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Sample records for pediatric longitudinal evaluation

  1. Longitudinal evaluation of patient-reported outcomes measurement information systems measures in pediatric chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Carle, Adam; Barnett, Kimberly; Goldschneider, Kenneth R; Sherry, David D; Mara, Constance A; Cunningham, Natoshia; Farrell, Jennifer; Tress, Jenna; DeWitt, Esi Morgan

    2016-02-01

    The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) initiative is a comprehensive strategy by the National Institutes of Health to support the development and validation of precise instruments to assess self-reported health domains across healthy and disease-specific populations. Much progress has been made in instrument development, but there remains a gap in the validation of PROMIS measures for pediatric chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the construct validity and responsiveness to change of 7 PROMIS domains for the assessment of children (ages: 8-18) with chronic pain--Pain Interference, Fatigue, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity Function, and Peer Relationships. The PROMIS measures were administered at the initial visit and 2 follow-up visits at an outpatient chronic pain clinic (CPC; N = 82) and at an intensive amplified musculoskeletal pain day-treatment program (N = 63). Aim 1 examined construct validity of PROMIS measures by comparing them with corresponding "legacy" measures administered as part of usual care in the CPC sample. Aim 2 examined sensitivity to change in both CPC and amplified musculoskeletal pain samples. Longitudinal growth models showed that PROMIS' Pain Interference, Anxiety, Depression, Mobility, Upper Extremity, and Peer Relationship measures and legacy instruments generally performed similarly with slightly steeper slopes of improvement in legacy measures. All 7 PROMIS domains showed responsiveness to change. Results offered initial support for the validity of PROMIS measures in pediatric chronic pain. Further validation with larger and more diverse pediatric pain samples and additional legacy measures would broaden the scope of use of PROMIS in clinical research. PMID:26447704

  2. Longitudinal clinical and radiographic evaluation of severely intruded permanent incisors in a pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Neto, José Jeová Siebra Moreira; Gondim, Juliana Oliveira; de Carvalho, Fernanda Matias; Giro, Elisa Maria Aparecida

    2009-10-01

    Intrusion is defined as the axial dislodgment of the tooth into its socket and is considered one of the most severe types of dental trauma. This longitudinal outcome study was undertaken to evaluate clinically and radiographically severely intruded permanent incisors in a population of children and adolescents. All cases were treated between September 2003 and February 2008 in a dental trauma service. Clinical and radiographic data were collected from 12 patients (eight males and four females) that represented 15 permanent maxillary incisors. Mean age at the time of injury was 8 years and 9 months (range 7-14 years and 8 months). Mean time elapsed to follow-up was 26.6 months (range 10-51 months). The analysis of data showed that tooth intrusion was twice as frequent in males. The maxillary central incisors were the most commonly intruded teeth (93.3%), and falling at home was the main etiologic factor (60%). More than half of the cases (53.3%) were multiple intrusions, 73.3% of the intruded teeth had incomplete root formation and 66.6% of the teeth suffered other injuries concomitant to intrusion. Immediate surgical repositioning was the treatment of choice in 66.7% of the cases, while watchful waiting for the tooth to return to its pre-injury position was adopted in 33.3% of the cases. The teeth that suffered additional injuries to the intrusive luxation presented a fivefold increased relative risk of developing pulp necrosis. The immature teeth had six times more chances of presenting pulp canal obliteration that the mature teeth and a lower risk of developing root resorption. The most frequent post-injury complications were pulp necrosis (73.3%), marginal bone loss (60%), inflammatory root resorption (40%), pulp canal obliteration (26.7%) and replacement root resorption (20%). From the results of this study, it was not possible to determine whether the type immediate treatment had any influence on the appearance of sequelae like pulp necrosis and root

  3. Prospective longitudinal evaluation of emotional and behavioral functioning in pediatric patients with low-grade glioma treated with conformal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Willard, Victoria W; Conklin, Heather M; Wu, Shengjie; Merchant, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    Patients with low-grade glioma (LGG) who are successfully treated with irradiation are at increased risk for cognitive and psychosocial late effects. Conformal radiation therapy (CRT) allows sparing of cognitive deficits, but how it affects emotional and behavioral functioning remains unclear. We performed a prospective longitudinal study of the emotional and behavioral functioning of pediatric patients with LGG in the first 5 years post-CRT. Ninety-five pediatric patients with LGG treated on an institutional Phase II trial (August 1997-June 2009) underwent neuropsychological assessments pre-CRT and 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months post-CRT. Parent-reported scores on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) were analyzed. Three competence scales (School Competence, Social Competence, and Activities), two summary scales (Internalizing Problems and Externalizing Problems), and two subscales of theoretical interest (Attention Problems and Social Problems) from the CBCL were used. Among 80 eligible patients [44 female, 68 white], 51 had pilocytic astrocytoma and 13 had optic pathway glioma. Mean age at diagnosis was 6.8 years (SD = 4.3 years) and at CRT initiation was 8.9 years (SD = 3.4 years). Before CRT, deficits were demonstrated on the competence scales (mean scores below normative mean) and the Attention Problems and Social Problems subscales (mean scores above normative means). This trend continued at 5 years post-CRT. Longitudinal trajectories of emotional and behavioral functioning were stable over 5 years. Emotional and behavioral deficits remain relatively stable over the 5 years post-CRT in patients with LGG, suggesting that CRT may not exacerbate pre-existing psychosocial difficulties in this population. PMID:25573605

  4. A Longitudinal Analysis of the Pediatric Surgeon Workforce

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, James A.; Gautam, Shiva; Geiger, James D.; Ein, Sigmund H.; Holder, Thomas M.; Bloss, Robert S.; Krummel, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe the trends in the pediatric surgeon workforce during the last 25 years and to provide objective data useful for planning graduate medical education requirements. Summary Background Data In 1975, the Study on U.S. Surgical Services (SOSSUS) was published, including a model to survey staffing. A pediatric surgeon workforce study was initiated in conjunction with SOSSUS as a population, supply, and need-based study. The study has been updated every 5 years using the same study model, with the goals of determining the number and distribution of pediatric surgeons in the United States, the number needed and where, and the number of training programs and trainee output required to fill estimated staffing needs. This is the only such longitudinal workforce analysis of a surgical specialty. Methods Questionnaires were sent to 100 pediatric surgeons representing the 62 standard metropolitan statistical areas (SMSAs) in the United States with a population of 200,000 or more to verify the names and locations of all active pediatric surgeons and to gain information about the 5-year need for new pediatric surgeons by region. A program was developed to predict the number of pediatric surgeons relative to the total population and the 0-to-17-year-old population in the subsequent 30 years using updated data on the present number and ages of pediatric surgeons, age-specific death and retirement rates, projections of U.S. population by age group, and varying numbers of trainees graduated per year. As each 5-year update was done, previous projections were compared with actual numbers of pediatric surgeons found. The trends during the last 25 years were analyzed and compared and additional information regarding the demographics of practice, trends in reimbursement, and volume and scope of surgery was obtained. Results The birth rate has been stable since 1994. The 0-to-17-year-old population has been increasing at 0.65% per year; a 0.64% annual rate is projected

  5. Pediatric Acute Longitudinal Extensive Transverse Myelitis Secondary to Neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sana; Singh, Neeraj; Dow, Amanda; Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Lyme neuroborreliosis has several different clinical manifestations in children, of which facial nerve palsies, meningitis and radiculopathies are the most common. Transverse myelitis (TM) secondary to Lyme disease has been reported in rare occasions, typically presenting with severe weakness, sensory abnormalities and autonomic dysfunction. We present the case of a 16-year-old male who developed acute left peripheral facial palsy and longitudinal extensive TM secondary to Lyme disease. Remarkably, the patient reported only mild symptoms with severe back pain in the absence of profound signs of myelopathy. We reviewed the medical literature and analyzed the clinical features of pediatric patients with Borrelia burgdorferi-related TM. PMID:26351447

  6. International longitudinal pediatric reference standards for bone mineral content.

    PubMed

    Baxter-Jones, Adam D G; Burrows, Melonie; Bachrach, Laura K; Lloyd, Tom; Petit, Moira; Macdonald, Heather; Mirwald, Robert L; Bailey, Don; McKay, Heather

    2010-01-01

    To render a diagnosis pediatricians rely upon reference standards for bone mineral density or bone mineral content, which are based on cross-sectional data from a relatively small sample of children. These standards are unable to adequately represent growth in a diverse pediatric population. Thus, the goal of this study was to develop sex and site-specific standards for BMC using longitudinal data collected from four international sites in Canada and the United States. Data from four studies were combined; Saskatchewan Paediatric Bone Mineral Accrual Study (n=251), UBC Healthy Bones Study (n=382); Penn State Young Women's Health Study (n=112) and Stanford's Bone Mineral Accretion study (n=423). Males and females (8 to 25 years) were measured for whole body (WB), total proximal femur (PF), femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine (LS) BMC (g). Data were analyzed using random effects models. Bland-Altman was used to investigate agreement between predicted and actual data. Age, height, weight and ethnicity independently predicted BMC accrual across sites (P<0.05). Compared to White males, Asian males had 31.8 (6.8) g less WB BMC accrual; Hispanic 75.4 (28.2) g less BMC accrual; Blacks 82.8 (26.3) g more BMC accrual with confounders of age, height and weight controlled. We report similar findings for the PF and FN. Models for females for all sites were similar with age, height and weight as independent significant predictors of BMC accrual (P<0.05). We provide a tool to calculate a child's BMC Z-score, accounting for age, size, sex and ethnicity. In conclusion, when interpreting BMC in pediatrics we recommend standards that are sex, age, size and ethnic specific. PMID:19854308

  7. Comparing Analytic Methods for Longitudinal GWAS and a Case-Study Evaluating Chemotherapy Course Length in Pediatric AML. A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Vujkovic, Marijana; Aplenc, Richard; Alonzo, Todd A; Gamis, Alan S; Li, Yimei

    2016-01-01

    Regression analysis is commonly used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to test genotype-phenotype associations but restricts the phenotype to a single observation for each individual. There is an increasing need for analytic methods for longitudinally collected phenotype data. Several methods have been proposed to perform longitudinal GWAS for family-based studies but few methods are described for unrelated populations. We compared the performance of three statistical approaches for longitudinal GWAS in unrelated subjectes: (1) principal component-based generalized estimating equations (PC-GEE); (2) principal component-based linear mixed effects model (PC-LMEM); (3) kinship coefficient matrix-based linear mixed effects model (KIN-LMEM), in a study of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the duration of 4 courses of chemotherapy in 624 unrelated children with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) genotyped on the Illumina 2.5 M OmniQuad from the COG studies AAML0531 and AAML1031. In this study we observed an exaggerated type I error with PC-GEE in SNPs with minor allele frequencies < 0.05, wheras KIN-LMEM produces more than expected type II errors. PC-MEM showed balanced type I and type II errors for the observed vs. expected P-values in comparison to competing approaches. In general, a strong concordance was observed between the P-values with the different approaches, in particular among P < 0.01 where the between-method AUCs exceed 99%. PC-LMEM accounts for genetic relatedness and correlations among repeated phenotype measures, shows minimal genome-wide inflation of type I errors, and yields high power. We therefore recommend PC-LMEM as a robust analytic approach for GWAS of longitudinal data in unrelated populations. PMID:27547214

  8. Comparing Analytic Methods for Longitudinal GWAS and a Case-Study Evaluating Chemotherapy Course Length in Pediatric AML. A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Vujkovic, Marijana; Aplenc, Richard; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gamis, Alan S.; Li, Yimei

    2016-01-01

    Regression analysis is commonly used in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to test genotype-phenotype associations but restricts the phenotype to a single observation for each individual. There is an increasing need for analytic methods for longitudinally collected phenotype data. Several methods have been proposed to perform longitudinal GWAS for family-based studies but few methods are described for unrelated populations. We compared the performance of three statistical approaches for longitudinal GWAS in unrelated subjectes: (1) principal component-based generalized estimating equations (PC-GEE); (2) principal component-based linear mixed effects model (PC-LMEM); (3) kinship coefficient matrix-based linear mixed effects model (KIN-LMEM), in a study of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the duration of 4 courses of chemotherapy in 624 unrelated children with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) genotyped on the Illumina 2.5 M OmniQuad from the COG studies AAML0531 and AAML1031. In this study we observed an exaggerated type I error with PC-GEE in SNPs with minor allele frequencies < 0.05, wheras KIN-LMEM produces more than expected type II errors. PC-MEM showed balanced type I and type II errors for the observed vs. expected P-values in comparison to competing approaches. In general, a strong concordance was observed between the P-values with the different approaches, in particular among P < 0.01 where the between-method AUCs exceed 99%. PC-LMEM accounts for genetic relatedness and correlations among repeated phenotype measures, shows minimal genome-wide inflation of type I errors, and yields high power. We therefore recommend PC-LMEM as a robust analytic approach for GWAS of longitudinal data in unrelated populations. PMID:27547214

  9. Longitudinal Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Cutaneous Infections in a Pediatric Outpatient Population.

    PubMed

    Slater, Nathaniel A; Gilligan, Peter H; Morrell, Dean S

    2016-09-01

    This longitudinal update on Staphylococcus aureus prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns surveyd 291 cultures from 188 patients in a pediatric outpatient dermatology clinic with suspected skin and soft tissue infections. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus remained stable at 24%. Staphylococcus aureus resistance to tetracyclines modestly but demonstrably increased in the interval since 2009. PMID:27384814

  10. Longitudinal outcome and recovery of social problems after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI): Contribution of brain insult and family environment.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicholas P; van Bijnen, Loeka; Catroppa, Cathy; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Crossley, Louise; Hearps, Stephen; Anderson, Vicki

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in a range of social impairments, however longitudinal recovery is not well characterized, and clinicians are poorly equipped to identify children at risk for persisting difficulties. Using a longitudinal prospective design, this study aimed to evaluate the contribution of injury and non-injury related risk and resilience factors to longitudinal outcome and recovery of social problems from 12- to 24-months post-TBI. 78 children with TBI (injury age: 5.0-15.0 years) and 40 age and gender-matched typically developing (TD) children underwent magnetic resonance imaging including a susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequence 2-8 weeks post-injury (M=39.25, SD=27.64 days). At 12 and 24-months post- injury, parents completed questionnaires rating their child's social functioning, and environmental factors including socioeconomic status, caregiver mental health and family functioning. Results revealed that longitudinal recovery profiles differed as a function of injury severity, such that among children with severe TBI, social problems significantly increased from 12- to 24-months post-injury, and were found to be significantly worse than TD controls and children with mild and moderate TBI. In contrast, children with mild and moderate injuries showed few problems at 12-months post-injury and little change over time. Pre-injury environment and SWI did not significantly contribute to outcome at 24-months, however concurrent caregiver mental health and family functioning explained a large and significant proportion of variance in these outcomes. Overall, this study shows that longitudinal recovery profiles differ as a function of injury severity, with evidence for late-emerging social problems among children with severe TBI. Poorer long-term social outcomes were associated with family dysfunction and poorer caregiver mental health at 24-months post injury, suggesting that efforts to optimize the child's environment and

  11. Recovery of Olfactory Function following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Longitudinal Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Kathleen; Catroppa, Cathy; Anderson, Vicki

    2016-04-15

    There is increasing evidence that disruption of olfactory function after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common. Olfactory dysfunction (OD) has been linked to significant functional implications in areas of health, safety, and quality of life, but longitudinal research investigating olfactory recovery is limited. This study aimed to investigate recovery trajectories for olfaction following pediatric TBI and explore predictors of early and late olfactory outcomes. The olfactory function of 37 children with TBI ages 8-16 years was assessed on average at 1.5, 8.0, and 18.0 months post-injury using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test. A significant improvement in olfactory performance was seen over time in those with acute OD, however, only 16% of those with the most severe OD showed recovery to normal olfactory function, with the remainder demonstrating ongoing olfactory impairment at the 18 month follow-up. Predictors of early (0-3 month) and late (18 month) olfactory outcomes varied with site of impact, a significant predictor of later olfactory performance. In summary, while there was evidence of recovery of OD over time in pediatric TBI, the majority of children with severe OD did not show any recovery. In light of limited recovery of function for more severely affected children, the importance of appropriate education and implementation of rehabilitation management strategies is highlighted. PMID:26413938

  12. Evaluation and management of pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wenick, Adam S.; Barañano, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachments are rare, accounting for less than ten percent of all rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. While most retinal detachments in the adult population are related to posterior vitreous detachment, pediatric retinal detachment are often related to trauma or an underlying congenital abnormalities or genetic syndrome. The anatomy of pediatric eyes, the often late presentation of the disease, and the high incidence of bilateral pathology in children all pose significant challenges in the management of these patients. We discuss the epidemiology of pediatric rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, review the genetic syndromes associated with a high incidence of retinal detachment, and examine other common causes of retinal detachment in this age group. We then outline an approach to evaluation and management and describe the expected outcomes of repair of retinal detachment in the pediatric population. PMID:23961003

  13. Pediatric delirium: Evaluating the gold standard

    PubMed Central

    SILVER, GABRIELLE; KEARNEY, JULIA; TRAUBE, CHANI; ATKINSON, THOMAS M.; WYKA, KATARZYNA E.; WALKUP, JOHN

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to evaluate interrater reliability for the diagnosis of pediatric delirium by child psychiatrists. Method Critically ill patients (N = 17), 0–21 years old, including 7 infants, 5 children with developmental delay, and 7 intubated children, were assessed for delirium using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual–IV (DSM–IV) (comparable to DSM–V) criteria. Delirium assessments were completed by two psychiatrists, each blinded to the other’s diagnosis, and interrater reliability was measured using Cohen’s κ coefficient along with its 95% confidence interval. Results Interrater reliability for the psychiatric assessment was high (Cohen’s κ = 0.94, CI [0.83, 1.00]). Delirium diagnosis showed excellent interrater reliability regardless of age, developmental delay, or intubation status (Cohen’s κ range 0.81–1.00). Significance of results In our study cohort, the psychiatric interview and exam, long considered the “gold standard” in the diagnosis of delirium, was highly reliable, even in extremely young, critically ill, and developmentally delayed children. A developmental approach to diagnosing delirium in this challenging population is recommended. PMID:24762563

  14. Reliability of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Marie; Jahnsen, Reidun; Froslie, Kathrine Frey; Hussain, Aktahr

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) is an instrument for evaluating function in children with disabilities aged 6 months to 7.5 years. The PEDI measures both functional performance and capability in three domains: (1) self-care, (2) mobility, and (3) social function. The PEDI has recently been translated into Norwegian. The purpose…

  15. Longitudinal Pediatric Palliative Care: Quality of Life & Spiritual Struggle (FACE): design and methods.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Ronald H; Wilkins, Megan L; Wang, Jichuan; Garcia, Ana; Lyon, Maureen E

    2012-09-01

    As life expectancy increases for adolescents ever diagnosed with AIDS due to treatment advances, the optimum timing of advance care planning is unclear. Left unprepared for end-of-life (EOL) decisions, families may encounter miscommunication and disagreements, resulting in families being charged with neglect, court battles and even legislative intervention. Advanced care planning (ACP) is a valuable tool rarely used with adolescents. The Longitudinal Pediatric Palliative Care: Quality of Life & Spiritual Struggle study is a two-arm, randomized controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of a disease specific FAmily CEntered (FACE) advanced care planning intervention model among adolescents diagnosed with AIDS, aimed at relieving psychological, spiritual, and physical suffering, while maximizing quality of life through facilitated conversations about ACP. Participants will include 130 eligible dyads (adolescent and family decision-maker) from four urban cities in the United States, randomized to either the FACE intervention or a Healthy Living Control. Three 60-minute sessions will be conducted at weekly intervals. The dyads will be assessed at baseline as well as 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18-month post-intervention. The primary outcome measures will be in congruence with EOL treatment preferences, decisional conflict, and quality of communication. The mediating and moderating effects of threat appraisal, HAART adherence, and spiritual struggle on the relationships among FACE and quality of life and hospitalization/dialysis use will also be assessed. This study will be the first longitudinal study of an AIDS-specific model of ACP with adolescents. If successful, this intervention could quickly translate into clinical practice. PMID:22664645

  16. Bedside pediatric emergency evaluation through ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Ann M; Coley, Brian D

    2008-11-01

    Bedside US has emerged as a valuable technology for the emergency department physician. It impacts clinical decision-making and the safety of procedures, and it decreases the time and increases the efficiency for completion of procedures. The portability, accuracy and noninvasive nature of US make it an ideal tool for the trained clinician. Bedside US can improve clinical decision-making for the pediatric patient by helping the clinician to identify critical pathology, direct therapeutic maneuvers and determine the futility of resuscitations. Many pediatric procedures, such as vascular access, lumbar puncture and bladder catheterization, are typically performed blindly. Bedside US enhances the success of procedures, minimizes complications and limits the number of attempts necessary to complete a procedure. Bedside US can be a valuable adjunct for complicated and time-sensitive disease processes such as ectopic pregnancy, testicular torsion and hypovolemia by providing information to guide diagnostic and therapeutic interventions that subsequently improve outcomes. PMID:18810417

  17. Economic evaluation of pediatric influenza immunization program compared with other pediatric immunization programs: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Edward; Begum, Najida; Sigmundsson, Birgir; Sackeyfio, Alfred; Hackett, Judith; Rajaram, Sankarasubramanian

    2016-05-01

    This study compared the economic value of pediatric immunisation programmes for influenza to those for rotavirus (RV), meningococcal disease (MD), pneumococcal disease (PD), human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B (Hep B), and varicella reported in recent (2000 onwards) cost-effectiveness (CE) studies identified in a systematic review of PubMed, health technology, and vaccination databases. The systematic review yielded 51 economic evaluation studies of pediatric immunisation - 10 (20%) for influenza and 41 (80%) for the other selected diseases. The quality of the eligible articles was assessed using Drummond's checklist. Although inherent challenges and limitations exist when comparing economic evaluations of immunisation programmes, an overall comparison of the included studies demonstrated cost-effectiveness/cost saving for influenza from a European-Union-Five (EU5) and United States (US) perspective; point estimates for cost/quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) from dominance (cost-saving with more effect) to ≤45,444 were reported. The economic value of influenza programmes was comparable to the other vaccines of interest, with cost/QALY in general considerably lower than RV, Hep B, MD and PD. Independent of the perspective and type of analysis, the economic impact of a pediatric influenza immunisation program was influenced by vaccine efficacy, immunisation coverage, costs, and most significantly by herd immunity. This review suggests that pediatric influenza immunisation may offer a cost effective strategy when compared with HPV and varicella and possibly more value compared with other childhood vaccines (RV, Hep B, MD and PD). PMID:26837602

  18. Economic evaluation of pediatric influenza immunization program compared with other pediatric immunization programs: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Edward; Begum, Najida; Sigmundsson, Birgir; Sackeyfio, Alfred; Hackett, Judith; Rajaram, Sankarasubramanian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study compared the economic value of pediatric immunisation programmes for influenza to those for rotavirus (RV), meningococcal disease (MD), pneumococcal disease (PD), human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B (Hep B), and varicella reported in recent (2000 onwards) cost-effectiveness (CE) studies identified in a systematic review of PubMed, health technology, and vaccination databases. The systematic review yielded 51 economic evaluation studies of pediatric immunisation — 10 (20%) for influenza and 41 (80%) for the other selected diseases. The quality of the eligible articles was assessed using Drummond's checklist. Although inherent challenges and limitations exist when comparing economic evaluations of immunisation programmes, an overall comparison of the included studies demonstrated cost-effectiveness/cost saving for influenza from a European-Union-Five (EU5) and United States (US) perspective; point estimates for cost/quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) from dominance (cost-saving with more effect) to ≤45,444 were reported. The economic value of influenza programmes was comparable to the other vaccines of interest, with cost/QALY in general considerably lower than RV, Hep B, MD and PD. Independent of the perspective and type of analysis, the economic impact of a pediatric influenza immunisation program was influenced by vaccine efficacy, immunisation coverage, costs, and most significantly by herd immunity. This review suggests that pediatric influenza immunisation may offer a cost effective strategy when compared with HPV and varicella and possibly more value compared with other childhood vaccines (RV, Hep B, MD and PD). PMID:26837602

  19. Development of a pediatric body mass index using longitudinal single-index models.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingwei; Tu, Wanzhu

    2016-04-01

    As a measure of human adiposity, the body mass index, defined as weight/height(2), has been widely used in clinical investigations. For children undergoing pubertal development, whether this function of height and weight represents an optimal way of quantifying body mass for assessing of specific health outcomes has not been carefully studied. In this study, we propose an alternative pediatric body mass measure for prediction of blood pressure based on recorded height and weight data using single-index modeling techniques. Specifically, we present a general form of partially linear single-index mixed effect models for the determination of this new metric. A methodological contribution of this research is the development of an efficient algorithm for the fitting of a general class of partially linear single-index models in longitudinal data situations. The proposed model and related model fitting algorithm are easily implementable in most computational platforms. Simulation demonstrates superior performance of the new method, as compared to the standard body mass index measure. Using the proposed method, we explore an alternative body mass measure for the prediction of blood pressure in children. The method is potentially useful for the construction of other indices for specific investigations. PMID:23302518

  20. Current Trends, Evaluation, and Management of Pediatric Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Joel D; Ellison, Jonathan S; Lendvay, Thomas S

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of pediatric nephrolithiasis has been steadily increasing for the past several decades, with a concomitant concerning increase in health care costs and burden to children with this disease. Recent population-based studies have also demonstrated a change in the current trends of pediatric nephrolithiasis that is characterized by a significant increase in the number of girls now being affected. While changes in diet and lifestyle, obesity prevalence, and even imaging practices have been proposed to contribute to the recent increase in pediatric nephrolithiasis, a definite underlying cause remains elusive. This situation is complicated by the fact that, unlike in adults, the trends occurring in pediatric nephrolithiasis have not been studied rigorously, which contributes to the paucity of data in children. The level of concern with the increasing incidence is raised by factors unique to pediatric nephrolithiasis that could expose an affected child to more complications. Factors such as variable clinical presentation, high recurrence of kidney stones associated with abnormalities of metabolism and the urinary tract, and the possible presence of rare genetic kidney stone diseases would require physicians to comprehensively evaluate patients presenting with kidney stones. The goal of evaluation is to identify modifiable risk factors and abnormalities for which targeted therapy can be prescribed. The goals of medical and surgical treatments are to eliminate the burden of kidney stones and prevent recurrence while simultaneously minimizing complications from interventions. Patients at high risk may benefit from a specialized kidney stone clinic staffed by a pediatric nephrologist, urologist, dietitian, and clinical nurse. Such a multidisciplinary clinic can help provide the medical and surgical support needed for patients at high risk and offer key opportunities to learn more about pediatric nephrolithiasis, thereby fueling the much-needed research in this

  1. Evaluation of an Outreach Activity of Pediatric Clerkship Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parcel, Guy S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    An opportunity for medical students to observe and interact with children in a setting outside the clinical environment was introduced as part of ambulatory pediatric clerkship training. Evaluation of the program indicated its overall effectiveness as well as areas for which changes are suggested. (LBH)

  2. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21 years –17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20 years–19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at pre-irradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. A total of 588 evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (p < .05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and pre-irradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r = .34; p = .01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (p < .05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (p < .05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions There was relative sparing of post-irradiation functional outcomes over time

  3. Longitudinal Investigation of Adaptive Functioning Following Conformal Irradiation for Pediatric Craniopharyngioma and Low-Grade Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Netson, Kelli L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Children treated for brain tumors with conformal radiation therapy experience preserved cognitive outcomes. Early evidence suggests that adaptive functions or independent-living skills may be spared. This longitudinal investigation prospectively examined intellectual and adaptive functioning during the first 5 years following irradiation for childhood craniopharyngioma and low-grade glioma (LGG). The effect of visual impairment on adaptive outcomes was investigated. Methods and Materials: Children with craniopharyngioma (n=62) and LGG (n=77) were treated using conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy. The median age was 8.05 years (3.21-17.64 years) and 8.09 years (2.20-19.27 years), respectively. Serial cognitive evaluations including measures of intelligence quotient (IQ) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS) were conducted at preirradiation baseline, 6 months after treatment, and annually through 5 years. Five hundred eighty-eight evaluations were completed during the follow-up period. Results: Baseline assessment revealed no deficits in IQ and VABS indices for children with craniopharyngioma, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline in VABS Communication and Socialization indices. Clinical factors associated with more rapid decline included females and preirradiation chemotherapy (interferon). The only change in VABS Daily Living Skills correlated with IQ change (r=0.34; P=.01) in children with craniopharyngioma. Children with LGG performed below population norms (P<.05) at baseline on VABS Communication, Daily Living Indices, and the Adaptive Behavior Composite, with significant (P<.05) longitudinal decline limited to VABS Communication. Older age at irradiation was a protective factor against longitudinal decline. Severe visual impairment did not independently correlate with poorer adaptive outcomes for either tumor group. Conclusions: There was relative sparing of postirradiation functional outcomes over time in this sample

  4. Review for the generalist: evaluation of pediatric hip pain

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Kristin M

    2009-01-01

    Hip pathology may cause groin pain, referred thigh or knee pain, refusal to bear weight or altered gait in the absence of pain. A young child with an irritable hip poses a diagnostic challenge. Transient synovitis, one of the most common causes of hip pain in children, must be differentiated from septic arthritis. Hip pain may be caused by conditions unique to the growing pediatric skeleton including Perthes disease, slipped capital femoral epiphysis and apophyseal avulsion fractures of the pelvis. Hip pain may also be referred from low back or pelvic pathology. Evaluation and management requires a thorough history and physical exam, and understanding of the pediatric skeleton. This article will review common causes of hip and pelvic musculoskeletal pain in the pediatric population. PMID:19450281

  5. Concussion evaluation and management in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Robin G; Roberson, Susan P; Whelan, Margaret; Rohan, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Concussions are among the most complex injuries to assess and manage in sports medicine and primary care. Sports concussion in youth has received much attention in recent years because research shows that improperly managed concussion can lead to long-term cognitive deficits and mental health problems. There are several notable risk factors affecting the incidence and severity of concussion in school-age children and adolescents, including a history of a previous concussion. A more conservative approach for return to activities following concussion has been proposed for children and adolescents. Programs of individualized, stepwise increases in physical activity have largely replaced use of algorithms for assigning a grade and activity expectations to concussions. Although validity and reliability testing is ongoing to support use of concussion assessment instruments in pediatric patients, it is practical and appropriate that clinicians incorporate symptom checklists, sideline and balance assessment tools, and neurocognitive assessment instruments into their practice in accordance with evidence-based guidelines. PMID:25494012

  6. Pediatrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  7. Evaluation of pediatric manual wheelchair mobility using advanced biomechanical methods.

    PubMed

    Slavens, Brooke A; Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Aurit, Christine M; Graf, Adam; Krzak, Joseph J; Reiners, Kathryn; Vogel, Lawrence C; Harris, Gerald F

    2015-01-01

    There is minimal research of upper extremity joint dynamics during pediatric wheelchair mobility despite the large number of children using manual wheelchairs. Special concern arises with the pediatric population, particularly in regard to the longer duration of wheelchair use, joint integrity, participation and community integration, and transitional care into adulthood. This study seeks to provide evaluation methods for characterizing the biomechanics of wheelchair use by children with spinal cord injury (SCI). Twelve subjects with SCI underwent motion analysis while they propelled their wheelchair at a self-selected speed and propulsion pattern. Upper extremity joint kinematics, forces, and moments were computed using inverse dynamics methods with our custom model. The glenohumeral joint displayed the largest average range of motion (ROM) at 47.1° in the sagittal plane and the largest average superiorly and anteriorly directed joint forces of 6.1% BW and 6.5% BW, respectively. The largest joint moments were 1.4% body weight times height (BW × H) of elbow flexion and 1.2% BW × H of glenohumeral joint extension. Pediatric manual wheelchair users demonstrating these high joint demands may be at risk for pain and upper limb injuries. These evaluation methods may be a useful tool for clinicians and therapists for pediatric wheelchair prescription and training. PMID:25802860

  8. Predictors of longitudinal outcome and recovery of pragmatic language and its relation to externalizing behaviour after pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Catroppa, Cathy; Beare, Richard; Coleman, Lee; Ditchfield, Michael; Crossley, Louise; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Anderson, Vicki A

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to evaluate the contribution of age-at-insult and brain pathology on longitudinal outcome and recovery of pragmatic language in a sample of children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Children and adolescents with mild to severe TBI (n=112) were categorized according to timing of brain insult: (i) Middle Childhood (5-9 years; n=41); (ii) Late Childhood (10-11 years; n=39); and (iii) Adolescence (12-15 years; n=32) and group-matched for age, gender and socio-economic status (SES) to a typically developing (TD) control group (n=43). Participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including a susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) sequence 2-8 weeks after injury and were assessed on measures of pragmatic language and behavioural functioning at 6- and 24-months after injury. Children and adolescents with TBI of all severity levels demonstrated impairments in these domains at 6-months injury before returning to age-expected levels at 2-years post-TBI. However, while adolescent TBI was associated with post-acute disruption to skills that preceded recovery to age-expected levels by 2-years post injury, the middle childhood TBI group demonstrated impairments at 6-months post-injury that were maintained at 2-year follow up. Reduced pragmatic communication was associated with frontal, temporal and corpus callosum lesions, as well as more frequent externalizing behaviour at 24-months post injury. Findings show that persisting pragmatic language impairment after pediatric TBI is related to younger age at brain insult, as well as microhemorrhagic pathology in brain regions that contribute to the anatomically distributed social brain network. Relationships between reduced pragmatic communication and more frequent externalizing behavior underscore the need for context-sensitive rehabilitation programs that aim to increase interpersonal effectiveness and reduce risk for maladaptive behavior trajectories into the

  9. Best practices in the pediatric pretransplant psychosocial evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitz, Debra S; Fitzgerald, Christopher J; Zelikovsky, Nataliya; Barlow, Katherine; Wray, Jo

    2014-06-01

    Assessment of psychosocial functioning is an often-included component of the pretransplant evaluation process. This study reviews several domains of assessment that have been related to post-transplant outcomes across solid organ transplant populations. These include evaluation of patient and family past adherence, knowledge about the transplantation process, and their neurocognitive, psychological, and family functioning. To date, few comprehensive pretransplant evaluation measures have been standardized for use with children; however, several assessment measures used to evaluate the aforementioned domains are reviewed throughout the study. Additionally, this article discusses some developmental, illness-specific, and cultural considerations in conducting the psychosocial evaluation. We also discuss ethical issues specific to the pediatric psychosocial evaluation. Recommendations are advanced to promote a comprehensive evaluation that identifies family strengths and risk factors as they begin the transplant journey. PMID:24802341

  10. Evaluation of forensic cases admitted to pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Duramaz, Burcu Bursal; Yıldırım, Hamdi Murat; Kıhtır, Hasan Serdar; Yeşilbaş, Osman; Şevketoğlu, Esra

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to determine the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of pediatric forensic cases to contribute to the literature and to preventive health care services. Material and Methods: Pediatric forensic cases hospitalized in our pediatric intensive care unit below the age of 17 years were reviewed retrospectively (January 2009–June 2014) . The patients were evaluated in two groups as physical traumas (Group A) and poisonings (Group B). The patients’ age, gender, complaints at presentation, time of presentation and referral (season, time) and, mortality rates were determined. Cases of physical trauma (Group A) were classified as traffic accidents, falling down from height, falling of device, drowning, electric shock, burns and child abuse. Poisonings (Group B) were classified as pharmaceuticals, pesticides, other chemicals and unknown drug poisonings. Results: Two hundred twenthy cases were included. The mean age was 5.1+3.1 years. One hundred fifteen (%52.5) of the cases were male and 105 (%47.5) were female. Group A consisted of 62 patients and Group B consisted of 158 patients. The patients presented most frequently in summer months. The most common reason for presentation was falling down from height (12.7%) in Group A and accidental drug poisoning (most frequently antidepressants) in Group B. The mortality rate was 5%. Conclusion: Forensic cases in the pediatric population (physical trauma and poisoning) are preventable health problems. Especially, preventive approach to improve the environment for falling down from height must be a priority. Increasing the awareness of families and the community on this issue, in summer months during which forensic cases are observed most frequently can contribute to a reduction in the number of cases. PMID:26568689

  11. Evaluation of Vancomycin Dosing in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Jennifer L.; Moonnumakal, Siby P.; Baker, Carol J.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients' sputa is associated with a decline in pulmonary function and increased mortality. Vancomycin is the preferred treatment for MRSA pneumonia in children. No published studies have evaluated the vancomycin dose needed to achieve goal vancomycin trough concentrations (VTCs; 15–20 mg/L) in pediatric patients with CF. The primary objective is to determine whether a vancomycin dosage of 60 mg/kg/day achieves a goal VTC in pediatric CF patients. Secondary objectives include determining the average dosage required to reach a goal VTC and the impact of achieving a goal VTC on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and pulmonary function. METHODS: A retrospective review of pediatric patients with CF who received vancomycin was conducted. RESULTS: A total of 90 vancomycin treatment courses were analyzed. Standard vancomycin dosing (60 mg/kg/day) achieved goal VTC in 11 courses (12.2%). The mean dosage required to achieve a goal VTC for all courses was 70.6 ± 16.7 mg/kg/day. Patients who achieved goal VTCs were more often older, weighed more, and had higher serum creatinine concentrations at therapy initiation. On average, a dosage of 70.6 mg/kg/day was required to achieve a goal VTC. Despite dosages up to 120 mg/kg/day, no significant changes in renal function occurred. Achieving a goal VTC had no significant impact on eGFR or pulmonary function during therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Vancomycin dosing of 60 mg/kg/day does not reliably achieve a VTC of 15 to 20 mg/L in pediatric CF patients. Younger CF patients may require higher vancomycin doses. PMID:27199623

  12. Transthoracic echocardiography in the evaluation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension and ventricular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Friedberg, Mark K.; Nestaas, Eirik; Michel-Behnke, Ina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the most accessible noninvasive diagnostic procedure for the initial assessment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH). This review focuses on principles and use of TTE to determine morphologic and functional parameters that are also useful for follow-up investigations in pediatric PH patients. A basic echocardiographic study of a patient with PH commonly includes the hemodynamic calculation of the systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), the mean and diastolic PAP, the pulmonary artery acceleration time, and the presence of a pericardial effusion. A more detailed TTE investigation of the right ventricle (RV) includes assessment of its size and function. RV function can be evaluated by RV longitudinal systolic performance (e.g., tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion), the tricuspid regurgitation velocity/right ventricular outflow tract velocity time integral ratio, the fractional area change, tissue Doppler imaging–derived parameters, strain measurements, the systolic-to-diastolic duration ratio, the myocardial performance (Tei) index, the RV/left ventricle (LV) diameter ratio, the LV eccentricity index, determination of an enlarged right atrium and RV size, and RV volume determination by 3-dimensional echocardiography. Here, we discuss the potential use and limitations of TTE techniques in children with PH and/or ventricular dysfunction. We suggest a protocol for TTE assessment of PH and myocardial function that helps to identify PH patients and their response to pharmacotherapy. The outlined protocol focuses on the detailed assessment of the hypertensive RV; RV-LV crosstalk must be analyzed separately in the evaluation of different pathologies that account for pediatric PH. PMID:27162612

  13. Transthoracic echocardiography in the evaluation of pediatric pulmonary hypertension and ventricular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Koestenberger, Martin; Friedberg, Mark K; Nestaas, Eirik; Michel-Behnke, Ina; Hansmann, Georg

    2016-03-01

    Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the most accessible noninvasive diagnostic procedure for the initial assessment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension (PH). This review focuses on principles and use of TTE to determine morphologic and functional parameters that are also useful for follow-up investigations in pediatric PH patients. A basic echocardiographic study of a patient with PH commonly includes the hemodynamic calculation of the systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), the mean and diastolic PAP, the pulmonary artery acceleration time, and the presence of a pericardial effusion. A more detailed TTE investigation of the right ventricle (RV) includes assessment of its size and function. RV function can be evaluated by RV longitudinal systolic performance (e.g., tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion), the tricuspid regurgitation velocity/right ventricular outflow tract velocity time integral ratio, the fractional area change, tissue Doppler imaging-derived parameters, strain measurements, the systolic-to-diastolic duration ratio, the myocardial performance (Tei) index, the RV/left ventricle (LV) diameter ratio, the LV eccentricity index, determination of an enlarged right atrium and RV size, and RV volume determination by 3-dimensional echocardiography. Here, we discuss the potential use and limitations of TTE techniques in children with PH and/or ventricular dysfunction. We suggest a protocol for TTE assessment of PH and myocardial function that helps to identify PH patients and their response to pharmacotherapy. The outlined protocol focuses on the detailed assessment of the hypertensive RV; RV-LV crosstalk must be analyzed separately in the evaluation of different pathologies that account for pediatric PH. PMID:27162612

  14. Treating Technophobia: A Longitudinal Evaluation of the Computerphobia Reduction Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Larry D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes a longitudinal evaluation of the five-week Computerphobia Reduction Program designed to reduce anxiety in the use of computers. Discusses methodology, evaluation measures, selection of clients, therapies offered, and results, which showed the intervention strategies to be successful in reducing computer anxiety over the long term. (28…

  15. Evaluating Digital Libraries: A Longitudinal and Multifaceted View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchionini, Gary

    2000-01-01

    The Perseus Digital Library (PDL), under continuous development since 1987, is one of the primary digital resources for the humanities. A summary of the PDL genesis and current status is given and the multifaceted and longitudinal evaluation effort is described. A brief synthesis of results is provided and reflections on the evaluation along with…

  16. Longitudinal DXA Studies: Minimum scanning interval for pediatric assessment of body fat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The increased prevalence of obesity in the United States, has led to the increased use of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for assessment of body fat mass (TBF) in pediatric populations. We examined DXA precision, in order to determine suitable scanning intervals for the measurement of change...

  17. Fun and fit: evaluation of a pediatric exercise program.

    PubMed

    Gruenfeld, Elizabeth A; Zagarins, Sofija E; Walker, Allison P; Skinner, Sandra S

    2013-01-01

    While the components of effective pediatric exercise interventions have been identified in structured research settings, recent reviews have highlighted the need for translating these interventions into accessible programs. In this paper we evaluate a behavioral intervention-based exercise program designed to serve community children and teens at risk for adult obesity. Measures of weight, strength, cardiovascular fitness, and exercise intensity improved significantly over the course of this program, and qualitative assessments indicated that attitudes towards exercise also improved. Our experiences suggest that structured, protocol-driven exercise interventions can be successfully translated into effective programs accessible to children of different ages and socioeconomic levels. PMID:23531461

  18. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Brighter Futures Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emihovich, Catherine; Davis, Terry

    This report provides information on the longitudinal evaluation of the Brighter Futures program in Florida, a teen pregnancy prevention program which created support groups for mothers age 16 and younger in order to prevent their having second pregnancies. Other program goals were to ensure that the girls finish high school and plan for a career,…

  19. Integration in Evanston, 1967-71: A Longitudinal Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsia, Jayjia

    In order to answer questions about the impact of desegregation upon the academic achievement and attitude of pupils and reactions of teachers, parents, and the community, longitudinal evaluation plans were adopted. The primary subjects were the 10,981 pupils who ranged from kindergarten through grade 8 in September 1967, at the start of complete…

  20. An Evaluation of PET Based on Longitudinal Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandeville, Garrett K.

    Although teacher inservice programs based on Madeline Hunter's Program for Effective Teaching (PET) have become very popular in U.S. schools, there is little evidence that the Hunter model ultimately results in increased student achievement. This longitudinal study attempts to evaluate the effects of Hunter-based staff development programs on…

  1. Evaluating the Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) System for Admitted Patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Delia L.; Mihalov, Leslie K.; Cohen, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) systems were developed to provide a reproducible assessment of a child’s clinical status while hospitalized. Most studies investigating the PEWS evaluate its usefulness in the inpatient setting. Limited studies evaluate the effectiveness and integration of PEWS in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to explore the test characteristics of an ED-assigned PEWS score for intensive care unit (ICU) admission or clinical deterioration in admitted patients. Methods This was a prospective 12-month observational study of patients, aged 0 to 21 years, admitted from the ED of an urban, tertiary care children’s hospital. ED nurses were instructed in PEWS assignment and electronic medical record (EMR) documentation. Interrater reliability between nurses was evaluated. PEWS scores were measured at initial assessment (P0) and time of admission (P1). Patients were stratified into outcome groups: those admitted to the ICU either from the ED or as transfers from the floor and those admitted to the floor only. Clinical deterioration was defined as transfer to the ICU within 6 hours or within 6 to 24 hours of admission. PEWS scores and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were compared for patients admitted to the floor, ICU, and with clinical deterioration. Results The authors evaluated 12,306 consecutively admitted patients, with 99% having a PEWS documented in the EMR. Interrater reliability was excellent (intraclass coefficient 0.91). A total of 1,300 (10.6%) patients were admitted to the ICU and 11,066 (89.4%) were admitted to the floor. PEWS scores were higher for patients in the ICU group (P0 = 2.8, SD ± 2.4; P1 = 3.2, SD ± 2.4; p < 0.0001) versus floor patients (P0 = 0.7, SD ± 1.2; P1 = 0.5, SD ± 0.9; p < 0.0001). To predict the need for ICU admission, the optimal cutoff points on the ROC are P0 = 1 and P1 = 2, with areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of 0.79 and 0

  2. Comparison of the validity of direct pediatric developmental evaluation versus developmental screening by parent report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare the validity of direct pediatric developmental evaluation with developmental screening by parent report, parents completed a developmental screen (the Child Development Review), a pediatrician performed a direct developmental evaluation (Capute Scales), and a psychologist administered the...

  3. Review for the generalist: evaluation of pediatric foot and ankle pain

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, Kristin M

    2008-01-01

    Foot and ankle pain is common in children and adolescents. Problems are usually related to skeletal maturity and are fairly specific to the age of the child. Evaluation and management is challenging and requires a thorough history and physical exam, and understanding of the pediatric skeleton. This article will review common causes of foot and ankle pain in the pediatric population. PMID:18400098

  4. Determinants and Regression Equations for the Calculation of z Scores of Left Ventricular Tissue Doppler Longitudinal Indexes in a Healthy Italian Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Fibbi, Veronica; Ballo, Piercarlo; Spaziani, Gaia; Calabri, Giovanni B.; Pollini, Iva; Zuppiroli, Alfredo; Chiappa, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Aim. We investigated the predictors of tissue Doppler left ventricular (LV) longitudinal indexes in a healthy Italian pediatric population and established normative data and regression equations for the calculation of z scores. Methods and Results. A total of 369 healthy subjects aged 1–17 years (age of 6.4 ± 1.1 years, 49.1% female) underwent echocardiography. LV peak longitudinal velocity at systole (s'), early diastole (e'), and late diastole (a') was determined by tissue Doppler. The ratio of peak early diastolic LV filling velocity to e' was calculated. Age was the only independent determinant of s' (β = 0.491, p < 0.0001) and the strongest determinant of e' (β = 0.334, p < 0.0001) and E/e' (β = −0.369, p < 0.0001). Heart rate was the main determinant of a' (β = 0.265, p < 0.0001). Male gender showed no effects except for a weak association with lateral s', suggesting no need of gender-specific reference ranges. Age-specific reference ranges, regression equations, and scatterplots for the calculation of z scores were determined for each index. Conclusion. In a pediatric Italian population, age was the strongest determinant of LV longitudinal dynamics. The availability of age-specific normality data for the calculation of z scores may allow for correctly detecting LV dysfunction in pediatric pathological populations. PMID:26759729

  5. Longitudinal evaluation of a live interactive video baccalaureate nursing program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Pam; Klotz, Linda; Alfred, Danita

    2007-01-01

    Beginning with a brief history of a community-inspired distance education initiative, the authors describe how one college of nursing offers an entire generic bachelor of science in nursing program over live interactive video for nursing students at 2 distance sites. The 10-year longitudinal evaluation of student and program outcomes is presented. Student and program success is evidenced by congruence of grades and National Council Licensure Exam (NCLEX) pass rates between sites. PMID:17220768

  6. [Clinical evaluation of faropenem against infections in pediatric fields].

