onset Endophthalmitis after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shirodkar, Anita R.; Pathengay, Avinash; Flynn, Harry W.; Albini, Thomas A.; Berrocal, Audina M.; Davis, Janet L.; Lalwani, Geeta A.; Murray, Timothy G.; Smiddy, William E.; Miller, Darlene

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To report a large consecutive case series of patients who developed delayed-onset and acute-onset endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Design Retrospective consecutive case series. Methods The current study is a retrospective consecutive case series of patients treated between January 2000 and December 2009 for culture-proven endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. The study defined two groups after cataract surgery: acute-onset endophthalmitis (≤ 6 weeks after surgery) and delayed-onset endophthalmitis (> 6 weeks after surgery). Results A total of 118 patients met study criteria and included 26 delayed-onset cases and 92 acute-onset cases. The following clinical features and outcomes occurred in delayed versus acute-onset cases: (1) the presenting visual acuity was ≤ 5/200 in 31% versus 89%, (2) hypopyon was found in 46% versus 80%, (3) the most frequent isolate was Propionibacterium acnes (11/26) versus coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (57/92), (4) patients with the most frequent isolate achieved a visual outcome of ≥ 20/100 in 91% versus 56%. In delayed-onset cases, the intraocular lens was removed or exchanged in 19/26 (73%). Of these 19 cases, 13 achieved a visual outcome of ≥ 20/100. Conclusions Patients with delayed-onset endophthalmitis generally presented with better initial visual acuities, had a lower frequency of hypopyon, and had better visual outcomes compared to acute-onset patients. Propionibacterium acnes and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species were the most common organisms cultured in delayed and acute-onset categories, respectively, and were associated with the best visual acuity outcomes in each group. PMID:22030353

  18. Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash and rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Cataracts Information for adults A A A The gray, ... this dilated pupil displays the appearance typical of cataract. Overview A cataract is any clouding of the ...

  19. Microincision cataract surgery combined with vitrectomy: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Jalil, A; Steeples, L; Subramani, S; Bindra, M S; Dhawahir-Scala, F; Patton, N

    2014-01-01

    Aim The objective of this study was to present the results of combined phacovitrectomy using 1.8 mm microincision cataract surgery (MICS) with special emphasis on the anterior segment complications in this group. Methods Retrospective, single-centre case series involving consecutive patients undergoing phacovitrectomy in a single centre in the United Kingdom during a 6-month period. Results A total of 52 eyes underwent combined MICS and pars plana vitrectomy. Intraoperative complications included posterior capsule rupture (n=2), minor iris trauma during phacoemulsification (n=1), iatrogenic retinal tears (n=2), and entry site break (n=1). Postoperatively two cases had significant inflammation, one of which resulted in 360° posterior synaechiea, iris bombe, and raised intraocular pressure. Other complications included mild posterior synaechiae (n=2), posterior capsular opacification (n=3), cystoid macular oedema (n=1), and hyphaema (n=1), which spontaneously resolved. There were no cases of intraocular lens decentration. Two patients who underwent surgery for retinal detachment repair subsequently redetached. Among those having surgery for macular hole, non-closure was seen in one patient and one patient developed a retinal detachment. Conclusion In conclusion, sub-2 mm MICS is a safe and effective technique in dealing with vitreoretinal disorders necessitating cataract surgery at the same time. PMID:24406418

  20. Optical Coherence Tomography of Clear Corneal Incisions for Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schallhorn, Julie M.; Tang, Maolong; Li, Yan; Song, Jonathan C.; Huang, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To study the architecture of clear corneal incisions for phacoemulsification cataract surgery using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Setting University-based cornea practice. Methods A prospective study of twenty eyes of twenty patients one month after cataract surgery performed by two experienced surgeons. Temporal clear corneal single-plane incisions were made with 3-mm metal keratomes; five of the twenty eyes received sutures for wound closure. Each eye was scanned before and 1 month after surgery with a prototype high-speed anterior segment OCT system (Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc.). The OCT scans were repeated 3 times during the same visit. The length of the corneal incision, thickness of the cornea, and position of the incision (distance from the external wound edge to the scleral spur) were measured using a computer caliper. The angle of the incision relative to the corneal surface was then calculated. Results The mean corneal incision length was 1.81±0.27mm, the mean corneal thickness at the incision was 747±67µm, and the mean distance between the incision and the scleral spur was 1.46±0.24mm. The average angle of the incision was 26.8±5.5°. The measurements were repeatable to within 0.072mm (pooled standard deviation) for the incision length, 11µm for the corneal thickness, and 0.042mm for the position of the incision. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the parameters between eyes with sutures and those without. Conclusions OCT provides an excellent way to evaluate corneal incisions in cataract surgery postoperatively. Measurements of wound dimensions using OCT are highly repeatable. PMID:18721720

  1. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  2. Comparative evaluation of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and conventional phacoemulsification in white cataract

    PubMed Central

    Titiyal, Jeewan S; Kaur, Manpreet; Singh, Archita; Arora, Tarun; Sharma, Namrata

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare femtosecond laser-assisted capsulotomy with conventional manual capsulorhexis in cases of white cataract. Patients and methods The prospective comparative study enrolled 80 eyes (80 patients) with white cataract that underwent either femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (Group I, n=40) or conventional manual phacoemulsification (Group II, n=40) at a tertiary care ophthalmic institution. The groups were divided based on the patient’s choice and affordability of the procedure. Capsulotomy/capsulorhexis was evaluated in terms of size, circularity index (4Π [area/perimeter2]), intraocular lens coverage, and continuity. Each group was further subdivided based on the release of white milky fluid on initiation of the capsulotomy/capsulorhexis, and the “fluid” cases were compared with the “no-fluid” cases. The primary outcome measure was capsulotomy/capsulorhexis characteristics in the two groups. The secondary outcome measures were intraoperative phacoemulsification parameters, intraoperative complications, and postoperative visual acuity. Results The size of the capsulotomy/capsulorhexis was 4.9±0.1 mm in Group I and 5.3±0.4 mm in Group II (P<0.001). Mean circularity index was 0.996±0.003 and 0.909±0.047 in Groups I and II, respectively (P<0.001). In Group I, free-floating circular capsulotomies were obtained in 52.5% (21/40) eyes; 37.5% (15/40) eyes had microadhesions; and 10% (4/40) eyes had incomplete capsulotomy in 1–2 clock hours. The incidence of residual adhesions was more in cases with release of white milky fluid (P=0.003). In Group II, a multistep capsulorhexis was performed in 70% (28/40) of the eyes. There was no difference in terms of visual outcomes and intraoperative complications. Conclusion Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery has the advantage of creating a circular and optimally sized capsulotomy in cases of white cataract. The release of white milky fluid during femtosecond laser delivery is the most

  3. Perioperative antibiotics for prevention of acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Emily W; Lindsley, Kristina; Nanji, Afshan A; Leyngold, Ilya; McDonnell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Background Endophthalmitis is a severe inflammation of the anterior and/or posterior chambers of the eye that may be sterile or associated with infection. It is a potentially vision-threatening complication of cataract surgery. Prophylactic measures for endophthalmitis are targeted against various sources of infection. Objectives The objective of this review was to evaluate the effects of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 October 2012. We also searched for additional studies that cited any included trials using the Science Citation Index. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that enrolled adults undergoing cataract surgery (any method and incision type) for lens opacities due to any origin. Trials that evaluated preoperative antibiotics, intraoperative (intracameral, subconjunctival or systemic) or postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis for acute endophthalmitis were included. We did not include studies that evaluated antiseptic preoperative preparations using agents such as povidone iodine, nor did we include studies that evaluated antibiotics for treating acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Data collection and analysis Two

  4. Cataract surgery in patients with ocular surface disease: An update in clinical diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Afsharkhamseh, Neda; Movahedan, Asadolah; Motahari, Hooman; Djalilian, Ali R

    2014-07-01

    In this article we review essentials of diagnosis and management of ocular surface disease in patients who undergo cataract surgery. It is clearly shown that dry eye disease worsens following the cataract surgery in patients with prior history of ocular surface disease, Also new cases of dry eye might appear. Current strategies for the timely diagnosis and proper management of dry eye syndrome in the face of cataract surgery patients are mainly emphasized. To achieve the best outcome in cataract surgery, a healthy ocular surface is crucial. While ocular surface preparation is indispensable in patients with established ocular surface disease, it is also helpful in those with minimal signs or symptoms of surface disease. The current approach begins with early diagnosis and drastic management of ocular surface disease before cataract surgery using a stepwise regimen customized to each patient and disease severity. These measures are continued throughout and after the surgery. PMID:25278791

  5. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Frank, James H; Halpern, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventually yielded culture results positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus, which was sensitive to vancomycin. We report a case of endophthalmitis that occurred on postoperative day 1 following complicated cataract surgery. This is an uncommon bacterium that is not widely reported in the literature as a cause of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. We urge clinicians to consider S. haemolyticus as an offending agent, especially when the infection presents very early and aggressively in the postoperative period. PMID:26951642

  6. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R.; Frank, James H.; Halpern, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventually yielded culture results positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus, which was sensitive to vancomycin. We report a case of endophthalmitis that occurred on postoperative day 1 following complicated cataract surgery. This is an uncommon bacterium that is not widely reported in the literature as a cause of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. We urge clinicians to consider S. haemolyticus as an offending agent, especially when the infection presents very early and aggressively in the postoperative period. PMID:26951642

  7. Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Cataracts Basic Facts & Information What are Cataracts? The lens of the eye is a clear ... in the US. The Most Common Types of Cataracts Cataracts are categorized depending on their location. They ...

  8. Suppurative keratitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae after cataract surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Charteris, D G; Batterbury, M; Armstrong, M; Tullo, A B

    1994-01-01

    Six elderly patients are described (age range 76-86 years) in whom a characteristic peripheral suppurative keratitis developed 1-36 months after uncomplicated cataract surgery. A corneal section had been used in all patients and four or five interrupted nylon sutures were present at the time of onset. Streptococcus pneumoniae was cultured from a corneal scrape in all cases. Treatment with appropriate antibiotics resulted in slow resolution though supplementary topical steroids were necessary in five of the six patients, and corneal opacification persists in all cases. Images PMID:7848983

  9. Results of cataract surgery in renal transplantation and hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Li-Hua; Xiong, Shi-Hong; Wang, Yan-Ling

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare the effect of cataract surgery in renal transplantation and hemodialysis patients. METHODS We evaluated 51 eyes of 31 renal transplantation patients, 41 eyes of 29 hemodialysis patients and 45 eyes of 32 normal control patients who received phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation from January, 2000 to August, 2014 in the Beijing Friendship Hospital. Each individual underwent a blood routine and a kidney function examination. Routine ophthalmologic examination included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), a slit-lamp examination to detect cataract type, determination of intraocular pressure, a corneal endothelial count, and fundus examination. All patients received phacoemulsification and an IOL implantation. RESULTS For the types of cataract in the three groups, transplantation group was significantly different from normal control group (P=0.04), the most kind is posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) in transplantation group 33 (64.7%), hemodialysis group had no significantly difference from normal control group (P=0.43), and the difference between transplantation group and hemodialysis group also had significantly difference (P=0.02). For postoperative BCVA in the three groups, transplantation group had significantly difference from normal control group (P=0.03), hemodialysis group was significantly different from normal control group (P=0.00), and the difference between transplantation group and hemodialysis group also had significantly difference (P=0.00). The multiple linear regression equation is Y=0.007 hemoglobin (Hb)-0.000233 serum creatinine (Cr), R2=0.898. Postoperative fundus examination showed that hemorrhage, exudation, and macular degeneration were greater in the hemodialysis group. CONCLUSION This study showed that the PSC was more in the renal transplantation patients. BCVA was better and fundus lesions were less frequent in the renal transplantation group than in the hemodialysis group after cataract surgery. The

  10. The challenges in improving outcome of cataract surgery in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Lindfield, Robert; Vishwanath, Kalluru; Ngounou, Faustin; Khanna, Rohit C

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness globally and surgery is the only known measure to deal with it effectively. Providing high quality cataract surgical services is critical if patients with cataract are to have their sight restored. A key focus of surgery is the outcome of the procedure. In cataract surgery this is measured predominantly, using visual acuity. Population- and hospital-based studies have revealed that the visual outcome of cataract surgery in many low and middle income settings is frequently sub-optimal, often failing to reach the recommended standards set by the World Health Organization (WHO). Another way of measuring outcome of cataract surgery is to ask patients for their views on whether surgery has changed the functioning of their eyes and their quality of life. There are different tools available to capture patient views and now, these patient-reported outcomes are becoming more widely used. This paper discusses the visual outcome of cataract surgery and frames the outcome of surgery within the context of the surgical service, suggesting that the process and outcome of care cannot be separated. It also discusses the components of patient-reported outcome tools and describes some available tools in more detail. Finally, it describes a hierarchy of challenges that need to be addressed before a high quality cataract surgical service can be achieved. PMID:22944761

  11. Small eyes big problems: is cataract surgery the best option for the nanophthalmic eyes?

    PubMed

    Utman, Saqib Ali Khan

    2013-09-01

    Nanophthalmos refers to an eyeball of short axial length, usually less than 20 mm which leads to angle closure glaucoma due to relatively large lens. Intra-ocular lens extraction relieves the angle closure in nanophthalmos. Cataract surgery in a nanophthalmic eye is technically difficult with high risk of complications such as posterior capsular rupture, uveal effusion, choroidal haemorrhage, vitreous haemorrhage, malignant glaucoma, retinal detachment and aqueous misdirection. Various options are explained in the literature to perform cataract surgery in nanophthalmos, like extracapsular cataract extraction with or without sclerostomy; small-incision cataract extraction by phacoemulsification which not only helps maintain the anterior chamber during surgery but also reduces the incidence of complications due to less fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP) during the surgery. Cataract surgery deepens and widens the anterior chamber angle in nanophthalmic eyes and has beneficial effects on IOP in eyes with nanophthalmos but is associated with a high incidence of complications. PMID:24034192

  12. Outcomes of Cataract Surgery at a Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Seyed-Farzad; Hashemi, Hassan; Mazouri, Arash; Rahman-A, Nazanin; Ashrafi, Elham; Mehrjardi, Hadi Z.; Roohipour, Ramak; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of cataract surgery at a large referral eye hospital and to identify factors associated with less than excellent visual outcomes. Methods: Hospital records of patients, who had undergone age-related cataract extraction (1,285 procedures) within a two-year period were sampled randomly for 353 patients (405 eyes) and baseline characteristics were recorded. Up to three causes of visual loss (contributory reasons) were considered and the principal cause of “less than excellent outcome,” i.e., best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) <20/25 was defined as the primary reason. Results: Mean age of the participants was 68.6 years, and 50.7% of enrolled subjects were female. Phacoemulsification had been performed in 92.1% of cases. Out of 405 eyes, 54%, 78%, and 97% achieved BSCVA of ≥20/25, ≥20/40, and ≥20/200, respectively. Poor visual outcomes were significantly associated with older age (OR: 4.55 for age >70 years), female gender (OR: 4.64), ocular comorbidities (OR: 7.68), surgically challenging eyes (OR: 7.33), long and short eyes (versus eyes with normal axial length, OR: 3.24), and being operated on by a novice surgeon (OR: 2.41). The leading contributory reasons for unfavorable outcome, in descending order were maculopathy (17%), posterior capsule opacification (PCO, 11.8%), corneal opacity (5.7%), and degenerative myopia (5.4%). Conclusion: Maculopathy, PCO, corneal opacity, degenerative myopia and ARMD may contribute to unfavorable outcomes in cataract surgery. PMID:26730309

  13. Clinical features and treatment of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Li, Z H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features and treatment results of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Five patients with endophthalmitis after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation were enrolled in this study. The pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, and surgical outcomes of 5 patients were compared. Three patients were surgically treated with anterior chamber irrigation and vitrectomy with intravitreal injection. The remaining two patients were medically treated with an intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime. Treatment results of the five patients were analyzed. Four patients had positive cultures for bacteria (two cases Staphylococcus epidermidis, one case Enterococcus faecalis, and one case head-like Staphylococcus). The culture of the fifth patient did not have bacterial growth. One year following treatment, four patients had restored visual acuity and a clear vitreous cavity. Retinal detachment and other complications were not observed. The remaining patient had a visual acuity of index at 30 cm one year following treatment. For patients with endophthalmitis after cataract surgery, a biochemical laboratory examination should be promptly performed and should include a bacterial culture and drug sensitivity test. When necessary, vitrectomy combined with an intravitreal injection of vancomycin should be performed to treat the infection early and to help retain useful vision. PMID:26125869

  14. Laparoscopic exploration in pediatric surgery emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Drăghici, L; Popescu, M; Liţescu, M

    2010-01-01

    The laparoscopic approach of pediatric surgery emergencies represents a specific preoccupation in hospitals everywhere in the world. Nowadays, when confronted with this pathology, pediatric surgeons are able to apply certain well–defined therapeutic protocols, depending on the technical equipment at their disposal and their laparoscopic expertise and training. We hereby present some of the surgical pediatric emergencies that have been subjected to minimally invasive celioscopic techniques, in the Department of Pediatric Surgery ‘Maria Sklodowska Curie’ Hospital, from August 1999 to July 2007. Out of 83 exploratory laparoscopies, 12 were performed for emergency pathology, other than acute appendicitis (in its various forms, including peritonitis) or acute cholecystitis. However, during the above–mentioned period, the number of therapeutic laparoscopies for emergencies has grown significantly (239 from a total of 663 laparoscopies), reflecting to a large extent the activity of a clinic with an emergency surgery profile. The authors conclude that exploratory laparoscopies in pediatric surgery emergencies are suited for surgical teams with a solid experience in celioscopy and a certain professional maturity, necessary to correctly appreciate the surgical and anesthetic risks involved by each individual case. It is not recommended that inexperienced laparoscopic surgeons embark on the ‘adventure’ of this minimally invasive approach for this type of pathology. Only when the training and learning process is fully and correctly completed, specialists are offered the advantage of continuing a celioscopic exploration by performing a minimally invasive therapeutic procedure, even for a pediatric emergency case. PMID:20302204

  15. Usefulness of Surgical Media Center as a Cataract Surgery Educational Tool

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomoichiro; Shiba, Takuya; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study retrospectively analyzed cataract surgeries to examine the usefulness of Surgical Media Center (SMC) (Abbott Medical Optics Inc.), a new cataract surgery recording device, for training of cataract surgery. Methods. We studied five hundred cataract surgeries conducted with a phacoemulsification system connected to the SMC. After surgery, the surgical procedures were reviewed, with changes in aspiration rate, vacuum level, and phaco power displayed as graphs superimposed on the surgical video. We examined whether use of SMC is able to demonstrate the differences in technique between experienced and trainee operators, to identify inappropriate phacoemulsification techniques from analyzing the graphs, and to elucidate the cause of intraoperative complications. Results. Significant differences in the time taken to reach maximum vacuum and the speed of increase in vacuum during irrigation and aspiration were observed between experienced and trainee operators. Analysis of the graphs displayed by SMC detected inappropriate phacoemulsification techniques mostly in cases operated by trainee operators. Conclusions. Using SMC, it was possible to capture details of cataract surgery objectively. This recording device allows surgeons to review cataract surgery techniques and identify the cause of intraoperative complication and is a useful education tool for cataract surgery. PMID:26881060

  16. Usefulness of Surgical Media Center as a Cataract Surgery Educational Tool.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoichiro; Shiba, Takuya; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study retrospectively analyzed cataract surgeries to examine the usefulness of Surgical Media Center (SMC) (Abbott Medical Optics Inc.), a new cataract surgery recording device, for training of cataract surgery. Methods. We studied five hundred cataract surgeries conducted with a phacoemulsification system connected to the SMC. After surgery, the surgical procedures were reviewed, with changes in aspiration rate, vacuum level, and phaco power displayed as graphs superimposed on the surgical video. We examined whether use of SMC is able to demonstrate the differences in technique between experienced and trainee operators, to identify inappropriate phacoemulsification techniques from analyzing the graphs, and to elucidate the cause of intraoperative complications. Results. Significant differences in the time taken to reach maximum vacuum and the speed of increase in vacuum during irrigation and aspiration were observed between experienced and trainee operators. Analysis of the graphs displayed by SMC detected inappropriate phacoemulsification techniques mostly in cases operated by trainee operators. Conclusions. Using SMC, it was possible to capture details of cataract surgery objectively. This recording device allows surgeons to review cataract surgery techniques and identify the cause of intraoperative complication and is a useful education tool for cataract surgery. PMID:26881060

  17. Reduction of intraocular pressure and improvement of vision after cataract surgeries in angle closure glaucoma with concomitant cataract patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zong-Mei; Niu, Qing; Nie, Yan; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to compare the efficacy of three different cataract surgeries in eyes with angle closure glaucoma (ACG) with concomitant cataract. Methods: A retrospective comparative analysis of 106 ACG patients (112 eyes) with concomitant cataract was conducted between February, 2012 and February, 2014. Clinical outcomes of ACG patients with concomitant cataract underwent phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation (group A, n = 34, 36 eyes, angle closure < 180°); combined phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and goniosynechialysis (group B, n = 43, 45 eyes, angle closure, 180°~270°); and combined phacoemulsification, intraocular lens implantation, and trabeculectomy (group C, n = 29, 31 eyes, angle closure > 270°) were compared during a 6-month follow-up. Results: There were no statistical differences among the 3 groups in pre-operative or post-operative average visual acuity (VA), intraocular pressure (IOP), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and angle opening distance (AOD) (all P > 0.05). Post-operative VA, IOP, ACD, AOD and the degree of angle opening in the 3 groups were all improved as compared with pre-operative levels (all P < 0.05). No statistical difference was detected among the 3 groups in the incidence of complications (χ2 = 0.376, P = 0.829). Conclusion: Phacoemulsification alone, combined phacoemulsification/goniosynechialysis, and combined phacoemulsification/trabeculectomy provide safe, effective, predictable, and stable options of cataract surgery for treatment of ACG with concomitant cataract. PMID:26629184

  18. Surgical Site Infections After Pediatric Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Floccari, Lorena V; Milbrandt, Todd A

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal deformity surgery is a complication in the pediatric population resulting in high morbidity and cost. Despite modern surgical techniques and preventative strategies, the incidence remains substantial, especially in the neuromuscular population. This review focuses on recent advancements in identification of risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for acute and delayed pediatric spine infections. It reviews recent literature, including the best practice guidelines for infection prevention in high-risk patients. Targets of additional research are highlighted to assess efficacy of current practices to further reduce risk of SSI in pediatric patients with spinal deformity. PMID:26772947

  19. Orbital cellulits following cataract surgery under peribulbar anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Chandoshi; Mitra, Arijit; Mushtaq, Bushra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Orbital cellulits following cataract surgery is extremely rare. We describe a case of orbital and facial cellulitis that occurred after routine cataract operation with peribulbar anaesthesia. There were no preoperative systemic or ocular risk factors for postoperative infection. Case description: An 89-year-old man presented to eye casualty, the day after he underwent an uneventful phacoemulsification and posterior chamber lens implantation in the left eye under peribulabr anaesthesia, with soreness, swelling and reduced visual acuity (6/18) in the operated eye. On initial presentation periorbital swelling was noted, the eye was minimally tender, intraocular pressure was raised at 28 mHg and fundoscopy was limited due to a hazy cornea. The patient was discharged on topical medication with a diagnosis of allergic reaction to postoperative drops. The following day, the patient re-presented with worsening orbital swelling involving the left cheek. Ocular findings remained unchanged. CT scan revealed left orbit soft tissue swelling and a locule of air medial to the medial rectus. There were no signs of sinus infection or periosteal inflammation. A diagnosis of left orbital and facial cellulitis was made and the patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics. Discussion: Our patient did not have any predisposing risk factors, therefore most likely cause of cellulitis is surgical trauma during administration of the peribulbar block. This case illustrates the need for adequate skin preparation before the administration of peribulbar anaesthesia and minimal tissue trauma during the procedure.

  20. Coaxial Microincision Cataract Surgery versus Standard Coaxial Small-Incision Cataract Surgery: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Shentu, Xingchao; Zhang, Xin; Tang, Xiajing; Yu, Xiaoning

    2016-01-01

    Background We conducted this meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of coaxial microincision cataract surgery (C-MICS) and standard coaxial small incision cataract surgery (C-SICS). Methods The outcomes of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting C-MICS and C-SICS were collected from PubMed, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library in May 2015. The final meta-analysis was conducted on the following intraoperative and postoperative outcomes: ultrasound time (UST), effective phacoemulsification time (EPT), balanced salt solution use (BSS use), cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), mean surgery time, endothelial cell loss percentage (ECL%), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), increased central corneal thickness (CCT), laser flare photometry values and surgically induced astigmatism (SIA). Results A total of 15 RCTs, involving 1136 eyes, were included in the final meta-analysis. No significant between-group differences were detected in EPT, BSS use, CDE, BCVA, laser flare photometry values or increased CCT. However, the C-MICS group showed less SIA (at postoperative day 7: p<0.01; at postoperative day 30 or more: p<0.01) and greater ECL% (at postoperative day 60 or more: p<0.01), whereas the C-SICS group required a shorter UST (p<0.01). Conclusions The present meta-analysis suggested that the C-MICS technique was more advantageous than C-SICS in terms of SIA, but C-MICS required a longer UST and induced a higher ECL%. Further studies should be done to confirm our results. PMID:26745279

  1. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, M S

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In MSICS, unlike phacoemulsification, there is no need to limit the size of the tunnel or restrain the size of capsulorrhexis. Large well-structured tunnels and larger capsulorrhexis provide better control on the surgical maneuvers. Safety and simplicity of MSICS has made it extremely popular. The purpose of this article is to describe nucleus management by phacosection in MSICS. PMID:19075409

  2. Preconditioner-based contact response and application to cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Courtecuisse, Hadrien; Allard, Jérémie; Duriez, Christian; Cotin, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new method to compute, in real-time, the physical behavior of several colliding soft-tissues in a surgical simulation. The numerical approach is based on finite element modeling and allows for a fast update of a large number of tetrahedral elements. The speed-up is obtained by the use of a specific preconditioner that is updated at low frequency. The preconditioning enables an optimized computation of both large deformations and precise contact response. Moreover, homogeneous and inhomogeneous tissues are simulated with the same accuracy. Finally, we illustrate our method in a simulation of one step in a cataract surgery procedure, which require to handle contacts with non homogeneous objects precisely. PMID:22003632

  3. [Current status of cataract surgery. Modern methods--internal medicine risk factors and contraindications].

    PubMed

    Knoche, M

    1998-02-10

    Modern cataract surgery is characterized by minimal invasive techniques that have been introduced during the past decade. These include phacoemulsification, capsulorhexis, foldable intraocular lenses and small tunnel incisions. High success rates coupled with low complication rates have resulted in a change in indications--cataract surgery is no longer performed merely to prevent blindness, but also to improve vision in patients whose professional or private visual demands are compromised by the onset of lens opacification. To ensure that their cooperation with the ophthalmic surgeon results in optimal benefit to the patient, it is important for general practitioners and internists to be conversant with the risk factors and contraindications for cataract surgery. PMID:9540259

  4. Cost-effectiveness of cataract surgery in a public health eye care programme in Nepal.

    PubMed Central

    Marseille, E.

    1996-01-01

    Presented is an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of cataract surgery using cost and services data from the Lumbini Zonal Eye Care Programme in Nepal. The analysis suggests that cataract surgery may be even more cost-effective than previously reported. Under a "best estimate" scenario, cataract surgery had a cost of US$5.06 per disability-adjusted life year (DALY). This places it among the most cost-effective of public health interventions. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cataract surgery remains highly cost-effective even under a very pessimistic set of assumptions. The estimated mortality rates of those who receive surgery and of those who do not are among the variables that most influence the cost per DALY. PMID:8789930

  5. Post-Cataract Surgery Visual Disturbance in a Retinitis Pigmentosa Patient with Asteroid Hyalosis

    PubMed Central

    Jingami, Yoko; Otani, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Makiyama, Yukiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2011-01-01

    A patient with retinitis pigmentosa showed visual disturbances following successful cataract surgery. He had a dense asteroid hyalosis in the eye before cataract surgery. After the surgery he noticed that his vision became worse. The visual disturbance was explained as being caused by the progression of retinal degeneration. Although the electroretinogram was non-recordable, the degeneration of macular area appeared relatively small. We considered that dense asteroid hyalosis was responsible for his visual disturbances, and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) was performed to remove the asteroid hyalosis. After the PPV, rapid improvement of his visual acuity was observed. Cataract surgery may affect the status of asteroid hyalosis and cause rapid visual loss. PPV should be considered for retinitis pigmentosa patients with dense asteroid hyalosis, especially when a large decrease in visual acuity is noted shortly after cataract surgery. PMID:21941506

  6. Correction of low corneal astigmatism in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Pia; Pastore, Marco Rocco; Zanei, Andrea; Umari, Ingrid; Messai, Meriem; Negro, Corrado; Tognetto, Daniele

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate and compare aspheric toric intraocular lens (IOL) implantation and aspheric monofocal IOL implantation with limbal relaxing incisions (LRI) to manage low corneal astigmatism (1.0-2.0 D) in cataract surgery. METHODS A prospective randomized comparative clinical study was performed. There were randomly recruited 102 eyes (102 patients) with cataracts associated with corneal astigmatism and divided into two groups. The first group received toric IOL implantation and the second one monofocal IOL implantation with peripheral corneal relaxing incisions. Outcomes considered were: visual acuity, postoperative residual astigmatism, endothelial cell count, the need for spectacles, and patient satisfaction. To determine the postoperative toric axis, all patients who underwent the toric IOL implantation were further evaluated using an OPD Scan III (Nidek Co, Japan). Follow-up lasted 6mo. RESULTS The mean uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCVA) and the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) demonstrated statistically significant improvement after surgery in both groups. At the end of the follow-up the UCVA was statistically better in the patients with toric IOL implants compared to those patients who underwent implantation of monofocal IOL plus LRI. The mean residual refractive astigmatism was of 0.4 D for the toric IOL group and 1.1 D for the LRI group (P<0.01). No difference was observed in the postoperative endothelial cell count between the two groups. CONCLUSION The two surgical procedures demonstrated a significant decrease in refractive astigmatism. Toric IOL implantation was more effective and predictable compared to the limbal relaxing incision. PMID:26309869

  7. Surgical outcome of safe surgery system trabeculectomy combined with cataract extraction

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, R R; Raje, D; Rathi, A; Agashe, A; Majumdar, M; Khandelwal, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the efficacy of safe surgery system trabeculectomy combined with manual small incision cataract surgery/phacoemulsification in primary glaucoma coexistent with cataract. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of 105 cases who underwent single-site combined surgery between January 2008 and December 2009. Safe surgery system trabeculectomy with diffuse and posterior application of mitomycin C was performed in all cases. Cataract extraction was done either by Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (MSICS) or phacoemulsification. Main outcome measures were success rate of trabeculectomy, as determined by four different IOP goals and incidence of postoperative complications. Analysis was performed using R-2.15, and the significance was tested at 5% level. Results The minimum follow-up period was 12 months. The overall success rates (with or without medication) when safe surgery system trabeculectomy was combined with MSICS were 91, 70, and 51% for IOP ≤18, ≤15, and ≤12 mm Hg, respectively, and target IOP was achieved in 72% cases. The mean IOP reduction was 43.8% with MSICS and 42.08% with phacoemulsification. The surgical outcome was not significantly different for both techniques. Postoperative complications were infrequent and comparable. Conclusion The Safe Surgery System Trabeculectomy combined with cataract surgery offers excellent IOP control with minimal postoperative complications. It offers an effective and improved solution for primary glaucoma coexistent with cataract found in developing countries. PMID:25502867

  8. Phacoemulsification versus small incision cataract surgery in patients with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Rahul; Kumar, Prachi; Sharma, Shiv Kumar; Kumar, Manoj; Kaur, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare the safety and efficacy of phacoemulsification and small incision cataract surgery (SICS) in patients with uveitic cataract. METHODS In a prospective, randomized multi-centric study, consecutive patients with uveitic cataract were randomized to receive phacoemulsification or manual SICS by either of two surgeons well versed with both the techniques. A minimum inflammation free period of 3mo (defined as less than 5 cells per high power field in anterior chamber) was a pre-requisite for eligibility for surgery. Superior scleral tunnel incisions were used for both techniques. Improvement in visual acuity post-operatively was the primary outcome measure and the rate of post-operative complications and surgical time were secondary outcome measures, respectively. Means of groups were compared using t-tests. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used when there were more than two groups. Chi-square tests were used for proportions. Kaplan Meyer survival analysis was done and means for survival time was estimated at 95% confidence interval (CI). A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS One hundred and twenty-six of 139 patients (90.6%) completed the 6-month follow-up. Seven patients were lost in follow up and another six excluded due to either follow-up less than six months (n=1) or inability implant an intraocular lens (IOL) because of insufficient capsular support following posterior capsule rupture (n=5). There was significant improvement in vision after both the procedures (paired t-test; P<0.001). On first postoperative day, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) was 20/63 or better in 31 (47%) patients in Phaco group and 26 (43.3%) patients in SICS group (P=0.384). The mean surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) was 0.86±0.34 dioptres (D) in the phacoemulsification group and 1.16±0.28 D in SICS group. The difference between the groups was significant (t-test, P=0.002). At 6mo, corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was

  9. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lawuyi, Lola Elizabeth; Gurbaxani, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3%) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis), miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. PMID:26203214

  10. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Lawuyi, Lola Elizabeth; Gurbaxani, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3%) by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis), miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. PMID:26203214

  11. Virtual reality phacoemulsification: a comparison between skilled surgeons and students naive to cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderberg, Per; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf; Simawi, Wamidh; Nordqvist, Per; Skarman, Eva; Nordh, Leif

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a simulator for virtual phacoemulsification surgery. In the current study, the performance of one experienced cataract surgeon was compared to the performance of four subjects naive to cataract surgery. They all operated on the same virtual patient and a number of different response variables were measured. It was found that the experienced subject performed better than the naive subjects on almost all response variables. This indicates that the simulator developed by us is authentic for phaco emulsification surgery. The lack of negative effects in case of complications during virtual phacoemulsification surgery makes the phaco simulator that we developed a very attractive tool for learning phacoemulsification surgery.

  12. Teaching Pediatric Hand Surgery in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Kotsis, Sandra V.

    2007-01-01

    Background International volunteering missions are becoming an important focus of plastic surgeons in the United States. The purpose of this paper is to describe the teaching of pediatric hand surgery in Vietnam to share the lessons learned from this project. Methods Two medical education trips were conducted to the no. 1 Children’s Hospital in Ho Chi Minh city (Saigon) to teach pediatric hand and burn reconstructive surgery to the surgeons and therapists. This is the main referral children’s hospital for the country, and pediatric hand surgery expertise is not available. Results Structured education programs were conducted over two trips to introduce congenital hand surgery and burn reconstructive procedures using flap techniques. The education programs included lectures and surgical demonstrations of selected procedures. Their proficiency was verified by supervised conduct of these operations. Conclusions A well-conceived medical education program can introduce complex surgical discipline to a country. Through two trips, the surgeons at this referral center will have the capability to take care of many children requiring reconstructive hand surgery. PMID:18780043

  13. Conjunctival sac bacterial flora isolated prior to cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Suto, Chikako; Morinaga, Masahiro; Yagi, Tomoko; Tsuji, Chieko; Toshida, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the trends of conjunctival sac bacterial flora isolated from patients prior to cataract surgery. Subjects and methods The study comprised 579 patients (579 eyes) who underwent cataract surgery. Specimens were collected by lightly rubbing the inferior palpebral conjunctival sac with a sterile cotton swab 2 weeks before surgery, and then cultured for isolation of bacteria and antimicrobial sensitivity testing. The bacterial isolates and percentage of drug-resistant isolates were compared among age groups and according to whether or not patients had diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, dialysis therapy, oral steroid use, dry eye syndrome, or allergic conjunctivitis. Results The bacterial isolation rate was 39.2%. There were 191 strains of Gram-positive cocci, accounting for the majority of all isolates (67.0%), among which methicillin-sensitive coagulase-negative staphylococci was the most frequent (127 strains, 44.5%), followed by methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (37 strains, 12.7%). All 76 Gram-positive bacillary isolates (26.7%) were from the genus Corynebacterium. Among the 16 Gram-negative bacillary isolates (5.9%), the most frequent was Escherichia coli (1.0%). The bacterial isolation rate was higher in patients >60 years old, and was lower in patients with dry eye syndrome, patients under topical treatment for other ocular disorders, and patients with hyperlipidemia. There was no significant difference in bacterial isolation rate with respect to the presence/absence of diabetes mellitus, steroid therapy, dialysis, or a history of allergic conjunctivitis. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci showed a significantly higher detection rate in diabetic patients than nondiabetic patients (20.3% versus 7.0%, P < 0.05). The percentage of all isolates resistant to levofloxacin, cefmenoxime, and tobramycin was 14.0%, 15.2%, and 17.9%, respectively, with no significant differences among these drugs. Conclusion

  14. Dealings between Cataract and Retinal Reattachment Surgery in PVR

    PubMed Central

    Deuchler, Svenja; Singh, Pankaj; Müller, Michael; Kohnen, Thomas; Ackermann, Hanns; Iwanczuk, Joerg; Benjilali, Rachid; Koch, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. To evaluate the impact of the eye lens status and oil side effects on the outcome of vitreoretinal surgery in retinal detachment with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) and a temporary silicone oil tamponade (SOT). Methods. 101 eyes were analyzed retrospectively and 103 eyes prospectively in regard to their retinal reattachment success rate and key factors for the outcome. Subgroup analysis of 27 eyes with Scheimpflug lens photography (SLP) before and after retinal reattachment service with SOT was performed. For SLP (65% phakic eyes) a Pentacam densitometry reference body with 3 mm diameter was chosen and 3 segments (anterior/mid/posterior) were evaluated separately after a quality check. Results. The retinal reattachment rate was highest in the prospective pseudophakic group (p = 0.039). Lens transparency loss occurred earlier in middle aged patients than in younger patients. Besides the nucleus, layers posterior and anterior to it showed specific transparency changes. The emulsification rate was higher when eyes had been operated on in the anterior chamber before retinal reattachment service. Conclusions. Retinal reattachment surgery seems to benefit from preoperative cataract removal. We found significant lens changes in the nucleus as well as in the layers anterior and posterior to it. This corresponds to the histology of the lens epithelium published before. PMID:27034821

  15. Capsulotomy and hydroprocedures for nucleus prolapse in manual small incision cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Veena, Kannusamy; Ravindran, Ravilla D

    2009-01-01

    Manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) involves the manual removal of nucleus through a scleral tunnel. To achieve 100% success every time, one has to do a good capsulotomy and should master the technique to prolapse the nucleus into anterior chamber. During conversion from extracapsular cataract surgery to MSICS, one can perform a can-opener capsulotomy and prolapse the nucleus. However, it is safer and better to perform a capsulorrhexis and hydroprolapse the nucleus, as it makes the rest of the steps of MSICS comfortable. Use of trypan blue in white and brown cataracts makes the capsulorrhexis and prolapse simple and safe. Extra caution should be taken in cases with hypermature cataracts with weak zonules and subluxated cataracts. PMID:19075402

  16. Capsulotomy and hydroprocedures for nucleus prolapse in manual small incision cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Veena, Kannusamy; Ravindran, Ravilla D

    2009-01-01

    Manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) involves the manual removal of nucleus through a scleral tunnel. To achieve 100% success every time, one has to do a good capsulotomy and should master the technique to prolapse the nucleus into anterior chamber. During conversion from extracapsular cataract surgery to MSICS, one can perform a can-opener capsulotomy and prolapse the nucleus. However, it is safer and better to perform a capsulorrhexis and hydroprolapse the nucleus, as it makes the rest of the steps of MSICS comfortable. Use of trypan blue in white and brown cataracts makes the capsulorrhexis and prolapse simple and safe. Extra caution should be taken in cases with hypermature cataracts with weak zonules and subluxated cataracts. PMID:19075402

  17. Feasibility and Complications between Phacoemulsification and Manual Small Incision Surgery in Subluxated Cataract.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruchi; Kamal, Saurabh; Kumar, Sushil; Kishore, Jugal; Malik, K P S; Angmo Bodh, Sonam; Bansal, Smriti; Singh, Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the feasibility of cataract surgery with implantation of endocapsular supporting devices and intraocular lens (IOL) in subluxated cataract in phacoemulsification and manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Design. Prospective randomized intervention case series consisting of 60 eyes with visually significant subluxated cataract. Method. The patients were randomly distributed between the two groups equally. The main outcome measure was implantation of in-the-bag IOL, requirement of additional procedure and complications, if any. Results. Capsular bag retention in subluxated lenses is possible in 90% cases in phacoemulsification versus 76.67% cases in MSICS (P = 0.16). Both groups, achieved similar best corrected visual acuity (P = 0.73), although additional procedures, intraoperative, and postoperative complications were more common in MSICS. Conclusions. Achieving intact capsulorhexis and nuclear rotation in MSICS may be difficult in cases with large nucleus size and severe subluxation, but subluxated cataracts can be effectively managed by both phacoemuslification and MSICS. PMID:22523646

  18. Lensectomy using a bimanual microincision cataract surgery technique during pars plana vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Suk Ho; Kwon, Oh W

    2009-01-01

    Lens extraction during vitrectomy is sometimes necessary to obtain an adequate view of the retina. Currently, phacoemulsification through a clear corneal incision with implantation of a foldable intraocular lens has become the preferred technique for cataract extraction during pars plana vitrectomy. The authors described the technique of lensectomy using a bimanual microincisional cataract surgery technique during pars plana vitrectomy and insertion of the intraocular lens at the end of surgery, which has several advantages over conventional coaxial phacoemulsification procedures. PMID:19205506

  19. Profitability analysis of a femtosecond laser system for cataract surgery using a fuzzy logic approach

    PubMed Central

    Trigueros, José Antonio; Piñero, David P; Ismail, Mahmoud M

    2016-01-01

    AIM To define the financial and management conditions required to introduce a femtosecond laser system for cataract surgery in a clinic using a fuzzy logic approach. METHODS In the simulation performed in the current study, the costs associated to the acquisition and use of a commercially available femtosecond laser platform for cataract surgery (VICTUS, TECHNOLAS Perfect Vision GmbH, Bausch & Lomb, Munich, Germany) during a period of 5y were considered. A sensitivity analysis was performed considering such costs and the countable amortization of the system during this 5y period. Furthermore, a fuzzy logic analysis was used to obtain an estimation of the money income associated to each femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (G). RESULTS According to the sensitivity analysis, the femtosecond laser system under evaluation can be profitable if 1400 cataract surgeries are performed per year and if each surgery can be invoiced more than $500. In contrast, the fuzzy logic analysis confirmed that the patient had to pay more per surgery, between $661.8 and $667.4 per surgery, without considering the cost of the intraocular lens (IOL). CONCLUSION A profitability of femtosecond laser systems for cataract surgery can be obtained after a detailed financial analysis, especially in those centers with large volumes of patients. The cost of the surgery for patients should be adapted to the real flow of patients with the ability of paying a reasonable range of cost. PMID:27500115

  20. Comparison of Peribulbar with Posterior Sub-Tenon's Anesthesia in Cataract Surgery Among Nigerians

    PubMed Central

    Iganga, Ogbonnaya N.; Fasina, Oluyemi; Bekibele, Charles O.; Ajayi, Benedictus G. K.; Ogundipe, Ayobade O.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the akinetic and the analgesic effects of peribulbar and posterior sub-Tenon's anesthesia in patients undergoing cataract surgery. Methods: In a hospital-based randomized comparative interventional study, patients aged 50 years and above who underwent elective surgery for uncomplicated cataract were randomized to receive either peribulbar block or posterior sub-Tenon block. Pain during injection, surgery, and after surgery was assessed using numerical reporting scale (NRS). Limbal excursion was measured with a transparent meter rule. Result: A total of 152 eyes of 152 patients were studied. Peribulbar and sub-Tenon regional blocks provided comparable adequate akinesia (P = 0.06) and similar levels of analgesia (P = 0.10) during cataract surgery. Both techniques also provided similar levels of analgesia to the patient during injection and in the immediate postoperative period. Ninety-two percent of patients who had peribulbar and 97% of those who had sub-Tenon blocks reported either mild pain or no pain at all during surgery (P = 0.49). There was no report of severe pain in all patients during the stages of the surgery. Occurrence of chemosis and subconjunctival hemorrhage was more common in sub-Tenon than peribulbar anesthesia. Conclusions: This study shows that peribulbar and posterior sub-Tenon routes of administering anesthetic substances is comparable in providing adequate akinesia and analgesia for cataract surgery with minimal complications. Therefore, both techniques are effective and safe for cataract surgery among Nigerians. PMID:27162452

  1. Variation in indications for cataract surgery in the United States, Denmark, Canada, and Spain: results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study

    PubMed Central

    Norregaard, J. C.; Bernth-Petersen, P.; Alonso, J.; Dunn, E.; Black, C.; Andersen, T. F.; Espallargues, M.; Bellan, L.; Anderson, G.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—International comparisons of clinical practice may help in assessing the magnitude and possible causes of variation in cross national healthcare utilisation. With this aim, the indications for cataract surgery in the United States, Denmark, the province of Manitoba (Canada), and the city of Barcelona (Spain) were compared.
METHODS—In a prospective multicentre study, patients scheduled for first eye cataract surgery and aged 50 years or older were enrolled consecutively. From the United States 766 patients were enrolled; from Denmark 291; from Manitoba 152; and from Barcelona 200. Indication for surgery was measured as preoperative visual status of patients enlisted for cataract surgery. Main variables were preoperative visual acuity in operative eye, the VF-14 score (an index of functional impairment in patients with cataract) and ocular comorbidity.
RESULTS—Mean visual acuity were 0.23 (USA), 0.17 (Denmark), 0.15 (Manitoba), and 0.07 (Barcelona) (p<0.001). When restricting the sample to eyes with normal retina and macula, no significant difference between United States and Denmark was observed (p>0.05). Mean VF-14 scores were 76 (USA), 76 (Denmark), 71 (Manitoba), and 64 (Barcelona) (p<0.001).
CONCLUSION—Similar indications for cataract surgery were found in the United States and Denmark. Significantly more restricted indications were observed in Manitoba and Barcelona. Possible explanations for the results are discussed, including differences in sociodemographic characteristics, access to care, surgeons' willingness to operate, and patient demand.

 Keywords: cataract surgery; North America; Europe PMID:9924294

  2. Modified Small Incision Cataract Surgery and Intraocular Lens Implantation in HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Kagmeni; Domngang, Christelle; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Come, Ebana Mvogo; Wiedemann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    AIM To describe a surgical technique suitable for cataract surgery in regions with a high prevalence of HIV infection. METHODS We reviewed the medical records of 20 consecutive AIDS patients with cataract who underwent modified small-incision cataract surgery (mSICS) with posterior chamber lens implantation. Classic extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) was compared to mSICS. The number of potentially risky steps for contamination during surgery and duration of surgery were analyzed. A risky step was defined as any time when the surgeon had to use a sharp instrument. Student’s paired t-test was carried out to compare continuous variables, and P-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS Twenty patients were included in the study, 13 males (65%) and seven females (35%). The mean age was 46.3 ± 13.6 years (range 22–70 years). The number of potentially risky steps for contamination was significantly higher in the classical ECCE than in mSICS (P < 0.001). The mean duration of cataract surgery with mSICS was significantly shorter as well (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Conversion to mSICS is essential in order to reduce accidental injuries during cataract surgery in sub-Saharan countries. Sharp instruments should be passed through a neutral zone to ensure that the surgeon and nurse do not touch the same instrument at the same time. PMID:26604848

  3. Comparison between Subjective Sensations during First and Second Phacoemulsification Eye Surgeries in Patients with Bilateral Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ji-guo; Ye, Ting; Huang, Qing; Feng, Yi-fan; Wang, Jue; Fu, Xun-an; Xiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate and compare the subjective sensations reported by patients during first and second cataract extractions. Methods. Consecutive patients undergoing bilateral sequential cataract extraction using phacoemulsification were recruited. Following cataract surgery, patients completed questionnaires designed to evaluate subjective sensations, including anxiety, eye bulges, pain, and light sensitivity. Changes in painful sensations experienced by patients between the two surgeries were also recorded. Comparisons were also performed for each subjective sensation between different age groups (<50, 50–59, 60–69, 70–79, and >79 years). Results. A total of 127 patients were included in the final evaluation. Statistical comparison of the results showed that there were significant differences in perception of anxiety, eye bulges, and pain scores between the first and second cataract surgeries (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant difference for light sensitivity scores between the two surgeries (P = 0.555). The differences in anxiety, perception of eye bulges, pain, and light sensitivity scores between both the surgeries showed no correlation with age (P > 0.05 for all). Conclusions. Our research confirms the common observation that patients with bilateral cataracts often report more ocular discomfort during the second surgery. There are, therefore, additional factors that should be considered upon treating patients with bilateral cataracts, and the provision of preoperative counseling could play an important role in providing adequate patient care. PMID:27239336

  4. Comparison between Subjective Sensations during First and Second Phacoemulsification Eye Surgeries in Patients with Bilateral Cataract.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji-Guo; Ye, Ting; Huang, Qing; Feng, Yi-Fan; Wang, Jue; Fu, Xun-An; Xiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate and compare the subjective sensations reported by patients during first and second cataract extractions. Methods. Consecutive patients undergoing bilateral sequential cataract extraction using phacoemulsification were recruited. Following cataract surgery, patients completed questionnaires designed to evaluate subjective sensations, including anxiety, eye bulges, pain, and light sensitivity. Changes in painful sensations experienced by patients between the two surgeries were also recorded. Comparisons were also performed for each subjective sensation between different age groups (<50, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, and >79 years). Results. A total of 127 patients were included in the final evaluation. Statistical comparison of the results showed that there were significant differences in perception of anxiety, eye bulges, and pain scores between the first and second cataract surgeries (P < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant difference for light sensitivity scores between the two surgeries (P = 0.555). The differences in anxiety, perception of eye bulges, pain, and light sensitivity scores between both the surgeries showed no correlation with age (P > 0.05 for all). Conclusions. Our research confirms the common observation that patients with bilateral cataracts often report more ocular discomfort during the second surgery. There are, therefore, additional factors that should be considered upon treating patients with bilateral cataracts, and the provision of preoperative counseling could play an important role in providing adequate patient care. PMID:27239336

  5. Willingness to Pay for Cataract Surgery Provided by a Senior Surgeon in Urban Southern China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xianhua; Ling, Yunlan; Lin, Xiaofeng; Li, Mingge; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Zheng, Yingfeng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study willingness to pay for cataract surgery and surgical service provided by a senior cataract surgeon in urban Southern China. Methods This study was a cross-sectional willingness-to-pay (WTP) interview using bidding formats. Two-hundred eleven persons with presenting visual impairment in either eye due to cataract were enrolled at a tertiary eye hospital. Participants underwent a comprehensive eye examination and a WTP interview for both surgery and service provided by a senior surgeon. Demographic information, socioeconomic status and clinical data were recorded. Results Among 211 (98% response rate) persons completing the interview, 53.6% were women and 80.6% were retired. About 72.2% had a monthly income lower than 1000 renminbi (US $161). A total of 189 (89.6%) were willing to pay for cataract and the median amount of WTP was 6000 renminbi (US$968). And 102 (50.7%) were willing to pay additional fees for surgery performed by a senior surgeon, and the median amount of WTP was 500 renminbi (US$81). In regression models adjusting for age and gender, persons with preexisting eye diseases other than cataract, were more likely to pay for cataract surgery and service provided by a senior surgeon (P = 0.04 for both). Conclusions In urban China, cataract patients, especially those with preexisting eye conditions, are willing to pay additional fees for a senior surgeon. Moving to a system where the price of cataract surgery is proportional to the consultant’ skill and expertise is possible and may have a potential impact on waiting list and quality of eye care. Further studies are needed to examine the impact of such pricing system on attitudes and choices of cataract patients. PMID:26575284

  6. Laser applications in pediatric airway surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamzadeh, Amir M.; Ahuja, Gurpreet S.; Nguyen, John D.; Crumley, Roger

    2003-06-01

    The smaller anatomy and limited access to instrumentation pose a challenge to the pediatric airway surgeon. The enhanced precision and ability to photocoagulate tissue while operating with the laser enhances the surgeon"s ability to successfully treat unique pediatric conditions such subglottic hemangiomas, congenital cysts, respiratory papillomatosis, and laryngeal or tracheal stenosis. Due to its shallow tissue penetration and thermal effect, the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser is generally considered the laser of choice for pediatric airway applications. The potential for increased scarring and damage to underlying tissue caused by the greater penetration depth and thermal effect of the Nd:YAG and KTP lasers preclude their use in this population. In this review, we will describe the specific advantages of using lasers in airway surgery, the current technology and where the current technology is deficient.