    PubMed

    Sunakawa, K; Satoh, Y; Iwata, S; Terashima, I; Meguro, H; Kusumoto, Y; Kato, T; Akita, H; Goshima, T; Yokota, T; Toyonaga, Y; Ishihara, T; Kanemura, H; Iwai, N; Nakamura, H; Nakashima, M

    1997-09-01

    The recent increases in the prevalence of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae becomes a point at issue clinically. We carried out a clinical study in 40 cases in the pediatrics department, as faropenem (FRPM) was proved to have an excellent antimicrobial activity against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. The study was planned to investigate in detail the movement of stools that had been a problem in a clinical development studies out before. In this study, an observation of the daily movement of stools was one of the principal evaluation items, hence the patients were divided into two groups. One group (S-group) were administered FRPM only, the other group (E-group) were administered FRPM in combination with a medicine for intestinal disorders (Enteronon-R). An observed frequencies of any loose bowel movements were 94.7% in S-group, and 63.2% in E-group, hence the study suggested that the combination drug was effective. The patients observed higher frequencies of development of the movement of stools, all of them were recovered from in the course of administration or within 4 days after administration, however whether or not being treated symptomatic therapy. Clinical efficacy rates of FRPM on mainly respiratory infections were 94.6%. In this study, 4 strains (patients) of penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae were isolated. Against penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, FRPM demonstrated more potent antibacterial activity than the oral penicillins and cephems tested here except cefditoren. Clinical efficacies was deemed effective in all of the 4 cases, and bacteriologically, 3 organisms were eradicated. As for side effects including diarrhea and loose stool, no serious side effects were observed. Based on the above results, FRPM is effective against most infections in the pediatric field which Streptococcus pneumoniae are isolated at high frequencies highly, and is considered to cases in be useful an attention will have to be

  7. Effects of pediatric first aid training on preschool teachers: a longitudinal cohort study in China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Unintentional injuries are a major cause of death among children. Data suggest that the retention of knowledge and skills about first aid declined over time. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of pediatric first aid training among teachers. Methods A stratified random sampling method was used to select 1,067 teachers. The selected trainees received pediatric first aid training. Follow-up assessments were conducted 6 months, 9 months and 4 years following the training. A standardized collection of demographics was performed, and participants were given a questionnaire to indicate knowledge of and emotions about first aid. Results In the pretest, 1067 people responded with a mean of 21.0 correct answers to 37 questions, whereas in the post-test period, the mean score increased to 32.2 correct answers of 37 questions (P <0.001). There was a decrease in scores from post-test to 6 months, 9 months and 4 years after the training. However, the mean at the 6-month, 9-month and 4-year marks were higher than the pretest mean (P < 0.001). A total of 82.8% of the participants achieved a pass mark of 80% or above; 42.8% of participants achieved the pass mark at 6 months, 41.7% at 9 months and 11.7% at 4 years (compared with pre-test, P < 0.001). The mean score of the subjects’ emotions in the post-test period increased to 81 (P < 0.001). The mean scores of emotions at 9 months or 4 years were higher than the pretest mean (P < 0.001). At the 4-year mark, the majority of preschool staff (>70%) had administered correct first aid for injuries. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the acquisition of knowledge, both short and long term, significantly improves. Despite appreciable decreases in knowledge long term, knowledge retention was modest but stable. PMID:25152013

  8. Executive functions after pediatric mild traumatic brain injury: a prospective short-term longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Loher, Sarah; Fatzer, Simone T; Roebers, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur frequently in childhood and entail broad cognitive deficits, particularly in the domain of executive functions (EF). Concerning mild TBI (mTBI), only little empirical evidence is available on acute and postacute performance in EF. Given that EF are linked to school adaptation and achievement, even subtle deficits in performance may affect children's academic careers. The present study assessed performance in the EF components of inhibition, working memory (WM), and switching in children after mTBI. Regarding both acute and postacute consequences, performance trajectories were measured in 13 patients aged between 5 and 10 years and 13 controls who were closely matched in terms of sex, age, and education. Performance in the EF components of inhibition, switching, and WM was assessed in a short-term longitudinal design at 2, 6, and 12 weeks after the mTBI. Results indicate subtle deficits after mTBI, which became apparent in the longitudinal trajectory in the EF components of switching and WM. Compared with controls, children who sustained mTBI displayed an inferior performance enhancement across testing sessions in the first 6 weeks after the injury in switching and WM, resulting in a delayed deficit in the EF component of WM 12 weeks after the injury. Results are interpreted as mTBI-related deficits that become evident in terms of an inability to profit from previous learning opportunities, a finding that is potentially important for children's mastery of their daily lives. PMID:24716869

  9. Central line-associated blood stream infections in pediatric ICUs: Longitudinal trends and compliance with bundle strategies

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jeffrey D; Herzig, Carolyn TA; Liu, Hangsheng; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Zachariah, Philip; Dick, Andrew W; Saiman, Lisa; Stone, Patricia W; Furuya, E Yoko

    2015-01-01

    Background Knowing the temporal trend central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates among U.S. pediatric intensive care units (PICU), the current extent of CL bundle compliance, and the impact of compliance on rates is necessary to understand what has been accomplished and can be improved in CLABSI prevention. Methods Longitudinal study of PICUs in National Healthcare Safety Network hospitals and a cross-sectional survey of directors/managers of infection prevention & control departments regarding PICU CLABSI prevention practices, including self-reported compliance with elements of central line bundles. Associations between 2011/12 PICU CLABSI rates and infection prevention practices were examined. Results Reported CLABSI rates decreased during the study period, from 5.8 per 1000 line days in 2006 to 1.4 in 2011/12 (P<0.001). While 73% of PICUs had policies for all central line prevention practices, only 35% of those with policies reported ≥95% compliance. PICUs with ≥95% compliance with central line infection prevention policies had lower reported CLABSI rates, but this association was statistically insignificant. Conclusions There was a non-significant trend in decreasing CLABSI rates as PICUs improved bundle policy compliance. Given that few PICUs reported full compliance with these policies, PICUs increasing their efforts to comply with these policies may help reduce CLABSI rates. PMID:25952048

  10. Longitudinal renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients: 20-years experience.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Punkaj; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Gardner, Megan; Bryant, Janet C; Noel, Tommy R; Knecht, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    This study was initiated to assess the temporal trends of renal function, and define risk factors associated with worsening renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients in the immediate post-operative period. We performed a single-center retrospective study in children ≤18 yr receiving OHT (1993-2012). The AKIN's validated, three-tiered AKI staging system was used to categorize the degree of WRF. One hundred sixty-four patients qualified for inclusion. Forty-seven patients (28%) were classified as having WRF after OHT. Nineteen patients (11%) required dialysis after heart transplantation. There was a sustained and steady improvement in renal function in children following heart transplantation in all age groups, irrespective of underlying disease process. The significant factors associated with risk of WRF included body surface area (OR: 1.89 for 0.5 unit increase, 95% CI: 1.29-2.76, p = 0.001) and use of ECMO prior to and/or after heart transplantation (OR: 3.50, 95% CI: 1.51-8.13, p = 0.004). Use of VAD prior to heart transplantation was not associated with WRF (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.17-1.51, p = 0.22). On the basis of these data, we demonstrate that worsening renal function improves early after orthotopic heart transplantation. PMID:25484128

  11. Evaluation of entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, L.; Lunelli, N.; Paschuk, S.; Oliveira, A.; Ferreira, J. L.; Schelin, H.; Miguel, C.; Denyak, V.; Kmiecik, C.; Tilly, J.; Khoury, H.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the entrance surface air kerma in pediatric chest radiography. An evaluation of 301 radiographical examinations in anterior-posterior (AP) and posterior-anterior (PA) (166 examinations) and lateral (LAT) (135 examinations) projections was performed. The analyses were performed on patients grouped by age; the groups included ages 0-1 y, 1-5 y, 5-10 y, and 10-15 y. The entrance surface air kerma was determined with DoseCal software (Radiological Protection Center of Saint George's Hospital, London) and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Two different exposure techniques were compared. The doses received by patients who had undergone LAT examinations were 40% higher, on average, those in AP/PA examinations because of the difference in tube voltage. A large high-dose “tail” was observed for children up to 5 y old. An increase in tube potential and corresponding decrease in current lead to a significant dose reduction. The difference between the average dose values for different age ranges was not practically observed, implying that the exposure techniques are still not optimal. Exposure doses received using the higher tube voltage and lower current-time product correspond to the international diagnostic reference levels.

  12. Adverse health events and late mortality after pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic SCT-two decades of longitudinal follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmsson, M; Vatanen, A; Borgström, B; Gustafsson, B; Taskinen, M; Saarinen-Pihkala, U M; Winiarski, J; Jahnukainen, K

    2015-06-01

    Treatment-related late toxicities after pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT) are increasingly important as long-term survival has become an expected outcome for many transplanted children and adolescents. In a retrospective cohort study, we assessed long-term health outcomes in 204 allo-HSCT survivors transplanted in childhood or adolescence (<20 years) between 1978 through 2000 after a median follow-up time of 12 (range 4-28) years. Data on conditioning regimen, adverse health events (AE) and growth and hormonal substitutions (hormone replacement therapies (HRTs)) were obtained from medical records. AEs were graded retrospectively according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0. Late deaths (⩾48 months after allo-HSCT) were evaluated separately. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that chronic GVHD (P<0.000) and longer follow-up time (P<0.05) correlated with AEs, whereas CY-based conditioning was inversely correlated (P<0.002). TBI and longer follow-up duration predicted more severe AEs (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). HRTs were more frequent after TBI. Diabetes type II, dyslipidemia and hypertension were detected in 9, 7 and 7% of the survivors, respectively. Late deaths (n=22) were most frequently due to pulmonary failure (n=7), followed by secondary malignancy (n=5). The occurrence of AEs after pediatric allo-HSCT is high and likely to increase during extended follow-up, particularly in patients who have received TBI. PMID:25798676

  13. Importance of genetic evaluation and testing in pediatric cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M

    2014-11-26

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are clinically heterogeneous heart muscle disorders that are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality. Phenotypes include hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy, restrictive cardiomyopathy, left ventricular noncompaction and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. There is substantial evidence for a genetic contribution to pediatric cardiomyopathy. To date, more than 100 genes have been implicated in cardiomyopathy, but comprehensive genetic diagnosis has been problematic because of the large number of genes, the private nature of mutations, and difficulties in interpreting novel rare variants. This review will focus on current knowledge on the genetic etiologies of pediatric cardiomyopathy and their diagnostic relevance in clinical settings. Recent developments in sequencing technologies are greatly impacting the pace of gene discovery and clinical diagnosis. Understanding the genetic basis for pediatric cardiomyopathy and establishing genotype-phenotype correlations may help delineate the molecular and cellular events necessary to identify potential novel therapeutic targets for heart muscle dysfunction in children. PMID:25429328

  14. Evaluation of adult aphasics with the Pediatric Speech Intelligibility test.

    PubMed

    Jerger, S; Oliver, T A; Martin, R C

    1990-04-01

    Results of conventional adult speech audiometry may be compromised by the presence of speech/language disorders, such as aphasia. The purpose of this project was to determine the efficacy of the speech intelligibility materials and techniques developed for young children in evaluating central auditory function in aphasic adults. Eight adult aphasics were evaluated with the Pediatric Speech Intelligibility (PSI) test, a picture-pointing approach that was carefully developed to be relatively insensitive to linguistic-cognitive skills and relatively sensitive to auditory-perceptual function. Results on message-to-competition ratio (MCR) functions or performance-intensity (PI) functions were abnormal in all subjects. Most subjects served as their own controls, showing normal performance on one ear coupled with abnormal performance on the other ear. The patterns of abnormalities were consistent with the patterns seen (1) on conventional speech audiometry in brain-lesioned adults without aphasia and (2) on the PSI test in brain-lesioned children without aphasia. An exception to this general observation was an atypical pattern of abnormality on PI-function testing in the subgroup of nonfluent aphasics. The nonfluent subjects showed substantially poorer word-max scores than sentence-max scores, a pattern seen previously in only one other patient group, namely young children with recurrent otitis media. The unusually depressed word-max abnormality was not meaningfully related to clinical diagnostic data regarding the degree of hearing loss and the location and severity of the lesions or to experimental data regarding the integrity of phonologic processing abilities. The observations of ear-specific and condition-specific abnormalities suggest that the linguistically- and cognitively-simplified PSI test may be useful in the evaluation of auditory-specific deficits in the aphasic adult. PMID:2132591

  15. Analysis of longitudinal data to evaluate a policy change.

    PubMed

    French, Benjamin; Heagerty, Patrick J

    2008-10-30

    Longitudinal data analysis methods are powerful tools for exploring scientific questions regarding change and are well suited to evaluate the impact of a new policy. However, there are challenging aspects of policy change data that require consideration, such as defining comparison groups, separating the effect of time from that of the policy, and accounting for heterogeneity in the policy effect. We compare currently available methods to evaluate a policy change and illustrate issues specific to a policy change analysis via a case study of laws that eliminate gun-use restrictions (shall-issue laws) and firearm-related homicide. We obtain homicide rate ratios estimating the effect of enacting a shall-issue law, which vary between 0.903 and 1.101. We conclude that in a policy change analysis it is essential to select a mean model that most accurately characterizes the anticipated effect of the policy intervention, thoroughly model temporal trends, and select methods that accommodate unit-specific policy effects. We also conclude that several longitudinal data analysis methods are useful to evaluate a policy change, but not all may be appropriate in certain contexts. Analysts must carefully decide which methods are appropriate for their application and must be aware of the differences between methods to select a procedure that generates valid inference. PMID:18618416

  16. Analysis of Longitudinal Data to Evaluate a Policy Change

    PubMed Central

    French, Benjamin; Heagerty, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    Longitudinal data analysis methods are powerful tools for exploring scientific questions regarding change and are well-suited to evaluate the impact of a new policy. However, there are challenging aspects of policy change data that require consideration, such as defining comparison groups, separating the effect of time from that of the policy, and accounting for heterogeneity in the policy effect. We compare currently available methods to evaluate a policy change and illustrate issues specific to a policy change analysis via a case study of laws that eliminate gun-use restrictions (shall-issue laws) and firearm-related homicide. We obtain homicide rate ratios estimating the effect of enacting a shall-issue law that vary between 0.903 and 1.101. We conclude that in a policy change analysis it is essential to select a mean model that most accurately characterizes the anticipated effect of the policy intervention, thoroughly model temporal trends, and select methods that accommodate unit-specific policy effects. We also conclude that several longitudinal data analysis methods are useful to evaluate a policy change, but not all may be appropriate in certain contexts. Analysts must carefully decide which methods are appropriate for their application and must be aware of the differences between methods to select a procedure that generates valid inference. PMID:18618416

  17. A Longitudinal Study of Growth and Relation With Anemia and Iron Overload in Pediatric Patients With Transfusion-dependent Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Nokeaingtong, Kwannapas; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Silvilairat, Suchaya; Saekho, Suwit; Pongprot, Yupada; Dejkhamron, Prapai

    2016-08-01

    Short stature is one of the most common endocrinopathies in transfusion-dependent thalassemia (TDT). This study aimed to determine the longitudinal pattern of growth in pediatric patients with TDT and study the relationship between growth and hemoglobin level, serum ferritin level/iron overload parameters, and other clinical factors. The interval height-for-age Z-scores (HAZ) of 50 patients with TDT, of a mean age of 13.3±2.8 years, were analyzed using linear mixed model analysis. Nineteen patients (38%) had short stature with HAZ≤-2.0. The prevalence of short stature increased with age. The estimated mean HAZ decreased by 0.19 SD per year from the age of 5 years until approximately 14 years (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.22 to -0.16, P<0.001). Male sex (estimate, -0.28; 95% CI, -0.43 to -0.14; P<0.001), mean 3-year hemoglobin level ≤8 g/dL (estimate, -0.36; 95% CI, -0.53 to -0.19; P<0.001), mean 3-year ferritin level ≥1800 ng/mL (estimate, -0.44; 95% CI, -0.59 to -0.29; P<0.001), and cardiac T2* ≤20 ms (estimate, -1.05; 95% CI, -1.34 to -0.77; P<0.001) were significantly associated with short stature. In conclusion, short stature in patients with TDT is common and relates significantly with increasing age, male sex, hemoglobin level, and iron overload status. PMID:27438019

  18. Specialized Pediatric Palliative Home Care: A Prospective Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Borasio, Gian Domenico; Nickolay, Carla; Bender, Hans-Ulrich; von Lüttichau, Irene; Führer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: In Germany since 2007 children with advanced life-limiting diseases are eligible for Pediatric Palliative Home Care (PPHC), which is provided by newly established specialized PPHC teams. The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptance and effectiveness of PPHC as perceived by the parents. Methods: Parents of children treated by the PPHC team based at the Munich University Hospital were eligible for this prospective nonrandomized study. The main topics of the two surveys (before and after involvement of the PPHC team) were the assessment of symptom control and quality of life (QoL) in children; and the parents' satisfaction with care, burden of patient care (Häusliche Pflegeskala, home care scale, HPS), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, HADS), and QoL (Quality of Life in Life-Threatening Illness–Family Carer Version, QOLLTI-F). Results: Of 43 families newly admitted to PPHC between April 2011 and June 2012, 40 were included in the study. The median interval between the first and second interview was 8.0 weeks. The involvement of the PPHC team led to a significant improvement of children's symptoms and QoL (P<0.001) as perceived by the parents; and the parents' own QoL and burden relief significantly increased (QOLLTI-F, P<0.001; 7-point change on a 10-point scale), while their psychological distress and burden significantly decreased (HADS, P<0.001; HPS, P<0.001). Conclusions: The involvement of specialized PPHC appears to lead to a substantial improvement in QoL of children and their parents, as experienced by the parents, and to lower the burden of home care for the parents of severely ill children. PMID:24168349

  19. The Latent Curve ARMA (P, Q) Panel Model: Longitudinal Data Analysis in Educational Research and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sivo, Stephen; Fan, Xitao

    2008-01-01

    Autocorrelated residuals in longitudinal data are widely reported as common to longitudinal data. Yet few, if any, researchers modeling growth processes evaluate a priori whether their data have this feature. Sivo, Fan, and Witta (2005) found that not modeling autocorrelated residuals present in longitudinal data severely biases latent curve…

  20. Thinking beyond Measurement, Description and Judgment: Fourth Generation Evaluation in Family-Centered Pediatric Healthcare Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Katherine Ann; Clarkin, Chantalle Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although pediatric healthcare organizations have widely implemented the philosophy of family-centered care (FCC), evaluators and health professionals have not explored how to preserve the philosophy of FCC in evaluation processes. Purpose: To illustrate how fourth generation evaluation, in theory, could facilitate collaboration between…

  1. Approaches for Assessing Risks to Sensitive Populations: Lessons Learned from Evaluating Risks in the Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Ronald N.; Sargent, Dana; Autrup, Herman; Birnbaum, Linda S.; Brent, Robert L.; Doerrer, Nancy G.; Cohen Hubal, Elaine A.; Juberg, Daland R.; Laurent, Christian; Luebke, Robert; Olejniczak, Klaus; Portier, Christopher J.; Slikker, William

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the risk profiles of potentially sensitive populations requires a “tool chest” of methodological approaches to adequately characterize and evaluate these populations. At present, there is an extensive body of literature on methodologies that apply to the evaluation of the pediatric population. The Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Subcommittee on Risk Assessment of Sensitive Populations evaluated key references in the area of pediatric risk to identify a spectrum of methodological approaches. These approaches are considered in this article for their potential to be extrapolated for the identification and assessment of other sensitive populations. Recommendations as to future research needs and/or alternate methodological considerations are also made. PMID:19770482

  2. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, A.; Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck SSSE coefficient of 2.8 × 10 - 7 V K-1.

  3. Longitudinal bioimpedance assessments to evaluate hydration in POEMS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, Amara Callistus; Morris, Lauren; Mayland, Catriona; Mason, Stephen; Pettitt, Andrew; Ellershaw, John

    2016-09-01

    Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with an underlying plasma cell dyscrasia and multiorgan failure. POEMS syndrome is potentially fatal and adversely affects quality of life. Oedema is common with many patients affected by pleural effusions, ascites and lower limb oedema. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) is a non-invasive assessment tool, which enables rapid bedside assessments of nutrition and hydration. This paper describes the use of sequential BIVA assessments to evaluate the response to diuretic therapy in a woman aged 52 years with POEMS syndrome. This case illustrates the potential to use BIVA to conduct longitudinal assessments of hydration status. This provides opportunities for further research using BIVA to monitor hydration and response to interventions. This may be useful in specific situations, for example at the end of life. PMID:27125269

  4. Longitudinal bioimpedance assessments to evaluate hydration in POEMS syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Lauren; Mayland, Catriona; Mason, Stephen; Pettitt, Andrew; Ellershaw, John

    2016-01-01

    Polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein and skin changes (POEMS) syndrome is a rare paraneoplastic disorder associated with an underlying plasma cell dyscrasia and multiorgan failure. POEMS syndrome is potentially fatal and adversely affects quality of life. Oedema is common with many patients affected by pleural effusions, ascites and lower limb oedema. Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) is a non-invasive assessment tool, which enables rapid bedside assessments of nutrition and hydration. This paper describes the use of sequential BIVA assessments to evaluate the response to diuretic therapy in a woman aged 52 years with POEMS syndrome. This case illustrates the potential to use BIVA to conduct longitudinal assessments of hydration status. This provides opportunities for further research using BIVA to monitor hydration and response to interventions. This may be useful in specific situations, for example at the end of life. PMID:27125269

  5. Initial experience with a juvenile sheep model for evaluation of the pediatric intracorporeal ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xufeng; Li, Tieluo; Sanchez, Pablo; Watkins, Amelia; Li, Shuying; DeFilippi, Christopher; Wu, Zhongjun J.; Griffith, Bartley P

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a scarcity of source material available in animal models appropriate to test pediatric-size blood pump design for assisting the left ventricle. A juvenile ovine animal model was developed to evaluate two pediatric ventricular assist devices (VAD). The child size Jarvik 2000 and CircuLite VADs were tested with this model. The 33 in vivo experiments were retrospectively studied to evaluate the reliability of the animal model. Methods Dorset hybrid juvenile sheep (20~36 kg) were used for evaluation of the small pediatric VADs. Under general anesthesia, a left lateral thoracotomy was performed through the fifth intercostal space. The devices were implanted between the left ventricle apex and the descending aorta without cardiopulmonary bypass. Heparin was continuously infused for anticoagulation therapy. Results Support duration averaged 26.7±19.6 days. 75.7% (25/33) experiments were completed as intended. Animals were docile and did not require sitters beyond the immediate operative period. Complication includes leg injury, graft infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, intravenous line disconnection, weight loss, renal failure, red urine (1 for each) and pulmonary failure in two. The activated clotting time (ACT) was adjusted via continuous intravenous heparin to 150-200 second. Reliable hemodynamics and biocompability data were collected for evaluate the pediatric intracorporeal VADs in the animal model. Conclusion The juvenile sheep model is a reliable, reproducible, and translatable for testing the Pediatric VADs. These experiments provided vital information for improvement of the devices and for clinical application in the future. PMID:23254234

  6. Evaluation and Management of the Pediatric Thyroid Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Guille, Jeremy T.; Opoku-Boateng, Adwoa

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are commonly diagnosed in adults. Although rare in children, the risk for thyroid cancer is much higher in the pediatric population compared with adults. Presenting as either a solitary nodule or a multinodular goiter, thyroid nodular disease in children requires a thorough workup that includes a detailed clinical examination comprised of prior history of thyroid disease in the patient or in their family, history of radiation exposure, careful palpation of the thyroid and lymph nodes, blood tests, ultrasonography, and cytological assessment. Thyroid surgery is the gold-standard treatment for pediatric thyroid nodules; nonetheless, the extent of surgery remains controversial. Because surgery is not without risk, the decision matrix necessitates focus on the benefits of surgery for the child contingent upon all the preoperative exams. New diagnostic technology such as molecular testing with fine needle aspiration biopsy may help distinguish between benign and malignant lesions while potentially decreasing surgery for benign disease. The objective of this review is to summarize new concepts in clinical disease management of nodular thyroid disease in the pediatric population, including patient history, medical examination, and diagnosis workup. PMID:25480825

  7. MRI in the evaluation of pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Banwell, Brenda; Arnold, Douglas L; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Rocca, Maria A; Filippi, Massimo; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Zivadinov, Robert; Sormani, Maria Pia

    2016-08-30

    MRI plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in children, as it does in adults. The presence of multiple lesions in CNS locations commonly affected by MS, along with the presence of both enhancing and nonenhancing lesions, can facilitate a diagnosis of MS at the time of a first attack, whereas the accrual of serial lesions or new clinical attacks over time confirms the diagnosis in patients not meeting such criteria at onset. T2 and enhancing lesion accrual could serve as a primary outcome metric for pediatric MS clinical trials of selected therapies with anti-inflammatory activity in order to facilitate feasible trial size numbers. More-advanced MRI techniques reveal the impact of MS on tissue integrity within both T2-bright and T1-hypointense lesions and regions of normal-appearing tissue. Volumetric MRI analyses quantify the impact of MS on age-expected brain growth, and fMRI reveals activation and resting-state functional connectivity patterns in patients with pediatric MS that differ from those seen in healthy age-matched youth. Such studies are of critical importance because MS onset during childhood may profoundly influence maturing and actively myelinating neural networks. High-field MRI visualizes MS pathology at a near-microscopic level and has the potential to more fully explain mechanisms for cognitive impairment, fatigue, and disability in patients with pediatric MS. PMID:27572868

  8. Evaluation and management of the pediatric thyroid nodule.

    PubMed

    Guille, Jeremy T; Opoku-Boateng, Adwoa; Thibeault, Susan L; Chen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are commonly diagnosed in adults. Although rare in children, the risk for thyroid cancer is much higher in the pediatric population compared with adults. Presenting as either a solitary nodule or a multinodular goiter, thyroid nodular disease in children requires a thorough workup that includes a detailed clinical examination comprised of prior history of thyroid disease in the patient or in their family, history of radiation exposure, careful palpation of the thyroid and lymph nodes, blood tests, ultrasonography, and cytological assessment. Thyroid surgery is the gold-standard treatment for pediatric thyroid nodules; nonetheless, the extent of surgery remains controversial. Because surgery is not without risk, the decision matrix necessitates focus on the benefits of surgery for the child contingent upon all the preoperative exams. New diagnostic technology such as molecular testing with fine needle aspiration biopsy may help distinguish between benign and malignant lesions while potentially decreasing surgery for benign disease. The objective of this review is to summarize new concepts in clinical disease management of nodular thyroid disease in the pediatric population, including patient history, medical examination, and diagnosis workup. PMID:25480825

  9. Enhancing pediatric residents’ scholar role: the development of a Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation program

    PubMed Central

    Pound, Catherine M.; Moreau, Katherine A.; Ward, Natalie; Eady, Kaylee; Writer, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Background Research training is essential to the development of well-rounded physicians. Although many pediatric residency programs require residents to complete a research project, it is often challenging to integrate research training into educational programs. Objective We aimed to develop an innovative research program for pediatric residents, called the Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation (SAGE) program. Methods We developed a competency-based program which establishes benchmarks for pediatric residents, while providing ongoing academic mentorship. Results Feedback from residents and their research supervisors about the SAGE program has been positive. Preliminary evaluation data have shown that all final-year residents have met or exceeded program expectations. Conclusions By providing residents with this supportive environment, we hope to influence their academic career paths, increase their research productivity, promote evidence-based practice, and ultimately, positively impact health outcomes. PMID:26059213

  10. Autism spectrum disorder in fragile X syndrome: a longitudinal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, R Nick; Feinberg, Rachel L; Vaurio, Rebecca; Passanante, Natalie M; Thompson, Richard E; Kaufmann, Walter E

    2009-06-01

    The present study extends our previous work on characterizing the autistic behavior profile of boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS) who meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, 4th Edition criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) into a longitudinal evaluation of ASD in FXS (FXS + ASD). Specifically, we aimed to determine the stability of the diagnosis and profile of ASD in FXS over time. Through regression models, we also evaluated which autistic and social behaviors and skills were correlates of diagnosis and autistic behavior severity (i.e., Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised total scores). Finally, we assessed the evolution of cognitive parameters in FXS + ASD. A population of 56 boys (30-88 months at baseline) with FXS was evaluated using measures of autistic, social, and cognitive behaviors and skills at three yearly evaluations. We found that the diagnosis of ASD in FXS was relatively stable over time. Further emphasizing this stability, we found a set of behaviors and skills, particularly those related to peer relationships and adaptive socialization, that differentiated FXS + ASD from the rest of the FXS cohort (FXS + None) and contributed to autistic severity at all time points. Nevertheless, the general improvement in autistic behavior observed in FXS + ASD coupled with the concurrent worsening in FXS + None resulted in less differentiation between the groups over time. Surprisingly, FXS + ASD IQ scores were stable while FXS + None non-verbal IQ scores declined. Our findings indicate that ASD is a distinctive subphenotype in FXS characterized by deficits in complex social interaction, with similarities to ASD in the general population. PMID:19441123

  11. A Longitudinal Evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Science Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Colleen F.; Goodman, Irene F.

    This paper proposes the design and key methodological features of a longitudinal evaluation of the National Cancer Institute Science Enrichment Program (NCISEP). Goodman Research Group's (GRG) five-year longitudinal evaluation is designed as a randomized experiment with a control group and employs both quantitative and qualitative data collection…

  12. Multilevel Growth Modeling: An Introductory Approach to Analyzing Longitudinal Data for Evaluators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, Kevin A.

    2014-01-01

    The growth in the availability of longitudinal data--data collected over time on the same individuals--as part of program evaluations has opened up exciting possibilities for evaluators to ask more nuanced questions about how individuals' outcomes change over time. However, in order to leverage longitudinal data to glean these important…

  13. Suicide attempts and ideation: adolescents evaluated on a pediatric ward.

    PubMed

    Paluszny, M; Davenport, C; Kim, W J

    1991-01-01

    This study compared psychological, familial, and demographic data for 42 suicidal, 16 suicide ideation, and 42 control pediatric patients. Chaotic families and behavior problems, as well as depression, constriction, and lack of insight, differentiated the suicide attempt group from the control group. The suicide ideation group was similar to both the control and suicide attempt groups and seen as "intermediate" between these two. In assessing lethality of the attempt, constriction was the only predictor differentiating the serious from less serious suicide attempt. PMID:2048475

  14. Evaluation of thermal gradients in longitudinal spin Seebeck effect measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, A. Kuepferling, M.; Basso, V.; Pasquale, M.; Kikkawa, T.; Uchida, K.; Saitoh, E.

    2015-05-07

    In the framework of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect (LSSE), we developed an experimental setup for the characterization of LSSE devices. This class of device consists in a layered structure formed by a substrate, a ferrimagnetic insulator (YIG) where the spin current is thermally generated, and a paramagnetic metal (Pt) for the detection of the spin current via the inverse spin-Hall effect. In this kind of experiments, the evaluation of a thermal gradient through the thin YIG layer is a crucial point. In this work, we perform an indirect determination of the thermal gradient through the measurement of the heat flux. We developed an experimental setup using Peltier cells that allow us to measure the heat flux through a given sample. In order to test the technique, a standard LSSE device produced at Tohoku University was measured. We find a spin Seebeck S{sub SSE} coefficient of 2.8×10{sup −7} V K{sup −1}.

  15. Radiologic evaluation of the ear anatomy in pediatric cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Manolis, Evangelos N; Filippou, Dimitrios K; Tsoumakas, Constantinos; Diomidous, Marianna; Cunningham, Michael J; Katostaras, Theophanis; Weber, Alfred L; Eavey, Roland D

    2009-05-01

    The aim of the study was to describe computed tomography (CT) findings in middle ear cholesteatoma in pediatric patients. A cohort of 32 children with cholesteatoma (3-14 years old) entered the study. From them, 30 presented acquired cholesteatoma (AC), and 2 presented congenital cholesteatoma. All of the children were investigated using CT before surgery of the middle ear and mastoid. Computed tomography was performed with 1- or 2-mm axial and coronal sections of both temporal bones. Nineteen children with AC (63.3%) revealed a diffuse soft-tissue density isodense with muscle, whereas in 6 of them, the mass mimicked inflammation. The remaining revealed localized soft-tissue mass with partially lobulated contour. In AC, ossicular erosion was detected in 23 cases (76.7%), abnormal pneumatization in 19 cases (63.3%), and erosion-blunting of spur and enlargement of middle ear or mastoid in 8 cases (26.7%). The 2 congenital cholesteatomas revealed soft-tissue mass with polypoid densities, while a semicircular canal fistula was detected in one of them. High-resolution CT facilitates early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of pediatric cholesteatoma by assessing the anatomic abnormalities and the extent of disease, which are crucial in middle ear and mastoid surgery. PMID:19390457

  16. Clinical evaluation of a 2K x 2K workstation for primary diagnosis in pediatric radiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mahmood; Sayre, James W.; Simons, Margaret A.; Hamedaninia, Azar; Boechat, Maria I.; Hall, Theodore R.; Kangarloo, Hooshang; Taira, Ricky K.; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Kashifian, Payam

    1991-07-01

    Preliminary results of a large-scale ROC study evaluating the diagnostic performance of digital hardcopy film and 2K X 2K softcopy display for pediatric chest radiographs are presented. The pediatric disease categories studied were pneumothorax, linear atelectasis, air bronchograms, and interstitial disease. Digital images were obtained directly from a computed radiography system. Results from the readings of 239 chest radiographs by 4 radiologists show no significant difference between viewing images on film and softcopy display for the disease categories pneumothorax and air bronchograms. A slight performance edge for softcopy was seen for the disease categories of interstitial disease and linear atelectasis.

  17. Discriminative Validity of the Danish Version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahlhut, Michelle; Gard, Gunvor; Aadahl, Mette; Christensen, Jette

    2011-01-01

    The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) assesses functional status in children with disabilities aged 0.5-7.5 years. The purpose of this study was to examine if the Danish version of the PEDI was able to discriminate between nondisabled children and children with cerebral palsy (CP) or juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).…

  18. Item Bank Development for a Revised Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Helene; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria; Haley, Stephen; Coster, Wendy; Kramer, Jessica; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) is a useful clinical and research assessment, but it has limitations in content, age range, and efficiency. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of the item bank for a new computer adaptive testing version of the PEDI (PEDI-CAT). An expanded item set and response options…

  19. Autism Training in Pediatric Residency: Evaluation of a Case-Based Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Major, Nili E.; Peacock, Georgina; Ruben, Wendy; Thomas, Jana; Weitzman, Carol C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent studies indicating the high prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), there has been little focus on improving ASD education during pediatric residency training. The objective of this study was to evaluate a new curriculum developed in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Maternal and Child…

  20. Trajectories of Symptoms and Impairment for Pediatric Patients with Functional Abdominal Pain: A 5-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvaney, Shelagh; Lambert, E. Warren; Garber, Judy; Walker, Lynn S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This prospective study characterizes trajectories of symptoms and impairment in pediatric patients with abdominal pain not associated with identifiable organic disease. Method: The Children's Somatization Inventory and the Functional Disability Inventory were administered four times over 5 years to 132 patients (6-18 years old) seen in…

  1. Development of a Postacute Hospital Item Bank for the New Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Helene M.

    2010-01-01

    The PEDI-CAT is a new computer adaptive test (CAT) version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Additional PEDI-CAT items specific to postacute pediatric hospital care were recently developed using expert reviews and cognitive interviewing techniques. Expert reviews established face and construct validity, providing positive…

  2. Safety evaluation of BSS plus in pediatric intraocular surgery.

    PubMed

    Burke, M J; Parks, M M; Calhoun, J H; Diamond, J G; deFaller, J M

    1981-01-01

    An open-label study was conducted to determine the safety of a new intraocular irrigating solution, BSS Plus, when used during pediatric ophthalmic surgery. BBS Plus is a modified glutathione-bicarbonate-Ringer's solution which contains the necessary ions, buffers, and substrates for maintenance of normal cellular metabolism, function, and structural integrity when used as a perfusate during ophthalmic surgical procedures. At three centers, 30 patients undergoing lens aspiration or anterior segment reconstruction using vitrectomy instrumentation were enrolled in this study. Transient postoperative increases in intracellular pressure and internal or external ocular inflammatory signs were seen which were consistent with the trauma produced by the surgical procedure. The solution was judged to be safe when used in these surgical indications. PMID:7264851

  3. Pediatric solid tumors: Evaluation by gallium-67 SPECT studies

    SciTech Connect

    Rossleigh, M.A.; Murray, I.P.; Mackey, D.W.; Bargwanna, K.A.; Nayanar, V.V. )

    1990-02-01

    A retrospective review of 37 children with a variety of solid tumors who underwent 60 {sup 67}Ga single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) studies was performed. These studies were correlated with clinical and radiological findings and, where possible, histopathologic confirmation. In all studies, SPECT gave better definition and better anatomic localization of disease sites than obtained with planar views. SPECT detected more lesions in the head and neck (planar 16, SPECT 19), chest (planar 39, SPECT 45), and abdomen (planar 22, SPECT 24). In six of 20 patients scanned following chemotherapy, SPECT was useful in demonstrating that tracer accumulation in a normally located and shaped thymus indicated uptake resulting from thymic regeneration rather than tumor recurrence. It is concluded that {sup 67}Ga SPECT studies are very useful in the pediatric population, where perhaps because of their small size, interpretation of standard planar views may be difficult.

  4. Clinical Evaluation of Red Eyes in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Beal, Casey; Giordano, Beverly

    2016-01-01

    Patients with the primary symptom of a red eye are commonly seen in pediatric primary care clinics. The differential diagnoses of a red eye are broad, but with a succinct history and physical examination, the diagnosis can be readily identified in many patients. Identifying conditions that threaten vision and understanding the urgency of referral to an ophthalmologist is paramount. Some systemic diseases such as leukemia, sarcoidosis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis can present with the chief symptom of a red eye. Finally, trauma, ranging from mild to severe, often precipitates an office visit with a red eye, and thus understanding the signs that raise concern for a ruptured globe is essential. In the primary care setting, with a focused history, a few simple examination techniques, and an appreciation of the differential diagnosis, one can feel confident in managing patients with acute red eyes. PMID:26948259

  5. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Pediatric Dentists Regarding Speech Evaluation of Patients: Implications for Dental Education.

    PubMed

    Van Eyndhoven, Lisa; Chussid, Steven; Yoon, Richard K

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine pediatric dentists' attitudes about speech evaluation in the dental setting and assess their knowledge of speech development and pathology. In October 2013, members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry were invited to participate in an electronic questionnaire. Categories of questions were demographics, attitudes and confidence in speech pathology, and theoretical and practical knowledge of speech development and speech pathology. Theoretical knowledge was assessed using questions about phonetics and speech milestones. Practical knowledge was determined with three 30-second interview-style video clips. A total of 539 responses were received for a response rate of 10.4%. The majority of respondents reported feeling that speech evaluation should be part of the pediatric dental visit (72.8%) and felt confident in their ability to detect speech issues (73.2%). However, they did poorly on the theoretical knowledge questions (41.9%) as well as the practical knowledge questions (8.5%). There was a statistically significant difference in theoretical score between gender and type of occupation (p<0.05). This difference was not observed when examining practical knowledge. This study suggests that although pediatric dentists are in an ideal position to aid in the detection of speech issues, they currently have insufficient training and knowledge to do so. PMID:26522632

  6. Expansion and Evaluation of Data Characterizing the Structural Behavior of the Pediatric Abdomen

    PubMed Central

    Lamp, John F.; Salzar, Robert; Kerrigan, Jason; Parent, Daniel; Lopez-Valdez, Francisco; Lau, Sabrina; Lessley, David; Kent, Richard; Luck, Jason; Loyd, Andre; Bass, Cameron

    2010-01-01

    Despite the importance of abdominal injuries in children involved in motor vehicle collisions, only two papers have reported experimental data quantifying the pediatric abdominal response to belt loading. One developed and characterized a porcine model of the pediatric abdomen and the other presented a series of tests performed on a single pediatric (7-year-old female) post-mortem human subject (PMHS) and used the data to evaluate the efficacy of the porcine model. The current paper presents the results from an additional pediatric (6-year-old female) PMHS test series and an expanded evaluation of the porcine model using the combined PMHS data. The two PMHS exhibited remarkably similar abdominal stiffness, both by level (upper and lower) and by rate (quasi-static and ∼2 m/s dynamic). Both PMHS and swine exhibited the same stiffness trend by abdominal level (lower stiffer than upper: 3444 N reaction force at 30.5 mm of displacement compared to 1756 N in the 6-year-old dynamic tests). The magnitude of lower abdomen stiffness was slightly less in the swine than in the PMHS (the average dynamic PMHS response was 1086 N greater than the porcine envelopes at 30.5 mm displacement) while the upper abdomen PMHS responses fit within the porcine response envelope. PMID:21050594

  7. Pediatric faculty and residents’ perspectives on In-Training Evaluation Reports (ITERs)

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rikin; Drover, Anne; Chafe, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Background In-training evaluation reports (ITERs) are used by over 90% of postgraduate medical training programs in Canada for resident assessment. Our study examined the perspectives of faculty and residents in one pediatric program as a means to improve the ITER as an evaluation tool. Method Two separate focus groups were conducted, one with eight pediatric residents and one with nine clinical faculty within the pediatrics program of Memorial University’s Faculty of Medicine to discuss their perceptions of, and suggestions for improving, the use of ITERs. Results Residents and faculty shared many similar suggestions for improving the ITER as an evaluation tool. Both the faculty and residents emphasized the importance of written feedback, contextualizing the evaluation and timely follow-up. The biggest challenge appears to be the discrepancy in the quality of feedback sought by the residents and the faculty members’ ability to do so in a time effective manner. Others concerns related to the need for better engagement in setting rotation objectives and more direct observation by the faculty member completing the ITER. Conclusions The ITER is a useful tool in resident evaluations, but a number of issues relating to its actual use could improve the quality of feedback which residents receive. PMID:27004076

  8. Longitudinal flexural mode utility in quantitative guided wave evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian

    2001-07-01

    Longitudinal Non-axisymmetric flexural mode utility in quantitative guided wave evaluation is examined for pipe and tube inspection. Attention is focused on hollow cylinders. Several source loading problems such as a partial-loading angle beam, an axisymmetric comb transducer and an angle beam array are studied. The Normal Mode Expansion method is employed to simulate the generated guided wave fields. For non-axisymmetric sources, an important angular profile feature is studied. Based on numerical calculations, an angular profile varies with frequency, mode and propagating distance. Since an angular profile determines the energy distribution of the guided waves, the angular profile has a great impact on the pipe inspection capability of guided waves. The simulation of non-axisymmetric angular profiles generated by partialloading is verified by experiments. An angular profile is the superposition of harmonic axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric modes with various phase velocities. A simpler equation is derived to calculate the phase velocities of the non-axisymmetric guided waves and is used for discussing the characteristics of non-axisymmetric guided waves. Angular profiles have many applications in practical pipe testing. The procedure of building desired angular profiles and also angular profile tuning is discussed. This angular profile tuning process is implemented by a phased transducer array and a special computational algorithm. Since a transducer array plays a critical role in guided wave inspection, the performance of a transducer array is discussed in terms of guided wave mode control ability and excitation sensitivity. With time delay inputs, a transducer array is greatly improved for its mode control ability and sensitivity. The algorithms for setting time delays are derived based on frequency, element spacing and phase velocity. With the help of the conclusions drawn on non- axisymmetric guided waves, a phased circumferential partial-loading array is

  9. Evaluating the use of a computerized clinical decision support system for asthma by pediatric pulmonologists

    PubMed Central

    Lomotan, Edwin A.; Hoeksema, Laura J.; Edmonds, Diana E.; Ramírez-Garnica, Gabriela; Shiffman, Richard N.; Horwitz, Leora I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate use of a new guideline-based, computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) system for asthma in a pediatric pulmonology clinic of a large academic medical center. Methods We conducted a qualitative evaluation including review of electronic data, direct observation, and interviews with all nine pediatric pulmonologists in the clinic. Outcome measures included patterns of computer use in relation to patient care, and themes surrounding the relationship between asthma care and computer use. Results The pediatric pulmonologists entered enough data to trigger the decision support system in 397/445 (89.2%) of all asthma visits from January 2009 to May 2009. However, interviews and direct observations revealed use of the decision support system was limited to documentation activities after clinic sessions ended. Reasons for delayed use reflected barriers common to general medical care and barriers specific to subspecialty care. Subspecialist-specific barriers included the perceived high complexity of patients, the impact of subject matter expertise on the types of decision support needed, and unique workflow concerns such as the need to create letters to referring physicians. Conclusions Pediatric pulmonologists demonstrated low use of a computerized decision support system for asthma care because of a combination of general and subspecialist-specific factors. Subspecialist-specific factors should not be underestimated when designing guideline-based, computerized decision support systems for the subspecialty setting. PMID:22204897

  10. Evaluation of Immune Survival Factors in Pediatric HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    SHEARER, WILLIAM T.; EASLEY, KIRK A.; GOLDFARB, JOHANNA; JENSON, HAL B.; ROSENBLATT, HOWARD M.; KOVACS, ANDREA; MCINTOSH, KENNETH

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, CD19+/20+ B cells, and serum immunoglobulins (Igs) have been implicated as survival factors for pediatric HIV-1 infection. To determine which of these immune factors might be important in predicting survival, we studied HIV-1 vertically infected (HIV-1+) children over a 5-year period. Peripheral blood lymphocytes and Igs were measured in 298 HIV-1+ children, who were classified as survivors or nonsurvivors, and in 463 HIV-1 vertically exposed and noninfected (HIV-1–) children. Measurements of other possible survival factors were included in this study: albumin, hemoglobin, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), and HIV-1 RNA levels. Survivors had significantly higher CD4+ T-cell, CD8+ T-cell, and CD19+/CD20+ B-cell counts and serum IgG levels, but lower serum IgA and IgM levels than nonsurvivors. Serum albumin and blood hemoglobin levels were higher, but serum LDH and HIV-1 RNA levels were lower in the survivors compared to non-survivors. In univariable analysis, factors affecting survival were baseline CD4+ T-cell and CD8+ T-cell counts, IgG, albumin, hemoglobin, LDH, and HIV-1 RNA (all p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, high baseline CD4+ T-cell count, IgG and albumin levels, and low baseline HIV-1 RNA load remained important factors for survival. Serum IgG level has been identified as an immune factor that independently predicts survival, in addition to the already established CD4+ T-cell count. The HIV-1 RNA and serum albumin levels also predicted survival. PMID:11144332

  11. Evaluation of Drug Treatment of Bronchopneumonia at the Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo

    PubMed Central

    Zec, Svjetlana Loga; Selmanovic, Kenan; Andrijic, Natasa Loga; Kadic, Azra; Zecevic, Lamija; Zunic, Lejla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Bronchopneumonia is the most common clinical manifestation of pneumonia in pediatric population and leading infectious cause of mortality in children under 5 years. Evaluation of treatment involves diagnostic procedures, assessment of disease severity and treatment for disease with an emphasis on vulnerability of the population. Aim: To determine the most commonly used antibiotics at the Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo and concomitant therapy in the treatment of bronchopneumonia. Patients and Methods: The study was retrospective and included a total of 104 patients, hospitalized in pulmonary department of the Pediatric Clinic in the period from July to December 2014. The treatment of bronchopneumonia at the Pediatric Clinic was empirical and it conformed to the guidelines and recommendations of British Thoracic Society. Results and Discussion: First and third generation of cephalosporins and penicillin antibiotics were the most widely used antimicrobials, with parenteral route of administration and average duration of treatment of 4.3 days. Concomitant therapy included antipyretics, corticosteroids, leukotriene antagonists, agonists of β2 adrenergic receptor. In addition to pharmacotherapy, hospitalized patients were subjected to a diet with controlled intake of sodium, which included probiotic-rich foods and adequate hydration. Recommendations for further antimicrobial treatment include oral administration of first-generation cephalosporins and penicillin antibiotics. Conclusion: Results of the drug treatment of bronchopneumonia at the Pediatric Clinic of the University Clinical Center of Sarajevo are comparable to the guidelines of the British Thoracic Society. It is necessary to establish a system for rational use of antimicrobial agents in order to reduce bacterial resistance. PMID:27594741

  12. Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for Alcohol and Other Drug Use among Adolescents: Evaluation of a Pediatric Residency Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sheryl A.; Martel, Shara; Pantalon, Michael; Martino, Steve; Tetrault, Jeanette; Thung, Stephen F.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Auinger, Peggy; Green, Michael L.; Fiellin, David A.; O'Connor, Patrick G.; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the integration of a screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) curriculum for alcohol and other drug use into a pediatric residency program. Pediatric and medicine/pediatric residents in an adolescent medicine rotation located in an urban teaching hospital participated in the…

  13. Evaluation of a Family Systems Intervention for Managing Pediatric Chronic Illness: Mastering Each New Direction (MEND)

    PubMed Central

    Distelberg, Brian; Williams-Reade, Jackie; Tapanes, Daniel; Montgomery, Susanne; Pandit, Mayuri

    2015-01-01

    Family systems play a crucial, albeit complex, role in pediatric chronic illness. Unfortunately, very few psychosocial interventions are available to help these stressed families navigate the developmental steps of chronic illness. A new intervention (MEND) addresses the needs of these families and applies to a broad range of chronic illnesses. This article presents this family systems intervention as well as includes preliminary program evaluation data on 22 families that graduated from the program. Results show consistently strong effects across an array of psychosocial measures. Conclusions from this preliminary study suggest that families entering MEND present with high levels of stress due to the child's chronic illness, but after MEND, the level of stress and other functioning measures are comparable to those seen in healthy families, suggesting that the program offers a significant benefit to families with pediatric chronic illness. PMID:24635346

  14. Common normal variants of pediatric vertebral development that mimic fractures: a pictorial review from a national longitudinal bone health study

    PubMed Central

    Jaremko, Jacob Lester; Siminoski, Kerry; Firth, Gregory; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Shenouda, Nazih; Konji, Victor N.; Roth, Johannes; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Reed, Martin; O’Brien, Kathleen; Nadel, Helen; McKillop, Scott; Kloiber, Reinhard; Dubois, Josée; Coblentz, Craig; Charron, Martin; Ward, Leanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Children with glucocorticoid-treated illnesses are at risk for osteoporotic vertebral fractures and growing awareness has led to increased monitoring for these fractures. However scant literature describes developmental changes in vertebral morphology that can mimic fractures. The goal of this paper is to aid in distinguishing between normal variants and fractures. We illustrate differences using lateral spine radiographs obtained annually from children recruited to the Canada-wide STeroid-Associated Osteoporosis in the Pediatric Population (STOPP) observational study, in which 400 children with glucocorticoid-treated leukemia, rheumatic disorders, and nephrotic syndrome were enrolled near glucocorticoid initiation and followed prospectively for 6 years. Normal variants mimicking fractures exist in all regions of the spine and fall into two groups. The first group comprises variants mimicking pathological vertebral height loss, including not-yet-ossified vertebral apophyses superiorly and inferiorly which can lead to a vertebral shape easily over-interpreted as anterior wedge fracture, physiologic beaking, and spondylolisthesis associated with shortened posterior vertebral height. The second group includes variants mimicking other radiologic signs of fractures: anterior vertebral artery groove resembling an anterior buckle fracture, Cupid’s bow balloon disk morphology, Schmorl nodes mimicking concave endplate fractures, and parallax artifact resembling endplate interruption or biconcavity. If an unexpected vertebral body contour is detected, careful attention to its location, detailed morphology, and (if available) serial changes over time may clarify whether it is a fracture requiring change in management or simply a normal variant. Awareness of the variants described in this paper can improve accuracy in the diagnosis of pediatric vertebral fractures. PMID:25828359

  15. Common normal variants of pediatric vertebral development that mimic fractures: a pictorial review from a national longitudinal bone health study.

    PubMed

    Jaremko, Jacob L; Siminoski, Kerry; Firth, Gregory B; Matzinger, Mary Ann; Shenouda, Nazih; Konji, Victor N; Roth, Johannes; Sbrocchi, Anne Marie; Reed, Martin H; O'Brien, Mary Kathleen; Nadel, Helen; McKillop, Scott; Kloiber, Reinhard; Dubois, Josée; Coblentz, Craig; Charron, Martin; Ward, Leanne M

    2015-04-01

    Children with glucocorticoid-treated illnesses are at risk for osteoporotic vertebral fractures, and growing awareness of this has led to increased monitoring for these fractures. However scant literature describes developmental changes in vertebral morphology that can mimic fractures. The goal of this paper is to aid in distinguishing between normal variants and fractures. We illustrate differences using lateral spine radiographs obtained annually from children recruited to the Canada-wide STeroid-Associated Osteoporosis in the Pediatric Population (STOPP) observational study, in which 400 children with glucocorticoid-treated leukemia, rheumatic disorders, and nephrotic syndrome were enrolled near glucocorticoid initiation and followed prospectively for 6 years. Normal variants mimicking fractures exist in all regions of the spine and fall into two groups. The first group comprises variants mimicking pathological vertebral height loss, including not-yet-ossified vertebral apophyses superiorly and inferiorly, which can lead to a vertebral shape easily over-interpreted as anterior wedge fracture, physiological beaking, or spondylolisthesis associated with shortened posterior vertebral height. The second group includes variants mimicking other radiologic signs of fractures: anterior vertebral artery groove resembling an anterior buckle fracture, Cupid's bow balloon disk morphology, Schmorl nodes mimicking concave endplate fractures, and parallax artifact resembling endplate interruption or biconcavity. If an unexpected vertebral body contour is detected, careful attention to its location, detailed morphology, and (if available) serial changes over time may clarify whether it is a fracture requiring change in management or simply a normal variant. Awareness of the variants described in this paper can improve accuracy in the diagnosis of pediatric vertebral fractures. PMID:25828359

  16. Multidetector computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Lin, Chien-Heng

    2016-06-01

    The accurate diagnosis of pediatric acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging tasks in the emergency department (ED) due to its unclear clinical presentation and non-specific findings in physical examinations, laboratory data, and plain radiographs. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of abdominal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) performed in the ED on pediatric patients presenting with acute abdominal pain. A retrospective chart review of children aged <18 years with acute abdominal pain who visited the emergency department and underwent MDCT between September 2004 and June 2007 was conducted. Patients with a history of trauma were excluded. A total of 156 patients with acute abdominal pain (85 males and 71 females, age 1-17 years; mean age 10.9 ± 4.6 years) who underwent abdominal MDCT in the pediatric ED during this 3-year period were enrolled in the study. One hundred and eighteen patients with suspected appendicitis underwent abdominal MDCT. Sixty four (54.2%) of them had appendicitis, which was proven by histopathology. The sensitivity of abdominal MDCT for appendicitis was found to be 98.5% and the specificity was 84.9%. In this study, the other two common causes of nontraumatic abdominal emergencies were gastrointestinal tract (GI) infections and ovarian cysts. The most common etiology of abdominal pain in children that requires imaging with abdominal MDCT is appendicitis. MDCT has become a preferred and invaluable imaging modality in evaluating uncertain cases of pediatric acute abdominal pain in ED, in particular for suspected appendicitis, neoplasms, and gastrointestinal abnormalities. PMID:27154197

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Youth with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS): Recommendations from the 2013 PANS Consensus Conference

    PubMed Central

    Frankovich, Jennifer; Cooperstock, Michael; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Murphy, Tanya K.; Pasternack, Mark; Thienemann, Margo; Williams, Kyle; Walter, Jolan; Swedo, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract On May 23 and 24, 2013, the First PANS Consensus Conference was convened at Stanford University, calling together a geographically diverse group of clinicians and researchers from complementary fields of pediatrics: General and developmental pediatrics, infectious diseases, immunology, rheumatology, neurology, and child psychiatry. Participants were academicians with clinical and research interests in pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorder associated with streptococcus (PANDAS) in youth, and the larger category of pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). The goals were to clarify the diagnostic boundaries of PANS, to develop systematic strategies for evaluation of suspected PANS cases, and to set forth the most urgently needed studies in this field. Presented here is a consensus statement proposing recommendations for the diagnostic evaluation of youth presenting with PANS. PMID:25325534

  18. Evaluation and Referral for Child Maltreatment in Pediatric Poisoning Victims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Joanne N.; Pecker, Lydia H.; Russo, Michael E.; Henretig, Fred; Christian, Cindy W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Although the majority of poisonings in young children are due to exploratory ingestions and might be prevented through improved caregiver supervision, the circumstances that warrant evaluation for suspected maltreatment and referral to Child Protective Services (CPS) are unclear. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine…

  19. Evaluation of intranasal Midazolam spray as a sedative in pediatric patients for radiological imaging procedures

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Anisha A.; Patel, Vipul R.; Chauhan, Parthiv R.; Patel, Deep J.; Chadha, Indu A.; Ramani, Monal N.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Preoperative anxiety and uncooperativeness experienced by pediatric patients are commonly associated with postoperative behavioral problems. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal Midazolam as a sedative in a pediatric age group for radiological imaging procedures and to note onset of sedation, level of sedation, condition of patient during separation from parents and effect on the cardio-respiratory system. Settings and Design: Randomized double-blinded study. Subjects and Methods: Fifty patients of the pediatric age group of American Society of Anesthesiologist grade 2 and 3 who came for any radiological imaging procedures were studied. Patients were randomly allocated to receive, intranasally, either Midazolam 0.5 mg/kg (group A N = 25) or normal saline (group B N = 25) in both nostrils (0.25 mg/kg in each) 15 min before the procedure. Time for onset of sedation and satisfactory sedation, sedation score, separation score, hemodynamic changes and side-effects were recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test. Results: Intranasal Midazolam group had a significantly shorter time for onset of sedation and satisfactory sedation. Mean sedation score and mean separation score at 10 min and 15 min intervals were significant in intranasal Midazolam as compared with normal saline (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Intranasal Midazolam 0.5 mg/kg is safe and effective and provides adequate sedation for easy separation from the parents and reduced requirement of intravenous supplementation during radiological imaging procedures without any untoward side-effects. PMID:25885831

  20. A Longitudinal Evaluation Study of a Science Professional Development Program for K-12 Teachers: NERDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing-Taylor, Jacque M.

    2012-01-01

    A longitudinal evaluation study of a science professional development program for K-12 teachers was conducted using the CIPP evaluation model. Eleven years of program data were described and analyzed. Elementary teachers comprised 62% of the 384 participants, 17% of all participants were middle school teachers, and 13% of all participants were…

  1. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify “insults” and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The

  2. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    PubMed

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  3. Pediatric Cardiology Boot Camp: Description and Evaluation of a Novel Intensive Training Program for Pediatric Cardiology Trainees.

    PubMed

    Ceresnak, Scott R; Axelrod, David M; Motonaga, Kara S; Johnson, Emily R; Krawczeski, Catherine D

    2016-06-01

    The transition from residency to subspecialty fellowship in a procedurally driven field such as pediatric cardiology is challenging for trainees. We describe and assess the educational value of a pediatric cardiology "boot camp" educational tool designed to help prepare trainees for cardiology fellowship. A two-day intensive training program was provided for pediatric cardiology fellows in July 2015 at a large fellowship training program. Hands-on experiences and simulations were provided in: anatomy, auscultation, echocardiography, catheterization, cardiovascular intensive care (CVICU), electrophysiology (EP), heart failure, and cardiac surgery. Knowledge-based exams as well as surveys were completed by each participant pre-training and post-training. Pre- and post-exam results were compared via paired t tests, and survey results were compared via Wilcoxon rank sum. A total of eight participants were included. After boot camp, there was a significant improvement between pre- and post-exam scores (PRE 54 ± 9 % vs. POST 85 ± 8 %; p ≤ 0.001). On pre-training survey, the most common concerns about starting fellowship included: CVICU emergencies, technical aspects of the catheterization/EP labs, using temporary and permanent pacemakers/implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs), and ECG interpretation. Comparing pre- and post-surveys, there was a statistically significant improvement in the participants comfort level in 33 of 36 (92 %) areas of assessment. All participants (8/8, 100 %) strongly agreed that the boot camp was a valuable learning experience and helped to alleviate anxieties about the start of fellowship. A pediatric cardiology boot camp experience at the start of cardiology fellowship can provide a strong foundation and serve as an educational springboard for pediatric cardiology fellows. PMID:26961569

  4. An Interactive Evaluation of Patient/Family Centered Rounds on Pediatric Inpatient Units.

    PubMed

    Palokas, J Michelle; Northington, Ladonna; Wilkerson, Robin R; Boss, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide excellent patient care and customer service, patient rounds should be efficient, effective, and timely. Also, essential healthcare team members should be present in rounds, to ensure interprofessional collaboration. Patients and families should also be included in rounds, to ensure accurate information is relayed and to ensure involvement in care planning. The purpose of this inquiry was to conduct an interactive evaluation with organizational stakeholders of patient/family centered rounds on pediatric inpatient units of a large academic medical center using a plan, do, study, act (PDSA) model. PMID:25481864

  5. Evaluation of standardized teaching plans for hospitalized pediatric patients: a performance improvement project.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Joanne; Stephens, Sigrid

    2008-01-01

    Discharge teaching in a pediatric hospital setting is difficult because the situation involves multiple learners, time constraints, and differing skill levels of nurse teachers. Shortened length of stay forces nurses to complete patient education efficiently. Unstructured education can lead to failed learning, as evidenced by readmissions and postdischarge feedback. A performance improvement project was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of standardized teaching plans for diabetes mellitus and infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Preliminary data indicated a passing score of at least 90% on posttests by all learners, suggesting that standardized teaching plans may help nurses complete prescribed discharge teaching. PMID:18507236

  6. Development of Anxiety Disorders in a Traumatized Pediatric Population: A Preliminary Longitudinal Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Adriana M.; Saltzman, Kassey M.; Weems, Carl F.; Regnault, Heather P.; Reiss, Allan L.; Carrion, Victor G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The current study was conducted to determine if post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology predicted later development of non-PTSD anxiety disorders in children and adolescents victimized by interpersonal trauma. Methods: Thirty-four children with a history of interpersonal trauma and no initial diagnosis of anxiety disorder…

  7. A clinical evaluation of sulbactam/ampicillin in the treatment of pediatric infections.

    PubMed

    Huang, L M; Lee, C Y; Lee, M J; Hsu, C Y; Liu, C C; Hong, J Y; Chen, J M

    1989-01-01

    We have treated 42 episodes of pediatric infections with sulbactam/ampicillin since 1987. Included were 9 cellulitis, 9 urinary tract infections, 5 cervical lymphadenitis, 4 meningitis, 2 thoracic empyema, 2 osteomyelitis, 2 sepsis, 1 furuncle, 1 perianal abscess, 1 dental abscess, 1 peritonsillitis, 1 salmonellosis, 1 shigellosis, 1 peritonitis, 1 suppurative thyroiditis, 1 infective endocarditis. Responsible pathogens were Escherichia coli in 8, Staphylococcus aureus in 6, Hemophilus influenzae in 2, Streptococcus pneumoniae in 3, Streptococcus viridans in 2, Staphylococcus epidermidis in 1, Bacteroides fragilis in 1, Salmonella D1 in 1, Shigella sonnei in 1, Klebsiella pneumoniae in 1, Enterobacter agglomerans in 1, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus in 1, Enterobacter cloacae in 1, group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus in 1, and polymicrobial infection in 4 cases. Thirty-nine out of 41 (95%) clinically evaluable patients cured and all (34/34) bacteriologically evaluable patients eradicated their pathogens after treatment with sulbactam/ampicillin. Side reactions were seen in five patients; one maculopapular skin rash, one hemolytic anemia, two diarrhea, and one liver function impairment plus leukopenia. All these reactions were transient and did not require interruption of therapy. These results indicate that sulbactam/ampicillin is safe and effective in the treatment of common pediatric infections beyond the neonatal period. PMID:2637593

  8. Evaluation of the Erosive Potential of Various Pediatric Liquid Medicaments: An in-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Tupalli, Abhinaya Reddy; Satish, B; Shetty, Bharath Raj; Battu, Someshwar; Kumar, J Phani; Nagaraju, B

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present in-vitro study was a scanning electron microscope (SEM) study conducted in primary teeth in order to evaluate the erosive potential of ten commonly used pediatric liquid medications (PLMs). Materials & Methods: 10 commonly used PLMs and 33 exfoliated or extracted primary teeth were collected. The 33 teeth were divided into two groups, the control group (n=3) and the study group (n=30). The endogenous pH of all the teeth was measured using a pH electrode meter. The control group teeth were immersed in artificial saliva for three different time intervals- 1 minute, 10 minutes and 8 hours. The study group teeth were also maintained for 1 minute, 10 minutes and 8 hours in various selected PLMs. The primary enamel surface (PES) changes were then observed under the SEM for all the teeth of both groups. Results: All the PLMs used in the study showed an erosive effect on the PES when viewed under SEM. Majority of the medications caused etched prism pattern followed by crater formation and sporadic rod ends in that order on PES. Conclusion: There is a need to educate parents and professionals about the association between dental erosion and PLMs which predisposes to dental caries. How to cite the article: Tupalli AR, Satish B, Shetty BR, Battu S, Kumar JP, Nagaraju B. Evaluation of the Erosive Potential of Various Pediatric Liquid Medicaments: An In-vitro Study. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):59-65. PMID:24653605

  9. EVALUATION OF THE CLEVELAND CHILD DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. A LONGITUDINAL STUDY (FIRST YEAR REPORT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CORTES, CARLOS F.; AND OTHERS

    IN ORDER TO EVALUATE THE EFFECT OF A STRUCTURED PRESCHOOL ACADEMIC PROGRAM UPON THE COGNITIVE GROWTH OF CULTURALLY DEPRIVED CHILDREN, A LONGITUDINAL STUDY WAS BEGUN ON 107 FOUR-YEAR-OLDS IN CLEVELAND, OHIO. RELEVANT RESEARCH LITERATURE WAS REVIEWED IN DESIGNING THE STUDY. THE FIRST PHASE, RECOUNTED IN THIS REPORT, EXPLORED PSYCHO-LINGUISTIC,…

  10. MPCP Longitudinal Educational Growth Study: Baseline Report. SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, John F.; Wolf, Patrick J.; Cowen, Joshua M.; Fleming, David J.; Lucas-McLean, Juanita

    2008-01-01

    This report focuses on the initial design, implementation and baseline results of the five-year Longitudinal Educational Growth Study (LEGS) of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP) being conducted by the School Choice Demonstration Project (SCDP). The LEGS will be the first evaluation of the participant effects of the MPCP using…

  11. Academies: A Model for School Improvement? Key Findings from a Five-Year Longitudinal Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, David; Bunting, Valerie; Larsen, Judy

    2009-01-01

    Academies were launched by David Blunkett, the then Secretary of State for Education, in March 2000 in a speech on transforming secondary education. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PwC) was commissioned by the predecessor of the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) in February 2003 to conduct an independent longitudinal evaluation of…

  12. Longitudinal Relationships between Core Self-Evaluations and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Griffin, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Core self-evaluations (CSE) have been proposed as a static personality trait that influences individuals' work experiences. However, CSE can also be influenced by work experiences. Based on the corresponsive principle of personality development, this study incorporated both dispositional and contextual perspectives to examine longitudinal…

  13. Longitudinal Evaluation of Head Start Planned Variation and Follow Through.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Herbert I; Haney, Walt

    Both administratively and in terms of their evaluations, Head Start and Follow Through have been treated as separate programs. Follow Through was initially conceived, however, as an effort to preserve and augment Head Start gains. In this report, achievement test data on a set of children who participated in both Head Start and Follow Through are…

  14. Retrospective Evaluation of Pediatric Oral Biopsies from A Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery Centre in Salem, Tamil Nadu, India

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Ramesh; Ramesh, Maya; Paul, George

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the pediatric oral biopsies received between 2002-2011 from a dental and maxillofacial centre in Salem, Tamilnadu, India retrospectively based on age, sex, site and type of the pathologies. Materials and Methods: The records of dental and maxillofacial surgery centre were taken and a retrospective evaluation of the pediatric lesions biopsied over a period of ten years (2002-2011) was done. Patients aged 15 years and below were considered as pediatric patients and pathologies were grouped into 8 categories, according to age, gender, anatomic location and pathologic diagnosis. Results: A total of nine hundred twenty five biopsies were studied, of which 97 cases were from pediatric patients. The pathologies were predominant in mandible to maxilla (47:29).The distribution of the pathologies were 44 odontogenic pathologies, 18 connective tissue tumours, 3 salivary gland tumours, 5 fibro osseous lesions and 25 tumour like lesions. Out of this 44 odontogenic pathologies, 39 were odontogenic cysts, and 5 were odontogenic tumours. Conclusion: Unlike other studies, the lesions were more common in the mandible with a female predilection. The majority of oral and maxillofacial lesions detected in pediatric population were benign similar to the previous reports. PMID:24596780

  15. Evaluating bronchodilator response in pediatric patients with post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans: use of different criteria for identifying airway reversibility

    PubMed Central

    Mattiello, Rita; Vidal, Paula Cristina; Sarria, Edgar Enrique; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Mocelin, Helena Teresinha; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Post-infectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is a clinical entity that has been classified as constrictive, fixed obstruction of the lumen by fibrotic tissue. However, recent studies using impulse oscillometry have reported bronchodilator responses in PIBO patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate bronchodilator responses in pediatric PIBO patients, comparing different criteria to define the response. Methods: We evaluated pediatric patients diagnosed with PIBO and treated at one of two pediatric pulmonology outpatient clinics in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Spirometric parameters were measured in accordance with international recommendations. Results: We included a total of 72 pediatric PIBO patients. The mean pre- and post-bronchodilator values were clearly lower than the reference values for all parameters, especially FEF25-75%. There were post-bronchodilator improvements. When measured as mean percent increases, FEV1 and FEF25-75%, improved by 11% and 20%, respectively. However, when the absolute values were calculated, the mean FEV1 and FEF25-75% both increased by only 0.1 L. We found that age at viral aggression, a family history of asthma, and allergy had no significant effects on bronchodilator responses. Conclusions: Pediatric patients with PIBO have peripheral airway obstruction that is responsive to treatment but is not completely reversible with a bronchodilator. The concept of PIBO as fixed, irreversible obstruction does not seem to apply to this population. Our data suggest that airway obstruction is variable in PIBO patients, a finding that could have major clinical implications. PMID:27383929

  16. Evaluation of SLOG/TCI-III pediatric system on target control infusion of propofol

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The target-controlled infusion-III (SLOG/TCI-III) system was derived from a model set up by the local pediatric population for target control infusion of propofol. Methods The current study aimed at evaluating the difference between target concentrations of propofol and performance, which was measured using the SLOG/TCI-III system in children. Thirty children fulfilling the I-II criteria according to American Society of Anesthesiology were enrolled in the study. The target plasma concentration of propofol was fed into the SLOG/TCI-III system and compared with the measured concentrations of propofol. Blood samples were collected and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector. The performance error (PE) was determined for each measured blood propofol concentration. The performances of the TCI-III system were determined by the median performance error (MDPE), the median absolute performance error (MDAPE), and Wobble (the median absolute deviation of each PE from the MDPE), respectively. Results Concentration against target concentration showed good linear correlation: concentration = 1.3428 target concentration - 0.2633 (r = 0.8667). The MDPE and MDAPE of the pediatric system were 10 and 22%, respectively, and the median value for Wobble was 24%. MDPE and MDAPE were less than 15 and 30%, respectively. Conclusions The performance of TCI-III system seems to be in the accepted limits for clinical practice in children. PMID:22044738

  17. Evaluation of Candida Infection after Six Months of Transplantation in Pediatric Liver Recipients in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Honar, N.; Imanieh, M. H.; Haghighat, M.; Dehghani, S. M.; Zahmatkeshan, M.; Geramizadeh, B.; Badiee, P.; Nikeghbalian, S.; Kazemi, K.; Bahador, A.; Salahi, H.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Liver transplantation (LT) is the standard treatment of end-stage liver diseases (ESLD). Invasive fungal infection is one of the important causes of morbidity and mortality after transplantation. Objective: To determine the incidence of late-onset (after 6 months of LT) Candida infection in recipients. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate 50 pediatric patients after LT for 8 years at the LT Unit of Nemazee Hospital affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. We followed the patients until 6 months post-LT for episodes of Candida infection proven by culture. Results: One recipient (2%) developed late-onset esophageal candidiasis with improvement after intravenous amphotricin therapy but finally expired with a diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). Conclusions: The incidence of late-onset Candida infection is not significant in pediatric liver recipient, but it still remains a significant problem. Control of Candida colonization would reduce the risk of invasive fungal infections and possibly more fatal complications. PMID:25013602

  18. Evaluation of the Relationship Between Mechanism of Injury and Outcome in Pediatric Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Randall S.; Jang, Tai S.; Nair, Satish S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Most prehospital triage strategies are based on physiologic, anatomic, and mechanism-related variables. Although previous studies have suggested the value of physiologic and anatomic triage criteria, the predictive capacity of mechanism of injury has been questioned. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between mechanism of injury and resource utilization and outcome among injured children treated at trauma centers. Methods The relationship between mechanism of injury and mortality and resource utilization (need for operative care, total and ICU length of stay) was analyzed using the records of pediatric patients (age <15 years) included in the National Pediatric Trauma Registry between 1995 and 2001. Results Significant variability in the outcome, resources requirements, and need for inpatient rehabilitation after discharge were observed among the mechanisms analyzed. Mechanisms such as firearm injuries were more likely to be severe and require significant trauma center resources, whereas other mechanisms such as falls related to stairs were more likely to result in injuries that were less severe and require relatively few resources. A proposed framework is presented into which mechanisms are stratified according to severity of injury (high vs. low severity) and need for trauma center resources (high vs. low requirement). Conclusions Mechanism of injury is associated with the need for trauma center care but this association is highly dependent on the measure used to determine appropriateness of triage. PMID:17426560

  19. Longitudinal Study Evaluating Postural Balance of Young Athletes.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Nemet, Dan; Pantanowitz, Michal; Zeev, Aviva; Hallumi, Monder; Sindiani, Mahmood; Meckel, Yoav; Eliakim, Alon

    2016-02-01

    Repeated anaerobic conditions during athletic performance may cause general and local fatigue that result in postural balance deficit. Evidence suggests that improved postural balance during athletic training may decrease the risk for fallings and traumatic injuries among athletes. Twenty athletes (12 girls, 8 boys) and 20 controls (12 girls, 8 boys) ages 10-15 years participated in the current study. All athletes were active in an 8-month physical activity program, 3 times per week for 90 min., specific to basketball, soccer, or athletic training. The control children participated in physical education at school only, with no involvement in organized extracurricular sports. All participants were evaluated for postural balance in three assessments over one year (at 4-mo intervals); the Interactive Balance System machine (Tetrax device) was used to assess balance at three test times (pre-, post-, and 10 min) after a session of a repeated sprint anaerobic test, consisting of 12 × 20 m run starting every 20 sec. The athletes had better postural balance than controls. There were different group patterns of change over the sessions; a significant interaction of session and group indicated that postural balance of the groups differed. The contribution of low sway frequencies (F1) and high sway frequencies (F6) differed between the controls and the athletes group. Results suggested that although athletes had better postural balance, improvement should be encouraged during training over the sessions and seasons, with special awareness of the balance deficit that occurs immediately after anaerobic stress and at the end of the season, to decrease the risk of injuries. PMID:27420320

  20. Design and Evaluation of a Simulation for Pediatric Dentistry in Virtual Worlds

    PubMed Central

    Louloudiadis, Konstantinos; Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos-Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Background Three-dimensional virtual worlds are becoming very popular among educators in the medical field. Virtual clinics and patients are already used for case study and role play in both undergraduate and continuing education levels. Dental education can also take advantage of the virtual world’s pedagogical features in order to give students the opportunity to interact with virtual patients (VPs) and practice in treatment planning. Objective The objective of this study was to design and evaluate a virtual patient as a supplemental teaching tool for pediatric dentistry. Methods A child VP, called Erietta, was created by utilizing the programming and building tools that online virtual worlds offer. The case is about an eight-year old girl visiting the dentist with her mother for the first time. Communication techniques such as Tell-Show-Do and parents’ interference management were the basic elements of the educational scenario on which the VP was based. An evaluation of the simulation was made by 103 dental students in their fourth year of study. Two groups were formed: an experimental group which was exposed to the simulation (n=52) and a control group which did not receive the simulation (n=51). At the end, both groups were asked to complete a knowledge questionnaire and the results were compared. Results A statistically significant difference between the two groups was found by applying a t test for independent samples (P<.001), showing a positive learning effect from the VP. The majority of the participants evaluated the aspects of the simulation very positively while 69% (36/52) of the simulation group expressed their preference for using this module as an additional teaching tool. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a pediatric dentistry VP built in a virtual world offers significant learning potential when used as a supplement to the traditional teaching techniques. PMID:24168820

  1. Accuracy and Precision of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Computer-Adaptive Tests (PEDI-CAT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Stephen M.; Coster, Wendy J.; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.; Kramer, Jessica; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Kao, Ying-Chia; Moed, Rich; Ludlow, Larry H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aims of the study were to: (1) build new item banks for a revised version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) with four content domains: daily activities, mobility, social/cognitive, and responsibility; and (2) use post-hoc simulations based on the combined normative and disability calibration samples to assess the…

  2. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills

    PubMed Central

    Psihogios, Alexandra M.; Kolbuck, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. Method 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Results Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. Conclusions This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. PMID:26002195

  3. EVALUATION OF CASES WITH THE USAGE OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE TABLETS IN THE PEDIATRIC FORMULA.

    PubMed

    Kuriata, Elżbieta; Sawicki, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Lack of availability, of either the medicinal product intended to be used for children, or such in a dose which is fitting for the individual child's needs, results in physicians administering medicines meant for the adult. The target of the thesis was to evaluate the cases with the usage of commercially avaible conventional tablet-formulated medicinal products intended for the adult in the pediatric formula. The subjects of the evaluation were the form of the pediatric drug, prepared from commercially available tablets and capsules, as well as the legitimacy of their usage in the treatment of the pediatric population. One hundred and fifty-four prescriptions filled in community pharmacies of Warminsko-Mazurskie Voivodeship in 2011 were chosen. A total of 5805 divided powders in starch capsules were prepared. The prescribing practice included 6 groups of manufactured medicinal products in the form of conventional tablets, containing as follows: anti-hypertensive medicines (ACE inhibitors--enalapril, captopril, ramipril, loop diuretics--furosemide, potassium sparing diuretics--spironolactone, β-adrenolytics--propranolol, α- and β-adrenolytics--carvedilol), medicines for heart failure (foxglove glycosides--digoxin, methyldigoxin), anti-clotting medicines (acetylsalicylic acid), peristalsis stimulating agents (metoclopramide), antibacterial medicines (furagin), and dopaminergic (carbidopa-levodopa). The only compounded forms ordered by the physicians were divided powders for an internal use. Starch capsules for powder preparation provided the only 'package' for the dose of the compounded powder, which after pouring, solving or suspending in water was administered to children. Such a shift of the form, between an oral tablet and divided powder for an internal use, did not cause a change in the method of administration. The information on indications and the way of dosage for children, inserted in the Summary of Product Characteristics, enables the administration

  4. Developing and evaluating an automated appendicitis risk stratification algorithm for pediatric patients in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Deleger, Louise; Brodzinski, Holly; Zhai, Haijun; Li, Qi; Lingren, Todd; Kirkendall, Eric S; Alessandrini, Evaline; Solti, Imre

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate a proposed natural language processing (NLP) and machine-learning based automated method to risk stratify abdominal pain patients by analyzing the content of the electronic health record (EHR). Methods We analyzed the EHRs of a random sample of 2100 pediatric emergency department (ED) patients with abdominal pain, including all with a final diagnosis of appendicitis. We developed an automated system to extract relevant elements from ED physician notes and lab values and to automatically assign a risk category for acute appendicitis (high, equivocal, or low), based on the Pediatric Appendicitis Score. We evaluated the performance of the system against a manually created gold standard (chart reviews by ED physicians) for recall, specificity, and precision. Results The system achieved an average F-measure of 0.867 (0.869 recall and 0.863 precision) for risk classification, which was comparable to physician experts. Recall/precision were 0.897/0.952 in the low-risk category, 0.855/0.886 in the high-risk category, and 0.854/0.766 in the equivocal-risk category. The information that the system required as input to achieve high F-measure was available within the first 4 h of the ED visit. Conclusions Automated appendicitis risk categorization based on EHR content, including information from clinical notes, shows comparable performance to physician chart reviewers as measured by their inter-annotator agreement and represents a promising new approach for computerized decision support to promote application of evidence-based medicine at the point of care. PMID:24130231

  5. An evaluation of the safety and efficacy of bimatoprost for eyelash growth in pediatric subjects

    PubMed Central

    Borchert, Mark; Bruce, Suzanne; Wirta, David; Yoelin, Steven G; Lee, Sungwook; Mao, Cheri; VanDenburgh, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the safety and effectiveness of bimatoprost 0.03% for treatment of eyelash hypotrichosis in a pediatric population. Patients and methods This multicenter, randomized, double-masked, parallel-group study was conducted at seven sites in the US and Brazil. Subjects with eyelash hypotrichosis caused by chemotherapy or alopecia areata (aged 5–17 years) or healthy adolescents aged 15–17 years were enrolled (N=71). Subjects applied bimatoprost 0.03% or vehicle to upper eyelid margins once nightly for 4 months and were followed for 1 month post-treatment. Eyelash prominence was assessed using the validated 4-grade Global Eyelash Assessment scale with photonumeric guide. Changes in eyelash length, thickness, and darkness were measured by digital image analysis. Safety was assessed by adverse events and ophthalmic observations. Results Eyelash prominence improved in a significantly greater proportion of subjects treated with bimatoprost compared with vehicle at month 4 (70.8% versus 26.1%; P<0.001). This benefit was sustained at month 5 post-treatment assessment. Digital image analysis measures were significantly improved with bimatoprost. Significant treatment benefits with bimatoprost versus vehicle were evident among the healthy adolescents but not in the postchemotherapy or alopecia areata subgroups. The safety profile of bimatoprost was consistent with previous studies in adults. Conclusion Bimatoprost was safe and well tolerated in pediatric subjects with eyelash hypotrichosis. In this study with limited sample size, subgroup analyses showed that treatment was effective in healthy adolescents with no concurrent contributing medical condition, but not in those with eyelash hypotrichosis due to chemotherapy or alopecia areata. PMID:27022239

  6. Pediatric Trichotillomania

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Julie P.; Franklin, Martin E.

    2012-01-01

    Trichotillomania (TTM) is an impulse control disorder characterized by chronic hair-pulling, distress, and impairment. Although the negative effects of TTM are documented and often readily evident, there remains a paucity of psychopathology and treatment research on this disorder, particularly in pediatric populations. In an effort to improve assessment of pediatric TTM, several TTM-specific instruments for youth have now been developed to reliably identify symptoms and examine related phenomenology. Instrument development has now yielded instruments to evaluate TTM and related symptoms in the context of clinical trials of youth, and the first randomized controlled trial of any treatment for pediatric TTM was recently published. Using the initial pediatric TTM studies as building blocks, future research is now needed to create a stronger body of knowledge about the relative and combined efficacy of potential interventions for TTM in youth, as well as to examine the effects of TTM phenomenology and comorbidity on treatment outcome. Dissemination efforts must also be heightened for this knowledge to best reach these vulnerable populations. PMID:22437627

  7. A fast building and effective hydraulic pediatric mock circulatory system for the evaluation of a left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Huang, Feng; Ruan, Xiaodong; Zou, Jun; Qian, Wenwei; Fu, Xin

    2013-01-01

    A mock circulatory system (MCS) has been proven a useful tool in the development of a ventricular assist device. Nowadays a MCS aimed at the evaluation of pediatric blood pumps, which require many different considerations compared with that of adults, has become an urgent need. This article presents the details on how the dynamic process of the left ventricle, which is described in terms of the pressure-volume loop (P-V loop), and the properties of the circulation such as compliance and resistance are simulated by hydraulic elements. A simple control method is introduced to reproduce the physiological afterload and preload sensitivities of the mock ventricle for the first time. Hemodynamic performance of the system is obtained by medical sensors to validate the similarity of the device to the native cardiovascular system. The actual sensitivities of the mock ventricle are obtained intuitively from the changes of the P-V loops. The aortic input impedance of the MCS is also obtained and compared with the data from previous medical reports. At last a pediatric left ventricular assist device (LVAD) prototype is introduced for testing to further verify the effectiveness of the MCS. The experimental results indicate that this pediatric MCS is capable of reproducing basic hemodynamic characteristics of a child in both normal and pathological conditions and it is sufficient for testing a pediatric LVAD. Besides, most components constituting the main hydraulic part of this MCS are inexpensive off-the-shelf products, making the MCS easy and fast to build. PMID:24088901

  8. Pediatric Hand Injuries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Matthew A; Cogan, Charles J; Adkinson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric hand injuries are extremely common. Although many hand injuries are adequately managed in the emergency department, some may need evaluation and treatment by a pediatric hand surgeon to ensure a good functional outcome. This article discusses the diagnosis and management of the most common pediatric hand maladies: fingertip injuries/amputation, tendon injuries, and phalangeal and metacarpal fractures. The plastic surgery nurse should be familiar with hand injuries that require intervention to facilitate efficient management and optimal postoperative care. PMID:27606586

  9. Parental Evaluation of a Nurse Practitioner-Developed Pediatric Neurosurgery Website

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Tina Kovacs; Kleib, Manal; Davidson, Sandra J

    2016-01-01

    Background Parents often turn to the Internet to seek health information about their child’s diagnosis and condition. Information, support, and resources regarding pediatric neurosurgery are scarce, hard to find, and difficult to comprehend. To address this gap, a pediatric nurse practitioner designed a website called the Neurosurgery Kids Fund (NKF). Analyzing the legitimacy of the NKF website for parents seeking health information and fulfilling their social and resource needs is critical to the website’s future development and success. Objective To explore parental usage of the NKF website, track visitor behavior, evaluate usability and design, establish ways to improve user experience, and identify ways to redesign the website. The aim of this study was to assess and evaluate whether a custom-designed health website could meet parents’ health information, support, and resource needs. Methods A multimethod approach was used. Google Analytic usage reports were collected and analyzed for the period of April 23, 2013, to November 30, 2013. Fifty-two online questionnaires that targeted the website’s usability were collected between June 18, 2014, and July 30, 2014. Finally, a focus group was conducted on August 20, 2014, to explore parents’ perceptions and user experiences. Findings were analyzed using an inductive content analysis approach. Results There were a total of 2998 sessions and 8818 page views, with 2.94 pages viewed per session, a 56.20% bounce rate, an average session duration of 2 minutes 24 seconds, and a 56.24% new sessions rate. Results from 52 eligible surveys included that the majority of NKF users were Caucasian (90%), females (92%), aged 36-45 years (48%), with a university or college degree or diploma (69%). Half plan to use the health information. Over half reported turning to the Internet for health information and spending 2 to 4 hours a day online. The most common reasons for using the NKF website were to (1) gather information

  10. Are Pediatric Critical Care Medicine Fellowships Teaching and Evaluating Communication and Professionalism?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, David A.; Mink, Richard B.; Lee, K. Jane; Winkler, Margaret K.; Ross, Sara L.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Schuette, Jennifer J.; Mason, Katherine; Storgion, Stephanie A.; Goodman, Denise M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the teaching and evaluation modalities utilized by pediatric critical care medicine (PCCM) training programs in the areas of professionalism and communication. Design Cross sectional national survey. Setting PCCM fellowship programs. Subjects PCCM program directors. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Survey response rate was 67% of program directors in the United States, representing educators for 73% of current PCCM fellows. Respondents had a median of 4 years experience, with a median of 7 fellows and 12 teaching faculty in his/her program. Faculty role modeling or direct observation with feedback were the most common modalities used to teach communication. However, 6 of the 8 (75%) required elements of communication evaluated were not specifically taught by all programs. Faculty role modeling was the most commonly utilized technique to teach professionalism in 44% of the content areas evaluated, and didactics were the technique utilized in 44% of other professionalism content areas. Thirteen of the 16 required elements of professionalism (81%) were not taught by all programs. Evaluations by members of the healthcare team were used for assessment for both competencies. The use of a specific teaching technique was not related to program size, program director experience, or training in medical education. Conclusions A wide range of techniques are currently utilized within PCCM to teach communication and professionalism, but there are a number of required elements that are not specifically taught by fellowship programs. These areas of deficiency represent opportunities for future investigation and improved education in the important competencies of communication and professionalism. PMID:23867427

  11. Pediatric MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the oral medications in the pediatric population. Network of Pediatric MS Centers The National MS Society ... MS Study Group (2004) and established a nationwide network of six Pediatric MS Centers of Excellence (2006) ...

  12. Pediatric Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... common causes, which are 1 , 2 , 3 : Motor vehicle accidents Suffocation (being unable to breathe) Drowning Poisoning ... gov/safechild [top] American Academy of Pediatrics. (2008). Management of pediatric trauma. Pediatrics, 121 , 849–854. [top] ...

  13. MO-E-17A-10: Evaluation of Body and Head Dimensions of Pediatric Patients as a Function of Age

    SciTech Connect

    Seibert, JA; Boone, JM

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Phantom development in medical physics plays an important role in radiation dose assessment and image quality evaluation, and this is especially true in the pediatric patient population. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the relationship between patient age and patient size, focusing on the abdomen-pelvis and head effective diameters, for patients ranging in age from newborn to 18 years. Methods: A dose reporting tool for computed tomography systems was installed at our institution to achieve compliance with state law commencing on July 1, 2012. The software records a number of patient-specific data, and also reports CT dose metrics (CTDIvol and DLP) into the patients interpretive report. The database generated by the software was mined to determine patient effective diameter as a function of age for pediatric patients aged 0–18 years. CT protocols including abdomen-pelvis and routine head were evaluated, and specific to this study the patients age, gender and equivalent diameter were recorded. Results: Six age ranges were evaluated: A(0–3), B(4–6), C(7–9), D(10–12),E(13–15),F(16–18). For the torso in these groups based upon 694 patients, median effective diameters were 147, 167, 184, 214, 231, 246 mm, respectively. For the head (N=1833), median diameters were 143, 157, 162, 168, 174, and 174, respectively. Conclusion: A solid understanding of the approximate dimensions of pediatric patients as a function of age is useful in the development of age-based imaging protocols and dose assessments. CT dose-reporting tools generate a great deal of data with respect to body dimensions automatically. In this study, median equivalent diameters for the abdomen-pelvis and head of pediatric patients were evaluated. These data may prove useful in the development of both mathematical and physical phantoms for dosimetry and image quality assessment.

  14. Clinical guidelines in pediatric headache: evaluation of quality using the AGREE II instrument

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) tool is a validated questionnaire used to assess the methodological quality of clinical guidelines (CGs). We used the AGREE II tool to assess the development process, the methodological quality, and the quality of reporting of available pediatric CGs for the management of headache in children. We also studied the variability in responses related to the characteristics of eleven Italian neuropediatric centers, showing similarities and differences in the main recommendations reported in CGs. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted from January 2002 to June 2013 on Mediline, the Cochrane database, the National Guideline Clearinghouse website and the NHS evidence search tool, using the following terms: headache, cephalalgia, guidelines and children (MESH or text words). Six CGs providing information on the diagnosis and management of headache and specific recommendations for children were selected. Eleven neuropediatric centers assessed the overall quality and the appropriateness of all available CGs using of the AGREE II instrument. Results Six CGs meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria were identified and assessed by 11 reviewers. Our study showed that the NICE CGs was “strongly recommended” while the French and Danish CGs were mainly “not recommended”. The comparison between the overall quality score of the French CGs and the NICE CGs was statistically significant (6.54 ± 0.69 vs 4.18 ± 1.08; p =0.001). The correlation analysis between quality domain score and guideline publication date showed a statistically significant association only for the “editorial independence” domain (r = 0.842 p = 0.035). The intra-class coefficients showed that the 11 reviewers had the highest agreement for the Lewis CGs (r = 0.857), and the lowest one for the NICE CGs (r = 0.656). Statistical analyses showed that professionals from outpatient services

  15. Appendicitis in Children: Evaluation of the Pediatric Appendicitis Score in Younger and Older Children

    PubMed Central

    Salö, Martin; Friman, Gustav; Stenström, Pernilla; Ohlsson, Bodil; Arnbjörnsson, Einar

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to evaluate Pediatric Appendicitis Score (PAS), diagnostic delay, and factors responsible for possible late diagnosis in children <4 years compared with older children who were operated on for suspected appendicitis. Method. 122 children, between 1 and 14 years, operated on with appendectomy for suspected appendicitis, were retrospectively analyzed. The cohort was divided into two age groups: ≥4 years (n = 102) and <4 years (n = 20). Results. The mean PAS was lower among the younger compared with the older patients (5.3 and 6.6, resp.; P = 0.005), despite the fact that younger children had more severe appendicitis (75.0% and 33.3%, resp.; P = 0.001). PAS had low sensitivity in both groups, with a significantly lower sensitivity among the younger patients. Parent and doctor delay were confirmed in children <4 years of age with appendicitis. PAS did not aid in patients with doctor delay. Parameters in patient history, symptoms, and abdominal examination were more diffuse in younger children. Conclusion. PAS should be used with caution when examining children younger than 4 years of age. Diffuse symptoms in younger children with acute appendicitis lead to delay and to later diagnosis and more complicated appendicitis. PMID:25574500

  16. [Clinical evaluation of biapenem (L-627), a new carbapenem antibiotic in the pediatric field].