  7. A VidEo-Based Intelligent Recognition and Decision System for the Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xu-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Fang; Hao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The phacoemulsification surgery is one of the most advanced surgeries to treat cataract. However, the conventional surgeries are always with low automatic level of operation and over reliance on the ability of surgeons. Alternatively, one imaginative scene is to use video processing and pattern recognition technologies to automatically detect the cataract grade and intelligently control the release of the ultrasonic energy while operating. Unlike cataract grading in the diagnosis system with static images, complicated background, unexpected noise, and varied information are always introduced in dynamic videos of the surgery. Here we develop a Video-Based Intelligent Recognitionand Decision (VeBIRD) system, which breaks new ground by providing a generic framework for automatically tracking the operation process and classifying the cataract grade in microscope videos of the phacoemulsification cataract surgery. VeBIRD comprises a robust eye (iris) detector with randomized Hough transform to precisely locate the eye in the noise background, an effective probe tracker with Tracking-Learning-Detection to thereafter track the operation probe in the dynamic process, and an intelligent decider with discriminative learning to finally recognize the cataract grade in the complicated video. Experiments with a variety of real microscope videos of phacoemulsification verify VeBIRD's effectiveness. PMID:26693249

  8. Risk factors for corneal endothelial cell loss by cataract surgery in eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yumi; Nejima, Ryohei; Mori, Yosai; Sakisaka, Toshihiro; Minami, Keiichiro; Miyata, Kazunori; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with decreases in corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) resulting from cataract surgery in eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PEX). Methods The clinical records of 78 eyes of 78 patients with PEX who had undergone cataract surgery were reviewed. ECD was measured preoperatively and at 3 months postoperatively with specular microscopy. Multiple regression analysis was used to assess the factors that were significantly related to the rate of ECD loss. Explanatory variables included age, preoperative ECD, pupil diameter, cataract grade, concomitance of glaucoma or diabetes mellitus, preoperative anterior chamber depth, surgery time, total time and power of ultrasound, performance of intraoperative pupillary enlargement manipulation, and postoperative aqueous flare intensity at 1 week and 1 month. Results ECD before and after surgery was 2,464±337 cells/mm2 and 2,400±347 cells/mm2, respectively, with an ECD loss rate of 2.6%±5.1% (mean ± SD). Multiple regression analysis revealed that ECD loss was significantly associated with the cataract grade (P=0.019) and preoperative anterior chamber depth (P=0.023). Conclusion With modern small incision cataract surgery, the ECD loss varied with surgical invasions due to severe cataract and shallow anterior chamber, and the presence of PEX was least affected. PMID:27621588

  9. A VidEo-Based Intelligent Recognition and Decision System for the Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shu; Yin, Xu-Cheng; Wang, Zhi-Bin; Zhou, Fang; Hao, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The phacoemulsification surgery is one of the most advanced surgeries to treat cataract. However, the conventional surgeries are always with low automatic level of operation and over reliance on the ability of surgeons. Alternatively, one imaginative scene is to use video processing and pattern recognition technologies to automatically detect the cataract grade and intelligently control the release of the ultrasonic energy while operating. Unlike cataract grading in the diagnosis system with static images, complicated background, unexpected noise, and varied information are always introduced in dynamic videos of the surgery. Here we develop a Video-Based Intelligent Recognitionand Decision (VeBIRD) system, which breaks new ground by providing a generic framework for automatically tracking the operation process and classifying the cataract grade in microscope videos of the phacoemulsification cataract surgery. VeBIRD comprises a robust eye (iris) detector with randomized Hough transform to precisely locate the eye in the noise background, an effective probe tracker with Tracking-Learning-Detection to thereafter track the operation probe in the dynamic process, and an intelligent decider with discriminative learning to finally recognize the cataract grade in the complicated video. Experiments with a variety of real microscope videos of phacoemulsification verify VeBIRD's effectiveness. PMID:26693249

  10. Cataract and Refractive Surgery in ; a Survey of KSCRS Members From 1995~2006

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Chul; Jung, Jee Woong; Sohn, Hee Jin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose This purpose of this report was to study trends in cataract and refractive surgeries conducted during the past twelve years and to compare results to previous reports from the ASCRS and New Zealand (NZ) in order to forecast future medical services. Methods We surveyed members of the Korean Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery (KSCRS) every year from 1995 to 2006, and studied changes in cataract and refractive surgeries (RS). Results The duration of hospitalization has been gradually decreasing to the point that a one day hospitalization following surgery has become common. The rate of topical anesthesia use has significantly increased since 1998. Sutureless incision methods are now commonly practiced. The use of acryl IOL as an optic material has been gradually increasing for cataract surgeries. KSCRS members showed an interest in the special intraocular lenses as multifocal IOL. While Excimer laser PRK was the most popular refractive surgery during the first stage, KSCRS members increasingly prefer LASIK to the Excimer laser PRK. Regression of the corrected visual acuity, dry eye, night halo, and flashes were the most common complications following refractive surgeries. Medical disputes related to PRK and LASIK have been gradually increasing throughout the study period. Conclusions We confirm that the KSCRS practice styles for cataract and RS are similar to those of the ASCRS and NZ. We infer a world-wide trend from the comparison of these three societies. PMID:19794938

  11. The corticosteroids effect on corneal endothelial cell in pulse therapy, specific to the cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, AC; Ghita, AM; Noaghi, M; Popa Cherecheanu, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: We suspect a protective role of corticosteroids in pulse therapy in cataract surgery Objective: The monitoring of the corticosteroids effect in pulse therapy after cataract surgery, associated with conventional therapy drugs on endothelial cells. Methods: According to the effective phacoemulsification time (EPT), we have created a lot with hard cataract (EPT>10s) and a lot with soft cataract (EPT<10s). Each lot had a control group treated with local steroids and a study group treated with local steroids to which steroids in pulse therapy were associated postoperative for 3 days. Results We noticed a smaller loss of endothelial cell in the study group with soft cataract compared to the control group but without statistic significance. In the study group with hard cataract the recovery of the visual function is faster than in the control group. The loss of endothelial cell compared to the EPT is similar at one week in both of the examined groups in patients with hard cataract (39.1±13.2 cells/mm2/s study group and 41.51±18.5 cells/mm2/s control group). In the 1 month postoperative examination, we could find a significantly bigger loss in the control group (40.18 ±16.6 cells/mm2/s) compared to the study group (24.48±7 cells/mm2/s) (p<0.05). Conclusions: The administration of corticosteroids in pulse therapy associated to topic therapy seems to be benefic in the limitation of the loss of endothelial cell specific to cataract surgery. The major benefit of pulse therapy appears in patients with hard cataract and in patients with a lower endothelial reserve in whom surgery is mandatory. PMID:27057248

  12. Outcomes of Descemetopexy with Isoexpansile Perfluoropropane after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Jyoti; Mathur, Umang; Acharya, Manisha Chabhra; Chauhan, Lokesh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the indications, anatomical outcomes, functional outcomes and limitations of descemetopexy with intracameral injection of isoexpansile perfluoropropane (14% C3F8) in eyes with Descemet's membrane (DM) detachment after cataract surgery. Methods: This retrospective non-comparative interventional case series included 67 eyes of 67 patients who underwent descemetopexy at a tertiary eye hospital. The procedure consisted of descemet's membrane reattachment by injecting isoexpansile perfluoropropane (14% C3F8)intracamerally. Outcome measures were reattachment of DM, improvement in visual acuity, resolution of corneal edema, causes for failure of DM reattachment and complications. Results: Sixty-seven eyes of 74 patients were analyzed. Phacoemulsification (56.71%) had the highest DM detachment as compared to manual SICS in 19 (28.36%) and ECCE in 10 (14.93%) eyes. Descemetopexy with 14% C3F8 resulted in anatomical reattachment of DM in 71.64% and functional improvement in visual acuity in 74.63% of treated eyes. The location and the extent of DM detachment did not influence DM reattachment. Complete reattachment of DM occurred in all 26 eyes (100%) with planar type detachments, whereas with non-planar type detachments only 22 eyes (53.7%) achieved complete reattachment. Conclusion: Descemetopexy with isoexpansile perfluoropropane offers good surgical outcomes regarding visual acuity and resolution of corneal edema. PMID:27413497

  13. Photodynamic treatment of lens epithelial cells for cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingua, Robert W.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.; Simon, Gabriel; Li, Kam

    1991-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) eiiploying Dihematopor*iyrin ethers (DHE) (Photofrin II) at pharmacologic lvels, has been denonstrate3 to kill rabbit lens epithelial cells, in vivo. This in vitro study, reports on the minimal necessary parameters for rabbit lens epithelial cell death. Explants of rabbit lenses were incubated in various concentrations of DHE (1O,, 100, 500, 1000 ug/ml) for 1, 2, or 5 minutes. 30 to 120 Joules/an of collimated 514.5 nm Argon laser light re delivered to the locier concentrations of 10, 50, and 100 ug,'ml DHE treated cells. One hundre1 fifteen explants were treated, in all. Higher concentrations of DHE alone (500 and 1000 ug/ml) were sufficient to induce cellular swelling. Lower concentrations required light for cellular effect. Trypan blue staining revealed cell death at these minimal pa9ieters: DHE 50 ug/ml, incubation 1 minute, 514.5 r Argon light 1.0 Watt/an for 30 sec (30 Joules) . In future studies, these rameters will be tested in vivo, for their ability to eliminate lens epithelial proliferation after cataract surgery.

  14. Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz: Do You Need a Flu Shot? Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Cataracts KidsHealth > ... she takes time to help him with his homework. Lately, though, Jake's noticed that Grandma Fran has ...

  15. Cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... Colors that seem faded Glare - headlights, lamps or sunlight may seem too bright. You may also see ... a hat with a brim to block ultraviolet sunlight may help to delay cataracts. NIH: National Eye ...

  16. Favorable Long-term Prognosis of Cataract Surgery in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kulbhushan Prakash; Mahajan, Deepti; Panwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Scleritis is a rare presentation of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, complicated most commonly by iridocyclitis and raised intraocular pressure. These complications can recur in subsequent years, therefore they should be managed well. Case Report: We describe a female patient who developed scleritis, complicated cataract and secondary glaucoma 2 years after being diagnosed by HZO. Secondary glaucoma was managed medically, and the patient underwent extracapsular cataract extraction for the complicated cataract. Final visual acuity was 6/6 and IOP was 22.4 mm Hg. This is a rare report describing favorable long-term (>20 years) prognosis for surgical management of cataract associated with HZO together with scleritis, secondary glaucoma and post-herpetic neuralgia. Conclusion: A favorable outcome may be attained with surgery for complicated cataract associated with HZO if the condition is managed optimally and intraocular inflammation is well controlled. PMID:27413505

  17. Changes of Vision-Related Quality of Life in Retinal Detachment Patients after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Bijun; Sun, Qian; Xu, Xian; Miao, Yuyu; Zou, Haidong

    2015-01-01

    Rhegmatenous retinal detachment (RRD) is one of the most serious complications after phacoemulsification combined with intraocular lens implantation surgery. It has been reported that vision-related quality of life (VRQoL), as well as visual acuity rapidly decreased when RRD developed. However, little is known of the VRQoL in those RRD patients after anatomical retinal re-attachment, especially whether or not the VRQoL is higher than that before cataract surgery. In this prospective case series study, we use the Chinese-version low vision quality of life questionnaire (CLVQOL) to assess the changes of VRQoL in age-related cataract patients who suffered from RRD after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (phaco-IOL) implantation. All participants were asked to complete questionnaires in face- to-face interviews one day before and two weeks after cataract surgery, as well as one day before and three months after RRD surgery. A total of 10,127 consecutive age-related cataract patients were followed up to one year after phaco-IOL implantation; among these patients, 17 were diagnosed as RRD. The total CLVQOL scores and subscale scores except “Mobility” decreased significantly when RRD developed. After retinal surgery, only the score of “General vision and lighting” in the CLVQOL questionnaires improved when compared to the scores two weeks after cataract surgery, although the best corrected visual acuity of all patients significantly raised up. However, the mean CLVQOL scores and subscale scores were still considerably higher than the level prior to cataract surgery. Our study suggests that cataract patients at high risk of postoperative RRD should not deny the opportunity to undergo phaco-IOL implantation, even though potential VRQoL impairment induced by RRD exists. PMID:25764367

  18. The effect of health insurance reform on the number of cataract surgeries in Chongqing, China

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness in China, and poverty is a major barrier to having cataract surgery. In 2003, the Chinese government began a series of new national health insurance reforms, including the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) and the Urban Resident Basic Health Insurance scheme (URBMI). These two programs, combined with the previously existing Urban Employee Basic Health Insurance (UEBMI) program, aimed to make it easier for individuals to receive medical treatment. This study reports cataract surgery numbers in rural and urban populations and the proportion of these who had health insurance in Chongqing, China from 2003 to 2008. Methods The medical records of a consecutive case series, including 14,700 eyes of 13,262 patients who underwent age-related cataract surgery in eight hospitals in Chongqing from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2008, were analysed retrospectively via multi-stage cluster sampling. Results In the past six years, the total number of cataract surgeries had increased each year as had the number of patients with insurance. Both the number of surgeries and the number of insured patients were much higher in the urban group than in the rural group. The rate of increase in the rural group however was much higher than in the urban group, especially in 2007 and 2008. The odds ratios of having health insurance for urban vs. rural individuals were relatively stable from 2003 to 2006, but it decreased in 2007 and was significantly lower in 2008. Conclusions Health insurance appears to be an important factor associated with increased cataract surgery in Chongqing, China. With the implementation of health insurance, the number of Chongqing's cataract surgeries was increased year by year. PMID:21439077

  19. Randomised, single-masked non-inferiority trial of femtosecond laser-assisted versus manual phacoemulsification cataract surgery for adults with visually significant cataract: the FACT trial protocol

    PubMed Central

    Day, Alexander C; Burr, Jennifer M; Bunce, Catey; Doré, Caroline J; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Wormald, Richard P L; Round, Jeff; McCudden, Victoria; Rubin, Gary; Wilkins, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cataract is one of the leading causes of low vision in the westernised world, and cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed operations. Laser platforms for cataract surgery are now available, the anticipated advantages of which are broad and may include better visual outcomes through greater precision and reproducibility, and improved safety. FACT is a randomised single masked non-inferiority trial to establish whether laser-assisted cataract surgery is as good as or better than standard manual phacoemulsification. Methods and analysis 808 patients aged 18 years and over with visually significant cataract will be randomised to manual phacoemulsification cataract surgery (standard care) or laser-assisted cataract surgery (intervention arm). Outcomes will be measured at 3 and 12 months after surgery. The primary clinical outcome is uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA, logMAR) at 3 months in the study eye recorded by an observer masked to the trial group. Secondary outcomes include UDVA at 12 months, corrected distance visual acuity at 3 and 12 months, complications, endothelial cell loss, patient-reported outcome measures and a health economic analysis conforming to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence standards. Ethics and dissemination Research Ethics Committee Approval was obtained on 6 February 2015, ref: 14/LO/1937. Current protocol: v2.0 (08/04/2015). Study findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Trial registration number ISRCTN: 77602616. PMID:26614627

  20. Comparison of Morphological and Functional Endothelial Cell Changes after Cataract Surgery: Phacoemulsification Versus Manual Small-Incision Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ganekal, Sunil; Nagarajappa, Ashwini

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the morphological (cell density, coefficient of variation and standard deviation) and functional (central corneal thickness) endothelial changes after phacoemulsification versus manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Design: Prospective randomized control study. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized control study, patients were randomly allocated to undergo phacoemulsification (Group 1, n = 100) or MSICS (Group 2, n = 100) using a random number Table. The patients underwent complete ophthalmic evaluation and specular microscopy preoperatively and at 1and 6 weeks postoperatively. Functional and morphological endothelial evaluation was Noncon ROBO PACHY SP-9000 specular microscope. Phacoemulsification was performed, the chop technique and MSICS, by the viscoexpression technique. Results: The mean difference in central corneal thickness at baseline and 1 week between Group 1 and Group 2 was statistically significant (P = 0.027). However, this difference at baseline when compared to 6 week and 1 week, 6 weeks was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The difference in mean endothelial cell density between groups at 1 week and 6 weeks was statistically significant (P = 0.016). The mean coefficient of variation and mean standard deviation between groups were not statistically significant (P > 0.05, both comparisons). Conclusion: The central corneal thickness, coefficient of variation, and standard deviation were maintained in both groups indicating that the function and morphology of endothelial cells was not affected despite an initial reduction in endothelial cell number in MSICS. Thus, MSICS remains a safe option in the developing world. PMID:24669147

  1. Extracapsular cataract surgery compared with manual small incision cataract surgery in community eye care setting in western India: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gogate, P M; Deshpande, M; Wormald, R P; Deshpande, R; Kulkarni, S R

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To study “manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS)” for the rehabilitation of cataract visually impaired and blind patients in community based, high volume, eye hospital setting; to compare the safety and effectiveness of MSICS with conventional extracapsular cataract surgery (ECCE). Methods: In a single masked randomised controlled clinical trial, 741 patients, aged 40–90 years, with operable cataract were randomly assigned to receive either MSICS or ECCE and operated upon by one of eight participating surgeons. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were graded and scored according to the Oxford Cataract Treatment and Evaluation Team recommendations. The patients were followed up at 1 week, 6 weeks, and 1 year after surgery and their visual acuity recorded. Results: This paper reports outcomes at 1 and 6 weeks. 706 of the 741(95.3%) patients completed the 6 week follow up. 135 of 362 (37.3%) of ECCE group and 165 of 344 (47.9%) of MSICS group had uncorrected visual acuity of 6/18 or better after 6 weeks of follow up. 314 of 362 (86.7%) of ECCE group and 309 of 344 (89.8%) of MSICS group had corrected postoperative vision of 6/18 or better. Four of 362 (1.1%) of ECCE group and six of 344 (1.7%) of MSICS group had corrected postoperative visual acuity less than 6/60. There were no significant differences between the two groups for intraoperative and severe postoperative complications. Conclusion: MSICS and ECCE are both safe and effective techniques for treatment of cataract patients in community eye care settings. MSICS needs similar equipment to ECCE, but gives better uncorrected vision. PMID:12770957

  2. The South Asian Cataract Management Study. I. The first 662 cataract surgeries: a preliminary report.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--The first 662 cases of a multicentre randomised clinical trial of intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE) with and without implantation of a four point multiflex (Cilco Kelman Choyce Modification) anterior chamber intraocular lens (AC IOL) were studied after 6 weeks to compare frequency of surgical complications, short term clinical outcomes, and corneal endothelial cell loss between groups. METHODS--Randomisation was performed after screening for predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Demographics, visual acuities, intraocular pressures, and corneal endothelium cell data were recorded preoperatively and at 6 weeks. Details of surgical procedure, complications, and postoperative adverse reactions were recorded. Monitoring of the study was secured by a standardised image documentation procedure on all patients using the IMAGEnet digital imaging system. Analysis of corneal endothelial cell images was done using the CELL SOFT software analysis program. RESULTS--343 patients were randomised to IOL and 319 to no IOL. Twelve IOL implantations (3.5%) were aborted because of complications. A complication was reported in 103 (15.6%) of the surgical procedures (IOL = 16.9%, no IOL = 14.1%, p = 0.37). The most frequent complication observed was vitreous loss followed by plain capsular rupture, unplanned ECCE, and iris dialysis. Mean corneal endothelial cell loss 6 weeks after surgery was 17.2% (SD 13.1%) in the total study population (IOL = 18.5% no IOL = 16.1%, p = 0.05). The postoperative complications registered until 6 week follow up were significantly higher in the IOL group (IOL = 6.9%, no IOL = 2.6%, p = 0.02), mainly due to mild to moderate iritis needing prolonged use of steroids. Eighty nine per cent of the patients had a best corrected visual acuity of 6/18 or better. There was no significant difference in visual outcome between study groups. CONCLUSIONS--The implantation of a multiflex AC IOL in primary ICCE surgery in the centres of this study did

  3. Randomized controlled trial on the safety of intracameral cephalosporins in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Philip TH; Young, Alvin L; Cheng, Lulu L; Tam, Patrick MK; Lee, Vincent YW

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the safety profiles of intracameral cephalosporins in cataract surgery. Patients and methods: In this controlled trial, 129 patients were randomized to one of four groups to receive 1 mg of one of three cephalosporins – cefazolin, cefuroxime, or ceftazidime, or normal saline – given intracamerally during cataract surgery. Central endothelial cell density (ECD) and retinal center point thickness (CPT) were determined by specular microscopy and ocular coherence tomography, respectively, before and at 3 months after surgery. Results: There were no statistical significant differences in the changes of ECD and CPT between eyes receiving intracameral cephalosporin and control. Conclusion: The use of intracameral cefazolin, cefuroxime, or ceftazidime (1 mg in 0.1-mL solution) at the time of cataract surgery had no significant effect on ECD and CPT postoperatively. PMID:21191447

  4. Complications of cataract surgery in patients with BPH treated with alpha 1A-blockers

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Wylegala, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and cataract increases with age. Both diseases may develop concomitantly and may affect almost 50% of elderly men as comorbidities. Cataract is treated surgically and it has been reported that there may be an association between use of alpha-blockers for BPH, particularly alpha1A-adrenergic receptor selective drugs, and complications of cataract surgery known as Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS). The article reviews literature published on this topic and provides recommendations on how to reduce incidence of iatrogenic IFIS or its severity and outcomes in patients with BPH. PMID:24578865

  5. 1004 cases of traumatic cataract surgery with implantation of an intraocular lens.

    PubMed

    Fyodorov, S N; Egorova, E V; Zubareva, L N

    1981-04-01

    Traumatic cataracts occurring after ocular trauma were removed by phacoemulsification, cryoextraction or extracapsular cataract extraction, depending on the degree of lens absorption. All eyes received sputnik-style iridocapsular lenses. Most cases were complicated by the presence of synechiae and/or the need for iridoplasty. The surgical technique varied with the specific nature of the ocular pathology. Eyes with penetrating injuries has a higher complication rate. Anterior chamber shallowing or collapse was the most frequent intraoperative complication, and was directly related to the incidence of postoperative complications. Most postoperative complications were typical of those associated with cataract surgery in complicated situations. PMID:7263486

  6. Factors Associated with Complications and Postoperative Visual Outcomes of Cataract Surgery; a Study of 1,632 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Thanigasalam, Thevi; Reddy, Sagili Chandrashekara; Zaki, Rafdzah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cataract surgery is the most common intraocular surgery performed all over the world and has advanced technically in recent years. As in all surgeries, complications are unavoidable. Herein we report factors associated with complications and visual outcomes of cataract surgery. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included data of 1,632 cataract surgeries performed from 2007 to 2010 which was obtained from the cataract registry of the Malaysian National Eye Database. Demographic features, ocular and systemic comorbidites, grade of surgeon expertise and duration of surgery, type of anesthesia, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and the type of intraocular lens were recorded. Best corrected visual acuities were compared before and after the operation. Results: Mean patient age was 66.9 years with equal gender distribution. The majority of subjects had age related cataracts. Phacoemulsification was done faster than other surgeries, especially by specialist surgeons. History of prior ocular surgery and operations performed under general anesthesia were associated with greater complications. Phacoemulsification was associated with less complications and better visual outcomes. The age and etiology of cataract did not affect complications. Malays, absence of ocular comorbidities, left eyes and eyes operated under local anesthesia were more likely to experience more visual improvement. Gender, age, cause of cataract, systemic comorbidities and surgeon expertise as well as intra-and postoperative complications did not affect the visual outcomes. Conclusion: Phacoemulsification had good visual outcomes in cataract surgery. Duration of surgery, expertise of the surgeon and complications did not affect the visual outcomes. PMID:27051481

  7. [The value of methods for morphofunctional analysis of cornea in cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Borodina, N B; Kobzova, M V; Musaeva, G M

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of morphofunctional status of cornea after extracapsular cataract extraction and phakoemulsification with IOL implantation (30 and 58 operations respectively) were analyzed in detail using up-to-date diagnostic techniques. The results of examination using developed algorithm including study of light transmission, refraction and protective function of cornea show advantage of microinvasive ultrasound technique of cataract surgery in terms of minimal impact on corneal structure, optical and biomechanical characteristics. PMID:22165096

  8. Phenotypes of Recessive Pediatric Cataract in a Cohort of Children with Identified Homozygous Gene Mutations (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif O.; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A.; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess for phenotype-genotype correlations in families with recessive pediatric cataract and identified gene mutations. Methods: Retrospective review (2004 through 2013) of 26 Saudi Arabian apparently nonsyndromic pediatric cataract families referred to one of the authors (A.O.K.) and for which recessive gene mutations were identified. Results: Fifteen different homozygous recessive gene mutations were identified in the 26 consanguineous families; two genes and five families are novel to this study. Ten families had a founder CRYBB1 deletion (all with bilateral central pulverulent cataract), two had the same missense mutation in CRYAB (both with bilateral juvenile cataract with marked variable expressivity), and two had different mutations in FYCO1 (both with bilateral posterior capsular abnormality). The remaining 12 families each had mutations in 12 different genes (CRYAA, CRYBA1, AKR1E2, AGK, BFSP2, CYP27A1, CYP51A1, EPHA2, GCNT2, LONP1, RNLS, WDR87) with unique phenotypes noted for CYP27A1 (bilateral juvenile fleck with anterior and/or posterior capsular cataract and later cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis), EPHA2 (bilateral anterior persistent fetal vasculature), and BFSP2 (bilateral flecklike with cloudy cortex). Potential carrier signs were documented for several families. Conclusions: In this recessive pediatric cataract case series most identified genes are noncrystallin. Recessive pediatric cataract phenotypes are generally nonspecific, but some notable phenotypes are distinct and associated with specific gene mutations. Marked variable expressivity can occur from a recessive missense CRYAB mutation. Genetic analysis of apparently isolated pediatric cataract can sometimes uncover mutations in a syndromic gene. Some gene mutations seem to be associated with apparent heterozygous carrier signs. PMID:26622071

  9. Incidence and Pattern of Dry Eye after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kasetsuwan, Ngamjit; Satitpitakul, Vannarut; Changul, Theerapa; Jariyakosol, Supharat

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the incidence and severity pattern of dry eye after phacoemulsification. Setting King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Design Prospective descriptive study. Methods Samples were collected from ninety-two uncomplicated cataract patients who were 18 years old or older. Dry eye incidence and pattern were analyzed at days 0, 7, 30 and 90 after phacoemulsification using (1) Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) questionnaire, (2) tear break up time (TBUT), (3) Oxford ocular surface staining system, and (4) Schirmer I test without anesthesia. Results Seven days after phacoemulsification, the incidence of dry eye was 9.8% (95% confidence interval; 3.6–16.0%). The severity of dry eye peaked seven days post-phacoemulsification and was measured by OSDI questionnaire and all three clinical tests. Within thirty days and 3 months post-surgery, both the symptoms and signs showed rapid and gradual improvements, respectively. However, dry eye post-phacoemulsification was not significantly associated with sex and systemic hypertension (P = 0.26, 0.17 and 0.73, respectively). Conclusions The incidence of dry eye after phacoemulsification was 9.8%. Symptoms and signs of dry eye occurred as early as seven days post-phacoemulsification and the severity pattern improved over time. We recommend that ophthalmologists should evaluate patients both before and after phacoemulsification to prevent further damage to the ocular surface and able to manage the patient promptly and effectively so the patient will not have a poor quality of life and vision due to dry eye syndrome. PMID:24265705

  10. IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery (Intraocular Lenses)

    MedlinePlus

    ... by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Elizabeth Yeu MD Mar. 01, 2016 Before intraocular lenses (IOLs) were developed, ... Foods Rich in Vitamin C Help Curb Cataracts Mar 28, 2016 Los Alimentos Ricos en Vitamina C ...

  11. Analysis of Intraoperative and Postoperative Complications in Pseudoexfoliation Eyes Undergoing Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sathyendranath B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pseudoexfoliation (PXE) is a genetically inherited condition affecting usually seen in those aged over 50 years. Surgical management of cataract in patients with PXE pose a challenge due to associated changes in ocular structures. Aim To study the challenges in the management of cataract in patients with PXE. Materials and Methods This was an interventional study conducted in the Ophthalmology Department of MS Ramaiah Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Bangalore from June 2012 to September 2014. All patients admitted for cataract surgery during this period who were diagnosed as cataract associated with PXE above 50 years of age belonging to either sex were included in the study. All patients underwent cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation. Depending on type of cataract both small incision and phacoemulsification operations were conducted. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were studied. The patients were reviewed up to 6 weeks postoperatively. Results A total of 50 eyes of 50 patients diagnosed as cataract with PXE underwent cataract surgery. Of which 40 eyes (80%) underwent small incision cataract surgery whereas, 10 (20%) underwent phacoemusification. Corneal thinning (<535 microns) was noted in majority of the cases (41 cases). Preoperatively there were 3 cases of zonular weakness. Pseudo exfoliation with glaucoma was seen in 5 cases. Intraoperative complications encountered during surgery were; zonular dialysis in 3 cases, posterior capsular tear in 2 cases, out of these 5 cases vitreous loss was seen in 3 cases. Postoperative complications were corneal odema in 17 cases, of which endothelium de-compensated in one case, while early posterior capsular opacification was seen in 6 cases. Final best corrected visual acuity was between 6/6-6/12 in 39(78%) eyes, 6/18 -6/36 in 6(12%) cases; 6/60 to less in 5(10%) cases. Conclusion Cataract surgery in eyes with PXE has higher incidence of intraoperative and postoperative

  12. Microbiologic spectrum and susceptibility of isolates in delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Animesh; Pathengay, Avinash; Jalali, Subhadra; Mathai, Annie; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy; Narayanan, Raja; Chhablani, Jay; Sharma, Savitri; Das, Taraprasad; Flynn, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates in delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis. A retrospective review of 33 consecutive patients with culture proven delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis was done from January 2006 to March 2013. There were 22 bacterial and eleven fungal cases. Common isolates were Streptococci (seven cases), coagulase-negative staphylococci (five), Gram-negative bacilli (seven), Nocardia (two), Aspergillus (five), Candida (five). Gram-positive cocci were most susceptible to vancomycin and gatifloxacin (91.7%). Gram-negative isolates were most susceptible to ofloxacin (85.7%). Fungi being slow growing organisms are an important cause of delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis. PMID:26124631

  13. Benefits and risks of immediately sequential bilateral cataract surgery: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Lansingh, Van C; Eckert, Kristen A; Strauss, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Immediately sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS) is a highly contended issue in ophthalmology, mainly due to the risk of bilateral endophthalmitis and financial penalties that many ophthalmologists face when performing simultaneous cataract surgeries. The purpose of this review is to understand the current status of the knowledge of ISBCS, mainly its benefits and risks and how they compare with the standard of care, delayed sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Evidence, although limited, increasingly supports ISBCS for providing faster rehabilitation, improved visual outcomes, and cost and time savings. Evidence does not support the fear of bilateral endophthalmitis resulting from the simultaneous procedure. However, stronger and greater evidence is needed before ISBCSs can be considered the standard of care. Where ISBCS can potentially create the most beneficial impact is in public eye health programmes in developing countries, but this has not yet been explored. PMID:25824813

  14. Microbiologic spectrum and susceptibility of isolates in delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Animesh; Pathengay, Avinash; Jalali, Subhadra; Mathai, Annie; Pappuru, Rajeev Reddy; Narayanan, Raja; Chhablani, Jay; Sharma, Savitri; Das, Taraprasad; Flynn, Harry W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological spectrum and antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates in delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis. A retrospective review of 33 consecutive patients with culture proven delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis was done from January 2006 to March 2013. There were 22 bacterial and eleven fungal cases. Common isolates were Streptococci (seven cases), coagulase-negative staphylococci (five), Gram-negative bacilli (seven), Nocardia (two), Aspergillus (five), Candida (five). Gram-positive cocci were most susceptible to vancomycin and gatifloxacin (91.7%). Gram-negative isolates were most susceptible to ofloxacin (85.7%). Fungi being slow growing organisms are an important cause of delayed post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis. PMID:26124631

  15. Hemorrhagic Occlusive Retinal Vasculitis After First Eye Cataract Surgery Without Subsequent Second Eye Involvement.

    PubMed

    Balducci, Nicole; Savini, Giacomo; Barboni, Piero; Ducoli, Pietro; Ciardella, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    A case of monocular postoperative hemorrhagic occlusive retinal vasculitis (HORV) after uncomplicated bilateral cataract surgery is described. HORV is a severe syndrome that leads to painless visual loss after uncomplicated cataract surgery. The same surgical procedure was adopted in both eyes except for the use of intracameral vancomycin, which was injected only in the eye that developed HORV. Diffuse retinal ischemia with vascular sheathing and intraretinal hemorrhages were detected during the fourth postoperative day. Despite treatment, the patient developed severe neovascular glaucoma. This case supports the causative role of vancomycin in the pathogenesis of HORV and suggests avoiding it for chemoprophylaxis. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2016;47:764-766.]. PMID:27548454

  16. Acute pulmonary oedema due to single dose acetazolamide taken after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Guven Yilmaz, Suzan; Palamar, Melis; Gurgun, Cemil

    2016-01-01

    An increase in intraocular pressure following cataract surgery is very common. The main reason for this condition is viscoelastic agent remaining in the eye, which leads to mechanical obstruction of the trabecular meshwork. Prophylaxis with oral acetazolamide is frequently practised to prevent this early rise in intraocular pressure in the preoperative and postoperative periods. We report a case of an 81-year-old man with acute pulmonary oedema due to prophylactic acetazolamide intake after cataract surgery. The case is presented in order to draw attention to this serious complication. PMID:27170607

  17. Towards achieving small-incision cataract surgery 99.8% of the time.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R; Kuriakose, T; George, R

    2000-06-01

    A surgical approach designed to reliably attain the modern goal of small incision cataract surgery 99.8% of the time is described. Phacoemulsification as well as a manual small incision technique is utilised to achieve the desired outcome as often as possible and for all types of cataracts. The logic, and required surgical steps are described and illustrated. This surgical technique allows the advantages of small incision surgery to be reliably achieved. The method is flexible and allows decisions and steps to be modified depending on the skill and comfort zone of the individual surgeon. PMID:11116514

  18. Diclofenac prevents temporal increase of intraocular pressure after uneventful cataract surgery with longer operation time

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Masahiko; Nakazawa, Toru; Yasuda, Kanako; Shiono, Takashi; Nishida, Kohji

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares the effect of topical diclofenac with that of betamethasone against postoperative increase of intraocular pressure (IOP) after cataract surgery in normal patients, and also investigated the risk factors for postoperative increase of IOP in each group. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients without systemic disease who have bilateral and symmetrical cataracts underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery in both eyes (100 eyes in total). Postoperatively, topical diclofenac was applied 4 times daily to one eye, and topical betamethasone to the other eye in each patient. IOP and best corrected logMAR visual acuity (BCVA) in each eye were measured up to 8 weeks. Total surgery time and effective phacoemulsification time (EPT) for each case was recorded. Results: BCVA in both diclofenac- and betamethasone-treated eyes significantly improved after the cataract surgery; however, no statistical difference in VA was noted between the diclofenac- and betamethasone-treated eyes throughout the observation period. IOP in the diclofenac-treated eyes decreased with time, in contrast to the IOP in the betamethasone-treated eyes, which showed a slight increase. At 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively, there was significant difference between these two eye groups. Multiple regression analysis revealed that postoperative increase in IOP at 8 weeks in the betamethasone-treated eyes was closely correlated with total surgery time and EPT, but the IOP in the diclofenac-treated eyes showed no correlation with any surgical or clinical parameters. Conclusions: Postoperative increase in IOP after cataract surgery was affected by total surgery time and EPT in the betamethasone-treated eye. The time for surgery and EPT is longer in complicated cases including patients with a hard nucleus or small pupils, and also longer for beginning surgeons and in older patients. In these cases, diclofenac in place of betamethasone as a postoperative topical antiinflammatory drug is recommended

  19. Optical quality of toric intraocular lens implantation in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xian-Wen; Hao, Jing; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Fang

    2015-01-01

    AIM To analyze the optical quality after implantation of toric intraocular lens with optical quality analysis system. METHODS Fifty-two eyes of forty-four patients with regular corneal astigmatism of at least 1.00 D underwent implantation of AcrySof toric intraocular lens, including T3 group 19 eyes, T4 group 18 eyes, T5 group 10 eyes, T6 group 5 eyes. Main outcomes evaluated at 3mo of follow-up, included uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), residual refractive cylinder and intraocular lens (IOL) axis rotation. Objective optical quality were measured using optical quality analysis system (OQAS II®, Visiometrics, Spain), included the cutoff frequency of modulation transfer function (MTFcutoff), objective scattering index (OSI), Strehl ratio, optical quality analysis system value (OV) 100%, OV 20% and OV 9% [the optical quality analysis system (OQAS) values at contrasts of 100%, 20%, and 9%]. RESULTS At 3mo postoperative, the mean UDVA and CDVA was 0.18±0.11 and 0.07±0.08 logMAR; the mean residual refractive cylinder was 0.50±0.29 D; the mean toric IOL axis rotation was 3.62±1.76 degrees, the mean MTFcutoff, OSI, Strehl ratio, OV 100%, OV 20% and OV 9% were 22.862±5.584, 1.80±0.84, 0.155±0.038, 0.76±0.18, 0.77±0.19 and 0.78±0.21. The values of UDVA, CDVA, IOL axis rotation, MTFcutoff, OSI, Strehl ratio, OV100%, OV20% and OV9% depending on the power of the cylinder of the implantation were not significantly different (P>0.05), except the residual refractive cylinder (P<0.05). CONCLUSION The optical quality analysis system was useful for characterizing the optical quality of AcrySof toric IOL implantation. Implantation of an AcrySof toric IOL is an effective and safe method to correct corneal astigmatism during cataract surgery. PMID:25709910

  20. A systematic review of phacoemulsification cataract surgery in virtual reality simulators.

    PubMed

    Lam, Chee Kiang; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Sulaiman, Mohd Nazri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the capability of virtual reality simulators in the application of phacoemulsification cataract surgery training. Our review included the scientific publications on cataract surgery simulators that had been developed by different groups of researchers along with commercialized surgical training products, such as EYESI® and PhacoVision®. The review covers the simulation of the main cataract surgery procedures, i.e., corneal incision, capsulorrhexis, phacosculpting, and intraocular lens implantation in various virtual reality surgery simulators. Haptics realism and visual realism of the procedures are the main elements in imitating the actual surgical environment. The involvement of ophthalmology in research on virtual reality since the early 1990s has made a great impact on the development of surgical simulators. Most of the latest cataract surgery training systems are able to offer high fidelity in visual feedback and haptics feedback, but visual realism, such as the rotational movements of an eyeball with response to the force applied by surgical instruments, is still lacking in some of them. The assessment of the surgical tasks carried out on the simulators showed a significant difference in the performance before and after the training. PMID:23652710

  1. A Comparison of Different Operating Systems for Femtosecond Lasers in Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, B M; Williams, G P; Tan, A; Mehta, J S

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of femtosecond lasers is potentially a major shift in the way we approach cataract surgery. The development of increasingly sophisticated intraocular lenses (IOLs), coupled with heightened patient expectation of high quality postsurgical visual outcomes, has generated the need for a more precise, highly reproducible and standardized method to carry out cataract operations. As femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) becomes more commonplace in surgical centers, further evaluation of the potential risks and benefits needs to be established, particularly in the medium/long term effects. Healthcare administrators will also have to weigh and balance out the financial costs of these lasers relative to the advantages they put forth. In this review, we provide an operational overview of three of five femtosecond laser platforms that are currently commercially available: the Catalys (USA), the Victus (USA), and the LDV Z8 (Switzerland). PMID:26483973

  2. A Comparison of Different Operating Systems for Femtosecond Lasers in Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, B. M.; Williams, G. P.; Tan, A.; Mehta, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of femtosecond lasers is potentially a major shift in the way we approach cataract surgery. The development of increasingly sophisticated intraocular lenses (IOLs), coupled with heightened patient expectation of high quality postsurgical visual outcomes, has generated the need for a more precise, highly reproducible and standardized method to carry out cataract operations. As femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) becomes more commonplace in surgical centers, further evaluation of the potential risks and benefits needs to be established, particularly in the medium/long term effects. Healthcare administrators will also have to weigh and balance out the financial costs of these lasers relative to the advantages they put forth. In this review, we provide an operational overview of three of five femtosecond laser platforms that are currently commercially available: the Catalys (USA), the Victus (USA), and the LDV Z8 (Switzerland). PMID:26483973

  3. Femtosecond laser combined with non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Haotian; Chen, Wan; Zhang, Bo; Xiang, Wu; Li, Jing; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Soft-lens cataract surgeries are becoming increasingly common for cataract surgeons and chopping the soft nucleus using conventional techniques is problematic. We introduced a femtosecond laser combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery and evaluated the safety and efficacy of using this technique. Sixty-six patients with soft-nucleus cataracts ranging from grade 1~3 were divided into 3 groups based on nuclear staging. Those groups were further divided into three subgroups: femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique (subgroup 1), conventional manual cataract surgery with a non-chopping rotation technique (subgroup 2) and conventional manual cataract surgery with a quick-chop technique (subgroup 3).Patients were followed up at 1, 7, and 30 days after surgery. There was an 84.6% and a 63.34% reduction in ultrasound time and cumulative dissipated energy, respectively, between the subgroup 1 and the subgroup 3; and this was associated with a 36.1% and 29.7% reduction in endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare. There were no adverse events at the follow-up times. With its reduced ultrasound energy, endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare, the femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation technique was more efficient than conventional manual cataract surgery for soft-nucleus cataracts. PMID:26728573

  4. Femtosecond laser combined with non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Lin, Haotian; Chen, Wan; Zhang, Bo; Xiang, Wu; Li, Jing; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    Soft-lens cataract surgeries are becoming increasingly common for cataract surgeons and chopping the soft nucleus using conventional techniques is problematic. We introduced a femtosecond laser combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery and evaluated the safety and efficacy of using this technique. Sixty-six patients with soft-nucleus cataracts ranging from grade 1~3 were divided into 3 groups based on nuclear staging. Those groups were further divided into three subgroups: femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique (subgroup 1), conventional manual cataract surgery with a non-chopping rotation technique (subgroup 2) and conventional manual cataract surgery with a quick-chop technique (subgroup 3).Patients were followed up at 1, 7, and 30 days after surgery. There was an 84.6% and a 63.34% reduction in ultrasound time and cumulative dissipated energy, respectively, between the subgroup 1 and the subgroup 3; and this was associated with a 36.1% and 29.7% reduction in endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare. There were no adverse events at the follow-up times. With its reduced ultrasound energy, endothelial cell loss and aqueous flare, the femtosecond laser pretreatment combined with a non-chopping rotation technique was more efficient than conventional manual cataract surgery for soft-nucleus cataracts. PMID:26728573

  5. Venturing into the overlap between pediatric orthopaedics and hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Scott H; Zlotolow, Dan A; Ratner, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    There is an overlap between pediatric orthopaedic surgery and hand surgery. A pediatric orthopaedic surgeon is accustomed to the intricacies of the immature skeleton, whereas a hand surgeon is more familiar with the regional anatomy and finer surgical techniques. Many hand diagnoses and surgical techniques are appropriate for the pediatric orthopaedic surgeon, including straightforward duplicated thumb reconstruction of a trigger thumb. Many pediatric diagnoses are more suitable for treatment by a hand surgeon, including simple syndactyly release and complex duplicated thumb reconstruction. Other procedures, such as pollicization, cleft hand reconstruction, synpolydactyly release, and macrodactyly management, require more advanced expertise for successful treatment. It is helpful for pediatric orthopaedic surgeons and hand surgeons to be familiar with the indications, surgical techniques, outcomes, and complications of pediatric hand surgery. PMID:24720302

  6. Optimal incision sites to reduce corneal aberration variations after small incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ling; Zhao, Jiang-Yue; Zhang, Jin-Song; Meng, Jie; Wang, Ming-Wu; Yang, Ya-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ming

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyze the effect of steep meridian small incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery on anterior, posterior and total corneal wavefront aberration. METHODS Steep meridian small incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery was performed in age-related cataract patients which were divided into three groups according to the incision site: 12 o'clock, 9 o'clock and between 9 and 12 o'clock (BENT) incision groups. The preoperative and 3-month postoperative root mean square (RMS) values of anterior, posterior and total corneal wavefront aberration including coma, spherical aberration, and total higher-order aberrations (HOAs), were measured by Pentacam scheimpflug imaging. The mean preoperative and postoperative corneal wavefront aberrations were documented. RESULTS Total corneal aberration and total lower-order aberrations decreased significantly in three groups after operation. RMS value of total HOAs decreased significantly postoperatively in the 12 o'clock incision group (P<0.001). Corneal spherical aberration was statistically significantly lower after steep meridian small incision phacoemulsification cataract surgery in BENT incision group (P<0.05) and Pearson correlation analysis indicated that spherical aberration changes had no significant relationship with total astigmatism changes in all three corneal incision location. CONCLUSION Corneal incision of phacoemulsification cataract surgery can affect corneal wavefront aberration. The 12 o'clock corneal incision eliminated more HOAs and the spherical aberrations decreased in BENT incision group obviously when we selected steep meridian small incision. Cataract lens replacement using wavefront-corrected intraocular lens combined with optimized corneal incision site would improve ocular aberration results. PMID:27162725

  7. Indication for cataract surgery. Do we have evidence of who will benefit from surgery? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kessel, Line; Andresen, Jens; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per; Tendal, Britta; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The need for cataract surgery is expected to rise dramatically in the future due to the increasing proportion of elderly citizens and increasing demands for optimum visual function. The aim of this study was to provide an evidence-based recommendation for the indication of cataract surgery based on which group of patients are most likely to benefit from surgery. A systematic literature search was performed in the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and COCHRANE LIBRARY databases. Studies evaluating the outcome after cataract surgery according to preoperative visual acuity and visual complaints were included in a meta-analysis. We identified eight observational studies comparing outcome after cataract surgery in patients with poor (<20/40) and fair (>20/40) preoperative visual acuity. We could not find any studies that compared outcome after cataract surgery in patients with few or many preoperative visual complaints. A meta-analysis showed that the outcome of cataract surgery, evaluated as objective and subjective visual improvement, was independent on preoperative visual acuity. There is a lack of scientific evidence to guide the clinician in deciding which patients are most likely to benefit from surgery. To overcome this shortage of evidence, many systems have been developed internationally to prioritize patients on waiting lists for cataract surgery, but the Swedish NIKE (Nationell Indikationsmodell för Katarakt Ekstraktion) is the only system where an association to the preoperative scoring of a patient has been related to outcome of cataract surgery. We advise that clinicians are inspired by the NIKE system when they decide which patients to operate to ensure that surgery is only offered to patients who are expected to benefit from cataract surgery. PMID:26036605

  8. Effect of Oral Lactoferrin on Cataract Surgery Induced Dry Eye: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sneha

    2015-01-01

    Context Cataract surgery is one of the most frequently performed intra-ocular surgeries, of these manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (SICS) is a time tested technique of cataract removal. Any corneal incisional surgery, including cataract surgery, can induce dry eye postoperatively. Various factors have been implicated, of which oneis the inflammation induced by the surgery. Lactoferrin, a glycoprotein present in tears is said to have anti-inflammatory effects, and promotes cell growth. It has been used orally in patients of immune mediated dry eye to alleviate symptoms. Aim This study was aimed to evaluate the dry eyes induced by manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery, and the effect if any, of oral lactoferrin on the dry eyes. Settings and Trial Design A single centre, prospective randomised controlled trial with a concurrent parallel design. The study was carried out on patients presenting in the OPD of Rohilkhand Medical College hospital for cataract surgery. Materials and Methods Sixty four patients of cataract surgery were included in the study. Patients with pre-existing dry eyes, ocular disease or systemic disease predisposing to dry eyes were excluded from the study. The selected patients were assigned into two groups by simple randomisation-Control Group A-32 patients that did not receive oral lactoferrin postoperatively. Group B-32 patients that received oral lactoferrin 350 gm postoperatively from day 1 after SICS. All patients were operated for cataract and their pre and postoperative (on days 7, 14, 30 and 60) dry eye status was assessed using the mean tear film break-up time (tBUT) and Schirmer test 1 (ST 1) as the evaluating parameters. Subjective evaluation of dry eye was done using Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) scoring. Data was analysed for 58 patients, as 6 did not complete the follow up. Statistical Analysis Unpaired t-test was used to calculate the p-values. Result There was a statistically significant difference between the t

  9. Retrograde intrarenal surgery in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Resorlu, Berkan; Sancak, Eyup Burak; Resorlu, Mustafa; Gulpinar, Murat Tolga; Adam, Gurhan; Akbas, Alpaslan; Ozdemir, Huseyin

    2014-11-01

    Urinary tract stone disease is seen at a level of 1%-2% in childhood (< 18 years). In recent years, however, there has been a marked increased in pediatric stone disease, particularly in adolescence. A carbohydrate- and salt-heavy diet and a more sedentary lifestyle are implicated in this increase. Although stone disease is rare in childhood, its presence is frequently associated with metabolic or anatomical disorders or infectious conditions, for which reason there is a high possibility of post-therapeutic recurrence. Factors such as a high possibility of recurrence and increasing incidence further enhance the importance of minimally invasive therapeutic options in children, with their expectations of a long life. In children in whom active stone removal is decided on, the way to achieve the highest level of success with the least morbidity is to select the most appropriate treatment modality. Thanks to today's advanced technology, renal stones that were once treated only by surgery can now be treated with minimally invasive techniques, from invasion of the urinary system in an antegrade (percutaneous nephrolithotomy) or retrograde (retrograde intrarenal surgery) manner or shock wave lithotripsy to laparoscopic stone surgery. This compilation study examined studies involving the RIRS procedure, the latest minimally invasive technique, in children and compared the results of those studies with those from other techniques. PMID:25374812

  10. Astigmatism after cataract surgery: nylon versus Mersilene. Five-year data.

    PubMed

    Drews, R C

    1995-01-01

    This is a follow-up of a previous study that evaluated astigmatism after cataract surgery. In that study with a six-month follow-up, there was no statistically significant difference in astigmatism between eyes with nylon sutures and those with polyester fiber (Mersilene) sutures. This article reports the five-year data on this series of eyes. PMID:7722909

  11. Experimental studies on the usage possibilities of the holmium laser in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Tadeusz; Kecik, Dariusz; Kasprzak, Jan; Pratnicki, Antoni; Jankiewicz, Zdzislaw; Zajac, Andrzej

    1996-03-01

    The authors present initial investigations of used holmium laser during experimental cataract surgery. The investigations were performed 'in vitro' and 'in vivo.' The presented results of the experiments show that structure of the lens can be emulsified with the use of the holmium laser.

  12. Three Cases of Post-Cataract Surgery Endophthalmitis Due to Rhizobium (Agrobacterium) radiobacter

    PubMed Central

    Moreau-Gaudry, Viviane; Chiquet, Christophe; Boisset, Sandrine; Croize, Jacques; Benito, Yvonne; Cornut, Pierre Loïc; Bron, Alain; Vandenesch, François

    2012-01-01

    We present three unrelated post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis cases caused by Rhizobium radiobacter, hospitalized in three different hospitals. Early diagnosis was obtained in two cases by bacterial DNA detection in vitreous samples. All patients recovered from infection, but pars plana vitrectomy was needed in two patients due to rapid clinical deterioration. PMID:22259203

  13. Three cases of post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis due to Rhizobium (Agrobacterium) radiobacter.

    PubMed

    Moreau-Gaudry, Viviane; Chiquet, Christophe; Boisset, Sandrine; Croize, Jacques; Benito, Yvonne; Cornut, Pierre Loïc; Bron, Alain; Vandenesch, François; Maurin, Max

    2012-04-01

    We present three unrelated post-cataract surgery endophthalmitis cases caused by Rhizobium radiobacter, hospitalized in three different hospitals. Early diagnosis was obtained in two cases by bacterial DNA detection in vitreous samples. All patients recovered from infection, but pars plana vitrectomy was needed in two patients due to rapid clinical deterioration. PMID:22259203

  14. [The pros and cons of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Li, Z H; Ye, Z

    2016-02-11

    Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is known as an innovative new technology. Compared with traditional surgical approach, FLACS is more accurate, more predictable and less energy used. However, in the current stage of development, there still may be intraoperative and postoperative complications, or even serious complications. FLACS has obvious advantages in certain surgical steps, but there are still clear disadvantages, so it still cannot completely replace the traditional phacoemulsification surgery. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 89-92). PMID:26906702

  15. Cataracts - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... cataract surgery? Is the cataract removed with a laser? Will I need a lens implant? Are there different types of lens implants? What are the risks of cataract surgery? What happens after cataract surgery? Will I have ...

  16. Causes of subnormal vision in patients following cataract surgery at a tertiary hospital in Kashmir.

    PubMed

    Ahangar, Andleeb; Sufi, Aalia Rasool; Nabi, Mushood; Rather, Muddasar Hassan

    2014-10-01

    Cataract surgery is aimed at restoring sight to near normal vision. This study, conducted at the Department of Ophthalmology, Government Medical College, Srinagar, is an attempt to determine the causes of subnormal vision in patients following cataract surgery at a tertiary hospital in Kashmir. One hundred patients who underwent cataract surgery with an unaided visual acuity of <6/9 at 16 weeks postoperatively were included in the study. Postoperative follow-up examinations were conducted until the 16th week. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were recorded to determine the cause of subnormal vision. Of 100 patients, 40 underwent extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE), 30 underwent small incision cataract surgery (SICS) and 30 underwent phacoemulsification. Seventy-five percent of the patients who underwent ECCE had postoperative astigmatism with a mean astigmatism of 2.2 ± 0.81 diopters at 16 weeks, with the majority having with-the-rule astigmatism. In the SICS group, 17 (56.6 %) patients had a mean postoperative astigmatism of 0.75 ± 0.40 diopters, with the majority (82.3 %) having against-the-rule (ATR) astigmatism. In the phacoemulsification group, 13 (43.3 %) of the patients had a mean postoperative astigmatism of 0.48 ± 0.23 diopters with the majority having ATR astigmatism. Other causes of subnormal vision were pseudophakic ametropia, posterior capsular opacity and intraoperative complications like posterior capsular rent and vitreous loss. Postoperative astigmatism was the major cause of subnormal vision with greater astigmatism seen in the ECCE group. Therefore, procedures like smaller incision sutureless surgery and careful biometry are advocated to improve visual outcome and patient satisfaction. PMID:24522881

  17. [Perioperative ocular surface evaluation and management in meibomian gland dysfunction patients undergoing cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Liang, Qingfeng; Dong, Zhe; Wang, Ningli

    2014-04-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is one of the most common conditions in the elderly. Most of MGD patients undergoing cataract surgery were found to have significant dry eye symptoms and ocular surface disease. The severe cases with ocular surface disease are also at higher risk of postoperative complications, namely infections and corneal ulcers. To improve the operation effect and achieve the best visual outcome and life quality in cataract patients, it is important to evaluate the ocular surface and meibomian glands in MGD patients preoperatively, pay attention to the intraoperative care and detect the postoperative complications carefully and use medicine properly. PMID:24931148

  18. Cataract surgery in the management of the late complications of lepromatous leprosy in South Korea.

    PubMed Central

    Ffytche, T J

    1981-01-01

    Clinical examination of 113 patients in South Korea with lepromatous leprosy and severe visual impairment showed that the main cause of visual loss was the combined effect of corneal and lens opacities associated with small nonreacting pupils and iris atrophy. Cataract surgery with broad iridectomy and inferior sphincterotomy offers these patients with chronic lepromatous complications the best chance of preserving vision. Eighty-one cataract operations were performed under local anaesthesia, and in 90% vision improved; in 60% this improvement was 2 Snellen's lines or more. Images PMID:7236567

  19. [Sealed-capsule irrigation during cataract surgery to prevent posterior capsule opacification].