    PubMed

    Mikuni, K; Kobayashi, T; Matsuyama, T; Watanabe, N

    1994-07-01

    We studied the clinical efficacy of biapenem (L-627), a new parenteral carbapenem beta-lactam antibiotic in the pediatric field. L-627 was administered intravenously to 11 patients with ages ranging 2 months to 10 years and 5 months with acute infectious diseases. Doses ranged 28.1 to 72.6 mg/kg/day. The diagnosed diseases included 7 respiratory tract infections, 1 purulent meningitis, 1 sepsis, 1 cervical lymphadenitis and 1 urinary tract infection. Two of these cases one with Mycoplasma infection and the other which had been administered with other antimicrobial agents were not evaluated. The clinical efficacy rate was 77.8% (7/9) and the bacteriological eradication rate was 66.7% (4/6). Laboratory examinations revealed that there was one case with elevated liver enzyme levels with showing elevation of GOT, GPT and LDH. No other side effects attributable to this drug were observed. Thus, it appears that L-627 is a useful antibiotic in treating moderate to severe acute bacterial infections in children. PMID:7933526

  17. Histological evaluation of bone response to pediatric endodontic pastes: an experimental study in guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Lacativa, Andréa Mara; Loyola, Adriano M; Sousa, Cassio José Alves

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate by the intra-osseous implant technique the most commonly used materials for pulp therapy in pediatric dentistry: calcium hydroxide (CH), Guedes Pinto paste and CTZ paste, according to FDI (1980) and ANSI/ADA (1982) recommendations. Thirty guinea pigs, 10 for each material, divided into experimental periods of 4 and 12 weeks received one implant on each side of the lower jaw symphysis. The external lateral tube wall served as control for the technique. At the end of the observation periods, the animals were euthanized and specimens were prepared for routine histological examination. It was observed that CH and CTZ paste induced severe inflammation, a large amount of necrotic tissue, lymphocytes, foreign body cells and bone resorption, while Guedes Pinto Paste induced little or no inflammation in the 4-week observation period. After 12 weeks, the reactions to CH and Guedes Pinto paste were also absent/mild, presenting a general pattern of replacement by recently formed bone tissue while a moderate to severe inflammatory response was observed with CTZ paste. Guedes Pinto paste presented acceptable biocompatibility levels in both analyzed periods; CH only showed acceptable biocompatibility in the 12-week period while CTZ paste showed no biocompatibility in both periods. Among the tested materials, only Guedes Pinto paste presented an acceptable biocompatibility. PMID:23338254

  18. Three-dimensional evaluation of heel raise test in pediatric planovalgus feet and normal feet.

    PubMed

    Krautwurst, Britta K; Wolf, Sebastian I; Dreher, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Planovalgus foot is a common pediatric deformity which may be associated with pain. To evaluate flexibility of the foot, the heel raise test is used. During this test the arch and hindfoot are assessed. Several studies have described planovalgus foot based on 3D gait and standing analysis. However, no studies have evaluated foot flexibility during heel raise using an objective 3D analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the flexibility of planovalgus feet during the heel raise test using an objective 3D assessment and to determine whether any hypotheses can be generated about potential differences between painful and painless flexible planovalgus feet and reference feet. Here, 3D foot analysis was conducted in 33 children (7 reference feet, 16 painless, and 10 painful flexible planovalgus feet) during the heel raise test. To identify the characteristics of planovalgus foot, the concept of 3D projection angles was used as introduced in the Heidelberg Foot Measurement Method (HFMM), with a modified marker set. All feet showed dynamic movements of the medial arch and hindfoot from valgus to varus position during heel raise. Reference feet had the smallest range of motion, perhaps due to joint stability and absence of foot deformity. Painful and painless flexible planovalgus feet demonstrated similar movements. No significant differences were found between the painful and painless groups. However, the kinematics of the pain group seemed to differ more from those of the reference group than did kinematics of the painless group. This assessment is a new, practical, and objective method to measure the flexibility of small children's feet. PMID:27262407

  19. [Methodological aspects of economic evaluation in pediatrics: illustration by RSV infection prophylaxis in the French setting].

    PubMed

    Hascoet, J-M; Fagnani, F; Charlemagne, A; Vieux, R; Rozé, J-C; Bendjenana, H

    2008-12-01

    The methodological approach of the economic evaluation of drugs in pediatrics is illustrated by the case study of the prophylaxis for RSV infections using palivizumab in the French setting. The indications for the reimbursement of this treatment have been restricted to premature children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) or hemodynamically significant congenital-heart disease. A model was developed primarily using the results of the pivotal clinical studies on palivizumab. Unit costs were estimated (2006 values) in both societal and payer's perspectives. An assumption was made and discussed on the benefits of the prophylaxis on mortality. Based on the different data available and the estimated costs and benefits, different cost-effectiveness ratios (CERs) were estimated from both the society's and payer's points of view. A discount rate of 3% was applied to benefit. The CER obtained in the most unfavorable case is considered acceptable for the innovative-medical technologies in the French-healthcare system. Some of the parameters used by the model will be illustrated from the EPIPAGE study data from 2 of the 9 regions involved in this study: this evaluation suggests that the children not having an RSV infection during their 1st year of life will continue to require significantly fewer hospitalizations in the following years. These additional evaluations also suggest that the model overestimates the costs of the treatment with regard to the true medical situation. This could be explained by the model not using the children's exact weight or the real number of injections because the children had been discharged from the maternity ward based on their date of birth and the epidemic period. In spite of these factors, RSV prophylaxis using palivizumab in premature children with BPD or hemodynamically significant congenital-heart disease can be considered cost-effective in France. PMID:18990549

  20. Update of Diagnostic Evaluation of Craniosynostosis with a Focus on Pediatric Systematic Evaluation and Genetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Su-Kyeong; Park, Ki-Su; Park, Seong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Most craniosynostoses are sporadic, but may have an underlying genetic basis. Secondary and syndromic craniosynostosis accompanies various systemic diseases or associated anomalies. Early detection of an associated disease may facilitate the interdisciplinary management of patients and improve outcomes. For that reason, systematic evaluation of craniosynostosis is mandatory. The authors reviewed systematic evaluation of craniosynostosis with an emphasis on genetic analysis. PMID:27226851

  1. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Harcke, H. Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Ultrasound is ideally suited to the evaluation of the pediatric musculoskeletal system because of the increased ratio of cartilage to bone in the immature skeleton. The purpose of this article is to review the current uses of musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric patients. Hip sonography is widely accepted; other applications are increasing in popularity. PMID:11387111

  2. Development of a Test to Evaluate Olfactory Function in a Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Pamela; Mennella, Julie A.; Maute, Christopher; Castor, Sara M.; Silva-Garcia, Aleida; Slotkin, Jerry; Grindle, Christopher R.; Parkes, William; Pribitkin, Edmund A.; Reilly, James S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis This study evaluated two versions of a test for olfactory function to determine suitability for use in a pediatric population. Study Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Method In phase 1, 369 children (ages 3–17 years) and 277 adults (parents) were tested. Children began with identification and familiarity judgments to pictures representing target odors and distractors. Odors were administered via a six-item scratch and sniff test. Each answer sheet contained the correct odor source and three distractors. In phase 2, 50 children (ages 3–4 years) and 43 adults were given a revised version with eight odors judged more representative of the source and familiar to children. Results Both completion time and identification accuracy in phase 1 improved with age. Accuracy of children 5 years old and above equaled adults for two of the three best odors. In phase 2, adults' accuracy significantly improved relative to phase 1 (92% vs. 68%), and exceeded that of 4 year olds for four of eight odors and 3 year olds for seven of eight odors. Conclusions Children as young as 3 years of age can perform olfactory testing, but take longer than do older children and adults (7.44 vs. 5.66 vs. 3.71 minutes). Identification accuracy also increases as a function of age. The current six-item National Institutes of Health Toolbox Odor Identification Test is a brief, easily conducted test for evaluating olfactory ability. Collection of normative data for children of all ages and adults is needed to determine the clinical utility of the test and its interpretations for pathological conditions. PMID:22024835

  3. Undergraduate medical education programme renewal: a longitudinal context, input, process and product evaluation study.

    PubMed

    Mirzazadeh, Azim; Gandomkar, Roghayeh; Hejri, Sara Mortaz; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Koochak, Hamid Emadi; Golestani, Abolfazl; Jafarian, Ali; Jalili, Mohammad; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Saleh, Narges; Shahi, Farhad; Razavi, Seyed Hasan Emami

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize the Context, Input, Process and Product (CIPP) evaluation model as a comprehensive framework to guide initiating, planning, implementing and evaluating a revised undergraduate medical education programme. The eight-year longitudinal evaluation study consisted of four phases compatible with the four components of the CIPP model. In the first phase, we explored the strengths and weaknesses of the traditional programme as well as contextual needs, assets, and resources. For the second phase, we proposed a model for the programme considering contextual features. During the process phase, we provided formative information for revisions and adjustments. Finally, in the fourth phase, we evaluated the outcomes of the new undergraduate medical education programme in the basic sciences phase. Information was collected from different sources such as medical students, faculty members, administrators, and graduates, using various qualitative and quantitative methods including focus groups, questionnaires, and performance measures. The CIPP model has the potential to guide policy makers to systematically collect evaluation data and to manage stakeholders' reactions at each stage of the reform in order to make informed decisions. However, the model may result in evaluation burden and fail to address some unplanned evaluation questions. PMID:26820748

  4. The evaluation of flap growth and long-term results of pediatric mandible reconstructions using free fibular flaps.

    PubMed

    Temiz, Gökhan; Bilkay, Ufuk; Tiftikçioğlu, Yiğit Özer; Mezili, Candan Tevfik; Songür, Ecmel

    2015-05-01

    Currently, the free fibular flap is well accepted as the first choice for mandibular reconstruction. Achieving functional results in pediatric patients requires a different approach than that employed for mature patients. Because the pediatric craniofacial skeleton continues to grow, reconstruction is more challenging, and the long-term results can be different from those of adult patients. In this study, we sought to measure flap growth objectively in our series. Ten pediatric patients who underwent reconstruction with free fibular flaps were retrospectively reviewed. Flap growth was evaluated by comparing the intraoperative photographs with photographs of the control panoramic mandibular radiographs taken using photo-anthropometric techniques. The measurements were converted to proportionality indices (PI), and these indices were compared. Subsequent complications and functional results were also evaluated. The mean patient age was 11.8 years, and the mean follow up was 57.7 months. The mean preoperative PI value was 10.74  ±  2.47. The mean postoperative PI value was 12.52  ±  2.34. The mean difference between the preoperative and postoperative PI values was -1.78 ± 0.53. These photo-anthropometric data clearly illustrated the growth of the fibular flaps (P = 0.001). None of these patients exhibited nonunion of the fractures; however, one patient experienced a delayed union, one had chronic temporomandibular joint pain, and one had chronic temporomandibular joint luxation. In two patients, the inter-incisive measurements were below the third percentile, and two additional patients had grade 2 eating abilities, which can be regarded as poor. All of the patients had symmetric mandibular contours. Free fibular flaps continue to grow in pediatric patients. This flap is a "workhorse" flap in children because it adapts to the craniofacial skeleton via its ability to grow, and this ability results in subsequent good cosmetic and functional results. PMID

  5. [Fundamental study of helical scanning CT--evaluation of spatial resolution in the longitudinal axis].

    PubMed

    Anno, H; Katada, K; Tsujioka, K; Ida, Y; Ohashi, I; Takeuchi, A; Koga, S

    1992-11-25

    We evaluated spatial resolution in the longitudinal axis with helical scanning CT using a fourth-generation fast CT scanner. We made a phantom by stringing acrylic balls (65 mm phi x 8 and 9 mm phi x 6). The acquired images were processed by MPR and assessed visually to evaluate axis resolution. With the conventional scanning method, the partial volume effect varied with the starting position, but helical scanning was able to reconstruct high-resolution images using continuous raw data. During helical scanning, axis resolution varied depending on the slice width and sliding speed of the couch top. Even if the sliding speed was kept constant at 4 mm/sec, axis resolution was superior with a slice width of 2 mm than with one of 5 mm. PMID:1465334

  6. Longitudinal Evaluation of Work/Study Programs for the Educable Mentally Retarded in Oregon: Progress Report. Working Paper No. 62.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Andrew S.; And Others

    Discussed is phase 3 of a longitudinal research study evaluating Oregon's work-study programs for educable retarded secondary school students along the following dimensions: student characteristics, curriculum content and school experiences, work placement, instructional objectives of 26 work coordinators and evaluative instruments of short-term…

  7. Using Faculty Evaluation to Improve Teaching Quality: A Longitudinal Case Study of Higher Education in Southeast Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of implementation of a new system of faculty teaching evaluation at a graduate school of business in Thailand. The research employed a non-experimental, longitudinal case study design in the analysis of student course evaluation data gathered over a period of 21 terms during a seven-year period. The report…

  8. Evaluation of antibiotic use in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Qalab; Ul Haq, Anwar; Kumar, Raman; Ali, Syed Asad; Hussain, Kashif; Shakoor, Sadia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) patients are often prescribed antibiotics with a low threshold in comparison to patients elsewhere. Irrational antibiotics use can lead to rapid emergence of drug resistance, so surveillance of their use is important. Objectives: To evaluate the use of antibiotics in relation to bacteriological findings in PICU of a Tertiary Hospital. Methods: Retrospective review of medical records of all children (age 1 month–16 years) admitted in our closed multidisciplinary-cardiothoracic PICU from January to June 2013 was performed, after approval from Ethical Review Committee. For each antibiotic, indication (prophylactic, empiric, therapeutic) and duration of use were recorded. All diagnoses of infections were recorded according to diagnostic criteria of IPSCC 2005. Results are presented as frequency and percentages and median with inter quartile range using SPSS version 19. Results: All of the total 240 patients admitted in PICU during the study period received antibiotics: 43% (n = 104) prophylactically, 42% (n = 102) empirically, and 15% (n = 15) therapeutically. Median number of antibiotic use per patient in PICU was 3, with range of 1–7. 25% received 1 antibiotic, 23% received 2 antibiotics, 29% received 3 antibiotics, and rest received ≥4 antibiotics. Most commonly used antibiotics were cefazolin, meropenem, vancomycin and ceftriaxone, and most frequently used combination was meropenem and vancomycin. In majority of the cases, (70%) empiric antibiotic combinations were stopped in 72 h. Conclusion: This is the first report of antibiotics use in PICU from our country, which shows that antibiotics are prescribed universally in our PICU. Strategies to assess the need for antibiotic use are needed. PMID:27275078

  9. Educating Parents About Pediatric Research: Children and Clinical Studies Website Qualitative Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Lisa D; Welch, Lisa C; Pemberton, Victoria L; Pearson, Gail D

    2016-07-01

    A gap in information about pediatric clinical trials exists, and parents remain uncertain about what is involved in research studies involving children. We aimed to understand parent perspectives about pediatric clinical research after viewing the online Children and Clinical Studies (CaCS) program. Using a qualitative descriptive study design, we conducted focus groups with parents and phone interviews with physicians. Three themes emerged providing approaches to improve parent's understanding of clinical research by including strategies where parents (a) hear from parents like themselves to learn about pediatric research, (b) receive general clinical research information to complement study-specific details, and (c) are provided more information about the role of healthy child volunteers. Parents found the website a valuable tool that would help them make a decision about what it means to participate in research. This tool can assist parents, providers, and researchers by connecting general information with study-specific information. PMID:26711142

  10. Considering maturation status and relative age in the longitudinal evaluation of junior rugby league players.

    PubMed

    Till, K; Cobley, S; O' Hara, J; Cooke, C; Chapman, C

    2014-06-01

    This study longitudinally evaluated whether maturation and relative age interact with time during adolescence to differentially affect the development of anthropometric and fitness characteristics in junior rugby league players. Anthropometric and fitness characteristics of 81 junior players selected into the UK Rugby Football League's talent identification and development process were assessed over three consecutive occasions (i.e., under-13s, -14s, -15s). Players were grouped and compared in relation to maturational status (i.e., early, average, late) and relative age quartile (i.e., quartile 1). Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance identified significant (P < 0.001) overall main effects for maturation group, relative age quartile and importantly a maturation group by time interaction. Findings showed that the early-maturing group had the greatest anthropometric characteristics and medicine ball throw across the three occasions. However, the late-maturing group increased their height (early = 5.0 cm, late = 10.3 cm), medicine ball throw and 60-m sprint (early = -0.46 s, late = -0.85 s) the most throughout the 2-year period. Early (de)selection policies currently applied in talent identification and development programs are questionable when performance-related variables are tracked longitudinally. During adolescence, maturation status alongside relative age should be considered and controlled for when assessing athlete potential for future progression. PMID:23289942

  11. Long-Term Changes of Subcutaneous Fat Mass in HIV-Infected Children on Antiretroviral Therapy: A Retrospective Analysis of Longitudinal Data from Two Pediatric HIV-Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Sophie; Innes, Steve; Geelen, Sibyl P. M.; Wells, Jonathan C. K.; Smit, Colette; Wolfs, Tom F. W.; van Eck-Smit, Berthe L. F.; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Reiss, Peter; Scherpbier, Henriette J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Longitudinal studies objectively evaluating changes in regional fat distribution of HIV-infected children assessed by whole body dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) are scarce, whilst this long-term effect of HIV and antiretroviral therapy (cART) is an important issue in infected children in need for lifelong treatment. Methods We assessed regional fat distribution over time, measured with sequential DEXA-scans in HIV-infected children on cART in cohorts from South Africa (SA) and the Netherlands (NL), and in healthy controls (SA). Limb and trunk fat Z-scores were calculated with the lambda-mu-sigma (LMS) method. Multivariable linear regression models with mixed effects were used to investigate the effect of cART compounds on body fat distribution over time. Results In total, 218 children underwent 445 DEXA assessments with a median follow-up of 3.5 years. Fat mass in all limbs was decreased in HIV-infected children compared to controls (arm fat Z-score: coefficient -0.4813; P = 0.006, leg fat Z-score: coefficient -0.4345; P = 0.013). In the HIV-infected group, stavudine treatment was associated with lower subcutaneous fat mass (arm fat Z-score: coefficient -0.5838; P = 0.001), with an additional cumulative exposure effect (arm fat Z-score: coefficient -0.0867; P = 0.003). Conclusions Our study shows that subcutaneous fat loss is still prevalent in HIV-infected children on cART, and is strongly associated with cumulative stavudine exposure. These results underline the need for early detection of subcutaneous fat loss and alternative treatment options for HIV-infected children globally. PMID:26148119

  12. Evaluation of conventional nonpulsatile and novel pulsatile extracorporeal life support systems in a simulated pediatric extracorporeal life support model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shigang; Evenson, Alissa; Chin, Brian J; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate two extracorporeal life support (ECLS) circuits and determine the effect of pulsatile flow on pressure drop, flow/pressure waveforms, and hemodynamic energy levels in a pediatric pseudopatient. One ECLS circuit consisted of a Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump and Hilite 2400 LT oxygenator with arterial/venous tubing. The second circuit consisted of a Maquet RotaFlow centrifugal pump and Quadrox-iD Pediatric oxygenator with arterial/venous tubing. A 14Fr Medtronic Bio-Medicus one-piece pediatric arterial cannula was used for both circuits. All trials were conducted at flow rates ranging from 500 to 2800 mL/min using pulsatile or nonpulsatile flow. The post-cannula pressure was maintained at 50 mm Hg. Blood temperature was maintained at 36°C. Real-time pressure and flow data were recorded using a custom-based data acquisition system. The results showed that the Deltastream DP3 circuit produced surplus hemodynamic energy (SHE) in pulsatile mode at all flow rates, with greater SHE delivery at lower flow rates. Neither circuit produced SHE in nonpulsatile mode. The Deltastream DP3 pump also demonstrated consistently higher total hemodynamic energy at the pre-oxygenator site in pulsatile mode and a lesser pressure drop across the oxygenator. The Deltastream DP3 pump generated physiological pulsatility without backflow and provided increased hemodynamic energy. This novel ECLS circuit demonstrates suitable in vitro performance and adaptability to a wide range of pediatric patients. PMID:24660832

  13. Evaluation and management of pediatric hand injuries resulting from exercise machines.

    PubMed

    Vouis, Jon; Hadeed, Josef

    2009-07-01

    Traumatic injury to the hand in the pediatric population unfortunately remains common in the spectrum of accidental injuries sustained in this population. This is particularly true regarding stationary exercise equipment. The popularity of home exercise equipment continues to rise in the United States, particularly stationary bicycles and treadmills. Additional safety mechanisms are required to prevent the anticipated increase in the number of hand injuries to children as a result of these machines. The aim of this paper was to review the incidence and management of pediatric hand injuries sustained as a result of stationary exercise equipment in the home, in addition to increasing awareness of these types of injuries. PMID:19553858

  14. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B

  15. Lateralization of infant holding by mothers: A longitudinal evaluation of variations over the first 12 weeks.

    PubMed

    Todd, Brenda K; Banerjee, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The maternal preference to hold infants on the left rather than right side of the body was examined longitudinally, with attention to 4 explanations: maternal monitoring of infant state, maternal handedness, infant proximity to the mother's heartbeat, and preferred infant head position. The side and site of holding were measured over the first 12 weeks of the lives of 24 infants. Information about group and individual consistency in holding side allowed novel evaluation of the theories. A strong bias to hold on the left dropped below significance when the infants were aged 12 weeks and was limited to specific holding positions. Findings were generally consistent with the monitoring hypothesis, and little support was found for the 3 alternative explanations. PMID:26314871

  16. Logarithmic analysis of eddy current thermography based on longitudinal heat conduction for subsurface defect evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruizhen; He, Yunze

    2014-11-01

    Longitudinal heat conduction from surface to inside of solid material could be used to evaluate the subsurface defects. Considering that the skin depth of high frequency eddy current in metal is quite small, this paper proposed logarithmic analysis of eddy current thermography (ECT) to quantify the depth of subsurface defects. The proposed method was verified through numerical and experimental studies. In numerical study, ferromagnetic material and non-ferromagnetic material were both considered. Results showed that the temperature-time curve in the logarithm domain could be used to detect subsurface defects. Separation time was defined as the characteristic feature to measure the defect's depth based on their linear relationships. The thermograms reconstructed by logarithm of temperature can improve defect detectability.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation of Developmental Delay in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Naziya P.; Murthy, G.S.N.; Nori, Madhavi; Abkari, Anand; Pooja, B.K.; Venkateswarlu, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Developmental delay is defined as significant delay in one or more developmental domains. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the best modality to investigate such patients. Evaluation of a child with developmental delay is important not only because it allows early diagnosis and treatment but also helpful for parental counseling regarding the outcome of their child and to identify any possible risk of recurrence in the siblings. Thus this study was undertaken to evaluate the developmental delay in Indian children which will help the clinicians in providing an estimation of the child’s ultimate developmental potential and organize specific treatment requirement and also relieve parental apprehension. Aims and Objectives: To study the prevalence of normal and abnormal MRI in pediatric patients presenting with developmental delay and further categorize the abnormal MRI based on its morphological features. Materials and Methods: It is a prospective, observational & descriptive study of MRI Brain in 81 paediatric patients (46 Males and 35 Females), aged between three months to 12 years; presenting with developmental delay in Deccan College of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad; over a period of three years (Sept 2011 to Sept 2014). MRI brain was done on 1.5T Siemens Magnetom Essenza & 0.35T Magnetom C with appropriate sequences and planes after making the child sleep/sedated/ anesthetized. Various anatomical structures like Ventricles, Corpus callosum, etc were systematically assessed. The MRI findings were divided into various aetiological subgroups. Results: Normal MRI findings were seen in 32% cases and 68% had abnormal findings of which the proportion of Traumatic/ Neurovascular Diseases, Congenital & Developmental, Metabolic and Degenerative, neoplastic and non specific were 31%, 17%, 10%, 2.5% and 7.5% respectively. The ventricles and white matter mainly the corpus callosum were the most commonly affected anatomical structures. The diagnostic yield was

  18. The Development and Evaluation of a Measure Assessing School Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Addressing Pediatric Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yelena P.; Steele, Ric G.

    2011-01-01

    School nurses represent an important resource for addressing pediatric obesity and weight-related health. However, school nurses perceive numerous barriers that prevent them from addressing the weight-related health of students. The current study developed and tested a new, comprehensive measure of nurses' perceptions of 10 types of barriers to…

  19. Preclinical Evaluation of UAB30 in Pediatric Renal and Hepatic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Waters, Alicia M; Stewart, Jerry E; Atigadda, Venkatram R; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Muccio, Donald D; Grubbs, Clinton J; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Rare tumors of solid organs remain some of the most difficult pediatric cancers to cure. These difficult tumors include rare pediatric renal malignancies, such as malignant rhabdoid kidney tumors (MRKT) and non-osseous renal Ewing sarcoma, and hepatoblastoma, a pediatric liver tumor that arises from immature liver cells. There are data in adult renal and hepatic malignancies demonstrating the efficacy of retinoid therapy. The investigation of retinoic acid therapy in cancer is not a new strategy, but the widespread adoption of this therapy has been hindered by toxicities. Our laboratory has been investigating a novel synthetic rexinoid, UAB30, which exhibits a more favorable side-effect profile. In this study, we hypothesized that UAB30 would diminish the growth of tumor cells from both rare renal and liver tumors in vitro and in vivo We successfully demonstrated decreased cellular proliferation, invasion and migration, cell-cycle arrest, and increased apoptosis after treatment with UAB30. Additionally, in in vivo murine models of human hepatoblastoma or rare human renal tumors, there were significantly decreased tumor xenograft growth and increased animal survival after UAB30 treatment. UAB30 should be further investigated as a developing therapeutic in these rare and difficult-to-treat pediatric solid organ tumors. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(5); 911-21. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26873726

  20. Pediatric Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kelly M; Malow, Beth A

    2016-05-01

    Insomnia in children is complex and frequently multifactorial. This review discusses the major categories of insomnia as well as common causes. The consequences of insomnia, including issues with mood, behavior, and cognition, are discussed. Sleep disorders are much more prevalent in certain pediatric populations, such as children with autism spectrum disorders. The evaluation of insomnia in children includes a focused history and examination and occasionally actigraphy or polysomnography. Behavioral and pharmacological therapies are discussed, as are future directions for research and clinical practice. PMID:26378738

  1. Psychological issues in pediatric obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Gurvinder; De Sousa, Avinash; Sonavane, Sushma; Shah, Nilesh

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric obesity is a major health problem and has reached epidemiological proportions today. The present paper reviews major psychological issues in pediatric obesity from a developmental perspective. Research and literature has shown that a number of developmental, family, maternal and child factors are responsible in the genesis of pediatric obesity. Family food habits, early developmental lifestyle of the child, parenting, early family relationships and harmony all contribute towards the growth and development of a child. The present review focuses on the role of developmental psychological factors in the pathogenesis of pediatric obesity and highlights the developmental factors that must be kept in mind when evaluating a case of pediatric obesity. PMID:23766572

  2. Economics of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures. PMID:18650705

  3. Evaluation of the hybrid III and Q-series pediatric ATD upper neck loads as compared to pediatric volunteers in low-speed frontal crashes.

    PubMed

    Seacrist, Thomas; Mathews, Emily A; Balasubramanian, Sriram; Maltese, Matthew R; Arbogast, Kristy B

    2013-11-01

    Debate exists in the automotive community regarding the validity of the pediatric ATD neck response and corresponding neck loads. Previous research has shown that the pediatric ATDs exhibit hyper-flexion and chin-to-chest contact resulting in overestimations of neck loads and neck injury criteria. Our previous work comparing the kinematics of the Hybrid III and Q-series 6 and 10-year-old ATDs to pediatric volunteers in low-speed frontal sled tests revealed decreased ATD cervical and thoracic spine excursions. These kinematic differences may contribute to the overestimation of upper neck loads by the ATD. The current study compared upper neck loads of the Hybrid III and Q-series 6 and 10-year-old ATDs against size-matched male pediatric volunteers in low-speed frontal sled tests. A 3-D near-infrared target tracking system quantified the position of markers on the ATD and pediatric volunteers (head top, nasion, bilateral external auditory meatus). Shear force (F x ), axial force (F z ), bending moment (M y ), and head angular acceleration ([Formula: see text]) were calculated about the upper neck using standard equations of motion. In general, the ATDs underestimated axial force and overestimated bending moment compared to the human volunteers. The Hybrid III 6, Q6, and Q10 exhibited reduced head angular acceleration and modest increases in upper neck shear compared to the pediatric volunteers. The reduction in axial force and bending moment has important implications for neck injury predictions as both are used when calculating N ij . These analyses provide insight into the biofidelity of the pediatric ATD upper neck loads in low-speed crash environments. PMID:23780472

  4. Evaluation of longitudinal steroid profiles from male football players in UEFA competitions between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Baume, Norbert; Geyer, Hans; Vouillamoz, Marc; Grisdale, Richard; Earl, Mike; Aguilera, Rodrigo; Cowan, David A; Ericsson, Magnus; Gmeiner, Günter; Kwiatkowska, Dorota; Kioukia-Fougia, Nassia; Molina, Adeline; Ruivo, João; Segura, Jordi; Van Eenoo, Peter; Jan, Nicolas; Robinson, Neil; Saugy, Martial

    2016-07-01

    Testosterone and related compounds are the most recurrent doping substances. The steroid profile, consisting of the quantification of testosterone and its metabolites, has been described as the most significant biomarker to detect doping with pseudo-endogenous anabolic steroids. The steroidal module of the Athlete Biological Passport (ABP) was launched by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in 2014. To assess the value of introducing the module to its anti-doping programme, the Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) decided to analyze retrospectively the steroid profile data of 4195 urine samples, collected from 879 male football players and analyzed in 12 WADA-accredited laboratories between 2008 and mid-2013. This study focused on the evaluation of T/E ratios. The coefficient of variation (CV) and the adaptive model were the two statistical models used to study the longitudinal follow-up. A CV of 46% was determined to be the maximal natural intra-individual variation of the T/E when the sequence consisted of single data points analyzed in different laboratories. The adaptive model showed some profiles with an atypical T/E sequence and also enabled an estimate of the prevalence of external factors impacting the T/E sequences. Despite the limitations of this retrospective study, it clearly showed that the longitudinal and individual follow-up of the T/E biomarker of the players is a good tool for target testing in football. UEFA has therefore decided to implement the steroidal module of the ABP from the start of the next European football season in September 2015. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26338140

  5. Longitudinal evaluation of dementia care in German nursing homes: the “DemenzMonitor” study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Germany, the number of people with dementia living in nursing homes is rapidly increasing. Providing adequate care for their special needs is a challenge for institutions and their staff members. Because of the growing number of people with dementia, changes to the conceptual orientation of nursing homes have occurred. These changes include specialized living arrangements and psychosocial interventions recommended for people with dementia. Until now, the provision of dementia care and its association to the residents’ behavior and quality of life is not well investigated in Germany. The purpose of this study is to describe the provision of dementia care and to identify resident- as well as facility-related factors associated with residents behavior and quality of life. Methods/Design The DemenzMonitor study is designed as a longitudinal study that is repeated annually. Data will be derived from a convenience sample consisting of nursing homes across Germany. For the data collection, three questionnaires have been developed that measure information on the level of the nursing home, the living units, and the residents. Data collection will be performed by staff members from the nursing homes. The data collection procedure will be supervised by a study coordinator who is trained by the research team. Data analysis will be performed on each data level using appropriate techniques for descriptions and comparisons as well as longitudinal regression analysis. Discussion The DemenzMonitor is the first study in Germany that assesses how dementia care is provided in nursing homes with respect to living arrangements and recommended interventions. This study links the acquired data with residents’ outcome measurements, making it possible to evaluate different aspects and concepts of care. PMID:24237990

  6. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Pediatric Cardiomyopathies Updated:Oct 22,2015 Patient education material ... oxygen or high blood pressure. According to the Pediatric Cardiomyopathy Registry, one in every 100,000 children ...

  7. Myocarditis - pediatric

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in an infant or young child. ... infections such as Lyme disease. Other causes of pediatric myocarditis include: Allergic reactions to certain medicines Exposure ...

  8. Review of "The Comprehensive Longitudinal Evaluation of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program: Summary of Fourth Year Reports"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfield, Clive

    2011-01-01

    This review is of "The Comprehensive Longitudinal Evaluation of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program: Summary of Fourth Year Reports," published by the School Choice Demonstration Project, University of Arkansas. The report makes eight claims about the effectiveness of the program, most of them positive. On the key issue of achievement of…

  9. Evaluation of an integrated simulation courseware in a pediatric nursing practicum.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyunsook; Kim, Mi Ja

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the effect of integrated pediatric nursing simulation courseware on students' critical thinking and clinical judgment. Ninety-five senior nursing students participated in this study. Every student followed the established courseware schedule, as well as the regular pediatric nursing practicum. The courseware schedule included two simple simulation scenarios and one comprehensive scenario on the first day of the first, second, and third weeks of the practicum. Students' critical thinking scores showed significant improvement after the use of simulation courseware using high-fidelity simulators and standardized patients. No significant predictors were found for improvement in critical thinking, but bivariate transformation of upper and lower groups in critical thinking achievement revealed a significant difference in the clinical judgment ability between the two groups. Simulation courseware supplementation is an innovative learning strategy for improving nursing students' critical thinking and clinical judgment during clinical practicum. Clinical judgment may play a role in facilitating nursing student improvement in critical thinking ability. PMID:25275992

  10. The Diagnosis, Evaluation and Treatment of Acute and Recurrent Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Schober, Megan; Korbel, Lindsey; Spencer, John David

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by pediatricians. Currently, the diagnosis and management of acute urinary tract infection and recurrent urinary tract infection in children remains controversial. Recently published guidelines and large clinical trials have attempted to clarify UTI diagnostic and management strategies. In this manuscript, we review the diagnosis and management of acute and recurrent urinary tract infection in the pediatric population. PMID:25421102

  11. Pediatric Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Goun; Lim, Byung Chan

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric stroke is relatively rare but may lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Along with the advance of brain imaging technology and clinical awareness, diagnosis of pediatric stroke is increasing wordwide. Pediatric stroke differs from adults in variable risk factor/etiologies, diverse and nonspecific clinical presentation depending on ages. This review will be discussed pediatric stroke focusing on their clinical presentations, diagnosis and etiologies/risk factors. PMID:26180605

  12. Sonography of the Pediatric Chest.

    PubMed

    Goh, Yonggeng; Kapur, Jeevesh

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, pediatric chest diseases are evaluated with chest radiography. Due to advancements in technology, the use of sonography has broadened. It has now become an established radiation-free imaging tool that may supplement plain-film findings and, in certain cases, the first-line modality for evaluation of the pediatric chest. This pictorial essay will demonstrate the diagnostic potential of sonography, review a spectrum of pediatric chest conditions, and discuss their imaging features and clinical importance. PMID:27009313

  13. Evaluation of radiation dose to pediatric patients during certain special procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulieman, A.; Alzimami, K.; Elhag, B.; Babikir, E.; Alsafi, K.

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to measure pediatric entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and effective dose during micturating cystourethrography (MCU), intravenous urography (IVU) and barium studies (barium meal, enema, and swallow) and to propose a local diagnostic reference level (DRL). ESAK was measured for patients using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs, GR200A). Effective doses (E) were calculated using the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) software. A total of 236 special pediatric procedures were investigated. 21.7% of the sample comprised barium procedures, 18.6% were MCU procedures while 59.5% of the sample were IVU procedures. The mean ESAK measurements (mGy) were 2.1±0.8, 3.0±23 and 1.2±0.2 for barium meal, enema and swallow in the same order. The mean patient dose for IVU procedures was 12.4±8.7 mGy per procedure and the mean patient dose per MCU procedure was 5.8±7 mGy. Local DRLs were proposed for all procedures. The patient doses in this study are within the reported values, suggesting that pediatric patients are adequately protected.

  14. Surgical and Molecular Evaluation of Pediatric Hydatid Cyst Cases in Eastern Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Bakal, Unal; Simsek, Sami; Kazez, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus is a major public health problem worldwide, including Turkey. The aim of the current study was to identify the strains and to estimate the potential risk factors of E. granulosus in operated pediatric cases in eastern Turkey. Ten pediatric patients (7 boys and 3 girls) living in rural areas, with ages ranging from 3 to 15 years old and various clinical histories, were included in this study. Eight patients had only liver hydatid cyst, while 1 patient had liver and lung hydatid cyst and the other liver, lung, and spleen, together. There were 2 ruptured liver cysts. After surgery, during follow-up, no increase was observed in hemagglutination levels, there were no mortalities, and there was no evidence of recurrence at 2 years post operation in all patients. Molecular analysis was performed on hydatid cyst samples obtained from the 10 pediatric cases. According to mt-12S rRNA PCR results, all cases were found to be G1/G3 cluster of E. granulosus sensu stricto. PMID:26797450

  15. An Evaluation Methodology for Longitudinal Studies of Short-Term Cancer Research Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Luz A; Venkatesh, Raam; Daniel, Casey L; Desmond, Renee A; Brooks, C Michael; Waterbor, John W

    2016-03-01

    The need to familiarize medical students and graduate health professional students with research training opportunities that cultivate the appeal of research careers is vital to the future of research. Comprehensive evaluation of a cancer research training program can be achieved through longitudinal tracking of program alumni to assess the program's impact on each participant's career path and professional achievements. With advances in technology and smarter means of communication, effective ways to track alumni have changed. In order to collect data on the career outcomes and achievements of nearly 500 short-term cancer research training program alumni from 1999-2013, we sought to contact each alumnus to request completion of a survey instrument online, or by means of a telephone interview. The effectiveness of each contact method that we used was quantified according to ease of use and time required. The most reliable source of contact information for tracking alumni from the early years of the program was previous tracking results, and for alumni from the later years, the most important source of contact information was university alumni records that provided email addresses and telephone numbers. Personal contacts with former preceptors were sometimes helpful, as were generic search engines and people search engines. Social networking was of little value for most searches. Using information from two or more sources in combination was most effective in tracking alumni. These results provide insights and tools for other research training programs that wish to track their alumni for long-term program evaluation. PMID:25412722

  16. Genetic pediatric retinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Say, Emil Anthony T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary pediatric retinal diseases are a diverse group of disorders with pathologies affecting different cellular structures or retinal development. Many can mimic typical pediatric retinal disease such as retinopathy of prematurity, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment and cystoid macular edema. Multisystem involvement is frequently seen in hereditary pediatric retinal disease. A thorough history coupled with a good physical examination can oftentimes lead the ophthalmologist or pediatrician to the correct genetic test and correct diagnosis. In some instances, evaluation of parents or siblings may be required to determine familial involvement when the history is inconclusive or insufficient and clinical suspicion is high.

  17. Pediatric sialadenitis.

    PubMed

    Francis, Carrie L; Larsen, Christopher G

    2014-10-01

    Sialadenitis in the pediatric population accounts for up to 10% of all salivary gland disease. Viral parotitis and juvenile recurrent parotitis are the two most common causes. Multiple factors, independently or in combination, can result in acute, chronic, or recurrent acute salivary gland inflammation. Sialendoscopy has emerged as the leading diagnostic technique and intervention for pediatric sialadenitis. Sialendoscopy is a safe and effective gland-preserving treatment of pediatric sialadenitis. Investigational studies are needed to address the impact of steroid instillation, postoperative stenting, and long-term outcomes of pediatric sialendoscopy. This article presents a comprehensive review of pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric sialadenitis. PMID:25128215

  18. Demand generation activities and modern contraceptive use in urban areas of four countries: a longitudinal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Speizer, Ilene S; Corroon, Meghan; Calhoun, Lisa; Lance, Peter; Montana, Livia; Nanda, Priya; Guilkey, David

    2014-12-01

    Family planning is crucial for preventing unintended pregnancies and for improving maternal and child health and well-being. In urban areas where there are large inequities in family planning use, particularly among the urban poor, programs are needed to increase access to and use of contraception among those most in need. This paper presents the midterm evaluation findings of the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (Urban RH Initiative) programs, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, that are being implemented in 4 countries: India (Uttar Pradesh), Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. Between 2010 and 2013, the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (MLE) project collected baseline and 2-year longitudinal follow-up data from women in target study cities to examine the role of demand generation activities undertaken as part of the Urban RH Initiative programs. Evaluation results demonstrate that, in each country where it was measured, outreach by community health or family planning workers as well as local radio programs were significantly associated with increased use of modern contraceptive methods. In addition, in India and Nigeria, television programs had a significant effect on modern contraceptive use, and in Kenya and Nigeria, the program slogans and materials that were blanketed across the cities (eg, leaflets/brochures distributed at health clinics and the program logo placed on all forms of materials, from market umbrellas to health facility signs and television programs) were also significantly associated with modern method use. Our results show that targeted, multilevel demand generation activities can make an important contribution to increasing modern contraceptive use in urban areas and could impact Millennium Development Goals for improved maternal and child health and access to reproductive health for all. PMID:25611476

  19. Demand generation activities and modern contraceptive use in urban areas of four countries: a longitudinal evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Speizer, Ilene S; Corroon, Meghan; Calhoun, Lisa; Lance, Peter; Montana, Livia; Nanda, Priya; Guilkey, David

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Family planning is crucial for preventing unintended pregnancies and for improving maternal and child health and well-being. In urban areas where there are large inequities in family planning use, particularly among the urban poor, programs are needed to increase access to and use of contraception among those most in need. This paper presents the midterm evaluation findings of the Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (Urban RH Initiative) programs, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, that are being implemented in 4 countries: India (Uttar Pradesh), Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal. Between 2010 and 2013, the Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (MLE) project collected baseline and 2-year longitudinal follow-up data from women in target study cities to examine the role of demand generation activities undertaken as part of the Urban RH Initiative programs. Evaluation results demonstrate that, in each country where it was measured, outreach by community health or family planning workers as well as local radio programs were significantly associated with increased use of modern contraceptive methods. In addition, in India and Nigeria, television programs had a significant effect on modern contraceptive use, and in Kenya and Nigeria, the program slogans and materials that were blanketed across the cities (eg, leaflets/brochures distributed at health clinics and the program logo placed on all forms of materials, from market umbrellas to health facility signs and television programs) were also significantly associated with modern method use. Our results show that targeted, multilevel demand generation activities can make an important contribution to increasing modern contraceptive use in urban areas and could impact Millennium Development Goals for improved maternal and child health and access to reproductive health for all. PMID:25611476

  20. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuyet A; Krakowski, Andrew C; Naheedy, John H; Kruk, Peter G; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2015-12-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  1. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  2. An Exploratory Evaluation of Conjoint Behavioral Consultation to Promote Collaboration among Family, School, and Pediatric Systems: A Role for Pediatric School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Susan M.; Warnes, Emily D.; Woods, Kathryn E.; Blevins, Carrie A.; Magee, Katie L.; Ellis, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric school psychology is a relatively new subspecialty in the field; however, few specific, prescribed roles have been articulated, and fewer have yielded preliminary efficacy data. In this exploratory study, the acceptability and potential efficacy of conjoint behavioral consultation (CBC) as a model for linking families, schools, and…

  3. Conceptions of ability as stable and self-evaluative processes: a longitudinal examination.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, E M; Saxon, J L

    2001-01-01

    It has generally been taken for granted that conceiving of ability as stable leads to negative self-evaluative processes, particularly in the face of failure. Yet, a close examination of the empirical findings suggests that the picture may be more complex. In this research, a three-wave longitudinal design spanning 12 months was employed. Older elementary school children (N = 932) indicated their conceptions of academic and social ability as stable to external forces and to internal forces. They also provided information about the importance they place on academic and social competence, their knowledge about academic and social performance, their preference for academic challenge, their perceptions of academic and social competence, and their attributions for academic and social performance. Children's grades in school and their acceptance by peers were obtained as indicators of performance. Over time, conceiving of ability as stable to external forces, particularly in the academic domain, appeared to heighten the importance placed on competence, performance knowledge, preference for challenge, perceptions of competence, and self-enhancing attributions. In contrast, conceptions of ability as stable to internal forces, particularly in the academic domain, appeared to be fostered by placing little importance on competence, a lack of performance knowledge, avoidance of challenge, negative perceptions of competence, self-deprecating attributions, and poor performance. PMID:11280476

  4. Longitudinal evaluation of patients with oral potentially malignant disorders using optical imaging and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard A.; Pierce, Mark C.; Mondrik, Sharon; Gao, Wen; Quinn, Mary K.; Bhattar, Vijayashree; Williams, Michelle D.; Vigneswaran, Nadarajah; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2012-02-01

    Dysplastic and cancerous alterations in oral tissue can be detected noninvasively in vivo using optical techniques including autofluorescence imaging, high-resolution imaging, and spectroscopy. Interim results are presented from a longitudinal study in which optical imaging and spectroscopy were used to evaluate the progression of lesions over time in patients at high risk for development of oral cancer. Over 100 patients with oral potentially malignant disorders have been enrolled in the study to date. Areas of concern in the oral cavity are measured using widefield autofluorescence imaging and depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy during successive clinical visits. Autofluorescence intensity patterns and autofluorescence spectra are tracked over time and correlated with clinical observations. Patients whose lesions progress and who undergo surgery are also measured in the operating room immediately prior to surgery using autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy, with the addition of intraoperative high-resolution imaging to characterize nuclear size, nuclear crowding, and tissue architecture at selected sites. Optical measurements are compared to histopathology results from biopsies and surgical specimens collected from the measured sites. Autofluorescence imaging and spectroscopy measurements are continued during post-surgery followup visits. We examined correlations between clinical impression and optical classification over time with an average followup period of 4 months. The data collected to date suggest that multimodal optical techniques may aid in noninvasive monitoring of the progression of oral premalignant lesions, biopsy site selection, and accurate delineation of lesion extent during surgery.

  5. Longitudinal Evaluation of Residual Cortical and Subcortical Motor Evoked Potentials in Spinal Cord Injured Rats.

    PubMed

    Redondo-Castro, Elena; Navarro, Xavier; García-Alías, Guillermo

    2016-05-15

    We have applied transcranial electrical stimulation to rats with spinal cord injury and selectively tested the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) conveyed by descending motor pathways with cortical and subcortical origin. MEPs were elicited by electrical stimulation to the brain and recorded on the tibialis anterior muscles. Stimulation parameters were characterized and changes in MEP responses tested in uninjured rats, in rats with mild or moderate contusion, and in animals with complete transection of the spinal cord. All injuries were located at the T8 vertebral level. Two peaks, termed N1 and N2, were obtained when changing from single pulse stimulation to trains of 9 pulses at 9 Hz. Selective injuries to the brain or spinal cord funiculi evidenced the subcortical origin of N1 and the cortical origin of N2. Animals with mild contusion showed small behavioral deficits and abolished N1 but maintained small amplitude N2 MEPs. Substantial motor deficits developed in rats with moderate contusion, and these rats had completely eliminated N1 and N2 MEPs. Animals with complete cord transection had abolished N1 and N2 and showed severe impairment of locomotion. The results indicate the reliability of MEP testing to longitudinally evaluate over time the degree of impairment of cortical and subcortical spinal pathways after spinal cord injuries of different severity. PMID:26560177

  6. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Treves, S.T.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the diagnostic techniques of nuclear medicine as applied in pediatric patients. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of scintigraphy of organ systems for diagnostic purposes. The topics covered are: scintigraphy of skeleton, bone marrow spleen, liver, thyroid, lungs, urinary tract, brain, heart and cerebrospinal fluid. The pathology and scintigraphy of lacrimal glands is also covered. Other diagnostic techniques of radiology in pediatrics are also briefly discussed for comparative evaluation.