    PubMed

    Kluś, Adam; Rekas, Marek; Rudowicz, Jacek; Stankiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of isolated use of pharmacological agents to selectively destroy anterior capsule epithelial cells and avoid toxic side effects on other tissues has become the aim of numerous research studies. Creation of a precise, tight, safe system which would allow delivery of pharmaceutical agents into the lens capsule following cataract extraction seems to be a solution. Thus, the aim of our study is to present a surgical technique preventing the development of posterior capsule opacification (PCO) after cataract surgery with the use of sealed-capsule irrigation system (SCI)--Perfect Capsule device. PMID:19517850

  20. A comparison of two ophthalmic steroid-antibiotic combinations after cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    van Endt, J J; Veraart, H G; Kramer, R; Janssen, A G; Sunder Raj, P

    1997-01-01

    We performed this prospective, randomised, investigator-masked, parallel-group study to compare Fluorometholone-Gentamicin eye drops with Maxitrol (dexamethasone, neomycin, polymyxin B) eye drops in the reduction of ocular bacterial flora and control of ocular inflammation after cataract surgery. One hundred and twelve (FML-Genta 54, Maxitrol 58) patients of both sexes undergoing cataract and posterior chamber lens implant surgery for visually disabling cataract were enrolled in the study and examined pre-operatively and post-operatively on days 1, 6-8 and 24-34. The baseline parameters were similar in the two study groups. The conjunctival bacterial colony count on day 6-8 post-operatively was significantly less on FML-Genta compared with Maxitrol (p = 0.033). There was no statistically significant difference between the two treatments in the degree of intra-ocular inflammation as assessed by flare and cells in the anterior chamber. Both treatments were judged to be equal in the global assessment of the success of therapy and local tolerance by the study patients and doctors. Fluorometholone-gentamicin eye drops were more effective than Maxitrol eye drops in the reduction of ocular bacterial flora while being as well-tolerated and as effective as Maxitrol in the control of ocular inflammation after cataract surgery. PMID:9243217

  1. Impact of tamsulosin exposure on late complications following cataract surgery: retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    González-Martín-Moro, Julio; González-López, Julio José; Gómez-Sanz, Fernando; Zarallo-Gallardo, Jesús; Cobo-Soriano, Rosario

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the impact of tamsulosin intake on five postoperative cataract surgery complications (toxic anterior segment syndrome, rebound uveitis, retinal detachment, macular edema, and postoperative endophthalmitis). This retrospective cohort study was conducted at University Hospital of Henares. The study included 660-eyes of 660 patients submitted to cataract surgery at the ophthalmology unit of Hospital del Henares (Madrid) between 2 March 2009 and 28 February 2010. Extracapsular cataract extraction, combined glaucoma and cataract surgery phacovitrectomy, posterior capsule rupture and zonular damage were considered exclusion criteria. Clinical charts were reviewed during July 2012. Patients were divided in two groups (exposed and non-exposed to tamsulosin). Cumulative incidence of toxic anterior segment syndrome, rebound uveitis, retinal detachment, macular edema and postoperative endophthalmitis were compared in both groups. Rebound uveitis (relative risk [RR] 3.39; confidence interval [CI] 1.63-7.08) and macular edema (RR 4.15; CI 1.06-16.22) were more common in the tamsulosin-exposed group. Retinal detachment had a similar incidence in both groups. We observed no cases of endophthalmitis or toxic anterior segment syndrome in either of the two groups. Tamsulosin exposure in this cohort was associated with a higher risk of rebound uveitis and macular edema but the other three studied postoperative complications had a similar incidence in both groups. PMID:24158613

  2. A Case of Decreased Visual Field after Uneventful Cataract Surgery: Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report a case of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) after uneventful cataract surgery. A 53-year-old Filipina underwent cataract surgery. She had a small optic disc with cup-to-disc ratio of 0.2 in the left eye and 0.3 in the right eye. On the first postoperative day, the uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was 20/20, with an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 20 mmHg in the left eye. At one week after operation, the UCVA was 20/20 and the IOP was 15 mmHg. Three weeks later, she underwent cataract surgery in the right eye. On the first postoperative day, her UCVA was 20/20 in both eyes, but she complained of a visual field decrease in the left eye. A relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) was noted and the optic disc was pallid and swollen diffusely. A red-free photo showed defect surrounding the optic disc. A visual field test showed tunnel vision sparing the central vision. In this report, the authors hypothesize an association between cataract extraction and delayed NAION. Since the risk of NAION in the fellow eye is 30-50%, visual acuity, visual field, fundus exam and RAPD should be routinely checked. PMID:20157417

  3. Tenon's Cyst Presenting as a Long-Term Complication following Incision Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Krishnacharya, Prabhakar Srinivasapuram

    2013-01-01

    Context. Tenon's cyst or conjunctival cyst formation is not uncommon late complication of traditional extracapsular cataract surgery; however, few reports are available in the literature. Aims. Large cystic swellings were clinically diagnosed as filtering blebs at the cataract incision site in two patients. The purpose of the case presentation is to discuss the factors leading to cyst formation, visual loss and cyst recurrence after its excision. Patients and Methods. Case 1. Sixty-one-year-old male patient presented with a bleb at superior limbal region in the right eye, two years after cataract surgery. Case 2. A giant bleb was found at the same region in the right eye of a 65-year-old male patient, eight years after cataract surgery. Results. Complete excision of the cyst was performed with conjunctival autograft in the first patient and followed up for two years. No recurrence of the cyst was observed. Internal wound gaping was seen on gonioscopy in the second patient. Conclusions. Unstable scleral tunnel could explain bleb formation in both the patients. Complete bleb excision with conjunctival auto-graft resulted in closure of the defect with no bleb recurrence during two-year follow-up. Over-filtration causing hypotonic maculopathy was the reason for decreased vision in the second case. PMID:24348577

  4. A case of decreased visual field after uneventful cataract surgery: nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je; Ma, Kyoung Tak

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to report a case of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) after uneventful cataract surgery. A 53-year-old Filipina underwent cataract surgery. She had a small optic disc with cup-to-disc ratio of 0.2 in the left eye and 0.3 in the right eye. On the first postoperative day, the uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was 20/20, with an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 20 mmHg in the left eye. At one week after operation, the UCVA was 20/20 and the IOP was 15 mmHg. Three weeks later, she underwent cataract surgery in the right eye. On the first postoperative day, her UCVA was 20/20 in both eyes, but she complained of a visual field decrease in the left eye. A relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) was noted and the optic disc was pallid and swollen diffusely. A red-free photo showed defect surrounding the optic disc. A visual field test showed tunnel vision sparing the central vision. In this report, the authors hypothesize an association between cataract extraction and delayed NAION. Since the risk of NAION in the fellow eye is 30-50%, visual acuity, visual field, fundus exam and RAPD should be routinely checked. PMID:20157417

  5. Comparison of surgically induced astigmatism between one-handed and two-handed cataract surgery techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Asushi; Kurosaka, Daijiro; Yoshida, Aktoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) between one-handed and two-handed cataract surgery techniques. Methods Eighty-eight eyes of 44 patients with no ocular disease other than cataract, who underwent cataract surgery by a single surgeon, were selected for this study. Cataract surgery was performed by coaxial phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation via a 2.4 mm transconjunctival single-plane sclerocorneal incision at the 12 o’clock position. In each patient, one eye was subjected to coaxial phacoemulsification using a one-handed technique while the fellow eye was subjected to coaxial phacoemulsification using a two-handed technique. For the two-handed technique, a corneal side port was created at the 2 o’clock position. The appropriate incision meridian was identified by a preoperative axis mark. SIA was calculated using the Alpins method. Results Mean SIA was 0.40 ± 0.28 diopters (D) in the one-handed technique group and 0.39 ± 0.25 D in the two-handed technique group. No statistically significant difference was found in the mean SIA score. The mean torque value was −0.05 ± 0.26 D in the one-handed technique group and 0.11 ± 0.37 D in the two-handed technique group. Mean torque was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the one-handed technique group than in the two-handed technique group. Conclusion The results indicate that the corneal side port in two-handed cataract surgery has a rotating effect on the axis of astigmatism. PMID:24124349

  6. The laparotomy incision: a technique to facilitate capsulorhexis in microincision cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Jeremy C; O'Connell, Eamon D; Sciscio, Andrea; Mulhern, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    Microincision cataract surgery is a new technique in the development of cataract surgery and is not without difficulties. Creation of the continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis as performed in conventional coaxial phacoemulsification surgery does not apply as readily. The authors describe a method for initiating the continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (the laparotomy incision) using only an inexpensive 25-gauge bent needle cystototome. The technique involves a long linear incision in the anterior capsule down the belly of the lens as a means of initiating the capsulorhexis. Advantages of the technique include the creation of a large capsular flap, which allows easier completion of the continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis through a smaller range of movement, avoiding "oar locking" in the small incision and creation of striae in the cornea. It also allows better maintenance of anterior chamber depth, minimizing risk of radial tears. PMID:19065989

  7. The distribution of cataract surgery services in a public health eye care program in Nepal.

    PubMed

    Marseille, E; Brand, R

    1997-11-01

    The cost-effectiveness of public health cataract programs in low-income countries has been well documented. Equity, another important dimension of program quality which has received less attention is analyzed here by comparisons of surgical coverage rates for major sub-groups within the intended beneficiary population of the Nepal blindness program (NBP). Substantial differences in surgical coverage were found between males and females and between different age groups of the same gender. Among the cataract blind, the surgical coverage of males was 70% higher than that of females. For both genders, the cataract blind over 55 received proportionately fewer services than younger people blind from cataract. Blind males aged 45-54 had a 500% higher rate of surgical coverage than blind males over 65. Blind females aged 35-44 had nearly a 600% higher rate of surgical coverage than blind females over 65. There was wide variation in overall surgical coverage between geographic zones, but little variation by terrain type, an indicator of the logistical difficulties in delivery of services. Members of the two highest caste groupings had somewhat lower surgical coverage than members of lower castes. Program managers should consider developing methods to increase services to women and to those over 65. Reaching these populations will become increasingly important as those most readily served receive surgery and members of the under-served groups form a growing portion of the remaining cataract backlog. PMID:10175620

  8. Modern cataract surgery: unfinished business and unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Apple, David J; Escobar-Gomez, Marcela; Zaugg, Brian; Kleinmann, Guy; Borkenstein, Andreas F

    2011-01-01

    We summarize information, based on clinicopathologic studies over the past decade, on various cataract intraocular lens (IOL) procedures and modern "specialized" IOLs, that will help surgeons continuously improve long-term results for cataract patients. Although most operations do initially provide excellent refractive correction and visual rehabilitation, late complications occur. These sometimes are missed because they are outside of the routine period of follow-up care. We have tried to determine if the various techniques and IOLs truly deliver the long-term results that we desire. Most safety and efficacy information is derived from the manufacturer and is passed through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This is often based on limited, relatively short-term observations made by the manufacturer. After a lens receives FDA approval, there are few means to assess the outcome of each procedure and lens years later. We rarely hear of a 10- or 20-year follow-up study. We have found that one of the best means to assess long-term results is pathologic analyses. We discuss recently studied aspects of pathologic reactions, such as posterior capsule opacification, intracapsular fibrosis, glistenings, intralenticular opacification, and other issues with the various IOL platforms; we then present a clinicopathological overview of tissues and IOLs from our database. These include hydrophobic and hydrophilic acrylic designs, plate lenses, and a dual optic lens. PMID:22117905

  9. Outcomes of cataract surgery in a rural and urban south Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Vijaya, Lingam; George, Ronnie; A, Rashima; Raju, Prema; Arvind, Hemamalini; Baskaran, Mani; Ve, Ramesh S

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the visual outcome after cataract surgery in a south Indian population. Materials and Methods: Population-based cross-sectional study of subjects aged 40 years or more. Three thousand nine hundred and twenty-four rural subjects from 27 contiguous villages and 3850 urban subjects from five randomly selected divisions were studied. All subjects underwent a comprehensive ophthalmic examination that included visual acuity, refraction, slit-lamp biomicroscopy, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, and dilated retinal examination. Statistical Analysis: Chi square test, t test and multivariate analysis were used. Results: Five hundred and twenty-eight (216 males, 312 females, 781 eyes) rural subjects (13.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 12.4% to 14.6%) and 406 (197 males, 209 females, 604 eyes) urban subjects (10.5%, 95% CI 9.6-11.5%) had undergone cataract surgery. Outcome of cataract surgery was defined based on visual acuity. Using best-corrected visual acuity for classification, the single most important cause for visual impairment was cystoid macular edema in the aphakic group and posterior capsule opacification in the pseudophakic group. Aphakia (visual acuity of <20/60 to ≤20/400 - odds ratio (OR) 1.8; 95% CI 1.3 to 2.6%, visual acuity of <20/400 - OR 6.2; 95% 4.0 to 9.8%), rural residence (visual acuity of <20/60 to ≤20/400 - OR 3.2; 95% CI 2.2 to 4.5% and visual acuity of <20/400 - OR OR 3.5; 95% CI 2.3 to 5.5%) were associated with visual impairment. The urban cataract-operated population had significantly more pseudophakics (P < 0.001), men (P = 0.02) and literates (P < 0.001). In the rural group the prevalence of cataract surgery (13.5% vs. 10.5%, P < 0.001) and number of people that had undergone cataract surgery within three years prior to examination (P < 0.001) were significantly greater. In 30% of rural and 16% of urban subjects uncorrected refraction was the cause of visual impairment. Conclusions: Surgery-related complications were

  10. Visual and Refractive Outcomes after Cataract Surgery with Implantation of a New Toric Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Mazzini, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate and report the visual, refractive and aberrometric outcomes of cataract surgery with implantation of the new aspheric Tecnis ZCT toric intraocular lens (IOL) in eyes with low to moderate corneal astigmatism. Methods We conducted a prospective study of 19 consecutive eyes of 17 patients (mean age: 78 years) with a visually significant cataract and moderate corneal astigmatism [higher than 1 diopter (D)] undergoing cataract surgery with implantation of the aspheric Tecnis ZCT toric IOL (Abbott Medical Optics). Visual, refractive and aberrometric changes were evaluated during a 6-month follow-up. Ocular aberrations as well as IOL rotation were evaluated by means of the OPD-Station II (Nidek). Results The six-month postoperative spherical equivalent and power vector components of the refractive cylinder were within ±0.50 D in all eyes (100%). Postoperative logMAR uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuities (UDVA/CDVA) were 0.1 (about 20/25) or better in almost all eyes (94.74%). The mean logMAR CDVA improved significantly from 0.41 ± 0.23 to 0.02 ± 0.05 (p < 0.01). No significant changes were found in corneal astigmatism (p = 0.73). The mean IOL rotation was 3.33 ± 1.94°. This parameter did not correlate with higher-order aberrations (r = −0.09, p = 0.73). A significant improvement in the Strehl ratio was also observed (p < 0.01), which was consistent with the significant reduction in higher-order aberrations (p = 0.02). Conclusion Cataract surgery with implantation of the aspheric Tecnis ZCT IOL is a predictable and effective procedure for visual rehabilitation in eyes with cataract and low to moderate corneal astigmatism, providing an excellent postoperative ocular optical quality. PMID:23898293

  11. Indications and clinical outcome of capsular tension ring (CTR) implantation: A review of 9528 cataract surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Tribus, Claudia; Alge, Claudia S; Haritoglou, Christos; Lackerbauer, Carlo; Kampik, Anselm; Mueller, Arthur; Priglinger, Siegfried G

    2007-01-01

    Background: To report the indications and clinical outcomes of all capsular tension ring (CTR) implantations in a large series of consecutive cataract surgeries during a five year interval in a university eye hospital. Methods: The study was designed as a restrospective analysis of a consecutive series of 9528 cataract surgeries. The records were checked for cases in which a CTR was implanted. The indications and clinical outcomes of CTR implantation were documented and an evaluation of posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL) insertion, position, and centration. Results: In this series, a CTR was implanted in 69 eyes of 67 patients. The indications were advanced or mature cataract in 40, post-traumatic cataract in 23, pseudoexfoliation syndrome in 4 and subluxated lens in 2 eyes. PCIOL implantation in the capsular bag was possible in 61 (90%) of these 69 eyes. In 5 (7%) additional eyes, PCIOL implantation in the ciliary sulcus was accomplished. In one eye (1%) no IOL implantation was performed because of high myopia. In only two of 69 eyes (2%), an anterior chamber intraocular lens had to be inserted despite prior CTR implantation. In 5 eyes (5%), a slight dislocation of the IOL was noted postoperatively, but none of these patients complained of visually relevant symptoms (eg, monocular diplopia). Conclusions: According to our experience CTRs are used very infrequently (0.7%), but remain useful in cataract surgeries with difficult preoperative or intraoperative conditions. If zonulolysis is less than two quadrants in extent, implantation of a PCIOL was possible in 98% of cases. Implantation of CTRs with special designs may have additional advantages (eg, inhibition of posterior capsule opacity) and warrant further investigation. PMID:19668468

  12. Deep sclerectomy in pediatric glaucoma filtering surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bayoumi, N H L

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study the additive value of deep sclerectomy to the procedure of combined trabeculotomy—trabeculectomy with mitomycin C (CTTM) for the treatment of primary congenital glaucoma. Study design This study is a prospective, randomized case series. Patients and methods The study was conducted on 20 eyes of 20 children with primary congenital glaucoma presenting to the Department of Ophthalmology of the Alexandria Main University Hospital. Preoperative examination under anesthesia was followed by surgical intervention. Postoperative examinations were conducted immediately after surgery and at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Intraoperative and postoperative complications, as well as operative time, were recorded. Results The mean (±SD, range) age of the study patients in the CTTM group and in the combined trabeculotomy–trabeculectomy with mitomycin C with deep sclerectomy (CTTM-DS) group was 4.7 (±2.0, 2–8) and 7.0 (±3.8, 3–13) months, respectively. The mean (±SD, range) preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) in the CTTM and CTTM-DS groups was 16.7 (4.3, 10–26) and 16.4 (8.4, 8–36), respectively, and these dropped at 12 months of follow-up to 4.9 (2.0, 2–8) and 5.6 (3.3, 2–10), respectively. The mean (±SD, range) of the duration of the operation in the CTTM and the CTTM-DS was 57 (±8, 50–71) min and 53 (±7, 42–64) min, respectively (P=0.428). Two eyes (20%) in the CTTM-DS group developed hypotony disc edema at the first 2 months and resolved spontaneously thereafter. No other complications were noted in either of the groups. Conclusion The addition of deep sclerectomy to the procedure of CTTM in pediatric glaucoma surgery facilitates the finding of Schlemm's canal, shortens the duration of surgery, and is not associated with any additional complications. Hence, the author recommends the addition of deep sclerectomy to CTTM surgery for primary congenital glaucoma. PMID:23060025

  13. Safety and efficacy of manual small incision cataract surgery for phacolytic glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Tan, Colin S H; Kumar, Thangavel Thirumalai; Ravindran, Ravilla D

    2007-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the safety, visual outcome and complications of manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) in the treatment of patients with phacolytic glaucoma. Methods In a nonrandomised interventional case series, 33 consecutive patients with phacolytic glaucoma underwent cataract extraction by MSICS, with staining of the anterior capsule by trypan blue. Results The mean preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) was 46.2 mmHg. No significant intraoperative complications such as posterior capsule rupture or expulsive hemorrhage occurred. In 31 patients (93.9%), an intraocular lens (IOL) was implanted in the posterior chamber. In two of 33 patients (6.1%), the posterior capsule was removed and the patient was left aphakic because of severe pre‐existing zonulysis. The postoperative best‐corrected visual acuity was 20/60 or better in 29 cases (87.9%) and 20/40 or better in 26 patients (78.8%). The IOP was 22 mmHg or less in all 33 cases without the use of anti‐glaucoma medications and the mean IOP was 15.1 mmHg (range, 7–22, SD ± 3.9). Postoperative corneal edema occurred in 11 cases (33.3%) and anterior chamber inflammation was present in nine cases (27.3%). Both conditions resolved with standard medical therapy. Conclusion Manual small incision cataract surgery with trypan blue staining of the anterior capsule is a safe and effective method of cataract extraction for patients with phacolytic glaucoma. PMID:17322465

  14. Measuring the "fifth vital sign" in cataract surgery patients--is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Henry, Cynthia; Navarro, Victoria; Jun, Albert; Annaberdyev, Shohrat

    2006-01-01

    As an ophthalmic nurse, you may wonder why it is so important to assess and manage the pain, or "fifth vital sign" of cataract surgery patients. How much pain could a patient experience as a result of a relatively short procedure? In January 2004, while reviewing the pain levels of 135 outpatient surgery patients undergoing cataract surgery, 21% of the patients reported pain. Twelve percent (12%) experienced mild pain and 9% experienced moderate to severe pain. Pain relief was recorded in 38% of cases. It was noted that there was no pain reassessment recorded by nurses in 62% of cases, demonstrating a deficit in pain assessment and documentation. At our institution, the Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital, there is a pain assessment and management policy that requires a postoperative pain goal be identified prior to any surgical procedure. Hospital guidelines should be followed for documentation of pain in the outpatient setting. To improve the quality of pain assessment and documentation, and to meet the hospital compliance rate of 85%, an audit was performed on 60 outpatient cataract surgery charts over a one-month period. An initial compliance rate of 83% was established. After staff education and changes to the critical pathway, a re-audit demonstrated an increase to 95% in pain assessment and documentation. PMID:17253012

  15. Comparison of Perioperative Ranibizumab Injections for Diabetic Macular Edema in Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the efficacy of perioperative ranibizumab injections on diabetic macular edema (DME) in patients undergoing cataract surgery. Methods. This study included 59 eyes of 59 patients. All patients had advanced cataract with DME and underwent an uneventful phacoemulsification surgery. There were 3 subgroups. The first group received intravitreal ranibizumab injection 2 weeks preoperatively, the second group received intraoperatively, and the third group received 2 weeks postoperatively. Follow-up examinations were performed at 1 week as well as at 1 and 3 months. Results. Baseline visual acuity showed a significant increase in all groups at 1 month. In group 1, compared to baseline value, foveal thickness (FT) increased significantly at 1 month and showed a significant decrease up to month 3. In group 2, FT increased at month 1 and this continued up to month 3. In group 3, FT increased at month 1 and was almost stable up to month 3. There were not any significant differences for visual acuity and FT between the groups. Conclusions. Although intrapostoperative ranibizumab injection for DME seems to be more effective than preoperative injections in patients undergoing cataract surgery, the treatment still needs to be continued following surgery. PMID:27493795

  16. Treatment costs of cystoid macular edema among patients following cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schmier, Jordana K; Covert, David W; Hulme-Lowe, Carolyn K; Mullins, Anmol; Mahlis, Emmanuel M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The current costs of treating cystoid macular edema (CME), a complication that can follow cataract surgery, are largely unknown. This analysis estimates the treatment costs for CME based on the recently released US Medicare data. Setting Nationally representative database. Design Retrospective analysis of the 2011 through 2013 Medicare 5% Beneficiary Encrypted Files. Methods Beneficiaries who underwent cataract surgery were identified and stratified by diagnosis of CME (cases) or no diagnosis of CME (controls) within 6 months following surgery. Claims and reimbursements for ophthalmic care were identified. Subgroup analyses explored the rates of CME in beneficiaries based on the presence of selected comorbidities and by the type of procedure (standard vs complex). Total Medicare and ophthalmic costs for cases and controls are presented. The analysis explored the effect of considering diabetic macular edema (DME) and macular edema (ME) as exclusion criteria. Results Of 78,949 beneficiaries with cataract surgery, 2.54% (n=2,003) were diagnosed with CME. One-third of beneficiaries had one or more conditions affecting retinal health (including diabetes), 4.5% of whom developed CME. The rate of CME, at 22.5%, was much higher for those patients with preoperative DME or ME. Ophthalmic charges were almost twice as high for cases compared with controls (US$10,410 vs $5,950); payments averaged 85% higher ($2,720 vs $1,470) (both P<0.0001). Conclusion Substantial costs can be associated with CME; beneficiaries whose retinas are already compromised before cataract surgery face higher risk. Cost savings could be realized with the use of therapies that reduce the risk of developing CME. Future analyses could identify whether and to what extent comorbidities influence costs. PMID:27041989

  17. Modelling lifetime cost consequences of ReSTOR® in cataract surgery in four European countries

    PubMed Central

    Lafuma, Antoine; Berdeaux, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    Background To compare the lifetime costs of liberating patients from spectacles after cataract surgery by implanting the multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) 'ReSTOR®' versus monofocal IOLs in France, Italy, Germany and Spain. Methods A Markov model was created to follow patient cohorts from cataract surgery until death. Prevalence rates of patients not needing spectacles after cataract surgery were obtained from clinical trials. Resource utilisation included implant surgery, IOLs, spectacles, visits to ophthalmologists and eye centres, transport, and time lost by patients. Economic perspectives were those of Society and Sickness Funds (SFs). Results The mean number of spectacles purchased after ReSTOR® was 1.34–1.61 and after monofocal IOLs 6.05–7.27. From the societal perspective, total cost estimates discounted by 3% were between €3,551 and €4,052 with ReSTOR® compared to €3,989 and €5,548 with monofocal IOLs. Undiscounted savings related to ReSTOR® ranged from €815 to €2,164. From the SFs' perspective total cost estimates discounted by 3% were between €2,150 and €2,524 with ReSTOR® compared to €2,324 and €2,610 with monofocal IOLs. Savings related to ReSTOR®, once costs discounted, ranged from €61 to €219. Discount and spectacle freedom prevalence rates were the most sensitive parameters. Conclusion The bulk of the savings related to ReSTOR® were realized outside the SF. From both a societal and SF perspective, savings, after a 3% discounting, achieved by liberating patients from spectacles counterbalanced the initially higher cost of ReSTOR®. ReSTOR® is a cost saving alternative to spectacles for patients requiring cataract surgery. PMID:18627594

  18. Safety of undiluted intracameral moxifloxacin without postoperative topical antibiotics in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Andrew Xingyu; Messenger, Wyatt Boyer; Sargent, Steven; Ambati, Balamurali Krishna

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the safety of undiluted 0.5 % intracameral moxifloxacin for postoperative endophthalmitis prophylaxis in cataract surgery patients without the use of additional postoperative topical antibiotics. All phacoemulsification cataract surgeries performed by a single surgeon (B.A.) at the John A. Moran Eye Center from June 2012 to May 2015 were reviewed retrospectively. From June 2012 to April 2014, patients were given topical 0.5 % moxifloxacin postoperatively. From May 2014 to May 2015, all patients were given moxifloxacin intracamerally with no antibiotics postoperatively. The follow-up period was 1 month after surgery. Preoperative visual acuity and postoperative visual acuity, corneal edema, and anterior chamber reaction were recorded and compared between the two groups. 384 cataract surgeries were performed during the study period. None of the 384 eyes in the study developed endophthalmitis. Of those 384 eyes, 222 were included in the study for analysis based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. 131 were part of the topical antibiotic group and 91 were part of the intracameral group. The differences in uncorrected visual acuity at 1 day postoperatively (p = 0.595) and best corrected visual acuity at 1 month postoperatively (p = 0.099) were not statistically significant. Differences in corneal edema (p = 0.370) and anterior chamber reaction (p = 0.069) at 1 day postoperatively and corneal edema (p = 0.512) and anterior chamber reaction (p = 0.512) at 1 month postoperatively were also not statistically significant. Undiluted 0.5 % moxifloxacin can be safely injected intracamerally following cataract surgery without additional postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent endophthalmitis without adverse effects on patient outcomes. PMID:26577588

  19. Visual Acuity Outcomes of Toric Lens Implantation in Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgery at a Residency Training Program.

    PubMed

    Sundy, Meryl; McKnight, Dustin; Eck, Craig; Rieger, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ophthalmology residents must become competent in the use of a variety of intraocular lenses (IOLs) and refractive technologies designed to reduce spectacle use after cataract surgery. Our study of visual acuity outcomes with toric IOLs at the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans' Hospital revealed that residents achieved an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/40 or better in 88% of the surgeries they performed, a rate comparable to that reported by other residency programs and by cataract surgeons. PMID:27039489

  20. Transient Corneal Edema is a Predictive Factor for Pseudophakic Cystoid Macular Edema after Uncomplicated Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jae Rock; Oh, Jong-Hyun; Chuck, Roy S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report transient corneal edema after phacoemulsification as a predictive factor for the development of pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME). Methods A total of 150 eyes from 150 patients (59 men and 91 women; mean age, 68.0 ± 10.15 years) were analyzed using spectral domain optical coherence tomography 1 week and 5 weeks after routine phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Transient corneal edema detected 1 week after surgery was analyzed to reveal any significant relationship with the development of PCME 5 weeks after surgery. Results Transient corneal edema developed in 17 (11.3%) of 150 eyes 1 week after surgery. A history of diabetes mellitus was significantly associated with development of transient corneal edema (odds ratio [OR], 4.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.41 to 11.54; p = 0.011). Both diabetes mellitus and transient corneal edema were significantly associated with PCME development 5 weeks after surgery (OR, 4.58; 95% CI, 1.56 to 13.43; p = 0.007; and OR, 6.71; CI, 2.05 to 21.95; p = 0.003, respectively). In the 8 eyes with both diabetes mellitus and transient corneal edema, 4 (50%) developed PCME 5 weeks after surgery. Conclusions Transient corneal edema detected 1 week after routine cataract surgery is a predictive factor for development of PCME. Close postoperative observation and intervention is recommended in patients with transient corneal edema. PMID:25646056

  1. Surgical Site Infections Following Pediatric Ambulatory Surgery: An Epidemiologic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Michael L; Jan, Dominique; Nassim, Janelle; Choi, Jaeun; Choi, Steven J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify surgical site infection (SSI) rates following pediatric ambulatory surgery, SSI outcomes and risk factors, and sensitivity and specificity of SSI administrative billing codes. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of pediatric ambulatory surgeries with International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SSI, and a systematic random sampling of 5% of surgeries without SSI ICD-9 codes, all adjudicated for SSI on the basis of an ambulatory-adapted National Healthcare Safety Network definition. SETTING Urban pediatric tertiary care center April 1, 2009-March 31, 2014. METHODS SSI rates and sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9 codes were estimated using sampling design, and risk factors were analyzed in case-rest of cohort, and case-control, designs. RESULTS In 15,448 pediatric ambulatory surgeries, 34 patients had ICD-9 codes for SSI and 25 met the adapted National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. One additional SSI was identified with systematic random sampling. The SSI rate following pediatric ambulatory surgery was 2.9 per 1,000 surgeries (95% CI, 1.2-6.9). Otolaryngology surgeries demonstrated significantly lower SSI rates compared with endocrine (P=.001), integumentary (P=.001), male genital (P<.0001), and respiratory (P=.01) surgeries. Almost half of patients with an SSI were admitted, 88% received antibiotics, and 15% returned to the operating room. No risk factors were associated with SSI. The sensitivity of ICD-9 codes for SSI following ambulatory surgery was 55.31% (95% CI, 12.69%-91.33%) and specificity was 99.94% (99.89%-99.97%). CONCLUSIONS SSI following pediatric ambulatory surgery occurs at an appreciable rate and conveys morbidity on children. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:931-938. PMID:27121727

  2. [Aberration corrected intraocular lens for microincision cataract surgery (MICS). Intraindividual comparison with a conventional lens - 1-year follow-up].

    PubMed

    Möglich, M; Häberle, H; Pham, D T; Wirbelauer, C

    2009-10-01

    Microincision cataract surgery (MICS) is an important advancement in the field of cataract surgery. This article compares an aberration corrected hydrophilic acrylic intraocular lens (IOL) having a hydrophobic surface for MICS with a one-piece hydrophobic acrylic IOL with respect to capsule sac stability, image quality, and after-cataract formation over the course of 1 year. The operations were performed as bimanual MICS or coaxial phacoemulsification. Overall the results after implantation of the IOL by MICS can be regarded as positive in comparison to the standard operation. PMID:18836727

  3. Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery-current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Dilraj S; Schultz, Tim; Basti, Surendra; Dick, H Burkhard

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) putatively offers several advantages over conventional phacoemulsification. We review the current status of FLACS and discuss the evolution of femtosecond lasers in cataract surgery and the currently available femtosecond laser platforms. We summarize the outcomes of FLACS for corneal wound creation, limbal relaxing incisions, capsulotomy, and lens fragmentation. We discuss surgical planning, preoperative considerations, clinical experiences including the learning curve and postoperative outcomes with FLACS, and also the cost effectiveness of FLACS. We present the intraoperative complications and management of challenging cases where FLACS offers an advantage and also speculate on the future directions with FLACS. Further advancements in laser technology to refine its efficacy, advancement in intraocular lens design to harness the potential benefits of FLACS, and a reduction in cost are needed to establish a clear superiority over conventional phacoemulsification. PMID:26409902

  4. Transzonular vitreous injection vs a single drop compounded topical pharmaceutical regimen after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Bret L; Potvin, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the relative effectiveness of a Tri-Moxi-Vanc intraocular solution injected transzonularly into the vitreous with the topical formulation of Pred-Moxi-Ketor (given for the first week postoperatively) followed by Pred-Ketor (given for weeks 2–4 after surgery). Patients and methods This was a single-site, single-surgeon, prospective, randomized, subject-masked contralateral eye study with an active comparator and was approved by an appropriate ethics committee. Twenty-five subjects with uncomplicated cataract who were scheduled for cataract surgery were enrolled. If surgery was uneventful, subjects received either an injection in that eye or followed a minimum drop postoperative pharmaceutical regimen. The second eye surgery was performed with the opposite treatment. Subjects were followed for 1 month. Measures of interest were the changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) from baseline and the changes in corneal and macular thickness. Subjects were also asked to evaluate pain perception, visual quality, and overall satisfaction with surgery. They were also asked which regimen they preferred. Results IOP was not statistically significantly different between the groups (P=0.81); there was also no statistically significant difference in IOP over time (P=0.74). There was no statistically significant difference in central macular thickness at 1 week and 1 month between the groups (P=0.18). The central corneal thickness was significantly greater 1 day postoperatively relative to baseline, but there was no statistically significant difference between the groups at any time point (P=0.92). The difference in reported pain was also not statistically significantly different between the groups (P=0.67). Satisfaction with surgery was similar for both groups, but significantly more subjects preferred the injection for overall experience (P<0.01). Conclusion Cataract surgery completed with the two pharmaceutical regimens was similar in outcome. Significantly more

  5. Macular edema after cataract surgery in diabetic eyes evaluated by optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Yong; Song, Wen-Jun; Cai, Hong-Yuan; Zhao, Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess quantitative changes of the macula in diabetic eyes after cataract surgery using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and to estimate the incidence of development or worsening of macular edema (ME) in diabetic eyes with or without pre-existing ME. METHODS In this prospective, observational study, 92 eyes of 60 diabetic patients who underwent cataract surgery were evaluated before surgery and 1, 3mo after surgery using OCT. Macular thickness was measured with OCT at nine macular subfields defined by the 9 zones early treatment of diabetic retinopathy study (ETDRS), as well as total macular volume obtained by OCT at 1, 3mo after surgery were compared with baseline features obtained before surgery. In addition, the incidence of development or worsening of ME was analyzed in diabetic eyes with or without pre-existing ME. RESULTS The central subfield mean thickness increased 21.0 µm and 25.5 µm at 1, 3mo follow-up, respectively (P<0.01). The average thickness of inner ring and outer ring increased 14.2 µm and 9.5 µm at 1mo, 18.2 µm and 12.9 µm at 3mo. Central-involved ME developed in 12 eyes at 3mo, including 4 eyes with pre-existing central-involved and 8 eyes with pre-existing non-central involved ME. Pre-existing diabetic macular edema (DME) was significantly associated with central-involved ME development (P<0.001). CONCLUSION A statistically significant increase could be detected in the central subfield as well as perifoveal and parafoveal sectors though the increase was mild. And eyes with pre-operative DME prior to cataract surgery are at higher risk for developing central-involved ME. PMID:26949615

  6. Aqueous Cytokines as Predictors of Macular Edema in Patients with Diabetes following Uncomplicated Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ning; Xu, Bing; Wang, Bingsong; Chu, Liqun; Tang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to ascertain whether cytokines in the aqueous humor can predict macular edema (ME) in diabetic patients following uncomplicated phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Undiluted aqueous humor samples were obtained from 136 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients who underwent cataract surgery. The concentrations of 27 cytokines were measured in aqueous humor using the multiplex bead immunoassay. At the final follow-up examination, 116 patients completed 4 weeks of follow-up, and the incidence of macular edema was 29.31% (34 patients) 4 weeks after cataract surgery. Compared to the ME (−) patients, the concentrations of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) (P < 0.001), IL-6 (P < 0.001), IL-8 (P < 0.001), interferon-induced protein-10 (IP-10) (P = 0.003), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) (P < 0.001), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (P < 0.001) in the ME (+) patients were significantly higher. In addition, the aqueous levels of IL-1β (r = 0.288), IL-6 (r = 0.345), IL-8 (r = 0.256), IP-10 (r = 0.377), MCP-1 (r = 0.423), and VEGF (r = 0.279) were positively correlated with the postoperative foveal center point thickness (FCPT). However, the aqueous levels of IL-10 (P = 0.003) and IL-12 (P = 0.017) were significantly lower in patients with ME. These results suggest IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IP-10, MCP-1, and VEGF may be potential predictors of postoperative macular thickness in patients with diabetes following uncomplicated phacoemulsification cataract surgery. PMID:25811020

  7. Two cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens after uneventful cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Leonard; Trattler, William; Boxer Wachler, Brian S

    2008-11-01

    We report 2 cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens AT50SE and AT52SE intraocular lenses (Eyeonics, Inc.) after uneventful cataract surgery. Both patients had subsequent neodymium:YAG laser capsulotomy treatment that remedied the complication. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of Z syndrome with the Crystalens AT50SE and AT52SE, a unique complication with this type of hinged accommodating intraocular lens. PMID:19006749

  8. Clinical Outcomes after Uncomplicated Cataract Surgery with Implantation of the Tecnis Toric Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Lubiński, Wojciech; Kaźmierczak, Beata; Gronkowska-Serafin, Jolanta; Podborączyńska-Jodko, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the clinical outcomes after uncomplicated cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric toric intraocular lens (IOL) during a 6-month follow-up. Methods. Prospective study including 27 consecutive eyes of 18 patients (mean age: 66.1 ± 11.4 years) with a visually significant cataract and corneal astigmatism ≥ 0.75 D and undergoing uncomplicated cataract surgery with implantation of the Tecnis ZCT toric IOL (Abbott Medical Optics). Visual, refractive, and keratometric outcomes as well as IOL rotation were evaluated during a 6-month follow-up. At the end of the follow-up, patient satisfaction and perception of optical/visual disturbances were also evaluated using a subjective questionnaire. Results. At 6 months after surgery, mean LogMAR uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) were 0.19 ± 0.12 and 0.14 ± 0.10, respectively. Postoperative UDVA of 20/40 or better was achieved in 92.6% of eyes. Mean refractive cylinder decreased significantly from −3.73 ± 1.96 to −1.42 ± 0.88 D (p < 0.001), while keratometric cylinder did not change significantly (p = 0.44). Mean absolute IOL rotation was 1.1 ± 2.4°, with values of more than 5° in only 2 eyes (6.9%). Mean patient satisfaction score was 9.70 ± 0.46, using a scale from 0 (not at all satisfied) to 10 (very satisfied). No postoperative optical/visual disturbances were reported. Conclusion. Cataract surgery with implantation of the Tecnis toric IOL is an effective method of refractive correction in eyes with corneal astigmatism due to the good IOL positional stability, providing high levels of patient's satisfaction. PMID:27022478

  9. Patient participation in free cataract surgery: a cross-sectional study of the low-income elderly in urban China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Haotian; Lin, Duoru; Long, Erping; Jiang, Haofeng; Qu, Bo; Tang, Jinzhu; Lin, Yingfen; Chen, Jingjing; Wu, Xiaohang; Lin, Zhuoling; Li, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Hui; Tan, Xuhua; Luo, Lixia; Liu, Yizhi; Chen, Weirong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the characteristics of the low-income elderly who underwent free cataract surgery and to determine the degree of patient satisfaction with the free cataract surgery programme in urban China. Methods A free cataract surgery management workflow was designed as a poverty relief project in Guangzhou. In this study, participants who underwent free cataract surgery between January and August 2014 received a telephone interview based on a structured questionnaire. Data were collected on patient demographics, resources, health conditions, reasons for undergoing the free surgery and overall evaluation of the free cataract surgery programme. Results Among the 833 participants, the mean surgical age was 76.85±7.46 years (95% CI 76.34 to 77.36), and the male to female ratio was 385:448. The majority (94.31%, 746/791) of patients resided in the main urban districts. Patients underwent surgery 61.08±60.15 months (95% CI 56.17 to 66.00) after becoming aware of the cataract, although 66.83% of them reported that their daily lives were influenced by cataracts. Only 21.5% of the respondents underwent physical examinations that included regular eye screening, and only 6.30% were highly educated patients. Financial problems were the primary reason cited by patients for participating in the free surgery programme. Those patients with a monthly family income of 1000–2999¥ (US$161–482) per capita constituted the largest patient population. The free clinics in the parks and the free cataract surgery were highly rated (9.46 and 9.11 of 10 points) by the beneficiaries. Conclusions The telephone survey revealed a high level of patient satisfaction regarding the free cataract surgery programme. Most of the patients who participated in the programme resided in major urban districts and had poor health awareness and a low level of education. The information provided by this study is crucial for improving and expanding the management of free cataract surgery

  10. Influence of Biometric Variables on Refractive Outcomes after Cataract Surgery in Angle-closure Glaucoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Nam; Lim, Hyung Bin; Lee, Jong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the influence of biometric variables on refractive outcomes after cataract surgery in angle-closure glaucoma (ACG) patients. Methods In this case-control study, 42 ACG patients, 40 open-angle glaucoma (OAG) patients, and 35 controls without glaucoma who had undergone conventional cataract surgery were enrolled consecutively. Electronic medical records, including preoperative biometric variables (keratometric diopter, axial length, anterior chamber depth, and lens thickness), the refractive change (RC), and the absolute value of refractive change (ARC) were reviewed. Results In the control and OAG patients, the anterior chamber depth was negatively correlated with the ARC (r = -0.344, p = 0.043 and r = -0.431, p = 0.006, respectively), whereas there was no correlation in the ACG patients. Lens thickness was positively correlated with the RC, but not with the ARC, in the control and OAG groups (r = 0.391, p = 0.020 and r = 0.501, p = 0.001, respectively). In contrast, lens thickness in the ACG group was not correlated with the RC but was positively correlated with the ARC (r = 0.331, p = 0.032). Conclusions In contrast with the anterior chamber depth, preoperatively measured lens thickness may be a useful predictor of the direction of the RC after cataract surgery in control and OAG patients. However, in ACG patients, a thicker lens was correlated with a larger RC, regardless of the direction of the shift (hyperopic or myopic). PMID:27478355

  11. Cataracts - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about cataracts; Lens implants - what to ask your doctor ... What is a cataract? How will cataract surgery help my vision? If I have cataracts in both eyes, can I have surgery on ...

  12. Cataract removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cataract surgery. In: Spaeth GL. Danensh-Meyer HV, Goldberg I, Kampik A, eds. Ophthalmic Surgery: Principles and ... this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial ...

  13. Efficacy comparison between manual small incision cataract surgery and phacoemulsification in cataract patients: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Zi; He, Shou-Zhi; Li, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Systematic review of manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) and phacoemulsification (PHACO) on the postoperative visual quality and surgical complications. Methods: Relevant literatures on clinical efficacy of PHACO and MSICS were included by retrieving in Medline, PubMed, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) and Chinese Academic Journal (CNKI) databases. Meta-analysis was conducted by RevMan5.0 software with OR and its 95% CI for the effect size. Results: A total of ten documents were included in the study. Uncorrected visual acuity 1 week after surgery (OR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.67 ~ 1.06, P=0.15), post-operative capsular rupture (OR = 1.07, 95% CI: 0.73~1.58, P=0.72), and corneal edema (OR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.70~1.16, P=0.42) between MSICS and PHACO showed no statistical difference (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Clinical efficacy and complications of MSICS was similar tothat of PHACO. PMID:26309538

  14. [Actual state of the one day simultaneous bilateral cataract surgery issue].

    PubMed

    Cholevík, D

    2014-12-01

    One-day Simultaneous Bilateral Cataract Surgery (SBCS) is not common routine procedure; nevertheless many surgeons all over the world perform it. During the history, SBCS was always performed, but due to the phacoemulsification development making the small incision surgery possible, more papers in the scientific literature are appearing. Besides the SBCS indications and contraindications, the intraoperative and postoperative complications are discussed, especially the danger of bilateral postoperative endophthalmitis. In this paper, an overview of the most important publications concerning the SBCS is presented. PMID:25640230

  15. Temporary graft for closed-system cataract surgery during corneal triple procedures.

    PubMed

    Nardi, M; Giudice, V; Marabotti, A; Alfieri, E; Rizzo, S

    2001-08-01

    Performing phacoemulsification during a triple corneal procedure has many advantages. Operating in a closed chamber makes surgery easier and safer. In some cases, however, a dense corneal opacity may prevent closed-chamber surgery, necessitating the use of an open-sky technique. In these cases, a temporary corneal graft using a corneal button not suitable for penetrating keratoplasty is proposed to allow phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lens implantation through a corneal tunnel. The temporary corneal graft is replaced with a permanent graft after these steps are completed. This technique was effective in 3 patients with cataract and dense corneal opacity. PMID:11524186

  16. Prevalence of Corneal Astigmatism and Anterior Segmental Biometry Characteristics Before Surgery in Chinese Congenital Cataract Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Duoru; Chen, Jingjing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaohang; Long, Erping; Luo, Lixia; Lin, Zhuoling; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hui; Liu, Jinchao; Chen, Weirong; Lin, Haotian; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and the distribution characteristics of corneal astigmatism (CA) and anterior segment biometry before surgery in Chinese congenital cataract (CC) patients are not completely understood. This study involved 400 CC patients from the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center enrolled from February 2011 to August 2015. Data on CA, keratometry, central corneal thickness (CCT) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured by the Pentacam Scheimpflug System. The mean age of patients was 54.27 months, and the ratio of boys to girls was 1.53:1. The mean CA was 2.03 diopters (D), and 39.25% of subjects had CA values ≥2 D. The most frequent (71.8%) diagnosis was with-the-rule astigmatism. Oblique astigmatism was present in 16.2% of cases, and 12% of cases had against-the-rule astigmatism. The mean keratometry measurement of cataractous eyes in bilateral patients was significantly larger than that in unilateral patients. Girls had a larger mean keratometry but a thinner CCT than did boys. The CA, CCT, and ACD of cataractous eyes were significantly larger than those of non-cataractous eyes in unilateral patients. The CA, mean keratometry, CCT, and ACD in CC patients varied with age, gender, and laterality. Fully understanding these characteristics may help inform guidelines and treatment decisions in CC patients. PMID:26912400

  17. Prevalence of Corneal Astigmatism and Anterior Segmental Biometry Characteristics Before Surgery in Chinese Congenital Cataract Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Duoru; Chen, Jingjing; Liu, Zhenzhen; Wu, Xiaohang; Long, Erping; Luo, Lixia; Lin, Zhuoling; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Chen, Hui; Liu, Jinchao; Chen, Weirong; Lin, Haotian; Liu, Yizhi

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and the distribution characteristics of corneal astigmatism (CA) and anterior segment biometry before surgery in Chinese congenital cataract (CC) patients are not completely understood. This study involved 400 CC patients from the Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center enrolled from February 2011 to August 2015. Data on CA, keratometry, central corneal thickness (CCT) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured by the Pentacam Scheimpflug System. The mean age of patients was 54.27 months, and the ratio of boys to girls was 1.53:1. The mean CA was 2.03 diopters (D), and 39.25% of subjects had CA values ≥2 D. The most frequent (71.8%) diagnosis was with-the-rule astigmatism. Oblique astigmatism was present in 16.2% of cases, and 12% of cases had against-the-rule astigmatism. The mean keratometry measurement of cataractous eyes in bilateral patients was significantly larger than that in unilateral patients. Girls had a larger mean keratometry but a thinner CCT than did boys. The CA, CCT, and ACD of cataractous eyes were significantly larger than those of non-cataractous eyes in unilateral patients. The CA, mean keratometry, CCT, and ACD in CC patients varied with age, gender, and laterality. Fully understanding these characteristics may help inform guidelines and treatment decisions in CC patients. PMID:26912400

  18. Safety of prophylactic intracameral moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution after cataract surgery in patients with penetrating keratoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Osman Sevki; Arici, Ceyhun; Unal, Mustafa; Cicik, Erdogan; Mangan, Mehmet Serhat; Atalay, Eray

    2014-01-01

    AIM To determine the safety of prophylactic intracameral moxifloxacin after cataract surgery in patients with penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). METHODS In this retrospective study of consecutive patients who had phacoemulsification cataract surgery after PKP, were treated with intracameral moxifloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution (0.5 mg/0.1 mL). The main outcome measures were anterior chamber reaction, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), corneal endothelial cell count (ECC), and central corneal thickness (CCT). RESULTS Fifty-five patients were recruited (26 males, 29 females). The mean age was 54.36±4.97y (range 45-64y). All eyes had improved postoperative BCVA. The mean BCVA was 0.25 preoperatively and 0.57 postoperatively, which was statistically significant (P<0.001). One eye had 3+, 7 eyes had 2+, 12 eyes had 1+ and 8 eyes had trace amount of aqueous cells on the first day after surgery. All eyes had no anterior chamber cells at subsequent follow up examinations. Effective phacoemulsification time was 4.33±1.01s. The mean ECC was 2340.20 cells/mm2 preoperatively and 1948.75 cells/mm2 1mo postoperatively (P<0.001). The increase of 21.09 µm in postoperative pachymetry 1mo after surgery was statistically significant (P<0.001). CONCLUSION No untoward effects were observed after intracameral injection of moxifloxacin (0.5 mg/0.1 mL) in terms of anterior chamber reaction, CCT, ECC, and visual rehabilitation at the conclusion of cataract surgery in patients with PKP. PMID:25349795

  19. Telephone follow-up for cataract surgery: feasibility and patient satisfaction study.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jeremy J S L; Pelosini, Lucia

    2016-05-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate the feasibility of telephone follow-up (TFU) after uncomplicated cataract surgery in low-risk patients and patient satisfaction with this alternative clinical pathway. Design/methodology/approach - Prospective, non-randomised cohort study. A ten-point subjective ophthalmic assessment questionnaire and a six-point patient satisfaction questionnaire were administered to patients following routine cataract surgery at two to three weeks post-procedure. All patients were offered a further clinic review if required. Exclusion criteria comprised ophthalmic co-morbidities, hearing/language impairment and high risk of post-operative complications. Patient notes were retrospectively reviewed over the study period to ensure no additional emergency attendances took place. Findings - Over three months, 50 eyes of 50 patients (mean age: 80; age range 60-91; 66 per cent second eye surgery) underwent uncomplicated phacoemulsification surgery received a TFU at 12-24 days (mean: 16 days) post-operatively. Subjective visual acuity was graded as good by 92 per cent of patients; 72 per cent patients reported no pain and 20 per cent reported mild occasional grittiness. Patient satisfaction was graded 8.9 out of 10; 81.6 per cent defined TFU as convenient and 75.5 per cent of patients preferred TFU to routine outpatient review. No additional visits were required. Research limitations/implications - Non-randomised with no control group; small sample size. One patient was unable to be contacted. Practical implications - Post-operative TFU can be suitably targeted to low-risk patients following uncomplicated cataract surgery. This study demonstrated a high patient satisfaction. A larger, randomised study is in progress to assess this further. Originality/value - This is the first study reporting TFU results and patient satisfaction to the usual alternative two-week outpatient review. PMID:27142949

  20. Efficacy and safety of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery versus conventional phacoemulsification for cataract: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Wei; Ye, Shaobi; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPCS) in the treatment of cataract. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Nine qualified studies with a total of 989 eyes were included. Compared with CPCS, FLACS significantly reduced mean phaco energy and effective phacoemulsification time (EPT) required in the surgery. Central corneal thickness (CCT) was significantly lower in FLACS at 1 day of follow-up, but CCT and corneal endothelial cells count was comparable at 1 week of follow-up or longer. FLACS achieved a better visual outcome at postoperative 1 week and 6 months, but the difference was not significant at postoperative 1-3 months. Regard to surgical complications, the incidences of intraoperative anterior capsule tear, postoperative macular edema and elevated intraocular pressure were similar. In conclusion, femtosecond laser pretreatment can reduce phaco energy and EPT, which may reduce the heat damage to ocular tissues by ultrasound. This novel technique might be beneficial for patients with dense cataract and/or low preoperative endothelial cell values. Well-designed RCTs with longer follow-up are still necessary to provide more reliable evidence. PMID:26269445

  1. Efficacy and safety of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery versus conventional phacoemulsification for cataract: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Xiao, Wei; Ye, Shaobi; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPCS) in the treatment of cataract. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Nine qualified studies with a total of 989 eyes were included. Compared with CPCS, FLACS significantly reduced mean phaco energy and effective phacoemulsification time (EPT) required in the surgery. Central corneal thickness (CCT) was significantly lower in FLACS at 1 day of follow-up, but CCT and corneal endothelial cells count was comparable at 1 week of follow-up or longer. FLACS achieved a better visual outcome at postoperative 1 week and 6 months, but the difference was not significant at postoperative 1–3 months. Regard to surgical complications, the incidences of intraoperative anterior capsule tear, postoperative macular edema and elevated intraocular pressure were similar. In conclusion, femtosecond laser pretreatment can reduce phaco energy and EPT, which may reduce the heat damage to ocular tissues by ultrasound. This novel technique might be beneficial for patients with dense cataract and/or low preoperative endothelial cell values. Well-designed RCTs with longer follow-up are still necessary to provide more reliable evidence. PMID:26269445

  2. [Cataract surgery: institutions, techniques and scientific models from Brisseau to Daviel].

    PubMed

    Monti, M T

    1994-01-01

    The intellectual biography of Jacques Daviel (1693-1762) offers unexpected opportunities to recall fundamental steps in the history of scientific ideas, academic institutions and surgical techniques. Kepler had, in fact, ousted the crystalline lens from the full seat of the visual power to the refracting medium, but his work had no effect on the central core of the eye doctors' practice, namely, cataract surgery. Daviel's audacity, which was not to push down but to extract the lens with the cataract, brought the Keplerian revolution to a completion. In addition, physiologists and philsophers tried to befriend Daviel, and they made use of his exceptional manual dexterity to work out Molyneux's question, that is, the test of the man born blind who recovered his sight, which posed problems in the 18th century in the theory of knowledge. PMID:11640568

  3. Spontaneous iris bleeding during cataract surgery in a patient with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Christopher, Karen L.; Stafeeva, Ksenia; Erlanger, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A 91-year old man with a history of senile cataract and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with a platelet count of 75,000/μL, presented for phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in the left eye. A paracentesis made at the beginning of the procedure caused a small but not unusual amount of anterior chamber decompression. Spontaneous bleeding subsequently occurred from multiple sights on the iris surface. The bleeding was stopped by injecting hyaluronic acid into the anterior chamber to increase intraocular pressure. The remainder of the procedure was performed without complication, and resulting visual acuity improved from 20/70 preoperatively to 20/20−2 with refraction 1 week postoperatively. In previously reported cases of intraocular bleeding during cataract surgery in thrombocytopenic patients, platelet counts were all ≤55,000/μL.

  4. Cost-Utility Analyses of Cataract Surgery in Advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyan; Huang, Jiannan; Zhu, Bijun; Sun, Qian; Miao, Yuyu; Zou, Haidong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To explore the cost-utility of cataract surgery in patients with advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods Patients who were diagnosed as having and treated for age-related cataract and with a history of advanced AMD at the Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, were included in the study. All of the participants underwent successful phacoemulsification with foldable posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation under retrobulbar anesthesia. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and utility value elicited by time trade-off method from patients at 3-month postoperative time were compared with those before surgery. Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained in a lifetime were calculated at a 3% annual discounted rate. Costs per QALY gained were calculated using the bootstrap method, and probabilities of being cost-effective were presented using a cost-effectiveness acceptability curve. Sensitivity analyses were performed to test the robustness of the results. Results Mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA in the operated eye increased from 1.37 ± 0.5 (Snellen, 20/469) to 0.98 ± 0.25 (Snellen, 20/191) (p < 0.001); BCVA in the weighted average from both eyes (=75% better eye + 25% worse eye) was changed from 1.13 ± 0.22 (Snellen, 20/270) to 0.96 ± 0.17 (Snellen, 20/182) (p < 0.001). Utility values from both patients and doctors increased significantly after surgery (p < 0.001 and p = 0.007). Patients gained 1.17 QALYs by cataract surgery in their lifetime. The cost per QALY was 8835 Chinese yuan (CNY) (1400 U.S. dollars [USD]). It is cost-effective at the threshold of 115,062 CNY (18,235 USD) per QALY in China recommended by the World Health Organization. The cost per QALY varied from 7045 CNY (1116 USD) to 94,178 CNY (14,925 USD) in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions Visual acuity and quality of life assessed by utility value improved significantly after surgery

  5. Corneal Changes in Diabetic Patients after Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, I.P.; Nagpal, Ramesh C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diabetics have abnormal corneal morphology along with higher rate of corneal endothelial cell loss and decreased corneal endothelial cell density and early onset of cataract. Aim: To evaluate the changes in corneal endothelium and corneal thickness in patients with diabetes mellitus after Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (MSICS) in eyes with brunescent Cataract. Materials and Methods: Sixty eyes of 60 patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus and 60 eyes of 60 age matched healthy patients of advanced brunescent cataract underwent MSICS were evaluated. All the patients underwent specular microscopy for the corneal endothelial cell count of cornea and central corneal thickness pre-operatively, at one week, six weeks and 12 weeks post-operatively. The morphology, variation in the endothelial size and shape and percentage of hexagonal cells were assessed. Results: The mean pre-operative endothelial count in the control was higher than the diabetic group (p<0.001). The post-operative endothelial count loss in both the groups were statistically significant (one-way ANOVA p<0.001). On comparing post-operative endothelial loss in non diabetics (8.05%) to diabetic group, the diabetic group had significantly higher endothelial loss (14.19% p<0.001). There was also a significant increase in central corneal thickness in diabetics as compared to control (p = 0.004). The change in percentage hexagon cells in diabetic group was significantly higher than in non diabetic group (p = 0.005). Inter group change in coefficient of variance was not statistically significant (p=0.144). Conclusion: Compared to non-diabetic patients, diabetic patients have more endothelial cells damage after MSICS. Corneal endothelial evaluation of diabetic patients is recommended before any intraocular surgery. PMID:24959498

  6. Evaluation of a Public Child Eye Health Tertiary Facility for Pediatric Cataract in Southern Nigeria I: Visual Acuity Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Roseline E.; Adio, Adedayo; Oparah, Sidney K.; Odey, Friday; Eyo, Okon A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study of the outcome of congenital and developmental cataract surgery was conducted in a public child eye health tertiary facility in children <16 years of age in Southern Nigeria, as part of an evaluation. Materials and Method: Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery with or without anterior vitrectomy was performed. The outcome measures were visual acuity (VA) and change (gain) in visual acuity. The age of the child at onset, duration of delay in presentation, ocular co-morbidity, non ocular co-morbidity, gender, and pre operative visual acuity were matched with postoperative visual acuity. A total of 66 children were studied for a period of six weeks following surgery. Results: Forty eight (72.7%) children had bilateral congenital cataracts and 18 (27.3%) children had bilateral developmental cataracts. There were 38(57.6%) males and 28 (42.4%) females in the study. Thirty Five (53%) children had good visual outcome (normal vision range 6/6/ -6/18) post-operatively. The number of children with blindness (vision <3/60) decreased from 61 (92.4%) pre-operatively to 4 (6.1%) post-operatively. Post operative complication occurred in 6.8% of cases six week after surgery. Delayed presentation had an inverse relationship with change (gain) in visual acuity (r = - 0.342; p-value = 0.005). Pre-operative visual acuity had a positive relationship with post operative change (gain) in visual acuity (r = 0.618; p-value = 0.000). Conclusion: Predictors of change in visual acuity in our study were; delayed presentation and pre-operative VA. Cataract surgery in children showed clinical benefit. PMID:27347247

  7. Blood Pressure and Heart Rate Alterations through Music in Patients Undergoing Cataract Surgery in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Merakou, Kyriakoula; Varouxi, Georgia; Barbouni, Anastasia; Antoniadou, Eleni; Karageorgos, Georgios; Theodoridis, Dimitrios; Koutsouri, Aristea; Kourea-Kremastinou, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Music has been proposed as a safe, inexpensive, nonpharmacological antistress intervention. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients undergoing cataract surgery while listening to meditation music experience lower levels of blood pressure and heart rate. METHODS Two hundred individuals undergoing cataract surgery participated in the study. Hundred individuals listened to meditation music, through headphones, before and during the operation (intervention group) and 100 individuals received standard care (control group). Patients stress coping skills were measured by the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC Scale). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate were defined as outcome measures. RESULTS According to the SOC Scale, both groups had similar stress coping skills (mean score: 127.6 for the intervention group and 127.3 for the control group). Before entering the operating room (OR) as well as during surgery the rise in systolic and diastolic pressures was significantly lower in the intervention group (P < 0.001). Among patients receiving antihypertensive therapy, those in the intervention group presented a lower increase only in systolic pressure (P < 0.001) at both time recordings. For those patients in the intervention group who did not receive antihypertensive treatment, lower systolic blood pressure at both time recordings was recorded (P < 0.001) while lower diastolic pressure was observed only during entry to the OR (P = 0.021). Heart rate was not altered between the two groups in any of the recordings. CONCLUSIONS Meditation music influenced patients’ preoperative stress with regard to systolic blood pressure. This kind of music can be used as an alternative or complementary method for blood pressure stabilizing in patients undergoing cataract surgery. PMID:26106264

  8. [Progress and problems in pediatric surgery--the Association of Pediatric Anesthesiologists].

    PubMed

    Tamiya, K

    1984-09-01

    From the first meeting of the Japanese Society of Pediatric Surgeons in 1964 a small group discussion on anesthetic problems and patient care was held by some anesthesiologists at night. The Association of Pediatric Anesthesiologists (started in 1971) has undertaken the night meeting ever since the twelfth Annual Meeting of the Society of Pediatric Surgeons in 1975. The problems about pediatric respiratory management, neonatal emergency surgery and pediatric anesthesia were discussed frequently by doctors in different specialties. The recent decrease of mortality in neonatal surgery is thought to have come from the improvement of pediatric respiratory management. This night meeting of anesthesiologists has had a major role in the resolution of problems in pediatric respiratory impairment. The problems to be resolved in an emergency--persistent fetal circulation, barotrauma, nutritional problems in long term ventilatory support and so on--, will be discussed in the future. The purpose of this association is to elevate the quality of pediatric anesthesiologists by discussion with the other specialists of medicine and to make clear their responsibility in Children's Hospitals or Centers. PMID:6503982

  9. Safety and Efficacy of the Transition from Extracapsular Cataract Extraction to Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery in Prevention of Blindness Campaigns

    PubMed Central

    Signes-Soler, Isabel; Javaloy, Jaime; Muñoz, Gonzalo; Moya, Tomas; Montalbán, Raúl; Albarrán, César

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the safety and the visual outcomes of two experienced cataract surgeons who converted from extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) to manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) during a campaign for the prevention of blindness. Methods: Two surgeons used the ECCE technique (ECCE group) during a campaign in Burkina Faso on 93 consecutive cataract patients with a corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) <20/80 in the best eye. Both surgeons used MSICS for the first time on 98 consecutive cases in another campaign in Kenya after theoretical instructional courses. Results: There were no significant differences in CDVA at 3 months postoperatively. There were 69% of eyes with uncorrected distance visual acuity ≥20/60 in the MSICS group and 49% eyes in the ECCE group. Spherical equivalents ranged between −1D and +1D in 55% of the MSICS group versus 43% in the ECCE group. There were significant differences in the changes in the vertical component of astigmatism (J45) but not the horizontal (J0) component. There were no significant differences in the intraoperative complications. The most common postoperative complication was corneal edema on the first day in 40.86% and 19.38% of the ECCE and MSICS groups, respectively. Conclusion: Transitioning from ECCE to MSICS for experienced cataract surgeons in surgical campaigns is safe. The rate of complications is similar for both techniques. Slightly better visual and refractive outcomes can be achieved due to the decreased induction of corneal astigmatism. PMID:27162451

  10. Epilepsy Surgery for Pediatric Epilepsy: Optimal Timing of Surgical Intervention

    PubMed Central

    SUGANO, Hidenori; ARAI, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric epilepsy has a wide variety of etiology and severity. A recent epidemiological study suggested that surgery might be indicated in as many as 5% of the pediatric epilepsy population. Now, we know that effective epilepsy surgery can result in seizure freedom and improvement of psychomotor development. Seizure control is the most effective way to improve patients neurologically and psychologically. In this review, we look over the recent evidence related to pediatric epilepsy surgery, and try to establish the optimal surgical timing for patients with intractable epilepsy. Appropriate surgical timing depends on the etiology and natural history of the epilepsy to be treated. The most common etiology of pediatric intractable epilepsy patients is malformation of cortical development (MCD) and early surgery is recommended for them. Patients operated on earlier than 12 months of age tended to improve their psychomotor development compared to those operated on later. Recent progress in neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies provide the possibility of very early diagnosis and comprehensive surgical management even at an age before 12 months. Epilepsy surgery is the only solution for patients with MCD or other congenital diseases associated with intractable epilepsy, therefore physicians should aim at an early and precise diagnosis and predicting the future damage, consider a surgical solution within an optimal timing. PMID:25925754

  11. Ectopic intraocular lens: an unusual complication of cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mehul A; Shah, Shreya A; Aggarwal, Parul M

    2014-06-01

    We wish to report an unusual complication of intraocular lens (IOL) insertion following uneventful phacoemulsification. After successful phacoemulsification surgery, a hydrophobic acrylic IOL was loaded in the injector for insertion into the capsular bag. During insertion, the IOL inadvertently extended into the corneal stromal lamella. The complication was recognized at a late stage, and the foldable acrylic lens was retrieved and reinserted correctly in the bag. The anterior chamber was made viscoelastically taut and was maintained in this state for 10 min, followed by a routine viscoelastic wash and air bubble injection. Cornea was slightly edematous with stromal haze, and the corneal thickness was 908 μm. At the 1-month follow-up visit, the patient's vision was 20/40, the stromal haze had subsided, the corneal thickness was 572 μm, and the patient was comfortable. Though it was unknown complication, following proper management patient recovered satisfactorily. PMID:25005208

  12. Choroidal and macular thickness changes induced by cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Manuel S; Gonçalves, Nuno M; Freitas-Costa, Paulo; Beato, João B; Rocha-Sousa, Amândio; Carneiro, Ângela; Brandão, Elisete M; Falcão-Reis, Fernando M

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of uneventful phacoemulsification on the morphology and thickness of the macula, the submacular choroid, and the peripapillary choroid. Methods In 14 eyes from 14 patients, retinal macular thickness, choroidal submacular thickness, and choroidal peripapillary thickness were measured preoperatively and at one week and one month after phacoemulsification using enhanced depth imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Changes in thickness of the different ocular tissues were evaluated. Results There was a statistically significant increase in mean retinal macular thickness at one month. In horizontal scans, the mean increase was +8.67±6.75 μm (P<0.001), and in vertical scans, the mean increase was +8.80±7.07 μm (P=0.001). However, there were no significant changes in choroidal morphology in the submacular and peripapillary areas one month after surgery. In vertical scans, there was a nonsignificant increase in choroidal thickness (+4.21±20.2 μm; P=0.47) whilst in horizontal scans a nonsignificant decrease was recorded (−9.11±39.59 μm; P=0.41). In peripapillary scans, a nonsignificant increase in mean choroidal thickness was registered (+3.25±11.80 μm; P=0.36). Conclusion Uncomplicated phacoemulsification induces nonpathologic increases in retinal macular thickness probably due to the inflammatory insult of the surgery; however these changes are not accompanied by significant changes in choroidal thickness. In the posterior segment, the morphologic response to the inflammatory insult of phacoemulsification is mainly observed at the retinal level, and seems to be independent of choroidal thickness changes. PMID:24368877

  13. The Safety and Efficacy of Routine Administration of Intracameral Vancomycin during Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rush, Sloan W.; Vu, Duy; Rush, Ryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intracameral vancomycin during cataract surgery using a standardized dosage and delivery technique. Methods. The charts of 20,719 consecutive eyes that underwent phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in a single ambulatory surgery center were retrospectively reviewed over a 5-year period. Results. The first 11,333 consecutive cases did not receive intracameral vancomycin, whereas the next 9,386 consecutive cases all received intracameral vancomycin. There were no significant differences in the baseline characteristics between the cohort of subjects who received intracameral vancomycin and the cohort of subjects that did not. There were a total of 11 subjects (0.97 cases per 1,000) that developed postoperative endophthalmitis in the group that did not receive intracameral vancomycin, whereas there were no cases of postoperative endophthalmitis in the group that received intracameral vancomycin (p = 0.0015). The overall rate of intraoperative and postoperative complications and the final postoperative visual acuities were similar among cohorts. There were no cases of toxic anterior segment syndrome occurring in either group during the study period. Conclusions. Routine administration of intracameral vancomycin during cataract surgery significantly decreased the incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis and was not associated with an increased incidence of postoperative adverse events. PMID:26617996

  14. A simulator to explore the role of haptic feedback in cataract surgery training.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Laura; Gauthier, Nicholas; Ramanathan, Saraswathy; Okamura, Allison

    2008-01-01

    Phacoemulsification cataract surgery, a minimally invasive technique to remove a cloudy lens from the eye, is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures in the western world. Conventional training for this procedure involves didactic lectures and practice on pig and human cadaver eyes, none of which allow trainees to form an accurate predictive model of human tissue behavior during surgery. A virtual environment simulator for capsulorrhexis, one of the first steps in cataract surgery, has been developed that allows a trainee to use surgical instruments to excise a circle of tissue on the anterior side of the lens capsule through tearing. The simulator invokes a deformable mass-spring-damper mesh model of the tissue that can be grasped and torn via shearing. A novel algorithm for mesh division and maintenance enables realistic tearing behavior. The trainee controls tool motion using a 3-degree-of-freedom haptic device, and haptic feedback is provided from the virtual tissue. Although the haptic feedback in a real capsulorrhexis procedure is below the human threshold of haptic sensing, this simulator enables an experiment to determine the effectiveness of "haptic training wheels" -- the idea of haptic training for a task without haptic feedback. PMID:18391267

  15. Cataract surgery with a mid-infrared endo-laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Qiushi; Simon, Gabriel; Gailitis, Raymond P.; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    1992-08-01

    With most current cataract surgery techniques, an intraocular lens (IOL) is implanted in the capsular bag to emetropize the eye for distance vision. Modern IOLs are made of flexible materials (e.g., silicone and acrylic elastomers) allowing the surgeon to fold and insert the IOL through a smaller limbal incision (4 mm), thus reducing the number of sutures. When using a scleral pocket technique, suturing of such small wounds might not be required. Recently, IOLs having 2 foci (multifocal IOLs) have been introduced. These implants give the patient a second focal plane at normal reading distance, but the double image reduces both visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. However, with all present surgical techniques, the patient loses the natural ability to accommodate. By directing laser energy into a flexible fiber, cataract removal might be performed endoscopically while minimizing trauma to healthy tissue. Bath successfully demonstrated the use of the 308 nm XeCl excimer laser for cataract removal. A significant drawback, however, lies in the fluorescence induced by the 308 nm laser pulses which may cause significant retinal damage. The use of UV radiation also raises serious concerns about carcinogenesis and cataractogenesis risk to both the patient and the surgeon.

  16. Symbolic algebra approach to the calculation of intraocular lens power following cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjelmstad, David P.; Sayegh, Samir I.

    2013-03-01

    We present a symbolic approach based on matrix methods that allows for the analysis and computation of intraocular lens power following cataract surgery. We extend the basic matrix approach corresponding to paraxial optics to include astigmatism and other aberrations. The symbolic approach allows for a refined analysis of the potential sources of errors ("refractive surprises"). We demonstrate the computation of lens powers including toric lenses that correct for both defocus (myopia, hyperopia) and astigmatism. A specific implementation in Mathematica allows an elegant and powerful method for the design and analysis of these intraocular lenses.

  17. Double aspiration/single irrigation system for bimanual lens cortex removal in cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Luis; Henriquez, Maria A; McCarthy, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a bimanual double aspiration/single irrigation system (DASIS) for cataract surgery that efficiently and safely performs aspiration of the entire cortex, including subincisional space. DASIS uses standard and common instruments such as an irrigation/aspiration handpiece in one hand and a single-aspiration handpiece in the other, joined with a short silicone tube using a three-way stopcock. DASIS allows access to 360° of the cortex without a hand exchange, reducing wound leakage and maintaining chamber stability. PMID:21117583

  18. Inadvertent Trypan Blue Staining of Posterior Capsule during Cataract Surgery Associated with "Argentinian Flag" Event.

    PubMed

    Prinzi, Robert A; Alapati, Neeti M; Gappy, Shawn S; Dilly, Jason S

    2016-01-01

    Trypan blue is common in visualizing the anterior capsule during cataract surgery. Inadvertent staining of the posterior capsule during phacoemulsification is a rare complication and there are few reports in the literature. The proposed mechanism of posterior capsule staining in previous reports includes a compromised zonular apparatus or iris retractors facilitating the posterior flow of trypan blue. We report the first case of trypan blue staining of the posterior capsule associated with the "Argentinian flag" sign. In our case, the "Argentinian flag" allowed the trypan blue to seep between the posterior capsule and the lens, staining the anterior surface of the posterior capsule. PMID:27022495

  19. Relationship between endothelial cell loss and microcoaxial phacoemulsification parameters in noncomplicated cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mahdy, Mohamed AE Soliman; Eid, Mohamed Z; Mohammed, Mahmoud Abdel-Badei; Hafez, Amr; Bhatia, Jagdish

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess the relationship between postoperative endothelial cell loss and microcoaxial phaco parameters using Ozil IP (Alcon Laboratories, Inc, Fort Worth, TX) in noncomplicated cataract surgery. Methods In this prospective observational study, 120 consecutive cases of cataract patients with different grades of nuclear hardness underwent microcoaxial phacoemulsification through a 2.2-mm clear corneal incision. An Alcon Infinity Vision System with Ozil IP (Alcon Laboratories) was used with an Ozil torsional handpiece and a Kelman-style 45° phacoemulsification tip. Patients underwent preoperative and postoperative central endothelial cell counts. Results The study included 120 cases of age-related cataract whose mean age (standard deviation [SD]) was 59.68 years (9.47). There was a highly statistically significant endothelial cell loss (P < 0.001). The endothelial cell loss ranged 11–1149 cells/mm2 with a median (interquartile range) of 386 cells/mm2 (184.5–686 cells/mm2). The percentage of postoperative ECLoss% ranged from 0.48% to 47.8% with a median (interquartile range) of 15.4% (7.2% to 26.8%). A significant positive correlation was found between the ECLoss% and different phaco parameters. The Spearman’s rank-order correlation coefficient values, rho, (ρ) were as follows: CDE (ρ = 0.425), aspiration time (ρ = 0.176), and volume (ρ = 0.278). Also, ECLoss% was significantly correlated with the grade of nuclear opalescence (Kendall’s tau τ = 0.42). Conclusion Microcoaxial phacoemulsification was efficient in removing noncomplicated cataracts; however a statistically significant endothelial cell loss was noted, especially with increased nuclear hardness. This endothelial cell loss was mostly related to the increased cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), aspiration time, and volume of balanced salt solution used. PMID:22536044

  20. Conjunctival flap in manual sutureless small-incision cataract surgery: a necessity or dogmatic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Punitkumar; Singh, Subhadra; Bhargav, Gajesh; Singh, Manju

    2012-08-01

    To compare the surgical outcomes of manual sutureless small-incision extracapsular cataract surgery (MSICS) with versus without a conjunctival flap for the treatment of cataracts. Prospective, randomized comparison of 220 consecutive patients with visually significant cataracts. Tertiary level eye clinic. 220 consecutive patients with cataracts. Patients assigned randomly to receive either SICS with a conjunctival flap or without one. Operative time, surgical complications, surgically induced astigmatism. Both surgical techniques achieved comparable surgical outcomes with comparable complication rates. The operative time was markedly less in group without flap (mean duration of 7.67 ± 1.45 min) than in group with flap (mean duration of 11.46 ± 1.69 min) (p value <0.001). In the group without a flap intraoperative pupillary miosis was significantly greater (p value 0.039) and on postoperative day 1, there were greater patients with a subconjunctival bleed involving greater than one quadrant of the bulbar conjunctiva (p value <0.0001). Also, post operative conjunctival retraction and consequent wound exposure was also significantly higher in this group (p value 0.026). However, the rate of other serious complications like any postop hyphaema, conjunctival bleb formation, iris prolapse, tunnel stability, shallow anterior chamber, post operative uveitis, malpositioned IOL, retinal detachment, cystoid macular edema, endophthalmitis were comparable in both. Both MSICS with and without a conjunctival flap achieved good surgical outcomes with comparable complication rates. But flapless MSICS is significantly faster. However it may be associated with higher intraoperative miosis and greater postoperative wound exposure. PMID:22638922

  1. Checklists and safety in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Konfirst, Chris; Preston, Stephanie; Yeh, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In rebuilding Tulane's pediatric heart center after Hurricane Katrina, the use of checklists proved to be essential, not only in rebuilding inventory and systems, but the culture of continued debriefing around their use was seminal in establishing a culture of safety and trust between caregivers; safety that ultimately benefitted our patients. PMID:25939842

  2. Long-Term Changes in Subfoveal Choroidal Thickness After Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Tolga; Karci, Ayse Aslihan; Yilmaz, İhsan; Yilmaz, Ahu; Yildirim, Yusuf; Sakalar, Yildirim Bayezit

    2016-01-01

    Background Cataract surgery is associated with the development of late-onset age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The pathogenic mechanism is still not fully established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible changes in central macula thickness (CMT) and subfoveal choroid thickness (SCT) after uneventful cataract surgery. Material/Methods A total of 65 eyes of 65 patients who underwent phacoemulsification and intracapsular lens implantation were included in this prospective study. Patients had not undergone previous ocular surgery and had no other ocular abnormality. CMT and SCT were measured at baseline and postoperatively at week 1 and months 1, 3, 6 and 12 via spectral domain optical cohorence tomography (SD-OCT). Results CMT was 252.4±27.6 μm (mean ±SD) preoperatively, then 253.5±29.8, 256.1±28.7, 257.4±27.2, 253.18±23.7, and 252.8±21.7 μm at postoperative week 1 and postoperative months 1, 3, 6, and 12, respectively. There were insignificant changes in CMT, and it returned to baseline at six months after surgery (all p>0.05). SCT was 237.4±21.6 μm preoperatively, and 240.5±24.8, 241.2±25.7, 242.7±26.3, 243.1±24.2, and 244.2±21.4 μm at postoperative week 1 and postoperative months 1, 3, 6, and 12, respectively. Although there was an increase in SCT during follow-up, the difference between preoperative and postoperative values was not significant (p>0.05). Conclusions Uncomplicated phacoemulsification induces subclinical changes in CMT, probably due to the inflammatory insult of surgery, and CMT returns to baseline value. There were slight, insignificant increases in choroid thickness during follow-up, and this did not return to baseline during follow-up. Changes in the choroid after cataract surgery may provide clues to the development of late-onset AMD. PMID:27158971

  3. Long-Term Changes in Subfoveal Choroidal Thickness After Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Tolga; Karci, Ayse Aslihan; Yilmaz, İhsan; Yılmaz, Ahu; Yıldırım, Yusuf; Sakalar, Yildirim Bayezit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cataract surgery is associated with the development of late-onset age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The pathogenic mechanism is still not fully established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible changes in central macula thickness (CMT) and subfoveal choroid thickness (SCT) after uneventful cataract surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 65 eyes of 65 patients who underwent phacoemulsification and intracapsular lens implantation were included in this prospective study. Patients had not undergone previous ocular surgery and had no other ocular abnormality. CMT and SCT were measured at baseline and postoperatively at week 1 and months 1, 3, 6 and 12 via spectral domain optical cohorence tomography (SD-OCT). RESULTS CMT was 252.4±27.6 μm (mean ±SD) preoperatively, then 253.5±29.8, 256.1±28.7, 257.4±27.2, 253.18±23.7, and 252.8±21.7 μm at postoperative week 1 and postoperative months 1, 3, 6, and 12, respectively. There were insignificant changes in CMT, and it returned to baseline at six months after surgery (all p>0.05). SCT was 237.4±21.6 μm preoperatively, and 240.5±24.8, 241.2±25.7, 242.7±26.3, 243.1±24.2, and 244.2±21.4 μm at postoperative week 1 and postoperative months 1, 3, 6, and 12, respectively. Although there was an increase in SCT during follow-up, the difference between preoperative and postoperative values was not significant (p>0.05). CONCLUSIONS Uncomplicated phacoemulsification induces subclinical changes in CMT, probably due to the inflammatory insult of surgery, and CMT returns to baseline value. There were slight, insignificant increases in choroid thickness during follow-up, and this did not return to baseline during follow-up. Changes in the choroid after cataract surgery may provide clues to the development of late-onset AMD. PMID:27158971

  4. Training of Resident Ophthalmologists in Cataract Surgery: A Comparative Study of Two Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Tzamalis, Argyrios; Lamprogiannis, Lampros; Chalvatzis, Nikolaos; Symeonidis, Chrysanthos; Tsinopoulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate and compare the efficacy of two different training methods in resident-performed phacoemulsification surgery. Methods. 502 eyes of 467 patients who underwent resident-performed phacoemulsification were included in the study by reviewing their medical records. Residents were allocated into two groups according to the method applied during their training in cataract surgery; Group A included residents that were trained with the “step-by-step” method and Group B those trained with the “one-step” method. Primary outcome was the incidence of main complications, defined as posterior capsular ruptures and/or zonular dehiscence with vitreous loss. Results. Each resident performed a median of 63 phacoemulsification surgeries. A statistically significant difference (p = 0.0032) was noted in the main complications rate between the two groups, yielding a mean of 17.3% in Group A and 7.25% in Group B. Other intraoperative complications were not shown to differ statistically significantly between study groups (p > 0.05). Among the first 40 surgeries of each resident, main complications rate differed also statistically significantly (p = 0.0048) between Group A (21.67%) and Group B (8.5%), while a better surgical performance-yielding statistical significance in Group A (p = 0.017) was indicated in both groups between the 20th and the 30th procedure. Conclusions. Training in cataract surgery using the “one-step” method may lead to an improvement in surgical competency, when measured by complications rates and, therefore, to significantly better quality of training for resident ophthalmologists. PMID:26075088

  5. Cataract surgery under topical anesthesia using 2% lignocaine jelly and intracameral lignocaine: is manual small incision cataract surgery comparable to clear corneal phacoemulsification?

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjiv K; Kumar, Ajai; Agarwal, Swati

    2010-01-01

    A prospective comparative study was undertaken to compare the patients' pain experience, surgical outcome and surgeon's experience in phacoemulsification and manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) under topical anesthesia supplemented with intracameral lignocaine (TASIL). In Group 1 (n=88) phacoemulsification was done and in Group 2 (n=92) MSICS was done. Pain scores were marked by the patients on a Visual analog scale (VAS) after the surgery. The surgical experience was noted on a questionnaire by the operating surgeon. Descriptive analysis and one-tailed Mann-Whitney test were used to draw results. The average VAS score in Group 1 was 0.65 (SD 1.31) and in Group 2 it was 0.90 (SD 1.22). This difference in the average was not statistically significant with P=0.09. The study demonstrates that MSICS and phacoemulsification both can be done safely under TASIL with acceptable patient comfort, and the pain experienced by the patients during the procedures is comparable. PMID:20952844

  6. Surgical outcomes with 360-degree suture trabeculotomy in poor prognosis primary congenital glaucoma and glaucoma associated with congenital anomalies or cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Allen D.; Lynn, Michael J.; Crandall, James; Mobin-Uddin, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the outcomes of 360-degree suture trabeculotomy in childhood glaucoma with poor prognosis. Subjects and Methods A nonrandomized, retrospective chart review was performed on pediatric patients (under 18 years old) treated with a 360-degree suture trabeculotomy for glaucoma. The cases were categorized into the following groups: (1) primary congenital glaucoma with birth-onset presentation accompanied by corneal clouding noted at birth, (2) primary congenital glaucoma with onset or presentation after 1 year of age, (3) primary congenital glaucoma with prior failed goniotomy surgery, (4) infantile-onset glaucoma following congenital cataract surgery, and (5) infantile-onset glaucoma with associated ocular/systemic anomalies. Results A total of 45 eyes of 33 patients were analyzed. The mean preoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) was 34.3 ± 6.7 mm Hg on an average of 1.5 medications. Median age at time of surgery was 7 months. Mean final IOP (median last follow-up or failure, 12 months) was 22.2 ± 7.1 mm Hg on an average of 1.5 medications. The probability of success according to time after surgery was 87% at 6 months, 63% at 1 year, and 58% at 2 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis of Groups 1-4 versus Group 5 failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference (p = 0.13). Of 5 eyes with port wine mark–related glaucoma, 2 had a large (>50%), persistent postoperative hyphema and concurrent vitreous hemorrhage. Conclusions Children with a wide range of ocular pathologies can be successfully treated with 360-degree suture trabeculotomy. Further evaluation of this surgical technique in primary congenital glaucoma and open-angle glaucoma following congenital cataract surgery is warranted. PMID:21397807

  7. Intraoperative and Immediate Postoperative Outcomes of Cataract Surgery using Phacoemulsification in Eyes with and without Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Arun K; Shankar, P Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Background: To compare the intraoperative and immediate postoperative behavior and complications in eyes with pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome with eyes having senile cataract without PEX during cataract surgery using phacoemulsification (PKE). Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 68 eyes of 68 patients were divided into two groups: Group 1 (test) comprised 34 eyes with immature senile cataract with PEX and Group 2 (control) included 34 eyes with immature senile cataract without PEX and any coexisting ocular pathology. Phacoemulsification (modern cataract surgery) was performed on both groups through stop and chop technique and comparative analysis of the incidence of intraoperative and immediate postoperative complications was made. Results: There was no significant difference in rates of intraoperative complications between PEX (2.9%) and Control (0%) group. The mean pupil diameter was significantly smaller in Group 1 (p<0.001). No eye in either group had phacodonesis. 58.8% of eyes in Group 1 and 29.4% in Group 2 had a harder cataract (nuclear sclerosis) ≥ grade 3 (p=0.017). PKE was performed in all eyes with cataract in both groups. Intraoperative complication (zonular dialysis (dehiscence) was encountered in only 2.9% (1 case) of eyes with PEX. PC (posterior capsule) tear (rent) with vitreous loss was seen in 2.9% eyes of Group 1 and none in Group 2. Postoperatively, IOP (intraocular pressure) and aqueous flare response were comparable between the groups. Significantly higher inflammatory cell response was observed in Group 1 (p=0.014). BCVA (best corrected visual acuity) using Snellen chart with pinhole on postoperative day1 was significantly better in the control group compared to the group with PEX (p=0.027). Conclusion: Phacoemulsification can be safely performed by experienced hands in cataractous eyes with PEX. The incidence of intraoperative and immediate post-operative complications in eyes with PEX was not significantly different

  8. Factors Influencing Efficacy of Peripheral Corneal Relaxing Incisions during Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hirnschall, Nino; Wiesinger, Jörg; Draschl, Petra; Findl, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate influencing factors on the residual astigmatism after performing peripheral corneal relaxing incisions (PCRIs) during cataract surgery. Methods. This prospective study included patients who were scheduled for cataract surgery with PCRIs. Optical biometry (IOLMaster 500, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany) was taken preoperatively, 1 week, 4 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Additionally, corneal topography (Atlas model 9000, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Germany), ORA (Ocular Response Analyzer, Reichert Ophthalmic Instruments, USA), and autorefraction (Autorefractometer RM 8800 Topcon) were performed postoperatively. Results. Mean age of the study population (n = 74) was 73.5 years (±9.3; range: 53 to 90) and mean corneal astigmatism preoperatively was −1.82 D (±0.59; 1.00 to 4.50). Mean corneal astigmatism was reduced to 1.14 D (±0.67; 0.11 to 3.89) 4 months postoperatively. A partial least squares regression showed that a high eccentricity of the cornea, a large deviation between keratometry and topography, and a high preoperative astigmatism resulted in a larger postoperative error concerning astigmatism. Conclusions. PCRI causes a reduction of preoperative astigmatism, though the prediction is difficult but several factors were found to be a relevant source of error. PMID:26199739

  9. Minimizing Surgically Induced Astigmatism at the Time of Cataract Surgery Using a Square Posterior Limbal Incision

    PubMed Central

    Ernest, Paul; Hill, Warren; Potvin, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the surgically induced astigmatism from clear corneal and square posterior limbal incisions at the time of cataract surgery. Methods. Surgically induced astigmatism was calculated for a set of eyes after cataract surgery using a temporal 2.2 mm square posterior limbal incision. Results were compared to similar available data from surgeons using clear corneal incisions of similar size. Results. Preoperative corneal astigmatism averaged 1.0 D and was not significantly different between the incision types. Surgically induced astigmatism with the 2.2 mm posterior limbal incision averaged 0.25 ± 0.14 D, significantly lower in magnitude than the aggregate surgically induced astigmatism produced by the 2.2 mm clear corneal incision (0.68 ± 0.49 D). Conclusion. The 2.2 mm square posterior limbal incision induced significantly less, and significantly less variable, surgically induced astigmatism relative to a similar-sized clear corneal incision. This is likely to improve refractive outcomes, particularly important with regard to premium intraocular lenses. PMID:22132310

  10. Continuous Curvilinear Capsulorhexis in Cataract Surgery Using a Modified 3-Bend Cystotome

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yuan; Gao, Jian-hua

    2015-01-01

    We modified a 2-bend cystotome for continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) in manual or phacoemulsification cataract surgery to improve the safety and ease of performance. A 26G needle was converted into a cystotome with 3 bends. In this retrospective study, the performance of modified 3-bend cystotome was compared with conventional 2-bend cystotome. During cataract surgery, in the 3-bend cystotome group, mean completion time of CCC was shorter, mean times of viscoelastic agent supplement were less, and CCC success rate was higher than that in 2-bend group. Complication incidence, such as postoperative transient corneal edema and irreparable V-shaped tear, was also lower in 3-bend group. No posterior capsular rupture or no other complication was observed in either group. A polymethyl methacrylate intraocular lens or a hydrogel intraocular lens was implanted in the capsular bag in all eyes. We conclude that it is safe and efficient to accomplish a CCC using the 3-bend cystotome due to its ability to sustain the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and keep the posterior lip intact. Using the 3-bend cystotome also allowed for an adequate view into the anterior chamber from lack of wound deformation. PMID:26509078

  11. Calculation of Ophthalmic Viscoelastic Device–Induced Focus Shift During Femtosecond Laser–Assisted Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Carolina P.; Cabot, Florence; Manns, Fabrice; Culbertson, William; Yoo, Sonia H.; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess if a change in refractive index of the anterior chamber during femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery can affect the laser beam focus position. Methods. The index of refraction and chromatic dispersion of six ophthalmic viscoelastic devices (OVDs) was measured with an Abbe refractometer. Using the Gullstrand eye model, the index values were used to predict the error in the depth of a femtosecond laser cut when the anterior chamber is filled with OVD. Two sources of error produced by the change in refractive index were evaluated: the error in anterior capsule position measured with optical coherence tomography biometry and the shift in femtosecond laser beam focus depth. Results. The refractive indices of the OVDs measured ranged from 1.335 to 1.341 in the visible light (at 587 nm). The error in depth measurement of the refilled anterior chamber ranged from −5 to +7 μm. The OVD produced a shift of the femtosecond laser focus ranging from −1 to +6 μm. Replacement of the aqueous humor with OVDs with the densest compound produced a predicted error in cut depth of 13 μm anterior to the expected cut. Conclusions. Our calculations show that the change in refractive index due to anterior chamber refilling does not sufficiently shift the laser beam focus position to cause the incomplete capsulotomies reported during femtosecond laser–assisted cataract surgery. PMID:25626971

  12. Continuous Curvilinear Capsulorhexis in Cataract Surgery Using a Modified 3-Bend Cystotome.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuan; Gao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    We modified a 2-bend cystotome for continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) in manual or phacoemulsification cataract surgery to improve the safety and ease of performance. A 26G needle was converted into a cystotome with 3 bends. In this retrospective study, the performance of modified 3-bend cystotome was compared with conventional 2-bend cystotome. During cataract surgery, in the 3-bend cystotome group, mean completion time of CCC was shorter, mean times of viscoelastic agent supplement were less, and CCC success rate was higher than that in 2-bend group. Complication incidence, such as postoperative transient corneal edema and irreparable V-shaped tear, was also lower in 3-bend group. No posterior capsular rupture or no other complication was observed in either group. A polymethyl methacrylate intraocular lens or a hydrogel intraocular lens was implanted in the capsular bag in all eyes. We conclude that it is safe and efficient to accomplish a CCC using the 3-bend cystotome due to its ability to sustain the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and keep the posterior lip intact. Using the 3-bend cystotome also allowed for an adequate view into the anterior chamber from lack of wound deformation. PMID:26509078

  13. Rationale for Implementation of Warm Cardiac Surgery in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Durandy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery was developed thanks to the introduction of hypothermia and cardiopulmonary bypass in the early 1950s. The deep hypothermia protective effect has been essential to circulatory arrest complex cases repair. During the early times of open-heart surgery, a major concern was to decrease mortality and to improve short-term outcomes. Both mortality and morbidity dramatically decreased over a few decades. As a consequence, the drawbacks of deep hypothermia, with or without circulatory arrest, became more and more apparent. The limitation of hypothermia was particularly evident for the brain and regional perfusion was introduced as a response to this problem. Despite a gain in popularity, the results of regional perfusion were not fully convincing. In the 1990s, warm surgery was introduced in adults and proved to be safe and reliable. This option eliminates the deleterious effect of ischemia–reperfusion injuries through a continuous, systemic coronary perfusion with warm oxygenated blood. Intermittent warm blood cardioplegia was introduced later, with impressive results. We were convinced by the easiness, safety, and efficiency of warm surgery and shifted to warm pediatric surgery in a two-step program. This article outlines the limitations of hypothermic protection and the basic reasons that led us to implement pediatric warm surgery. After tens of thousands of cases performed across several centers, this reproducible technique proved a valuable alternative to hypothermic surgery. PMID:27200324

  14. Rationale for Implementation of Warm Cardiac Surgery in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery was developed thanks to the introduction of hypothermia and cardiopulmonary bypass in the early 1950s. The deep hypothermia protective effect has been essential to circulatory arrest complex cases repair. During the early times of open-heart surgery, a major concern was to decrease mortality and to improve short-term outcomes. Both mortality and morbidity dramatically decreased over a few decades. As a consequence, the drawbacks of deep hypothermia, with or without circulatory arrest, became more and more apparent. The limitation of hypothermia was particularly evident for the brain and regional perfusion was introduced as a response to this problem. Despite a gain in popularity, the results of regional perfusion were not fully convincing. In the 1990s, warm surgery was introduced in adults and proved to be safe and reliable. This option eliminates the deleterious effect of ischemia-reperfusion injuries through a continuous, systemic coronary perfusion with warm oxygenated blood. Intermittent warm blood cardioplegia was introduced later, with impressive results. We were convinced by the easiness, safety, and efficiency of warm surgery and shifted to warm pediatric surgery in a two-step program. This article outlines the limitations of hypothermic protection and the basic reasons that led us to implement pediatric warm surgery. After tens of thousands of cases performed across several centers, this reproducible technique proved a valuable alternative to hypothermic surgery. PMID:27200324

  15. Does cognitive impairment influence outcomes from cataract surgery? Results from a 1-year follow-up cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Jefferis, Joanna Mary; Taylor, John-Paul; Clarke, Michael Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Background/aims To assess the impact of impaired cognition on visual outcomes 1 year following cataract surgery in a cohort of older people. Methods Participants aged 75 years or more with bilateral cataract and scheduled for cataract surgery were recruited consecutively. Cognition was assessed using the revised Addenbrooke's cognitive examination (ACE-R). Participants were divided into two groups: normal (ACE-R ≥88) and impaired cognition (ACE-R <88). Visual quality of life (VQOL) and logarithm of minimum angle of resolution visual acuity (VA) were assessed at baseline and 1 year following cataract surgery. Results Of 112 participants, 48 (43%) had normal cognition and 64 (57%) had impaired cognition. One year following cataract surgery participants in both groups had significant improvements in VQOL and VA. Visual outcomes at 1 year were significantly better in participants with normal cognition than in those with impaired cognition (95% CIs for difference 0.4–7.0 and 0.02–0.1, for VQOL and VA, respectively). Regression analyses correcting for potential confounders showed a relationship between baseline cognition and VA at 1 year (R2=0.30, p=0.001) and a possible relationship between baseline cognition and VQOL at 1 year (R2=0.41, p=0.01, this became insignificant after removal of outliers). Conclusions Patients with impaired cognition benefit from cataract surgery, but not to the same extent as patients with normal cognition. PMID:25287367

  16. The effect of a visual aid on the comprehension of cataract surgery in a rural, indigent South Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Karan, Abraar M.; Campbell, Daniel J.; Mayer, Hylton R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether a visual aid improves the understanding and retention of information presented during informed consent for rural, indigent patients presenting for cataract surgery. Materials and Methods This was a randomized, unmasked, interventional study. We recruited patients who presented to the Hande Surgical Hospital in Chennai, India, for cataract surgery. Patients were randomized into two groups: verbal consent alone (group A) and verbal consent plus a poster (group B). Both groups completed an 11-question true/false quiz immediately before and after informed consent and one day after surgery. Results A total of 60 patients were recruited for the study, with 30 randomly assigned to each group; 23 patients from group A and 17 from group B completed the study. Informed consent improved patient scores in both groups; however, group B had significantly higher mean scores on postoperative day 1 (7.4 vs 8.7, P = 0.005) and significantly greater improvement in mean scores from pre–informed consent to postoperative day 1 (1.3 vs 3.6, P = 0.002). Conclusions Informed consent improves patient understanding of cataract surgery. Using a visual aid during informed consent for cataract surgery improves understanding and retention of information more than verbal consent alone in a rural South Indian population. PMID:23362389

  17. Intraocular Lens Opacification following Intracameral Injection of Recombinant Tissue Plasminogen Activator to Treat Inflammatory Membranes after Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Simon S. M.; Islam, Niaz M.; Zambarakji, Hadi J.; Khoramnia, Ramin; Auffarth, Gerd U.; Parmar, Dipak N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To report 7 cases of intraocular lens (IOL) opacification following treatment of postoperative anterior chamber fibrin with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) after cataract surgery. Methods. Retrospective case series of 7 eyes in 7 patients who developed IOL opacification after receiving rtPA for anterior chamber inflammatory membrane formation resulting from phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Three explanted IOLs were investigated with light microscopy, histochemical analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray spectrometry. Results. All patients underwent uncomplicated cataract surgery and posterior chamber hydrophilic IOL implantation. Anterior chamber inflammatory membranes developed between 1 and 4 weeks of surgery and were treated with intracameral rtPA. IOL opacification was noted between 4 weeks and 6 years after rtPA treatment with reduced visual acuity, and IOL exchange was carried out in 3 patients. Light microscopy evaluation revealed diffuse fine granular deposits on the anterior surface/subsurface of IOL optic that stained positive for calcium salts. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) confirmed the presence of calcium and phosphate on the IOL. Conclusions. Intracameral rtPA, though rapidly effective in the treatment of anterior chamber inflammatory membranes following cataract surgery, may be associated with IOL opacification. PMID:25861464

  18. Evaluation of response variables in computer-simulated virtual cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderberg, Per G.; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf; Simawi, Wamidh; Nordqvist, Per; Skarman, Eva; Nordh, Leif

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a virtual reality (VR) simulator for phacoemulsification (phaco) surgery. The current work aimed at evaluating the precision in the estimation of response variables identified for measurement of the performance of VR phaco surgery. We identified 31 response variables measuring; the overall procedure, the foot pedal technique, the phacoemulsification technique, erroneous manipulation, and damage to ocular structures. Totally, 8 medical or optometry students with a good knowledge of ocular anatomy and physiology but naive to cataract surgery performed three sessions each of VR Phaco surgery. For measurement, the surgical procedure was divided into a sculpting phase and an evacuation phase. The 31 response variables were measured for each phase in all three sessions. The variance components for individuals and iterations of sessions within individuals were estimated with an analysis of variance assuming a hierarchal model. The consequences of estimated variabilities for sample size requirements were determined. It was found that generally there was more variability for iterated sessions within individuals for measurements of the sculpting phase than for measurements of the evacuation phase. This resulted in larger required sample sizes for detection of difference between independent groups or change within group, for the sculpting phase as compared to for the evacuation phase. It is concluded that several of the identified response variables can be measured with sufficient precision for evaluation of VR phaco surgery.

  19. Real-time segmentation and recognition of surgical tasks in cataract surgery videos.

    PubMed

    Quellec, Gwénolé; Lamard, Mathieu; Cochener, Béatrice; Cazuguel, Guy

    2014-12-01

    In ophthalmology, it is now common practice to record every surgical procedure and to archive the resulting videos for documentation purposes. In this paper, we present a solution to automatically segment and categorize surgical tasks in real-time during the surgery, using the video recording. The goal would be to communicate information to the surgeon in due time, such as recommendations to the less experienced surgeons. The proposed solution relies on the content-based video retrieval paradigm: it reuses previously archived videos to automatically analyze the current surgery, by analogy reasoning. Each video is segmented, in real-time, into an alternating sequence of idle phases, during which no clinically-relevant motions are visible, and action phases. As soon as an idle phase is detected, the previous action phase is categorized and the next action phase is predicted. A conditional random field is used for categorization and prediction. The proposed system was applied to the automatic segmentation and categorization of cataract surgery tasks. A dataset of 186 surgeries, performed by ten different surgeons, was manually annotated: ten possibly overlapping surgical tasks were delimited in each surgery. Using the content of action phases and the duration of idle phases as sources of evidence, an average recognition performance of Az = 0.832 ± 0.070 was achieved. PMID:25055383

  20. Cost analysis of cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation: a single blind randomised clinical trial comparing extracapsular cataract extraction and phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Rizal, A M; Aljunid, S M; Normalina, M; Hanom, A Faridah; Chuah, K L; Suzainah, Y; Zainal, M; Azman, A B

    2003-08-01

    A randomised single blinded clinical trial to compare the cost of cataract surgery between extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) and phacoemulsification (PEA) was conducted at Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) between March and December 2000. A total of 60 patients were included in this study. The cost of a cataract surgery incurred by hospital, patients and households up to two months after discharge were included. The costs of training, loss of patients' income after discharge and intangible costs were excluded. Results showed that the average cost for one ECCE operation is RM1,664.46 (RM1,233.04-RM2,377.64) and for PEA is RM1,978.00 (RM1,557.87-RM3,334.50). During this short period of follow up, it can be concluded that ECCE is significantly cheaper than PEA by an average difference of RM 313.54 per patient (p < 0.001). Cost of equipment and low frequency of PEA technique done in HUKM were the two main reasons for the high unit cost of PEA as compared to ECCE. PMID:14750378

  1. The impact of a preloaded intraocular lens delivery system on operating room efficiency in routine cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jason J; Chu, Jeffrey; Graham, Jacob; Zaluski, Serge; Rocha, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the operational impact of using preloaded intraocular lens (IOL) delivery systems compared with manually loaded IOL delivery processes during routine cataract surgeries. Methods Time and motion data, staff and surgery schedules, and cost accounting reports were collected across three sites located in the US, France, and Canada. Time and motion data were collected for manually loaded IOL processes and preloaded IOL delivery systems over four surgery days. Staff and surgery schedules and cost accounting reports were collected during the 2 months prior and after introduction of the preloaded IOL delivery system. Results The study included a total of 154 routine cataract surgeries across all three sites. Of these, 77 surgeries were performed using a preloaded IOL delivery system, and the remaining 77 surgeries were performed using a manual IOL delivery process. Across all three sites, use of the preloaded IOL delivery system significantly decreased mean total case time by 6.2%–12.0% (P<0.001 for data from Canada and the US and P<0.05 for data from France). Use of the preloaded delivery system also decreased surgeon lens time, surgeon delays, and eliminated lens touches during IOL preparation. Conclusion Compared to a manual IOL delivery process, use of a preloaded IOL delivery system for cataract surgery reduced total case time, total surgeon lens time, surgeon delays, and eliminated IOL touches. The time savings provided by the preloaded IOL delivery system provide an opportunity for sites to improve routine cataract surgery throughput without impacting surgeon or staff capacity. PMID:27382245

  2. Refractive and Visual Outcomes of Different Intraocular Lenses with Femtosecond Laser Cataract Surgery: The Expectation of Independence from Spectacles

    PubMed Central

    Crispim, Joao; Nose, Ricardo; Yogi, Milton; Nose, Walton

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the visual performance of different types of intraocular lens (IOL) in eyes submitted to femtosecond laser (FSL) cataract surgery and to analyze whether this technology could result in spectacles independence. Design: Retrospective comparative case series. Methods: Consecutive eyes that were scheduled for FSL cataract surgery were included in this study. After one month postoperative, patients were divided into two groups: cases that required prescription for eyeglasses and cases that did not require prescription. In addition, the patients were analyzed according to the type of IOL that was implanted (monofocal, monofocal toric, multifocal and multifocal toric). Results: Thirty-five cataract surgeries were analyzed. Twenty-three eyes had a monofocal IOL implanted, and 12 had a multifocal IOL implanted. After 1 month, 12 cases required prescription (Group 1), and 23 did not require prescription (Group 2). The proportion of eyes that did not require corrective lenses was significantly greater (P = 0.02) in eyes that received multifocal IOL (91.67%) compared with those that received monofocal IOL (47.83%). Additionally, 100% of eyes that received multifocal toric IOL did not require eyeglasses at one month postoperatively. Conclusion: The FSL surgical precision associated with modern IOL technology may be an important factor related to vision satisfaction after cataract surgery. PMID:26535071

  3. Assessment of visual outcomes of cataract surgery in Tujia nationality in Xianfeng County, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Wang, Xia; Yang, Li-Qin; Xing, Yi-Qiao; Yang, Yan-Ning

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the visual outcome and factors influencing visual outcome of manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) in the rural area in the Xianfeng County. METHODS Eighty-two eyes of 82 patients who underwent cataract surgery performed by using MSICS technique were identified. Data collected included each patient's age, gender, the level of education. Uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity (UDVA and CDVA) at presentation and at 1, 6, 8wk postoperatively, pre-existing eye disease, operative findings and complications, the risk factors were evaluated. RESULTS In 82 patients, the average age was 69.6±0.6y, illiterate were 52 (63.4%). Of 82 eyes, pseudophakia was present in 77 eyes (93.9%). At 1wk postoperatively, 47 eyes (57.3%) had the UDVA of ≥6/18, and 52 eyes (63.4%) had the CDVA of ≥6/18. At 6 to 8wk postoperatively, 50 eyes (61.0%) had UDVA of ≥6/18, and 57 eyes (69.5%) had the CDVA of ≥6/18. Postoperative visual status was significantly related to the co-morbidities, such as corneal pathology, glaucoma (P<0.001). Operative complications, such as posterior capsule opacity and cystoid macular edema were main operative cause for the poor visual outcome. CONCLUSION MSICS provides a good visual recovery in our study but the vision outcome did not fulfill the standards proposed by WHO, which highlights the need for an improvement in local socioeconomic understanding, population education and surgery quality. PMID:25938043

  4. Giovanni Battista Morgagni and his contribution to pediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Zani, Augusto; Cozzi, Denis A

    2008-04-01

    Pediatric surgery is a less than a century old surgical specialty. However, early knowledge of human malformations and pediatric surgical conditions dates back to centuries before. One of the main contributors to progress in these fields was Giovanni Battista Morgagni (1682-1771), who also had a substantial weight in the development of future pediatric surgery. With his masterpiece De Sedibus et Causis Morborum per Anatomen Indagatis (On the Seats and Causes of Diseases Investigated by Anatomy) (1761), he set the basis for modern pathology. In this textbook, Morgagni was the first to describe anatomical elements like the trigonum sternocostale dextrum (the Morgagni's foramen), the appendix testis (the Morgagni's hydatid), and the vertical folds of distal rectum (the Morgagni's columns). He was also the first to describe pediatric pathological conditions like epispadia, meconium peritonitis, Crohn's disease, and coarctation of the aorta. Finally, he substantially contributed to the understanding of the pathophysiology of conditions like the vesico-ureteral reflux, the anterior wall defects (gastroschisis/omphalocele), and the spina bifida. For this, it was said of him: "If all the anatomical findings made by Morgagni should bear his name, probably one third of human body would be called Morgagni's." PMID:18405723

  5. Astigmatism management in cataract surgery with Precizon® toric intraocular lens: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Carolina; Menezes, Carlos; Firmino-Machado, J; Rodrigues, Pedro; Lume, Miguel; Tenedório, Paula; Menéres, Pedro; Brochado, Maria do Céu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visual and refractive outcomes and rotational stability of the new aspheric Precizon® toric intraocular lens (IOL) for the correction of corneal astigmatism in cataract surgery. Setting Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Geral de Santo António – Centro Hospitalar do Porto, EPE and Hospital de Pedro Hispano, Matosinhos, Portugal. Design This was a prospective clinical study. Patients and methods A total of 40 eyes of 27 patients with corneal astigmatism greater than 1.0 diopter (D) underwent cataract surgery with implantation of Precizon® toric IOL. IOL power calculation was performed using optical coherence biometry (IOLMaster®). Outcomes of uncorrected (UDVA) and best-spectacle corrected distance visual acuities (BCDVA), refraction, and IOL rotation were analyzed at the 1st week, 1st, 3rd, and 6th month’s evaluations. Results The median postoperative UDVA was better than preoperative best-spectacle corrected distance visual acuity (0.02 [0.06] logMAR vs 0.19 [0.20] logMAR, P<0.001). At 6 months, postoperative UDVA was 0.1 logMAR or better in 95% of the eyes. At last follow-up, the mean spherical equivalent was reduced from −3.35±3.10 D to −0.02±0.30 D (P<0.001) with 97.5% of the eyes within ±0.50 D of emmetropia. The mean preoperative keratometric cylinder was 2.34±0.95 D and the mean postoperative refractive cylinder was 0.24±0.27 D (P<0.001). The mean IOL rotation was 2.43°±1.55°. None of the IOLs required realignment. Conclusion Precizon® toric IOL revealed very good rotational stability and performance regarding predictability, efficacy, and safety in the correction of preexisting regular corneal astigmatism associated with cataract surgery. PMID:26855559

  6. Immediate versus Delayed Sequential Bilateral Cataract Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Malvankar-Mehta, Monali S.; Chen, Yufeng Nancy; Patel, Sangita; Leung, Angela Pui-Kei; Merchea, Man Mohan; Hodge, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Immediately sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS), the cataract surgery that is performed in both eyes simultaneously, is gaining popularity worldwide compared to the traditional treatment paradigm: delayed sequential bilateral cataract surgery (DSBCS), the surgery that is performed in each eye on a different day as a completely separate operation. ISBCS provides advantages to patients and patients’ families in the form of fewer hospital visits. Additionally, patients enjoy rapid rehabilitation, lack of anisometropia - potentially reducing accidents and falls, and avoid suboptimal visual function in daily life. The hospital may benefit due to lower cost. Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate ISBCS and DSBCS. Data Sources Databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, CINAHL, Health Economic Evaluations Database (HEED), ISI Web of Science (Thomson-Reuters) and the Cochrane Library were searched. Participants Not applicable. Methods Literature was systematically reviewed using EPPI-Reviewer 4 gateway. Meta-analysis was conducted using STATA v. 13.0. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated and heterogeneity was assessed using I2 statistics. Fixed-effect and random-effect models were computed based on heterogeneity. Meta-analysis was done by instrument used to calculate utility score. Results In total, 9,133 records were retrieved from multiple databases and an additional 128 records were identified through grey literature search. Eleven articles with 3,657 subjects were included for analysis. Our meta-analysis results indicated significant improvement in post-operative utility score using TTO, EQ5D, HUI3, VF-7, and VF-14 and a non-significant improvement using Catquest questionnaire for both surgeries. For ISBCS versus DSBCS, utility-specific fixed-effect model provided an overall SMD of the utility score using the TTO method as 0.12 (95% CI: -0.15, 0.40), EQ5D as 0.14 (95

  7. Care of the pediatric patient in ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, K A

    1997-06-01

    Caring for the pediatric and adolescent patient in the ambulatory surgery unit is challenging for several reasons. The first 18 years are a period of rapid physical, cognitive, and psychosocial growth. Psychological preparation is very important to ensure the readiness of the child and family for surgery; however, the efficacy of the different methods of preparation varies. Teaching should be geared to the developmental level of the child, and specific information on the process, sights, smells, and sensations the child will experience should be given to allay parental anxiety and fears. Appropriate tools must be available for the nurse to assess and implement the physical plan of care. PMID:9115488

  8. Comparison of surgically induced astigmatism in various incisions in manual small incision cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jauhari, Nidhi; Chopra, Deepak; Chaurasia, Rajan Kumar; Agarwal, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    AIM To determine the surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) in Straight, Frown and Inverted V shape (Chevron) incisions in manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS). METHODS A prospective cross sectional study was done on a total of 75 patients aged 40y and above with senile cataract. The patients were randomly divided into three groups (25 each). Each group received a particular type of incision (Straight, Frown or Inverted V shape incisions). Manual SICS with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation was performed. The patients were compared 4wk post operatively for uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and SIA. All calculations were performed using the SIA calculator version 2.1, a free software program. The study was analyzed using SPSS version 15.0 statistical analysis software. RESULTS The study found that 89.5% of patients in Straight incision group, 94.2% in Frown incision group and 95.7% in Inverted V group attained BCVA post-operatively in the range of 6/6 to 6/18. Mean SIA was minimum (-0.88±0.61D×90 degrees) with Inverted V incision which was statistically significant. CONCLUSION Inverted V (Chevron) incision gives minimal SIA. PMID:25540754

  9. Schlieren visualization of fluid dynamics phenomena during phacosonication in cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafino, Gabriella; Piuzzi, Barbara; Sanguinetti, G.; Sirotti, C.; Sirotti, Paolo; Tognetto, D.

    2005-03-01

    In ultrasonic phacoemulsification during cataract surgery the lens material fragmentation has been described as being caused by a combination of several mechanisms. The different theories involve tip vibration, acoustic waves produced by the tip, particles and liquids impact on the surface of the lens and cavitation. However the mechanisms are still not clear. To better understand phaco-related phenomena we have tried to produce a description in term of images of the cataract phacoemulsification procedure. An expanded and collimated laser diode beam transilluminates a transparent tube containing a liquid medium. The machine is activated separating the different phases of irrigation, aspiration and phacosonication. Fluid turbulences and phenomena related to the tip vibration constitute the phase images, visualized using Schlieren or similar techniques. The optical Fourier transform is filtered by a blade or by a black dot. The filtered transform is reconstructed into the visualized phase image and this is acquired by a digital image processing system. The presence of acoustic cavitation and possibly of ultrasonic radiation has been revealed. The technique promises to be a possible means for evaluation of single phaco apparatus power setting and comparison between different machines in terms of power modulation and cavitation production.