  7. Pediatric Open Fractures.

    PubMed

    Trionfo, Arianna; Cavanaugh, Priscilla K; Herman, Martin J

    2016-07-01

    Open fractures in children are rare and are typically associated with better prognoses compared with their adult equivalents. Regardless, open fractures pose a challenge because of the risk of healing complications and infection, leading to significant morbidity even in the pediatric population. Therefore, the management of pediatric open fractures requires special consideration. This article comprehensively reviews the initial evaluation, classification, treatment, outcomes, and controversies of open fractures in children. PMID:27241379

  8. POND4Kids: a global web-based database for pediatric hematology and oncology outcome evaluation and collaboration.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Yuri; Patel, Aman N; Arreola, Magada; Antillon, Federico G; Ribeiro, Raul C; Howard, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    The Pediatric Oncology Network Database, (www.pond4kids.org, POND), is a secure, web-based, multilingual pediatric hematology/oncology database created for use in countries with limited resources to meet various clinical data management needs including cancer registration, delivery of protocol-based care, outcome evaluation, and assessment of psychosocial support programs. Established as a part of the International Outreach Program at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, POND serves as a tool for oncology units to store patient data for easy retrieval and analysis and to achieve uniform data collection to facilitate meaningful comparison of information among centers. Launched in 2003, POND now has 233 sites registered with over 1,000 users in 66 countries. However, adoption and usage of POND varies widely among sites. This paper reviews some of the challenges to developing a global collaborative clinical platform based on the experiences of developing POND. The paper also presents a case study of POND use in Guatemala, where the Guatemalan National Oncology Unit (UNOP) has developed extensive internal and external global collaborations using POND. PMID:23388293

  9. Evaluation of Anesthesia Profile in Pediatric Patients after Inguinal Hernia Repair with Caudal Block or Local Wound Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilovska-Brzanov, Aleksandra; Kuzmanovska, Biljana; Kartalov, Andrijan; Donev, Ljupco; Lleshi, Albert; Jovanovski-Srceva, Marija; Spirovska, Tatjana; Brzanov, Nikola; Simeonov, Risto

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study is to evaluate anesthesia and recovery profile in pediatric patients after inguinal hernia repair with caudal block or local wound infiltration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this prospective interventional clinical study, the anesthesia and recovery profile was assessed in sixty pediatric patients undergoing inguinal hernia repair. Enrolled children were randomly assigned to either Group Caudal or Group Local infiltration. For caudal blocks, Caudal Group received 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine; Local Infiltration Group received 0.2 ml/kg 0.25% bupivacaine. Investigator who was blinded to group allocation provided postoperative care and assessments. Postoperative pain was assessed. Motor functions and sedation were assessed as well. RESULTS: The two groups did not differ in terms of patient characteristic data and surgical profiles and there weren’t any hemodynamic changes between groups. Regarding the difference between groups for analgesic requirement there were two major points - on one hand it was statistically significant p < 0.05 whereas on the other hand time to first analgesic administration was not statistically significant p = 0.40. There were significant differences in the incidence of adverse effects in caudal and local group including: vomiting, delirium and urinary retention. CONCLUSIONS: Between children undergoing inguinal hernia repair, local wound infiltration insures safety and satisfactory analgesia for surgery. Compared to caudal block it is not overwhelming. Caudal block provides longer analgesia, however complications are rather common. PMID:27275337

  10. Evaluating the Safety of Intraoperative Antiarrhythmics in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Beaty, Rachel S; Moffett, Brady S; Hall, Stuart; Kim, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias occurring during the intraoperative period for cardiac surgery have been associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Several antiarrhythmics have been utilized for the management of intraoperative arrhythmias. These antiarrhythmic medications can cause undesirable adverse outcomes in the intensive care setting. The incidence and treatment of adult intraoperative arrhythmias have been studied. In addition, the prevalence, risk factors, and optimal treatment of pediatric postoperative arrhythmias have also been studied. However, the literature has not been published on intraoperative antiarrhythmia treatment during pediatric cardiac surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine the safety of intraoperative antiarrhythmic medications utilized in pediatric cardiac surgery patients. This was a retrospective review of all patients who received an intraoperative antiarrhythmic in the cardiovascular operating room at Texas Children's Hospital. Patients were included if they underwent cardiovascular surgery from November 2008 to July 2013 and were excluded if antiarrhythmics were given intraoperatively for other indications (i.e., esmolol for hypertension) or if patients were older than 18 years of age. Safety of antiarrhythmic treatment was determined by the absence or presence of adverse events. Control or recurrence of the arrhythmia was analyzed as a secondary measure to help determine antiarrhythmic efficacy. A total of 45 patients were identified (53.3 % male). Patients were a median of 0.52 years at the time of surgery. Primary surgery types were tetralogy of Fallot repair (n = 6; 13.3 %) and ventricular septal defect closure (n = 5, 11.1 %). Thirty-one patients (68.9 %) had documented adverse events after the administration of antiarrhythmics. Most of these adverse events occurred after the administration of amiodarone (n = 16; 51.6 %) followed by esmolol (n = 15; 48.4 %). Fifty-one percent of the arrhythmias resolved in the operating

  11. Evaluation of a Case-Based Primary Care Pediatric Conference Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S.; Fenick, Ada M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our goal was to assess the impact of a standardized residency curriculum in ambulatory pediatrics on residents' participation, satisfaction, and confidence. Methods A case-based curriculum for weekly primary care conference was developed to replace the existing free-form review of topics at the Yale Pediatrics Residency Program. Before the curricular switch, faculty preceptors and members of the academic year 2005–2006 intern class completed surveys designed to measure conference occurrence and resident attendance, participation, satisfaction, and confidence in clinical skills. One year after the curricular switch, identical surveys were completed by faculty preceptors and members of the academic year 2006–2007 intern class. Results Faculty surveys indicated that conferences took place significantly more often after the curricular switch. The number of residents at conference each day (3.18 vs 4.50; P < .01) and the percentage who actually spoke during conference (45% vs 82%, P < .01) significantly increased. There were 18 demographically similar interns in each of the 2 classes. Members of the academic year 2006–2007 intern class, having trained exclusively with the standardized curriculum, were significantly more likely to respond favorably to survey items about participation, satisfaction, and confidence. In addition, they were more likely to endorse survey items that reflected explicit goals of the standardized curriculum and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Conclusion Implementation of a structured curriculum for ambulatory care improved interns' self-reported participation, satisfaction, and confidence. The primary care conference occurred more dependably after the curricular change, and improvements in attendance and participation were documented. Pediatric residency programs may make better use of conference time in the ambulatory setting through the use of structured, case

  12. Thrombopoietin Measurement as a Key Component in the Evaluation of Pediatric Thrombocytosis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Nya D; Marcogliese, Andrea; Bergstrom, Katie; Scheurer, Michael; Mahoney, Donald; Bertuch, Alison A

    2016-08-01

    JAK2, MPL, and CALR mutations, which underlie essential thrombocythemia (ET) in most adults, are infrequent in children. Consequently, additional tests are needed to confirm pediatric ET diagnoses. We report a child with suspected ET and normal JAK2, MPL, and CALR analyses. Serum thrombopoietin (TPO) was markedly elevated, leading to analysis of the TPO gene, TPHO, which contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF) known to repress THPO translation. Sequencing revealed a de novo, germline stopgain mutation in the uORF, explaining the elevated TPO and thrombocytosis. This finding suggests that screening TPO levels and, if elevated, THPO 5' UTR sequencing could be diagnostic. PMID:27100794

  13. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F.; Jeggo, Penny A.; Martin, Olga A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  14. Pediatric systems medicine: evaluating needs and opportunities using congenital heart block as a case study.

    PubMed

    Tegnér, Jesper; Abugessaisa, Imad

    2013-04-01

    Medicine and pediatrics are changing and health care is moving from being reactive to becoming preventive. Despite rapid developments of new technologies for molecular profiling and systems analysis of diseases, significant hurdles remain. Here, we use the clinical setting of congenital heart block (CHB) to uncover and illustrate key informatics challenges impeding the development of a systems medicine approach emphasizing the prevention and prediction of disease. We find that there is a paucity of useful bioinformatics tools enabling the integrative analysis of different databases of molecular information and clinical sources in a disease context such as CHB, contrasting with the current emphasis on developing bioinformatics tools for the analysis of individual data types. Moreover, informatics solutions for managing data, such as the Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) or Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment, require serious software engineering support for the maintenance and import of data beyond the capabilities of clinicians working with CHB. Hence, there is an urgent unmet need for user-friendly tools facilitating the integrative analysis and management of omics data and clinical information. Pediatrics represents an untapped potential to execute such a systems medicine program in close collaboration with clinicians and families who are keen to do what is needed for their children to prevent and predict diseases and nurture wellness. PMID:23370412

  15. The SickKids Genome Clinic: developing and evaluating a pediatric model for individualized genomic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bowdin, S C; Hayeems, R Z; Monfared, N; Cohn, R D; Meyn, M S

    2016-01-01

    Our increasing knowledge of how genomic variants affect human health and the falling costs of whole-genome sequencing are driving the development of individualized genomic medicine. This new clinical paradigm uses knowledge of an individual's genomic variants to anticipate, diagnose and manage disease. While individualized genetic medicine offers the promise of transformative change in health care, it forces us to reconsider existing ethical, scientific and clinical paradigms. The potential benefits of pre-symptomatic identification of at-risk individuals, improved diagnostics, individualized therapy, accurate prognosis and avoidance of adverse drug reactions coexist with the potential risks of uninterpretable results, psychological harm, outmoded counseling models and increased health care costs. Here we review the challenges, opportunities and limits of integrating genomic analysis into pediatric clinical practice and describe a model for implementing individualized genomic medicine. Our multidisciplinary team of bioinformaticians, health economists, health services and policy researchers, ethicists, geneticists, genetic counselors and clinicians has designed a 'Genome Clinic' research project that addresses multiple challenges in pediatric genomic medicine--ranging from development of bioinformatics tools for the clinical assessment of genomic variants and the discovery of disease genes to health policy inquiries, assessment of clinical care models, patient preference and the ethics of consent. PMID:25813238

  16. Evaluation of safety and efficacy of pacemaker and defibrillator implantation by axillary incision in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joselyn C R; Shannon, Kevin; Boyle, Noel G; Klitzner, Thomas S; Bersohn, Malcolm M

    2004-03-01

    We successfully implanted 11 pacemakers, 6 defibrillators, and 1 biventricular pacemaker in 18 pediatric patients (15 female; 4 to 15 years, average age: 9) using the retropectoral transvenous approach with a hidden axillary incision. The average follow-up period was 24 months (range 49 months). Eight patients had congenital structural heart conditions (d-transposition of great arteries S/P Mustard operation, d-transposition of great arteries S/P arterial switch operation, truncus arteriosus, right ventricular diverticula, ventricular septal defect, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy). Four patients had acquired heart conditions (dilated cardiomyopathy, myocarditis). Excellent sensing and pacing thresholds were achieved in all attempted implantations. There was no pneumothorax. There was one lead dislodgement. One lead fracture distant from the subclavian vein occurred 4 months after implantation. Implantation of pacemakers and defibrillators via axillary incisions can be safe and effective in pediatric patients. This approach avoids skin erosion when implanting large devices such as defibrillators or biventricular devices in small patients with limited muscle mass while achieving superior aesthetic results. The axillary or extrathoracic venous entry site avoids subclavian crush syndrome. PMID:15009854

  17. Evaluation of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and Combined Immunodeficiency Pediatric Patients on the Basis of Cellular Radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Lobachevsky, Pavel; Woodbine, Lisa; Hsiao, Kuang-Chih; Choo, Sharon; Fraser, Chris; Gray, Paul; Smith, Jai; Best, Nickala; Munforte, Laura; Korneeva, Elena; Martin, Roger F; Jeggo, Penny A; Martin, Olga A

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric patients with severe or nonsevere combined immunodeficiency have increased susceptibility to severe, life-threatening infections and, without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, may fail to thrive. A subset of these patients have the radiosensitive (RS) phenotype, which may necessitate conditioning before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and this conditioning includes radiomimetic drugs, which may significantly affect treatment response. To provide statistical criteria for classifying cellular response to ionizing radiation as the measure of functional RS screening, we analyzed the repair capacity and survival of ex vivo irradiated primary skin fibroblasts from five dysmorphic and/or developmentally delayed pediatric patients with severe combined immunodeficiency and combined immunodeficiency. We developed a mathematical framework for the analysis of γ histone 2A isoform X foci kinetics to quantitate DNA-repair capacity, thus establishing crucial criteria for identifying RS. The results, presented in a diagram showing each patient as a point in a 2D RS map, were in agreement with findings from the assessment of cellular RS by clonogenic survival and from the genetic analysis of factors involved in the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway. We provide recommendations for incorporating into clinical practice the functional assays and genetic analysis used for establishing RS status before conditioning. This knowledge would enable the selection of the most appropriate treatment regimen, reducing the risk for severe therapy-related adverse effects. PMID:26151233

  18. Training Personnel for the Education of Individuals with Disabilities Program. Component 2: Preparation of Related Services Personnel (Pediatric Residents). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruder, Mary Beth

    This final report describes the activities and outcomes of a project designed to develop, implement, and evaluate a new three-year longitudinal competency based curriculum for pediatric residents on their role in early intervention and special education. The curriculum consisted of four half-days per month for every resident in an ambulatory…

  19. Reasons for Non-Completion of Health Related Quality of Life Evaluations in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donna L.; Nagarajan, Rajaram; Caparas, Mae; Schulte, Fiona; Cullen, Patricia; Aplenc, Richard; Sung, Lillian

    2013-01-01

    Background Health related quality of life (HRQL) assessments during therapy for pediatric cancer are important. The objective of this study was to describe reasons for failure to provide HRQL assessments during a pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) clinical trial. Methods We focused on HRQL assessments embedded in a multicenter pediatric AML clinical trial. The PedsQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales, PedsQL 3.0 Acute Cancer Module, PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, and Pediatric Inventory for Parents were obtained from parent/guardian respondents at a maximum of six time points. Children provided self-report optionally. A central study coordinator contacted sites with delinquent HRQL data. Reasons for failure to submit the HRQL assessments were evaluated by three pediatric oncologists and themes were generated using thematic analysis. Results There were 906 completed and 1091 potential assessments included in this analysis (83%). The median age of included children was 12.9 years (range 2.0 to 18.9). The five themes for non-completion were: patient too ill; passive or active refusal by respondent; developmental delay; logistical challenges; and poor knowledge of study processes from both the respondent and institutional perspective. Conclusions We identified reasons for non-completion of HRQL assessments during active therapy. This information will facilitate recommendations to improve study processes and future HRQL study designs to maximize response rates. PMID:24040278

  20. Pediatric tracheomalacia.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jose Carlos; Jennings, Russell W; Kim, Peter C W

    2016-06-01

    Tracheomalacia (TM) is defined as an increased collapsibility of the trachea due to structural anomalies of the tracheal cartilage and/or posterior membrane. Tracheomalacia has a wide range of etiologies but is most commonly present in children born with esophageal atresia and tracheal esophageal fistula. Clinical symptoms can range from minor expiratory stridor with typical barking cough to severe respiratory distress episodes to acute life-threatening events (ALTE). Although the majority of children have mild-to-moderate symptoms and will not need surgical intervention, some will need life-changing surgical treatment. This article examines the published pediatric literature on TM, discusses the details of clinical presentation, evaluation, diagnosis, and a variety of treatments. PMID:27301602

  1. Evaluation of intoxicated patients hospitalized in a newly-opened level two pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Güngörer, Vildan; Yisldırım, Nurdan Kökten

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to retrospectively examine the demographic and etiological characteristics, prognosis and length of stay in intensive care unit of intoxicated patients hospitalized in Level two Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Samsun. Material and Methods: The study retrospectively examined the records of patients hospitalized between 14th March 2014 and 14th March 2015 in Level two Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Samsun with respect to age, gender, cause of poisoning, time of emergency department admission, length of hospitalization and prognosis. Results: Of 82 patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, 29 (35.3%) were male and 53 (64.6%) were female. The mean age of the male and female patients was 7.89±6.3 years and 11.2±5.7 years, respectively and the mean age of the study group was 10.04±6.1. Twenthy one (39,6%) of the female patients were at the age group of 0–14 years and 32 (60.4%) were at the age group of 14–18 years. Twenthy (68.9%) of the male patients were at the age group of 0–14 years and nine (31.1%) were at the age group of 14–18 years. The cause of poisoning was drug intoxication (antidepressants, antibiotics, painkillers and other drugs) in 64 patients (78%) and the remaining 18 patients (22%) were admitted to hospital for other causes (rat poison, mushroom, carbonmonoxide, scorpion stings, bonzai and pesticides). Thirthy eight (46.3%) of all the patients used such substances for suicidal purpose. Thirthy three (62.2%) of these were female and 32 were at the age group of 14–18 years. Fourty (48.7%) of the patients who ingested medication ingested one drug, while 24 (29.2%) ingested multiple drugs. Antidepressants were found to be the most commonly used drugs (31.2%). The mean hospital admission time was 3.41±2 hours and the mean time of intensive care unit stay was 2.89±1.04 days. No mortality was recorded. Thirthy patients (36.5%) were referred

  2. Evaluation of an Alternative Intravenous N-Acetylcysteine Regimen in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sandritter, Tracy L.; Lowry, Jennifer A.; Algren, D. Adam

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Conventionally, intravenous N-acetylcysteine (IV-NAC) administration is a 3-bag regimen administered over the course of 21 hours, which increases the risk of reconstitution and administration errors. To minimize errors, an alternative IV-NAC regimen consists of a loading dose (150 mg/kg) followed by a maintenance infusion (15 mg/kg/hr) until termination criteria are met. The aim was to determine the clinical outcomes of an alternative IV-NAC regimen in pediatric patients. METHODS: A retrospective review of pharmacy dispensing records and diagnostic codes at a pediatric hospital identified patients who received alternative IV-NAC dosing from March 1, 2008, to September 10, 2012, for acetaminophen overdoses. Exclusion criteria included chronic liver disease, initiation of oral or other IV-NAC regimens, and initiation of standard IV-NAC infusion prior to facility transfer. Clinical and laboratory data were abstracted from the electronic medical record. Descriptive statistics were utilized. Clinical outcomes and adverse drug reaction incidences were compared between the alternative and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved IV-NAC regimens. RESULTS: Fifty-nine patients (mean age 13.4 ± 4.3 years; range: 2 months-18 years) with acetaminophen overdoses were identified. Upon IV-NAC discontinuation, 45 patients had normal alanine transaminase (ALT) concentrations, while 14 patients' ALT concentrations remained elevated (median 140 units/L) but were trending downward. Two patients (3.4%) developed hepatotoxicity (aspartate transaminase/ALT > 1000 units/L). No patients developed hepatic failure, were listed for a liver transplant, were intubated, underwent hemodialysis, or died. Two patients (3.4%) developed anaphylactoid reactions. No known medication or administration errors occurred. Clinical outcome incidences of the studied endpoints with the alternative IV-NAC regimen are at the lower end of published incidence ranges compared to the FDA IV

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of restoring longitudinal connectivity for stream fish communities: towards a more holistic approach.

    PubMed

    Tummers, Jeroen S; Hudson, Steve; Lucas, Martyn C

    2016-11-01

    A more holistic approach towards testing longitudinal connectivity restoration is needed in order to establish that intended ecological functions of such restoration are achieved. We illustrate the use of a multi-method scheme to evaluate the effectiveness of 'nature-like' connectivity restoration for stream fish communities in the River Deerness, NE England. Electric-fishing, capture-mark-recapture, PIT telemetry and radio-telemetry were used to measure fish community composition, dispersal, fishway efficiency and upstream migration respectively. For measuring passage and dispersal, our rationale was to evaluate a wide size range of strong swimmers (exemplified by brown trout Salmo trutta) and weak swimmers (exemplified by bullhead Cottus perifretum) in situ in the stream ecosystem. Radio-tracking of adult trout during the spawning migration showed that passage efficiency at each of five connectivity-restored sites was 81.3-100%. Unaltered (experimental control) structures on the migration route had a bottle-neck effect on upstream migration, especially during low flows. However, even during low flows, displaced PIT tagged juvenile trout (total n=153) exhibited a passage efficiency of 70.1-93.1% at two nature-like passes. In mark-recapture experiments juvenile brown trout and bullhead tagged (total n=5303) succeeded in dispersing upstream more often at most structures following obstacle modification, but not at the two control sites, based on a Laplace kernel modelling approach of observed dispersal distance and barrier traverses. Medium-term post-restoration data (2-3years) showed that the fish assemblage remained similar at five of six connectivity-restored sites and two control sites, but at one connectivity-restored headwater site previously inhabited by trout only, three native non-salmonid species colonized. We conclude that stream habitat reconnection should support free movement of a wide range of species and life stages, wherever retention of such

  4. Evaluation of 5-Year Trends in Knee Society Scores Stratified by Comorbidities: A Prospective, Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Jauregui, Julio J; Issa, Kimona; Cherian, Jeffrey J; Harwin, Steven F; Given, Kristin; Mont, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasties (TKAs) are reliable procedures for treating end-stage knee osteoarthritis with excellent long-term outcomes. The purpose of this study was to longitudinally evaluate temporal trends of Knee Society Scores (KSS) after TKA and to identify potential demographic and comorbid factors that affect these outcomes. This prospective study evaluated 281 patients (108 men and 173 women) with a mean age of 66 years (range, 39-80 years) who underwent primary TKA (minimum follow-up 5 years). During each follow-up visit, KS objective, function, and total scores were evaluated. The effects of different demographics and comorbidities on outcomes were further analyzed using multivariate regression analysis. Following TKA, peak mean KSS were observed at 1-year follow-up (mean, 92 points), after which there was no significant difference in scores at 5 years compared with 1-year follow-up (mean, 92 points). KS function scores were observed to be unchanged from preoperative levels (mean, 53 points) and at 6 weeks (mean, 56 points). These were significantly higher at 3 months (mean, 78 points) and reached a maximum mean peak at 1 year (mean, 85 points). KS objective scores increased earlier than function scores. The demographic variables and comorbidities that demonstrated a significantly negative impact in KS function scores were increased age, female gender, higher body mass index, and several medical comorbidities including immunological and neurological disease, and neoplasm. Race was the only variable that significantly decreased the KS objective scores. KSS after TKA follow temporal trends with scores initially unchanged from preoperative levels for the objective component, but the scores increased for the functional component. All components demonstrated higher levels compared with preoperative scores by 3 months and peaked at 1-year follow-up. At 5-year follow-up, all mean KSS were unchanged relative to peak scores seen at 1 year. Various patient

  5. Experiences of outreach workers in promoting smoking cessation to Bangladeshi and Pakistani men: longitudinal qualitative evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite having high smoking rates, there have been few tailored cessation programmes for male Bangladeshi and Pakistani smokers in the UK. We report on a qualitative evaluation of a community-based, outreach worker delivered, intervention that aimed to increase uptake of NHS smoking cessation services and tailor services to meet the needs of Bangladeshi and Pakistani men. Methods This was a longitudinal, qualitative study, nested within a phase II cluster randomised controlled trial of a complex intervention. We explored the perspectives and experiences of five outreach workers, two stop smoking service managers and a specialist stop smoking advisor. Data were collected through focus group discussions, weekly diaries, observations of management meetings, shadowing of outreach workers, and one-to-one interviews with outreach workers and their managers. Analysis was undertaken using a modified Framework approach. Results Outreach workers promoted cessation services by word of mouth on the streets, in health service premises, in local businesses and at a wide range of community events. They emphasised the reasons for cessation, especially health effects, financial implications, and the impact of smoking on the family. Many smokers agreed to be referred to cessation services, but few attended, this in part being explained by concerns about the relative inflexibility of existing service provision. Although outreach workers successfully expanded service reach, they faced the challenges of perceived lack of awareness of the health risks associated with smoking in older smokers and apathy in younger smokers. These were compounded by perceptions of "lip service" being given to their role by community organisations and tensions both amongst the outreach workers and with the wider management team. Conclusions Outreach workers expanded reach of the service through taking it to diverse locations of relevance to Pakistani and Bangladeshi communities. The optimum

  6. Longitudinal Evaluation of Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and Periodontal Status in HIV+ Patients

    PubMed Central

    Alpagot, Tamer; Remien, John; Bhattacharyya, Mouchumi; Konopka, Krystyna; Lundergan, William; Dűzgűneş, Nejat

    2007-01-01

    Summary The study aim was to determine whether Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) could serve as a risk factor for periodontitis in human immunodeficiency virus-positive (HIV+) patients. Clinical measurements, including gingival index (GI), plaque index, bleeding index, probing depth (PD), attachment loss (AL) and GCF samples were taken from 2 healthy sites (including sites with gingival recession, GI=0; PD≤ 3 mm; AL≤ 2 mm), 3 gingivitis sites (GI>0; PD≤ 3 mm; AL=0) and 3 periodontitis sites (GI>0; PD≥5 mm; AL≥3 mm) of each of the 30 patients at baseline and 6-month visits. GCF samples were also taken by means of paper strips. GCF PGE2 levels were determined by a sandwich ELISA. The progressing site was defined as a site which had 2 mm or more attachment loss during the 6-month study period. The mean amounts of PGE2 were significantly higher in gingivitis and periodontitis sites than in healthy sites (p<0.0001). GCF levels of PGE2 were significantly correlated with probing depth, attachment loss, CD4+ cells, viral load, age, and smoking pack-years at baseline and 6-month visits (0.0001Longitudinal evaluation of GCF PGE2 with respect to the progression of untreated periodontitis sites in HIV+ subjects will contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of periodontitis in HIV+ patients. These data indicate that sites with high GCF levels of PGE2 in HIV+ patients are at significantly greater risk for progression of periodontitis. PMID:17586460

  7. A longitudinal evaluation of Treponema pallidum PCR testing in early syphilis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Syphilis is a growing public health problem among men who have sex with men (MSM) globally. Rapid and accurate detection of syphilis is vital to ensure patients and their contacts receive timely treatment and reduce ongoing transmission. Methods We evaluated a PCR assay for the diagnosis of Treponema pallidum using swabs of suspected early syphilis lesions in longitudinally assessed MSM. Results We tested 260 MSM for T pallidum by PCR on 288 occasions: 77 (26.7%) had early syphilis that was serologically confirmed at baseline or within six weeks, and 211 (73.3%) remained seronegative for syphilis. Of 55 men with primary syphilis, 49 were PCR positive, giving a sensitivity of 89.1% (95% CI: 77.8%-95.9%) and a specificity of 99.1% (95% CI: 96.5%-99.9%). Of 22 men with secondary syphilis, 11 were PCR positive, giving a sensitivity of 50% (95% CI: 28.2%-71.8%) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 66.4%-71.8%). Of the 77 syphilis cases, 43 (56%) were HIV positive and the sensitivity and specificity of the PCR test did not vary by HIV status. The PCR test was able to detect up to five (10%) primary infections that were initially seronegative, including one HIV positive man with delayed seroconversion to syphilis (72 to 140 days) and one HIV positive man who did not seroconvert to syphilis over 14 months follow-up. Both men had been treated for syphilis within a week of the PCR test. Conclusions T pallidum PCR is a potentially powerful tool for the early diagnosis of primary syphilis, particularly where a serological response has yet to develop. PMID:23241398

  8. Evaluation of the National Tips From Former Smokers Campaign: the 2014 Longitudinal Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Deesha; Davis, Kevin; Ridgeway, William; Shafer, Paul; Cox, Shanna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Since 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has aired a national tobacco education campaign to encourage quitting, Tips From Former Smokers (Tips), which consists of graphic antismoking advertisements that feature former cigarette smokers. We evaluated phase 2 of the 2014 campaign by using a nationally representative longitudinal cohort. Methods Cigarette smokers who participated in a baseline survey were re-contacted for follow-up (n = 4,248) approximately 4 months later, immediately after the campaign’s conclusion. The primary outcomes were incidence of a quit attempt in the previous 3 months, intention to quit within 30 days, and intention to quit within 6 months during the postcampaign period. We used multivariate logistic regression models to estimate the odds of each outcome. We also stratified models by race/ethnicity, education, and mental health status. Postcampaign rates of quit attempts, intentions to quit, and sustained quits were also estimated. Results Exposure to the campaign was associated with increased odds of a quit attempt in the previous 3 months (OR, 1.17; P = .03) among baseline smokers and intentions to quit within the next 6 months (OR, 1.28; P = .01) among current smokers at follow-up. The Tips campaign was associated with an estimated 1.83 million additional quit attempts, 1.73 million additional smokers intending to quit within 6 months, and 104,000 sustained quits of at least 6 months. Conclusion The Tips campaign continued to have a significant impact on cessation-related behaviors, providing further justification for the continued use of tobacco education campaigns to accelerate progress toward the goal of reducing adult smoking in the United States. PMID:27010845

  9. Decreasing pediatric patient anxiety about radiology imaging tests: prospective evaluation of an educational intervention.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Annette J; Steele, Jennifer; Russell, Gregory B; Moran, Rhonda; Fredericks, Kirsten P; Jennings, S Gregory

    2009-12-01

    This trial investigated anxiety levels and effect of an educational coloring book (CB) among pediatric patients about to undergo radiology imaging tests. Control group (N = 101) and intervention group (N = 175) children ages 3-10 years and their parents were surveyed to determine anxiety levels before the imaging test, with the intervention group being surveyed after patient and parental review of the CB. Anxiety was low for all subjects overall compared with findings from previously published literature, perhaps related to systemic measures to make children's hospitals more child friendly in recent years. Review of the CB was not associated with decreased anxiety among patients or parents. However, among a subgroup with higher baseline parental anxiety, there was a trend toward lower patient anxiety in the intervention group. Most parents indicated that the CB was informative and helped them and their child be less worried, and that they were pleased to have received the CB. PMID:19833667

  10. Evaluation and Management of Patellar Instability in Pediatric and Adolescent Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khormaee, Sariah; Kramer, Dennis E.; Yen, Yi-Meng; Heyworth, Benton E.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The rising popularity and intensity of youth sports has increased the incidence of patellar dislocation. These sports-related injuries may be associated with significant morbidity in the pediatric population. Treatment requires understanding and attention to the unique challenges in the skeletally immature patient. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed searches spanning 1970-2013. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Although nonoperative approaches are most often suitable for first-time patellar dislocations, surgical treatment is recommended for acute fixation of displaced osteochondral fractures sustained during primary instability and for patellar realignment in the setting of recurrent instability. While a variety of procedures can prevent recurrence, the risk of complications is not minimal. Conclusion: Patellar stabilization and realignment procedures in skeletally immature patients with recurrent patellar dislocation can effectively treat patellar instability without untoward effects on growth if careful surgical planning incorporates protection of growth parameters in the skeletally immature athlete. PMID:25984256

  11. Moving towards Routine Evaluation of Quality of Inpatient Pediatric Care in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gathara, David; Nyamai, Rachael; Were, Fred; Mogoa, Wycliffe; Karumbi, Jamlick; Kihuba, Elesban; Mwinga, Stephen; Aluvaala, Jalemba; Mulaku, Mercy; Kosgei, Rose; Todd, Jim; Allen, Elizabeth; English, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Background Regular assessment of quality of care allows monitoring of progress towards system goals and identifies gaps that need to be addressed to promote better outcomes. We report efforts to initiate routine assessments in a low-income country in partnership with government. Methods A cross-sectional survey undertaken in 22 ‘internship training’ hospitals across Kenya that examined availability of essential resources and process of care based on review of 60 case-records per site focusing on the common childhood illnesses (pneumonia, malaria, diarrhea/dehydration, malnutrition and meningitis). Results Availability of essential resources was 75% (45/61 items) or more in 8/22 hospitals. A total of 1298 (range 54–61) case records were reviewed. HIV testing remained suboptimal at 12% (95% CI 7–19). A routinely introduced structured pediatric admission record form improved documentation of core admission symptoms and signs (median score for signs 22/22 and 8/22 when form used and not used respectively). Correctness of penicillin and gentamicin dosing was above 85% but correctness of prescribed intravenous fluid or oral feed volumes for severe dehydration and malnutrition were 54% and 25% respectively. Introduction of Zinc for diarrhea has been relatively successful (66% cases) but use of artesunate for malaria remained rare. Exploratory analysis suggests considerable variability of the quality of care across hospitals. Conclusion Quality of pediatric care in Kenya has improved but can improve further. The approach to monitoring described in this survey seems feasible and provides an opportunity for routine assessments across a large number of hospitals as part of national efforts to sustain improvement. Understanding variability across hospitals may help target improvement efforts. PMID:25822492

  12. Paper or plastic? Simulation based evaluation of two versions of a cognitive aid for managing pediatric peri-operative critical events by anesthesia trainees: evaluation of the society for pediatric anesthesia emergency checklist.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Scott C; Anders, Shilo; Clebone, Anna; Hughes, Elisabeth; Zeigler, Laura; Patel, Vikram; Shi, Yaping; Shotwell, Matthew S; McEvoy, Matthew; Weinger, Matthew B

    2016-06-01

    Cognitive aids (CA), including emergency manuals and checklists, are tools designed to assist users in prioritizing and performing complex tasks during time sensitive, high stress situations (Marshall in Anesth Analgesia 117(5):1162-1171, 2013; Marshall and Mehra in Anaesthesia 69(7):669-677, 2014). The society for pediatric anesthesia (SPA) has developed a series of emergency checklists tailored for use by pediatric perioperative teams that cover a wide range of intraoperative critical events (Shaffner et al. in Anesth Analgesia 117(4):960-979, 2013). In this study, we evaluated user preferences for a CA (SPA checklist) using two different presentation formats, paper and electronic, during management of simulated critical events. Anesthesia trainees managed the simulated critical events under one of three randomized conditions: (1) memory alone, (2) with a paper version of the CA, (3) with an electronic version of the CA. Following participation in the simulated critical events, participants were asked to complete a survey regarding their experience using the different versions of the CA. The percentage of favorable responses for each format of the CA was compared using a mixed effects proportional odds model. There were 143 simulated events managed by 89 anesthesia trainees. Approximately one out of three trainees (electronic 29 %, paper 30 %) assigned to use the CA chose not to use it and completed the scenario from memory alone. The survey was completed by 68 % of participants, 58 % of trainees preferred the paper version and 35 % preferred the electronic version. All survey responses that reached statistical significance favored the paper version. In this study, anesthesia trainees had a favorable opinion of the content and perceived clinical relevance of both versions of the CA. In both quantitative and qualitative analysis, the paper version of the CA was preferred over the electronic version by participants. Despite overall favorable responses to the

  13. Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Comparisons of the Predominant Fecal Microbiota Compositions of a Group of Pediatric Patients with Cystic Fibrosis and Their Healthy Siblings▿†

    PubMed Central

    Duytschaever, Gwen; Huys, Geert; Bekaert, Maarten; Boulanger, Linda; De Boeck, Kris; Vandamme, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Although only poorly documented, it can be assumed that intensive antibiotic treatments of chronic lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) also affect the diversity and metabolic functioning of the gastrointestinal microbiota and potentially lead to a state of dysbiosis. A better knowledge of the differences in gut microbiota composition and stability between patients with CF and healthy subjects could lead to optimization of current antibiotic therapies and/or development of add-on therapies. Using conventional culturing and population fingerprinting by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA amplicons, we compared the predominant fecal microbiota of 21 patients with CF and 24 healthy siblings in a cross-sectional study. General medium counts, as well as counts on media specific for lactic acid bacteria, clostridia, Bifidobacterium spp., Veillonella spp., and Bacteroides-Prevotella spp., were consistently higher in sibling samples than in CF samples, whereas the reverse was found for enterobacterial counts. DGGE fingerprinting uncovered large intersubject variations in both study groups. On the other hand, the cross-sectional data indicated that the predominant fecal microbiota of patients and siblings had comparable species richness. In addition, a longitudinal study was performed on 7 or 8 consecutive samples collected over a 2-year period from two patients and their respective siblings. For these samples, DGGE profiling indicated an overall trend toward lower temporal stability and lower species richness in the predominant fecal CF microbiota. The observed compositional and dynamic perturbations provide the first evidence of a general dysbiosis in children with CF compared to their siblings. PMID:21926193

  14. Longitudinal Evaluation of Peer Health Education on a College Campus: Impact on Health Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Sabina; Park, Yong S.; Israel, Tania; Cordero, Elizabeth D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated the longitudinal impact of peer health education on the health behaviors of undergraduate students pertaining to alcohol and drug use, eating and nutrition, and sexual health. Participants: From fall 2003 to spring 2006, the authors annually administered a Web-based survey to a cohort of 2,000 randomly selected…

  15. State-Funded Compensatory/Remedial Program Final Evaluation, 1984-85. Longitudinal Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, Janella

    The longitudinal effects of Louisiana's Compensatory/Remedial Program upon student performance were assessed using data from four administrations of the Basic Skills Test (BST) between 1982 and 1985. Language arts and mathematics tests were administered in grades 2 through 5. Scores increased slightly between 1982 and 1984, and declined in 1985;…

  16. Technology, Learning, and the Classroom: Longitudinal Evaluation of a Faculty Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Karen; Bolliger, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Technology, Learning, and the Classroom, a workshop designed to jump-start faculty's use of instructional technology in face-to-face classrooms, was offered as a week-long intensive workshop and once-a-week session over a semester. Faculty were interviewed five years after participation to determine the longitudinal effects, differences in opinion…

  17. Protocol of plain radiographs, hip ultrasound, and triple phase bone scans in the evaluation of the painful pediatric hip

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.E.; Seibert, J.J.; Aronson, J.; Williamson, S.L.; Glasier, C.M.; Rodgers, A.B.; Corbitt, S.L.

    1988-04-01

    A useful protocol for the evaluation of hip pain in the pediatric patient, using a combination of plain radiographs, hip ultrasound (US), and triple phase radionuclide bone scans is presented. Patients with hip pain were initially evaluated by plain radiographs of the pelvis and hips. If no diagnosis was reached, the hips were studied for effusions by real-time hip ultrasonography. If an effusion was present, the joint was aspirated for diagnosis. If no effusion was present by US or if no diagnosis was reached by aspiration, triple phase radionuclide bone scans were performed. Fifty patients were evaluated by this prospective protocol, and the diagnosis was reached in 48 of the 50 cases (10 by plain radiographs, 16 by US, and aspiration of the joint, and 22 by triple phase bone scans). Hip effusions were found in 20 patients by US, with no false positives or false negatives. Previous studies for detecting effusions by US have emphasized absolute measurements of the capsular width, but we report a typical appearance of the hip capsule when fluid is present (a bulging convex capsule). When no effusion is present, the capsule is concave and parallels the long axis of the femoral neck.

  18. A longitudinal evaluation of factors associated with retaining women in science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Christina Marie Osslund

    1999-11-01

    This study investigated the longitudinal effects of a Living Learning Center (LLC) on women studying engineering, science, and mathematics. The intervention was designed to decrease social isolation within women studying traditionally male-dominated career fields. Secondary goals included increasing LLC participants' retention within nontraditional academic majors and enhancing LLC participants' academic performance within nontraditional courses of study. Finally, increasing LLC participants' university retention, overall academic performance, self-efficacy, and college adjustment were tertiary objectives. Based on previous research, it was hypothesized that women participating in the LLC would report less social isolation, greater major and university retention, higher academic performance, and greater self-efficacy and college adjustment than women studying nontraditional majors housed in traditional residence halls. It was further hypothesized that members of the LLC would experience increasing levels of academic performance, adjustment, and retention over the span of their college careers. Finally, demographic and outcome variables were assessed for their predictive power of university and major retention. Three cohorts were studied in the present evaluation that included 149 LLC participants and 207 non-participants. Results of the investigation were mixed. Results suggested that decreasing social isolation within LLC participants was achieved. Although no differences were found between the participant groups in university retention, findings indicated greater nontraditional major retention among LLC participants than non-participants, and participants achieved higher retention percentage rates than non-participants within each cohort for each year of the study. No differences were found in academic performance between the two groups and all respondents attained relatively high academic grades. Overall, both groups indicated high levels of adjustment, self

  19. Longitudinal evaluation of aflatoxin exposure in two cohorts in south-western Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Su; Nkurunziza, Peter; Muwanika, Richard; Qian, Guoqing; Tang, Lili; Song, Xiao; Xue, Kathy; Nkwata, Allan; Ssempebwa, John; Lutalo, Tom; Asiki, Gershim; Serwadda, David; Seeley, Janet; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Nalugoda, Fred; Newton, Robert; William, Jonathan H; Wang, Jia-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) are a group of mycotoxins. AF exposure causes acute and chronic adverse health effects such as aflatoxicosis and hepatocellular carcinoma in human populations, especially in the developing world. In this study, AF exposure was evaluated using archived serum samples from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-seronegative participants from two cohort studies in south-western Uganda. AFB1-lysine (AFB-Lys) adduct levels were determined via HPLC fluorescence in a total of 713 serum samples from the General Population Cohort (GPC), covering eight time periods between 1989 and 2010. Overall, 90% (642/713) of the samples were positive for AFB-Lys and the median level was 1.58 pg mg(-1) albumin (range = 0.40-168 pg mg(-1) albumin). AFB-Lys adduct levels were also measured in a total of 374 serum samples from the Rakai Community Cohort Study (RCCS), across four time periods between 1999 and 2003. The averaged detection rate was 92.5% (346/374) and the median level was 1.18 pg mg(-1) albumin (range = 0.40-122.5 pg mg(-1) albumin). In the GPC study there were no statistically significant differences between demographic parameters, such as age, sex and level of education, and levels of serum AFB-Lys adduct. In the RCCS study, longitudinal analysis using generalised estimating equations revealed significant differences between the adduct levels and residential areas (p = 0.05) and occupations (p = 0.02). This study indicates that AF exposure in people in two populations in south-western Uganda is persistent and has not significantly changed over time. Data from one study, but not the other, indicated that agriculture workers and rural area residents had more AF exposure than those non-agricultural workers and non-rural area residents. These results suggest the need for further study of AF-induced human adverse health effects, especially the predominant diseases in the region. PMID:26208708

  20. Discrete Choice Experiment to Evaluate Factors That Influence Preferences for Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Regier, Dean A.; Diorio, Caroline; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Alli, Amanda; Alexander, Sarah; Boydell, Katherine M.; Gassas, Adam; Taylor, Jonathan; Kellow, Charis; Mills, Denise; Sung, Lillian

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacterial and fungal infections in pediatric oncology patients cause morbidity and mortality. The clinical utility of antimicrobial prophylaxis in children is uncertain and the personal utility of these agents is disputed. Objectives were to use a discrete choice experiment to: (1) describe the importance of attributes to parents and healthcare providers when deciding between use and non-use of antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis; and (2) estimate willingness-to-pay for prophylactic strategies. Methods Attributes were chances of infection, death and side effects, route of administration and cost of pharmacotherapy. Respondents were randomized to a discrete choice experiment outlining hypothetical treatment options to prevent antibacterial or antifungal infections. Each respondent was presented 16 choice tasks and was asked to choose between two unlabeled treatment options and an opt-out alternative (no prophylaxis). Results 102 parents and 60 healthcare providers participated. For the antibacterial discrete choice experiment, frequency of administration was significantly associated with utility for parents but not for healthcare providers. Increasing chances of infection, death, side effects and cost were all significantly associated with decreased utility for parents and healthcare providers in both the antibacterial and antifungal discrete choice experiment. Parental willingness-to-pay was higher than healthcare providers for both strategies. Conclusion Chances of infection, death, side effects and costs were all significantly associated with utility. Parents have higher willingness-to-pay for these strategies compared with healthcare providers. This knowledge can help to develop prophylaxis programs. PMID:23082169

  1. Evaluation of an initiative to reduce radiation exposure from CT to children in a non-pediatric-focused facility.

    PubMed

    Blumfield, Einat; Zember, Jonathan; Guelfguat, Mark; Blumfield, Amit; Goldman, Harold

    2015-12-01

    We would like to share our experience of reducing pediatric radiation exposure. Much of the recent literature regarding successes of reducing radiation exposure has come from dedicated children's hospitals. Nonetheless, over the past two decades, there has been a considerable increase in CT imaging of children in the USA, predominantly in non-pediatric-focused facilities where the majority of children are treated. In our institution, two general hospitals with limited pediatric services, a dedicated initiative intended to reduce children's exposure to CT radiation was started by pediatric radiologists in 2005. The initiative addressed multiple issues including eliminating multiphase studies, decreasing inappropriate scans, educating referring providers, training residents and technologists, replacing CT with ultrasound or MRI, and ensuring availability of pediatric radiologists for consultation. During the study period, the total number of CT scans decreased by 24 %. When accounting for the number of scans per visit to the emergency department (ED), the numbers of abdominal and head CT scans decreased by 37.2 and 35.2 %, respectively. For abdominal scans, the average number of phases per scan decreased from 1.70 to 1.04. Upon surveying the pediatric ED staff, it was revealed that the most influential factors on ordering of scans were daily communication with pediatric radiologists, followed by journal articles and lectures by pediatric radiologists. We concluded that a non-pediatric-focused facility can achieve dramatic reduction in CT radiation exposure to children; however, this is most effectively achieved through a dedicated, multidisciplinary process led by pediatric radiologists. PMID:26263878

  2. Assessing self-care and social function using a computer adaptive testing version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory Accepted for Publication, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Coster, Wendy J.; Haley, Stephen M.; Ni, Pengsheng; Dumas, Helene M.; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine score agreement, validity, precision, and response burden of a prototype computer adaptive testing (CAT) version of the Self-Care and Social Function scales of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) compared to the full-length version of these scales. Design Computer simulation analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal retrospective data; cross-sectional prospective study. Settings Pediatric rehabilitation hospital, including inpatient acute rehabilitation, day school program, outpatient clinics; community-based day care, preschool, and children’s homes. Participants Four hundred sixty-nine children with disabilities and 412 children with no disabilities (analytic sample); 38 children with disabilities and 35 children without disabilities (cross-validation sample). Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Summary scores from prototype CAT applications of each scale using 15-, 10-, and 5-item stopping rules; scores from the full-length Self-Care and Social Function scales; time (in seconds) to complete assessments and respondent ratings of burden. Results Scores from both computer simulations and field administration of the prototype CATs were highly consistent with scores from full-length administration (all r’s between .94 and .99). Using computer simulation of retrospective data, discriminant validity and sensitivity to change of the CATs closely approximated that of the full-length scales, especially when the 15- and 10-item stopping rules were applied. In the cross-validation study the time to administer both CATs was 4 minutes, compared to over 16 minutes to complete the full-length scales. Conclusions Self-care and Social Function score estimates from CAT administration are highly comparable to those obtained from full-length scale administration, with small losses in validity and precision and substantial decreases in administration time. PMID:18373991

  3. A comparison of power analysis methods for evaluating effects of a predictor on slopes in longitudinal designs with missing data.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cuiling; Hall, Charles B; Kim, Mimi

    2015-12-01

    In many longitudinal studies, evaluating the effect of a binary or continuous predictor variable on the rate of change of the outcome, i.e. slope, is often of primary interest. Sample size determination of these studies, however, is complicated by the expectation that missing data will occur due to missed visits, early drop out, and staggered entry. Despite the availability of methods for assessing power in longitudinal studies with missing data, the impact on power of the magnitude and distribution of missing data in the study population remain poorly understood. As a result, simple but erroneous alterations of the sample size formulae for complete/balanced data are commonly applied. These 'naive' approaches include the average sum of squares and average number of subjects methods. The goal of this article is to explore in greater detail the effect of missing data on study power and compare the performance of naive sample size methods to a correct maximum likelihood-based method using both mathematical and simulation-based approaches. Two different longitudinal aging studies are used to illustrate the methods. PMID:22357710