  10. Aqueous cytokines as predictors of macular edema in non-diabetic patients following uncomplicated phacoemulsification cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liqun; Wang, Bingsong; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To ascertain whether cytokines in the aqueous humor can predict macular edema (ME) in non-diabetic patients following uncomplicated phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Methods Undiluted aqueous humor samples were obtained from 288 consecutive non-diabetic patients (288 eyes; 132 men and 156 women) who underwent cataract surgery. Macular edema was defined as an increase in the foveal center point thickness (FCPT) more than 30% from the preoperative baseline using optical coherence tomography 4 weeks after cataract surgery. The concentrations of 27 cytokines were measured in aqueous humor samples using the multiplex bead immunoassay. Results No major intraoperative complications occurred. The incidence of ME was 8.13% (23 patients) 4 weeks after cataract surgery. Compared to the ME (-) patients, the concentrations of interleukin-1β (IL-1β; p=0.016), IL-6 (p=0.013), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1; p=0.030), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF; p=0.033) in the ME (+) patients were significantly higher. In addition, the aqueous humor levels of IL-1β (r=0.376), IL-6 (r=0.418), MCP-1 (r=0.348), and VEGF (r=0.375) positively correlated with the postoperative FCPT. However, the aqueous humor levels of IL-10 (p=0.017) were significantly lower in patients with ME and were negatively correlated with the postoperative FCPT (r=–0.424). Conclusions IL-1β, IL-6, MCP-1, VEGF, and IL-10 may be potential predictors of postoperative macular thickness in non-diabetic patients following uncomplicated phacoemulsification cataract surgery. PMID:24319335

  11. Comparing the Curative Effects between Femtosecond Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery and Conventional Phacoemulsification Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinyi; Chen, Kailin; He, Jiliang; Yao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) with those of conventional phacoemulsification surgery (CPS) for age-related cataracts. Methods A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials (RCT) and comparative cohort studies comparing FLACS with CPS. Endothelial cell loss percentage (ECL%), central corneal thickness (CCT), corrected and uncorrected distant visual acuity (CDVA and UDVA), and mean absolute error (MAE) of refraction were used as primary outcomes. Secondary outcomes included surgically induced astigmatism (SIA), mean effective phacoemulsification time (EPT), phacoemulsification power and circularity of the capsulorhexis. Results Nine RCTs and fifteen cohort studies including 4,903 eyes (2,861 in the FLACS group and 2,072 in the CPS group) were identified. There were significant differences between the two groups in ECL% at one week, about one month and three months postoperatively, in CCT at one day, about one month postoperatively and at the final follow-up, in CDVA at one week postoperatively, and in UDVA at the final follow-up. Significant differences were also observed in MAE, EPT, phacoemulsification power, and the circularity of capsulorhexis. However, no significant differences were observed in CDVA at one week postoperatively or in surgically induced astigmatism. Conclusions Compared to CPS, FLACS is a safer and more effective method for reducing endothelial cell loss and postoperative central corneal thickening as well as achieving better and faster visual rehabilitation and refractive outcomes. However, there is no difference in final CDVA and surgically induced astigmatism between the two groups. PMID:26999612

  12. Toxic anterior segment syndrome after uncomplicated cataract surgery possibly associated with intracamaral use of cefuroxime

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Burçin; Celik, Erkan; Aksoy, Nilgün Özkan; Bursalı, Özlem; Uçak, Turgay; Bozkurt, Erdinç; Alagoz, Gursoy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS) after cataract surgery possibly associated with intracameral use of cefuroxime. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review and analysis on the pre- and postoperative conditions of the subjects who had developed TASS. Results The patient group consisted of 17 patients. Tyndallization and fibrin fibers were positive in all eyes. In four eyes, hypopyon formation developed. These reactions diminished on the third day and fully resolved 1 week after the operations with the use of intensive topical steroid and mydriatic therapy. To determine the etiology of TASS, infusion fluid, viscoelastics, and intracameral antibiotic agent were changed respectively. After changing intracameral antibiotic agent from cefuroxime axetile to moxifloxacin no new cases of TASS were diagnosed. Conclusion All agents injected into the anterior chamber can cause TASS. Ophthalmologists and operating room staff need to pay careful attention to all drugs and irrigating solutions. PMID:25834384

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis of postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery: Results of the 2014 ASCRS member survey.

    PubMed

    Chang, David F; Braga-Mele, Rosa; Henderson, Bonnie An; Mamalis, Nick; Vasavada, Abhay

    2015-06-01

    A 2014 online survey of the American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery members indicated increasing use of intracameral antibiotic injection prophylaxis compared with a comparable survey from 2007. Forty-seven percent of respondents already used or planned to adopt this measure. One half of all surgeons not using intracameral prophylaxis expressed concern about the risks of noncommercially prepared antibiotic preparations. Overall, the large majority (75%) said they believe it is important to have a commercially available antibiotic approved for intracameral injection. Assuming reasonable cost, the survey indicates that commercial availability of Aprokam (cefuroxime) would increase the overall percentage of surgeons using intracameral antibiotic injection prophylaxis to nearly 84%. Although the majority used topical perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis, and gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin were still the most popular agents, there was a trend toward declining use of fourth-generation fluoroquinolones (60%, down from 81% in 2007) and greater use of topical ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin (21%, up from 9% in 2007). PMID:26189384

  14. Is the Memory Effect of the Blind Spot Involved in Negative Dysphotopsia after Cataract Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Martin; Menapace, Rupert; Eppig, Timo; Langenbucher, Achim

    2015-01-01

    We present novel clinical observations on negative dysphotopsia (ND) in eyes that have undergone cataract surgery. In the past, shadow effects were alleged to be located in the far peripheral temporal visual field 50° to 100° away from the optical axis. In a small series of eight patients we found evidence of photic effects, described by the patients as shadows in the periphery that were objectively located much more centrally. In all cases, we could find an association of these phenomena with the blind spot. We hypothesize that the memory effect of the blind spot which is dislocated and changed in magnification due to replacement of the crystalline lens could be one determinant for pseudophakic ND. The scotoma of the optic nerve head and the main arteries and veins of the phakic eye are displaced in the pseudophakic eye depending on the specific characteristics and position of the intraocular lens within the eye. PMID:26425353

  15. [Pay attention to the corneal epithelial cell dysfunction after cataract surgery].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuguang; Wang, Sen

    2015-03-01

    Corneal epithelial dysfunction ( CED ) is the abnormality of the regeneration, conjunction, adhesion and immigration of the corneal epithelium cells without the decompensation of the corneal limbal cells. Due to the affection resulting from the systemic problems of patients and the management in the preoperative period, some of the patients at one to two weeks after cataract surgery will present the edema and fluorescein staining of the corneal epithelium. Without correct therapy, the defect of the epithelium, or even persisting ulceration of the cornea will occur. The key points of the management for CED are the early diagnosis and reasonable therapy. We suggest paying special attention to CED in the patients with metabolism diseases, abnormality of the tear film and long-term blepharitis. PMID:26268637

  16. Percutaneous Pediatric Foot and Ankle Surgery.

    PubMed

    Uglow, Michael G

    2016-09-01

    The techniques for performing percutaneous osteotomies in treating deformities of the foot in children are presented along with a detailed description of the operative details. The author's use of minimal-access surgery for tibial, os calcis, and midfoot osteotomies is described using a cooled side-cutting burr that has not previously been described for use in the child's foot. The cancellous nature of the bones in the child are easily cut with the burr and the adjacent soft tissues are not damaged. The early experience of the healing times are not impaired and the complications associated with percutaneous scars seem to be negligible. PMID:27524707

  17. Long-term outcomes of limbal relaxing incisions during cataract surgery: aberrometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Gaspare; Scialdone, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the final changes in corneal wavefront aberration by limbal relaxing incisions (LRIs) after cataract surgery. Methods This prospective cumulative interventional nonrandomized case study included cataract and astigmatic patients undergoing LRIs and phaco with intraocular lens implantation. LRIs were planned using Donnenfeld nomogram. The root mean square of corneal wave aberration for total Z(n,i)(1≤n≤8), astigmatism Z(2,±1), coma Z(3–5–7,±1), trefoil Z(3–5–7,±2), spherical Z(4–6–8,0), and higher-order aberration (HOA) Z(3≤n≤8) was examined before and 3 years after surgery (optical path difference-Scan II [OPD-Scan II)]. Uncorrected distance visual acuity and best-corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) for distance, keratometric cylinder, and variations in average corneal power were also analyzed. Results Sixty-four eyes of 48 patients were included in the study. Age ranged from 42 to 92 years (70.6±8.4 years). After LRIs, uncorrected distance visual acuity and best-corrected distance visual acuity improved statistically (P<0.01). The keratometric cylinder value decreased by 40.1%, but analysis of KP90 and KP135 polar values did not show any decrease that could be statistically confirmed (P=0.22 and P=0.24). No significant changes were detected in root mean square of total (P=0.61) and HOAs (P=0.13) aberrations. LRIs did not induce alteration in central corneal power confirming a 1:1 coupling ratio. Conclusion LRIs determined a nonsignificant alteration of corneal HOA. Therefore, LRIs can be still considered a qualitatively viable mean in those cases where toric intraocular lenses are contraindicated or not available. Yet, the authors raise the question of nonpersonalized nomograms, as in the present study, LRIs did not reach the preset target cylinder. PMID:26357459

  18. Effect of biaxial versus coaxial microincision cataract surgery on optical quality of the cornea

    PubMed Central

    Eliwa, Tamer Fahmy; Elsamkary, Mahmoud A; Hamza, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Context: Visual function is determined by a combination of the cornea, which has a larger effect and internal aberrations generated by the intraocular lens and those induced by the surgery. These corneal refractive changes are related to the location and size of the corneal incision. The smaller the incision, the lower the aberrations and the better the optical quality. Aims: To compare the effect of uneventful coaxial versus biaxial microincision cataract surgery (MICS) on the corneal aberrations. Settings and Design: Retrospective interventional nonrandomized comparative case study comprised 40 eyes of 36 patients with primary senile cataract. Subjects and Methods: They were divided into two groups: Group I (20 eyes) had operated by biaxial MICS and Group II (20 eyes) had operated by coaxial MICS. Each group were assessed by corneal topography and wavefront analysis over 6 mm pupil size preoperatively and 1-month postoperatively. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS for Windows (version 17.0.1, SPSS, Inc.). The paired t-test was used to compare the mean values of corneal aberrations preoperatively and 1-month postoperatively in each group. Results: There was a significant increase in trefoil and quatrefoil in biaxial MICS (P = 0.063, 0.032 respectively) while other aberrations insignificantly changed. The coaxial MICS showed a significant increase in root mean square (RMS) of total high order aberrations (HOAs) (P = 0.02) and coma (0.028), but not the others. In comparison to each other, there was the insignificant difference as regards astigmatism, RMS of individual and total HOAs. Conclusions: Coaxial and biaxial MICS are neutral on corneal astigmatism and aberrations. PMID:26265637

  19. Aspergillus terreus infection in a sutureless self-sealing incision made during cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Elif; Kandemir, Hazal; Arıkan-Akdağlı, Sevtap; Esen, Ebru; Açıkalın, Arbil; Yağmur, Meltem; İlkit, Macit

    2015-02-01

    Here, we describe a case of keratitis caused by Aspergillus terreus in an 80-year-old immunocompetent woman 1 month after uneventful cataract surgery. The patient presented with decreased visual acuity (20/50) and severe pain in her right eye. Examination revealed a 3.5 × 4.5 mm white-colored deep stromal infiltration located on the temporal corneal tunnel incision. Corneal scraping samples were obtained for cytological and culture examinations. The cinnamon-brown colonies consisting of a dense felt of conidiophores were identified as A. terreus using molecular data. Using CLSI M38-A2 microdilution method, minimum inhibitory concentration values of amphotericin B, itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole were determined to be 2, 1, 0.25, and 1 μg/ml, respectively, and minimum effective concentration values of caspofungin and anidulafungin were ≤0.03 and ≤0.03, respectively, at 48 h for the A. terreus strain. Antifungal therapy was started as topical 1 % voriconazole drops hourly and 5 % natamycin ointment five times a day; however, corneal infection and melting progressed despite the ongoing intensive treatment and visual acuity dropped to the 20/200 level at the end of the first week. Amniotic membrane transplantation was performed to promote corneal healing. Topical medication was tapered and discontinued within 2 months based on the clinical features. The ulcer healed with scarring and vascularization, and visual acuity improved to 20/50. In conclusion, A. terreus is a very uncommon cause of mycotic keratitis and is especially rare after cataract surgery. We suggest that early and accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment of A. terreus keratitis may have a major impact on preventing severe disease complications. PMID:25362536

  20. Methicillin resistance of Staphylococcus species among health care and nonhealth care workers undergoing cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Randall; Donnenfeld, Eric; Bucci, Frank A; Price, Francis W; Raizman, Michael; Solomon, Kerry; Devgan, Uday; Trattler, William; Dell, Steven; Wallace, R Bruce; Callegan, Michelle; Brown, Heather; McDonnell, Peter J; Conway, Taryn; Schiffman, Rhett M; Hollander, David A

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to characterize the bacterial flora of the ocular and periocular surface in cataract surgery patients and to determine the prevalence of methicillin resistance among staphylococcal isolates obtained from health care workers (HCWs) and non-HCWs. Methods: In this prospective, multicenter, case series study, eyelid and conjunctival cultures were obtained from the nonoperative eye of 399 consecutive cataract patients on the day of surgery prior to application of topical anesthetics, antibiotics, or antiseptics. Speciation and susceptibility testing were performed at the Dean A. McGee Eye Institute. Logistic regression was utilized to evaluate whether any factors were significant in predicting the presence of methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates. Results: Staphylococcus epidermidis (62.9%), followed by S. aureus (14.0%), was the most frequently isolated organism. Methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis accounted for 47.1% (178/378) of S. epidermidis isolates, and methicillin-resistant S. aureus accounted for 29.5% (26/88) of S. aureus isolates. Methicillin-resistant staphylococcal isolates were found in 157 of 399 (39.3%) patients, the majority (89.2%) of whom were non-HCWs. The likelihood of being colonized with methicillin-resistant organisms increased with age (odds ratio [OR], 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–1.58; P = 0.04) but decreased with diabetes (OR, 0.51; 95% CI: 0.29–0.89; P = 0.02). Being a HCW (OR, 1.25; 95% CI: 0.61–2.58; P = 0.54) was not a risk factor for colonization with methicillin-resistant organisms. Conclusion: Patients without exposure to health care environments are as likely as HCWs to be colonized with methicillin-resistant organisms. Increasing methicillin resistance with age may partially explain the increased risk of endophthalmitis reported with older age. PMID:21191448

  1. Topical Latanoprost Does Not Cause Macular Thickening after Uncomplicated Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Moghimi, Sasan; Zandian, Mehdi; Latifi, Golshan; Amini, Heydar; Eslami, Yadollah; Zarei, Reza; Fakhraie, Ghasem; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kouros

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To explore changes in central macular thickness (CMT) after a two-month period of glaucoma therapy with topical latanoprost after uneventful phacoemulsification. Methods Forty-one eyes of 31 patients with primary open angle or pseudoexfoliative glaucoma who required glaucoma medications after cataract surgery were prospectively enrolled. All eyes had undergone uneventful phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation at least 4 months before initiation of latanoprost. After a complete ophthalmic examination, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fluorescein angiography (FA) were performed at baseline before starting latanoprost. All eyes received latanoprost for 2 months, and clinical examinations were repeated one and two months afterwards; OCT and FA were repeated after 2 months. Outcome measures were CMT and loss of more than 2 lines of best corrected visual acuity (BCVA). Results Mean patient age was 71.6±7.8 years. Intraocular pressure decreased from 21.5±3.4 mmHg to 14.4±2.6 mmHg (p<0.001) at 2 months. None of the eyes developed reduction of BCVA exceeding 2 lines, or angiographic cystoid macular edema (CME). Likewise no significant change was noted in CMT (249.9±29.8 vs 248.8±30.7µm), average macular thickness (274.5±15.0 vs 273.8±17.0µm), or macular volume (9.6±1.0 vs 9.6±1.1µm2) after treatment as compared to baseline (P>0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion Topical use of latanoprost later than 4 months after uncomplicated cataract surgery does not seem to predispose to increased macular thickness or CME and may safely be used in this setting. PMID:23503128

  2. Foldable vs rigid lenses after phacoemulsification for cataract surgery: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, A; Puri, L R; Sharma, H; Evans, J R; Yorston, D

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes of phacoemulsification with either a 2.5-mm clear corneal incision and a foldable intraocular lens (IOL) or a 5-mm sclerocorneal tunnel incision and a rigid polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) IOL. Methods In a prospective, randomised clinical trial of phacoemulsification cataract surgery, 1200 patients received either a foldable hydrophilic acrylic IOL through a 2.5-mm corneal incision or an inexpensive rigid PMMA IOL via a 5-mm sclerocorneal tunnel. Intra- and post-operative data and visual acuity at discharge, 6 weeks, and 1 year follow-up were analysed. Results At 1 year after surgery, 996 (83.0%) patients were followed up with an uncorrected visual acuity of 6/18 or better in 90.3% of the foldable and 94.3% in the rigid IOL group (risk ratio (RR) 0.96, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.92–0.99). Poor outcome (best-corrected acuity 6/60 or worse) occurred in 1.0% and 0.4%, respectively (RR 4.28, 95% CI 0.48–38.18). The surgical cost of consumables and overall surgical time were similar in both groups; however, the cost of the foldable IOL was eight times higher than the PMMA IOL. Posterior capsule opacification was more common in the rigid IOL group at 12 months (36.1% vs 23.3%); however, this did not affect post-operative vision. Conclusion In the hands of experienced cataract surgeons, phacoemulsification with implantation of a foldable or a rigid IOL gives excellent results. Using an inexpensive rigid PMMA IOL will make phacoemulsification more affordable for poor patients in low- and middle-income countries. PMID:24556879

  3. Evaluation of ultrasonic biomicroscopy results in anterior eye segment before and after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Simsek, Ali; Ciftci, Süleyman

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the value of ultrasonic biomicroscopy in reporting decreases in intraocular pressure resulting from changes in anterior chamber depth and angle after phacoemulsification and intracapsular lens implantation in patients with cataract. Methods This prospective interventional case series included 50 eyes of 50 consecutive subjects operated at the same center. Patients with eye disease affecting visual acuity, a history of eye surgery, corneal surface irregularities, a pupil diameter < 5 mm after preoperative dilation, aged younger than 35 years, posterior capsule perforation, iris dialysis during surgery, intensive postoperative corneal edema, and inability to attend adequate follow-up were excluded. Intraocular pressure, anterior chamber depth and angle, and corneal thickness were measured before and one month after surgery. Results The mean preoperative intraocular pressure was 14 mmHg and postoperatively was 11 mmHg. Mean anterior chamber depth preoperatively was 2.8 mm and increased to 3.7 mm postoperatively. The mean anterior chamber angle was measured as 27° preoperatively and as 42° postoperatively. Conclusion After phacoemulsification and intracapsular lens implantation, ultrasonic biomicroscopy showed that the iris diaphragm had shifted backwards, widening the angle of the anterior chamber and decreasing intraocular pressure. PMID:23204837

  4. Risk factors for endophthalmitis following cataract surgery-our experience at a tertiary eye care centre in India

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Rohit C.; Ray, Vanita Pathak; Latha, Madhavi; Cassard, Sandra D; Mathai, Annie; Sekhar, Garudadri C

    2015-01-01

    AIM To determine the risk factors for acute endophthalmitis after cataract extraction in a tertiary care centre in India. METHODS We performed a nested case control study within a retrospective cohort. The surgical records of all patients with clinically diagnosed endophthalmitis within one month after cataract surgery, performed between January 2006 and December 2009, were reviewed. These were compared with randomly selected age and gender-matched controls, from patients having routine cataract surgery within ±1wk of the endophthalmitis case. Univariable and multivariable analysis were performed to identify risk factors for endophthalmitis. RESULTS Of the total 33 856 cataract surgeries performed during this period, there were 57 cases of postoperative acute endophthalmitis that met our study criteria. Thus, the overall incidence of endophthalmitis in our cohort was 1.6 per 1000 cataract extractions performed. Mean age of cases was 55.9y (SD: 10.9y) and for controls was 55.6y (SD: 9.8y). Thirty-five cases (61.4%) and 133 controls (59.6%) were males. Median time of onset of endophthalmitis was 4d (IQR 2-9d; range: 1-30d). Thirty-nine cases (68.4%) presented within 7d and 27 cases (47.4%) were culture positive. Two hundred and twenty-three age and gender matched controls were selected. In multivariate analysis, endophthalmitis was associated with posterior capsular rupture (PCR) during surgery (OR 6.98, 95%CI: 2.22-21.98), phacoemulsification via scleral incision with a foldable intraocular lens (IOL) implantation (OR 3.02, 95%CI: 1.13-8.04) and ocular co-morbidity (OR 2.32, 95%CI: 1.11-4.87). CONCLUSION PCR, presence of ocular co-morbidity, and phacoemulsification via scleral incision with foldable-IOL were found to be independent risk factors for acute endophthalmitis. PMID:26682170

  5. Early detection of acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, John Lynn; Devarajan, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is increasingly recognized as a common problem in children undergoing cardiac surgery, with well documented increases in morbidity and mortality in both the short and the long term. Traditional approaches to the identification of AKI such as changes in serum creatinine have revealed a large incidence in this population with significant negative impact on clinical outcomes. However, the traditional diagnostic approaches to AKI diagnosis have inherent limitations that may lead to under-diagnosis of this pathologic process. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials for the prevention and treatment of AKI associated with cardiac surgery, at least in part due to the paucity of early predictive biomarkers. Novel non-invasive biomarkers have ushered in a new era that allows for earlier detection of AKI. With these new diagnostic tools, a more consistent approach can be employed across centers that may facilitate a more accurate representation of the actual prevalence of AKI and more importantly, clinical investigation that may minimize the occurrence of AKI following pediatric cardiac surgery. A thoughtful management approach is necessary to mitigate the effects of AKI after cardiac surgery, which is best accomplished in close collaboration with pediatric nephrologists. Long-term surveillance for improvement in kidney function and potential development of chronic kidney disease should also be a part of the comprehensive management strategy. PMID:27429538

  6. Which colours are seen by the patient during cataract surgery? Results of an intraoperative interview.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, M; Schulze Schwering, M

    2016-03-01

    PurposeTo discover what cataract patients see during phacoemulsification and if these light phenomena influence their anxiety levels during surgery.MethodsIn all, 200 patients were interviewed intraoperatively at the Eye Hospital, Petrisberg, Trier, Germany. The quality of the visual experiences was described and if these were pleasant, neutral or unpleasant. Systemic sedation was noted.ResultsAmong 200 patients (209 eyes): 88 were men (91 eyes; 44%) and 112 were women (118 eyes; 56%). Median age (years): men (71), women (70). Mean operating time was 8 min. 49/209 (23%) were not anxious before and during surgery. 110/209 (52%) were more anxious before than during surgery, 50/209 (24%) were still anxious during surgery, 27/209 (13%) got sedation with midazolam (1-5 mg). Colours in descending order seen: blue, red, pink, yellow, green, purple, turquois, and orange. The most dominant colour combination was red/blue. Structures were seen by 162/209 (78%). Most (61%) intraoperative visual experiences were pleasant, 38% were neutral, and 1% found them transiently unpleasant. Three patients felt blinded by the light of the operating microscope.ConclusionsThe experience of colours and other light phenomena was pleasant for most patients during phacoemulsification under topical anaesthesia. They occur spontaneously when the patient is fixating on the operating light. They are not dependent on the individual or environment. Sedation only in 13%. Direct questioning for visual sensations by the operating surgeon may lead to less need for sedation and lead to less side effects for elderly and multimorbidity people postoperatively. The surgeon can use this knowledge to reassure patients during surgery. PMID:26563653

  7. Imaging and investigating the effects of incision angle of clear corneal cataract surgery with optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Bin; Zhang, Jun; Taban, Mehran; McDonnell, Peter J.; Chen, Zhongping

    2003-12-01

    Effects of incision angle in construction of clear corneal cataract incision are studied with optical coherence tomography (OCT). A stable incision angle range is found to be existent for single-planed, clear corneal cataract incisions. When well pressurized, incision angles within this stable range result in well-apposed incision edges that resist gapping while incision angles falling outside this range have a larger tendency for wound leakage. It is also shown that a two-planed incision can effectively expand the stable range. For incision angles outside the stable range, the farther the incision angle is away from stable range, the larger the gap between incision wound edges when well pressurized. These findings emphasize the significance of incision construction to the self-sealing property of clear corneal cataract incisions. Finally, we demonstrate that OCT could be an effective modality for imaging and monitoring corneal surgery.

  8. Facts and Myths about Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... your physician. MYTH: The best time to have cataract surgery done is when it is first diagnosed. FACT: ... membrane behind the implant may become cloudy after cataract surgery. Laser treatment then may be used to open ...

  9. A Comparison of the Efficacy of Cataract Surgery Using Aqualase® with Phacoemulsification Using MicroFlow® System

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyun-Wook; Park, Shin-Hae

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare the outcomes after phacoemulsification performed with the AquaLase® and phacoemulsification in MicroFlow® system, including surgically induced astigmatism (SIA), corneal endothelial cell damage and postoperative recovery of visual acuity. Methods The cataracts of Lens Opacities Classification System, version III (LOCS III) nuclear grade below 2 were subjected in this study. Nineteen eyes underwent cataract operation using AquaLase® (Alcon Laboratories, Fort Worth, Texas, U.S.A.). A control group (19 eyes) used the MicroFlow® system (Millenium, Stortz, U.S.A.) and was selected by matching age, sex, systemic disease, corneal astigmatism and corneal endothelial cell density. All the surgeries were performed by the same operator. SIA, corneal endothelial cell loss, visual acuity, and corneal thickness were evaluated postoperatively. Results SIA in the group using AquaLase® was less than that of the group using MicroFlow® system (P=0.022) at 2 months postoperatively. Evaluation of corneal endothelial cell loss, recovery of visual acuity and corneal thickness found no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions Cataract surgery using AquaLase® induces less surgically induced astigmatism in mild to moderate cataracts. PMID:17804917

  10. Cataract Surgery in Eyes with Low Corneal Astigmatism: Implantation of the Acrysof IQ Toric SN6AT2 Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Jaskirat S; Vincent, Stephen J; White, Shane; Panchapakesan, Jai

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the refractive and visual outcomes following cataract surgery and implantation of the AcrySof IQ Toric SN6AT2 intraolcular lens (IOL) (Alcon Laboratories, Inc., Fort Worth, TX, USA) in patients with low corneal astigmatism. Methods: This study is a retrospective, consecutive, single surgeon series of 98 eyes of 88 patients (with low preoperative corneal astigmatism) undergoing cataract surgery and implantation of the AcrySof IQ Toric SN6AT2 IOL. Postoperative measurements were obtained 1-month postsurgery. Main outcome measures were monocular distance visual acuity and residual refractive astigmatism. Results: Mean preoperative corneal astigmatic power vector (APV) was 0.38±0.09 D. Following surgery and implantation of the toric IOL, mean postoperative refractive APV was 0.13±0.10 D. Mean postoperative distance uncorrected visual acuity was 0.08±0.09 logMAR. Postoperative spherical equivalent refraction (SER) resulted in a mean of –0.23±0.22 D, with 96% of eyes falling within 0.50 D of the target SER. Conclusion: The AcrySof IQ Toric SN6AT2 IOL is a safe and effective option for eyes undergoing cataract surgery with low levels of preoperative corneal astigmatism. PMID:25667733

  11. Comparison of postoperative corneal changes between dry eye and non-dry eye in a murine cataract surgery model

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jin Woo; Chung, Yeon Woong; Choi, Jin A; La, Tae Yoon; Jee, Dong Hyun; Cho, Yang Kyung

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the effects of the surgical insult of cataract surgery on corneal inflammatory infiltration, neovascularization (NV) and lymphangiogenesis (LY) between the dry eye and non-dry eye in murine cataract surgery models. METHODS We established two groups of animals, one with normal eyes (non-dry eye) and the second with induced dry eyes. In both groups, we used surgical insults to mimic human cataract surgery, which consisted of lens extraction, corneal incision and suture. After harvesting of corneas on the 9th postoperative day and immunohistochemical staining, we compared NV, LY and CD11b+ cell infiltration in the corneas. RESULTS Dry eye group had significantly more inflammatory infiltration (21.75%±7.17% vs 3.65%±1.49%; P=0.049). The dry eye group showed significantly more NV (48.21%±4.02% vs 26.24%±6.01%; P=0.016) and greater levels of LY (9.27%±0.48% vs 4.84%±1.15%; P=0.007). In corneas on which no surgery was performed, there was no induction of NV in both the dry and non-dry group, but dry eye group demonstrated more CD11b+ cells infiltration than the non-dry eye group (0.360%±0.160% vs 0.023%±0.006%; P=0.068). Dry eye group showed more NV than non-dry eye group in both topical PBS application and subconjunctival PBS injection (P=0.020 and 0.000, respectively). CONCLUSION In a murine cataract surgery model, preexisting dry eye can induce more postoperative NV, LY, and inflammation in corneal tissue. PMID:26949638

  12. Endothelial cell loss and complication rates with combined Descemets stripping endothelial keratoplasty and cataract surgery in a UK centre

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S M; Fajgenbaum, M A; Hollick, E J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report 6-month, 1- and 2-year endothelial cell loss (ECL), intra- and postoperative complications in a large series of patients undergoing either Descemets stripping endothelial keratoplasty (DSEK) or a combined phacoemulsification and DSEK in a UK centre. Patients and methods Patients undergoing DSEK with or without concurrent cataract surgery were included in this retrospective study. Surgeries were performed between January 2006 and May 2013. Main outcomes included intra- and postoperative complications and percentage ECL. Results DSEK was performed in 226 eyes (210 patients). Of these, 141 eyes (126 patients) underwent DSEK alone and 85 eyes (84 patients) underwent DSEK combined with cataract surgery. Excluding complex anterior segment pathology the mean percentage ECL at 6, 12 and 24 months was 40.5±13.4, 45.1±14.6 and 53.1±13.0 in the DSEK group and 40.7±15.4, 42.6±15.3 and 49.6±16.5 in patients undergoing the combined procedure, respectively. There was no significant difference in percentage ECL at 6 or 24 months between the two groups both in complex and routine cases. Intraoperative complications occurred in four patients undergoing DSEK and three undergoing combined procedure. Postoperative complication rates did not reach statistical significance between the groups. Conclusion Mean ECL and complication rates were comparable at 6, 12 and 24 months in routine cases undergoing concurrent DSEK with cataract surgery and those undergoing DSEK. These data support the combined procedure in patients requiring both cataract surgery and endothelial keratoplasty. Further collaboration to report endothelial cell counts from other UK centres should be encouraged. PMID:25771818

  13. Bloodless Surgery in a Pediatric Jehovah’s Witness

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Jerry; Berrios, Lindsay; Solimine, Mike; Knott-Craig, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Pediatric cardiac surgery in Jehovah’s Witness patients who refuse the use of blood products remains a challenge because of the extreme hemodilution caused by priming the circuit and subsequent cardiopulmonary bypass. We report our successful strategy for reducing the prime volume for a 2-year-old Jehovah’s Witness patient who required open heart surgery. We modified our conventional bypass circuit requirements for this size child by incorporating a lower prime oxygenator and reducing the size of the venous line and circuit, which decreased the circuit prime volume. We managed to reduce our initial sanguineous prime volume from 315 to 210 mL. The prime was further reduced to 160 mL by minimizing circuit length at the field and with venous prime sequestration prebypass. The postbypass hematocrit was 31%. Bloodless pediatric cardiac surgery in Jehovah’s Witness patients can be performed safely. Incorporating a lower prime oxygenator into a revised circuit alleviated the need for blood transfusion and allowed us to achieve our calculated flow rate of 2.6 L/min/m2 while maintaining a hematocrit of 31%. PMID:24649574

  14. Perfusionist strategies for blood conservation in pediatric cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Durandy, Yves

    2010-02-26

    There is increasing concern about the safety of homologous blood transfusion during cardiac surgery, and a restrictive transfusion practice is associated with improved outcome. Transfusion-free pediatric cardiac surgery is unrealistic for the vast majority of procedures in neonates or small infants; however, considerable progress has been made by using techniques that decrease the need for homologous blood products or even allow bloodless surgery in older infants and children. These techniques involve a decrease in prime volume by downsizing the bypass circuit with the help of vacuum-assisted venous drainage, microplegia, autologous blood predonation with or without infusion of recombinant (erythropoietin), cell salvaging, ultrafiltration and retrograde autologous priming. The three major techniques which are simple, safe, efficient, and cost-effective are: a prime volume as small as possible, cardioplegia with negligible hydric balance and circuit residual blood salvaged without any alteration. Furthermore, these three techniques can be used for all the patients, including emergencies and small babies. In every pediatric surgical unit, a strategy to decrease or avoid blood bank transfusion must be implemented. A strategy to minimize transfusion requirement requires a combined effort involving the entire surgical team with pre-, peri-, and postoperative planning and management. PMID:21160681

  15. Lens Extraction for Management of Coexisting Cataract and Post-filtering Surgery Ocular Hypotony

    PubMed Central

    Fakhraie, Ghasem; Mohajernezhad-Fard, Zahra; Moghimi, Sasan; Vahedian, Zakieh; Eslami, Yadollah; Zarei, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of phacoemulsification for management of post-filtering ocular hypotony. Methods: This prospective interventional case series study recruited 21 consecutive patients with an established diagnosis of ocular hypotony with or without maculopathy. Clear corneal incision phacoemulsification was done for all patients. Nineteen cases that completed a follow-up of at least 6 months were considered for final analysis. Results: Mean baseline intraocular pressure (IOP) was 2.95 ± 1.43 mm Hg, which increased to 8.84 ± 4.67 mm Hg at 6 months (P < 0.001). Hypotony was resolved in 13 cases (68%) at 6 months while 6 cases (32%) showed persistent hypotony at this time point. Postoperative IOP change at all follow-up time points was not correlated with patient age, time interval between filtering surgery and phacoemulsification, baseline IOP, baseline anterior chamber depth and IOP on the first postoperative day. Three cases (16%) showed filtering bleb failure with dramatic IOP rise around the first postoperative month and required glaucoma medication for IOP control. No significant intra- or postoperative complications were noted. Conclusion: Cataract surgery alone seems promising in resolving hypotony in patients with post-filtering ocular hypotony, and can be considered as an effective treatment modality before proceeding to more complicated procedures. PMID:27051482

  16. Ultrasound Biomicroscopy and Scheimpflug Imaging in Anterior Megalophthalmos: Changes Seen after Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Nawani, Nishant; Jain, Arun K; Singh, Ramandeep

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. With this report we describe ultrasound biomicroscopic (UBM) findings in a patient with anterior megalophthalmos before and after undergoing phacoemulsification with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation. Methods. Phacoemulsification was carried out for nuclear sclerosis in both eyes of a patient diagnosed with anterior megalophthalmos. The patient was subjected to detailed ophthalmic examination including ultrasound biomicroscopy and Scheimpflug imaging prior to and after surgery. Preoperative ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed a deep anterior chamber with posterior bowing of the midperipheral iris in both eyes. The ciliary processes were inserted on the posterior surface of the iris. UBM was repeated postoperatively as well. Results. Phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation (IOL) were carried out successfully in both eyes. The IOLs were well centered and captured within the anterior capsulorhexis. The anterior chambers were hyperdeep, 6.24 mm (OD) and 6.08 mm (OS), respectively. The posterior bowing of the midperipheral iris was absent, with the iris having a more flat profile. Conclusion. UBM findings in anterior megalophthalmos seemed to partially resolve after cataract surgery. The anterior chamber deepens appreciably as well. PMID:26064734

  17. Predictability of Intraocular Lens Power Calculation After Simultaneous Pterygium Excision and Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Kazutaka; Shimizu, Kimiya; Iijima, Kei; Shoji, Nobuyuki; Kobashi, Hidenaga

    2015-12-01

    This study was aimed to assess the predictability of intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation after simultaneous pterygium excision and phacoemulsification with IOL implantation. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts of 60 eyes of 60 consecutive patients (mean age ± standard deviation, 73.5 ± 7.0 years) who developed pterygium and cataract. We determined visual acuity (logMAR), manifest spherical equivalent, manifest astigmatism, corneal astigmatism, and mean keratometry, preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Corrected visual acuity was significantly improved from 0.19 ± 0.20 preoperatively to -0.06 ± 0.07 postoperatively (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Uncorrected visual acuity was also significantly improved from 0.62 ± 0.33 preoperatively to 0.31 ± 0.32 postoperatively (P < 0.001). At 3 months, 48% and 82% of the eyes were within ± 0.5 and ± 1.0 D, respectively, of the targeted correction. We found significant correlations of the prediction errors with the changes in the mean keratometry (Spearman signed-rank test, r = -0.535, P < 0.001) and with the pterygium size (r = -0.378, P = 0.033). Simultaneous pterygium and cataract surgery was safe and effective, and the accuracy was moderately predictable. However, it should be noted that a significant myopic shift occurred postoperatively, possibly resulting from the steepening of the cornea after pterygium removal, especially when the size of pterygium was large. PMID:26717362

  18. Types of intraocular lenses for cataract surgery in eyes with uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Theresa G; Lindsley, Kristina; Kuo, Irene C

    2014-01-01

    Background Cataract formation often occurs in people with uveitis. It is unclear which intraocular lens (IOL) type is optimal for use in cataract surgery for eyes with uveitis. Objectives To summarize the effects of different IOLs on visual acuity, other visual outcomes, and quality of life in people with uveitis. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 7), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to August 2013), EMBASE (January 1980 to August 2013), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to August 2013), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 14 August 2013. We also performed forward and backward searching using the Science Citation Index and the reference lists of the included studies, respectively, in August 2013. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing hydrophobic or hydrophilic acrylic, silicone, or poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) IOLs with or without heparin-surface modification (HSM), with each other, or with no treatment in adults with uveitis, for any indication, undergoing cataract surgery. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two review authors screened the search results and for included studies, assessed the risk of bias and extracted data independently. We contacted study investigators for additional information. We did not perform a meta-analysis due to variability in reporting and follow-up intervals for the primary

  19. Measuring outcomes in craniofacial and pediatric plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Karen W Y; Forrest, Christopher R; Goodacre, Tim E E; Klassen, Anne F

    2013-04-01

    This article discusses the measurement of outcomes in craniofacial and pediatric plastic surgery, using examples of craniosynostosis and cleft lip and/or palate (CLP). The challenges in measuring the standard outcomes of function, aesthetics, and health-related quality of life are discussed, along with the importance of developing evidence and studying quality improvement in this specialty. The need to define specific and comprehensive goals is discussed with a focus on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Examples from the development of the CLEFT-Q, a PRO instrument for patients with CLP, are provided to support the need to seek the patient perspective. PMID:23506771

  20. An outbreak of endophthalmitis after extracapsular cataract surgery probably caused by endotoxin contaminated distilled water used to dissolve acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    Boks, T; van Dissel, J T; Teterissa, N; Ros, F; Mahmut, M H; Utama, E D; Rol, M; van Asdonk, P; Airiani, S; van Meurs, J C

    2006-01-01

    Aim To study possible causes of an outbreak of severe endophthalmitis after planned extracapsular cataract surgery in Medan, Indonesia. Methods In a 3 week period in November 2001, 17 of 43 patients developed signs of endophthalmitis after planned extracapsular cataract surgery. A search for possible causes was undertaken 4 months later. Results In autoclaved stored distilled water used to dissolve acetylcholine (used in 16 of 17 patients with endophthalmitis) a high amount of endotoxin was detected in a human blood essay, as well as a small number of non‐typeable Pseudomonas spp. Conclusions These findings suggest that distilled water used as solvent for acetylcholine was responsible for this outbreak of endophthalmitis. As a consequence, we now rely on solvents that are regularly checked for impurities such as an intravenous infusion fluid, rather than on vials with distilled water that is presumed to be sterile and kept for some time. PMID:16687451

  1. Pharmacokinetics and aqueous humor penetration of levofloxacin 1.5% and moxifloxacin 0.5% in patients undergoing cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Frank A; Nguimfack, Ines Teuma; Fluet, Angel T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin 1.5% and moxifloxacin hydrochloride 0.5% ophthalmic solutions in aqueous humor after multiple doses prior to cataract surgery. Methods Ninety-eight eyes underwent cataract surgery and met the requirements of PK analysis. Eligible eyes were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive levofloxacin or moxifloxacin prior to cataract surgery and were randomized into one of four sampling time points (ie, 1, 2, 4, and 6 hour post-last dose). Randomization was investigator and laboratory-masked. Three days prior to cataract surgery, each patient instilled one drop of the assigned study medication into the operative eye four times daily. One aqueous humor specimen was collected from the eye at the randomized time point. Aqueous humor specimens were assayed for drug concentration using a validated liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometer. Results Concentrations of the drug in the aqueous humor, as described by mean Cmax and pooled AUC0–6 values, were greater for levofloxacin than moxifloxacin (Cmax: 1.43, 0.87 μg/ml, respectively, P=0.008; AUC0–6 6.1, 3.8 μg·min/ml, P<0.001 respectively). No treatment-emergent adverse events were reported. Conclusion Significantly greater drug exposures were attained in aqueous humor following the administration of levofloxacin 1.5% than moxifloxacin 0.5% ophthalmic solution. Achieving considerable higher drug concentration in the aqueous humor with levofloxacin 1.5% may demonstrate a greater potential for bacterial eradication. PMID:27194905

  2. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Nonglaucomatous Patients With Open Angles

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Kakigi, Caitlin L.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Methods The main outcome of the prospective study was percentage of IOP change, which was calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + 1/2 lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, central corneal thickness, ACD, LT, axial length (AXL), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of percentage of IOP change. The predictive values of the parameters we found to be associated with the primary outcome were compared. Results Four months after cataract surgery, the average IOP reduction was 2.03 ± 2.42 mm Hg, a 12.74% reduction from the preoperative mean of 14.5 ± 3.05 mm Hg. Lens position was correlated with IOP reduction percentage after adjusting for confounders (P = 0.002). Higher preoperative IOP, shallower ACD, shorter AXL, and thicker LT were significantly associated with percentage of IOP decrease. Although not statistically significant, LP was a better predictor of percentage of IOP change compared to PD ratio, preoperative IOP, and ACD. Conclusions The percentage of IOP reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles is greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Lens position, which is convenient to compute by basic ocular biometric data, is an accessible predictor with considerable predictive value for postoperative IOP change. PMID:26650901

  3. The role of sideport incision in astigmatism change after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Theodoulidou, Sofia; Asproudis, Ioannis; Kalogeropoulos, Christos; Athanasiadis, Aristidis; Aspiotis, Miltiadis

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To study the changes in corneal astigmatism after cataract surgery when the sideport incision is performed at a predetermined location away from the tunnel incision. Setting General Hospital of Piraeus “Tzaneio”, Attiki, Greece. Materials and methods A total of 333 eyes with corneal astigmatism ≤1.5 diopters (D) underwent cataract surgery. A three-step superotemporal clear corneal incision for the right eye and a superonasal clear corneal incision for the left eye (3.0 mm) was made, while the sideport incision was located at <90°, 90°–110°, and >110°. Keratometric data were measured with corneal topography EyeSys Vista 2000 pre- and postoperatively at the 1st and 6th month. Surgically induced astigmatism was calculated by vector analysis. We noted all cases in which a change >0.5 D in corneal astigmatic power occurred, as well as a change >20° in axis torque, despite axis direction. Results After multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted, cases with >110° distance between the tunnel and sideport incision had 2.22 times (P=0.021) greater likelihood for having changed >0.5 D in astigmatic power at the 1st month and 3.45 times (P=0.031) at the 6th month postoperatively, as compared with cases with a 90°–110° distance between the tunnel and sideport incision. As for the change in the astigmatic axis, cases with <90° distance had a 4.18 times greater likelihood for having a change >20° (P<0.001) (preoperative to 1st month) as compared with cases having 90°–110° of distance. Conclusion For surgeons that operate only from the superior position, we propose that in order to produce an incision that is as “astigmatically neutral” as possible, they should perform the sideport incision at a 90°–110° distance. PMID:26346741

  4. Results at seven years after the use of intracamerular cefazolin as an endophthalmitis prophylaxis in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate results after seven years using prophylactic intracameral cefazolin for the prevention of endophthalmitis in cataract surgery. Methods A prospective, observational study of all patients submitted to cataract surgery over the period January 1996 to December 2009. All cases of postoperative endophthalmitis over that period were reviewed. The patients were classified in two groups: Group 1 (11,696 patients) operated on between January 1996 and December 2002, Group 2 (13,305 patients) between January 2003 and December 2009 (in whom a 1 mg/0.1 bolus of intracameral cefazolin was instilled). Results During the study period, 76 cases of endophthalmitis were observed in Group 1, and seven in Group 2. The rate of postoperative endophthalmitis reduced from 0.63% to 0.05% with a cefazolin injection. The relative risk (RR) for endophthalmitis in Group 1 against group 2 was 11.45 [95% CI 5.72-22.84, p < 0.001]. Conclusions An intracameral bolus injection of cefazolin (1 mg in 0.1 ml solution) at the conclusion of the cataract surgery significantly reduced the rate of postoperative endophthalmitis. PMID:22272570

  5. Evaluation of the Ex-PRESS® P-50 implant under scleral flap in combined cataract and glaucoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huerva, Valentín; Soldevila, Jordi; Ascaso, Francisco J.; Lavilla, Laura; Muniesa, M. Jesús; Sánchez, M. Carmen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of glaucoma drainage device Ex-PRESS® P-50 for combined cataract surgery and glaucoma. METHODS Patients having cataract and open angle glaucoma or patients with open advanced glaucoma which needed two or more antiglaucoma medications were included. Combined cataract surgery and glaucoma with Ex-PRESS® P-50 model placed under scleral flap was performed. RESULTS Out of 40 eyes of 40 patients (55% male and 45% female) completed the study during one-year follow-up. The mean of age was 76.6±11.02y. The intraocular pressure (IOP) decreased significantly during the 12-month follow-up from 23.5 mm Hg to 16.8 mm Hg (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, P<0.001). A 59.5% of patients did not need any topical treatment, 10.8% of them needed one active principle, 27% needed two active principles, and 2.7% of them needed three active principles for successful IOP control (<21 mm Hg). CONCLUSION Combined surgery of phacoemulsification with ExPRESS® P-50 lowers IOP from the preoperative baseline and reduces significantly the number of antiglaucoma active principles for IOP control after the operation. PMID:27162726

  6. Gastroscopy in pediatric surgery: indications, complications, outcomes, and ethical aspects.

    PubMed

    Roth, Louise; Salö, Martin; Hambraeus, Mette; Stenström, Pernilla; Arnbjörnsson, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to map gastroscopies performed at a single tertiary pediatric surgery centre to investigate indications, complications, outcomes, and ethical aspects. Material and Methods. A retrospective study of gastroscopies performed during two time periods (2001-2004 and 2011-2014) was conducted. Data regarding indications, outcomes, and complications of pediatric gastroscopies were analysed from a prospectively collected database. Results. The indications for gastroscopies changed over time. Therefore, 376 gastroscopies performed from 2011 through 2014 were studied separately. The median patient was four years old. The predominant indications were laparoscopic gastrostomy (40%), investigation of gastroenterological conditions (22%), obstruction in the upper gastrointestinal tract (20%), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (15%), and other indications (3%). Percentages of gastroscopies with no positive findings for each condition were laparoscopic gastrostomy, 100%; gastroenterological conditions, 46%; obstruction in the upper gastrointestinal tract, 36%; GERD, 51%. Furthermore, gastroscopies did not lead to any further action or change in treatment in 45% of gastroenterological conditions and 72% of GERD cases. The overall complication rate was 1%. Conclusion. The results are valuable to educate pediatric surgeons and to inform health care planning when including gastroscopy within clinical practice. PMID:25883646

  7. Postoperative Adiponectin Levels in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Open Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Thaler, A.; Kanety, H.; Avni, T.; Mishali, D.; Hemi, R.; Yissaschar, E.; Pariente, C.; Paret, G.; Modan-Moses, D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ that secretes cytokines, including adiponectin, levels of which are negatively correlated with the severity of the inflammatory process. Aim. To assess the time course of adiponectin levels following open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass and its correlation with early postoperative outcomes. Materials and Methods. Blood samples were obtained from 24 children undergoing cardiac surgery and analyzed for adiponectin, C-reactive protein, and other inflammatory markers. Results. Baseline adiponectin levels were negatively correlated with patients' preoperative weight and age. Postoperative adiponectin levels decreased compared to baseline (P = 0.01) and correlated negatively with duration of cardiopulmonary bypass (r = −0.438, P = 0.037), length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit (r = −0.457, P = 0.025), and the inotropic score (r = −0.471, P = 0.02). Adiponectin levels were positively correlated with sVCAM 1 levels; however, there was no correlation between adiponectin levels and sP selectin, tPA, MCP1, and sCD40. Conclusions. The inflammatory response after open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass is associated with a reduction in adiponectin levels. Prolonged or more complicated surgery induced a more substantial inflammatory process characterized by a significant reduction in adiponectin levels over time and a delayed return to baseline levels. PMID:24224162

  8. Best Practice Updates for Pediatric/Adolescent Weight Loss Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Janey S.A.; Lenders, Carine M.; Dionne, Emily A.; Hoppin, Alison G.; Hsu, George L.K.; Inge, Thomas H.; Lawlor, David F.; Marino, Margaret F.; Meyers, Alan F.; Rosenblum, Jennifer L.; Sanchez, Vivian M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study is to update evidence-based best practice guidelines for pediatric/adolescent weight loss surgery (WLS). We performed a systematic search of English-language literature on WLS and pediatric, adolescent, gastric bypass, laparoscopic gastric banding, and extreme obesity published between April 2004 and May 2007 in PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library. Keywords were used to narrow the search for a selective review of abstracts, retrieval of full articles, and grading of evidence according to systems used in established evidence-based models. In light of evidence on the natural history of obesity and on outcomes of WLS in adolescents, guidelines for surgical treatment of obesity in this age group need to be updated. We recommend modification of selection criteria to include adolescents with BMI ≥ 35 and specific obesity-related comorbidities for which there is clear evidence of important short-term morbidity (i.e., type 2 diabetes, severe steatohepatitis, pseudotumor cerebri, and moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnea). In addition, WLS should be considered for adolescents with extreme obesity (BMI ≥ 40) and other comorbidities associated with long-term risks. We identified >1,085 papers; 186 of the most relevant were reviewed in detail. Regular updates of evidence-based recommendations for best practices in pediatric/adolescent WLS are required to address advances in technology and the growing evidence base in pediatric WLS. Key considerations in patient safety include carefully designed criteria for patient selection, multidisciplinary evaluation, choice of appropriate procedure, thorough screening and management of comorbidities, optimization of long-term compliance, and age-appropriate fully informed consent. PMID:19396070

  9. The Prevalence of Age-Related Eye Diseases and Cataract Surgery among Older Adults in the City of Lodz, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Michal Szymon; Smigielski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the prevalence of age-related eye diseases and cataract surgery among older adults in the city of Lodz, in central Poland. Material and Methods. The study design was cross-sectional and observational study. A total of 1107 women and men of predominantly Caucasian origin were successfully enumerated and recruited for the study. All selected subjects were interviewed and underwent detailed ophthalmic examinations. Results. Overall 8.04% (95% CI 6.44–9.64) subjects had cataract surgery in either eye. After excluding subjects with bilateral cataract surgery, the prevalence of cataract was 12.10% (95% CI 10.18–14.03). AMD was found in 4.33% (95% CI 3.14–5.54 ) of all subjects. Of them 3.25% (95% CI 2.21–4.30 ) had early AMD and 1.08% (95% CI 0.47–1.69) had late AMD. Various types of glaucoma were diagnosed in 5.51% (95% CI 4.17–6.85) of subjects and 2.62% (95% CI 1.68–3.56) had OHT. The prevalence rates of DR and myopic macular degeneration were 1.72% (95% CI 0.95–2.48) and 0.45% (95% CI 0.06–0.85), respectively. All multiple logistic regression models were only significantly associated with older age. The highest rate of visual impairment was observed among subjects with retinal diseases. Conclusions. The study revealed high prevalence of age-related eye diseases in this older population. PMID:25789169

  10. Evaluation of minimal dose of atracurium for cataract surgery in children: A prospective randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Darlong, Vanlal; Garg, Rakesh; Pandey, Ravinder; Khokhar, Sudarshan; Chandralekha; Sinha, Renu; Punj, Jyotsna; Sinha, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cataract surgery when performed under general anesthesia, especially without neuromuscular blocking agents, eccentric position of the eye has been reported. However, no evidence exists for the need and optimal dose of neuromuscular blocking agents for surgical reasons when the anesthetic management may be done without its need. We hypothesize that the minimal dose atracurium may accomplish the surgical requirement of cataract surgery in children. Materials and Methods: After ethical committee approval, this double-blind, prospective, randomized study was conducted in children scheduled for cataract surgery under general anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced in a standardized manner and using laryngeal mask airway. The patients were randomized into four groups of 55 patients each and atracurium was administered as per group allocation: Group 0: No atracurium was administered; Group 50: Received atracurium at 50% dose of ED95; Group 75: Received atracurium at 75% dose of ED95; Group 100: Received atracurium of 100% dose of ED95. Surgeon was asked to grade surgical condition just after the stab incision in the cornea. The primary outcome variable included the need of atracurium supplementation based on grading of surgical conditions by the operating surgeon who was blinded to the randomized group. Results: The need of atracurium due to unacceptable surgical conditions based on surgeon satisfaction score was statistically significant when compared among the groups being maximum in Group 0 (P < 0.001). Also, the surgeon satisfaction score was statistically significant among the groups (P < 0.0001) with the least satisfaction in Group 0. The laryngeal mask airway (LMA) insertion score was statistically significant in the four groups (P - 0.001). However, number of attempts for LMA placement was comparable among the four groups (P - 0.766). Conclusion: We conclude that a balanced anesthetic technique including atracurium provided better surgical condition for

  11. Macular Edema After Cataract Surgery In Eyes Without Pre-operative Central-involved Diabetic Macular Edema

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Carl W.; Almukhtar, Talat; Bressler, Neil M.; Glassman, Adam R.; Grover, Sandeep; Kim, Stephen J.; Murtha, Timothy J.; Rauser, Michael E.; Stockdale, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of central-involved macular edema (ME)16 weeks following cataract surgery in eyes with diabetic retinopathy (DR) without definite central-involved diabetic macular edema (DME) preoperatively. Methods In a multicenter, prospective, observational study, participants (N = 293) with DR without definite OCT central subfield (CSF) thickening underwent cataract surgery. The primary outcome was development of central-involved ME defined as; (1) OCT CSF thickness ≥ 250μm (time domain) or ≥ 310μm (spectral domain) with ≥1 step increase in logOCT CSF thickness pre-operative to the 16-week visit; (2) ≥2-step increase in logOCT CSF pre-operative to 16-week visit; or (3) non-topical treatment for ME received before the 16-week visit with either of the OCT criteria met at the time of treatment. Results Median participant age was 64 years with median visual acuity letter score of 69 (Snellen equivalent 20/40). Forty-four percent of eyes had history of prior treatment for DME. Sixteen weeks postoperatively, central-involved ME was noted in 0% (95%CI: 0-20%) of 17 eyes with no pre-operative DME. Of eyes with non-central involved DME, 10% (95%CI: 5-18%) of 97 eyes without central involved DME and 12% (95%CI: 7-19%) of 147 eyes with possible central involved DME at baseline progressed to central-involved ME. History of DME treatment was significantly associated with central-involved ME development (P<0.001). Conclusion In eyes with DR without concurrent central-involved DME, presence of non-central DME immediately prior to cataract surgery, or history of DME treatment, may increase risk of developing central-involved ME 16 weeks after cataract extraction. PMID:23599174

  12. The treatment of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery: review of 26 cases.

    PubMed

    Parkkari, M; Päivärinta, H; Salminen, L

    1995-01-01

    A retrospective study of 26 cases of postoperative endophthalmitis occurring after extracapsular cataract extraction and lens implantation was conducted between January 1989 and December 1992. Twenty-one of the 26 cases (81%) were diagnosed within two weeks after surgery. The most common organism isolated was Staphylococcus saprophyticus (23%). After the bacterial samples had been taken, cefotaxime or gentamicin was injected into anterior chamber and vitreous space. The therapy regimen consisted of topical tobramycin, Polysporin (polymyxinsulfate, neomycinsulfate and gramicidin), dexamethasone and atropine and parabulbar cefotaxime, netilmicin and betamethasone. Cefotaxime or, alternatively, clindamycin, ciprofloxacin and prednisolone were given systemically. The final visual acuity of 20/40 or more was obtained in 15 cases (58%). Twenty-one patients (81%) achieved a visual acuity of 20/400 or better. Three patients had no light perception after the treatment of endophthalmitis. Silk as suture material in wound closure and rupture of the posterior capsule were found to be risk factors in the development of endophthalmitis. The results of the present study show that effective drug treatment also results in good visual outcome. PMID:8590267

  13. Visual Hallucinations in an Old Patient after Cataract Surgery and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, Halil; Yucel, Atakan; Ates, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    Sensory visual pathologies, accompanying simple or complex visual hallucinations that occur in visually-impaired individuals due to ophthalmologic or brain pathologies related to visual pathways in patients without mental disorders, are defined as Charles Bonnet syndrome. Between 10% and 60% of the patients having age-related eye diseases involving retina, cornea and the lens, commonly with macular degeneration experience complex visual hallucinations depending on the severity of visual problems. The neurophysiology of the visual hallucinations in Charles Bonnet Syndrome is not clearly known, and they may differ in content and severity over time. In differential diagnoses of Charles Bonnet Syndrome, many aetiologies (drugs, uraemia, exposure to toxic materials, neurodegenerative and psychiatric conditions) need to be ruled out. In the treatment of Charles Bonnet syndrome, first the management of the reason of visual loss should be clarified if possible. If needed, neuroleptics, anticonvulsants, antidepressants, benzodiazepines, cognitive enhancer agents such as cholinesterase inhibitors can be used also. In this case, an 83-year-old female patient experiencing visual hallucinations as burning candles in both eyes’ visual field after left eye cataract surgery, treated with 0.5 milligram/day risperidone will be presented. PMID:27026767

  14. Normal conjunctival flora and their antibiotic sensitivity in Omanis undergoing cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Keshav, Belur R.; Basu, Somansu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the normal conjunctival flora and to ascertain their sensitivity to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Prospective study was undertaken with 56 patients scheduled for cataract surgery. In each of these patients, conjunctival swab was taken from both eyes before instilling any antibiotic drops or local anesthetics and were sent for culture sensitivity by inoculating the samples in blood agar plates. The un-operated eyes served as controls for the study. The results were tabulated and analyzed by applying confidence intervals at 95% confidence limits. Results: Of the 112 eyes studied, positive cultures were obtained from 54 eyes (48.3%) preoperatively, and included both operated and control eyes. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was isolated in 44 eyes (81.5%). Maximum sensitivity was found with vancomycin, gentamycin, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin and maximum resistance with fusidic acid, penicillin, and oxacillin. Conclusion: We conclude that coagulase-negative staphylococcus are the most common bacteria isolated from the conjunctival sac, and vancomycin followed by gentamycin and ciprofloxacin are most effective against normal conjunctiva l flora, and fusidic acid the most ineffective of all the antibiotics tested. PMID:22557871

  15. Stereo-PIV study of flow inside an eye under cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Jun; Yamashita, Masaki; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Kaji, Yuichi; Oshika, Tetsuro

    2012-04-01

    We measured velocity distributions in the anterior chamber of porcine eyes under simulated cataract surgery using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (stereo-PIV). The surface of the cornea was detected based on the images of laser-induced fluorescent light emitted from fluorescent dye solution introduced in a posterior chamber. A coaxial phacoemulsification procedure was simulated with standard size (standard coaxial phacoemulsification) and smaller (micro coaxial phacoemulsification) surgical instruments. In both cases, an asymmetric flow rate of irrigation was observed, although both irrigation ports had the same dimensions prior to insertion into the eye. In cases where the tip of the handpiece was placed farther away from the top of the cornea, i.e., closer to the crystalline lens, direct impingement of irrigation flow onto the cornea surface was avoided and the flow turned back toward the handpiece along the surface of the corneal endothelium. Viscous shear stress on the corneal endothelium was computed based on the measured mean velocity distribution. The maximum shear stress for most cases exceeded 0.1 Pa, which is comparable to the shear stress that caused detachment of the corneal endothelial cells reported by Kaji et al. in Cornea 24:S55-S58, (2005). When direct impingement of the irrigation flow was avoided, the shear stress was reduced considerably.

  16. The role of environmental light in sleep and health: effects of ocular aging and cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Turner, Patricia L; Van Someren, Eus J W; Mainster, Martin A

    2010-08-01

    Environmental illumination profoundly influences human health and well-being. Recently discovered photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) are primary mediators of numerous circadian, neuroendocrine and neurobehavioral responses. pRGCs provide lighting information to diverse nonvisual (non-image-forming) brain centers including the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) which serve as the body's master biological clock. The SCN exert functional control over circadian aspects of physiology. The timing and strength (amplitude) of SCN rhythmic signals are affected by light exposure. Light deficiency may attenuate SCN function and its control of physiological and hormonal rhythms which in turn can result in a cascade of adverse events. Inadequate pRGC photoreception cannot be perceived consciously, but may aggravate many common age-associated problems including insomnia, depression and impaired cognition. In this review we (1) summarize circadian physiology, emphasizing light's critical role as the most important geophysical timing cue in humans; (2) analyze evidence that typical residential lighting is insufficient for optimal pRGC requirements in youth and even more so with advancing age; (3) show how ocular aging and cataract surgery impact circadian photoreception; and (4) review some of the diverse morbidities associated with chronodisruption in general and those which may be caused by light deficiency in particular. PMID:20056462

  17. Fusarium Endophthalmitis following Cataract Surgery: Successful Treatment with Intravitreal and Systemic Voriconazole

    PubMed Central

    Logroño, Juan F. Batlle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To report a case of postoperative endophthalmitis caused by Fusarium species successfully treated with intravitreal and systemic voriconazole after treatment failure with amphotericin B. Methods. Clinical case report of a 60-year-old immunocompetent woman who presents with endophthalmitis of unknown origin 4 weeks after uneventful cataract extraction and IOL implantation surgery. IOL explantation, vitrectomy with capsular bag removal, vitreous aspiration for culture, and intravitreal injection of amphotericin B (5 μg/0.1 mL) were performed. Diagnosis was established by culturing the vitreous aspirate on a Sabouraud agar medium and staining with lactophenol blue solution. Five days later, there was no clinical response. The decision was made to administer a single dose of intravitreal voriconazole (2.5 μg/0.1 mL) and oral voriconazole (200 mg BID) for 30 days. Results. Fusarium sp. grew on culture. Treatment with local and systemic voriconazole was started after no improvement with vitrectomy, IOL explantation, and intravitreal amphotericin B. After 1 month of treatment, the infection resolved and best-corrected visual acuity was 20/25. Conclusion. In patients with endophthalmitis caused by Fusarium sp., topical and systemic voriconazole treatment should be considered in cases resistant to intravitreal amphotericin B. PMID:27418989

  18. Antibacterial efficacy of prophylactic besifloxacin 0.6% and moxifloxacin 0.5% in patients undergoing cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bucci, Frank A; Evans, Ruth E; Amico, Loretta M; Morris, Timothy W; Fluet, Angel T; Sanfilippo, Christine M; DeCory, Heleen H; Comstock, Timothy L

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the ocular bacterial flora in patients scheduled to undergo cataract surgery and compare the antibacterial effects of besifloxacin ophthalmic suspension 0.6% and moxifloxacin ophthalmic solution 0.5% in these patients. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, laboratory-masked clinical trial. Patients received besifloxacin or moxifloxacin “quater in die” or QID (four times a day) for 3 days before cataract surgery in the surgical eye and 1 hour before surgery in the nonsurgical fellow eye. Conjunctival and eyelid swabs were obtained from both eyes at baseline and after treatment, on the day of surgery (Visit 2). Swabs were processed for bacterial colony counts (in terms of colony-forming units) and species identification. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of isolates were determined using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints. Results Fifty-nine patients (n=28 besifloxacin, n=31 moxifloxacin) completed the study. The majority (73%) of conjunctival samples were culture negative at baseline. The most frequent isolates were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS, 89%), specifically Staphylococcus epidermidis (72%). Both fluoroquinolones reduced the lid CFU values when administered QID for 3 days (P≤0.019), but only besifloxacin reduced the lid CFU estimate 1 hour following instillation of a single drop (P=0.039). Fewer besifloxacin-treated eyes had lids that were culture positive for CoNS at Visit 2 compared with moxifloxacin-treated eyes regardless of dosing regimen (P≤0.03). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) of besifloxacin against methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE) was eightfold lower than that of moxifloxacin. Conclusion Besifloxacin appeared more effective in reducing bacterial counts on eyelids of patients undergoing cataract surgery, with significant reductions as early as 1 hour postdose, compared with moxifloxacin. Besifloxacin was more active in vitro

  19. Comparison of Preoperative Topical Dexamethasone Phosphate Versus Ketorolac Tromethamine in Maintaining Intraoperative Mydriasis During Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Hans Raj; Sharma, Rajni; Singh, Amrita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intraoperative miosis is one of the many challenges which a surgeon can face during cataract surgery. It may lead to impaired view and difficulty in delivering the nucleus. Also, it increases the chances of more serious intraoperative and postoperative complications. Therefore, maintaining adequate pupillary dilatation is of utmost importance during cataract surgery. Aim To study the efficacy of topical dexamethasone phosphate (0.1%) and topical ketorolac tromethamine (0.4%) in maintaining pupillary dilatation during cataract surgery. Materials and Methods A total of 200 patients were studied. These were randomly divided into two groups of 100 each. Group1 was given topical dexamethasone phosphate (0.1%) and Group 2, topical ketorolac tromethamine (0.4%). Medications were started 1-day before surgery in the form of one drop to be instilled every 6 hours. Pupillary diameter was measured in the horizontal meridian; 4 readings were taken - before making the incision, after nucleus delivery, following cortical clean-up and after Intraocular Lens (IOL) implantation. Results The two drugs showed no statistically significant difference in pupillary diameter at the commencement of surgery (p=0.435). The difference between the two drugs was statistically significant, for the mean pupillary diameter which changed from the start of surgery to after cortical clean-up. At this stage, ketorolac group showed a tendency towards larger mean pupillary diameter than dexamethasone group (6.70 ± 0.85mm and 6.32 ± 0.84mm, respectively, p=0.002). Again, ketorolac group patients had larger pupillary diameter after IOL implantation than dexamethasone group patients (the mean was 6.16± 0.97mm and 5.75 ± 0.73mm, respectively, p=0.001). Conclusion Both ketorolac tromethamine (0.4%) and dexamethasone phosphate (0.1%) are effective in maintaining adequate mydriasis during cataract surgery, but the comparative analysis of the two drugs concludes that, ketorolac is definitely a

  20. Access to essential paediatric eye surgery in the developing world: a case of congenital cataracts left untreated.

    PubMed

    Vinluan, Marilyn L; Olveda, Remigio M; Olveda, David U; Chy, Delia; Ross, Allen G

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cataracts are a major cause of treatable blindness. Early recognition, surgical intervention and appropriate follow-up after surgery can result in good visual outcomes. However, several factors may impact on the availability of such services, including lack of an available, affordable and accessible comprehensive eye care centre, financial limitations affecting coverage by the national healthcare provider, and household socioeconomic status. We report a case of congenital cataracts in a 12-year-old male adolescent from Northern Samar, the Philippines, who was left blind since birth. This case highlights the disparities in essential health services in the developing world and the challenges patients face in getting the care they need. PMID:25903202

  1. Cost-effectiveness analysis should continually assess competing health care options especially in high volume environments like cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ashiya; Amitava, Abadan Khan; Rizvi, Syed Ali Raza; Siddiqui, Ziya; Kumari, Namita; Grover, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cost-effectiveness analysis should continually assess competing health care options especially in high volume environments like cataract surgery. Aims: To compare the cost effectiveness of phacoemulsification (PE) versus manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Settings and Design: Prospective randomized controlled trial. Tertiary care hospital setting. Subjects and Methods: A total of 52 consenting patients with age-related cataracts, were prospectively recruited, and block randomized to PE or MSICS group. Preoperative and postoperative LogMAR visual acuity (VA), visual function-14 (VF-14) score and their quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) were obtained, and the change in their values calculated. These were divided by the total cost incurred in the surgery to calculate and compare the cost effectiveness and cost utility. Surgery duration was also compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Two group comparison with Student's t-test. Significance set at P < 0.05; 95% confidence interval (CI) quoted where appropriate. Results: Both the MSICS and PE groups achieved comparative outcomes in terms of change (difference in mean [95% CI]) in LogMAR VA (0.03 [−0.05−0.11]), VF-14 score (7.92 [−1.03−16.86]) and QALYs (1.14 [−0.89−3.16]). However, with significantly lower costs (INR 3228 [2700–3756]), MSICS was more cost effective, with superior cost utility value. MSICS was also significantly quicker (10.58 min [6.85–14.30]) than PE. Conclusions: MSICS provides comparable visual and QALY improvement, yet takes less time, and is significantly more cost-effective, compared with PE. Greater push and penetration of MSICS, by the government, is justifiably warranted in our country. PMID:26265639

  2. Impact of minimally invasive surgery on the pediatric surgical profession.

    PubMed

    Jones, Vinci S; Biesheuvel, Cornelis J; Cohen, Ralph C

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a survey among pediatric surgeons to examine the impact of the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) on the pediatric surgical profession with respect to job satisfaction and training challenges. An invitation to participate in a web-based questionnaire was sent out to 306 pediatric surgeons. Apart from demographic details and training recommendations, parameters relevant to job satisfaction, including patient interaction, peer pressure, ethical considerations, academic progress, ability to train residents, and financial remuneration, were studied. The response rate was 38.2%. Working in a unit performing MIS was identified by 71% of respondents as the most effective and feasible modality of training in MIS. Inability to get away from a busy practice was the most common reason cited for inability to acquire MIS training. The overall responses to the job satisfaction parameters showed a positive trend in the current MIS era for patient interaction, ethical considerations, academic progress, and training residents, with a negative trend for peer pressure and financial remuneration. The enthusiastic minimally invasive surgeons (EMIS) were defined as those having more than 5 years of MIS experience and also performing more than 10% of their work using MIS. Of the 113 responses analyzed, 67 belonged to the EMIS category. Those belonging to the EMIS group were less likely to feel inadequate in training their residents, in meeting the felt needs of the patients, or to complain about peer pressure. They were more likely to consider MIS to be as relevant and beneficial in children as in adults. Embracing MIS, as represented by the EMIS group, correlated with an overall greater job satisfaction. PMID:19105675

  3. Safety evaluation of BSS plus in pediatric intraocular surgery.

    PubMed

    Burke, M J; Parks, M M; Calhoun, J H; Diamond, J G; deFaller, J M

    1981-01-01

    An open-label study was conducted to determine the safety of a new intraocular irrigating solution, BSS Plus, when used during pediatric ophthalmic surgery. BBS Plus is a modified glutathione-bicarbonate-Ringer's solution which contains the necessary ions, buffers, and substrates for maintenance of normal cellular metabolism, function, and structural integrity when used as a perfusate during ophthalmic surgical procedures. At three centers, 30 patients undergoing lens aspiration or anterior segment reconstruction using vitrectomy instrumentation were enrolled in this study. Transient postoperative increases in intracellular pressure and internal or external ocular inflammatory signs were seen which were consistent with the trauma produced by the surgical procedure. The solution was judged to be safe when used in these surgical indications. PMID:7264851

  4. Nontechnical skills in pediatric surgery: Factors influencing operative performance.

    PubMed

    Youngson, George G

    2016-02-01

    Technical competence is an essential aspect of intraoperative performance but is in itself insufficient to ensure an optimal surgical outcome. A list of other skills complement technical ability and these relate, among others, to surgical judgment and intraoperative decision-making processes as well as the role of the operating surgeon as leader of the surgical team. This article outlines the composite set of nontechnical skills (NTS) and the factors which influence surgical performance by virtue of this skill set. A framework has been developed to allow identification, teaching, and assessment of NTS known as Nontechnical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS), and the relevance and influence of NOTSS during the intraoperative performance of pediatric surgery is presented. PMID:26644073

  5. Cataract surgery: factors influencing decision to treat and implications for training (south-east Scotland 2008–2014)

    PubMed Central

    Sniatecki, Jan J; Styles, Caroline; Boyle, Natalie; Sanders, Roshini

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe the population referred for cataract surgery, identify factors that influenced decision to treat, and patients suitable for ophthalmic training. Patients and methods A total of 2,693 consecutive referrals over 6 years were interrogated using Business Objects software on cataract electronic patient records. Results A total of 2,693 patients were referred for cataract surgery (group A). Of these patients 2,132 (79%) had surgery (group B) and 561 (21%) did not (group C). Age for group B vs group C: 672 (32%) vs 115 (20%) ≤69 years, P<0.001; 803 (38%) vs 225 (40%) 70–79 years, P=0.48; 586 (27%) vs 203 (36%) 80–89 years, P<0.05; 71 (3%) vs 18 (3%) ≥90 years, P=1.0. Visual acuity, group B vs group C: 556 (26%) vs 664 (59%) 6/12 or better; 1,275 (60%) vs 367 (33%) 6/18–6/60; 266 (12%) vs 64 (6%) counting fingers or worse, P<0.05. Medical history for group B vs C: cognitive impairment: 55 (2.6%) vs 29 (5.2%), P<0.05; cardiovascular accident: 158 (7.4%) vs 60 (10.7%), P<0.05; diabetes: 372 (17.4%) vs 96 (17.1%), P=0.87; COPD/asthma: 382 (17.9%) vs 93 (16.6%), P=0.53; heart disease: 535 (25.1%) vs 155 (27.6%), P=0.35; hypertension: 971 (45.5%) vs 263 (46.9%), P=0.73. Ocular history for group B vs C was significant (P<0.05) for age-related macular degeneration 255 (12.0%) vs 93 (16.6%), other macular pathology 38 (1.8%) vs 25 (4.5%), corneal pathology 92 (4.3%) vs 36 (6.4%), amblyopia 37 (1.7%) vs 22 (3.9%). Detailed data on presenting complaint, ophthalmic history, and social status is discussed. Conclusion We observed that surgery at a younger age with good levels of visual acuity was a factor in deferring cataract surgery. Cognitive impairment, cardiovascular accident, amblyopia, corneal and macular pathology significantly affected decision not to operate. We estimate that 80% of patients would be suitable for ophthalmic training. PMID:26491242

  6. Correlation between contrast sensitivity and higher-order aberration based on pupil diameter after cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Takefumi; Negishi, Kazuno; Ohnuma, Kazuhiko; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between contrast sensitivity and calculated higher-order aberrations based on individual natural pupil diameter after cataract surgery. Methods This prospective study included 120 eyes from 92 patients who were randomized to receive one of four lenses, including three aspheric lenses (Acrysof SN60WF, Tecnis ZA9000, and Hoya Py60AD) and one spherical lens (Acrysof SN60AT). Contrast sensitivity, higher-order aberrations of the whole eye, and pupil diameter under photopic and mesopic conditions were measured 1 month postoperatively. Higher-order aberrations were decomposed into Zernike coefficients, calculated according to individual pupil diameter. The correlation between higher-order aberrations and contrast sensitivity was evaluated. Results There were no significant differences in contrast sensitivity function between the four types of lenses under photopic conditions. However, the contrast sensitivity function and area under log contrast sensitivity function in the aspheric lenses were significantly better than in the spherical lens under mesopic conditions. Under mesopic conditions, spherical aberration in eyes with aspheric lenses was significantly lower than in eyes with spherical lenses (P < 0.05). Under photopic conditions, coma aberration had a significant negative correlation with contrast sensitivity at 12 cycles/degree. Under mesopic conditions, spherical aberration had a significant negative correlation with contrast sensitivity at 3, 6, and 12 cycles/degree with glare, and with contrast sensitivity at 6 and 18 cycles/degree without glare. Conclusion In terms of influence on visual function, coma aberration may be more significant under photopic conditions and spherical aberration under mesopic conditions. PMID:22205829

  7. The refractive outcome of Toric Lentis Mplus implant in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chiam, Patrick J; Quah, Say A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the refractive outcome of Toric Lentis Mplus intraocular lens (IOL) implant. METHODS This is a retrospective case series. Consecutive patients with corneal astigmatism of at least 1.5 D had Toric Lentis Mplus IOL implant during cataract surgery. The exclusion criteria included irregular astigmatism on corneal topography, large scotopic pupil diameter (>6 mm), poor visual potential and significant ocular comorbidity. Postoperative manifest refraction, uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), best-corrected distance visual acuity (BCVA), uncorrected intermediate visual acuity (UIVA) at 3/4 m and uncorrected near visual acuity (UNVA) were obtained. RESULTS There were 70 eyes from 49 patients in this study. Patients were refracted at a median of 8.9wk (range 4.0 to 15.5) from the operation date. Sixty-five percent of eyes had 6/7.5 (0.10 logMAR) or better, and 99% 6/12 (0.30 logMAR) or better postoperative UDVA. Eighty-nine percent could read Jaeger (J) 3 (0.28 logMAR) and 95% J5 (0.37 logMAR) at 40 cm. The median magnitude of astigmatism decreased from 1.91 D to 0.49 D (Wilcoxon, P<0.001) after the operation. The range of the cylindrical error was reduced from 1.5-3.95 D (keratometric) preoperatively to 0.00-1.46 D (subjective refraction transposed to corneal plane) postoperatively. CONCLUSION Toric Lentis Mplus IOL has good predictability in reducing preexisting corneal astigmatism. PMID:27275424

  8. High order aberration and straylight evaluation after cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting monofocal intraocular lens

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Florian T A; Tandogan, Tamer; Khoramnia, Ramin; Auffarth, Gerd U

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the quality of vision in respect to high order aberrations and straylight perception after implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting, monofocal intraocular lens (IOL). METHODS Twenty-one patients (34 eyes) aged 50 to 83y underwent cataract surgery with implantation of an aspheric, aberration correcting IOL (Tecnis ZCB00, Abbott Medical Optics). Three months after surgery they were examined for uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), contrast sensitivity (CS) under photopic and mesopic conditions with and without glare source, ocular high order aberrations (HOA, Zywave II) and retinal straylight (C-Quant). RESULTS Postoperatively, patients achieved a postoperative CDVA of 0.0 logMAR or better in 97.1% of eyes. Mean values of high order abberations were +0.02±0.27 (primary coma components) and -0.04±0.16 (spherical aberration term). Straylight values of the C-Quant were 1.35±0.44 log which is within normal range of age matched phakic patients. The CS measurements under mesopic and photopic conditions in combination with and without glare did not show any statistical significance in the patient group observed (P≥0.28). CONCLUSION The implantation of an aspherical aberration correcting monofocal IOL after cataract surgery resulted in very low residual higher order aberration (HOA) and normal straylight. PMID:26309872

  9. Long-Term Observation of Triplex Surgery for Cataract after Phakic 6H Implantation for Super High Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Xiaoying; Lu, Yi; Zheng, Tianyu; Zhou, Xingtao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the safety, effectiveness, and stability of triplex surgery for phakic 6H anterior chamber phakic intraocular lens explantation and phacoemulsification with in-the-bag IOL implantation for super high myopia in long-term observations. Methods. This retrospective case series evaluated 16 eyes of 10 patients who underwent triplex surgery. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), endothelial cell density (ECD), and associated adverse events were evaluated. Results. The mean follow-up time after the triplex surgery was 46 ± 14 months. The mean logMAR BCVA was significantly improved after triplex surgery (P = 0.047). One eye developed endophthalmitis five days postoperatively and underwent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). Five eyes with preoperative severe endothelial cell loss developed corneal decompensation and underwent keratoplasty at a mean time of 9.4 ± 2.6 months after the triplex surgery. One eye had graft failure and underwent a second keratoplasty. The eye developed rhegmatogenous retinal detachment and underwent PPV with silicone oil 18 months later. ECD before the triplex surgery was not significantly different compared with that at last follow-up (P = 0.495) apart from these five eyes. Three eyes (18.8%) developed posterior capsule opacification. Conclusions. Triplex surgery was safe and effective for phakic 6H related complicated cataracts. Early extraction before severe ECD loss is recommended. PMID:27190642

  10. Normothermia for Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery: An Expanded Horizon

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuddin, Ahmad Mahir; Nikman, Ahmad Mohd; Ali, Saedah; Zain, Mohd Rizal Mohd; Wong, Abdul Rahim; Corno, Antonio Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in pediatric cardiac surgery is generally performed with hypothermia, flow reduction and hemodilution. From October 2013 to December 2014, 55 patients, median age 6 years (range 2 months to 52 years), median weight 18.5 kg (range 3.2–57 kg), underwent surgery with normothermic high flow CPB in a new unit. There were no early or late deaths. Fifty patients (90.9%) were extubated within 3 h, 3 (5.5%) within 24 h, and 2 (3.6%) within 48 h. Twenty-four patients (43.6%) did not require inotropic support, 31 (56.4%) received dopamine or dobutamine: 21 ≤5 mcg/kg/min, 8 5–10 mcg/kg/min, and 2 >10 mcg/kg/min. Two patients (6.5%) required noradrenaline 0.05–0.1 mcg/kg/min. On arrival to ICU and after 3 and 6 h and 8:00 a.m. the next morning, mean lactate levels were 1.9 ± 09, 2.0 ± 1.2, 1.6 ± 0.8, and 1.4 ± 0.7 mmol/L (0.6–5.2 mmol/L), respectively. From arrival to ICU to 8:00 a.m. the next morning mean urine output was 3.8 ± 1.5 mL/kg/h (0.7–7.6 mL/kg/h), and mean chest drainage was 0.6 ± 0.5 mL/kg/h (0.1–2.3 mL/kg/h). Mean ICU and hospital stay were 2.7 ± 1.4 days (2–8 days) and 7.2 ± 2.2 days (4–15 days), respectively. In conclusion, normothermic high flow CPB allows pediatric and congenital heart surgery with favorable outcomes even in a new unit. The immediate post-operative period is characterized by low requirement for inotropic and respiratory support, low lactate production, adequate urine output, minimal drainage from the chest drains, short ICU, and hospital stay. PMID:25973411

  11. Long-Term Efficacy and Rotational Stability of AcrySof Toric Intraocular Lens Implantation in Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung Hun; Chung, Tae-Young

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the long-term efficacy and rotational stability of the AcrySof toric intraocular lens (IOL) in correcting preoperative astigmatism in cataract patients. Methods This prospective observational study included 30 eyes from 24 consecutive patients who underwent implantation of an AcrySof toric IOL with micro-coaxial cataract surgery between May 2008 and September 2008. Outcomes of visual acuity, refractive and keratometric astigmatism, and IOL rotation after 1 day, 1 month, 3 months, and long-term (mean, 13.3±5.0 months) follow-up were evaluated. Results At final follow-up, 73.3% of eyes showed an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/25 or better. The postoperative keratometric value was not different from the preoperative value; mean refractive astigmatism was reduced to -0.28±0.38 diopter (D) from -1.28±0.48 D. The mean rotation of the toric IOL was 3.45±3.39 degrees at final follow-up. One eye (3.3%) exhibited IOL rotation of 10.3 degrees, the remaining eyes (96.7%) had IOL rotation of less than 10 degrees. Conclusions Early postoperative and long-term follow-up showed that implantation of the AcrySof toric IOL is an effective, safe, and predictable method for managing corneal astigmatism in cataract patients. PMID:20714383

  12. Dexmedetomidine with low-dose ketamine for cataract surgery under peribulbar block in a patient with Huntington's chorea

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Shraddha; Shetti, Akshaya N.; Nadkarni, A. V.; Ahuja, Bhuvna

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's chorea (HC) is a rare hereditary disorder of the nervous system. It is inherited as an autosomal dominant disorder and is characterized by progressive chorea, dementia, and psychiatric disturbances. There are only a few case reports regarding the anesthetic management of a patient with HC and the best anesthetic technique is yet to be established for those patients which are at higher risk of perioperative complications. We report the anesthetic management of a 64-year-old patient with HC admitted for cataract surgery. PMID:25886428

  13. Inadvertent Trypan Blue Staining of Posterior Capsule during Cataract Surgery Associated with “Argentinian Flag” Event

    PubMed Central

    Prinzi, Robert A.; Alapati, Neeti M.; Gappy, Shawn S.; Dilly, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Trypan blue is common in visualizing the anterior capsule during cataract surgery. Inadvertent staining of the posterior capsule during phacoemulsification is a rare complication and there are few reports in the literature. The proposed mechanism of posterior capsule staining in previous reports includes a compromised zonular apparatus or iris retractors facilitating the posterior flow of trypan blue. We report the first case of trypan blue staining of the posterior capsule associated with the “Argentinian flag” sign. In our case, the “Argentinian flag” allowed the trypan blue to seep between the posterior capsule and the lens, staining the anterior surface of the posterior capsule. PMID:27022495

  14. Cataract surgery in the setting of severe pathologic myopia with high axial length: use of pars plana lensectomy and vitrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gologorsky, Daniel; Flynn, Harry W

    2016-01-01

    Cataract surgery in patients with pathologic myopia and high axial length can be challenging for a variety of reasons, including imprecise intraocular lens calculations in eyes with posterior staphylomas and intraoperative complications such as suprachoroidal hemorrhage, posterior capsular rupture, and retinal tears. Although most surgeons recommend standard phacoemulsification and preservation of the posterior capsule in these cases, an alternative approach presented in this series entails the removal of the lens through the pars plana and removal of formed vitreous during the concurrent procedure. PMID:27313443

  15. Comparison of effect of nepafenac and diclofenac ophthalmic solutions on cornea, tear film, and ocular surface after cataract surgery: the results of a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Atsushi; Utsunomiya, Tsugiaki; Kato, Yuji; Takayanagi, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the effects of nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% (Nevanac) and diclofenac sodium ophthalmic solution 0.1% (Diclod) on the cornea, tear film, and ocular surface after cataract surgery. Methods A total of 60 eyes (60 patients) were selected for this study, with no ocular diseases other than cataract (scheduled for cataract surgery by one surgeon). Patients were randomly enrolled to receive nepafenac or diclofenac in the perioperative period, and cataract surgery was performed using torsional microcoaxial phacoemulsification and aspiration with intraocular lens implantation via a transconjunctival single-plane sclerocorneal incision at the 12 o’clock position. We compared intra- and intergroup differences preoperatively and postoperatively in conjunctival and corneal fluorescein staining scores, tear film breakup times, Schirmer’s tests, the Dry Eye Related Quality of Life Scores, and tear meniscus areas using anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Results The diclofenac group had significantly higher conjunctival and corneal fluorescein staining scores at 4 weeks postoperatively compared with the nepafenac group (P<0.001). Within the diclofenac group, significantly higher conjunctival and corneal fluorescein staining scores were noted at 4 weeks postoperatively than those seen preoperatively (P<0.001) and at 1 week postoperatively (P<0.001). No statistically significant differences were found in any other items. Conclusions Nepafenac ophthalmic suspension 0.1% is considered safe for the corneal epithelium after cataract surgery. PMID:27019091

  16. Effect of Biometric Characteristics on the Change of Biomechanical Properties of the Human Cornea due to Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Langenbucher, Achim; Gatzioufas, Zisis; Seitz, Berthold; El-Husseiny, Moatasem

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the impact of biometric characteristics on changes of biomechanical properties of the human cornea due to standard cataract surgery using biomechanical analysis. Patients and Methods. This prospective consecutive cross-sectional study comprised 54 eyes with cataract in stages I or II that underwent phacoemulsification and IOL implantation. CH, CRF, IOPg, and IOPcc intraocular pressure were measured by biomechanical analysis preoperatively and at 1 month postoperatively. Changes (Δ) were calculated as preoperative value versus postoperative value. Biometrical data were extracted from TMS-5 (CSI and SAI), IOLMaster (AL), and EM-3000 (CCT and ECC) preoperatively. Results. The average values of the changes were ΔCH = −0.45 ± 1.27 mmHg, ΔCRF = −0.88 ± 1.1 mmHg, ΔIOPg = −1.58 ± 3.15 mmHg, and ΔIOPcc = −1.45 ± 3.93 mmHg. The higher the CSI the smaller the decrease in CH (r = 0.302, P = 0.028). The higher the CCT the larger the decrease in CRF (r = −0.371, P = 0.013). The higher the AL the smaller the decrease in IOPg (r = 0.417, P = 0.005). The higher the AL, SAI, and EEC the smaller the decrease in IOPcc (r = 0.351, P = 0.001; r = −0.478, P < 0.001; r = 0.339, P = 0.013). Conclusions. Corneal biomechanical properties were affected by comprehensive factors after cataract surgery, including corneal endothelium properties, biometry, and geometrical characteristics. PMID:24987697

  17. A retrospective study on the outcomes of cataract surgery in an Eastern Regional Health Authority hospital of Trinidad and Tobago

    PubMed Central

    Sonron, Ebiakpo-aboere; Bridgemohan, Petra; Sharma, Subash

    2015-01-01

    Background. Worldwide, cataract is a major cause of blindness. The paper aims to evaluate factors associated with borderline and poor outcomes of cataract surgery at an Eastern Regional Health Authority (ERHA) hospital in Trinidad and Tobago. Materials and Methods. A hospital-based, retrospective study was done on 401 patients who had undergone cataract surgery (unilateral and bilateral) at an ERHA Hospital between March 2009 and September 2014. Data was collected on variables concerning demographic, medical history, surgical history, ocular findings and visual acuity (VA). The outcome variable of interest was Snellen’s post-operative (presenting) VA which was transformed into a dichotomous variable with borderline and poor outcomes as one and good outcomes as the other. Data were analysed using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results. Good outcome (presenting VA 6/18 or better) was seen in 350 (67%) eyes. The fitted model consisted of ocular co-morbidity (OR =2.133; 95% CI [1.346–3.380]), hypertension (OR = 0.520; 95% CI [0.381–0.928]), surgical procedure (OR = 1.56; 95% CI [1.004–2.425]), good preoperative VA (OR = 0.388, 95% CI [0.211–0.714]), borderline preoperative VA (OR = 0.485; 95% CI = [0.278–0.843]) and year of first visit to clinic (OR = 2.243; 95% CI [1.215–4.141]). Conclusion. There is a need for community-based outreach to increase awareness of eye health and diseases. It is recommended that the general population is encouraged to take responsibility for personal management. The facilities at the Hospital should also be enhanced. PMID:26357596

  18. A survey of preoperative blood tests in primary open-angle glaucoma patients versus cataract surgery patients

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Laura P.; Wong, Jessica; Jiwani, Aliya Z.; Greenstein, Scott H.; Brauner, Stacey C.; Chen, Sherleen C.; Turalba, Angela V.; Chen, Teresa C.; Shen, Lucy; Rhee, Douglas J.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Kang, Jae Hee; Loomis, Stephanie; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate biomarker differences in routine preoperative blood tests performed on primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) case and control patients presenting for anterior segment eye surgery. Methods POAG cases and age-related cataract surgery patients (controls) who underwent anterior segment surgery at Massachusetts Eye and Ear from January 2009 through March 2012 were identified by retrospective record review. Patients with diabetes mellitus, secondary glaucoma, and cataract due to trauma or steroid exposure were excluded. Data on demographic features, preoperative ophthalmological and medical diagnosis, blood pressure, anthropometric measures, basic metabolic panel, and complete blood count were extracted from the medical records. Univariate differences in lab values between POAG cases and controls were assessed using unpaired t tests. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was completed to determine the independent associations of biomarkers with POAG. Results A total of 150 cases and 150 age-related controls were included. In multivariate analysis, higher AG was inversely associated with POAG (odds ratio [OR] = 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80–1.00), and higher Cl− level was positively associated with POAG (OR = 1.15; 95% CI, 1.02–1.29). The lower AG in POAG patients could be explained by higher IgG levels as the available data in post hoc analysis showed a nonsignificant trend toward higher IgG in cases compared to controls (17 vs 23; 1142 ± 284 mg/dl vs 1028 ± 291 mg/dl; P = 0.22). Furthermore, in multivariable analysis, a higher red blood cell count was also associated with POAG (OR = 1.91; 95% CI, 1.11–3.28). Conclusions Patients with POAG presenting for anterior segment surgery had a lower AG compared to age-related cataract surgery patients. The etiology of this reduced gap is unclear but the possible contribution of IgG warrants further exploration. The etiology of higher red blood cell counts in POAG cases is unknown and

  19. Cataracts in Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Arun, Veena; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Latkany, Paul; Troia, Robert N.; Jalbrzikowski, Jessica; Kasza, Kristen; Karrison, Ted; Cezar, Simone; Sautter, Mari; Greenwald, Mark J.; Mieler, William; Mets, Marilyn B.; Alam, Ambereen; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Roizen, Nancy; Rabiah, Peter; Del Monte, Monte A.; McLeod, Rima

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the incidence and natural history of cataracts in children with congenital toxoplasmosis. Methods Children referred to the National Collaborative Chicago-based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) between 1981 and 2005 were examined by ophthalmologists at predetermined times according to a specific protocol. The clinical course and treatment of patients who developed cataracts was reviewed. Results In the first year of life, 134 of 173 children examined were treated with pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine, and Leucovorin, while the remaining 39 were not treated. Cataracts occurred in 27 eyes of 20 patients (11.6%, 95% confidence interval [7.2%, 17.3%]). Fourteen cataracts were present at birth, and 13 developed postnatally. Locations of the cataracts included anterior polar (3 eyes), anterior subcapsular (6), nuclear (5), posterior subcapsular (7), and unknown (6). Thirteen cataracts were partial, 9 total, and 5 with unknown complexity. Twelve cataracts remained stable, 12 progressed, and progression was not known for 3. Five of 27 eyes had cataract surgery, with 2 of these developing glaucoma. Sixteen eyes of 11 patients had retinal detachment and cataract. All eyes with cataracts had additional ocular lesions. Conclusions In the NCCCTS cohort, 11.6% of patients were diagnosed with cataracts. There was considerable variability in the presentation, morphology, and progression of the cataracts. Associated intraocular pathology was an important cause of morbidity. PMID:18086432

  20. High-resolution genotyping of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains linked to acute post cataract surgery endophthalmitis outbreaks in India

    PubMed Central

    Kenchappa, Prashanth; Sangwan, Virender S; Ahmed, Niyaz; Rao, K Rajender; Pathengay, Avinash; Mathai, Annie; Mansoori, Tarannum; Das, Taraprasad; Hasnain, Seyed E; Sharma, Savitri

    2005-01-01

    Background Investigation of two independent outbreaks of post cataract surgery endophthalmitis identified the reservoir of epidemic strains of P. aeruginosa. Methods Patient isolates cultured from vitreous fluid of all the nine cases and from the peripheral devices of phacoemulsification machine were subjected to high-resolution Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (FAFLP) analysis. Results FAFLP based genotyping of the isolates confirmed nosocomial transmission. Although biochemical characterization and antibiotic susceptibility profiles grouped all the isolates together, FAFLP based genotyping revealed that, all the outbreak isolates were derived from 2 different strains, with independent origins. One group of isolates was traced to phacoprobe and the second one to the internal tubing system of the phacoemulsification machine used in cataract surgery. In silico analysis indicated possible evolution in both the clusters of P. aeruginosa isolates due to genetic polymorphisms. The polymorphisms were mapped to gene products (cell envelope, outer membrane proteins) possibly having significant role in pathogenesis. Conclusion The present study is probably the first one to apply FAFLP typing successfully to investigate outbreaks of postoperative endophthalmitis (POE) in an ophthalmic setting, which was able to identify the source, and helped to make rational decisions on sterilization procedures that halted more cases of infection in these hospitals. PMID:16343353

  1. Safety and Efficacy of Propranolol in Comparison With Combination of Fentanyl and Ketamine as Premedication in Cataract Surgery Under the Topical Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fazel, Farhad; Saryazdi, Hamidhajigholam; Rezaei, Leila; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and effects of propranolol as a premedication before cataract surgery and compared them with the usual combination doses of fentanyl and ketamine. Among all reffered patients to Feiz Hospital of Esfahan for cataract surgery, 122 patients between Mar to Sep 2010 were enrolled in this study and randomly allocated into one of the following equal groups: 40 mg propranolol, 2 hours before surgery and combination of 15 mg ketamine and 50 µg fentanyl l. 5 min before surgery. The ability to control of hemodynamic instabilities caused by stress and to gain patients satisfaction was compared between two groups. Also, the efficacy of each premedication to control of hemodynamic changes during surgery were evaluated and compared. No significant differences were seen in the patients satisfaction and controlling of stress induced hemodynamic changes between two groups (P>0.05). However, patients in ketamine + fentanyl group showed more nausea and less pain during and after surgery. Moreover, no significant adverse effects were reported during and after the surgery. Our results demonstrated that propranolol can be used safely as a premedication in cataract surgery in the comparable efficacy to ketamine plus fentanyl premedication. PMID:26153173

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Propranolol in Comparison With Combination of Fentanyl and Ketamine as Premedication in Cataract Surgery Under the Topical Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Farhad; Saryazdi, Hamidhajigholam; Rezaei, Leila; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and effects of propranolol as a premedication before cataract surgery and compared them with the usual combination doses of fentanyl and ketamine. Among all reffered patients to Feiz Hospital of Esfahan for cataract surgery, 122 patients between Mar to Sep 2010 were enrolled in this study and randomly allocated into one of the following equal groups: 40 mg propranolol, 2 hours before surgery and combination of 15 mg ketamine and 50 µg fentanyl l. 5 min before surgery. The ability to control of hemodynamic instabilities caused by stress and to gain patients satisfaction was compared between two groups. Also, the efficacy of each premedication to control of hemodynamic changes during surgery were evaluated and compared. No significant differences were seen in the patients satisfaction and controlling of stress induced hemodynamic changes between two groups (P>0.05). However, patients in ketamine + fentanyl group showed more nausea and less pain during and after surgery. Moreover, no significant adverse effects were reported during and after the surgery. Our results demonstrated that propranolol can be used safely as a premedication in cataract surgery in the comparable efficacy to ketamine plus fentanyl premedication. PMID:26153173

  3. Comparison of phacotrabeculectomy and sequential surgery in the treatment of chronic angle-closure glaucoma coexisted with cataract

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai-Jun; Xuan, Jie; Zhu, Xiao-Min; Xie, Lin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the safety and effectiveness of phacotrabeculectomy versus sequential surgery in chronic angle-closure glaucoma (CACG) with coexisting cataract. METHODS One hundred and sixty-two CACG patients (162 eyes) were retrospectively analyzed. Of them, 87 patients (87 eyes) in group A had underwent phacotrabeculectomy with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and 75 patients (75 eyes) in group B had underwent sequential surgery with IOL implanted. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), complications and anterior chamber angle (ACA) were measured. RESULTS Demographic characteristics of the two groups were similar. A mean follow-up period was 15±6mo (range 13 to 24mo), a mean IOP of 16.61±6.43 mm Hg in group A and 15.80±5.35 mm Hg in group B (P=0.84) at the last follow up. The Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that the cumulative probability of success in both groups was similar (P=0.61). Anterior uveitis and hypotony were the most common complications in group A, whereas group B experienced shallow anterior chamber with trabeculectomy. With the exception of anterior uveitis, no complications occurred to 11 trabeculectomized eyes. All postoperative measurements of anterior chamber showed statistically significant differences in each group according to the preoperative data (P<0.05). However, fewer changes occurred in group B than in group A. CONCLUSION Phacotrabeculectomy and sequential surgery exhibit similar IOP reduction, visual recovery, and complications when treating CACG patients with cataract. However, for a wider ACA, phacotrabeculectomy has demonstrated higher effectiveness than sequential surgery. PMID:27275422

  4. A methodological approach to identify external factors for indicator-based risk adjustment illustrated by a cataract surgery register

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Risk adjustment is crucial for comparison of outcome in medical care. Knowledge of the external factors that impact measured outcome but that cannot be influenced by the physician is a prerequisite for this adjustment. To date, a universal and reproducible method for identification of the relevant external factors has not been published. The selection of external factors in current quality assurance programmes is mainly based on expert opinion. We propose and demonstrate a methodology for identification of external factors requiring risk adjustment of outcome indicators and we apply it to a cataract surgery register. Methods Defined test criteria to determine the relevance for risk adjustment are “clinical relevance” and “statistical significance”. Clinical relevance of the association is presumed when observed success rates of the indicator in the presence and absence of the external factor exceed a pre-specified range of 10%. Statistical significance of the association between the external factor and outcome indicators is assessed by univariate stratification and multivariate logistic regression adjustment. The cataract surgery register was set up as part of a German multi-centre register trial for out-patient cataract surgery in three high-volume surgical sites. A total of 14,924 patient follow-ups have been documented since 2005. Eight external factors potentially relevant for risk adjustment were related to the outcome indicators “refractive accuracy” and “visual rehabilitation” 2–5 weeks after surgery. Results The clinical relevance criterion confirmed 2 (“refractive accuracy”) and 5 (“visual rehabilitation”) external factors. The significance criterion was verified in two ways. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed almost identical external factors: 4 were related to “refractive accuracy” and 7 (6) to “visual rehabilitation”. Two (“refractive accuracy”) and 5 (“visual rehabilitation”) factors

  5. Meta-analysis to Compare the Safety and Efficacy of Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery and Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Gogate, Parikshit; Optom, Jyoti Jaggernath B.; Deshpande, Swapna; Naidoo, Kovin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing the safety, efficacy, and expenses related to phacoemulsification versus manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS). Methods: PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus databases were searched with key words manual SICS 6/18 and 6/60; astigmatism and endothelial cell loss postoperatively, intra- and post-operative complications, phacoemulsification, and comparison of SICS and phacoemulsification. Non-English language manuscripts and manuscripts not indexed in the three databases were also search for comparison of SICS with phacoemulsification. Data were compared between techniques for postoperative uncorrected and corrected distance visual acuity (UCVA and best corrected visual acuity [BCVA], respectively) better than 6/9, surgical cost and duration of surgery. The Oxford cataract treatment and evaluation team scores were used for grading intraoperative and postoperative complications, uncorrected near vision. Result: This review analyzed, 11 comparative studies documenting 76,838 eyes that had undergone cataract surgery considered for analysis. UCVA of 6/18 UCVA and 6/18 BCVA were comparable between techniques (P = 0.373 and P = 0.567, respectively). BCVA of 6/9 was comparable between techniques (P = 0.685). UCVA of 6/60 and 6/60 BCVA aided and unaided vision were comparable (P = 0.126 and P = 0.317, respectively). There was no statistical difference in: Endothelial cell loss during surgery (P = 0.298), intraoperative (P = 0.964) complications, and postoperative complications (P = 0.362). The phacoemulsification group had statistically significantly less astigmatism (P = 0.005) and more eyes with UCVA of 6/9 (P = 0.040). UCVA at near was statistically significantly better with SICS due to astigmatism and safer during the learning phase (P = 0.003). The average time for SICS was lower than phacoemulsification and cost <½ of phacoemulsification. Conclusion: The outcome of this meta-analysis indicated there is no

  6. Comparison of preoperative nepafenac (0.1%) and flurbiprofen (0.03%) eye drops in maintaining mydriasis during small incision cataract surgery in patients with senile cataract: A randomized, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Saumya; Mondal, Kanchan Kumar; Roy, Sukalyan Saha; Gayen, Sharmistha; Ghosh, Abhishek; De, Radha Raman

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study compared the effectiveness of prophylactic administration of topical flurbiprofen 0.03% and nepafenac 0.1% in maintaining mydriasis during small incision cataract surgery (SICS). Materials and Methods: This study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind comparative study in adult cataract patients given topical flurbiprofen or nepafenac prior to SICS and capsular bag intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at a tertiary care hospital. Horizontal and vertical diameters of pupil were measured at the beginning and end of surgery, and the mean values were compared across the two groups. Unpaired t-test and Fisher's exact test were used to analyse the results. Results: A total of 70 eyes of cataract surgery patients, 33 males and 37 females, with a mean age of 58.5 ± 11.24 years, were included in the study. The mean horizontal and vertical diameters of the two groups were similar at the start of surgery. Significant differences were seen after IOL implantation, with the nepafenac group having the larger mean diameters in both horizontal (P = 0.03) and vertical (P = 0.04) pupillary measurements. Conclusions: Topical nepafenac has been shown to be a more effective inhibitor of meiosis during SICS and provides a more stable mydriatic effect compared to topical flurbiprofen. PMID:26600636

  7. Structural Analysis of Different Incision Sizes and Stromal Hydration in Cataract Surgery Using Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jong-Wook; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To analyze healing changes of corneal wounds of different corneal incision sizes with or without stromal hydration in cataract surgery using anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Methods Cataract surgeries were performed by a single surgeon and 2.2- and 2.8-mm corneal incisions were made using a diamond blade (ME-759; Meyco, Biel-Bienne, Swiss). Patients were divided into four groups according to incision size (2.2 and 2.8 mm), and with/without stromal hydration. Fifteen eyes were assigned to each group and incision wounds were measured using anterior segment optical coherence tomography at 2 hours, 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months postoperatively. Corneal thickness, incision length and incision angle were measured and existence of epithelial, endothelial gaping and Descemet's membrane detachment was evaluated. Results Incision thickness was greater in the group with stromal hydration than in the group without on operation day (p < 0.05). Stromal hydration exerted greater influence in the 2.2-mm incision group than in the 2.8-mm incision group. Corneal thickness decreased more rapidly in the stromal hydration group than in the group with no hydration (p = 0.022). Endothelial gaping was greater in the 2.2-mm incision group than in the 2.8-mm incision group 1 day, 1 month, and 3 months after surgery (p = 0.035, p = 0.009, and p = 0.008, respectively). No other statistical significance was observed between the two groups (2.2 and 2.8 mm) during follow-up regarding corneal thickness, epithelial gaping and Descemet's membrane detachment. Conclusions Corneal wounds with a smaller incision could be more vulnerable to external stimuli such as stromal hydration and are less stable than those with a larger incision. PMID:25646057

  8. A comparison of patient pain and visual outcome using topical anesthesia versus regional anesthesia during cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosoda, Yoshikatsu; Kuriyama, Shoji; Jingami, Yoko; Hattori, Hidetsugu; Hayashi, Hisako; Matsumoto, Miho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to compare the level of patient pain during the phacoemulsification and implantation of foldable intraocular lenses while under topical, intracameral, or sub-Tenon lidocaine. Patients and methods This was a retrospective study. Three hundred and one eyes subjected to cataract surgery were included in this study. All eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery and intraocular lens implantation using topical, sub-Tenon, or intracameral anesthesia. The topical group received 4% lidocaine drops, and the intracameral group received a 0.1–0.2 cc infusion of 1% preservative-free lidocaine into the anterior chamber through the side port combined with topical drops of lidocaine. The sub-Tenon group received 2% lidocaine. Best-corrected visual acuity, corneal endothelial cell loss, and intraoperative pain level were evaluated. Pain level was assessed on a visual analog scale (range 0–2). Results There were no significant differences in visual outcome and corneal endothelial cell loss between the three groups. The mean pain score in the sub-Tenon group was significantly lower than that in the topical and intracameral groups (P=0.0009 and P=0.0055, respectively). In 250 eyes without high myopia (< −6D), there were no significant differences in mean pain score between the sub-Tenon and intracameral groups (P=0.1417). No additional anesthesia was required in all groups. Conclusion Intracameral lidocaine provides sufficient pain suppressive effects in eyes without high myopia, while sub-Tenon anesthesia is better for cataract surgery in eyes with high myopia. PMID:27382247

  9. A comparative study of complications of cataract surgery with phacoemulsification in eyes with high and normal axial length

    PubMed Central

    Fesharaki, Hamid; Peyman, Alireza; Rowshandel, Mehdi; Peyman, Mohammadreza; Alizadeh, Pegah; Akhlaghi, Mohammadreza; Ashtari, AliReza

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study performed to assess the safety of cataract extraction with phacoemulsification and intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in patients with high axial length compared with patients with normal axial length. Materials and Methods: A total of 866 eyes were enrolled in this study; all subjects underwent phacoemulsification and IOL implantation for treatment of cataract. Seven hundred and nine eyes fell in the normal group with axial lengths ranging between 21 and 24.5 mm, and 157 eyes were considered myopic with axial length equal or greater than 26 mm. The two groups were compared regarding intraoperative surgical complications, such as vitreous loss, posterior capsular rupture, nucleolus drop, and undesirable implantation of IOL in the anterior chamber. Results: Age was a risk factor in both groups, with each year increase of age, the chance of incidence of intraoperative complications increased 1.04-folds (P = 0.03). And with 1 mm increase in axial length, the incidence of complications raised 1.22-folds (P = 0.007). There was no significant correlation between axial length and incidence of vitreous loss, although the incidence of posterior capsular rupture and nucleus fragment drops increased with increment in the axial length. Sex of the patients and side of the left or right eye were not found to be significant risk factors. Conclusions: As the results illustrate, in this survey, age and high axial length were statistically significant risk factors for incidence of intraoperative complications of cataract surgery with phacoemulsification technique. Anticipation of these complications and also preparation and prophylactic measures may decrease incidence of these complications. PMID:23326797

  10. Cataract (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A cataract is a cloudy or opaque area in the lens of the eye. Cataracts usually develop as a person gets older and ... substances can also accelerate the development of a cataract. Cataracts can cause visual problems such as difficulty ...

  11. Comparison of Blue Light-Filtering IOLs and UV Light-Filtering IOLs for Cataract Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-feng; Zou, Hai-dong; Yu, Yong-fu; Sun, Qian; Zhao, Nai-qing

    2012-01-01

    Background A number of published randomized controlled trials have been conducted to evaluate visual performance of blue light-filtering intraocular lenses (IOL) and UV light-filtering intraocular lenses (IOL) after cataract phacoemulsification surgery. However, results have not always been consistent. Therefore, we carried out a meta-analysis to compare the effectiveness of blue light-filtering IOLs versus UV light-filtering IOLs in cataract surgery. Methods and Findings Comprehensive searches of PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and the Chinese BioMedical literature databases were performed using web-based search engines. Fifteen trials (1690 eyes) were included for systematic review, and 11 of 15 studies were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed that there were no significant differences in postoperative mean best corrected visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, overall color vision, or in the blue light spectrum under photopic light conditions between blue light-filtering IOLs and UV light-filtering IOLs [WMD = −0.01, 95%CI (−0.03, 0.01), P = 0.46; WMD = 0.07, 95%CI (−0.04, 0.19), P = 0.20; SMD = 0.14, 95%CI (−0.33, 0.60), P = 0.566; SMD = 0.20, 95%CI (−0.04, 0.43), P = 0.099]. However, color vision with blue light-filtering IOLs was significantly reduced in the blue light spectrum under mesopic light conditions [SMD = 0.74, 95%CI (0.29, 1.18), P = 0.001]. Conclusion This meta-analysis demonstrates that postoperative visual performance with blue light-filtering IOLs is approximately equal to that of UV light-filtering IOLs after cataract surgery, but color vision with blue light-filtering IOLs demonstrated some compromise in the blue light spectrum under mesopic light conditions. PMID:22412976

  12. Relationship between age, corneal astigmatism, and ocular dimensions with reference to astigmatism in eyes undergoing routine cataract surgery.