  4. Formulation Development and Evaluation of Fast Disintegrating Tablet of Cetirizine Hydrochloride: A Novel Drug Delivery for Pediatrics and Geriatrics

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Deepak; Singh, Mankaran; Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Gurmeet

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in fast disintegrating tablets have brought convenience in dosing to pediatric and elderly patients who have trouble in swallowing tablets. The objective of the present study was to prepare the fast disintegrating tablet of Cetirizine Hydrochloride for allergic and respiratory disorders. As precision of dosing and patient's compliance become important prerequisite for a long-term treatment, there is a need to develop a formulation for this drug which overcomes problems such as difficulty in swallowing, inconvenience in administration while travelling, and patient's acceptability. Hence, the present investigation was undertaken with a view to develop a fast disintegrating tablet of Cetirizine Hydrochloride which offers a new range of products having desired characteristics and intended benefits. Superdisintegrants such as Sodium Starch Glycolate were optimized. Different binders were optimized along with optimized superdisintegrant concentration. The tablets were prepared by direct compression technique. The tablets were evaluated for hardness, friability, weight variation, wetting time, disintegration time and uniformity of content. Optimized formulation was evaluated by in vitro dissolution test, drug excipient compatibility and accelerated stability study. It was concluded that fast disintegrating tablets of Cetirizine Hydrochloride were formulated successfully with desired characteristics which disintegrated rapidly, provide rapid onset of action, and enhance the patient convenience and compliance. PMID:26556203

  5. Innovation in pediatric surgical education.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew S; Wulkan, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric surgical training in the United States remained basically unchanged from the model developed by Ladd and Gross in the 1930s until recently. Standardized curriculum and novel evaluation methods are now being implemented. Pediatric Surgical education is currently undergoing a transition to competency-based evaluation and promotion. Unfortunately, there is little data on the efficacy of these changes. This presents an opportunity for further study of how we conduct training, and how we evaluate and promote our trainees. PMID:25976147

  6. An Evaluation of a Dog Bite Prevention Intervention in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Cinnamon A.; Pomerantz, Wendy J.; Hart, Kimberly W.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Mahabee-Gittens, E. Melinda

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the efficacy of a video-based dog bite prevention intervention at increasing child knowledge and describe any associated factors; and to assess the acceptability of providing this intervention in a pediatric emergency department (PED). Methods This cross-sectional, quasi experimental study enrolled a convenience sample of 5–9 year old patients and their parents, presenting to a PED with non-urgent complaints or dog bites. Children completed a 14-point simulated scenario test used to measure knowledge about safe dog interactions pre-/post- a video intervention. Based on previous research, a passing score (≥11/14) was defined a priori. Parents completed surveys regarding sociodemographics, dog-related experiential history and the intervention. Results There were 120 child/parent pairs. Mean child age was 7 (SD 1) and 55% were male. Of parents, 70% were white, 2/3 had more than high school education, and half had incomes <$40,000. Current dog ownership was 77%; only 6% of children had received prior dog bite prevention education. Test pass rate was 58% pre-intervention; 90% post-intervention. Knowledge score increased in 83% of children; greatest increases were in questions involving stray dogs or dogs that were fenced or eating. Younger child age was the only predictor of failing the post-test (p<0.001). Nearly all parents found the intervention informative; 93% supported providing the intervention in the PED. Conclusions Child knowledge of dog bite prevention is poor. The video-based intervention we tested appears efficacious at increasing short-term knowledge in 5–9 year old children and is acceptable to parents. Parents strongly supported providing this education. PMID:24061505

  7. Evaluation of a practice-based intervention to improve the management of pediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, Helen; Keller, Adrienne; Ehrensberger, Ryan; Irani, Anne-Marie

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric asthma remains a significant burden upon patients, families, and the healthcare system. Despite the availability of evidence-based best practice asthma management guidelines for over a decade, published studies suggest that many primary care physicians do not follow them. This article describes the Provider Quality Improvement (PQI) intervention with six diverse community-based practices. A pediatrician and a nurse practitioner conducted the year-long intervention, which was part of a larger CDC-funded project, using problem-based learning within an academic detailing model. Process and outcome assessments included (1) pre- and post-intervention chart reviews to assess eight indicators of quality care, (2) post-intervention staff questionnaires to assess contact with the intervention team and awareness of practice changes, and (3) individual semi-structured interviews with physician and nurse champions in five of the six practices. The chart review indicated that all six practices met predefined performance improvement criteria for at least four of eight indicators of quality care, with two practices meeting improvement criteria for all eight indicators. The response rate for the staff questionnaires was high (72%) and generally consistent across practices, demonstrating high staff awareness of the intervention team, the practice "asthma champions," and changes in practice patterns. In the semi-structured interviews, several respondents attributed the intervention's acceptability and success to the expertise of the PQI team and expressed the belief that sustaining changes would be critically dependent on continued contact with the team. Despite significant limitations, this study demonstrated that interventions that are responsive to individual practice cultures can successfully change practice patterns. PMID:21337050

  8. Dosimetric evaluation of X-ray examinations of paranasal sinuses in pediatric patients*

    PubMed Central

    Cantalupo, Beatriz de Lucena Villa-Chan; Xavier, Aline Carvalho da Silva; da Silva, Clemanzy Mariano Leandro; Andrade, Marcos Ely Almeida; de Barros, Vinícius Saito Monteiro; Khoury, Helen Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the entrance surface air kerma (Ka,e) and air kerma in the region of radiosensitive organs in radiographs of pediatric paranasal sinuses. Materials and Methods Patient data and irradiation parameters were collected in examinations of the paranasal sinuses in children from 0 to 15 years of age at two children's hospitals in the city of Recife, PE, Brazil. We estimated the Ka,e using the X-ray tube outputs and selected parameters. To estimate the air kerma values in the regions of the eyes and thyroid, we used thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results The Ka,e values ranged from 0.065 to 1.446 mGy in cavum radiographs, from 0.104 to 7.298 mGy in Caldwell views, and from 0.113 to 7.824 mGy in Waters views. Air kerma values in the region of the eyes ranged from 0.001 to 0.968 mGy in cavum radiographs and from 0.011 to 0.422 mGy in Caldwell and Waters views . In the thyroid region, air kerma values ranged from 0.005 to 0.932 mGy in cavum radiographs and from 0.002 to 0.972 mGy in Caldwell and Waters views. Conclusion The radiation levels used at the institutions under study were higher than those recommended in international protocols. We recommend that interventions be initiated in order to reduce patient exposure to radiation and therefore the risks associated with radiological examination of the paranasal sinuses. PMID:27141129

  9. The Comprehensive Longitudinal Evaluation of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program: Summary of Final Reports. SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #36

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    This report contains a summary of the findings from the various topical reports that comprise the author's comprehensive longitudinal study. As a summary, it does not include extensive details regarding the study samples and scientific methodologies employed in those topical studies. The research revealed a pattern of school choice results that…

  10. Evaluation and management of longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis: a guide for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, S; Eckart Sorte, D; Zamora, C A; Mossa-Basha, M; Newsome, S D; Izbudak, I

    2016-10-01

    Longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis (LETM) is defined as an intramedullary spinal cord T2 signal abnormality extending craniocaudally over at least three vertebral bodies on an MRI study. Timely and appropriate diagnosis greatly facilitates patient management. The radiologist should review the relevant clinical information and determine the patient demographics and acuity of symptoms. Herein, we review the spectrum of diseases causing LETM and propose interpretation to guide the radiologist when presented with the MRI finding of LETM. PMID:27450408

  11. Clinical Evaluation of a Fully-automatic Segmentation Method for Longitudinal Brain Tumor Volumetry

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Raphael; Knecht, Urspeter; Loosli, Tina; Bauer, Stefan; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Reyes, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Information about the size of a tumor and its temporal evolution is needed for diagnosis as well as treatment of brain tumor patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a fully-automatic segmentation method, called BraTumIA, for longitudinal brain tumor volumetry by comparing the automatically estimated volumes with ground truth data acquired via manual segmentation. Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging data of 14 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma encompassing 64 MR acquisitions, ranging from preoperative up to 12 month follow-up images, was analysed. Manual segmentation was performed by two human raters. Strong correlations (R = 0.83–0.96, p < 0.001) were observed between volumetric estimates of BraTumIA and of each of the human raters for the contrast-enhancing (CET) and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments (NCE-T2). A quantitative analysis of the inter-rater disagreement showed that the disagreement between BraTumIA and each of the human raters was comparable to the disagreement between the human raters. In summary, BraTumIA generated volumetric trend curves of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments comparable to estimates of human raters. These findings suggest the potential of automated longitudinal tumor segmentation to substitute manual volumetric follow-up of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments. PMID:27001047

  12. Clinical Evaluation of a Fully-automatic Segmentation Method for Longitudinal Brain Tumor Volumetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Raphael; Knecht, Urspeter; Loosli, Tina; Bauer, Stefan; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Reyes, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    Information about the size of a tumor and its temporal evolution is needed for diagnosis as well as treatment of brain tumor patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a fully-automatic segmentation method, called BraTumIA, for longitudinal brain tumor volumetry by comparing the automatically estimated volumes with ground truth data acquired via manual segmentation. Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging data of 14 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma encompassing 64 MR acquisitions, ranging from preoperative up to 12 month follow-up images, was analysed. Manual segmentation was performed by two human raters. Strong correlations (R = 0.83–0.96, p < 0.001) were observed between volumetric estimates of BraTumIA and of each of the human raters for the contrast-enhancing (CET) and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments (NCE-T2). A quantitative analysis of the inter-rater disagreement showed that the disagreement between BraTumIA and each of the human raters was comparable to the disagreement between the human raters. In summary, BraTumIA generated volumetric trend curves of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments comparable to estimates of human raters. These findings suggest the potential of automated longitudinal tumor segmentation to substitute manual volumetric follow-up of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments.

  13. Clinical Evaluation of a Fully-automatic Segmentation Method for Longitudinal Brain Tumor Volumetry.

    PubMed

    Meier, Raphael; Knecht, Urspeter; Loosli, Tina; Bauer, Stefan; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Reyes, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Information about the size of a tumor and its temporal evolution is needed for diagnosis as well as treatment of brain tumor patients. The aim of the study was to investigate the potential of a fully-automatic segmentation method, called BraTumIA, for longitudinal brain tumor volumetry by comparing the automatically estimated volumes with ground truth data acquired via manual segmentation. Longitudinal Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging data of 14 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma encompassing 64 MR acquisitions, ranging from preoperative up to 12 month follow-up images, was analysed. Manual segmentation was performed by two human raters. Strong correlations (R = 0.83-0.96, p < 0.001) were observed between volumetric estimates of BraTumIA and of each of the human raters for the contrast-enhancing (CET) and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments (NCE-T2). A quantitative analysis of the inter-rater disagreement showed that the disagreement between BraTumIA and each of the human raters was comparable to the disagreement between the human raters. In summary, BraTumIA generated volumetric trend curves of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments comparable to estimates of human raters. These findings suggest the potential of automated longitudinal tumor segmentation to substitute manual volumetric follow-up of contrast-enhancing and non-enhancing T2-hyperintense tumor compartments. PMID:27001047

  14. Approaches for Assessing Risks to Sensitive Populations: Lessons Learned from Evaluating Risks in the Pediatric Population

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the risk profiles of potentially sensitive populations requires a "tool chest" of methodological approaches to adequately characterize and evaluate these populations. At present, there is an extensive body of literature on methodologies that apply to the evaluation of t...

  15. Approaches for assessing risks to sensitive populations: Lessons learned from evaluating risks in the pediatric populations*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the risk profiles of potentially sensitive populations requires a 'tool chest' of methodological approaches to adequately characterize and evaluate these populations. At present, there is an extensive body of literature on methodologies that apply to the evaluation of...

  16. Developing pediatric surgery in low- and middle-income countries: An evaluation of contemporary education and care delivery models.

    PubMed

    Butler, Marilyn W

    2016-02-01

    There are several different models of education and care delivery models in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and many endeavors combine more than one of the described models. This article summarizes the burden of pediatric surgical disease and discusses the benefits and shortcomings of the following: faith-based missions; short-term surgical trips; partnerships, twinning, and academic collaborations; teaching workshops, "train the trainer," and pediatric surgery camps; specialty treatment centers; online conferences, telemedicine, and mobile health; specific programs for exchange and education; and training in high-income countries (HICs), fellowships, and observorships. It then addresses ethical concerns common to all humanitarian pediatric surgical efforts. PMID:26831137

  17. SU-E-I-57: Evaluation and Optimization of Effective-Dose Using Different Beam-Hardening Filters in Clinical Pediatric Shunt CT Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, K; Aldoohan, S; Collier, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Study image optimization and radiation dose reduction in pediatric shunt CT scanning protocol through the use of different beam-hardening filters Methods: A 64-slice CT scanner at OU Childrens Hospital has been used to evaluate CT image contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and measure effective-doses based on the concept of CT dose index (CTDIvol) using the pediatric head shunt scanning protocol. The routine axial pediatric head shunt scanning protocol that has been optimized for the intrinsic x-ray tube filter has been used to evaluate CNR by acquiring images using the ACR approved CT-phantom and radiation dose CTphantom, which was used to measure CTDIvol. These results were set as reference points to study and evaluate the effects of adding different filtering materials (i.e. Tungsten, Tantalum, Titanium, Nickel and Copper filters) to the existing filter on image quality and radiation dose. To ensure optimal image quality, the scanner routine air calibration was run for each added filter. The image CNR was evaluated for different kVps and wide range of mAs values using above mentioned beam-hardening filters. These scanning protocols were run under axial as well as under helical techniques. The CTDIvol and the effective-dose were measured and calculated for all scanning protocols and added filtration, including the intrinsic x-ray tube filter. Results: Beam-hardening filter shapes energy spectrum, which reduces the dose by 27%. No noticeable changes in image low contrast detectability Conclusion: Effective-dose is very much dependent on the CTDIVol, which is further very much dependent on beam-hardening filters. Substantial reduction in effective-dose is realized using beam-hardening filters as compare to the intrinsic filter. This phantom study showed that significant radiation dose reduction could be achieved in CT pediatric shunt scanning protocols without compromising in diagnostic value of image quality.

  18. The Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial (CHAT): Rationale, Design, and Challenges of a Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating a Standard Surgical Procedure in a Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Redline, Susan; Amin, Raouf; Beebe, Dean; Chervin, Ronald D.; Garetz, Susan L.; Giordani, Bruno; Marcus, Carole L.; Moore, Renee H.; Rosen, Carol L.; Arens, Raanan; Gozal, David; Katz, Eliot S.; Mitchell, Ronald B.; Muzumdar, Hiren; Taylor, H.G.; Thomas, Nina; Ellenberg, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Each year, over 500,000 adenotonsillectomies (AT), mostly for the treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are performed in the US in children under 15 years of age. No definitive study, however, has been yet conducted that has rigorously evaluated the effectiveness of AT for not only improving sleep disordered breathing, but also for improving clinically relevant outcomes, such as neurocognitive function, behavior, and quality of life. The Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial (CHAT) was designed to assess neuropsychological and health outcomes in children randomized to receive early AT (eAT) as compared to Watchful Waiting with Supportive Care (WWSC). Important secondary goals of the study are to evaluate outcomes in subgroups defined by obesity and race. This paper addresses key elements in the design and implementation of a controlled trial for a widely used “standard practice” surgical intervention in a pediatric population, that include establishment of standardized data collection procedures across sites for a wide variety of data types, establishment of equipoise, and approaches for minimizing unblinding of selected key personnel. The study framework that was established should provide a useful template for other pediatric controlled studies or other studies that evaluate surgical interventions. Citation: Redline S; Amin R; Beebe D; Chervin RD; Garetz SL; Giordani B; Marcus CL; Moore RH; Rosen CL; Arens R; Gozal D; Katz ES; Mitchell RB; Muzumdar H; Taylor HG; Thomas N; Ellenberg S. The Childhood Adenotonsillectomy Trial (CHAT): rationale, design, and challenges of a randomized controlled trial evaluating a standard surgical procedure in a pediatric population. SLEEP 2011;34(11):1509-1517. PMID:22043122

  19. A Multi-Stage Longitudinal Comparative Design Stage II Evaluation of the Changing Lives Program: The Life Course Interview (RDA-LCI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arango, Lisa Lewis; Kurtines, William M.; Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Ritchie, Rachel

    2008-01-01

    The study reported in this article, a Multi-Stage Longitudinal Comparative Design Stage II evaluation conducted as a planned preliminary efficacy evaluation (psychometric evaluation of measures, short-term controlled outcome studies, etc.) of the Changing Lives Program (CLP), provided evidence for the reliability and validity of the qualitative…

  20. A Multistage Longitudinal Comparative (MLC) Design Stage II: Evaluation of the Changing Lives Program (CLP)--The Possible Selves Questionnaire-Qualitative Extensions (PSQ-QE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kortsch, Gabrielle; Kurtines, William M.; Montgomery, Marilyn J.

    2008-01-01

    The study reported in this paper, a Multistage Longitudinal Comparative (MLC) Design Stage II evaluation conducted as a planned preliminary efficacy evaluation (psychometric evaluation of measures, short-term controlled outcome studies, etc.) of the Changing Lives Program (CLP), provided evidence for the reliability and validity of qualitative…

  1. Pediatric Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  2. Pediatric Terminology

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is working with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other resea

  3. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... Untreated pediatric sleep apnea may lead to: High blood pressure Heart or lung problems Slow growth and development

  4. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Last revised on February 12, 2016 Related Digital Libraries Pediatric GeneralPediatrics.com - the general pediatrician's view of the Internet PediatricEducation.org - a pediatric digital library and learning collaboratory intended to serve as a ...

  5. Evaluation of dosimetry and image of very low-dose computed tomography attenuation correction for pediatric positron emission tomography/computed tomography: phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahn, Y. K.; Park, H. H.; Lee, C. H.; Kim, H. S.; Lyu, K. Y.; Dong, K. R.; Chung, W. K.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, phantom was used to evaluate attenuation correction computed tomography (CT) dose and image in case of pediatric positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. Three PET/CT scanners were used along with acryl phantom in the size for infant and ion-chamber dosimeter. The CT image acquisition conditions were changed from 10 to 20, 40, 80, 100 and 160 mA and from 80 to 100, 120 and 140 kVp, which aimed at evaluating penetrate dose and computed tomography dose indexvolume (CTDIvol) value. And NEMA PET Phantom™ was used to obtain PET image under the same CT conditions in order to evaluate each attenuation-corrected PET image based on standard uptake value (SUV) value and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In general, the penetrate dose was reduced by around 92% under the minimum CT conditions (80 kVp and 10 mA) with the decrease in CTDIvol value by around 88%, compared with the pediatric abdomen CT conditions (100 kVp and 100 mA). The PET image with its attenuation corrected according to each CT condition showed no change in SUV value and no influence on the SNR. In conclusion, if the minimum dose CT that is properly applied to body of pediatric patient is corrected for attenuation to ensure that the effective dose is reduced by around 90% or more compared with that for adult patient, this will be useful to reduce radiation exposure level.

  6. Pediatric Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinich, Kathleen D.; Reed, Matthew P.

    Anthropometry is the measurement of human size, shape, and physical capabilities. Most pediatric anthropometry data are gathered to describe child growth patterns, but data on body size, mass distribution, range of motion, and posture are used to develop crash test dummies and computational models of child occupants. Pediatric anthropometry data are also used to determine child restraint dimensions, so they will accommodate the applicable population of child occupants.

  7. Pediatric head trauma

    PubMed Central

    Alexiou, George A; Sfakianos, George; Prodromou, Neofytos

    2011-01-01

    Head injury in children accounts for a large number of emergency department visits and hospital admissions. Falls are the most common type of injury, followed by motor-vehicle-related accidents. In the present study, we discuss the evaluation, neuroimaging and management of children with head trauma. Furthermore, we present the specific characteristics of each type of pediatric head injury. PMID:21887034

  8. Evaluation of the Pediatric Symptom Checklist as a screening tool for the identification of emotional and psychosocial problems

    PubMed Central

    Muzzolon, Sandra Regina B.; Cat, Mônica Nunes L.; dos Santos, Lúcia Helena C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the Brazilian version of Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC) as a screening tool to identify psychosocial and emotional problems in schoolchildren from six to 12 years old. METHODS Diagnostic test conducted in a public school of Curitiba, Paraná (Southern Brazil), to evaluate the PSC accuracy and consistency, considering the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) as the gold standard. Among 415 parents invited for the study, 145 responded to both PSC and CBCL. The results of the two instruments were compared. PSC and CBCL were considered positive if scores ≥28 and >70 respectively. RESULTS Among the 145 cases, 49 (33.8%) were positive for both PSC and CBCL. The ROC curve showed the PSC score of 21 as the best cutoff point for screening psychosocial and emotional problems, with a sensitivity of 96.8% and a specificity of 86.7%. Regarding the reference cutoff (score ≥28 points), the sensitivity was 64.5% and the specificity, 100.0%, similar to those found in the original version of the tool. CONCLUSIONS The Portuguese version of PSC was effective for early identification of emotional and/or psychosocial problems in a schoolchildren group and may be useful for pediatricians. PMID:24142319

  9. Seizures in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: evaluation of clinical, electroencephalographic, and neuroradiologic features in a pediatric case series.

    PubMed

    Nicita, Francesco; Verrotti, Alberto; Pruna, Dario; Striano, Pasquale; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Savasta, Salvatore; Spartà, Maria Valentina; Parisi, Pasquale; Parlapiano, Giovanni; Tarani, Luigi; Spalice, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Seizures are observed with a frequency of 3-21% in children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). However, clinical, neuroradiologic, and electroencephalography (EEG) features are poorly described. In this study, 13 patients with FASD and epilepsy or seizures were identified retrospectively from the databases of seven Italian pediatric neurology divisions. Eleven children were affected by epilepsy, and two had at least one documented seizure. Both generalized and focal seizures were observed. EEG showed diffuse or focal epileptic activity; two children developed electric status epilepticus during sleep (ESES). Structural brain anomalies, including polymicrogyria, nodular heterotopia, atrophy, and Arnold-Chiari type 1 malformation, were discovered in almost 50% of patients. Control of seizures was not difficult to obtain in 11 cases; one patient showed pharmacoresistant epilepsy. EEG and clinical follow-up are recommended in children with FASD and epilepsy, since severe conditions requiring aggressive treatment, such as in ESES, may develop. Neuroradiological evaluation is warranted because several types of brain anomalies could be associated with maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy. A PowerPoint slide summarizing this article is available for download in the Supporting Information section here. PMID:24815902

  10. Defining, evaluating, and removing bias induced by linear imputation in longitudinal clinical trials with MNAR missing data.

    PubMed

    Helms, Ronald W; Reece, Laura Helms; Helms, Russell W; Helms, Mary W

    2011-03-01

    Missing not at random (MNAR) post-dropout missing data from a longitudinal clinical trial result in the collection of "biased data," which leads to biased estimators and tests of corrupted hypotheses. In a full rank linear model analysis the model equation, E[Y] = Xβ, leads to the definition of the primary parameter β = (X'X)(-1)X'E[Y], and the definition of linear secondary parameters of the form θ = Lβ = L(X'X)(-1)X'E[Y], including, for example, a parameter representing a "treatment effect." These parameters depend explicitly on E[Y], which raises the questions: What is E[Y] when some elements of the incomplete random vector Y are not observed and MNAR, or when such a Y is "completed" via imputation? We develop a rigorous, readily interpretable definition of E[Y] in this context that leads directly to definitions of β, Bias(β) = E[β] - β, Bias(θ) = E[θ] - Lβ, and the extent of hypothesis corruption. These definitions provide a basis for evaluating, comparing, and removing biases induced by various linear imputation methods for MNAR incomplete data from longitudinal clinical trials. Linear imputation methods use earlier data from a subject to impute values for post-dropout missing values and include "Last Observation Carried Forward" (LOCF) and "Baseline Observation Carried Forward" (BOCF), among others. We illustrate the methods of evaluating, comparing, and removing biases and the effects of testing corresponding corrupted hypotheses via a hypothetical but very realistic longitudinal analgesic clinical trial. PMID:21390998

  11. Neonatal and pediatric respiratory care

    SciTech Connect

    Koff, P.B. ); Eitzman, D.V.; Nev, J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 23 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiographic evaluations; Neonatal parenchymal diseases: physiologic development; Oxygen therapy; Pediatric parenchymal diseases; and Care of the neurologically injured child.

  12. THE PEDIATRIC RHEUMATOLOGY INTERNATIONAL TRIALS ORGANIZATION PROVISIONAL CRITERIA FOR THE EVALUATION OF RESPONSE TO THERAPY IN JUVENILE DERMATOMYOSITIS

    PubMed Central

    Ruperto, Nicolino; Pistorio, Angela; Ravelli, Angelo; Rider, Lisa G.; Pilkington, Clarissa; Oliveira, Sheila; Wulffraat, Nico; Espada, Graciela; Garay, Stella; Cuttica, Ruben; Hofer, Michael; Quartier, Pierre; Melo-Gomes, Jose; Reed, Ann M.; Wierzbowska, Malgorzata; Feldman, Brian M.; Harjacek, Miroslav; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Nielsen, Susan; Flato, Berit; Lahdenne, Pekka; Michels, Harmut; Murray, Kevin J.; Punaro, Lynn; Rennebohm, Robert; Russo, Ricardo; Balogh, Zsolt; Rooney, Madeleine; Pachman, Lauren M.; Wallace, Carol; Hashkes, Philip; Lovell, Daniel J.; Giannini, Edward H.; Martini, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop a provisional definition for the evaluation of response to therapy in juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) based on the PRINTO JDM core set of variables. Methods Thirty-seven experienced pediatric rheumatologists from 27 countries, achieved consensus on 128 difficult patient profiles as clinically improved or not improved using a stepwise approach (patients rating, statistical analysis, definition selection). Using the physicians’ consensus ratings as the “gold-standard measure”, chi-square, sensitivity, specificity, false positive and negative rate, area under the ROC, and kappa agreement for candidate definitions of improvement were calculated. Definitions with kappa >0.8 were multiplied with the face validity score to select the top definitions. Results The top definition of improvement was: at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3/6 core set variables with no more than 1 of the remaining worsening by more than 30%, which cannot be muscle strength. The second highest scoring definition was at least 20% improvement from baseline in 3/6 core set variables with no more than 2 of the remaining worsening by more than 25%, which cannot be muscle strength which is definition P1 selected by the IMACS group. The third is similar to the second with the maximum amount of worsening set to 30%. This indicates convergent validity of the process. Conclusion we proposes a provisional data driven definition of improvement that reflects well the consensus rating of experienced clinicians, which incorporates clinically meaningful change in core set variables in a composite endpoint for the evaluation of global response to therapy in JDM. PMID:20583105

  13. A Longitudinal Magnetization Transfer Imaging Evaluation of Brain Injury in a Macaque Model of NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chun-Xia; Herndon, James G.; Novembre, Francis J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Magnetization transfer (MT) imaging has been explored in prior studies of HIV patients and showed the potential capacity to assess brain injury after HIV infection. In the present study, adult pig-tailed macaques were infected with a highly neuropathogenic virus SIVsmmFGb. MT imaging was exploited to examine the monkey brains before simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) inoculation and 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks post-SIV inoculation. Blood samples were collected from each animal for monitoring CD4+ and CD8+ T cells before each MRI scan. The MT ratios (MTR) in several brain regions of interest were evaluated longitudinally. Significant reductions of MTR were observed in whole brain and selected regions of interest (genu, splenium, thalamus, caudate, centrum semiovale, frontal white matter, frontal gray matter, and putamen) in the SIV-infected monkeys, consistent with those reported previously in HIV patients. In particular, the longitudinal results indicate that abnormal MTR reduction can be detected as early as in 2 weeks and MTR may be more sensitive to the brain injury in cortical regions than in subcortical regions during acute SIV infection. In addition, MTR reduction in genu, centrum semiovale, and thalamus significantly correlated with the CD4+ T cell percentage decrease. Also, the MTR reduction in thalamus correlated with the CD8+ T cell percentage elevation. Taken together, this study reported the longitudinal evolution of MTR in different brain regions during SIV infection and further validates previous findings in HIV patients. The preliminary results suggest that MT imaging could be a robust and sensitive approach to characterize the neurodegeneration after SIV or HIV infection. PMID:25376011

  14. Evaluation of longitudinal dispersivity estimates from forced-gradient tracer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Converging radial-flow and two-well tracer tests are simulated in two-dimensional aquifers to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and forced-gradient test configuration on longitudinal dispersivity (??L) estimates, and to compare ??L estimates from forced-gradient tests with ??L values that characterize solute spreading under natural-gradient flow. Results indicate that in mildly heterogeneous aquifers, for tests with relatively large tracer transport distances, ??L estimates from the two test types are generally similar, and are also similar to ??L values determined from natural-gradient tracer simulations. In highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests are generally larger than those from radial-flow tests, and the ??L estimates from both test types are typically smaller than the ??L values determined from natural-gradient simulations.

  15. Evaluation of longitudinal dispersivity estimates from forced-gradient tracer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    Converging radial-flow and two-well tracer tests are simulated in two-dimensional aquifers to investigate the effects of heterogeneity and forced-gradient test configuration on longitudinal dispersivity (??L) estimates, and to compare ??L estimates from forced-gradient tests with ??L values that characterize solute spreading under natural-gradient flow. Results indicate that in both mildly and highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests are generally larger than those from radial-flow tests. In mildly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests with relatively large tracer transport distances are similar to ??L values from natural-gradient simulations. In highly heterogeneous aquifers, ??L estimates from two-well tests at all tracer transport distances are typically smaller than ??L values from natural-gradient simulations.

  16. Characteristics of Children Evaluated at a Pediatric Low Vision Clinic: 1981-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Mark E.; Trantham, Carole S.

    2004-01-01

    The records of 1,661 children and adolescents who received 3,188 clinical low vision evaluations from a single examiner at low vision clinics sponsored by the Iowa Braille School over a 22-year period were surveyed to determine the characteristics of this population. The factors that were reviewed included age, sex, ocular condition,…

  17. Pediatric drug development: formulation considerations.

    PubMed

    Ali, Areeg Anwer; Charoo, Naseem Ahmad; Abdallah, Daud Baraka

    2014-10-01

    Absence of safe, effective and appropriate treatment is one of the main causes of high mortality and morbidity rates among the pediatric group. This review provides an overview of pharmacokinetic differences between pediatric and adult population and their implications in pharmaceutical development. Different pediatric dosage forms, their merits and demerits are discussed. Food and Drug Administration Act of 1997 and the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children Act 2002 added 6 months patent extension and exclusivity incentives to pharmaceutical companies for evaluation of medicinal products in children. Prescription Drug User Fee Act and Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 made it mandatory for pharmaceutical companies to perform pediatric clinical studies on new drug products. Drug development program should include additional clinical bridge studies to evaluate differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs in adult and child populations. Additionally, pharmaceutical development should consider ease of administration, palatability, appropriate excipients, stability and therapeutic equivalency of pediatric dosage forms. Pediatric population is diverse with individual preferences and demand for custom made dosage formulations. Practically it is not feasible to have different pharmaceutical dosage forms for each group. Hence, an appropriate dosage form that can be administered across pediatric population is warranted. PMID:24483293

  18. Neuroprognostication After Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Kirschen, Matthew P.; Topjian, Alexis A.; Hammond, Rachel; Illes, Judy; Abend, Nicholas S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Management decisions and parental counseling after pediatric cardiac arrest depend on the ability of physicians to make accurate and timely predictions regarding neurological recovery. We evaluated neurologists and intensivists performing neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest to determine prediction agreement, accuracy, and confidence. METHODS Pediatric neurologists (n = 10) and intensivists (n = 9) reviewed 18 cases of children successfully resuscitated from a cardiac arrest and managed in the pediatric intensive care unit. Cases were sequentially presented (after arrest day 1, days 2–4, and days 5–7), with updated examinations, neurophysiologic data, and neuroimaging data. At each time period, physicians predicted outcome by Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category and specified prediction confidence. RESULTS Predicted discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category versus actual hospital discharge Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category outcomes were compared. Exact (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = 0) and close (Predicted Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category – Actual Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category = ±1) outcome prediction accuracies for all physicians improved over successive periods (P < 0.05). Prediction accuracy did not differ significantly between physician groups at any period or overall. Agreement improved over time among neurologists (day 1 Kappa [κ], 0.28; days 2–4 κ, 0.43; days 5–7 κ, 0.68) and among intensivists (day 1 κ, 0.30; days 2–4 κ, 0.44; days 5–7 κ, 0.57). Prediction confidence increased over time (P < 0.001) and did not differ between physician groups. CONCLUSIONS Inter-rater agreement among neurologists and among intensivists improved over time and reached moderate levels. For all physicians, prediction accuracy and confidence improved over time. Further prospective research is needed to better characterize how physicians

  19. Longitudinal Associations Among Change in Overweight Status, Fear of Negative Evaluation, and Weight-Related Teasing Among Obese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Barker, David H.; Sato, Amy F.; Lloyd-Richardson, Elizabeth E.; Hart, Chantelle N.; Jelalian, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine longitudinal bidirectional associations between changes in adolescents’ weight status and psychosocial constructs. Method 118 obese adolescents aged 13–16 years participated in a behavioral weight control intervention. Percent overweight (OW), fear of negative evaluation (FNE), and frequency of weight-related teasing (WRT) were collected at baseline, end of intervention, and 12 and 24 months post-randomization. 3 multivariate latent change score models were estimated to examine longitudinal cross-lagged associations between: (1) OW and FNE; (2) OW and WRT; and (3) FNE and WRT. Results Decreases in OW were prospectively associated with subsequent decreases in both FNE and WRT; however, changes in FNE and WRT were not prospectively associated with subsequent change in OW. Decreases in FNE were prospectively associated with subsequent decreases in WRT. Conclusion Moderate weight loss in the context of a behavioral weight control intervention has positive long-term implications for obese adolescents’ peer relations. PMID:24893862

  20. Evaluation of Iranian pediatric specialists’ attitude and knowledge regarding approach to patients with acute otitis media

    PubMed Central

    Ghalehbaghi, Babak; Asghari, Alimohamad; Ahmadvand, Alireza; Moradi, Yasaman; Kamrava, Kamran; Motiei, Mir Abolfazl

    2012-01-01

    Background The ministry of health and medical education of Iran and many other countries advice physicians to use this guideline for diagnosis and treatment of acute otitis media (AOM), but there is not any evaluation of effectiveness and obedience of this guideline, so the aim of this study was to evaluate the attitude of pediatricians, the most important group that interfere with these patients in treatment of acute otitis media. Methods A total of 120 anonymous surveys were mailed to 120 pediatrician in Tehran (Iran) to evaluate pattern of diagnosis and treatment of AOM in these physicians. Age, gender, place of work, attitude of diagnosis and treatment were asked by anonymous survey. Results Sixty-two completed surveys were received, for a response rate of 51%. There was no significant difference between responders in these survey and scenarios, according to sex, age, practice setting, graduation year or the number of AOM patients visiting each month. Conclusion Our study seems to add new insights to the previous literature on management of AOM according to guideline. We can assess the impact of guidelines on the usual practice of practitioners in evidenced-based management of AOM. PMID:23483781

  1. Pediatric sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Adrienne G; McCulloh, Russell J

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is the leading cause of death in children worldwide. Although the diagnosis and management of sepsis in infants and children is largely influenced by studies done in adults, there are important considerations relevant for pediatrics. This article highlights pediatric-specific issues related to the definition of sepsis and its epidemiology and management. We review how the capacity of the immune system to respond to infection develops over early life. We also bring attention to primary immune deficiencies that should be considered in children recurrently infected with specific types of organisms. The management of pediatric sepsis must be tailored to the child’s age and immune capacity, and to the site, severity, and source of the infection. It is important for clinicians to be aware of infection-related syndromes that primarily affect children. Although children in developed countries are more likely to survive severe infections than adults, many survivors have chronic health impairments. PMID:24225404

  2. Analysis of 31P MR spectroscopy data using artificial neural networks for longitudinal evaluation of muscle diseases: dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Kari, S; King, L E; Olsen, N J

    1998-01-01

    Classical myopathic dermatomyositis (DM) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by an erythematous rash and severe, proximal muscle weakness. A disease variant, amyopathic DM, presents with the typical rash but without clinical evidence of muscle weakness. Prednisone and immunosuppressive drugs alleviate symptoms in many patients. Accurate longitudinal evaluations of patients are important to limit serious side effects of these drugs, including osteoporosis, cataracts, and growth inhibition. Metabolic abnormalities detected with 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provide the best quantitative data for evaluating these patients. With 31P MRS, the levels of inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP, and phosphodiesters (PDE) were determined in the quadricep muscles of patients during rest and exercise. Artificial neural network (ANN) analyses of these data were previously used for accurate classification of patients with myopathic or amyopathic DM and normal controls. In the present investigation, an artificial neural network was employed for further analysis of the 31P metabolite levels in quantitative, longitudinal evaluations of the extent (percent) of clinical improvement or deterioration during treatment with prednisone and immunosuppressive drugs. The ANN results showed that adult patients in a severe myopathic state could improve with treatment to a clinical status of amyopathic DM. In contrast, severely weak juvenile patients in the myopathic state recovered to normal status. One juvenile patient did not improve and remained in the myopathic state. Additionally, a serious clinical relapse in an amyopathic patient was predicted with serial ANN analyses well in advance of the actual clinical event. These network analyses show potential utility for clinical applications in muscle diseases. PMID:9719579

  3. Pediatric rosacea.

    PubMed

    Kellen, Roselyn; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2016-07-01

    Because rosacea is uncommon in the pediatric population, care must be taken to exclude other papulopustular disorders. Children can present with vascular, papulopustular, and/or ocular findings. Importantly, ocular symptoms can appear before the cutaneous symptoms of rosacea, leading to misdiagnosis. Rosacea is a clinical diagnosis, but histopathologic examination typically reveals dilated vessels, perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates in the upper dermis, elastosis, and disorganization of the upper dermal connective tissue. Treatment involves avoiding known triggers and utilizing topical and/or systemic therapies. Although treatment can control flares, pediatric rosacea often persists into adulthood. PMID:27529708

  4. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma. PMID:27542645

  5. Anthropometric evaluation of pediatric patients with nonprogressive chronic encephalopathy according to different methods of classification☆

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Jéssica Socas; Gomes, Mirian Martins

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To perform anthropometric assessment of patients with quadriplegic, chronic non-progressive encephalopathy, comparing two distinct references of nutritional classification and to compare the estimated height to the length measured by stadiometer. Method: Cross-sectional study including 0-3-year children with quadriplegic chronic non-progressive encephalopathy in secondary public hospital. Length, weight, arm circumference, triceps skinfold and knee height were measured. The arm muscle circumference and estimated height were calculated. The following relations were evaluated: weight-for-age, length-for-age and weight-for-length, using as reference the charts of the World Health Organization (WHO) and those proposed by Krick et al. Results: Fourteen children with a mean age of 21 months were evaluated. Assessment of anthropometric indicators showed significant difference between the two classification methods to assess nutritional indicators length/age (p=0.014), weight/age (p=0.014) and weight/length (p=0.001). There was significant correlation between measured length and estimated height (r=0.796, p=0.001). Evaluation of arm circumference and triceps skinfold showed that most patients presented some degree of malnutrition. According to arm muscle circumference, most were eutrophic. Conclusions: Specific curves for children with chronic non-progressive encephalopathy appear to underestimate malnutrition when one takes into account indicators involving weight. Curves developed for healthy children can be a good option for clinical practice and weight-for-length indicator and body composition measurements should be considered as complementary tools. PMID:25479849

  6. The medico-legal evaluation of injuries from falls in pediatric age groups.

    PubMed

    Kafadar, Safiye; Kafadar, Hüseyin

    2015-04-01

    Blunt trauma from accidental falls or intentional jumping from great heights occurs frequently in forensic medicine. The goal of this study was to investigate injuries due to falls in children under 19 years of age. Injuries from falls are the leading cause of visits to emergency departments and to deaths due to injuries. Various methods are used in the classification of falls. In this study, we have classified falls as "high-level" (≥ 5 m), "low-level" (<5 m) and "ground-level". We have retrospectively evaluated 814 boys (61.18%) and 512 girls (38.62%), making up a total of 1326 children (under 19 years old) with the mean age of 7.85 ± 3.46, that were admitted to State Hospital between January 2009 and December 2013 due to falls from heights and falls on ground-level. Falls were low-level in 738 cases, high-level in 176 cases, and ground-level in 412 cases. Cases were categorized by gender, age, age group, fall height, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), injured body part(s), mortality rate, and distribution according to months. In conclusion, falls merit attention because of their high risk of mortality and morbidity, as well as their burden on medical budgets. If the medico-legal aspects of falls were evaluated with regard to preventive event or death, the importance of the topic could be better understood. PMID:25735785

  7. Quantitation of aortic and mitral regurgitation in the pediatric population: evaluation by radionuclide angiocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Hurwitz, R.A.; Treves, S.; Freed, M.; Girod, D.A.; Caldwell, R.L.

    1983-01-15

    The ability to quantitate aortic (AR) or mitral regurgitation (MR), or both, by radionuclide angiocardiography was evaluated in children and young adults at rest and during isometric exercise. Regurgitation was estimated by determining the ratio of left ventricular stroke volume to right ventricular stroke volume obtained during equilibrium ventriculography. The radionuclide measurement was compared with results of cineangiography, with good correlation between both studies in 47 of 48 patients. Radionuclide stroke volume ratio was used to classify severity: the group with equivocal regurgitation differed from the group with mild regurgitation (p less than 0.02); patients with mild regurgitation differed from those with moderate regurgitation (p less than 0.001); and those with moderate regurgitation differed from those with severe regurgitation (p less than 0.01). The stroke volume ratio was responsive to isometric exercise, remaining constant or increasing in 16 of 18 patients. After surgery to correct regurgitation, the stroke volume ratio significantly decreased from preoperative measurements in all 7 patients evaluated. Results from the present study demonstrate that a stroke volume ratio greater than 2.0 is compatible with moderately severe regurgitation and that a ratio greater than 3.0 suggests the presence of severe regurgitation. Thus, radionuclide angiocardiography should be useful for noninvasive quantitation of AR or MR, or both, helping define the course of young patients with left-side valvular regurgitation.

  8. Development and preliminary evaluation of a pediatric Spanish/English speech perception task

    PubMed Central

    Calandruccio, Lauren; Gomez, Bianca; Buss, Emily; Leibold, Lori J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a task to evaluate children’s English and Spanish speech perception abilities in either noise or competing speech maskers. Methods Eight bilingual Spanish/English and eight age matched monolingual English children (ages 4.9 –16.4 years) were tested. A forced-choice, picture-pointing paradigm was selected for adaptively estimating masked speech reception thresholds. Speech stimuli were spoken by simultaneous bilingual Spanish/English talkers. The target stimuli were thirty disyllabic English and Spanish words, familiar to five-year-olds, and easily illustrated. Competing stimuli included either two-talker English or two-talker Spanish speech (corresponding to target language) and spectrally matched noise. Results For both groups of children, regardless of test language, performance was significantly worse for the two-talker than the noise masker. No difference in performance was found between bilingual and monolingual children. Bilingual children performed significantly better in English than in Spanish in competing speech. For all listening conditions, performance improved with increasing age. Conclusions Results indicate that the stimuli and task are appropriate for speech recognition testing in both languages, providing a more conventional measure of speech-in-noise perception as well as a measure of complex listening. Further research is needed to determine performance for Spanish-dominant listeners and to evaluate the feasibility of implementation into routine clinical use. PMID:24686915

  9. Pediatric Biliary Interventions.

    PubMed

    Atchie, Benjamin; Kalva, Sanjeeva; Josephs, Shellie

    2015-12-01

    An interventional radiologist is frequently called to evaluate and treat biliary diseases in children; a tailored approach specific to this population is required. Imaging with an emphasis on minimizing ionizing radiation is used not only in the initial workup but also to guide interventions. The most common form of intervention generally consists of transhepatic biliary drainage to treat either biliary obstruction or bile leakage, a scenario frequently encountered after pediatric liver transplantation. Other pathologies referred for evaluation and management include biliary atresia and, rarely, symptomatic choledochal cysts. Biliary complications caused by an underlying malignancy are not a frequently encountered problem in the pediatric population. The initial evaluation, role of preprocedural imaging, and interventional management with an emphasis on technique are discussed regarding these common biliary pathologies in children. PMID:26615168

  10. Evaluation of treatment efficacy using a Bayesian mixture piecewise linear model of longitudinal biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lili; Feng, Dai; Neelon, Brian; Buyse, Marc

    2015-05-10

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a widely used marker in clinical trials for patients with prostate cancer. We develop a mixture model to estimate longitudinal PSA trajectory in response to treatment. The model accommodates subjects responding and not responding to therapy through a mixture of two functions. A responder is described by a piecewise linear function, represented by an intercept, a PSA decline rate, a period of PSA decline, and a PSA rising rate; a nonresponder is described by an increasing linear function with an intercept and a PSA rising rate. Each trajectory is classified as a linear or a piecewise linear function with a certain probability, and the weighted average of these two functions sufficiently characterizes a variety of patterns of PSA trajectories. Furthermore, this mixture structure enables us to derive clinically useful endpoints such as a response rate and time-to-progression, as well as biologically meaningful endpoints such as a cancer cell killing fraction and tumor growth delay. We compare our model with the most commonly used dynamic model in the literature and show its advantages. Finally, we illustrate our approach using data from two multicenter prostate cancer trials. The R code used to produce the analyses reported in this paper is available on request. PMID:25630845

  11. Digital subtraction radiography evaluation of longitudinal bone density changes around immediate loading implants: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, LS; da Cunha, HA; Leles, CR; Mendonça, EF

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess longitudinal quantitative changes in bone density around different implant loading protocols and implant surfaces measured by digital subtraction radiography (DSR). Methods 12 patients received bilateral homologous standard and TiUnite® (Nobel Biocare, Kloten, Switzerland) single-tooth implants under 2 implant—loading protocols: immediate loading (8 patients, 16 implants, 12 maxillary) and conventional loading (4 patients, 8 implants, 4 maxillary). Standardized periapical radiographs were taken immediately after implant placement (baseline image) and at the 3-month, 6-month and 12-month follow ups. Radiographic images were digitized and submitted to digital subtraction using the DSR system® (Electro Medical System, Nyon, Switzerland), resulting in three subtracted images. Quantitative analysis of bone density was performed using Image Tool® software (University of Texas Health Science Centre, San Antonio, TX) to assess pixel value changes in five areas around the implants (crestal, subcrestal, medial third, apical–lateral and apical). Results Repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that grey levels were significantly influenced by follow-up time and implant-loading protocol. A linear increase in grey levels was found for immediate loading (IML) implants and a significant decrease in grey levels was observed in the 12-month follow up for conventional loading implants. No effect of implant surface treatment was observed. Conclusion In conclusion, IML protocol induced mineral bone gain around single-tooth implants after the first year under function for cases with favourable bone conditions. PMID:22074866

  12. Longitudinal Evaluation of Enteric Protozoa in Haitian Children by Stool Exam and Multiplex Serologic Assay

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Delynn M.; Priest, Jeffrey W.; Hamlin, Kathy; Derado, Gordana; Herbein, Joel; Petri, William A.; Lammie, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Haitian children were monitored longitudinally in a filariasis study. Included were stool samples examined for Giardia intestinalis and Entamoeba histolytica cysts, and serum specimens analyzed for immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to eight recombinant antigens from G. intestinalis (variant-specific surface protein [VSP1–VSP5]), E. histolytica (lectin adhesion molecule [LecA]), and Cryptosporidium parvum (17- and 27-kDa) using a multiplex bead assay. The IgG responses to VSP antigens peaked at 2 years of age and then diminished and were significantly lower (P < 0.002) in children > 4.5 years than in children < 4.5 years. The IgG responses to Cryptosporidium tended to increase with age. The IgG responses to LecA and VSP antigens and the prevalence of stools positive for cysts were significantly higher (P < 0.037 and P < 0.035, respectively) in the rainy season than in the dry season. The multiplex bead assay provides a powerful tool for analyzing serologic responses to multiple pathogens. PMID:24591430

  13. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Scheepbouwer, Chantal; Meyer, Sandra; Burggraaf, Maroeska J; Jose, Jithin; Molthoff, Carla F M

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new) agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics. PMID:27533303

  14. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Sandra; Burggraaf, Maroeska J.; Jose, Jithin; Molthoff, Carla F. M.