    PubMed

    Collier Wakefield, O; Annoh, R; Nanavaty, M A

    2016-04-01

    PurposeTo assess the relationship between age, corneal astigmatism, and ocular dimensions with reference to astigmatism correction during cataract surgery.MethodsIn this cross-sectional study of right eyes of 2247 consecutive patients attending cataract surgery preassessment, data on patient demographics, axial length (AL), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and keratometric astigmatism were collected. Astigmatism was further analyzed as against-the-rule (ATR: steepest meridian 180±30°), with-the-rule (WTR: 90±30°), and oblique (OB: 30-60°or 120-150°).ResultsMean age, AL, and ACD were 72.28±13.84 years, 23.99±1.85 mm and 3.08 ±0.52 mm, respectively. In all, 20.4% eyes had ≤0.50 diopters (D), 55.2% had 0.51-1.50 D, 7.9% had 2.01-3.00 D, and 3.7% eyes had >3.00 D of astigmatism. Overall, 44.2% of eyes had corneal astigmatism >1.00 D. Average astigmatism in age ranges 40-49, 50-59, 60-69, 70-79, 80-89, and 90+ years were 0.82, 1.04, 1.04, 1.02, 1.15 and 2.01 D, respectively. The magnitude of preoperative astigmatism positively correlated with age (P<0.0001), with increasing and decreasing prevalence of ATR and WTR astigmatism, respectively, with advancing age. The magnitude of ATR astigmatism inversely correlates to AL (P<0.0001). ATR astigmatism is more prevalent with increasing magnitude of astigmatism (P<0.0001).ConclusionsA majority of patients for cataract surgery have astigmatism between 0.51 and 1.5 D. ATR astigmatism increases, whereas WTR decreases with age. ATR astigmatism inversely correlates to AL. With increasing age, the magnitude of astigmatism increases and ATR astigmatism becomes increasingly prevalent. The likelihood of a patient requiring astigmatic correction increases with age. PMID:26795412

  13. Vancomycin Dosing and Pharmacokinetics in Postoperative Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Benefield, Emily C.; Hagemann, Tracy M.; Allen, H. Christine; Farmer, Kevin; Burton, Michael E.; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study compared vancomycin trough concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery (CTS) patients versus those in controls receiving 20 mg/kg/dose, intravenously, every 8 hours. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted in children <18 years of age, following CTS, versus an age-and sex-matched control group. The primary objective was to determine differences in trough concentrations between groups. Secondary objectives included comparisons of pharmacokinetics between groups and development of vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as a doubling in serum creatinine from baseline. Also dosing projections were developed to target an area-under-the-curve-to-minimum inhibitory concentration (AUC:MIC) ratio of ≥400. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients in each group were evaluated. Mean trough concentrations were significantly different between groups (CTS: 18.4 mg/L; control: 8.8 mg/L; p < 0.01). Vancomycin-associated acute kidney injury AKI was significantly higher in the CTS group than in controls (25.9% versus 0%, respectively, p<0.01). There were significant differences in vancomycin elimination rates, with a high degree of variability, but no statistical differences in other parameters. Based on dosing projections, CTS patients would require 21 to 88 mg/kg/day, with a dosage interval determined by the child's glomerular filtration rate to achieve the target AUC:MIC ≥400. CONCLUSIONS: Vancomycin dosage of 20 mg/kg/dose intravenously every 8 hours achieved significantly higher trough concentrations in CTS patients than in controls. Pharmacokinetic parameters were highly variable in CTS patients, indicating more individualization of dosage is needed. A future prospective study is needed to determine whether the revised dosage projections achieve the AUC:MIC target and to determine whether these regimens are associated with less vancomycin-associated AKI. PMID:26997930

  14. Growth factor restriction impedes progression of wound healing following cataract surgery: identification of VEGF as a putative therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Eldred, Julie A.; McDonald, Matthew; Wilkes, Helen S.; Spalton, David J.; Wormstone, I. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Secondary visual loss occurs in millions of patients due to a wound-healing response, known as posterior capsule opacification (PCO), following cataract surgery. An intraocular lens (IOL) is implanted into residual lens tissue, known as the capsular bag, following cataract removal. Standard IOLs allow the anterior and posterior capsules to become physically connected. This places pressure on the IOL and improves contact with the underlying posterior capsule. New open bag IOL designs separate the anterior capsule and posterior capsules and further reduce PCO incidence. It is hypothesised that this results from reduced cytokine availability due to greater irrigation of the bag. We therefore explored the role of growth factor restriction on PCO using human lens cell and tissue culture models. We demonstrate that cytokine dilution, by increasing medium volume, significantly reduced cell coverage in both closed and open capsular bag models. This coincided with reduced cell density and myofibroblast formation. A screen of 27 cytokines identified nine candidates whose expression profile correlated with growth. In particular, VEGF was found to regulate cell survival, growth and myofibroblast formation. VEGF provides a therapeutic target to further manage PCO development and will yield best results when used in conjunction with open bag IOL designs. PMID:27076230

  15. Subperiosteal hematoma from peribulbar block during cataract surgery leading to optic nerve compression in a patient with parahemophilia

    PubMed Central

    Khokhar, Sudarshan; Nayak, Bhagabat; Patil, Bharat; Changole, Milind Devidas; Sinha, Gautam; Sharma, Reetika; Nayak, Lipika

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old male presented with gradual painless diminution of vision since childhood. Slit lamp examination revealed both eyes having congenital cataract. Right eye lens aspiration was performed but was uneventful, and he prepared for left eye surgery after 7 days. Immediately after giving a peribulbar block, a complete akinesia, tight eyelids, and stony hard eyeball was noted. An abaxial proptosis of 7 mm was noted. Lateral canthotomy and inferior cantholysis were done and proptosis reduced to 5 mm. Bleeding time–clotting time was normal. Proptosis worsened to 8 mm the next day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan showed inferolateral subperiosteal hematoma, but drainage could not be performed due to prolonged prothrombin time and activated prothrombin time. Fresh frozen plasma was transfused. Tarsorrhaphy was performed for exposure keratopathy after his coagulation profile became normal. Hematology evaluation after 2 weeks detected factor V deficiency, and was diagnosed as Owren’s disease or parahemophilia. PMID:26664247

  16. Dexmedetomidine as an additive to local anesthetics compared with intravenous dexmedetomidine in peribulbar block for cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, AM; Mahmoud, AAA; Abdelhaq, MM; Yasin, HM; Bayoumi, ASM

    2016-01-01

    Background: No studies compared parenteral dexmedetomidine with its use as an adjuvant to ophthalmic block. We compared between adding dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine in peribulbar block and intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine during peribulbar block for cataract surgery. Materials and Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study on 90 patients for cataract surgery under peribulbar anesthesia. Study included three groups; all patients received 10 ml of peribulbar anesthesia and IV infusion of drugs as follows: Group I: Received a mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (4.5 ml) + lidocaine 2% (4.5 ml) + normal saline (1 ml) + 150 IU hyaluronidase + IV infusion of normal saline, Group II: Received mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (4.5 ml) + lidocaine 2% (4.5 ml) + dexmedetomidine 50 μg (1 ml) +150 IU hyaluronidase + IV infusion of normal saline and Group III: Received mixture of bupivacaine 0.5% (4.5 ml) + lidocaine 2% (4.5 ml) + normal saline (1 ml) +150 IU hyaluronidase + IV dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg over 10 min; followed by 0.4 μg/kg/h IV infusion. We recorded onset, duration of block, Ramsay Sedation Score, intra-ocular pressure (IOP), hemodynamics, and adverse effects. Results: There was a significant decrease in the onset of action and increase in the duration of block in Group II as compared with the Group I and Group III. Mean Ramsay Sedation Score was higher in Group III. The IOP showed a significant decrease in Group II and Group III 10 min after injection (P < 0.01). Heart rate showed a significant decrease in Group III in comparison with the two other groups (P < 0.05). Only two patients in Group III developed bradycardia. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine as an additive shortens onset time, prolong block durations and significantly decreases the IOP with minimal side effects. IV dexmedetomidine, in addition, produces intra-operative sedation with hemodynamic stability. PMID:26952175

  17. YouTube and pediatric surgery. What is the danger for parents?

    PubMed

    Adorisio, Ottavio; Silveri, Massimiliano; De Peppo, Francesco; Ceriati, Emanuela; Marchetti, Paola; De Goyet, Jean De Ville

    2015-04-01

    Internet became one of the most important sources of public health informations especially for relatives and/or caregivers of sick children. Use of YouTube as a source of information in pediatric surgery has not been evaluated. In this study, we want to evaluate the use of YouTube as a source of information about one of the most frequent surgical urgency in pediatric patients, the acute appendicitis, to evaluate the risks for patients and parents. PMID:24683101

  18. Cataract Surgery: Fraud, Waste, and Abuse. A Report by the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This report is a summary of the findings from the Subcommittee on Health and Long-Term Care of the United States House of Representatives Select Committee on Aging investigation of cataract surgery and the use of intraocular lenses (IOL's) in the United States. The document provides background on the definition and treatment of cataracts and…

  19. Pediatric National Surgical Quality Improvement Program: Useful for Quality Improvement in Craniosynostosis Surgery?

    PubMed

    Lam, Sandi; Fridley, Jared; Desai, Virendra R; Srinivasan, Visish M; Jea, Andrew; Luerssen, Thomas G; Pan, I-Wen

    2016-05-01

    The American College of Surgeons and the American Pediatric Surgical Association collaborate to provide pediatric hospitals with multispeciality surgical outcomes data through the Pediatric National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP Peds). The authors used this national multicenter database to describe 30-day outcomes from craniosynostosis surgery and identify associations with perioperative events and blood transfusion.Data from NSQIP Peds were used to describe children undergoing craniosynostosis surgery. The authors examined statistical association of clinical risk factors with the defined end point outcomes of perioperative complications and blood transfusion.Five hundred seventy-two surgeries were included. By Common Procedural Terminology codes, 93 identified as single suture synostosis, the remainder as multiple or unknown suture involvement. Location of the affected suture is not captured. Mean surgical time was 196.84 minutes (SD 113.46). Mean length of stay was 4.22 days (SD 5.04). Sixty-seven percent of patients received blood transfusions. 3.15% were other perioperative occurrences, including infection, wound disruption, unplanned reintubation, stroke/hemorrhage, cardiac arrest, seizures, thromboembolism. 2.8% were readmitted; 2.45% underwent reoperation within 30 days. Duration of surgery and length of hospital stay significantly differed in the presence of blood transfusion versus none. On multivariate analysis, duration from anesthesia start to surgery start, duration from surgery end to anesthesia end, and duration of operation were risk factors for blood transfusion.Pediatric NSQIP gives a national overview of 30-day outcome metrics in craniosynostosis surgery. Perioperative adverse event rate was 3.15%. Duration of surgery and duration of anesthesia were significantly associated with blood transfusion. The authors identified opportunities for pediatric NSQIP database improvement. PMID:27046470

  20. Clinical applications of retrograde autologous priming in cardiopulmonary bypass in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fu, G.W.; Nie, Y.F.; Jiao, Z.Y.; Zhao, W.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Retrograde autologous priming (RAP) has been routinely applied in cardiac pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). However, this technique is performed in pediatric patients weighing more than 20 kg, and research about its application in pediatric patients weighing less than 20 kg is still scarce. This study explored the clinical application of RAP in CPB in pediatric patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Sixty pediatric patients scheduled for cardiac surgery were randomly divided into control and experimental groups. The experimental group was treated with CPB using RAP, while the control group was treated with conventional CPB (priming with suspended red blood cells, plasma and albumin). The hematocrit (Hct) and lactate (Lac) levels at different perioperative time-points, mechanical ventilation time, hospitalization duration, and intraoperative and postoperative blood usage were recorded. Results showed that Hct levels at 15 min after CPB beginning (T2) and at CPB end (T3), and number of intraoperative blood transfusions were significantly lower in the experimental group (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in CPB time, aortic blocking time, T2-Lac value or T3-Lac between the two groups (P>0.05). Postoperatively, there were no significant differences in Hct (2 h after surgery), mechanical ventilation time, intensive care unit time, or postoperative blood transfusion between two groups (P>0.05). RAP can effectively reduce the hemodilution when using less or not using any banked blood, while meeting the intraoperative perfusion conditions, and decreasing the perioperative blood transfusion volume in pediatric patients. PMID:27119427

  1. Cataract Surgery Visual Outcomes and Associated Risk Factors in Secondary Level Eye Care Centers of L V Prasad Eye Institute, India

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Sumathi; Park, Jiwon; Palamaner Subash Shantha, Ghanshyam; Khanna, Rohit C.; Rao, Gullapalli N.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate cataract surgery visual outcomes and associated risk factors in rural secondary level eye care centers of L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI), India. Methods The Eye Health pyramid of LVPEI has a network of rural secondary care centres (SCs) and attached vision centres (VCs) that provide high quality comprehensive eye care with permanent infrastructure to the most disadvantaged sections of society. The most common procedure performed at SCs is cataract surgery. We audited the outcome of a random sample of 2,049 cataract surgeries done from October 2009-March 2010 at eight rural SCs. All patients received a comprehensive ophthalmic examination, both before and after surgery. The World Health Organization recommended cataract surgical record was used for data entry. Visual outcomes were measured at discharge, 1–3 weeks and 4–11 weeks follow up visits. Poor outcome was defined as best corrected visual acuity <6/18. Results Mean age was 61.8 years (SD: 8.9 years) and 1,133 (55.3%) surgeries were performed on female patients. Pre-existing ocular co-morbidity was present in 165 patients (8.1%). The most common procedure was small incision cataract surgery (SICS) with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation (91.8%). Intraoperative complications were seen in 29 eyes (1.4%). At the 4–11 weeks follow-up visit, based on presenting visual acuity (PVA), 61.8% had a good outcome and based on best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), 91.7% had a good outcome. Based on PVA and BCVA, those with less than 6/60 were only 2.9% and 1.6% respectively. Using multivariable analysis, poor visual outcomes were significantly higher in patients aged ≥70 (OR 4.63; 95% CI 1.61, 13.30), in females (OR 1.58; 95% CI 1.04, 2.41), those with preoperative comorbidities (odds ratio 4.68; 95% CI 2.90, 7.57), with intraoperative complications (OR 8.01; 95% CI 2.91, 22.04), eyes that underwent no IOL or anterior chamber-IOL (OR 12.63; 95% CI 2.65, 60.25) and those undergoing extracapsular

  2. [Astigmatism following cataract surgery: comparison following wound closure with nylon suture and Mersilene].

    PubMed

    Bigar, F

    1990-05-01

    Mersilene (polyester fiber) is stronger and less elastic than nylon suture material. In contrast to nylon, Mersilene does not appear to be susceptible to biodegradation in the long term. After a follow-up period of 6 months, the regression of surgically induced astigmatism following extracapsular cataract extraction and lens implantation with a conventional 150 degree corneoscleral incision was in the same range with nylon monofilament 10-0 and Mersilene 10-0. With nylon single sutures (14 patients) there was a reduction from 3.5 and with Mersilene (12 patients) from 3.9 to 0.9 diopters. PMID:2195225

  3. [State-of-the-art cataract surgery and intraocular optical correction].

    PubMed

    Maliugin, B É

    2014-01-01

    The paper provides current knowledge on cataract epidemiology worldwide and in the Russian Federation, including issues of cataractogenesis and prevention. An overview of medical equipment for preoperative and intraoperative diagnostics is provided. Key aspects of the conventional ultrasonic phacoemulsification method as well as the most marked trends in correction of aphakia with intraocular lenses and in design of the latter are presented. Major laser-assisted techniques, including those that imply the use of femtosecond laser systems, and results that they yielded to date are discussed in detail. PMID:25715557

  4. [History of organ transplantation in the field of pediatric surgery in Japan].

    PubMed

    Inomata, Yukihiro

    2014-11-01

    In Japan, liver transplantation was first attempted 50 years ago, around the same time as the development of pediatric surgery. In 1989, clinical liver transplantation in Japan started with a living related-donor transplantation in a boy with biliary atresia. In the early years, the majority of recipients were children worldwide, which is why pediatric surgeons played a major role in the establishment of liver transplantation in Japan. From 1998, most of the indications for pediatric patients needing liver transplantation have been covered by governmental health insurance. Since that year, the annual number of pediatric liver transplantations, mainly living-donor transplantations, has remained stable at around 130. Biliary atresia is still the most common indication, but others like metabolic disease and hepatoblastoma have been increasing. Deceased-donor liver transplantation started in 1999 in Japan, but pediatric donors are very rare. Intestinal transplantation in Japan also started in a pediatric patient with short bowel syndrome in 1996. Deceased-donor intestinal transplantation is also performed, but the number of those on the waiting list for bowel transplantations in Japan has been very limited, probably due to financial constraints and relatively poor long-term results. With the change in the Organ Transplant Law in 2010, organ donations in Japan have increased slightly. Cadaveric split-liver transplantation has the potential to expand the benefit to pediatric recipients. A universal system for the long-term follow-up of pediatric recipients should be established to manage their transition to adulthood. PMID:25702514

  5. [A paradigm shift in pediatric surgery created by the National Clinical Database].

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kosaku

    2014-01-01

    The use of data from the National Clinical Database (NCD) is becoming more important in pediatric surgery. First, it is possible to review all surgical data in the NCD. Although pediatric surgeons treat a wide variety of conditions, with the exceptions of common ones such as appendicitis or inguinal hernia, rare anomalies with an incidence of only one in 1,000 births account for most cases. Therefore the number of surgeries for each type of rare anomaly performed in institutions specializing in pediatric surgery annually is very few. If many institutions do not accumulate large numbers of cases over the short-term, it will be impossible to analyze useful surgical data. The use of NCD data can therefore contribute to safe, clear medical care. Second, the Japanese neonate/infant mortality rate is the world's lowest, but on the other hand, the mortality rate of 1-3-year-olds is around the 20th lowest. The leading cause of death in this age-group is accident, and therefore the development of a childhood emergency medical system is important to improve this situation. Pediatric surgeons have an important role to play in emergency care and only they can prevent complications from surgery. However, until the creation of the NCD it was not clear which types of medical care were given at which institutions. Analysis of the reasonable placement of specialists or the ideal system of pediatric surgical emergency care can now be conducted based on scientific grounds by analyzing data from the NCD provided by all surgeons. For those performing pediatric surgery, the true value of the NCD will be determined in the future based on how they cope with this paradigm shift. PMID:24597331

  6. Secondary pouchitis in a pediatric patient successfully treated by salvage surgery.

    PubMed

    Okita, Yoshiki; Araki, Toshimitsu; Uchida, Keiichi; Matsushita, Kohei; Kawamura, Mikio; Koike, Yuhki; Otake, Kohei; Inoue, Mikihiro; Toiyama, Yuji; Ohi, Masaki; Tanaka, Koji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2016-07-01

    Apart from primary pouchitis, patients with secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complications require surgical management. The use of abdomino-anal salvage surgery to treat secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complications in pediatric patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) has not been reported in detail. A girl was diagnosed with UC at 8 years old. She underwent restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA) at 9 years old. She presented at 12 years old because of chronic antibiotic-refractory pouchitis. The fistula and stricture failed to improve despite multiple local salvage surgeries and ileostomy construction. At 15 years old, she underwent redo IPAA. The patient was well at 20 years old with no signs of pouchitis. Early treatment by abdomino-anal salvage surgery might be indicated to improve quality of life in pediatric patients with secondary pouchitis caused by surgical complication unresponsive to defunctioning and local salvage surgery. PMID:27097567

  7. Patients' satisfaction and spectacle independence after cataract surgery with multifocal intraocular lens implantation in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Baig, Rashid; A Chaudhry, Tanveer; Kukreja, Saajan; Shakil, Sidra; Ahmad, Khabir

    2016-06-01

    This single group cohort study, undertaken at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from Jan 2012 to September 2013, assessed patients' satisfaction, spectacle independence and visual disturbance after implantation of multifocal IOLs. A total of 39 patients who underwent bilateral cataract surgery with multifocal IOL implantation were included for telephonic interviews. The mean age of participants was 55.5 ± 8.1 years. The mean follow up time was 9.60 ± 3.19 months. The overall satisfaction rate after surgery was found to be 84.6% and there was no statistically significant association of satisfaction with gender, age or education. In all 84.6%, 94.9% and 84.6% people had spectacle independence for far, intermediate and near, respectively. More than half of participants (59%) had some degree of visual disturbance. In this study, multifocal IOL implantation provided high levels of satisfaction and spectacle independence despite notable risk of halo or glare symptoms at night. Therefore, careful patient selection and preoperative counselling regarding possible risks and benefits is recommended. PMID:27339580

  8. Corneal Graft and Cataract Surgery in Patients with Moderate to Severe Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, C. A.; Frazer, D. G.; Jackson, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Intraocular surgery in patients with intellectual disability can be hazardous. Our aim was to determine the outcomes of surgery on all such patients seen in a consultant-led service, and to assess the overall risks and benefits. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients with moderate to severe intellectual…

  9. [The use of OVD' for enhancement of their use in cataract surgery and complications of surger].

    PubMed

    Marc, T; Pop, Doina; Horvath, Karin

    2014-01-01

    OVD's are pseudoplastic fluids used in anterior segment surgery, their correct use decrease the incidence of complications. Arshinoff classified OVD's according to their properties and described optimal techniques for their use. The three classes are represented by viscoadaptive, cohesinve and dispersive OVD's, used in different steps of the surgery and their behavior is influenced by operating parameters. PMID:25145117

  10. Single-Incision Single-Instrument Adnexal Surgery in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Loux, Tara; Falk, Gavin A.; Gaffley, Michaela; Ortega, Stephanie; Ramos, Carmen; Malvezzi, Leopoldo; Knight, Colin G.; Burnweit, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Pediatric surgeons often practice pediatric gynecology. The single-incision single-instrument (SISI) technique used for appendectomy is applicable in gynecologic surgery. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the records of patients undergoing pelvic surgery from 2008 to 2013. SISI utilized a 12 mm transumbilical trocar and an operating endoscope. The adnexa can be detorsed intracorporeally or extracorporealized via the umbilicus for lesion removal. Results. We performed 271 ovarian or paraovarian surgeries in 258 patients. In 147 (54%), the initial approach was SISI; 75 cases (51%) were completed in patients aged from 1 day to 19.9 years and weighing 4.7 to 117 kg. Conversion to standard laparoscopy was due to contralateral oophoropexy, solid mass, inability to mobilize the adnexa, large mass, bleeding, adhesions, or better visualization. When SISI surgery was converted to Pfannenstiel, the principal reason was a solid mass. SISI surgery was significantly shorter than standard laparoscopy. There were no major complications and the overall cohort had an 11% minor complication rate. Conclusion. SISI adnexal surgery is safe, quick, inexpensive, and effective in pediatric patients. SISI was successful in over half the patients in whom it was attempted and offers a scarless result. If unsuccessful, the majority of cases can be completed with standard multiport laparoscopy. PMID:26557994

  11. Current Status of Robot-Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery in Pediatric Urology

    PubMed Central

    Song, Sang Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic procedures for urological diseases in children have been proven to be safe and effective. However, the availability of laparoscopic procedures is still partly limited to experienced, high-volume centers because the procedures are technically demanding. The da Vinci robot system is being used for an increasing variety of reconstructive procedures because of the advantages of this approach, such as motion scaling, greater optical magnification, stereoscopic vision, increased instrument tip dexterity, and tremor filtration. Particularly in pediatric urologic surgery, where the operational field is limited owing to the small abdominal cavity of children, robotic surgical technology has its own strengths. Currently, robots are used to perform most surgeries in children that can be performed laparoscopically. In this review, we aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the current role of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in Pediatric Urology by analyzing the published data in this field. A growing body of evidence supports the view that robotic technology is technically feasible and safe in pediatric urological surgery. Robotic technology provides additional benefits for performing reconstructive urologic surgery, such as in pyeloplasty, ureteral reimplantation, and enterocystoplasty procedures. The main limitations to robotic surgery are its high purchase and maintenance costs and that the cost-effectiveness of this technology remains to be validated. PMID:25132942

  12. Current status of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in pediatric urology.

    PubMed

    Song, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kun Suk

    2014-08-01

    Laparoscopic procedures for urological diseases in children have been proven to be safe and effective. However, the availability of laparoscopic procedures is still partly limited to experienced, high-volume centers because the procedures are technically demanding. The da Vinci robot system is being used for an increasing variety of reconstructive procedures because of the advantages of this approach, such as motion scaling, greater optical magnification, stereoscopic vision, increased instrument tip dexterity, and tremor filtration. Particularly in pediatric urologic surgery, where the operational field is limited owing to the small abdominal cavity of children, robotic surgical technology has its own strengths. Currently, robots are used to perform most surgeries in children that can be performed laparoscopically. In this review, we aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the current role of robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery in Pediatric Urology by analyzing the published data in this field. A growing body of evidence supports the view that robotic technology is technically feasible and safe in pediatric urological surgery. Robotic technology provides additional benefits for performing reconstructive urologic surgery, such as in pyeloplasty, ureteral reimplantation, and enterocystoplasty procedures. The main limitations to robotic surgery are its high purchase and maintenance costs and that the cost-effectiveness of this technology remains to be validated. PMID:25132942

  13. Torsional Mode Phacoemulsification: Effective, Safe Cataract Surgery Technique of the Future

    PubMed Central

    El-Moatassem Kotb, Ahmed M.; Gamil, Mohamed M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare various outcome measures using torsional mode and longitudinal mode in the phacoemulsification of cataract with different nuclear densities. Setting: Magrabi Eye Hospitals, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Design: A randomized comparative clinical study. Materials and Methods: This study includes 200 eyes of 156 patients (100 in the ultrasound longitudinal “US” group and 100 in the torsional group). All eyes received AcrySof® single piece intraocular lens (Alcon Surgical, Fort Worth, TX). The primary outcome measures were ultrasound time (UST), cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), and surgical complications. Postoperative outcome measures were the degree of corneal edema on the first postoperative day and final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and CCT (central corneal thickness). Results: The differences in UST and CDE between subgroups of nucleus hardness were statistically significant (P < 0.01). The UST and CDE consistently increased in eyes with higher grades of nucleus density. On day one, the mean BCVA was 0.61 ± 0.13 decimals in the ultrasound (US) group and 0.67 ± 0.11 decimals in the torsional group (significant P < 0.05). Corneal edema was significantly less in the torsional group (P < 0.05). At 30 days, the mean BCVA was 0.94 ± 0.22 decimals in the US group and 1.0 ± 0.12 decimals in the torsional group but this difference was not statistically different (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The torsional mode provides an effective and safe method for cataract removal with lower energy usage as compared to longitudinal traditional phacoemulsification. However, the final visual outcome was similar for both study groups. PMID:20543940

  14. Comparing resident cataract surgery outcomes under novice versus experienced attending supervision

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Sidharth; Kiely, Amanda E; Wang, Jiangxia; Woodfield, Alonzo S; Ramanathan, Saras; Sikder, Shameema

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether supervision by an attending who is new to surgical teaching, or an experienced attending measurably influences intraoperative complications rates or outcomes in phacoemulsification performed by ophthalmology residents. Setting Single tertiary hospital. Design Retrospective cohort study. Methods Resident-performed phacoemulsification cases supervised by one novice attending (N=189) and experienced attending (N=172) over 1 year were included. Data included: resident year, patient age, sex, preoperative risk factors (4+ on the four point scale for dense/white/brunescent cataracts, Flomax, zonular dialysis, pseudoexfoliation, glaucoma risk, post-vitrectomy), intraoperative risk factors (Trypan blue, iris hooks), and intraoperative complications (capsule tears, vitreous loss, zonular dialysis, zonular dehiscence, burns, nuclear fragment loss, Descemet’s tear). Experienced attending data were compared against those of the novice attending. Results Regarding preoperative risks, experienced attending cases more likely involved 4+ cataract (P=0.005), Flomax (P<0.001), or glaucoma risk (P=0.001). For intraoperative risks, novice attending cases more likely involved Trypan blue (P<0.001). Regarding complications, novice attending cases were associated with vitreous loss (P=0.002) and anterior capsule tears (P<0.001). When comparing total complications, the novice attending was more likely to have both increased number of cases with complications and total complications than the experienced attending. The novice attending’s overall complication rate trended downward (rate from 28% in first 25 cases to 6.67% in last 15). Conclusion Early cases for the novice attending were accompanied by greater complications (vitreous loss and anterior capsule tear), likely due to a learning curve. Surgical judgment in the operating room likely develops with experience. Training programs may focus on these specific areas to aid new instructors. PMID:26396493

  15. Outpatient pediatric dermatologic surgery: experience in 296 patients.

    PubMed

    D'Acunto, Carmine; Raone, Beatrice; Neri, Iria; Passarini, Batrice; Patrizi, Annalisa

    2015-01-01

    From January 2010 to December 2012, 296 skin biopsies were performed in pediatric patients using only local anesthesia (cream and infiltration). The biopsies were divided into three groups: biopsies of skin neoplasms, biopsies of skin rashes and biopsies of follicular-centered lesions. Our data demonstrate the possibility of using this procedure, with the dual advantage of eliminating hospitalization and cost savings. PMID:25490940

  16. Corneal astigmatism change and wavefront aberration evaluation after cataract surgery: “Single” versus “paired opposite” clear corneal incisions

    PubMed Central

    Razmjoo, Hasan; Koosha, Nima; Vaezi, Mohammad Hadi; Rahimi, Behrooz; Peyman, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Correcting the pre-existing astigmatism is an optimal goal in cataract surgery. The aim of this study is to compare the astigmatic correcting effect of a single regular 3.2 mm clear corneal incision (CCI) with paired opposite CCI in cataract patients and effect of these incisions on optical aberrations using the wavefront quantitative analysis. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial study undertaken in an ophthalmology referral center on 50 patients planned for cataract surgery who were randomized to either single 3.2 mm CCI or paired opposite CCI group. Post-operative evaluation was performed at 12 weeks and included refraction, keratometery, corneal topography and wavefront analysis. Corneal astigmatism and post-operative values were compared in two groups. Results: The mean pre-operative corneal astigmatism was 2.58 ± 1.03 D in the single incision group and 2.70 ± 0.94 D in the paired opposite incisions group. After 12 weeks of surgery, the corneal astigmatism was reached to 2.15 ± 0.82 D in single incision group and 1.63 ± 1.21 in the paired opposite incisions group. There was a statistically significant difference in two arms of treatment regarding to surgically induced astigmatism after 3 months. The mean post-operative total and higher order aberrations and values were not significantly different in two groups. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that paired opposite incisions is an effective procedure for reducing pre-existing corneal astigmatism in cataract surgery. Paired incisions did not show any beneficial effect regarding wavefront aberrations compared with conventional single incision method. PMID:25221766

  17. Visual performance of Acrysof ReSTOR compared with a monofocal intraocular lens following implantation in cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    JI, JING; HUANG, XIAOLIN; FAN, XIANQUN; LUO, MIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the visual performance of Acrysof ReSTOR and Acrysof Natural intraocular lenses (IOLs) following cataract surgery. A randomized prospective study was performed in which 64 eyes (51 patients) were divided randomly into two groups. Monofocal IOLs (Acrysof Natural) were implanted into 34 eyes (27 patients) and multifocal IOLs (Acrysof ReSTOR) were implanted into 30 eyes (24 patients) using phacoemulsification surgery. The corrected distance visual acuity, near visual acuity, pseudoaccommodation, contrast sensitivity (CS) and wavefront analysis were measured at 1 week, 1 month and 3 months after surgery. The distance vision of the monofocal and ReSTOR patients improved equally with glasses (P<0.05). A greater improvement in near vision without glasses was observed in the ReSTOR-implanted patients (P<0.01). The CS values of the multifocal IOL group were significantly lower than those of the monofocal IOL group for all spatial frequencies tested (P<0.05). The spherical aberration was significantly higher in the multifocal IOL group compared with the monofocal IOL group (P<0.05). We observed no differences in coma between the two groups. The difference in the amplitude of pseudoaccommodation between the two groups was statistically significant (−3.14±0.91 D in the ReSTOR group vs. −1.03±0.33 D in the Natural group, P<0.01). The improvement in near vision was significantly more evident in the ReSTOR patients. Compared with the monofocal IOL lens, the multifocal lens is able to increase the amplitude of pseudoaccommodation. However, increased spherical aberration may contribute to lower CS values in the multifocal IOL group. PMID:23251283

  18. Recognizing Cataracts

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Recognizing Cataracts Watch for Vision Changes as You Age As ... cause of impaired eyesight later in life is cataracts. A cataract is a clouding of the lens ...

  19. Capsular Outcomes Differ with Capsulorhexis Sizes after Pediatric Cataract Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Haotian; Tan, Xuhua; Lin, Zhuoling; Chen, Jingjing; Luo, Lixia; Wu, Xiaohang; Long, Erping; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2015-01-01

    Capsular outcomes of anterior/posterior capsulorhexis opening (ACO/PCO) are essential for performing a secondary in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation. To compare the capsular outcomes with different primary capsulorhexis sizes, Thirty-eight eligible patients (45 eyes) were randomly assigned to three groups by anterior capsulorhexis diameter (Group A: 3.0–3.9, Group B: 4.0–5.0, and Group C: 5.1–6.0 mm). The areas of ACO/PCO and posterior capsule opening opacity (PCOO) as primary outcomes, while, the incidence of visual axis opacity (VAO) as secondary outcome were measured at follow-up visits. Among the thirty eyes included in the final analysis, the mean area of the ACO decreased significantly, whereas the PCO enlarged with time. Group A had the highest anterior capsule constriction and percentage reduction, which increased with time. There were significant differences in the percentage reductions at 6 months and 1 year compared to 1 month in Group A and B. Group C had the highest posterior capsule enlargement. The percentage of PCOO to PCO area and the incidence of VAO was highest in Group A and lowest in Group C. Thus, Capsulorhexis diameter of 4.0–5.0 mm may yield better capsular outcomes, considering moderate contraction of ACO, moderate enlargement of PCO, and lower percentage of PCOO and VAO. PMID:26537991

  20. Effectiveness and Optical Quality of Topical 3.0% Diquafosol versus 0.05% Cyclosporine A in Dry Eye Patients following Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Song, In Seok; Kim, Kyoung Lae; Yoon, Sam Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and optical quality of 3.0% topical diquafosol versus 0.05% cyclosporine A in dry eye patients following cataract surgery. Methods. In total, 40 eyes of 40 patients newly diagnosed with dry eye syndrome 1 week after cataract surgery were randomized to receive either 3.0% diquafosol ophthalmic solution six times daily or 0.05% cyclosporine A twice daily for 3 months. Outcome measures were tear film break-up time (TBUT), results on Schirmer 1 test, ocular surface staining score, the ocular surface disease index (OSDI) score, and higher-order aberrations (HOAs). Measurements were taken at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months. Results. In the diquafosol group, TBUT showed higher outcomes than the cyclosporine A group at 1 and 3 months. Both groups showed increased scores on Schirmer 1 test. The ocular surface staining score decreased in all periods in both groups. Vertical coma and total HOAs decreased more in the cyclosporine A group than in the diquafosol group at 3 months. Conclusion. Both 3.0% diquafosol and 0.05% cyclosporine A were effective in treating dry eye after cataract surgery. Diquafosol was more effective in increasing the tear secretion, but cyclosporine A was more effective in improving optical aberrations. PMID:26989503

  1. Effectiveness and Optical Quality of Topical 3.0% Diquafosol versus 0.05% Cyclosporine A in Dry Eye Patients following Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Song, In Seok; Kim, Kyoung Lae; Yoon, Sam Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and optical quality of 3.0% topical diquafosol versus 0.05% cyclosporine A in dry eye patients following cataract surgery. Methods. In total, 40 eyes of 40 patients newly diagnosed with dry eye syndrome 1 week after cataract surgery were randomized to receive either 3.0% diquafosol ophthalmic solution six times daily or 0.05% cyclosporine A twice daily for 3 months. Outcome measures were tear film break-up time (TBUT), results on Schirmer 1 test, ocular surface staining score, the ocular surface disease index (OSDI) score, and higher-order aberrations (HOAs). Measurements were taken at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months. Results. In the diquafosol group, TBUT showed higher outcomes than the cyclosporine A group at 1 and 3 months. Both groups showed increased scores on Schirmer 1 test. The ocular surface staining score decreased in all periods in both groups. Vertical coma and total HOAs decreased more in the cyclosporine A group than in the diquafosol group at 3 months. Conclusion. Both 3.0% diquafosol and 0.05% cyclosporine A were effective in treating dry eye after cataract surgery. Diquafosol was more effective in increasing the tear secretion, but cyclosporine A was more effective in improving optical aberrations. PMID:26989503

  2. A pilot study to determine if intraocular lens choice at the time of cataract surgery has an impact on patient-reported driving habits

    PubMed Central

    Beiko, George HH

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if intraocular lens (IOL) choice at the time of cataract surgery affects driving habits. Materials and methods Pseudophakes who were 28–35 months postbilateral cataract surgery with one of two contemporary one-piece hydrophobic acrylic IOLs (SN60WF or ZCB00) were asked to complete the Driving Habits Questionnaire, a validated instrument for determining self-reported driving status, frequency, and difficulty. To determine if there were any differences in driving habits between the two groups, t-tests and χ2 tests were used. Results Of 90 respondents, 72 (40 SN60WF and 32 ZCB00) were still active drivers. The SN60WF-implanted subjects were less likely to drive at the same speed or faster than the general flow of traffic, less likely to rate their quality of driving as average/above average, less likely to have traveled beyond their immediate neighborhood, less likely to drive at night, more likely to have moderate-to-severe difficulty driving at night, and more likely to have self-reported road traffic accidents. The differences did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion Changes in patients’ driving habits 2–3 years after cataract surgery may be associated with the type of IOL implanted. A larger study, powered to demonstrate statistical significance, is needed to verify the trends identified in this pilot study and discover possible contributing factors. PMID:26357458

  3. Epilepsy Surgery in Pediatric Intractable Epilepsy with Destructive Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Young; Kwon, Hye Eun; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Kim, Dong Seok; Kim, Heung Dong

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The aim of the current study is to review the clinical features, surgery outcomes and parental satisfaction of children with destructive encephalopathy who underwent epilepsy surgery due to medically intractable seizures. Methods: 48 patients who underwent epilepsy surgery from October 2003 to August 2011 at Severance Children’s Hospital have been reviewed. The survey was conducted for functional outcomes and parental satisfaction at least 1 year after the surgery. Results: Epileptic encephalopathy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and infantile spasms was more prevalent than symptomatic focal epilepsy. Hypoxic ischemic injury accounted for most of the underlying etiology of the destructive encephalpathy, followed by central nervous system infection and head trauma. 27 patients (56.3%) underwent resective surgery and 21 patients (43.7%) underwent palliative surgery. 16 patients (33.3%) achieved seizure free and 27 parents (87.5%) reported satisfaction with the outcome of their children’s epilepsy surgery. In addition, 14 parents (77.8 %) whose children were not seizure free reported satisfaction with their children’s improvement in cognitive and behavior issues. Conclusions: Epilepsy surgery in destructive encephalopathy was effective for controlling seizures. Parents reported satisfaction not only with the surgical outcomes, but also with improvement of cognitive and behavior issues. PMID:24649473

  4. The effect of lens aging and cataract surgery on circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shen-Shen; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms have evolved an approximately 24-hour circadian rhythm that allows them to achieve internal physiological homeostasis with external environment. Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central pacemaker of circadian rhythm, and its activity is entrained to the external light-dark cycle. The SCN controls circadian rhythm through regulating the synthesis of melatonin by pineal gland via a multisynaptic pathway. Light, especially short-wavelength blue light, is the most potent environmental time cue in circadian photoentrainment. Recently, the discovery of a novel type of retinal photoreceptors, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, sheds light on the mechanism of circadian photoentrainment and raises concerns about the effect of ocular diseases on circadian system. With age, light transmittance is significantly decreased due to the aging of crystalline lens, thus possibly resulting in progressive loss of circadian photoreception. In the current review, we summarize the circadian physiology, highlight the important role of light in circadian rhythm regulation, discuss about the correlation between age-related cataract and sleep disorders, and compare the effect of blue light- filtering intraocular lenses (IOLs) and ultraviolet only filtering IOLs on circadian rhythm. PMID:27500118

  5. The effect of lens aging and cataract surgery on circadian rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shen-Shen; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms have evolved an approximately 24-hour circadian rhythm that allows them to achieve internal physiological homeostasis with external environment. Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central pacemaker of circadian rhythm, and its activity is entrained to the external light-dark cycle. The SCN controls circadian rhythm through regulating the synthesis of melatonin by pineal gland via a multisynaptic pathway. Light, especially short-wavelength blue light, is the most potent environmental time cue in circadian photoentrainment. Recently, the discovery of a novel type of retinal photoreceptors, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, sheds light on the mechanism of circadian photoentrainment and raises concerns about the effect of ocular diseases on circadian system. With age, light transmittance is significantly decreased due to the aging of crystalline lens, thus possibly resulting in progressive loss of circadian photoreception. In the current review, we summarize the circadian physiology, highlight the important role of light in circadian rhythm regulation, discuss about the correlation between age-related cataract and sleep disorders, and compare the effect of blue light- filtering intraocular lenses (IOLs) and ultraviolet only filtering IOLs on circadian rhythm. PMID:27500118

  6. The Umbilical Benz Incision for Reduced Port Surgery in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Amano, Hizuru; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Deie, Kyoichi; Murase, Naruhiko; Makita, Satoshi; Yokota, Kazuki; Tanaka, Yujiro

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: For reduced port surgery in pediatric patients, the initial umbilical incision plays an important role in both functional ability and cosmetic impact. Larger umbilical incisions enable better manipulation of forceps, extraction of larger surgical specimens, and easier exteriorization of the intestine for anastomosis. We have pursued an incision of the small pediatric umbilicus that allows for enlargement of the orifice of the abdominal opening with preservation of the natural umbilical profile. This article aims to present a new umbilical incision technique and describe the outcomes. Methods: We devised a new umbilical incision technique for reduced port surgery in pediatric patients. Our incision is made in an inverted Y shape (Benz incision), allowing for access port device insertion. The Benz incision technique was applied between November 2010 and May 2014 and was retrospectively studied. Results: Seventy-five patients underwent Benz incisions. The median age of all patients was 6 years 6 months (range, 26 days to 18 years), and the median body weight was 21.7 kg (range, 3.1–54.3 kg). Benz incisions were applied for various procedures, including reduced port surgery with hepaticojejunostomy for congenital biliary dilatation, portojejunostomy for biliary atresia, Meckel diverticulectomy, tumor resection, varicocelectomy, cholecystectomy, splenectomy, ileus surgery, ileocecal resection, and total colectomy. All patients were successfully treated, without a significant increase in operating time or severe complications. The cosmetic profile of the umbilicus was maintained after surgery. Conclusion: The Benz incision is a feasible, effective, and scarless approach for reduced port surgery in pediatric patients whose umbilical rings are too small for the conventional approach. PMID:25848185

  7. Pediatric thyroid disease: when is surgery necessary, and who should be operating on our children?

    PubMed

    Breuer, Christopher; Tuggle, Charles; Solomon, Daniel; Sosa, Julie Ann

    2013-01-01

    Surgical diseases of the thyroid in the pediatric population represent a diverse set of both benign and malignant conditions. Overall, incidence is rare. Benign conditions include Graves' disease, toxic adenomas, congenital hyperthyroidism, and goiter. Differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), with its related familial cancer syndromes, are the most common malignancies. Near-total or total thyroidectomy is the appropriate surgery for thyroid cancer, with/out central lymph node dissection. Emerging practice guidelines from professional societies are helpful, although they generally have not addressed surgical management of the pediatric patient. Thyroidectomy in children is associated with a higher rate of complications, such as recurrent laryngeal nerve injury and hypoparathyroidism, as compared to the surgery in adults. Therefore, it is essential that pediatric thyroidectomy be performed by high-volume thyroid surgeons, regardless of specialty. Case volume to support surgical expertise usually must be borrowed from the adult experience, given the relative paucity of pediatric thyroidectomies at an institutional level. These surgeons should work as part of a multidisciplinary team that includes pediatric endocrinologists and anesthesiologists, pediatricians, nuclear medicine physicians, and pathologists to afford children the best clinical outcomes. PMID:23149389

  8. Bacterial tick-borne diseases caused by Bartonella spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Coxiella burnetii, and Rickettsia spp. among patients with cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Tomasz; Brydak-Godowska, Joanna; Fiecek, Beata; Rorot, Urszula; Sędrowicz, Elżbieta; Werenowska, Małgorzata; Kopacz, Dorota; Hevelke, Agata; Michniewicz, Magdalena; Kęcik, Dariusz; Tylewska-Wierzbanowska, Stanisława

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical data have shown that tick-borne diseases caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, and Rickettsia spp. can affect the central nervous system, including the eye. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between the incidence of cataract and evidence of bacterial infections transmitted by ticks. Material/Methods Fluid with lenticular masses from inside of the eye and blood from 109 patients were tested by PCR and sequencing. Sera from patients and the control group were subjected to serological tests to search specific antibodies to the bacteria. Results Microbiological analysis revealed the presence of Bartonella sp. DNA in intraoperative specimens from the eye in 1.8% of patients. Serological studies have shown that infections caused by B. burgdorferi sensu lato and Bartonella sp. were detected in 34.8% and 4.6% of patients with cataract surgery, respectively. Conclusions Presence of DNA of yet uncultured and undescribed species of Bartonella in eye liquid indicates past infection with this pathogen. Specific antibodies to B. burgdorferi sensu lato and Bartonella sp. are detected more frequently in patients with cataract compared to the control group. This could indicate a possible role of these organisms in the pathological processes within the eyeball, leading to changes in the lens. Further studies are needed to identify Bartonella species, as well as to recognize the infectious mechanisms involved in cataract development. PMID:24902636

  9. Clear-cornea cataract surgery: pupil size and shape changes, along with anterior chamber volume and depth changes. A Scheimpflug imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John; Asimellis, George

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate, by high-precision digital analysis of data provided by Scheimpflug imaging, changes in pupil size and shape and anterior chamber (AC) parameters following cataract surgery. Patients and methods The study group (86 eyes, patient age 70.58±10.33 years) was subjected to cataract removal surgery with in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation (pseudophakic). A control group of 75 healthy eyes (patient age 51.14±16.27 years) was employed for comparison. Scheimpflug imaging (preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively) was employed to investigate central corneal thickness, AC depth, and AC volume. In addition, by digitally analyzing the black-and-white dotted line pupil edge marking in the Scheimpflug “large maps,” the horizontal and vertical pupil diameters were individually measured and the pupil eccentricity was calculated. The correlations between AC depth and pupil shape parameters versus patient age, as well as the postoperative AC and pupil size and shape changes, were investigated. Results Compared to preoperative measurements, AC depth and AC volume of the pseudophakic eyes increased by 0.99±0.46 mm (39%; P<0.001) and 43.57±24.59 mm3 (36%; P<0.001), respectively. Pupil size analysis showed that the horizontal pupil diameter was reduced by −0.27±0.22 mm (−9.7%; P=0.001) and the vertical pupil diameter was reduced by −0.32±0.24 mm (−11%; P<0.001). Pupil eccentricity was reduced by −39.56%; P<0.001. Conclusion Cataract extraction surgery appears to affect pupil size and shape, possibly in correlation to AC depth increase. This novel investigation based on digital analysis of Scheimpflug imaging data suggests that the cataract postoperative photopic pupil is reduced and more circular. These changes appear to be more significant with increasing patient age. PMID:25368512

  10. Gendered Disparities in Quality of Cataract Surgery in a Marginalised Population in Pakistan: The Karachi Marine Fishing Communities Eye and General Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Khabir; Zwi, Anthony B.; Tarantola, Daniel J. M.; Soomro, Abdul Qadeem; Baig, Rashid; Azam, Syed Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Background Marine fishing communities are among the most marginalised and hard-to-reach groups and have been largely neglected in health research. We examined the quality of cataract surgery and its determinants, with an emphasis on gender, in marine fishing communities in Karachi, Pakistan, using multiple indicators of performance. Methods and Findings The Karachi Marine Fishing Communities Eye and General Health Survey was a door-to-door, cross-sectional study conducted between March 2009 and April 2010 in fishing communities living on 7 islands and in coastal areas in Keamari, Karachi, located on the Arabian Sea. A population-based sample of 638 adults, aged ≥ 50 years, was studied. A total of 145 eyes (of 97 persons) had undergone cataract surgery in this sample. Cataract surgical outcomes assessed included vision (presenting and best-corrected with a reduced logMAR chart), satisfaction with surgery, astigmatism, and pupil shape. Overall, 65.5% of the operated eyes had some form of visual loss (presenting visual acuity [PVA] < 6/12). 55.2%, 29.0%, and 15.9% of these had good, borderline, and poor visual outcomes based on presenting vision; with best correction, these values were: 68.3 %, 18.6%, and 13.1%, respectively. Of 7 covariates evaluated in the multivariable generalized estimating equations (GEE) analyses, gender was the only significant independent predictor of visual outcome. Women’s eyes were nearly 4.38 times more likely to have suboptimal visual outcome (PVA<6/18) compared with men’s eyes (adjusted odds ratio 4.38, 95% CI 1.96-9.79; P<0.001) after adjusting for the effect of household financial status. A higher proportion of women’s than men’s eyes had an irregular pupil (26.5% vs. 14.8%) or severe/very severe astigmatism (27.5% vs. 18.2%). However, these differences did not reach statistical significance. Overall, more than one fourth (44/144) of cataract surgeries resulted in dissatisfaction. The only significant predictor of

  11. Controversies in intraocular lens implantation in pediatric uveitis.

    PubMed

    Phatak, Sumita; Lowder, Careen; Pavesio, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Cataract is one of the most common and visually debilitating complications of pediatric uveitis. It develops as a consequence of chronic inflammation and steroid use and is seen most often in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)-associated uveitis. Cataract extraction with intraocular lens (IOL) insertion has been carried out with a measure of success in non-uveitic pediatric eyes, but in cases of uveitis, multiple factors affect the final outcome. Chronic inflammation and its sequelae such as band keratopathy, posterior synechiae, and cyclitic membranes make surgical intervention more challenging and outcome less certain. Postoperative complications like increased inflammation, glaucoma, posterior capsular opacification, retrolental membranes, and hypotony may compromise the visual outcome. Early refractive correction is imperative in pediatric eyes to prevent amblyopia. The use of contact lenses and intraocular lenses in pediatric uveitic eyes were fraught with complications in the past. Surgical interventions such as vitreo-lensectomy followed by contact lens fitting and small incision cataract surgery followed by different types of intraocular lenses have been utilized, and many reports have been published, albeit in small patient groups. This review analyzes and discusses the existing literature on intraocular lens implantation in cases of pediatric uveitic cataract surgery. PMID:27009616

  12. Technical aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery: Report of a multicenter, multinational web-based survey by the ILAE Task Force on Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cukiert, Arthur; Rydenhag, Bertil; Harkness, William; Cross, J Helen; Gaillard, William D

    2016-02-01

    Surgical techniques may vary extensively between centers. We report on a web-based survey aimed at evaluating the current technical approaches in different centers around the world performing epilepsy surgery in children. The intention of the survey was to establish technical standards. A request was made to 88 centers to complete a web-based survey comprising 51 questions. There were 14 questions related to general issues, 13 questions investigating the different technical aspects for children undergoing epilepsy surgery, and 24 questions investigating surgical strategies in pediatric epilepsy surgery. Fifty-two centers covering a wide geographic representation completed the questionnaire. The median number of resective procedures per center per year was 47. Some important technical practices appeared (>80% of the responses) such as the use of prophylactic antibiotics (98%), the use of high-speed drills for bone opening (88%), nonresorbable material for bone flap closure (85%), head fixation (90%), use of the surgical microscope (100%), and of free bone flaps. Other questions, such as the use of drains, electrocorticography (ECoG) and preoperative withdrawal of valproate, led to mixed, inconclusive results. Complications were noted in 3.8% of the patients submitted to cortical resection, 9.9% hemispheric surgery, 5% callosotomy, 1.8% depth electrode implantation, 5.9% subdural grids implantation, 11.9% hypothalamic hamartoma resection, 0.9% vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and 0.5% deep brain stimulation. There were no major differences across regions or countries in any of the subitems above. The present data offer the first overview of the technical aspects of pediatric epilepsy surgery worldwide. Surprisingly, there seem to be more similarities than differences. That aside many of the evaluated issues should be examined by adequately designed multicenter randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Further knowledge on these technical issues might lead to increased

  13. Factors associated with strabismus after cataract extraction and primary intraocular lens implantation in congenital cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Jung; Kim, Wan-Soo

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate factors associated with the development of strabismus after cataract extraction and primary intraocular lens implantation. METHODS The medical records of 122 patients, aged 1.5mo to 9y, who had undergone cataract extraction with primary intraocular lens implantation between January 1993 and August 2011 were reviewed. Fourteen patients (17 eyes) with strabismus before cataract surgery were excluded. Patients were divided into those with congenital bilateral cataracts (64 patients, 128 eyes) and those with unilateral cataracts (44 patients, 44 eyes). The associations between the development of strabismus and age at cataract surgery, pre- and post-cataract extraction corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), interocular CDVA difference, nystagmus, surgical method, and secondary cataract were evaluated. RESULTS Factors significantly associated with the development of strabismus included age at cataract surgery (≤1y), preoperative mean CDVA ≤20/100, presence of nystagmus in the bilateral cataract group and postoperative interocular CDVA difference >20/70 in the unilateral group. Postoperative CDVA ≤20/100 and preservation of posterior capsule, and presence of secondary cataract were significant factors in both groups. CONCLUSION Children with congenital cataracts should be monitored carefully after cataract surgery for the development of strabismus, especially when they underwent surgery at age ≤1y, and they have nystagmus, large postoperative interocular CDVA difference, poor preoperative and postoperative CDVA, preservation of the posterior capsule, or secondary cataract. PMID:24967203

  14. Corneal Optical Quality Following Sub 1.8 mm Micro-Incision Cataract Surgery vs. 2.2 mm Mini-Incision Coaxial Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Alió, Jorge L.; Elkady, Bassam; Ortiz, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To study and compare the effects of the micro-incision cataract surgery (MICS-sub 1.8 mm) and miniincision coaxial phacoemulsification (2.2 mm) on the optical quality of the cornea characterized in terms of corneal aberrations. Materials and Methods: Fifty eyes underwent MICS and 50 mini-incision phacoemulsification, by the same surgeon. Both types of cataract surgery were performed using low ultrasound power and through a clear corneal incision, placed on the steepest corneal meridian ranging from 1.6 to 1.8 in MICS (Group I) and from 2.12 to 2.3 mm in mini-incision coaxial phacoemulsification (Group II). Seidel and Zernike aberration coefficients and RMS values were obtained for a 6-mm pupil preoperatively and one month after surgery. Results: The corneal astigmatism did not show statistically significant changes in either of the two groups: (MICS: –0.73 ± 0.63, –0.65 ± 0.53 D, P = 0.25), (mini-incision phacoemulsification; –1.21 ± 1.52, –1.00 ± 1.19 D, P = 0.12). The total RMS remained unchanged after MICS (1.77 ± 1.7, 1.65 ± 1.3 μm, P = 0.18) and mini-incision phacoemulsification (2.00 ± 1.87, 2.09 ± 1.8 μm, P = 0.41). Statistically significant changes were found for coma (P = 0.004) and higher-order aberrations (P < 0.001), showing MICS significantly less changes in cornea. Conclusions: Both MICS and mini-incision phacoemulsification do not degrade the optical quality of the cornea. Both surgeries do not induce a modification of the corneal astigmatism, even in the axis. It seems that 2 mm is the limit around which no optical changes are induced by cataract surgery in the human cornea. PMID:20543945

  15. Prospective evaluation of visual outcomes with three presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses following cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ang, RE; Martinez, GA; Cruz, EM; Tiongson, AA; Dela Cruz, AG

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To compare the visual acuity and quality of vision achieved with three widely-used intraocular lenses (IOLs) in subjects with bilateral cataracts. Patients and methods This three-arm, parallel, prospective, partially masked, single-surgeon study randomized 78 subjects to receive bilateral Crystalens® Advanced Optics (AO) accommodating IOLs, AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® +3.0 multifocal IOLs, or TECNIS® Multifocal IOLs. Examinations were assessed through days 120 to 180. Results The Crystalens AO group had statistically significantly better monocular and binocular, high-contrast (HC) and low-contrast (LC) uncorrected intermediate visual acuity, HC and LC distance-corrected intermediate visual acuity, and significantly fewer monocular and binocular halos and starbursts than did the ReSTOR and TECNIS groups. Monocular and binocular, HC and LC uncorrected near visual acuity exhibited no significant differences among the three lenses. For monocular and binocular HC distance-corrected near visual acuity, the Crystalens AO performed significantly better than the TECNIS and was not significantly different from the ReSTOR. For monocular and binocular LC distance-corrected near visual acuity, the Crystalens AO performed significantly better than both the ReSTOR and the TECNIS. Contrast sensitivity was clinically similar between groups. The Crystalens AO produced statistically fewer halos and starbursts. Conclusion All three IOLs had excellent uncorrected acuity results at all distances and had good safety, confirming the established safety and effectiveness of these IOLs. Distance and near vision were similar between all three IOLs, and the Crystalens AO provided statistically significantly better intermediate vision. PMID:24092961

  16. Predictors of Acute Renal Failure During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Pediatric Patients After Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lin; Long, Cun; Liu, Jinping; Hei, Feilong; Ji, Bingyang; Yu, Kun; Hu, Qiang; Hu, Jinxiao; Yuan, Yuan; Gao, Guodong

    2016-05-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is associated with increased mortality in pediatric extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The aim of this study was to identify predictors of ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. A retrospective study analyzed 42 children (≤15 years) after cardiac surgery requiring venous-arterial ECMO between December 2008 and December 2014 at Fuwai Hospital. ARF was defined as ≥300% rise in serum creatinine (SCr) concentration from baseline or application of dialysis. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify the predictors of ARF during ECMO. A total of 42 children (age, interquartile range [IQR], 13.0 [7.2-29.8] months; weight, IQR, 8.5 [6.7-11.0] kg) after cardiac surgery requiring ECMO were included in this study. The total survival rate was 52.4%, and the incidence of ARF was 40.5%. As the result of univariate analysis, ECMO duration, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, maximum free hemoglobin (FHB) during ECMO, lactate level, and mean blood pressure before initiation of ECMO were entered in multiple logistic regression analysis. In multiple logistic regression analysis, FHB during ECMO (OR 1.136, 95% CI 1.023-1.261) and lactate level before initiation of ECMO (OR 1.602, 95% CI 1.025-2.502) were risk factors for ARF during ECMO after pediatric cardiac surgery. There was a linear correlation between maximum SCr and maximum FHB (Pearson's r = 0.535, P = 0.001). Maximum SCr during ECMO has also a linear correlation with lactate level before initiation of ECMO (Pearson's r = 0.342, P = 0.044). Increased FHB during ECMO and high lactate level before initiation of ECMO were risk factors for ARF during ECMO in pediatric patients after cardiac surgery. PMID:26636965

  17. Mini-incision cataract surgery and toric lens implantation for the reduction of high myopic astigmatism in patients with pellucid marginal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balestrazzi, A; Baiocchi, S; Balestrazzi, A; Cartocci, G; Tosi, G M; Martone, G; Michieletto, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical outcomes, safety, and efficacy of cataract surgery with the implantation of a toric intraocular lens (IOL) in eyes with stable pellucid marginal degeneration (PMD). Methods Eleven eyes (eight patients) diagnosed as stable PMD and cataract underwent mini-incision 2.2 mm cataract surgery followed by the implantation of hydrophobic toric aspheric IOL (AcrySof IQ Toric IOL, Alcon, Fort Worth, TX, USA). Perioperative variables of interest included uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuities, manifest refraction, and corneal topography. Paired samples t-tests were used to analyze preoperative and postoperative visual acuity, astigmatism, and spherical equivalent (SE) parameters. Follow-up was 6 months. Results The mean CDVA was 0.62±0.26 logMAR preoperatively and 0.07±0.07 logMAR postoperatively. The mean preoperative sphere and cylinder was −3.14±3.58D and −4.84±2.02D, respectively. The mean postoperative manifest refractive sphere and cylinder was −0.30±0.51D and −0.81±1.51D, respectively. There was a significant reduction in refractive astigmatism after toric IOL implantation (P<0.002). The toric IOL axis rotation was <5° in all cases at the final follow-up. Conclusions Implantation of hydrophobic toric IOL was a safe and effective surgical procedure to correct mild to moderate stable PMD. PMID:25721517

  18. Minimally Invasive Thoracic Surgery in Pediatric Patients: The Taiwan Experience

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Kai; Chou, Chieh; Li, Chung-Liang; Chiu, Hui-Gin; Chang, Yu-Tang

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive technology or laparoscopic surgery underwent a major breakthrough over the past two decades. The first experience of thoracoscopy in children was reported around 1980 for diagnosis of intrathoracic pathology and neoplasia. Up until the middle of the 1990s, the surgical community in Taiwan was still not well prepared to accept the coming era of minimally invasive surgery. In the beginning, laparoscopy was performed in only a few specialties and only relatively short or simple surgeries were considered. But now, the Taiwan's experiences over the several different clinical scenarios were dramatically increased. Therefore, we elaborated on the experience about pectus excavatum: Nuss procedure, primary spontaneous hemopneumothorax, thoracoscopic thymectomy, and empyema in Taiwan. PMID:23819123

  19. Effect of Co-Implantation of a Capsular Tension Ring on Clinical Outcomes after Cataract Surgery with Monofocal Intraocular Lens Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Ju; Lee, Hun; Kim, Do Wook; Kim, Eung Kweon; Seo, Kyoung Yul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The objective was to evaluate the effect of co-implantation of a preloaded capsular tension ring (CTR) and aberration-free monofocal intraocular lens (IOL) on clinical outcomes and visual quality after cataract surgery. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent cataract surgery were randomized into two groups that were implanted with a CTR and IOL (group 1, 26 eyes) or an IOL only (group 2, 26 eyes). At 1 and 3 months after surgery, visual acuity, refractive errors, refractive prediction errors, ocular aberrations, and modulation transfer function (MTF) were analyzed. At 3 months postoperatively, anterior chamber depth (ACD) and contrast sensitivity were evaluated. Results Group 1 showed greater hyperopic shift, which caused the refractive prediction error at 3 months after surgery to be significantly different between the two groups (p=0.049). Differences in ACD between the preoperative and postoperative periods tended to be greater in group 1 than in group 2. At 3 months postoperatively, internal MTF values at 20, 25, and 30 cycles per degree were significantly better in group 1 than in group 2 (p=0.034, 0.017, and 0.017, respectively). Contrast sensitivity showed comparable results at almost all spatial frequencies between the groups. Conclusion Regarding visual acuity and quality, both groups showed comparable results. Co-implantation of a CTR and aberration-free monofocal IOL was associated with hyperopic refractive outcomes. Surgeons should consider the position of the IOL when planning co-implantation of a CTR and IOL. PMID:27401657

  20. Perioperative glycaemic control in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery under local anaesthesia: a survey of practices of Singapore ophthalmologists and anaesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Jyh Haur; Ng, Wei Di; Salah, Maaz Mohammad; Neelam, Kumari; Eong, Kah-Guan Au; Kumar, Chandra Mohan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Perioperative glycaemic control is an important aspect of clinical management in diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery under local anaesthesia. While poor long-term glycaemic control has significant implications for surgery, perioperative hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia may also compromise patient safety and surgical outcomes. We aimed to survey ophthalmologists and anaesthesiologists on their approach and to identify the prevalent practice patterns in Singapore. METHODS This was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey conducted in four public hospitals in Singapore with established ophthalmology and anaesthesia units. Respondents were approached individually, and the self-administered questionnaires comprised questions related to practice patterns, clinical scenarios and awareness of pre-existing guidelines. RESULTS A total of 129 doctors responded to the questionnaire survey. 76 (58.9%) were from ophthalmology departments and 53 (41.1%) were from anaesthesia departments. The majority chose to withhold oral hypoglycaemic agents (82.9%) and/or insulin (69.8%), and keep the patient fasted preoperatively. A blood glucose level ≥ 17 mmol/L prompted 86.0%–93.8% of respondents to adopt a treat-and-defer strategy, while a level ≥ 23 mmol/L prompted 86.0%–96.9% of respondents to cancel the cataract surgery. The respondents were consistently more concerned about perioperative hyperglycaemia (n = 99, 76.7%) than intraoperative hypoglycaemia (n = 83, 64.3%). CONCLUSION The current study presented the prevalent practice patterns of ophthalmologists and anaesthesiologists in the perioperative management of diabetic patients undergoing cataract surgery in four public hospitals in Singapore. Further research in this field is required, and may be useful for the future formulation of formal guidelines and protocols. PMID:26892742

  1. Evaluating the Safety of Intraoperative Antiarrhythmics in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Rachel S; Moffett, Brady S; Hall, Stuart; Kim, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occurring during the intraoperative period for cardiac surgery have been associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Several antiarrhythmics have been utilized for the management of intraoperative arrhythmias. These antiarrhythmic medications can cause undesirable adverse outcomes in the intensive care setting. The incidence and treatment of adult intraoperative arrhythmias have been studied. In addition, the prevalence, risk factors, and optimal treatment of pediatric postoperative arrhythmias have also been studied. However, the literature has not been published on intraoperative antiarrhythmia treatment during pediatric cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of intraoperative antiarrhythmic medications utilized in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. This was a retrospective review of all patients who received an intraoperative antiarrhythmic in the cardiovascular operating room at Texas Children's Hospital. Patients were included if they underwent cardiovascular surgery from November 2008 to July 2013 and were excluded if antiarrhythmics were given intraoperatively for other indications (i.e., esmolol for hypertension) or if patients were older than 18 years of age. Safety of antiarrhythmic treatment was determined by the absence or presence of adverse events. Control or recurrence of the arrhythmia was analyzed as a secondary measure to help determine antiarrhythmic efficacy. A total of 45 patients were identified (53.3 % male). Patients were a median of 0.52 years at the time of surgery. Primary surgery types were tetralogy of Fallot repair (n = 6; 13.3 %) and ventricular septal defect closure (n = 5, 11.1 %). Thirty-one patients (68.9 %) had documented adverse events after the administration of antiarrhythmics. Most of these adverse events occurred after the administration of amiodarone (n = 16; 51.6 %) followed by esmolol (n = 15; 48.4 %). Fifty-one percent of the arrhythmias resolved in the operating

  2. [Intravenous arginine vasopressin for two pediatric cases of pulmonary hypertension after congenital heart surgery].

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Yusuke; Hara, Mariko

    2012-10-01

    We experienced two pediatric cases of severe pulmonary hypertension after congenital heart surgery. It was difficult to wean two cases from cardiopulmonary bypass for systemic hypotension concomitant with pulmonary hypertension reflactory to conventional therapy, including administration of adrenaline, nitroglycerin, milrinone, and/or inhalation of nitric oxide. In order to increase systemic arterial blood pressure and improve severe right heart failure, we administered arginine vasopressin (AVP) intravenously, which is a potent vasoconstrictor via V1 receptor. The dose of AVP was 0.0002 unit x kg(-1) x min(-1). After administration of AVP, systemic arterial pressure increased markedly and pulmonary arterial pressure decreased slightly, and we succeeded in weaning the patients from cardiopulmonary bypass. No adverse effect with AVP was found. In conclusion, administration of AVP is a therapeutic option for treating systemic hypotension concomitant with severe pulmonary hypertension in pediatric congenital heart surgery. PMID:23157099

  3. SN-38-loaded nanofiber matrices for local control of pediatric solid tumors after subtotal resection surgery.

    PubMed

    Monterrubio, Carles; Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Cano, Francisco; Vila-Ubach, Monica; Manzanares, Alejandro; Schaiquevich, Paula; Tornero, Jose A; Sosnik, Alejandro; Mora, Jaume; Carcaboso, Angel M

    2016-02-01

    In addition to surgery, local tumor control in pediatric oncology requires new treatments as an alternative to radiotherapy. SN-38 is an anticancer drug with proved activity against several pediatric solid tumors including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing sarcoma. Taking advantage of the extremely low aqueous solubility of SN-38, we have developed a novel drug delivery system (DDS) consisting of matrices made of poly(lactic acid) electrospun polymer nanofibers loaded with SN-38 microcrystals for local release in difficult-to-treat pediatric solid tumors. To model the clinical scenario, we conducted extensive preclinical experiments to characterize the biodistribution of the released SN-38 using microdialysis sampling in vivo. We observed that the drug achieves high concentrations in the virtual space of the surgical bed and penetrates a maximum distance of 2 mm within the tumor bulk. Subsequently, we developed a model of subtotal tumor resection in clinically relevant pediatric patient-derived xenografts and used such models to provide evidence of the activity of the SN-38 DDS to inhibit tumor regrowth. We propose that this novel DDS could represent a potential future strategy to avoid harmful radiation therapy as a primary tumor control together with surgery. PMID:26695118

  4. Innovation in pediatric surgery: the surgical innovation continuum and the ETHICAL model.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jennifer A T

    2014-04-01

    Innovations are indispensable to the practice and advancement of pediatric surgery. Children represent a special type of vulnerable population and must be protected since they do not have legal capacity to consent, and their parent's judgment may be compromised in circumstances when the child is very ill or no adequate therapy exists. In an effort to protect patients, legislators could pass and enforce laws that prohibit or curtail surgical innovations and thus stifle noble advancement of the practice. The goals of this paper are, 1) To clearly define the characteristics of surgical innovation types so interventions may be classified into 1 of 3 distinct categories along a continuum: Practice Variation, Transition Zone, and Experimental Research, and 2) To propose a practical systematic method to guide surgeon decision-making when approaching interventions that fall into the "Transition Zone" category on the Surgical Intervention Continuum. The ETHICAL model allows those that know the intricacies and nuances of pediatric surgery best, the pediatric surgeons and professional pediatric surgical societies, to participate in self-regulation of innovation in a manner that safeguards patients without stifling creativity or unduly hampering surgical progress. PMID:24726128

  5. [Antibioprophylaxis in pediatric surgery: how to harmonize practices?].

    PubMed

    Dumont, R; Pichenot, V; Gras-Le Guen, C; Launay, E

    2013-11-01

    Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis has demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing surgical site infections. Existing recommendations for adults are however subject to poor compliance. Surgical antibiotic representing a significant proportion of antibiotic prescriptions, it is then important to respect its general principles (narrow spectrum, short duration, choosing molecules different than the ones used in therapeutics, etc.) to limit its impact on the bacterial ecology. A brief survey of pediatric practices in five French university hospitals has allowed us to highlight some significant changes in terms of choice of molecule or duration. Through the experience of harmonizing practices at the University Hospital of Nantes, we showed that the development of national guidelines is a prerequisite to harmonize practices but must be accompanied by a multidisciplinary reflexion within each hospital in order to improve their acceptability and application. PMID:24360303

  6. Staged Delayed Sternal Closure Using a Binder Clip After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fuchigami, Tai; Nishioka, Masahiko; Akashige, Toru; Higa, Shotaro; Nagata, Nobuhiro

    2016-07-01

    After pediatric cardiac surgery, patients who undergo delayed sternal closure may become hemodynamically unstable. We performed a staged sternal closure technique using a binder clip in 31 consecutive patients to minimize cardiopulmonary instability. Only one patient (3.2%) died of mediastinitis. Thus, our technique may be safe and minimize cardiopulmonary instability. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12767 (J Card Surg 2016;31:464-466). PMID:27277820

  7. MIS-behavior: practical heuristics for precise pediatric minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Blinman, Thane A

    2015-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has changed pediatric urology and general surgery, offering less morbidity and new surgical options for many procedures. This promise goes unrealized when technical methods lag. Application of MIS in children is uneven after more than 2 decades of application. Principles of versatile and proficient technique may remain unstated and implicit in surgical training, often leaving surgical training an exercise in inference and imitation. This article describes some essential practical principles of precision MIS applied to patients of any size. PMID:25455179

  8. Conservative Management of Wound Dehiscence Following Pediatric Cavus Foot Surgery: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cavus foot surgeries are relatively common procedures in pediatric orthopedics. Following surgery, the tensile forces exerted on the wound by the newly corrected foot may hinder soft tissue healing and lead to wound dehiscence. Treatments including skin grafting and other plastic surgery procedures have been described in order to manage this complication. However, the effectiveness of conservative treatment regimens in cases of large dehiscence of these wounds has not yet been reported. Methods: The charts of 7 patients between the ages of 7 and 19 who had surgical correction of severe cavus deformity and who developed wound dehiscence postoperatively were reviewed. All patients were treated conservatively with regular cleaning with chlorhexedine and application of different ointments and dressings along with surgical debridements. Three patients also received antibiotics. The primary outcome was wound healing as documented by clinical notes and photographs. Results: The treatment was successful in producing the desired outcome in all cases with no other systemic or wound complications developing. Complete wound healing was obtained within a median time of 6 months and 5 days of treatment without the need for skin grafting or other plastic surgery procedures. Conclusions: In pediatric patients with wound dehiscence postcavus foot surgery, conservative management with minimal surgical debridement and regular cleaning and dressing of the wound is a viable treatment option that has been shown to be effective in 7 cases. It should be considered in such patients before proceeding to more invasive surgical treatment. PMID:26894015

  9. Apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes during pediatric cardiac surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocsi, J.; Pipek, M.; Hambsch, J.; Schneider, P.; Tárnok, A.

    2006-02-01

    There is a constant need for clinical diagnostic systems that enable to predict disease course for preventative medicine. Apoptosis, programmed cell death, is the end point of the cell's response to different induction and leads to changes in the cell morphology that can be rapidly detected by optical systems. We tested whether apoptosis of T-cells in the peripheral blood is useful as predictor and compared different preparation and analytical techniques. Surgical trauma is associated with elevated apoptosis of circulating leukocytes. Increased apoptosis leads to partial removal of immune competent cells and could therefore in part be responsible for reduced immune defence. Cardiovascular surgery with but not without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) induces transient immunosuppression. Its effect on T-cell apoptosis has not been shown yet. Flow-cytometric data of blood samples from 107 children (age 3-16 yr.) who underwent cardiac surgery with (78) or without (29) CPB were analysed. Apoptotic T-lymphocytes were detected based on light scatter and surface antigen (CD45/CD3) expression (ClinExpImmunol2000;120:454). Results were compared to staining with CD3 antibodies alone and in the absence of antibodies. T-cell apoptosis rate was comparable when detected with CD45/CD3 or CD3 alone, however not in the absence of CD3. Patients with but not without CPB surgery had elevated lymphocyte apoptosis. T-cell apoptosis increased from 0.47% (baseline) to 0.97% (1 day postoperatively). In CPB patients with complication 1.10% significantly higher (ANOVA p=0.01) comparing to CPB patients without complications. Quantitation of circulating apoptotic cells based on light scatter seems an interesting new parameter for diagnosis. Increased apoptosis of circulating lymphocytes and neutrophils further contributes to the immune suppressive response to surgery with CPB. (Support: MP, Deutsche Herzstiftung, Frankfurt, Germany)

  10. Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of a standardised intracameral combination of mydriatics and anaesthetics for cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Labetoulle, Marc; Findl, Oliver; Malecaze, François; Alió, Jorge; Cochener, Béatrice; Lobo, Conceição; Lazreg, Sihem; Hartani, Dahbia; Colin, Joseph; Tassignon, Marie-José; Behndig, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background/aims To compare the efficacy and safety of intracameral (IC) administration at the beginning of cataract surgery, of Mydrane, a standardised ophthalmic combination of tropicamide 0.02%, phenylephrine 0.31% and lidocaine 1%, to a standard topical regimen. Methods In this international phase III, prospective, randomised study, the selected eye of 555 patients undergoing phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation received 200 μL of Mydrane (Mydrane group) just after the first incision or a topical regimen of one drop each of tropicamide 0.5% and phenylephrine 10% repeated three times (reference group). The primary efficacy variable was achievement of capsulorhexis without additional mydriatics. The non-inferiority of Mydrane to the topical regimen was tested. The main outcome measures were pupil size, patient perception of ocular discomfort and safety. Results Capsulorhexis without additional mydriatics was performed in 98.9% of patients and 94.7% in the Mydrane and reference groups, respectively. Both groups achieved adequate mydriasis (>7 mm) during capsulorhexis, phacoemulsification and IOL insertion. IOL insertion was classified as ‘routine’ in a statistically greater number of eyes in the Mydrane group compared with the reference group (p=0.047). Patients in the Mydrane group reported statistically greater comfort than the reference group before IOL insertion (p=0.034). Safety data were similar between groups. Conclusions Mydrane is an effective and safe alternative to standard eye drops for initiating and maintaining intraoperative mydriasis and analgesia. Patients who received IC Mydrane were significantly more comfortable before IOL insertion than the reference group. Surgeons found IOL insertion less technically challenging with IC Mydrane. Trial registration number NCT02101359; Results. PMID:26531052

  11. Establishment of a Clinically Relevant Ex Vivo Mock Cataract Surgery Model for Investigating Epithelial Wound Repair in a Native Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Janice L.; Bleaken, Brigid M.; Wolff, Iris M.; Menko, A. Sue

    2015-01-01

    The major impediment to understanding how an epithelial tissue executes wound repair is the limited availability of models in which it is possible to follow and manipulate the wound response ex vivo in an environment that closely mimics that of epithelial tissue injury in vivo. This issue was addressed by creating a clinically relevant epithelial ex vivo injury-repair model based on cataract surgery. In this culture model, the response of the lens epithelium to wounding can be followed live in the cells’ native microenvironment, and the molecular mediators of wound repair easily manipulated during the repair process. To prepare the cultures, lenses are removed from the eye and a small incision is made in the anterior of the lens from which the inner mass of lens fiber cells is removed. This procedure creates a circular wound on the posterior lens capsule, the thick basement membrane that surrounds the lens. This wound area where the fiber cells were attached is located just adjacent to a continuous monolayer of lens epithelial cells that remains linked to the lens capsule during the surgical procedure. The wounded epithelium, the cell type from which fiber cells are derived during development, responds to the injury of fiber cell removal by moving collectively across the wound area, led by a population of vimentin-rich repair cells whose mesenchymal progenitors are endogenous to the lens1. These properties are typical of a normal epithelial wound healing response. In this model, as in vivo, wound repair is dependent on signals supplied by the endogenous environment that is uniquely maintained in this ex vivo culture system, providing an ideal opportunity for discovery of the mechanisms that regulate repair of an epithelium following wounding. PMID:26132117

  12. Influence of the prediction error of the first eye undergoing cataract surgery on the refractive outcome of the fellow eye

    PubMed Central

    Gorodezky, Ludmilla; Mazinani, Babac AE; Plange, Niklas; Walter, Peter; Wenzel, Martin; Roessler, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In addition to measurement errors, individual anatomical conditions could be made responsible for unexpected prediction errors in the determination of the correct intraocular lens power for cataract surgery. Obviously, such anatomical conditions might be relevant for both eyes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the postoperative refractive error of the first eye has to be taken in account for the biometry of the second. Methods In this retrospective study, we included 670 eyes of 335 patients who underwent phacoemulsification and implantation of a foldable intraocular lens in both eyes. According to the SRK/T formula, the postoperative refractive error of each eye was determined and compared with its fellow eye. Results Of 670 eyes, 622 showed a postoperative refractive error within ±1.0 D (93%), whereas the prediction error was 0.5 D or less in 491 eyes (73%). The postoperative difference between both eyes was within 0.5 D in 71% and within 1.0 D in 93% of the eyes. Comparing the prediction error of an eye and its fellow eye, the error of the fellow eye was about half the value of the other. Conclusion Our results imply that substitution of half of the prediction error of the first eye into the calculation of the second eye may be useful to reduce the prediction error in the second eye. However, prospective studies should be initiated to demonstrate an improved accuracy for the second eye’s intraocular lens power calculation by partial adjustment. PMID:25382967

  13. Use of a Toric Intraocular Lens and a Limbal-Relaxing Incision for the Management of Astigmatism in Combined Glaucoma and Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Allister

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report the surgical management of a patient with glaucoma undergoing cataract surgery with high preexisting astigmatism. A combination of techniques was employed for her astigmatism management. Methods A 76-year-old female with 5.5 dpt of corneal astigmatism underwent surgery in her left eye consisting of one-site trabeculectomy, phacoemulsification, toric intraocular lens implantation and a single inferior limbal-relaxing incision. Results Intraocular pressure control was achieved with no medication at 11 mm Hg; before the filtering procedure, the pressure was 16 mm Hg on two topical drugs. Astigmatism was reduced to 0.75 dpt, and both corrected and uncorrected visual acuity improved. Conclusions Astigmatism management can have a good outcome in combined procedures. We encourage surgeons to address astigmatism in the preoperative planning of patients undergoing glaucoma surgery associated with phacoemulsification. PMID:27293408

  14. Etiology of postoperative hyponatremia following pediatric intracranial tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Williams, Cydni N; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Bratton, Susan L

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH) cause postoperative hyponatremia in neurosurgery patients, can be difficult to distinguish clinically, and are associated with increased morbidity. The authors aimed to determine risk factors associated with CSW and SIADH among children undergoing surgery for intracranial tumors. METHODS This retrospective cohort study included children 0-19 years of age who underwent a first intracranial tumor surgery with postoperative hyponatremia (sodium ≤ 130 mEq/L). CSW was differentiated from SIADH by urine output and fluid balance, exclusive of other causes of hyponatremia. The CSW and SIADH groups were compared with basic bivariate analysis and recursive partitioning. RESULTS Of 39 hyponatremic patients, 17 (44%) had CSW and 10 (26%) had SIADH. Patients with CSW had significantly greater natriuresis compared with those with SIADH (median urine sodium 211 vs 28 mEq/L, p = 0.01). Age ≤ 7 years and female sex were significant risk factors for CSW (p = 0.03 and 0.04, respectively). Both patient groups had hyponatremia onset within the first postoperative week. Children with CSW had trends toward increased sodium variability and symptomatic hyponatremia compared with those with SIADH. Most received treatment, but inappropriate treatment was noted to worsen hyponatremia. CONCLUSIONS The authors found that CSW was more common following intracranial tumor surgery and was associated with younger age and female sex. Careful assessment of fluid balance and urine output can separate patients with CSW from those who have SIADH, and high urine sodium concentrations (> 100 mEq/L) support a CSW diagnosis. Patients with CSW and SIADH had similar clinical courses, but responded to different interventions, making appropriate diagnosis and treatment imperative to prevent morbidity. PMID:26613271

  15. Effects of regional analgesia on stress responses to pediatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Andrew R

    2012-01-01

    Invasive surgery induces a combination of local response to tissue injury and generalized activation of systemic metabolic and hormonal pathways via afferent nerve pathways and the central nervous system. The local inflammatory responses and the parallel neurohumoral responses are not isolated but linked through complex signaling networks, some of which remain poorly understood. The magnitude of the response is broadly related to the site of injury (greater in regions with visceral pain afferents such as abdomen and thorax) and the extent of the trauma. The changes include alterations in metabolic, hormonal, inflammatory, and immune systems that can be collectively termed the stress response. Integral to the stress responses are the effects of nociceptive afferent stimuli on systemic and pulmonary vascular resistance, heart rate, and blood pressure, which are a combination of efferent autonomic response and catecholamine release via the adrenal medulla. Therefore, pain responses, cardiovascular responses, and stress responses need to be considered as different aspects of a combined bodily reaction to surgery and trauma. It is important at the outset to understand that not all components of the stress response are suppressed together and that this is important when discussing different analgesic modalities (i.e. opioids vs regional anesthesia). For example, in terms of the use of fentanyl in the infant, the dose required to provide analgesia (1-5 mcg·kg(-1)) is less than that required for hemodynamic stability in response to stimuli (5-10 mcg·kg(-1)) (1) and that this in turn is less than that required to suppress most aspects of the stress response (25-50 mcg·kg(-1)) (2). In contrast to this considerable dose dependency, central local anesthetic blocks allow blockade of the afferent and efferent sympathetic pathways at relatively low doses resulting in profound suppression of hemodynamic and stress responses to surgery. PMID:21999144

  16. Factors affecting recovery of postoperative bowel function after pediatric laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Daphnée; Andreu-Gallien, Juliette; Skhiri, Alia; Bonnard, Arnaud; Nivoche, Yves; Dahmani, Souhayl

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laparoscopic pediatric surgery allows a rapid postoperative rehabilitation and hospital discharge. However, the optimal postoperative pain management preserving advantages of this surgical technique remains to be determined. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the postoperative recovery of bowel function after laparoscopic surgery in children. Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis of factors affecting recovery of bowel function in children and infants undergoing laparoscopic surgery between January 1, 2009 and September 30, 2009, was performed. Factors included were: Age, weight, extent of surgery (extensive, regional or local), chronic pain (sickle cell disease or chronic intestinal inflammatory disease), American Society of Anaesthesiologists status, postoperative analgesia (ketamine, morphine, nalbuphine, paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], nefopam, regional analgesia) both in the Postanesthesia Care Unit and in the surgical ward; and surgical complications. Data analysis used classification and regression tree analysis (CART) with a 10-fold cross validation. Results: One hundred and sixty six patients were included in the analysis. Recovery of bowel function depended upon: The extent of surgery, the occurrence of postoperative surgical complications, the administration of postoperative morphine in the surgical ward, the coadministration of paracetamol and NSAIDs and/or nefopam in the surgical ward and the emergency character of the surgery. The CART method generated a decision tree with eight terminal nodes. The percentage of explained variability of the model and the cross validation were 58% and 49%, respectively. Conclusion: Multimodal analgesia using nonopioid analgesia that allows decreasing postoperative morphine consumption should be considered for the speed of bowel function recovery after laparoscopic pediatric surgery.

  17. Late postoperative choroidal detachment following an uneventful cataract surgery in a patient on topical latanoprost.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Rashmi; Senthil, Sirisha; Garudadri, Chandrasekhar S

    2015-01-01

    Topical latanoprost is a most effective and commonly used antiglaucoma medication. Use of prostaglandin analogues (PGA) in the early postoperative period is controversial due to its proinflammatory properties. We report a case of a 64-year-old man with primary open angle glaucoma, post-trabeculectomy 17 years prior, with good intraocular pressure (IOP) control on topical levobunolol 0.5% and latanoprost 0.005%. He underwent a clear corneal phacoemulsification surgery in his left eye and the PGA was stopped. He had an uneventful postoperative course and was prescribed eyeglasses at 4-week follow-up. Two weeks later, he presented to the emergency department with decreased vision in the left eye, flat anterior chamber, IOP of 00 mm Hg and 360° choroidal detachment. The continued use of topical latanoprost in the operated eye was implicated as the cause. This case illustrates the serious vision-threatening side effect of PGA when used in the early postoperative period. PMID:26174734

  18. Surgical and Functional Results of Hybrid 25-27-Gauge Vitrectomy Combined with Coaxial 2.2 mm Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Fabian; Kretz, Florian; Pavlidis, Mitrofanis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcomes after coaxial 2.2 mm small incision cataract surgery combined with hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy in eyes with vitreoretinal disease and age-related cataract. Methods. A single-center, retrospective case series study of 55 subjects (55 eyes) with a mean age of 70 years who underwent combined small incision phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy during the 12-month period to December 2014. Intraoperative and postoperative complications and visual results were the main outcome measures. Results. The mean follow-up period was 6 months (range: 2–18 months). Intraoperative findings were 3 retinal breaks (5.5%). No cases required corneal or scleral suture or conversion to larger-gauge vitrectomy. Postoperative complications consisted of posterior capsule opacification (12.7%), elevated intraocular pressure >30 mmHg (1.8%), and fibrin reaction (5.5%). There were no cases of hypotony (<7 mmHg), IOL decentration, or postoperative endophthalmitis. Visual acuity (mean ± SD) improved from 0.52 ± 0.6 logMAR preoperatively to 0.22 ± 0.46 logMAR at final postoperative visit (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Surgical and visual outcomes suggest hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy combined with small incision phacoemulsification and IOL implantation is feasible, safe, and effective as a one-step surgical procedure for the management of vitreoretinal pathologies and concurrent cataract. PMID:26966558

  19. Surgical and Functional Results of Hybrid 25-27-Gauge Vitrectomy Combined with Coaxial 2.2 mm Small Incision Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Höhn, Fabian; Kretz, Florian; Pavlidis, Mitrofanis

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate outcomes after coaxial 2.2 mm small incision cataract surgery combined with hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy in eyes with vitreoretinal disease and age-related cataract. Methods. A single-center, retrospective case series study of 55 subjects (55 eyes) with a mean age of 70 years who underwent combined small incision phacoemulsification, intraocular lens (IOL) implantation, and hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy during the 12-month period to December 2014. Intraoperative and postoperative complications and visual results were the main outcome measures. Results. The mean follow-up period was 6 months (range: 2-18 months). Intraoperative findings were 3 retinal breaks (5.5%). No cases required corneal or scleral suture or conversion to larger-gauge vitrectomy. Postoperative complications consisted of posterior capsule opacification (12.7%), elevated intraocular pressure >30 mmHg (1.8%), and fibrin reaction (5.5%). There were no cases of hypotony (<7 mmHg), IOL decentration, or postoperative endophthalmitis. Visual acuity (mean ± SD) improved from 0.52 ± 0.6 logMAR preoperatively to 0.22 ± 0.46 logMAR at final postoperative visit (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Surgical and visual outcomes suggest hybrid 25-27-gauge vitrectomy combined with small incision phacoemulsification and IOL implantation is feasible, safe, and effective as a one-step surgical procedure for the management of vitreoretinal pathologies and concurrent cataract. PMID:26966558

  20. What are the prospects for non-scheduled robotic procedures in pediatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Ballouhey, Quentin; Fouracde, Laurent; Longis, Bernard; Vacquerie, Virginie; Clermidi, Pauline; Carcauzon Couvrat, Véronique; Cros, Jérôme; Berenguer, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Robotic technology allows for the management of complex surgical cases with a minimally invasive approach. The aim of this study was to communicate our experience using robotic technology for non-scheduled pediatric procedures (NSP). We performed a prospective study over the last 5 years including all consecutive cases where surgery was performed with a robot. NSP procedures were defined as a time to surgery of <24 h. Preoperative time, operative time, overall completion rate, and postoperative course were analyzed. Of the 85 cases recorded, five corresponded to robot-assisted NSP with a mean weight of 10 kg (3-36 kg). The mean time before surgery was 19 h (11-24 h). Conversion rate to open procedure was 40 %. Fifteen NSP had to be performed without robotic plateform. Robotic surgery is a potentially relevant option for most pediatric thoracic or abdominal procedures performed in a non-scheduled setting and offers technical advantages. PMID:26994773

  1. Methodological Issues in Predicting Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery Candidates Through Natural Language Processing and Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Kevin Bretonnel; Glass, Benjamin; Greiner, Hansel M.; Holland-Bouley, Katherine; Standridge, Shannon; Arya, Ravindra; Faist, Robert; Morita, Diego; Mangano, Francesco; Connolly, Brian; Glauser, Tracy; Pestian, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We describe the development and evaluation of a system that uses machine learning and natural language processing techniques to identify potential candidates for surgical intervention for drug-resistant pediatric epilepsy. The data are comprised of free-text clinical notes extracted from the electronic health record (EHR). Both known clinical outcomes from the EHR and manual chart annotations provide gold standards for the patient’s status. The following hypotheses are then tested: 1) machine learning methods can identify epilepsy surgery candidates as well as physicians do and 2) machine learning methods can identify candidates earlier than physicians do. These hypotheses are tested by systematically evaluating the effects of the data source, amount of training data, class balance, classification algorithm, and feature set on classifier performance. The results support both hypotheses, with F-measures ranging from 0.71 to 0.82. The feature set, classification algorithm, amount of training data, class balance, and gold standard all significantly affected classification performance. It was further observed that classification performance was better than the highest agreement between two annotators, even at one year before documented surgery referral. The results demonstrate that such machine learning methods can contribute to predicting pediatric epilepsy surgery candidates and reducing lag time to surgery referral. PMID:27257386

  2. The Preventable Shunt Revision Rate: a potential quality metric for pediatric shunt surgery.

    PubMed

    Venable, Garrett T; Rossi, Nicholas B; Morgan Jones, G; Khan, Nickalus R; Smalley, Zachary S; Roberts, Mallory L; Klimo, Paul

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Shunt surgery consumes a large amount of pediatric neurosurgical health care resources. Although many studies have sought to identify risk factors for shunt failure, there is no consensus within the literature on variables that are predictive or protective. In this era of "quality outcome measures," some authors have proposed various metrics to assess quality outcomes for shunt surgery. In this paper, the Preventable Shunt Revision Rate (PSRR) is proposed as a novel quality metric. METHODS An institutional shunt database was queried to identify all shunt surgeries performed from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014, at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital. Patients' records were reviewed for 90 days following each "index" shunt surgery to identify those patients who required a return to the operating room. Clinical, demographic, and radiological factors were reviewed for each index operation, and each failure was analyzed for potentially preventable causes. RESULTS During the study period, there were 927 de novo or revision shunt operations in 525 patients. A return to the operating room occurred 202 times within 90 days of shunt surgery in 927 index surgeries (21.8%). In 67 cases (33% of failures), the revision surgery was due to potentially preventable causes, defined as inaccurate proximal or distal catheter placement, infection, or inadequately secured or assembled shunt apparatus. Comparing cases in which failure was due to preventable causes and those in which it was due to nonpreventable causes showed that in cases in which failure was due to preventable causes, the patients were significantly younger (median 3.1 vs 6.7 years, p = 0.01) and the failure was more likely to occur within 30 days of the index surgery (80.6% vs 64.4% of cases, p = 0.02). The most common causes of preventable shunt failure were inaccurate proximal catheter placement (33 [49.3%] of 67 cases) and infection (28 [41.8%] of 67 cases). No variables were found to be predictive of

  3. Pediatric functional endoscopic sinus surgery: is a second look necessary?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R B; Pereira, K D; Younis, R T; Lazar, R H

    1997-09-01

    Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) has become the surgical procedure of choice for the treatment of chronic sinusitis that is refractory to medical treatment. It has become routine to perform endoscopy in children under general anesthesia 2 to 3 weeks after FESS to facilitate examination and cleaning of the operative site. We compared the clinical outcome of 50 children who underwent FESS without a second-look endoscopy with 50 children who underwent a routine second look. Patients with systemic disease (cystic fibrosis, immotile ciliary syndrome, immunoglobulin deficiency) or undergoing a revision procedure were excluded from the study. The results show that the postoperative improvement in nasal obstruction, nasal drainage, and chronic cough was the same for both groups. We conclude that in the vast majority of children without systemic disease and not undergoing a revision procedure, a second endoscopic procedure may not offer any apparent advantage. PMID:9292615

  4. Cataract removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following ways, depending on the type of cataract: Phacoemulsification: With this procedure, the doctor uses a tool that produces sound waves to break up the cataract into small pieces. The pieces are then suctioned ...

  5. Effectiveness and properties of the biological prosthesis Permacol™ in pediatric surgery: A large single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Filisetti, Claudia; Costanzo, Sara; Marinoni, Federica; Vella, Claudio; Klersy, Catherine; Riccipetitoni, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of prosthetic patches of non-absorbable materials represents a valid tool in the treatment of abdominal wall and diaphragmatic defects in pediatric age. In recent years research has developed biological dermal scaffolds made from a sheet of acellular matrix that can provide the desired support and reduce the occurrence of complications from non-absorbable implant. We present our experience and a systematic review to evaluate the use of biologic prosthesis for abdominal wall closure in pediatric patients. Methods The study from January 2009 to January 2015 involved 20 patients treated with Permacol™ implant. We observed postoperative complications only in patients treated for abdominal wall closure, which is the major indication for the use of Permacol™. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis (according to PRISMA) on PubMed/Medline, Scopus and EMBASE regarding the use of biological prosthesis in pediatric population considering the incidence of complications as the primary outcome. Results 3/20 patients experienced complications: 2 patients with skin necrosis healed conservatively and 1 of them developed laparocele. Thus only 1 patient with incisional hernia had significant surgery complication. In patients who were permanently implanted with Permacol™ it has not determined adverse reactions with optimal functional outcome. Conclusions In accordance with the few data (case reports and case series) reported in literature about pediatric patients, our experience in different pathologies and applications has shown the effectiveness of Permacol™, in particular for the non-occurrence of infections, that often affect the use of prosthesis. PMID:27054034

  6. Are We Monitoring the Quality of Cataract Surgery Services? A Qualitative Situation Analysis of Attitudes and Practices in a Large City in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Haastrup, Oluwatosin O. O.; Buchan, John C.; Cassels-Brown, Andy; Cook, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the current quality “assurance” and “improvement” mechanisms, the knowledge, attitudes and practices of cataract surgeons in a large South African city. Methodology: A total of 17 in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with ophthalmologists in June 2012 at 2 tertiary institutions in the Republic of South Africa. Recruitment of the purposive sample was supplemented by snowball sampling. The study participants were 5 general ophthalmologists and 2 pediatric ophthalmologists; 4 senior and 4 junior registrars and a medical officer. Participants were interviewed by a trained qualitative interviewer. The interview lasted between 20 and 60 min. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for thematic content. Results: Mechanisms for quality assurance were trainee logbooks and subjective senior staff observation. Clinicians were encouraged, but not obliged to self-audit. Quality improvement is incentivized by personal integrity and ambition. Poorly performing departments are inconspicuous, especially nationally, and ophthalmologists rely on the impression to gauge the quality of service provided by colleagues. Currently, word of mouth is the method for determining the better cataract surgical centers. Conclusion: The quality assurance mechanisms were dependent on insight and integrity of the individual surgeons. No structures were described that would ensure the detection of surgeons with higher than expected complication rates. Currently, audits are not enforced, and surgical outcomes are not well monitored due to concerns that this may lead to lack of openness among ophthalmologists. PMID:25949081

  7. A comparable study of clinical and optical outcomes after 1.8, 2.0 mm microcoaxial and 3.0 mm coaxial cataract surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yi-Bo; Zhu, Ya-Nan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yi-Dong; Yu, Yin-Hui; Yao, Ke

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical and optical outcomes after clear corneal incision cataract surgery (CICS) with three different incision sizes (1.8, 2.0 and 3.0 mm). METHODS Eyes of 150 patients with age-related cataract scheduled for coaxial cataract surgery were randomized to three groups: 1.8, 2.0, or 3.0 mm CICS. Intraoperative data and postoperative outcomes including surgically induced astigmatism (SIA), the corneal incision thickness, wavefront aberrations and modulation transfer function (MTF) of cornea were obtained. RESULTS There were no significant differences among the three groups in demographic characteristics and intraoperative outcome. The 1.8 and 2.0 mm microincisions showed more satisfactory clinical outcomes than the 3.0 mm incision. The 1.8 mm incision showed significantly less SIA than the 2.0 mm incision until postoperative 1mo (P<0.05), but the difference was only 0.14-0.18 D. Combined with less increased incision thickness only at postoperative 1d (P=0.013), the 1.8 mm incision presented better uncorrected distance visual acuity (UCDVA) than the 2.0 mm incision only at 1d postoperatively (P=0.008). For higher-order aberrations and other Zernike coefficients, there were no significant differences between the 1.8 mm group and 2.0 mm group (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Converting from 3.0 mm CICS to 1.8 or 2.0 mm CICS result in better clinical and optical outcomes. However, when incision is 1.8 mm, the benefits from further reduction in size compared with 2.0 mm are limited. The necessity to reduce the incision size is to be deliberated. PMID:27158610

  8. Loteprednol etabonate gel 0.5% for postoperative pain and inflammation after cataract surgery: results of a multicenter trial

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Raymond; Leitritz, Martin; Siou-Mermet, Raphaele; Erb, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Loteprednol etabonate (LE) is approved by the US FDA in a suspension and ointment form (0.5%) for the treatment of postoperative ocular inflammation. This study examined the gel formulation of LE, an improved, nonsettling formulation with a lower preservative level and a more physiologic pH. Patients and methods This multicenter, double-masked, parallel-group, vehicle-controlled study randomized patients aged ≥18 years with postoperative anterior chamber cell (ACC) ≥ grade 2 following uncomplicated cataract surgery to either LE gel or vehicle four times a day for 14 days. Primary efficacy end points included the proportion of patients with complete resolution of ACC and grade 0 (no) pain by postoperative day 8. Secondary efficacy end points included complete resolution and change from baseline in ACC and flare (individual and combined), and grade 0 pain at each visit. Safety end points included treatment-emergent adverse events, ocular symptoms, changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) and visual acuity, and biomicroscopy and funduscopy findings. Results A total of 407 patients were randomized to treatment (n = 206, LE gel; n = 201, vehicle). At day 8, 31.1% (64) of LE-treated patients and 13.9% (28) of vehicle-treated patients had complete resolution of ACC (P < 0.001), and 75.7% (156) of LE-treated patients and 45.8% (92) of vehicle-treated patients had grade 0 pain (P < 0.001). Secondary efficacy end points also favored LE gel. Fewer patients treated with LE gel required rescue medication (10.7% versus 42.3%) prior to day 15, and fewer had an ocular adverse event (16.0% versus 28.9%, P = 0.002). No drug-related adverse effects were reported more than once in the LE group. Mean IOP decreased in both treatment groups; one patient in the LE group demonstrated a clinically significant increase (≥10 mm Hg) in IOP that was not considered drug-related. Visual acuity and funduscopy findings were similar between treatments. Conclusion LE gel 0.5% was

  9. Distribution of pseudoexfoliation material on anterior segment structures in human autopsy eyes after cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation.

    PubMed

    Schmack, Ingo; Auffarth, Gerd Uwe

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the distribution and amount of pseudoexfoliation material (PXM) on anterior segment structures in pseudophakic human autopsy eyes with pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome and to study its impact on fixation and decentration of posterior chamber intraocular lenses (IOLs). Sixteen human autopsy eyes (donor age [mean ± SD] 77.5 ± 8.6 years; range, 70-90 years) with history of cataract surgery and PEX syndrome were analyzed for distribution and accumulation of PXM on structures of the anterior segment by light microscopy. Quantitative IOL decentration measurements were performed using the Miyake-Apple posterior view technique. All 16 eyes displayed IOLs which were either fixed symmetrically in the capsular bag (n = 8) or asymmetrically with one haptic in the sulcus and one in the bag (n = 7) or at the pars plicata of the ciliary body (n = 1). In the majority, PXM was found around the pars plicata (average grade: 1.6 ± 0.53 µm) and the lens capsule (average grade: 1.05 ± 0.46 µm). Minor amounts were detected at the pars plana and the trabecular meshwork. IOL decentration measurements ranged from 0.51 ± 0.35 (symmetrical-fixation) to 0.61 ± 0.43 mm (asymmetrical-fixation). There was only a weak statistically not significant correlation in regard to the amount of PXM and IOL decentration and between PXM distribution and the IOL fixation site. PXM contributes to weakening of the suspensory apparatus of the crystalline lens. Although PXM induced tissue alterations predispose for a broad spectrum of intra- and postoperative complications, the amount and distribution of PXM on different anterior segment structures showed only a weak correlation to IOL decentration or fixation location. PMID:26307751

  10. Bioabsorbable plates and screws in pediatric craniofacial surgery: a review of 22 cases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A V; Staffenberg, D A; Petronio, J A; Wood, R J

    1997-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the application of bioabsorbable fixation devices in reconstructive craniofacial procedures in the pediatric population. We reviewed 22 cases in which bioabsorbable plates and screws were used in craniofacial surgery for reconstruction. The procedures were performed in a 7-month period. The patients ranged in age from 5 to 228 months at the time of surgery (mean, 76.7 months). The postoperative clinical follow-up ranged from 2 to 16 weeks. The fixation devices were evaluated with regards to satisfactory fixation at the time of procedure. The postoperative follow-up evaluated clinical wound healing, signs of infection or local inflammation, and visibility or palpability of plates through the skin. All patients except one showed satisfactory wound healing with no sign of infection or local inflammation. The plates provided satisfactory fixation and were not visible through the skin. Two patients had plates that were palpable at the 4-month follow-up period. One patient with repair of a blow-out fracture of the orbit with resorbable mesh had redness and swelling over the wound site 2 weeks postoperatively with resolution 4 weeks postoperatively. Our early experience suggests reabsorbable fixation is an attractive option in pediatric plastic and craniofacial surgery. With further experience, this technology may represent the standard of care in reconstruction of the infant calvarium. PMID:10332274

  11. Risks and benefits of epilepsy surgery in a pediatric population: Consequences for memory and academic skills.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rebecca; Cirino, Paul; Hiscock, Merrill; Schultz, Rebecca; Collins, Robert; Chapieski, Lynn

    2016-09-01

    We examined benefits and risks for memory and academic functioning associated with epilepsy surgery in a pediatric population. A total of 46 patients with intractable seizures and a single seizure focus were divided into four groups according to focus localization: right temporal, left temporal, frontal, and parietal/occipital region. Pre- and postsurgery performance measures were compared across groups and with a fifth group of patients that had intractable seizures but did not undergo surgery. Both groups with temporal lobe epilepsy showed significant declines in memory test scores, while performance of the group with frontal lobe epilepsy improved. These changes were mirrored in parental reports of everyday memory. Consistent with other pediatric studies, no lateralized material-specific declines in the groups with temporal lobe epilepsy were found. When memory improved, the improvement was associated with decreases in seizure frequency and the number of anticonvulsant medications. Presurgical performance was the best predictor of declines in memory test performance. Deterioration of academic test scores in the group that did not have surgery exemplified a potential risk of living with seizures and antiepilepsy medication. PMID:27494354

  12. Outcomes of Disconnective Surgery in Intractable Pediatric Hemispheric and Subhemispheric Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Santhosh George; Chacko, Ari George; Thomas, Maya Mary; Babu, K. Srinivasa; Russell, Paul Swamidhas Sudhakar; Daniel, Roy Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To study the outcome of disconnective epilepsy surgery for intractable hemispheric and sub-hemispheric pediatric epilepsy. Methods: A retrospective analysis of the epilepsy surgery database was done in all children (age <18 years) who underwent a peri-insular hemispherotomy (PIH) or a peri-insular posterior quadrantectomy (PIPQ) from April 2000 to March 2011. All patients underwent a detailed pre surgical evaluation. Seizure outcome was assessed by the Engel's classification and cognitive skills by appropriate measures of intelligence that were repeated annually. Results: There were 34 patients in all. Epilepsy was due to Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE), Infantile hemiplegia seizure syndrome (IHSS), Hemimegalencephaly (HM), Sturge Weber syndrome (SWS) and due to post encephalitic sequelae (PES). Twenty seven (79.4%) patients underwent PIH and seven (20.6%) underwent PIPQ. The mean follow up was 30.5 months. At the last follow up, 31 (91.1%) were seizure free. The age of seizure onset and etiology of the disease causing epilepsy were predictors of a Class I seizure outcome. Conclusions: There is an excellent seizure outcome following disconnective epilepsy surgery for intractable hemispheric and subhemispheric pediatric epilepsy. An older age of seizure onset, RE, SWS and PES were good predictors of a Class I seizure outcome. PMID:22518176

  13. The application of a new cyanoacrylate glue in pediatric surgery for fistula closure.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Vahid; Bahador, Ali; Foroutan, Hamid Reza; Sabet, Babak; Geramizadeh, Bita; Zarenezhad, Mohammad

    2011-03-01

    Surgical glues have been used in pediatric surgery because of the fragility of tissue, and to prevent major surgeries. The present report describes our experience with using a new cyanoacrylate Glubran 2 (Viareggio, Italy) in the treatment of five cases of tracheoesophageal atresia with fistula (one fistula protection, three recurrent fistula, and one unstable patients), two cases of hypospadias, one case of vesicutanouse fistula after bladder extrophy, and one case of cloacal extrophy from January-December 2008. Three cases of recurrent tracheoesophageal atresia with fistula were treated by bronchoscpic glue injection. The other two cases benefited from glue through its ability to plug the fistula and to act as a protecting layer on anastomosis. In two cases with hypospadias excessive use of the glue caused skin necrosis, which was repaired. The wounds of cloacal extrophy were protected from nearby colostomy contamination and infection, and the vesicocutanouse fistula was closed by deepithelialization and sealing with glue. Based on the outcomes of the cases, it may be possible to suggest that Glubran 2 may be used safely in Pediatric Surgery as a sealant for the prevention and treatment of fistulas. PMID:23365480

  14. The Application of a New Cyanoacrylate Glue in Pediatric Surgery for Fistula Closure

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad Vahid; Bahador, Ali; Foroutan, Hamid Reza; Sabet, Babak; Geramizadeh, Bita; Zarenezhad, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Surgical glues have been used in pediatric surgery because of the fragility of tissue, and to prevent major surgeries. The present report describes our experience with using a new cyanoacrylate Glubran 2 (Viareggio, Italy) in the treatment of five cases of tracheoesophageal atresia with fistula (one fistula protection, three recurrent fistula, and one unstable patients), two cases of hypospadias, one case of vesicutanouse fistula after bladder extrophy, and one case of cloacal extrophy from January–December 2008. Three cases of recurrent tracheoesophageal atresia with fistula were treated by bronchoscpic glue injection. The other two cases benefited from glue through its ability to plug the fistula and to act as a protecting layer on anastomosis. In two cases with hypospadias excessive use of the glue caused skin necrosis, which was repaired. The wounds of cloacal extrophy were protected from nearby colostomy contamination and infection, and the vesicocutanouse fistula was closed by deepithelialization and sealing with glue. Based on the outcomes of the cases, it may be possible to suggest that Glubran 2 may be used safely in Pediatric Surgery as a sealant for the prevention and treatment of fistulas. PMID:23365480

  15. Minimally invasive pediatric surgery: Increasing implementation in daily practice and resident’s training

    PubMed Central

    Bax, N. M. A.; Tytgat, S. H. A. J.; de Jong, J. R.; Travassos, D. Vieira; Kramer, W. L. M.; van der Zee, D. C.

    2007-01-01

    Background In 1998, the one-year experience in minimally invasive abdominal surgery in children at a pediatric training center was assessed. Seven years later, we determined the current status of pediatric minimally invasive surgery in daily practice and surgical training. Methods A retrospective review was undertaken of all children with intra-abdominal operations performed between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2005. Results The type of operations performed ranged from common interventions to demanding laparoscopic procedures. 81% of all abdominal procedures were performed laparoscopically, with a complication rate stable at 6.9%, and conversion rate decreasing from 10% to 7.4%, compared to 1998. There were six new advanced laparoscopic procedures performed in 2005 as compared to 1998. The children in the open operated group were significantly smaller and younger than in the laparoscopic group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.001, respectively). The majority (64.2%) of the laparoscopic procedures were performed by a trainee. There was no difference in the operating times of open versus laparoscopic surgery, or of procedures performed by trainees versus staff surgeons. Laparoscopy by trainees did not have a negative impact on complication or conversion rates. Conclusions Laparoscopy is an established approach in abdominal procedures in children, and does not hamper surgical training. PMID:17483990

  16. Medicare program; fraud and abuse; civil monetary penalties and exclusions for assistants at cataract surgery--HHS. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    1987-04-10

    This final rule implements section 9307 of Pub. L. 99-272, the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985, as amended by section 1895(b)(16) of Pub. L. 99-514, the Tax Reform Act of 1986, by providing the imposition of civil monetary penalties (CMPs) and exclusions against physicians billing the Medicare program or program beneficiaries for services of an assistant at surgery for cataract operations where prior approval has not been granted. The purpose of these regulations is to strengthen existing OIG penalty and exclusion authorities, and to prevent specific abusive and fraudulent practices against the Medicare program with regard to the use of assistants at surgery where not medically necessary. PMID:10301433

  17. Transparency and Public Reporting of Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery Outcomes in North America.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Jacobs, Marshall L

    2016-01-01

    Health care is embarking on a new era of increased transparency. In January 2015, the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) began to publicly report outcomes of pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery using the 2014 Society of Thoracic Surgeons Congenital Heart Surgery Database (STS CHSD) Mortality Risk Model. Because the 2014 STS CHSD Mortality Risk Model adjusts for procedural factors and patient-level factors, it is critical that centers are aware of the important impact of incomplete entry of data in the fields for patient-level factors. These factors are used to estimate expected mortality, and incomplete coding of these factors can lead to inaccurate assessment of case mix and estimation of expected mortality. In order to assure an accurate assessment of case mix and estimate of expected mortality, it is critical to assure accurate completion of the fields for patient factors, including preoperative factors. It is crucial to document variables such as whether the patient was preoperatively ventilated or had an important noncardiac congenital anatomic abnormality. The lack of entry of these variables will lead to an underestimation of expected mortality. The art and science of assessing outcomes of pediatric and congenital cardiac surgery continues to evolve. In the future, when models have been developed that encompass other outcomes in addition to mortality, pediatric and congenital cardiac surgical performance may be able to be assessed using a multidomain composite metric that incorporates both mortality and morbidity, adjusting for the operation performed and for patient-specific factors. It is our expectation that in the future, this information will also be publicly reported. In this era of increased transparency, the complete and accurate coding of both patient-level factors and procedure-level factors is critical. PMID:26714994

  18. Pediatric cardiac surgery in low- and middle-income countries or emerging economies: a continuing challenge.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nguyenvu; Pezzella, A Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A number of recent publications, addresses, seminars, and conferences have addressed the global backlog and increasing incidence of both congenital and acquired cardiac diseases in children, with reference to early and delayed recognition, late referral, availability of and access to services, costs, risks, databases, and early and long-term results and follow-up. A variety of proposals, recommendations, and projects have been outlined and documented. The ultimate goal of these endeavors is to increase the quality and quantity of pediatric cardiac care and surgery worldwide and particularly in underserved areas. A contemporary review of past and present initiatives is presented with a subsequent focus on the more challenging areas. PMID:25870347

  19. Use of the flexible fiber CO2 laser in pediatric transcanal endoscopic middle ear surgery.

    PubMed

    Landegger, Lukas D; Cohen, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    We describe 4 pediatric patients (age 6-11 years) who underwent transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (TEES) with the assistance of a flexible fiber CO2 laser over a period of 6 months. Three of these individuals suffered from densely adherent cholesteatoma, where the laser permitted one-handed dissection while preserving endoscopic visualization by limiting bleeding. In the fourth patient, TEES ossiculoplasty was performed for a congenital stapes bar, with subsequent hearing improvement. Advantages and disadvantages of the flexible fiber CO2 laser in the setting of TEES are discussed. Use of the flexible fiber CO2 laser was found to expand the TEES toolkit. PMID:27240515

  20. The efficacy of bromfenac ophthalmic solution 0.07% dosed once daily in achieving zero-to-trace anterior chamber cell severity following