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new) agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics. PMID:27533303

  15. Evaluating the biomechanics of the pediatric foot in Turner syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Stewart C; Izod, Alexander; Mahaffey, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that can present clinically with multiple concurrent comorbidities. This case report describes a 12-year-old girl with Turner syndrome who was referred for podiatric medical assessment and explores the application of optoelectronic stereophotogrammetry in the biomechanical assessment of the foot and lower limb. A four-segment kinematic foot model using 14-mm reflective markers was applied to the foot and lower limb of the patient to track motion at the tibia, rearfoot, forefoot, and hallux. Kinematic results presented in this case study illustrate evidence of excessive foot pronation throughout the stance phase of gait. Whether excessive pronation is a general characteristic of foot function in Turner syndrome remains to be confirmed, but the findings presented suggest that a comprehensive evaluation of foot biomechanics in patients with Turner syndrome may be warranted. PMID:22659771

  16. Using Trait-State Models to Evaluate the Longitudinal Consistency of Global Self-Esteem From Adolescence to Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Donnellan, M. Brent; Kenny, David A.; Trzesniewski, Kali H.; Lucas, Richard E.; Conger, Rand D.

    2012-01-01

    The present research used a latent variable trait-state model to evaluate the longitudinal consistency of self-esteem during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Analyses were based on ten administrations of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) spanning the ages of approximately 13 to 32 for a sample of 451 participants. Results indicated that a completely stable trait factor and an autoregressive trait factor accounted for the majority of the variance in latent self-esteem assessments, whereas state factors accounted for about 16% of the variance in repeated assessments of latent self-esteem. The stability of individual differences in self-esteem increased with age consistent with the cumulative continuity principle of personality development. PMID:23180899

  17. Using Trait-State Models to Evaluate the Longitudinal Consistency of Global Self-Esteem From Adolescence to Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Donnellan, M Brent; Kenny, David A; Trzesniewski, Kali H; Lucas, Richard E; Conger, Rand D

    2012-12-01

    The present research used a latent variable trait-state model to evaluate the longitudinal consistency of self-esteem during the transition from adolescence to adulthood. Analyses were based on ten administrations of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem scale (Rosenberg, 1965) spanning the ages of approximately 13 to 32 for a sample of 451 participants. Results indicated that a completely stable trait factor and an autoregressive trait factor accounted for the majority of the variance in latent self-esteem assessments, whereas state factors accounted for about 16% of the variance in repeated assessments of latent self-esteem. The stability of individual differences in self-esteem increased with age consistent with the cumulative continuity principle of personality development. PMID:23180899

  18. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction for Academic Evaluation Anxiety: A Naturalistic Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Dundas, Ingrid; Thorsheim, Torbjørn; Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per Einar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) for academic evaluation anxiety and self-confidence in 70 help-seeking bachelor’s and master’s students was examined. A repeated measures analysis of covariance on the 46 students who completed pretreatment and posttreatment measures (median age = 24 years, 83% women) showed that evaluation anxiety and self-confidence improved. A growth curve analysis with all 70 original participants showed reductions in both cognitive and emotional components of evaluation anxiety, and that reduction continued postintervention. Although more research is needed, this study indicates that MBSR may reduce evaluation anxiety. PMID:27227169

  19. Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies and Special Health Care Needs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Thomas H.; Katz, Emily R.; Duffy, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Children with mental health problems are increasingly being evaluated and treated by both pediatric primary care and pediatric emergency physicians. This article focuses on the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of the two most common pediatric mental health emergencies, suicidal and homicidal/aggressive patients, as well as the equally challenging population of children with autism or other developmental disabilities. PMID:24093903

  20. Imaging in pediatric liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Monti, L; Soglia, G; Tomà, P

    2016-05-01

    Liver transplantation has become an established curative treatment in adult patients with acute or chronic end-stage liver diseases. In pediatric cases the number of cadaveric donor livers is not sufficient and to overcome the shortage of appropriate-sized whole liver grafts, technical variants of liver transplantation have been practiced. Reduced-size cadaveric and split cadaveric allografts have become an important therapeutic option, expanding the availability of size-appropriate organs for pediatric recipients with terminal liver disease. The number of pediatric deaths awaiting liver transplantation has been reduced by the introduction of living-related liver transplantation, developed to overcome the shortage of suitable grafts for children. It is important for radiologists to know that children have distinct imaging of liver transplantation that distinguish them from adults. A multidisciplinary pediatric liver transplantation team should be skilled in pediatric conditions and in associated processes, risks and complications. Radiologists should know the common pediatric liver diseases that lead to liver transplantation, the anastomotic techniques and the expected postoperative imaging findings. The aim of this study is to illustrate the role of non-invasive imaging such us ultrasonography, color Doppler ultrasonography, multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of pediatric liver transplantation and in potential liver donors. PMID:26909515

  1. Pediatric functional constipation gastrointestinal symptom profile compared with healthy controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patient-reported outcomes are necessary to evaluate the gastrointestinal symptom profile of patients with functional constipation. Study objectives were to compare the gastrointestinal symptom profile of pediatric patients with functional constipation with matched healthy controls with the Pediatric...

  2. Pediatric ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two leading experts explore the benefits and limitations of pediatric ultrasonography, explaining the latest techniques for optimal imaging of specific body regions: the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, extremities, and soft tissues. Numerous illustrations emphasize significant points and combine with the text to show specifically what to look for when imaging children.

  3. Stepwise Endoscopy Based on Sigmoidoscopy in Evaluating Pediatric Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Jae; Choi, Shin Jie; Yang, Hye Ran; Chang, Ju Yuong; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Shin, Hee Young; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Ko, Jae Sung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of our study was to establish a safe and convenient diagnostic method for acute gastrointestinal (GI) graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in children by determining the sensitivity and negative predictive values of upper and lower endoscopic biopsies for children suspected of GI GVHD. Methods Patients suspected of GI GVHD who received endoscopic evaluation within 100 days after stem cell transplantation and endoscopies between January 2012 and March 2014 in Seoul National University Children's Hospital were included in our study. Results Fifteen patients with a total of 20 endoscopic procedures were included in our study. Sensitivity at the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum were 22.2%, 30.0%, and 80.0%, respectively. Negative predictive values at the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum were 22.2%, 30.0%, and 60.0%, respectively. Overall sensitivity and negative predictive values of upper endoscopic biopsy for GVHD were 77.8% and 50.0%, respectively. Overall sensitivity and negative predictive values of lower endoscopic biopsy for GVHD were 88.9% and 66.7%, respectively. Conclusion We recommend flexible sigmoidoscopy as a safe and accurate diagnostic tool for GVHD, similar to other studies reported previously. However, if there is no evidence of GVHD on sigmoidoscopy with high index of suspicion of GI bleeding, full colonoscopy and upper endoscopy should be considered. PMID:27066447

  4. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction for Academic Evaluation Anxiety: A Naturalistic Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dundas, Ingrid; Thorsheim, Torbjørn; Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per Einar

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) for academic evaluation anxiety and self-confidence in 70 help-seeking bachelor's and master's students was examined. A repeated measures analysis of covariance on the 46 students who completed pretreatment and posttreatment measures (median age = 24 years, 83% women) showed that evaluation anxiety and…

  5. Teacher-Course Evaluation: A Longitudinal Study of Response Stability and Instrument Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCollester, Charles W.; And Others

    The temporal context within which a teacher and course evaluation (TCE) is completed did not appear to be of crucial importance in affecting TCE responses. A sample of students was asked to evaluate, initially as freshmen and retrospectively as seniors, a specific teacher and course. Additional data on the student's academic status characteristics…

  6. The MPCP Longitudinal Educational Growth Study: Third Year Report. SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, John F.; Cowen, Joshua M.; Fleming, David J.; Wolf, Patrick J.; Condon, Meghan R.; Lucas-McLean, Juanita

    2010-01-01

    This is the third-year report in a five-year evaluation of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP). The MPCP, which began in 1990, provides government-funded vouchers for low-income children to attend private schools in the City of Milwaukee. The general purposes of the evaluation are to analyze the effectiveness of the MPCP in terms of…

  7. Student Use of Mobile Devices in Course Evaluation: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Matthew V.

    2013-01-01

    A 2012 survey of higher education found that 27% of colleges and universities were "mobile ready", that is, allowing students to complete course evaluations via mobile devices, and 26% of schools planned to allow the use of mobile devices for course evaluations within the next year. The purpose of this study was to prepare for this…

  8. A Pediatric Twin Study of Brain Morphometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Gregory L.; Schmitt, J. Eric; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Viding, Essi; Ordaz, Sarah; Rosenthal, Michael A.; Molloy, Elizabeth A.; Clasen, Liv S.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Neale, Michael C.; Giedd, Jay N.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Longitudinal pediatric neuroimaging studies have demonstrated increasing volumes of white matter and regionally-specific inverted U shaped developmental trajectories of gray matter volumes during childhood and adolescence. Studies of monozygotic and dyzygotic twins during this developmental period allow exploration of genetic and…

  9. Candidate gene association study in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia evaluated by Bayesian network based Bayesian multilevel analysis of relevance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We carried out a candidate gene association study in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to identify possible genetic risk factors in a Hungarian population. Methods The results were evaluated with traditional statistical methods and with our newly developed Bayesian network based Bayesian multilevel analysis of relevance (BN-BMLA) method. We collected genomic DNA and clinical data from 543 children, who underwent chemotherapy due to ALL, and 529 healthy controls. Altogether 66 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 19 candidate genes were genotyped. Results With logistic regression, we identified 6 SNPs in the ARID5B and IKZF1 genes associated with increased risk to B-cell ALL, and two SNPs in the STAT3 gene, which decreased the risk to hyperdiploid ALL. Because the associated SNPs were in linkage in each gene, these associations corresponded to one signal per gene. The odds ratio (OR) associated with the tag SNPs were: OR = 1.69, P = 2.22x10-7 for rs4132601 (IKZF1), OR = 1.53, P = 1.95x10-5 for rs10821936 (ARID5B) and OR = 0.64, P = 2.32x10-4 for rs12949918 (STAT3). With the BN-BMLA we confirmed the findings of the frequentist-based method and received additional information about the nature of the relations between the SNPs and the disease. E.g. the rs10821936 in ARID5B and rs17405722 in STAT3 showed a weak interaction, and in case of T-cell lineage sample group, the gender showed a weak interaction with three SNPs in three genes. In the hyperdiploid patient group the BN-BMLA detected a strong interaction among SNPs in the NOTCH1, STAT1, STAT3 and BCL2 genes. Evaluating the survival rate of the patients with ALL, the BN-BMLA showed that besides risk groups and subtypes, genetic variations in the BAX and CEBPA genes might also influence the probability of survival of the patients. Conclusions In the present study we confirmed the roles of genetic variations in ARID5B and IKZF1 in the susceptibility to B-cell ALL

  10. Re-evaluating the need for hospital admission and observation of pediatric traumatic brain injury after a normal head CT.

    PubMed

    Plackett, Timothy P; Asturias, Sabrina; Tadlock, Matthew; Wright, Franklin; Ton-That, Hieu; Demetriades, Demetrios; Esposito, Thomas; Inaba, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    There is no consensus on the optimal management of pediatric patients with suspected trauma brain injury and a normal head CT. This study characterizes the clinical outcomes of patients with a normal initial CT scan of the head. A retrospective chart review of pediatric blunt trauma patients who underwent head CT for closed head injury at two trauma centers was performed. Charts were reviewed for demographics, neurologic function, CT findings, and complications. 631 blunt pediatric trauma patients underwent a head CT. 63% had a negative CT, 7% had a non-displaced skull fracture, and 31% had an intracranial hemorrhage and/or displaced skull fracture. For patients without intracranial injury, the mean age was 8 years, mean ISS was 5, and 92% had a GCS of 13-15 on arrival. All patients with an initial GCS of 13-15 and no intracranial injury were eventually discharged to home with a normal neurologic exam and no patient required craniotomy. Not admitting those children with an initial GCS of 13-15, normal CT scan, and no other injuries would have saved 1.8 ± 1.5 hospital days per patient. Pediatric patients who have sustained head trauma, have a negative CT scan, and present with a GCS 13-15 can safely be discharged home without admission. PMID:25957025

  11. Evaluation of Educational Environment for Medical Students of a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital in Tehran, Using DREEM Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Andalib, Masoud Mohammad; Malekzadeh, Masoud Mohammad; Agharahimi, Zahra; Daryabeigi, Maede; Yaghmaei, Bahareh; Ashrafi, Mahmoud-Reza; Rabbani, Ali; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tertiary pediatric hospitals usually provide excellent clinical services, but such centers have a lot to do for educational perfection. Objectives: This study was performed to address under-graduate educational deficits and find feasible solutions. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in a target population of 77 sixth year undergraduate medical students (response rate = 78%) who spent their 3-month pediatric rotation in the Children’s Medical Center, the Pediatrics Center of Excellence in Tehran, Iran. The Dundee ready educational environment measure (DREEM) instrument was used for assessing educational environment of this subspecialized pediatric hospital. Results: Among 60 students who answered the questionnaires, 24 were male (40%). Participants’ age ranged from 23 to 24 years. The mean total score was 95.8 (48%). Comparison of scores based on students’ knowledge showed no significant difference. Problematic areas were learning, academic self-perception, and social self-perception. Conclusions: Having an accurate schedule to train general practitioner, using new teaching methods, and providing a non-stressful atmosphere were suggested solutions. PMID:26495091

  12. Longitudinal Evaluation of Cognitive Functioning in Young Children with Type 1 Diabetes over 18 Months

    PubMed Central

    Cato, M. Allison; Mauras, Nelly; Mazaika, Paul; Kollman, Craig; Cheng, Peiyao; Aye, Tandy; Ambrosino, Jodie; Beck, Roy W.; Ruedy, Katrina J.; Reiss, Allan L.; Tansey, Michael; White, Neil H.; Hershey, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Objective Decrements in cognitive function may already be evident in young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Here we report prospectively acquired cognitive results over 18 months in a large cohort of young children with and without T1D. Methods 144 children with T1D (mean HbA1c: 7.9%) and 70 age-matched healthy controls (mean age both groups 8.5 years; median diabetes duration 3.9 yrs; mean age of onset 4.1 yrs) underwent neuropsychological testing at baseline and after 18-months of follow-up. We hypothesized that group differences observed at baseline would be more pronounced after 18 months, particularly in those T1D patients with greatest exposure to glycemic extremes. Results Cognitive domain scores did not differ between groups at the 18 month testing session and did not change differently between groups over the follow-up period. However, within the T1D group, a history of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) was correlated with lower Verbal IQ and greater hyperglycemia exposure (HbA1c area under the curve) was inversely correlated to executive functions test performance. In addition, those with a history of both types of exposure performed most poorly on measures of executive function. Conclusions The subtle cognitive differences between T1D children and nondiabetic controls observed at baseline were not observed 18 months later. Within the T1D group, as at baseline, relationships between cognition (VIQ and executive functions) and glycemic variables (chronic hyperglycemia and DKA history) were evident. Continued longitudinal study of this T1D cohort and their carefully matched healthy comparison group is planned. PMID:26786245

  13. Imaging Evaluation of Pediatric Sensorineural Hearing Loss in Potential Candidates for Cochlear Implantation.

    PubMed

    Jallu, Aleena Shafi; Jehangir, Majid; Ul Hamid, Waqar; Pampori, Rafiq Ahmad

    2015-12-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) are complementary in the imaging of the labyrinth, the internal auditory canal and the brain in children with sensorineural hearing loss who are being evaluated for cochlear implantation. An accurate anatomical description of the inner ear is essential in the preoperative work up. Computerized tomography visualizes the bony structures, whereas MR can discern soft-tissue components including intra labyrinthine fluid, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), nerves, and vessels within the IAC. This prospective study was conducted in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Government Medical College, Srinagar. 40 children in the age group of 1-16 years with unidentified causes of bilateral SNHL were analysed radiologically over the period of 2 years from Dec 2011 to Jan 2014. Each patient underwent MRI and high resolution CT scanning of temporal bone in axial and coronal planes. Out of the 40 patients 22 were males (55 %) and 18 were females (45 %). 30 patients (72.5 %)in our study had normal radiological scans. Five patients (12.5 %) had B/L large vestibular aqueduct and two patients (5 %) had internal auditory canal stenosis with cochlear nerve hypoplasia on CT and MR imaging. Cochlear dysplasia was present in two patients (5 %) and semicircular canal dysplasia was present in one patient (2.5 %) as an isolated finding on HRCT. In addition isolated cochlear nerve hypoplasia was present in one patient (2.5 %). Hyperintense basal ganglia lesion suggestive of kernicterus was present in one patient (2.5 %) and hyperintense posterior parietal and occipital white matter lesions suggestive of congenital CMV infection was present in one patient (2.5 %) on MR imaging. Arachnoid cysts of middle cranial fossa was an incidental finding present in one patient. Radiological abnormalities of the inner ear are not uncommon. Computerized tomography and MRI are important modalities to analyze the inner ear in

  14. An Index of Longitudinal Hydrologic Connectivity to Evaluate Effects of Water Abstraction on Streams Dominated by Migratory Shrimps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, K. E.; Pringle, C. M.; Freeman, M. C.; Scatena, F. N.

    2005-05-01

    Massive water withdrawals from streams draining the Caribbean National Forest (CNF), Puerto Rico, are threatening their biotic integrity. Migratory tropical shrimps are ideal indicator species to measure water withdrawal effects on riverine connectivity and biointegrity because: (1) their migratory range encompasses the stream network from estuaries to headwater streams; (2) they represent greater than 90% of biomass in streams draining the CNF; and (3) they facilitate important in-stream ecological processes. We developed an index to evaluate individual and cumulative effects of water intakes on each stage of the shrimp's life-cycle. Effect of water withdrawal on longitudinal connectivity was evaluated by combining effects of water withdrawal on larval and juvenile shrimps. Larvae require downstream transport to the estuary for advancement to the next life-stage, and juveniles similarly require access to headwater streams. Therefore, these two life-stages represent the bi-directional connectivity of streams from headwaters to estuaries. Seventeen water intakes were evaluated in and around the CNF. Larger intakes cause a greater decrease in connectivity than smaller intakes; however, several small, high elevation intakes had very low connectivity. Also, intakes with alternative designs, such as a French drain, have reduced effects on connectivity.

  15. [Evaluation of the pediatric aspects of the WHO document and meta-analysis of immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Ibáñez Sendín, M D

    2000-01-01

    the clinical evolution, that the studies carried out on children were more homogenous than on adults, which means that their significance on this population is more important. Approximately 50% of the studies that evaluate the clinical evolution, the medicines taken and the specific BHR study with allergens, included children and/or adolescents. It is very probable that these conclusions can be applied to the population between 5 and 18 years old that suffer from allergic asthma, but it is clear that a meta-analysis of the efficiency of immunotherapy in paediatrics is needed. Recently regulations on immunotherapy have been published that appeared after the immunotherapy experts from the World Health Organisation met in Geneva in 1997 (1). The recommendations for immunotherapy in children are clear and similar to those applied to adults: 1. Rhonoconjunctivitis and allergic asthma mediated by IgE. 2. Serious anaphylactic reactions caused by hymenoptera bites. 3. The same diagnosis and treatment considerations recommended are applied to children as well as adults. It is not indicated for allergies to food substances and atopic dermatitis. The patients age is another factor to be considered and, except in the case of allergy to hymenoptera poison, when the patient is under 5 it is a relative counter indication to administer immunotherapy. In general it is admitted that immunotherapy is more efficient on children than on adults, but more studies need to be carried out on the efficiency and safety on children under 5. The early treatment with immunotherapy in children who suffer from allergic respiratory illnesses can have an important significance, as this type of treatment could have a preventive nature as it prevents the rhinitis developing into asthma, as well as the beneficial effect that has been shown on children with allergic asthma. PMID:10867375

  16. Evaluation of Hearing Aid Frequency Response Fittings in Pediatric and Young Adult Bimodal Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lisa S.; Firszt, Jill B.; Brenner, Chris; Cadieux, Jamie H.

    2015-01-01

    Background A coordinated fitting of a cochlear implant (CI) and contralateral hearing aid (HA) for bimodal device use should emphasize balanced audibility and loudness across devices. However, guidelines for allocating frequency information to the CI and HA are not well established for the growing population of bimodal recipients. Purpose The study aim was to compare the effects of three different HA frequency responses, when fitting a CI and an HA for bimodal use, on speech recognition and localization in children/young adults. Specifically, the three frequency responses were wideband, restricted high frequency, and nonlinear frequency compression (NLFC), which were compared with measures of word recognition in quiet, sentence recognition in noise, talker discrimination, and sound localization. Research Design The HA frequency responses were evaluated using an A B1 A B2 test design: wideband frequency response (baseline-A), restricted high-frequency response (experimental-B1), and NLFC-activated (experimental-B2). All participants were allowed 3–4 weeks between each test session for acclimatization to each new HA setting. Bimodal benefit was determined by comparing the bimodal score to the CI-alone score. Study Sample Participants were 14 children and young adults (ages 7–21 yr) who were experienced users of bimodal devices. All had been unilaterally implanted with a Nucleus CI24 internal system and used either a Freedom or CP810 speech processor. All received a Phonak Naida IX UP behind-the-ear HA at the beginning of the study. Data Collection and Analysis Group results for the three bimodal conditions (HA frequency response with wideband, restricted high frequency, and NLFC) on each outcome measure were analyzed using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Group results using the individual “best bimodal” score were analyzed and confirmed using a resampling procedure. Correlation analyses examined the effects of audibility (aided and unaided hearing

  17. Should pediatric parenteral nutrition be individualized?☆

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Renata Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento; Nogueira, Roberto José Negrão; Saron, Margareth Lopes Galvão; Lima, Alexandre Esteves Souza; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations are commonly individualized, since their standardization appears inadequate for the pediatric population. This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional state and the reasons for PN individualization in pediatric patients using PN, hospitalized in a tertiary hospital in Campinas, São Paulo. METHODS: This longitudinal study comprised patients using PN followed by up to 67 days. Nutritional status was classified according to the criteria established by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2006) and WHO (2007). The levels of the following elements in blood were analyzed: sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, chloride, magnesium, inorganic phosphorus, and triglycerides (TGL). Among the criteria for individualization, the following were considered undeniable: significant reduction in blood levels of potassium (<3mEq/L), sodium (<125mEq/L), magnesium (<1mEq/L), phosphorus (<1.5mEq/L), ionic calcium (<1mmol), and chloride (<90mEq/L), or any value above the references. RESULTS: Twelve pediatric patients aged 1 month to 15 years were studied (49 individualizations). Most patients were classified as malnourished. It was observed that 74/254 (29.2%) of examinations demanded individualized PN for indubitable reasons. CONCLUSION: The nutritional state of patients was considered critical in most cases. Thus, the individualization performed in the beginning of PN for energy protein adequacy was indispensable. In addition, the individualized PN was indispensable in at least 29.2% of PN for correction of alterations found in biochemical parameters. PMID:25510996

  18. Mastery motivation and self-evaluative affect in toddlers: longitudinal relations with maternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Kelley, S A; Brownell, C A; Campbell, S B

    2000-01-01

    This study examined relations between maternal control and evaluative feedback during the second year of life and children's mastery motivation and expressions of self-evaluative affect a year later. Participants were 75 toddlers (35 girls, 40 boys) and their mothers. Maternal controlling behavior and evaluative feedback were examined while mothers taught their 24-month-olds a challenging task. Children's mastery motivation and expressions of self-evaluative affect were assessed during easy and difficult achievement-like tasks when they were 36 months old. Maternal evaluative feedback and control style at 24 months predicted children's shame, persistence, and avoidance of mastery activities at 36 months. Specifically, negative maternal evaluations at age two related to children's later shame, especially when feedback was linked to children's actions or products; positive maternal feedback overall, as well as corrective feedback, related to children's later persistence; mothers who engaged in more autonomy-supporting control with their 2-year-olds had children who were less likely to avoid challenging activities at age 3. Children's pride at 36 months was not predicted by mothers' behavior at 24 months. PMID:11016566

  19. The Effects of Head Start Health Services: Report of the Head Start Health Evaluation. Volume I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fosburg, Linda B.; And Others

    In 1977, a longitudinal study was initiated to assess the effectiveness of health services provided by Head Start. The study provided for 10 domains: pediatric health examinations, health history recordings, dental evaluation, anthropometric assessment, diet and nutrition assessment, and hematology evaluations, as well as for developmental,…

  20. Evaluating Psychometric Properties of the Spanish-version of the Pediatric Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Perceived Cognitive Function (pedsFACIT-PCF)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Alex W. K.; Correia, Helena; Cella, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The pediatric Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Perceived Cognitive Function (pedsFACIT-PCF) is a 13-item short-form derived from the pediatric Perceived Cognitive Function item bank (pedsPCF), which was developed to measure children’s daily cognitive behaviors and was validated on the US general population and children with cancer. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of Spanish language pedsFACIT-PCF and the measurement equivalence between Spanish and English versions. Methods pedsFACIT-PCF items were translated into Spanish using a standard iterative methodology. A total of 1358 English- and 604 Spanish-speaking children aged 8–17 years who completed English and Spanish versions of pedsFACIT-PCF, respectively, were administered through an Internet survey company. Unidimensionality was evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Item responses were modeled using item response theory. The presence and impact of differential item functioning (DIF) were evaluated using ordinal logistic regression. Results Unidimensionality of the pedsFACIT-PCF was supported. One of the 13 items demonstrated statistically significant DIF by language; however, impacts of language DIF on both individual scores and at the test level were negligible. No Spanish items showed DIF with respect to age and gender. Conclusions The 13-item pedsFACIT-PCF demonstrated stable measurement properties on language, gender and age and can be used for future trials. PMID:25749924

  1. Pediatric Ingestions: Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Tarango Md, Stacy M; Liu Md, Deborah R

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric ingestions present a common challenge for emergency clinicians. Each year, more than 50,000 children aged less than 5 years present to emergency departments with concern for unintentional medication exposure, and nearly half of all calls to poison centers are for children aged less than 6 years. Ingestion of magnetic objects and button batteries has also become an increasing source of morbidity and mortality. Although fatal pediatric ingestions are rare, the prescription medications most responsible for injury and fatality in children include opioids, sedative/hypnotics, and cardiovascular drugs. Evidence regarding the evaluation and management of common pediatric ingestions is comprised largely of case reports and retrospective studies. This issue provides a review of these studies as well as consensus guidelines addressing the initial resuscitation, diagnosis, and treatment of common pediatric ingestions. Also discussed are current recommendations for decontamination, administration of antidotes for specific toxins, and management of ingested foreign bodies. PMID:27104813

  2. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Keane JF, Lock JE, Fyler DC, eds. Nadas' Pediatric Cardiology . 2nd ed. St. Louis, MO; WB Saunders; ...

  3. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  4. Baseline low immunoglobulin A predicts inferior disease-free survival in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and serial evaluation suggests role of immunoglobulin A in leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Anuj Kumar; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Kumar, Uma; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2014-05-01

    Abstract Data on serial evaluation of immunoglobulins (Ig) in pediatric AML is lacking. From April 2010 to May 2011, 45 consecutive patients with AML aged 1-18 years were prospectively enrolled along with nine healthy controls. Ig were assessed at diagnosis, post-induction, post-consolidation, 3 and 6 months follow-up and relapse. At diagnosis, Ig levels were significantly higher in patients than in healthy controls. Patienths with gum hypertrophy had low Ig levels (IgG, p = 0.007; IgA, p = 0.003; IgM, p = 0.06). Baseline Ig did not correlate with complete remission (CR). Patients who relapsed had a lower baseline IgA level than those in continuous CR (169 ± 94 g/dL vs. 310 ± 177 g/dL, p = 0.019). Patients with a low baseline IgA level (less than median) had inferior disease-free-survival (DFS) on multivariate analysis (p = 0.048). Post-induction, IgM (p < 0.001) and IgA (p = 0.048) were significantly reduced as compared to their baseline values. On serial follow-up in patients who were in continuous CR, there was a significant decrease in IgA from post-induction until 6 months after treatment completion. This is the first study to evaluate the trend of humoral immunity in sequential pediatric patients with AML. Our study demonstrates that in pediatric AML, baseline Ig were higher than in controls. Gum hypertrophy was observed in patients with low Ig (IgA and IgG) levels. Relatively lower baseline IgA predicted disease relapse and inferior DFS. On serial follow-up, IgA significantly decreased in those who continued to stay in CR but not in patients who relapsed, suggesting an association of IgA with leukemogenesis. PMID:23865831

  5. The Comprehensive Longitudinal Evaluation of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program: Summary of Second Year Reports. SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    This report discusses the progress of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program (MPCP) evaluation and presents a brief summary of the main findings of the seven distinct topical reports that have been completed for 2007-08--the second year of the evaluation. Those seven specialized reports build on the five reports that were released in 2008 and are:…

  6. The Comprehensive Longitudinal Evaluation of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program: Summary of Baseline Reports. SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the Milwaukee Parental Choice Program and the author's plan for evaluating it over a five year period. It also presents a brief summary of the main findings of the four distinct topical reports that the author and his colleagues have completed for 2006-07--the baseline year of the evaluation. Those four…

  7. WWC Review of the Report "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies." What Works Clearinghouse Single Study Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 study, "Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-Up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies," examined the effects of "Technology-enhanced, Research-based, Instruction, Assessment, and professional Development (TRIAD)," a math intervention for preschoolers that combines a curriculum, a…

  8. Longitudinal Evaluation of a Scale-up Model for Teaching Mathematics with Trajectories and Technologies: Persistence of Effects Three Years after the Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie; Layzer, Carolyn; Unlu, Fatih; Wolfe, Christopher B.; Spitler, Mary Elaine

    2013-01-01

    Education needs generalizable models to scale up evidence-based practices and programs and longitudinal research evaluating the persistence of the effect of their implementation. This is particularly important given the "deep, systemic incapacity of U.S. schools, and the practitioners who work in them, to develop, incorporate, and extend new…

  9. Longitudinal Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior during an Atypical Neuroleptic Medication Cross-over Evaluation for an Adolescent with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy R.; Tervo, Raymond C.; McComas, Jennifer J.; Rivard, Patrick F.; Symons, Frank J.

    2009-01-01

    This quasi-longitudinal descriptive case study evaluated problem behavior for an adolescent boy with developmental disabilities via repeated functional behavioral analysis (FBA) probes during a blinded cross-over from the atypical neuroleptic Risperdal (Risperidone) to Seroquel (Quetiapine). The repeated FBA probes showed no medication differences…

  10. Sustainability of a Scale-Up Intervention in Early Mathematics: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Implementation Fidelity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.; Sarama, Julie; Wolfe, Christopher B.; Spitler, Mary Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: We evaluated the fidelity of implementation and the sustainability of effects of a research-based model for scaling up educational interventions. The model was implemented by 64 teachers in 26 schools in 2 distal city districts serving low-resource communities, with schools randomly assigned to condition. Practice or Policy:…

  11. Vocabulary Development in Italian Children: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Odorico, Laura; Carubbi, Stefania; Salerni, Nicoletta; Calvo, Vicenzo

    2001-01-01

    Vocabulary development of a sample of 42 Italian children was evaluated through monthly administration of the Italian version of the CDI. Data collection started at age one for 32 children and a few moths later for the remaining subjects and continued until children's vocabulary reached 200 words. At fixed stages of vocabulary size, individual…

  12. The "Process" of Process Use: Methods for Longitudinal Assessment in a Multisite Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Jessica; Campbell, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Process use refers to the ways in which stakeholders and/or evaluands change as a function of participating in evaluation activities. Although the concept of process use has been well discussed in the literature, exploration of methodological strategies for the measurement and assessment of process use has been limited. Typically, empirical…

  13. A Longitudinal, Mixed Method Evaluation of Self-Awareness Training in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Anna; Williams, Helen M.; Allinson, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether self-awareness, which is associated with general well-being and positive life outcomes, is also of specific benefit in the workplace. The authors tested the relationship between self-awareness and job-related well-being, and evaluated two different interventions designed to improve…

  14. A Longitudinal Evaluation of "QuickSmart": An Effective Australian Intervention to Improve Numeracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Lorraine; Pegg, John

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports data from the evaluation of the numeracy component of a long-running educational intervention, covering the period from 2001 to 2008. "QuickSmart" is both an intervention and research project operating in Australian schools. It is a structured intervention program designed for middle-school students (ages 10 to 13 years) with…

  15. Longitudinal evaluation, acceptability and long-term retention of knowledge on a horizontally integrated organic and functional systems course.

    PubMed

    Palha, Joana Almeida; Almeida, Armando; Correia-Pinto, Jorge; Costa, Manuel João; Ferreira, Maria Amélia; Sousa, Nuno

    2015-08-01

    Undergraduate medical education is moving from traditional disciplinary basic science courses into more integrated curricula. Integration models based on organ systems originated in the 1950s, but few longitudinal studies have evaluated their effectiveness. This article outlines the development and implementation of the Organic and Functional Systems (OFS) courses at the University of Minho in Portugal, using evidence collected over 10 years. It describes the organization of content, student academic performance and acceptability of the courses, the evaluation of preparedness for future courses and the retention of knowledge on basic sciences. Students consistently rated the OFS courses highly. Physician tutors in subsequent clinical attachments considered that students were appropriately prepared. Performance in the International Foundations of Medicine examination of a self-selected sample of students revealed similar performances in basic science items after the last OFS course and 4 years later, at the moment of graduation. In conclusion, the organizational and pedagogical approaches of the OFS courses achieve high acceptability by students and result in positive outcomes in terms of preparedness for subsequent training and long-term retention of basic science knowledge. PMID:26228737

  16. Pediatric Neurotrauma

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Nithya; Ramaiah, Ramesh; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children over 1 year of age. Knowledge about the age-specific types of injury and how to manage children with neurotrauma is essential to understanding and recognizing the extent and degree of injury and to optimize outcomes. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical management of pediatric neurotrauma. PMID:25024940

  17. Pediatric Virology

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Bernard

    1965-01-01

    Pediatric virology is not an isolàted discipline. Rather, the syndromes associated with viral infection are modified by the unique characteristics of infancy and childhood. Fortunately for the pediatrician, and certainly for children, viral infections in childhood are rarely fatal, and are almost never serious. Future efforts of the pediatrician and virologist should be directed toward increased fetal salvage as with rubella and the prevention of severe, viral lower respiratory tract disease. PMID:14298871

  18. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed. PMID:24580990

  19. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, R.M.; Coulam, C.M.; Allen, J.H.; Fleischer, A.; Lee, G.S.; Kirchner, S.G.; James A.E. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    Evaluation of pediatric emergencies by diagnostic imaging technics can involve both invasive and noninvasive procedures. Nuclear medicine, conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized axial tomography, and xeroradiography are the major nonangiographic diagnostic technics available for patient evaluation. We will emphasize the use of computerized axial tomography, nuclear medicine, xeroradiography, and ultrasound in the evaluation of emergencies in the pediatric age group. Since the radiologist is the primary consultant with regard to diagnostic imaging, his knowledge of these modulities can greatly influence patient care and clinical results.

  20. A longitudinal evaluation of a project-based learning initiative in an engineering undergraduate programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Wayne; Palmer, Stuart; Bennett, Mitchell

    2012-05-01

    Project-based learning (PBL) is a well-known student-centred methodology for engineering design education. The methodology claims to offer a number of educational benefits. This paper evaluates the student perceptions of the initial and second offering of a first-year design unit at Griffith University in Australia. It builds on an earlier evaluation conducted after the initial offering of the unit. It considers the implementation of the recommended changes. Evaluations of the two offerings reveal that students (in both the initial and second offering) generally enjoyed the experience, but that the second offering was found to be a significantly more enjoyable learning experience. Students in the second offering also reported a significantly better understanding of what they needed to do for the design projects and where to find the requisite information. The oral presentation aspect of the initial and second offerings received the lowest satisfaction rating. The inclusion (and delivery) of the computer-aided drawing component of the unit is seen as a positive aspect by some students, but many others comment on it negatively. The best aspects of the PBL unit and those aspects needing further improvement were similar to the findings of other investigations documented in the literature.

  1. Evaluation of Antiseptic Use in Pediatric Surgical Units in the United Kingdom-Where Is the Evidence Base?

    PubMed

    Ng, Angela Li Ching; Jackson, Claire; Kazmierski, Marcin

    2016-08-01

    Aim Our aim was to conduct a survey of practice regarding skin preparation products for premature neonates (under 32 weeks gestation, below 1.5 kg) in the United Kingdom (UK) pediatric surgical units and to review the evidence on the safety and efficacy of the commonest skin preparation products used. Methods For the survey, following Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust's (Addenbrooke's Hospital) approval, the UK pediatric surgical units were contacted. Each unit was asked for both unit policy and individual consultant preference for skin preparation in infants. A structured literature search was performed using Medline and EMBASE. All study types investigating skin antisepsis with povidone iodine or chlorhexidine in neonates were included. Abstracts and non-English language articles were excluded. Target outcomes related to effectiveness and potential risks of the product. Results A total of 28 pediatric surgical units were surveyed. Overall, 14 units had a standardized policy, with 8 units using Betadine (Purdue Products L.P., Stamford, CT), 4 using alcoholic chlorhexidine, and 2 using aqueous chlorhexidine. A total of 34 articles fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. There is moderate quality evidence to support the efficacy of chlorhexidine over povidone iodine for preoperative skin antisepsis. There is evidence that povidone iodine can be absorbed, causing reactive hypothyroidism. Chlorhexidine can be absorbed but there is no evidence of this being significant. Both alcoholic and aqueous chlorhexidine can cause skin damage, including burns. Conclusion A majority of pediatric surgical units and individual surgeons use Betadine in premature and below 1.5 kg infants despite this being outside the product license. There is no ideal product choice based on current evidence but surgeons must be aware of the inherent risks and benefits of each product. PMID:26378485

  2. [Understanding and reducing the risk of adverse drug reactions in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Gotta, Verena; van den Anker, Johannes; Pfister, Marc

    2015-12-01

    Developmental pharmacology influences the safety profile of drugs in pediatrics. Altered pharmacokinetics and/ or pharmacodynamics of drugs make pediatric patients susceptible to adverse drug reactions (ADRs), especially infants and newborns. Since the efficacy/ safety balance of most available drugs has not been formally evaluated in pediatric clinical trials, optimal dosing is rarely known in pediatrics. Suboptimal pediatric drug formulations make dose optimization even more difficult exposing pediatric patients to medication errors like overdosing and associated ADRs. We provide an overview of pediatric ADRs and discuss recent regulatory and pharmacological measures to understand and reduce risk of ADRs in pediatric patients. PMID:26654811

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Performance Evaluation of the Second Developmental Version of the PediaFlow Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Timothy M.; Kocyildirim, Ergin; Johnson, Carl A.; Daly, Amanda R.; Olia, Salim E.; Woolley, Joshua R.; Snyder, Shaun; Bengston, Shawn G.; Kameneva, Marina V.; Antaki, James F.; Wagner, William R.; Borovetz, Harvey S.; Wearden, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) have significantly impacted the treatment of adult cardiac failure, but few options exist for pediatric patients. This has motivated our group to develop an implantable magnetically levitated rotodynamic VAD (PediaFlow®) for 3–20 kg patients. The second prototype design of the PediaFlow (PF2) is 56% smaller than earlier prototypes, and achieves 0.5–1.5 L/min blood flow rates. In vitro hemodynamic performance and hemolysis testing were performed with analog blood and whole ovine blood, respectively. In vivo evaluation was performed in an ovine model to evaluate hemocompatibility and end-organ function. The in vitro normalized index of hemolysis was 0.05–0.14 g/L over the specified operating range. In vivo performance was satisfactory for two of the three implanted animals. A mechanical defect caused early termination at 17 days of the first in vivo study, but two subsequent implants proceeded without complication and electively terminated at 30 and 70 days. Serum chemistries and plasma free hemoglobin were within normal limits. Gross necropsy revealed small, subclinical infarctions in the kidneys of the 30 and 70 day animals (confirmed by histopathology). The results of these experiments, particularly the biocompatibility demonstrated in vivo encourage further development of a miniature magnetically levitated VAD for the pediatric population. Ongoing work including further reduction of size will lead to a design freeze in preparation for of clinical trials. PMID:22211150

  4. Development of Cortical Morphology Evaluated with Longitudinal MR Brain Images of Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Moeskops, Pim; Benders, Manon J. N. L.; Kersbergen, Karina J.; Groenendaal, Floris; de Vries, Linda S.; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The cerebral cortex develops rapidly in the last trimester of pregnancy. In preterm infants, brain development is very vulnerable because of their often complicated extra-uterine conditions. The aim of this study was to quantitatively describe cortical development in a cohort of 85 preterm infants with and without brain injury imaged at 30 and 40 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA). Methods In the acquired T2-weighted MR images, unmyelinated white matter (UWM), cortical grey matter (CoGM), and cerebrospinal fluid in the extracerebral space (CSF) were automatically segmented. Based on these segmentations, cortical descriptors evaluating volume, surface area, thickness, gyrification index, and global mean curvature were computed at both time points, for the whole brain, as well as for the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes separately. Additionally, visual scoring of brain abnormality was performed using a conventional scoring system at 40 weeks PMA. Results The evaluated descriptors showed larger change in the occipital lobes than in the other lobes. Moreover, the cortical descriptors showed an association with the abnormality scores: gyrification index and global mean curvature decreased, whereas, interestingly, median cortical thickness increased with increasing abnormality score. This was more pronounced at 40 weeks PMA than at 30 weeks PMA, suggesting that the period between 30 and 40 weeks PMA might provide a window of opportunity for intervention to prevent delay in cortical development. PMID:26161536

  5. A longitudinal evaluation of the Resilient Families randomized trial to prevent early adolescent depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Buttigieg, Jason P; Shortt, Alison L; Slaviero, Tania M; Hutchinson, Delyse; Kremer, Peter; Toumbourou, John W

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether an intervention prevented the development of depressive symptoms through the early years of secondary school (Grades 7 to 9 - mean ages 12.3 to 14.5 years) in Victoria, Australia. Twelve schools were randomized to a universal preventative intervention (including a student social relationship/emotional health curriculum, and parent/caregiver parenting education); 12 were randomized as control schools. Multivariate regression analyses used student self-report to predict depressive symptoms at 26-month follow-up (13-months after intervention completion) from baseline measures and intervention status (N = 2027). There was no overall intervention effect on depressive symptoms. However, intervention students with moderate symptoms whose parents attended parent education events had a significantly reduced risk of depressive symptoms at follow-up. Future evaluations of interventions of this type should investigate: therapeutic processes; methods to increase recruitment into effective parent education events; and the potential to target assistance to students with high depressive symptoms. PMID:26298674

  6. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  7. Process evaluation of the Enabling Mothers toPrevent Pediatric Obesity Through Web-Based Learning and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj

    2014-09-01

    Family-and-home-based interventions are an important vehicle for preventing childhood obesity. Systematic process evaluations have not been routinely conducted in assessment of these interventions. The purpose of this study was to plan and conduct a process evaluation of the Enabling Mothers to Prevent Pediatric Obesity Through Web-Based Learning and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) randomized control trial. The trial was composed of two web-based, mother-centered interventions for prevention of obesity in children between 4 and 6 years of age. Process evaluation used the components of program fidelity, dose delivered, dose received, context, reach, and recruitment. Categorical process evaluation data (program fidelity, dose delivered, dose exposure, and context) were assessed using Program Implementation Index (PII) values. Continuous process evaluation variables (dose satisfaction and recruitment) were assessed using ANOVA tests to evaluate mean differences between groups (experimental and control) and sessions (sessions 1 through 5). Process evaluation results found that both groups (experimental and control) were equivalent, and interventions were administered as planned. Analysis of web-based intervention process objectives requires tailoring of process evaluation models for online delivery. Dissemination of process evaluation results can advance best practices for implementing effective online health promotion programs. PMID:24648285

  8. A Pilot Study of the ELFE Longitudinal Cohort: Feasibility and Preliminary Evaluation of Biological Collection

    PubMed Central

    Oleko, Amivi; Betsou, Fotini; Sarter, Hélène; Gerdil, Claire; Desbois, Isabelle; Charles, Marie Aline; Leridon, Henri

    2011-01-01

    Etude Longitudinale Française depuis l'Enfance (ELFE) will be a national French cohort of 20,000 children followed from birth to adulthood. Biological samples will be taken at birth to evaluate the fetal exposition to several substances. A pilot study was carried out in October 2007 to test the preanalytical factors that affected sample quality. A variety of fractions were collected by the midwife after delivery from different blood collection tubes. Options in the collection process were 2 daily transports of samples, centralized and standardized processing methodology, and storage of multiple aliquots in liquid nitrogen or at −80°C. We analyzed preanalytical factors that could have affected coagulation and then soluble CD40 Ligand (sCD40L) as a quality control tool for serum quality. Cord blood and urine were collected from 82% and 84% of women, respectively, who agreed to be followed up in the ELFE project. The use of syringe was the main factor correlated with coagulation (relative risk: 2.79 [1.47; 5.31], P<0.01). Maternity unit status was also associated with coagulation (RR: 1.48 [1.03; 2.13] in a private maternity unit vs. a public maternity) as well as time between collection and centrifugation (RR 1.03 [1; 1.07] when time between collection and centrifugation increases from 1 h). There were no extremely low sCD40L values indicating extreme exposures to room temperatures. This first evaluation study allowed us to stress the importance of carefully recording all potentially critical preanalytical variables that might be used at a large-scale level. PMID:21977239

  9. A Pilot Study of the ELFE Longitudinal Cohort: Feasibility and Preliminary Evaluation of Biological Collection.

    PubMed

    Oleko, Amivi; Betsou, Fotini; Sarter, Hélène; Gerdil, Claire; Desbois, Isabelle; Charles, Marie Aline; Leridon, Henri; Vandentorren, Stéphanie

    2011-09-01

    Etude Longitudinale Française depuis l'Enfance (ELFE) will be a national French cohort of 20,000 children followed from birth to adulthood. Biological samples will be taken at birth to evaluate the fetal exposition to several substances. A pilot study was carried out in October 2007 to test the preanalytical factors that affected sample quality. A variety of fractions were collected by the midwife after delivery from different blood collection tubes. Options in the collection process were 2 daily transports of samples, centralized and standardized processing methodology, and storage of multiple aliquots in liquid nitrogen or at -80°C. We analyzed preanalytical factors that could have affected coagulation and then soluble CD40 Ligand (sCD40L) as a quality control tool for serum quality. Cord blood and urine were collected from 82% and 84% of women, respectively, who agreed to be followed up in the ELFE project. The use of syringe was the main factor correlated with coagulation (relative risk: 2.79 [1.47; 5.31], P<0.01). Maternity unit status was also associated with coagulation (RR: 1.48 [1.03; 2.13] in a private maternity unit vs. a public maternity) as well as time between collection and centrifugation (RR 1.03 [1; 1.07] when time between collection and centrifugation increases from 1 h). There were no extremely low sCD40L values indicating extreme exposures to room temperatures. This first evaluation study allowed us to stress the importance of carefully recording all potentially critical preanalytical variables that might be used at a large-scale level. PMID:21977239

  10. Evaluating the program of a smoking cessation support group for adult smokers: a longitudinal pilot study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Ling

    2005-09-01

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in Taiwan. In order to increase cessation rates among adult smokers, the Department of Health in Taiwan has begun providing financial support for nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). However, therapies based on multiple interventions can lead to significantly higher cessation rates than NRT alone. This study develops and evaluates the outcomes of a smoking cessation program that provides a combination of physiological and psychological treatment in the context of a short-term support group. In this study, ten adult smokers were recruited by means of advertisements broadcast on local television over a seven-day period and one thousand flyers that advertised free assistance with quitting smoking. The smoking cessation support group was carried in Tainan County, in southern Taiwan. The three-month program consisted of three, monthly group sessions, free nicotine patches, telephone counseling by public health nurses, and telephone interviews by community health volunteers. Those participating in the group were encouraged to keep a record of all smoking behavior and its "triggers" in a diary, list the personal benefits of quitting, draw up a quitting contract, and enlist significant family members to monitor their quitting behavior. Participants were also trained in behavioral strategies to avoid smoking, including imagery rehearsal, relaxation techniques, exercise, and distraction. The outcome of the project was assessed by the following two criteria: (1) carbon monoxide (CO) level in the breath before and after the three-month program, as measured by percentage of carboxyhemoglobin (%COHB), and (2) the self-reported number of cigarettes smoked per month, taken at the outset of the three-month program, at the conclusion of the program, and six months after the termination of the program. The Wilcoxon signed-rank and Friedman tests respectively revealed that there were significant decreases both in the subjects' %COHB

  11. Evaluation of the Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events (EMMACE)-3: protocol for a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Alabas, O A; West, R M; Gillott, R G; Khatib, R; Hall, A S; Gale, C P

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients with cardiovascular disease are living longer and are more frequently accessing healthcare resources. The Evaluation of the Methods and Management of Acute Coronary Events (EMMACE)-3 national study is designed to improve understanding of the effect of quality of care on health-related outcomes for patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods and analysis EMMACE-3 is a longitudinal study of 5556 patients hospitalised with an ACS in England. The study collects repeated measures of health-related quality of life, information about medications and patient adherence profiles, a survey of hospital facilities, and morbidity and mortality data from linkages to multiple electronic health records. Together with EMMACE-3X and EMMACE-4, EMMACE-3 will assimilate detailed information for about 13 000 patients across more than 60 hospitals in England. Ethics and dissemination EMMACE-3 was given a favourable ethical opinion by Leeds (West) Research Ethics committee (REC reference: 10/H131374). On successful application, study data will be shared with academic collaborators. The findings from EMMACE-3 will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, at scientific conferences, the media, and through patient and public involvement. Study registration number ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01808027. Information about the study is also available at EMMACE.org. PMID:26105029

  12. An evaluation of intraoperative and postoperative outcomes of torsional mode versus longitudinal ultrasound mode phacoemulsification: a Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Pia; Umari, Ingrid; Mangogna, Alessandro; Zanei, Andrea; Tognetto, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate and compare the intraoperative parameters and postoperative outcomes of torsional mode and longitudinal mode of phacoemulsification. METHODS Pertinent studies were identified by a computerized MEDLINE search from January 2002 to September 2013. The Meta-analysis is composed of two parts. In the first part the intraoperative parameters were considered: ultrasound time (UST) and cumulative dissipated energy (CDE). The intraoperative values were also distinctly considered for two categories (moderate and hard cataract group) depending on the nuclear opacity grade. In the second part of the study the postoperative outcomes as the best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and the endothelial cell loss (ECL) were taken in consideration. RESULTS The UST and CDE values proved statistically significant in support of torsional mode for both moderate and hard cataract group. The analysis of BCVA did not present statistically significant difference between the two surgical modalities. The ECL count was statistically significant in support of torsional mode (P<0.001). CONCLUSION The Meta-analysis shows the superiority of the torsional mode for intraoperative parameters (UST, CDE) and postoperative ECL outcomes. PMID:27366694

  13. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Skin Microbiome and Association with Microenvironment and Treatment in Canine Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Charles W; Morris, Daniel O; Rankin, Shelley C; Cain, Christine L; Misic, Ana M; Houser, Timothy; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Grice, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Host-microbe interactions may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder characterized by universal colonization with Staphylococcus species. To examine the relationship between epidermal barrier function and the cutaneous microbiota in atopic dermatitis, this study used a spontaneous model of canine atopic dermatitis. In a cohort of 14 dogs with canine atopic dermatitis, the skin microbiota were longitudinally evaluated with parallel assessment of skin barrier function at disease flare, during antimicrobial therapy, and post-therapy. Sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene showed decreased bacterial diversity and increased proportions of Staphylococcus (S. pseudintermedius in particular) and Corynebacterium species compared with a cohort of healthy control dogs (n = 16). Treatment restored bacterial diversity with decreased proportions of Staphylococcus species, concurrent with decreased canine atopic dermatitis severity. Skin barrier function, as measured by corneometry, pH, and transepidermal water loss also normalized with treatment. Bacterial diversity correlated with transepidermal water loss and pH level but not with corneometry results. These findings provide insights into the relationship between the cutaneous microbiome and skin barrier function in atopic dermatitis, show the impact of antimicrobial therapy on the skin microbiome, and highlight the utility of canine atopic dermatitis as a spontaneous nonrodent model of atopic dermatitis. PMID:26854488

  14. Longitudinal evaluation of the importance of homework assignment completion for the academic performance of middle school students with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Langberg, Joshua M; Dvorsky, Melissa R; Molitor, Stephen J; Bourchtein, Elizaveta; Eddy, Laura D; Smith, Zoe; Schultz, Brandon K; Evans, Steven W

    2016-04-01

    The primary goal of this study was to longitudinally evaluate the homework assignment completion patterns of middle school age adolescents with ADHD, their associations with academic performance, and malleable predictors of homework assignment completion. Analyses were conducted on a sample of 104 middle school students comprehensively diagnosed with ADHD and followed for 18 months. Multiple teachers for each student provided information about the percentage of homework assignments turned in at five separate time points and school grades were collected quarterly. Results showed that agreement between teachers with respect to students assignment completion was high, with an intraclass correlation of .879 at baseline. Students with ADHD were turning in an average of 12% fewer assignments each academic quarter in comparison to teacher-reported classroom averages. Regression analyses revealed a robust association between the percentage of assignments turned in at baseline and school grades 18 months later, even after controlling for baseline grades, achievement (reading and math), intelligence, family income, and race. Cross-lag analyses demonstrated that the association between assignment completion and grades was reciprocal, with assignment completion negatively impacting grades and low grades in turn being associated with decreased future homework completion. Parent ratings of homework materials management abilities at baseline significantly predicted the percentage of assignments turned in as reported by teachers 18 months later. These findings demonstrate that homework assignment completion problems are persistent across time and an important intervention target for adolescents with ADHD. PMID:26931065

  15. Psychological health of military children: longitudinal evaluation of a family-centered prevention program to enhance family resilience.

    PubMed

    Lester, Patricia; Stein, Judith A; Saltzman, William; Woodward, Kirsten; MacDermid, Shelley W; Milburn, Norweeta; Mogil, Catherine; Beardslee, William

    2013-08-01

    Family-centered preventive interventions have been proposed as relevant to mitigating psychological health risk and promoting resilience in military families facing wartime deployment and reintegration. This study evaluates the impact of a family-centered prevention program, Families OverComing Under Stress Family Resilience Training (FOCUS), on the psychological adjustment of military children. Two primary goals include (1) understanding the relationships of distress among family members using a longitudinal path model to assess relations at the child and family level and (2) determining pathways of program impact on child adjustment. Multilevel data analysis using structural equation modeling was conducted with deidentified service delivery data from 280 families (505 children aged 3-17) in two follow-up assessments. Standardized measures included service member and civilian parental distress (Brief Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist-Military), child adjustment (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and family functioning (McMaster Family Assessment Device). Distress was significantly related among the service member parent, civilian parent, and children. FOCUS improved family functioning, which in turn significantly reduced child distress at follow-up. Salient components of improved family functioning in reducing child distress mirrored resilience processes targeted by FOCUS. These findings underscore the public health potential of family-centered prevention for military families and suggest areas for future research. PMID:23929043

  16. Longitudinal bone marrow evaluations for myelodysplasia in myeloma patients before and after treatment with lenalidomide

    PubMed Central

    Monaghan, Sara A.; Dai, Lijun; Mapara, Markus Y.; Normolle, Daniel P.; Gollin, Susanne M.; Lentzsch, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Lenalidomide (LEN) treatment in multiple myeloma (MM) results in superior outcome. However, there is concern for increased myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemias (MDS/AML) associated with LEN. Thus, bone marrow morphology and cytogenetic studies from 40 patients were evaluated for early signs of MDS prior to therapy, during therapy and at follow-up. Newly diagnosed MM patients treated with LEN and dexamethasone (LD) alone or followed by ASCT (LD/ASCT), or relapsed/refractory MM patients treated with LEN, bendamustine and dexamethasone (BLD) were included. One patient developed MDS. Baseline prevalence of mild morphologic myelodysplasia was highest in pretreated MM patients (BLD, 71%), but was also seen in newly diagnosed patients (LD and LD/ASCT, 17%). Prevalence of myelodysplasia did not increase over time. Thus, this study did not reveal rapidly emerging MDS in 39 of 40 MM patients treated with LEN. Development of MDS in one patient suggests that longer follow up is needed for all. PMID:23216269

  17. Evaluating the Impact of Internships - Longitudinal Participant Tracking in the Soars Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacker, R.; Sloan, V.

    2014-12-01

    While there is widespread agreement about the benefits of research internship experiences for students, long-term tracking of student progress beyond the summer experience is challenging. Coordinated tracking can effectively document program impact, inform programmatic improvement, and identifying gaps in the internship effort. Tracking can also strengthen diversity efforts and the retention of students from underrepresented groups. Continuous follow-up and guidance can only be provided to students if we know where they are, what they are doing and what they need in order to stay engaged in the field. The SOARS Program at the National Center for Atmospheric Research has supported undergraduate students for over 18 years to enter and succeed in graduate school. Over 85% of SOARS participants have transitioned to geoscience graduate programs or the STEM workforce. The SOARS mission is to broaden participation in the atmospheric and related sciences by engaging students from groups historically under-represented in science, including Black or African-American, American Indian or Alaska Native, Hispanic or Latino, female, first-generation college students, and students with disabilities. SOARS relies on proven intervention strategies such as multi-year research experiences, multifaceted mentoring, and a strong learning community. Fostering relationships developed during this time using a wider range of technologies and program longevity play important roles in tracking participants over time. This presentation will highlight significant program results and share the tracking and evaluation techniques utilized in SOARS.

  18. Longitudinal evaluation of a statewide network of hospital programs to improve child passenger safety.

    PubMed

    Colletti, R B

    1986-04-01

    As a project begun in 1979 to improve child passenger safety, a statewide network of hospital-based car safety seat rental and education programs was implemented by a coalition of volunteers, nurses, physicians, and state agencies. A car safety seat program was established at every hospital delivering newborns. To evaluate the effectiveness of this network of programs, 1,846 newborns (87% of hospital discharges) were observed at discharge at ten hospitals during 33 observation studies from 1979 to 1984. Mean correct car safety seat usage increased from less than 21% in 1979 to 82% in 1984. Concurrently, use of the dangerous lap or arms position decreased from 70% preprogram to 6% postprogram, and incorrect car safety seat usage decreased from 28% to 3%. In addition 1,597 children from 0 to 3 years of age were observed at an annual county fair from 1982 to 1984. Use of either a vehicle seat belt alone or car safety seat with harness and seat belt increased from 34% in 1982 to 67% in 1984. Car safety seat and seat belt misuse occurred in 42% of infants less than 1 year of age and 20% of children 1 to 3 years of age. These findings suggest that a network of hospital-based car safety seat rental and education programs is an effective means of improving the passenger safety of newborns, infants, and young children. PMID:3960621

  19. Pediatric radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton. (KRM)

  20. How Effective Is Help on the Doorstep? A Longitudinal Evaluation of Community-Based Organisation Support

    PubMed Central

    Sherr, Lorraine; Yakubovich, Alexa R.; Skeen, Sarah; Cluver, Lucie D.; Hensels, Imca S.; Macedo, Ana; Tomlinson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Community-based responses have a lengthy history. The ravages of HIV on family functioning has included a widespread community response. Although much funding has been invested in front line community-based organisations (CBO), there was no equal investment in evaluations. This study was set up to compare children aged 9–13 years old, randomly sampled from two South African provinces, who had not received CBO support over time (YC) with a group of similarly aged children who were CBO attenders (CCC). YC baseline refusal rate was 2.5% and retention rate was 97%. CCC baseline refusal rate was 0.7% and retention rate was 86.5%. 1848 children were included—446 CBO attenders compared to 1402 9–13 year olds drawn from a random sample of high-HIV prevalence areas. Data were gathered at baseline and 12–15 months follow-up. Standardised measures recorded demographics, violence and abuse, mental health, social and educational factors. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that children attending CBOs had lower odds of experiencing weekly domestic conflict between adults in their home (OR 0.17; 95% CI 0.09, 0.32), domestic violence (OR 0.22; 95% CI 0.08, 0.62), or abuse (OR 0.11; 95% CI 0.05, 0.25) at follow-up compared to participants without CBO contact. CBO attenders had lower odds of suicidal ideation (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.18, 0.91), fewer depressive symptoms (B = -0.40; 95% CI -0.62, -0.17), less perceived stigma (B = -0.37; 95% CI -0.57, -0.18), fewer peer problems (B = -1.08; 95% CI -1.29, -0.86) and fewer conduct problems (B = -0.77; 95% CI -0.95, -0.60) at follow-up. In addition, CBO contact was associated with more prosocial behaviours at follow-up (B = 1.40; 95% CI 1.13, 1.67). No associations were observed between CBO contact and parental praise or post-traumatic symptoms. These results suggest that CBO exposure is associated with behavioural and mental health benefits for children over time. More severe psychopathology was not affected by attendance and

  1. How Effective Is Help on the Doorstep? A Longitudinal Evaluation of Community-Based Organisation Support.

    PubMed

    Sherr, Lorraine; Yakubovich, Alexa R; Skeen, Sarah; Cluver, Lucie D; Hensels, Imca S; Macedo, Ana; Tomlinson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Community-based responses have a lengthy history. The ravages of HIV on family functioning has included a widespread community response. Although much funding has been invested in front line community-based organisations (CBO), there was no equal investment in evaluations. This study was set up to compare children aged 9-13 years old, randomly sampled from two South African provinces, who had not received CBO support over time (YC) with a group of similarly aged children who were CBO attenders (CCC). YC baseline refusal rate was 2.5% and retention rate was 97%. CCC baseline refusal rate was 0.7% and retention rate was 86.5%. 1848 children were included-446 CBO attenders compared to 1402 9-13 year olds drawn from a random sample of high-HIV prevalence areas. Data were gathered at baseline and 12-15 months follow-up. Standardised measures recorded demographics, violence and abuse, mental health, social and educational factors. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that children attending CBOs had lower odds of experiencing weekly domestic conflict between adults in their home (OR 0.17; 95% CI 0.09, 0.32), domestic violence (OR 0.22; 95% CI 0.08, 0.62), or abuse (OR 0.11; 95% CI 0.05, 0.25) at follow-up compared to participants without CBO contact. CBO attenders had lower odds of suicidal ideation (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.18, 0.91), fewer depressive symptoms (B = -0.40; 95% CI -0.62, -0.17), less perceived stigma (B = -0.37; 95% CI -0.57, -0.18), fewer peer problems (B = -1.08; 95% CI -1.29, -0.86) and fewer conduct problems (B = -0.77; 95% CI -0.95, -0.60) at follow-up. In addition, CBO contact was associated with more prosocial behaviours at follow-up (B = 1.40; 95% CI 1.13, 1.67). No associations were observed between CBO contact and parental praise or post-traumatic symptoms. These results suggest that CBO exposure is associated with behavioural and mental health benefits for children over time. More severe psychopathology was not affected by attendance and may need

  2. Young children with functional abdominal pain (FAP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) followed in pediatric gastroenterology (PED-GI) vs primary pediatric care (PED): Differences in outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that children with recurrent abdominal pain without alarm signs be managed in pediatric rather than specialty care. However, many of these children are seen in tertiary care. In a longitudinal examination of physical and psychological symptoms, we hypothes...

  3. Evaluation of dietary cholesterol intake in elderly Chinese: a longitudinal study from the China Health and Nutrition Survey

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaofang; Su, Chang; Wang, Zhihong; Wang, Huijun; Jiang, Hongru; Zhang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate daily cholesterol intake across demographic factors and its food sources in elderly Chinese. Design A longitudinal study was conducted using demographic and dietary data for elders aged 60 and above from eight waves (1991–2011) of the China Health and Nutrition Survey. Setting The data were derived from urban and rural communities of nine provinces (autonomous regions) in China. Participants There were 16 274 participants (7657 male and 8617 female) in this study. Outcomes The primary outcome was daily cholesterol intake, which was calculated by using the Chinese Food Composition Table, based on dietary data. Results Daily consumption of cholesterol in the elderly significantly increased by 34% from 1991 to 2011 (p<0.0001) and reached 253.9 mg on average in 2011. Secular trends in the proportion of subjects with an intake of >300 mg/day increased significantly during 1991–2011 (p<0.0001). The major food sources of cholesterol by ranked order were eggs, pork, and fish and shellfish in 1991 and 2011, while organ meats which ranked fourth in the contribution to total intake in 1991 was replaced by poultry in 2011. Moreover, younger elders, male elders and elders from a high-income family or a highly urbanised community had higher cholesterol intakes and larger proportions of subjects with excessive cholesterol consumption in each survey year. Conclusions The large growth in daily cholesterol intake may pose major challenges for the health of elders in China. Reduced exposure to food enriched in cholesterol is required for elderly Chinese. PMID:27507232

  4. Longitudinal evaluation of regulatory T-cell dynamics on HIV-infected individuals during the first 2 years of therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Claudia; Horta, Ana; Coutinho-Teixeira, Vítor; Martins-Ribeiro, Ana; Baldaia, Ana; Rb-Silva, Rita; Santos, Catarina L.; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A sizeable percentage of individuals infected by HIV and on antiretroviral therapy (ART) fail to increase their CD4+ T-cells to satisfactory levels. The percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) has been suggested to contribute to this impairment. This study aimed to address this question and to expand the analysis of Tregs subpopulations during ART. Design: Longitudinal follow-up of 81 HIV-infected individuals during the first 24 months on ART. Methods: CD4+ T-cell counts, Tregs percentages, and specific Tregs subpopulations were evaluated at ART onset, 2, 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, and 24 months of ART (five individuals had no Tregs information at baseline). Results: The slope of CD4+ T-cell recovery was similar for individuals with moderate and with severe lymphopenia at ART onset. No evidence was found for a contribution of the baseline Tregs percentages on the CD4+ T-cell counts recovery throughout ART. In comparison to uninfected individuals, Tregs percentages were higher at ART onset only for patients with less than 200 cells/μl at baseline and decreased afterwards reaching normal values. Within Tregs, the percentage of naive cells remained low in these patients. Reduced thymic export and increased proliferation of Tregs vs. conventional CD4+ T cells might explain these persistent alterations. Conclusion: No effect of Tregs percentages at baseline was detected on CD4+ T-cell recovery. However, profound alterations on Tregs subpopulations were consistently observed throughout ART for patients with severe lymphopenia at ART onset. PMID:26919738

  5. The Relationship Between Initial Physical Examination Findings and Failure on Objective Validity Testing During Neuropsychological Evaluation After Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Provance, Aaron J.; Terhune, E. Bailey; Cooley, Christine; Carry, Patrick M.; Connery, Amy K.; Engelman, Glenn H.; Kirkwood, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The symptomatology after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is complex as symptoms are subjective and nonspecific. It is important to differentiate symptoms as neurologically based or caused by noninjury factors. Symptom exaggeration has been found to influence postinjury presentation, and objective validity tests are used to help differentiate these cases. This study examines how concussed patients seen for initial medical workup may present with noncredible effort during follow-up neuropsychological examination and identifies physical findings during evaluation that best predict noncredible performance. Hypothesis: A portion of pediatric patients will demonstrate noncredible effort during neuropsychological testing after mTBI, predicted by failure of certain vestibular and cognitive tests during initial examination. Study Design: Retrospective cohort. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Participants (n = 80) underwent evaluation by a sports medicine physician ≤3 months from injury, were subsequently seen for a neuropsychological examination, and completed the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT). Variables included results of a mental status examination (orientation), serial 7s examination, Romberg test, and heel-to-toe walking test. The primary outcome variable of interest was pass/fail of the MSVT. Results: Of the participants, 51% were male and 49% were female. Eighteen of 80 (23%) failed the MSVT. Based on univariable logistic regression analysis, the outcomes of the Romberg test (P = 0.0037) and heel-to-toe walking test(P = 0.0066) were identified as significant independent predictors of MSVT failure. In a multivariable model, outcome of Romberg test was the only significant predictor of MSVT failure. The probability of MSVT failure was 66.7% (95% CI, 33.3% to 88.9%) when a subject failed the Romberg test. Conclusion: A meaningful percentage of pediatric subjects present evidence of noncredible performance during neuropsychological examination

  6. Adolescent and Pediatric Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... abta.org Donate Now Menu Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ... or Complete our contact form Adolescent & Pediatric Brain Tumors Brain Tumors In Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family ...

  7. Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Richards, Amber M

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory emergencies are 1 of the most common reasons parents seek evaluation for the their children in the emergency department (ED) each year, and respiratory failure is the most common cause of cardiopulmonary arrest in pediatric patients. Whereas many respiratory illnesses are mild and self-limiting, others are life threatening and require prompt diagnosis and management. Therefore, it is imperative that emergency clinicians be able to promptly recognize and manage these illnesses. This article reviews ED diagnosis and management of foreign body aspiration, asthma exacerbation, epiglottitis, bronchiolitis, community-acquired pneumonia, and pertussis. PMID:26614243

  8. Five-year longitudinal evaluation of quality of life in a cohort of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Giusti, Massimo; Melle, Giulia; Fenocchio, Monica; Mortara, Lorenzo; Cecoli, Francesca; Caorsi, Valeria; Ferone, Diego; Minuto, Francesco; Rasore, Elda

    2011-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) generally has a favorable outcome. Thyroid disease, treatments, stress, and comorbidity can compromise health-related quality of life (QoL) and indirectly weigh upon the outcome. From 2004 to 2008, we evaluated QoL longitudinally in 128 DTC subjects. During scheduled examinations, subjects were asked to undergo a semi-structured psychiatric interview and five rated inventories. The same examination was conducted in 219 subjects after surgery for benign thyroid pathology. Low scores represent a better QoL. DTC and control subjects were similar in terms of age, male/female ratio, concomitant psychopharmacological treatments, and frequency of psychiatric diseases. In DTC subjects, Billewicz scale (BS) scores showed an increasing trend over time, especially among females. The ad hoc thyroid questionnaire (TQ) scores were similar in both groups and did not change over time, but at the end of the study ad hoc TQ and BS were significantly related. Ad hoc TQ scores were also related to age on entry to the study. In both male and female DTC subjects, Hamilton’s tests for anxiety (HAM-A), but not for depression (HAM-D), showed an improving trend. At the end of the study, HAM-A and HAM-D scores were comparable to those of the control group. HAM-A and HAM-D were both positively correlated with the stage of cancer and the time between diagnosis and treatment. Only HAM-D correlated with age on entry to the study. Kellner symptom questionnaire (KSQ) item scores were higher in DTC subjects than in controls. The change over time in the items including anxiety, somatization, depression, and hostility was significant. Somatization and hostility were more significantly reduced in DTC females than in DTC males. Hostility scores were significantly lower in DTC subjects than in controls at the end of the study. Somatization and depression were significantly related to staging on diagnosis and age on entry to the study. Our study confirms a wide

  9. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  10. The Baylor pediatric nutrition handbook for residents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Baylor Pediatric Nutrition Handbook for Residents provides basic resource information about the assessment of growth, the nutritional status assessment and feeding guidelines, biochemical evaluation of nutritional status, infant nutrition, enteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition, nutritional man...

  11. Pediatric Cancer Recognition Training in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Slone, Jeremy S; Ishigami, Elise; Mehta, Parth S

    2016-01-01

    Delayed presentation of children with cancer is a significant barrier to improving the survival from children's cancer in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Botswana, a country of approximately 2 million people in southern Africa, has only 1 pediatric cancer treatment program, based at Princess Marina Hospital (PMH) in the capital of Gaborone. A pediatric cancer recognition training program was developed that reached 50% of the government hospitals in Botswana teaching 362 health care workers how to recognize and refer children with cancer to PMH. Through evaluation of attendees, limitations in pediatric cancer training and general knowledge of pediatric cancer were identified. Attendees demonstrated improvement in their understanding of pediatric cancer and the referral process to PMH following the workshop. PMID:27336006

  12. Pediatric Cancer Recognition Training in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Slone, Jeremy S.; Ishigami, Elise; Mehta, Parth S.

    2016-01-01

    Delayed presentation of children with cancer is a significant barrier to improving the survival from children’s cancer in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Botswana, a country of approximately 2 million people in southern Africa, has only 1 pediatric cancer treatment program, based at Princess Marina Hospital (PMH) in the capital of Gaborone. A pediatric cancer recognition training program was developed that reached 50% of the government hospitals in Botswana teaching 362 health care workers how to recognize and refer children with cancer to PMH. Through evaluation of attendees, limitations in pediatric cancer training and general knowledge of pediatric cancer were identified. Attendees demonstrated improvement in their understanding of pediatric cancer and the referral process to PMH following the workshop. PMID:27336006

  13. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Scheller, RoseAnn L; Johnson, Laurie; Lorts, Angela; Ryan, Thomas D

    2016-09-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in the pediatric population is a rare and potentially devastating occurrence. An understanding of the differential diagnosis for the etiology of the cardiac arrest allows for the most effective emergency care and provides the patient with the best possible outcome. Pediatric SCA can occur with or without prodromal symptoms and may occur during exercise or rest. The most common cause is arrhythmia secondary to an underlying channelopathy, cardiomyopathy, or myocarditis. After stabilization, evaluation should include electrocardiogram, chest radiograph, and echocardiogram. Management should focus on decreasing the potential for recurring arrhythmia, maintaining cardiac preload, and thoughtful medication use to prevent exacerbation of the underlying condition. The purpose of this review was to provide the emergency physician with a concise and current review of the incidence, differential diagnosis, and management of pediatric patients presenting with SCA. PMID:27585126

  14. Development and Evaluation of a Longitudinal Case-Based Learning (CBL) Experience for a Geriatric Medicine Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struck, Bryan D.; Teasdale, Thomas A.

    2008-01-01

    The DWR Department of Geriatric Medicine at OUHSC and the OKC VA Medical Center began a mandatory third-year geriatric medicine clerkship in 2003. As part of the didactic sessions, the Department created a longitudinal Case-Based Learning (CBL) experience. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CBL experience, report student satisfaction…

  15. Ultrasonography: Applications in Pediatric Abdomen.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Akshay Kumar; Gupta, Pankaj; Sodhi, Kushaljit Singh

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a valuable imaging tool for evaluation of different clinical conditions in children, in general and abdominal conditions, in particular. The interest in US derives primarily from the lack of ionizing radiation exposure, low cost, portability, real-time imaging and Doppler capabilities. In addition, US application requires no preparation or sedation, making it particularly attractive in the pediatric population. Because of these advantages, US has been adopted as the primary imaging tool for evaluation of a number of pediatric abdominal conditions that would have involved the use of ionising radiation in the past, e.g., pyloric stenosis, intussusception and various renal and bladder abnormalities, to name a few. Certain limitations, however, are inherent to US including large body habitus, excessive bowel gas, postoperative state and the learning curve. In addition, pediatric US is particularly challenging as the children are frequently unable to co-operate for breath holding and many of them are crying during the scanning. In the present review, the authors discuss the various applications of US in the evaluation of pediatric abdomen. PMID:26973334

  16. Pediatric diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gyll, C.; Blake, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book treats the practical problems of pediatric radiography and radiological procedures. Written jointly by a radiographer and a radiologist, it covers pediatric positioning and procedures. An extended chapter covers neonatal radiography and radiology.

  17. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... International Welcome to PENS The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) is committed to the development and advancement ... PENS@kellencompany.com • Copyright © 2016 Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society • ALL RIGHTS RESERVED • Privacy Policy • Admin

  18. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed.

  19. 'Not just little adults' - a pediatric trauma primer.

    PubMed

    Overly, Frank L; Wills, Hale; Valente, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    This article describes pediatric trauma care and specifically how a pediatric trauma center, like Hasbro Children's Hospital, provides specialized care to this patient population. The authors review unique aspects of pediatric trauma patients broken down into anatomy and physiology, including Airway and Respiratory, Cardiovascular Response to Hemorrhage, Spine Injuries, Traumatic Brain Injuries, Thoracic Injuries and Blunt Abdominal Trauma. They review certain current recommendations for evaluation and management of these pediatric patients. The authors also briefly review the topic of Child Abuse/Non-accidental Trauma in pediatric patients. Although Pediatric Trauma is a very broad topic, the goal of this article is to act as a primer and describe certain characteristics and management recommendations unique to the pediatric trauma patient. PMID:24400309

  20. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia. PMID:2132469

  1. Diagnostic Approach to Pediatric Spine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the developmental features of the pediatric spine and spinal cord, including embryologic steps and subsequent growth of the osteocartilaginous spine and contents is necessary for interpretation of the pathologic events that may affect the pediatric spine. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients suspected of harboring spinal abnormalities, whereas computed tomography and ultrasonography play a more limited, complementary role. This article discusses the embryologic and developmental anatomy features of the spine and spinal cord, together with some technical points and pitfalls, and the most common indications for pediatric spinal MR imaging. PMID:27417404

  2. A randomized trial evaluating low doses of propofol infusion after intravenous ketamine for ambulatory pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Divya; Gupta, Madhu; Subramanian, Shalini

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Our study compared the discharge time after pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following sedation with propofol infusion dose of 100, 75 and 50 mcg/kg/min given after a bolus dose of ketamine and propofol. Materials and Methods: One hundred children of American Society of Anesthesiologists status 1/2, aged 6 months to 8 years, scheduled for elective MRI were enrolled and randomized to three groups to receive propofol infusion of 100, 75 or 50 mcg/kg/min (Groups A, B, and C, respectively). After premedicating children with midazolam 0.05 mg/kg intravenous (i.v.), sedation was induced with bolus dose of ketamine and propofol (1 mg/kg each) and the propofol infusion was connected. During the scan, heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation were monitored. Results: The primary outcome that is, discharge time was shortest for Group C (44.06 ± 18.64 min) and longest for Group A (60.00 ± 18.66 min), the difference being statistically and clinically significant. The secondary outcomes that is, additional propofol boluses, scan quality and awakening time were comparable for the three groups. The systolic blood pressure at 20, 25 and 30 min was significantly lower in Groups A and B compared with Group C. The incidence of sedation related adverse events was highest in Group A and least in Group C. Conclusion: After a bolus dose of ketamine and propofol (1 mg/kg each), propofol infusion of 50 mcg/kg/min provided sedation with shortest discharge time for MRI in children premedicated with midazolam 0.05 mg/kg i.v. It also enabled stable hemodynamics with less adverse events. PMID:25422610

  3. Pediatric optic neuritis.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E Ann; Graves, Jennifer S; Benson, Leslie A; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waldman, Amy

    2016-08-30

    Optic neuritis (ON) is a common presenting symptom in pediatric CNS demyelinating disorders and may be associated with dramatic visual loss. Knowledge regarding clinical presentation, associated diseases, therapy, and outcomes in ON in children has grown over the past decade. These studies have shown that younger children (<10 years of age) are more likely to present with bilateral ON and older children with unilateral ON. Furthermore, studies focusing on visual recovery have shown excellent recovery of high-contrast visual acuity in the majority of children, but functional and structural studies have shown evidence of irreversible injury and functional decline after ON in children. Although randomized controlled treatment trials have not been performed in children and adolescents with ON, standard of care suggests that the use of high-dose pulse steroids is safe and likely effective. This article reviews current knowledge about the clinical presentation and management of pediatric ON, with attention to associated syndromes and evaluative tools that may inform diagnosis and interventions. PMID:27572862

  4. A Mixed-Method Application of the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool to Evaluate the Sustainability of 4 Pediatric Asthma Care Coordination Programs

    PubMed Central

    Janevic, Mary; Lara, Marielena; Ramos-Valencia, Gilberto; Stephens, Tyra Bryant; Persky, Victoria; Uyeda, Kimberly; Ohadike, Yvonne; Malveaux, Floyd

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As part of a cross-site evaluation of the implementation of an evidence-based intervention for pediatric asthma care coordination into low-income communities, we sought to understand the factors that influenced the programs’ expected sustainability of the programs after external funding ended. Methods We administered the Center for Public Health Systems Science’s Program Sustainability Assessment Tool, a 40-item instrument assessing 8 domains of sustainability capacity, to 12 key informants across 4 program sites. We developed open-ended probes for each domain. We examined patterns in site-specific and overall domain scores, and coded qualitative data to identify challenges and strategies in each domain. Results Across sites, the domains of program evaluation (cross-site mean, 5.4 on a scale of 1–7) and program adaptation (mean, 5.2) had the highest ratings (indicating a strong finding during program evaluation) and funding stability had the lowest rating (mean, 2.7). Scores varied most across sites in the domains of strategic planning (SD, 0.9) and funding stability (SD, 0.9). Qualitative data revealed key challenges, including how implementation difficulties and externally led implementation can impede planning for sustainability. Program leaders discussed multiple strategies for enhancing capacity within each domain, including capitalizing on the interconnectedness of all domains, such as using evaluation and communication strategies to bolster internal political support throughout the implementation process. Conclusion Findings indicating weak and strong domains were consistent with previous findings of studies that used the Program Sustainability Assessment Tool. The addition of qualitative probes yielded detailed data describing capacity strengths, weaknesses, and strategies to increase the likelihood that programs are sustained. PMID:26632955

  5. Comparative evaluation of dexmedetomidine and midazolam-ketamine combination as sedative agents in pediatric dentistry: A double-blinded randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Parul Uppal; Thakur, Seema; Singhal, Parul; Chauhan, Deepak; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Sood, Ritu; Malhotra, Yagyeshwar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pharmacological methods have been used as an adjunct to enhance child cooperativeness and facilitate dental treatment. Objective: Purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of sedation by intranasal dexmedetomidine and oral combination drug midazolam–ketamine in a group of children with uncooperative behavior requiring dental treatment. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study that included patients 3–9 years old with American Society of Anesthesiologists-I status. About 36 children presenting early childhood caries were randomly assigned to one of three groups studied: Group MK received intranasal saline and oral midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) with ketamine (5 mg/kg) mixed in mango juice; Group DX received intranasal dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) and oral mango juice; and Group C received intranasal saline and oral mango juice. Patients' heart rate, blood pressure, and oxygen saturation were recorded before, during, and at the end of the procedure. Patients' behavior, sedation status, and wake up behavior were evaluated with modified observer assessment of alertness and sedation scale. Ease of treatment completion was evaluated according to Houpt scale. Results: Hemodynamic changes were statistically insignificant in Group MK and Group DX. About 75% patients in Group MK were successfully sedated as compared to 53.9% Group DX and none of the patients in Group C. Ease of treatment completion was better with Group MK as compared to Group DX and least with Group C. Around 50% patients in Group MK had postoperative complications. Conclusion: Oral midazolam–ketamine combination and intranasal dexmedetomidine evaluated in the present study can be used safely and effectively in uncooperative pediatric dental patients for producing conscious sedation. PMID:27307665

  6. Ethics consultation in pediatrics: long-term experience from a pediatric oncology center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Liza-Marie; Church, Christopher L; Metzger, Monika; Baker, Justin N

    2015-01-01

    There is little information about the content of ethics consultations (EC) in pediatrics. We sought to describe the reasons for consultation and ethical principles addressed during EC in pediatrics through retrospective review and directed content analysis of EC records (2000-2011) at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Patient-based EC were highly complex and often involved evaluation of parental decision making, particularly consideration of the risks and benefits of a proposed medical intervention, and the physician's fiduciary responsibility to the patient. Nonpatient consultations provided guidance in the development of institutional policies that would broadly affect patients and families. This is one of the few existing reviews of the content of pediatric EC and indicates that the distribution of ethical issues and reasons for moral distress are different than with adults. Pediatric EC often facilitates complex decision making among multiple stakeholders, and further prospective research is needed on the role of ethics consultation in pediatrics. PMID:25970382

  7. Psychopharmacology in pediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Frederick J; Usher, Craigan T; Abrams, Annah N

    2006-07-01

    Psychopharmacologic treatment in pediatric critical care requires a careful child or adolescent psychiatric evaluation, including a thorough review of the history of present illness or injury, any current or pre-existing psychiatric disorder, past history, and laboratory studies. Although there is limited evidence to guide psychopharmacologic practice in this setting, psychopharmacologic treatment is increasing in critical care, with known indications for treatment, benefits, and risks; initial dosing guidelines; and best practices. Treatment is guided by the knowledge bases in pediatric physiology, psycho-pharmacology, and treatment of critically ill adults. Pharmacologic considerations include pharmacokinetic and pharmcodynamic aspects of specific drugs and drug classes, in particular elimination half-life, developmental considerations, drug interactions, and adverse effects. Evaluation and management of pain is a key initial step, as pain may mimic psychiatric symptoms and its effective treatment can ameliorate them. Patient comfort and safety are primary objectives for children who are acutely ill and who will survive and for those who will not. Judicious use of psychopharmacolgic agents in pediatric critical care using the limited but growing evidence base and a clinical best practices collaborative approach can reduce anxiety,sadness, disorientation, and agitation; improve analgesia; and save lives of children who are suicidal or delirious. In addition to pain, other disorders or indications for psychopharmacologic treatment are affective disorders;PTSD; post-suicide attempt patients; disruptive behavior disorders (especially ADHD); and adjustment, developmental, and substance use disorders. Treating children who are critically ill with psychotropic drugs is an integral component of comprehensive pediatric critical care in relieving pain and delirium; reducing inattention or agitation or aggressive behavior;relieving acute stress, anxiety, or depression; and

  8. Selecting score types for longitudinal evaluations: the responsiveness of the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Toddlers in children with developmental disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yu-Pei; Tung, Li-Chen; Lee, Ya-Chen; Wang, Yu-Lin; Yen, Yun-Shan; Chen, Kuan-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to examine the responsiveness of the Comprehensive Developmental Inventory for Infants and Toddlers (CDIIT) in children with developmental disabilities (DD). Methods The responsiveness of a measure is its ability to detect change over time, and it is fundamental to an outcome measure for detecting changes over time. We compared the responsiveness of four types of scores (ie, raw scores, developmental ages [DAs], percentile ranks [PRs], and developmental quotients [DQs]) in the five subtests of the CDIIT. The CDIIT was administrated three times at intervals of 3 months on 32 children with DD aged between 5 months and 64 months (mean =30.6, standard deviation [SD] =17.8). The CDIIT is a pediatric norm-referenced assessment commonly used for clinical diagnosis of developmental delays in five developmental areas: cognition, language, motor, social, and self-care skills. The responsiveness was analyzed using three methods: effect size, standardized response mean, and paired t-test. Results The effect size results showed that at the 3-month and 6-month follow-ups, responsiveness was small or moderate in the raw scores and DAs of most of the subtest scores of the CDIIT, but the level of responsiveness varied in the PRs and DQs. The standardized response mean results of the 3-month and 6-month follow-ups showed that most of the subtest scores of the CDIIT had respectively moderate and large responsiveness in raw scores and DAs, but the responsiveness varied (from no to large) in PRs and DQs. Conclusion The findings generally support the use of the CDIIT as an outcome measure. We also suggest using the raw scores and DAs when using a norm-referenced pediatric developmental assessment to evaluate developmental changes and program effectiveness in children with DD. PMID:27217755

  9. Evaluating the dose effects of a longitudinal micro-CT study on pulmonary tissue in C57BL/6 mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detombe, Sarah A.; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Petrov, Ivailo E.; Drangova, Maria

    2012-03-01

    Background: Micro-computed tomography offers numerous advantages for small animal imaging, including the ability to monitor the same animals throughout a longitudinal study. However, concerns are often raised regarding the effects of x-ray dose accumulated over the course of the experiment. In this study, we scan C57BL/6 mice multiple times per week for six weeks, to determine the effect of the cumulative dose on pulmonary tissue at the end of the study. Methods/Results: C57BL/6 male mice were split into two groups (irradiated group=10, control group=10). The irradiated group was scanned (80kVp/50mA) each week for 6 weeks; the weekly scan session had three scans. This resulted in a weekly dose of 0.84 Gy, and a total study dose of 5.04 Gy. The control group was scanned on the final week. Scans from weeks 1 and 6 were reconstructed and analyzed: overall, there was no significant difference in lung volume or lung density between the control group and the irradiated group. Similarly, there were no significant differences between the week 1 and week 6 scans in the irradiated group. Histological samples taken from excised lung tissue also showed no evidence of inflammation or fibrosis in the irradiated group. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that a 5 Gy x-ray dose accumulated over six weeks during a longitudinal micro-CT study has no significant effects on the pulmonary tissue of C57BL/6 mice. As a result, the many advantages of micro- CT imaging, including rapid acquisition of high-resolution, isotropic images in free-breathing mice, can be taken advantage of in longitudinal studies without concern for negative dose-related effects.

  10. Role of Quantitative Clinical Pharmacology in Pediatric Approval and Labeling.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Nitin; Bhattaram, Atul; Earp, Justin C; Florian, Jeffry; Krudys, Kevin; Lee, Jee Eun; Lee, Joo Yeon; Liu, Jiang; Mulugeta, Yeruk; Yu, Jingyu; Zhao, Ping; Sinha, Vikram

    2016-07-01

    Dose selection is one of the key decisions made during drug development in pediatrics. There are regulatory initiatives that promote the use of model-based drug development in pediatrics. Pharmacometrics or quantitative clinical pharmacology enables development of models that can describe factors affecting pharmacokinetics and/or pharmacodynamics in pediatric patients. This manuscript describes some examples in which pharmacometric analysis was used to support approval and labeling in pediatrics. In particular, the role of pharmacokinetic (PK) comparison of pediatric PK to adults and utilization of dose/exposure-response analysis for dose selection are highlighted. Dose selection for esomeprazole in pediatrics was based on PK matching to adults, whereas for adalimumab, exposure-response, PK, efficacy, and safety data together were useful to recommend doses for pediatric Crohn's disease. For vigabatrin, demonstration of similar dose-response between pediatrics and adults allowed for selection of a pediatric dose. Based on model-based pharmacokinetic simulations and safety data from darunavir pediatric clinical studies with a twice-daily regimen, different once-daily dosing regimens for treatment-naïve human immunodeficiency virus 1-infected pediatric subjects 3 to <12 years of age were evaluated. The role of physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling (PBPK) in predicting pediatric PK is rapidly evolving. However, regulatory review experiences and an understanding of the state of science indicate that there is a lack of established predictive performance of PBPK in pediatric PK prediction. Moving forward, pharmacometrics will continue to play a key role in pediatric drug development contributing toward decisions pertaining to dose selection, trial designs, and assessing disease similarity to adults to support extrapolation of efficacy. PMID:27079249

  11. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-05

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  12. Evaluation of radiation dose and image quality of CT scan for whole-body pediatric PET/CT: A phantom study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ching-Ching; Liu, Shu-Hsin; Mok, Greta S. P.; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to tailor the CT imaging protocols for pediatric patients undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations with appropriate attention to radiation exposure while maintaining adequate image quality for anatomic delineation of PET findings and attenuation correction of PET emission data. Methods: The measurements were made by using three anthropomorphic phantoms representative of 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children with tube voltages of 80, 100, and 120 kVp, tube currents of 10, 40, 80, and 120 mA, and exposure time of 0.5 s at 1.75:1 pitch. Radiation dose estimates were derived from the dose-length product and were used to calculate risk estimates for radiation-induced cancer. The influence of image noise on image contrast and attenuation map for CT scans were evaluated based on Pearson's correlation coefficient and covariance, respectively. Multiple linear regression methods were used to investigate the effects of patient age, tube voltage, and tube current on radiation-induced cancer risk and image noise for CT scans. Results: The effective dose obtained using three anthropomorphic phantoms and 12 combinations of kVp and mA ranged from 0.09 to 4.08 mSv. Based on our results, CT scans acquired with 80 kVp/60 mA, 80 kVp/80 mA, and 100 kVp/60 mA could be performed on 1-, 5-, and 10-year-old children, respectively, to minimize cancer risk due to CT scans while maintaining the accuracy of attenuation map and CT image contrast. The effective doses of the proposed protocols for 1-, 5- and 10-year-old children were 0.65, 0.86, and 1.065 mSv, respectively. Conclusions: Low-dose pediatric CT protocols were proposed to balance the tradeoff between radiation-induced cancer risk and image quality for patients ranging in age from 1 to 10 years old undergoing whole-body PET/CT examinations.

  13. [From guidelines to practice: evaluation of the pediatric care provided by a service of secondary reference in the north of the State of Minas Gerais].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Laura Monteiro de Castro; Alves, Cláudia Regina Lindgren; Belisário, Soraya Almeida; Bueno, Mariana de Caux; de Moraes, Erica Furtado

    2013-06-01

    In the State of Minas Gerais, the Secondary Reference Viva Vida Centers (CVVRS) are one of the strategies deployed to tackle the problems in child health. This study sought to evaluate pediatric care provided in a CVVRS, using the guidelines defined when it was set up as a benchmark. A quantitative-qualitative approach was adopted, which included a cross-sectional study with stratified random sampling of 385 medical records of children registered with the program between 2007 and 2009, and analysis of focus groups with strategic actors of the initiative. There were divergences between the user profiles and the target audience in terms of age, hometown and clinical characteristics. Access and use of the service differed depending on the town, due to problems of misinformation concerning the proposal, difficulty of transportation and the fragility of the health network. The centers are considered an innovative and important initiative for the expansion and organization of the health network, though the intended logic is not effectively seen in practice. Interventions for articulation between the network services and adaptation of the agreed guidelines to the regional specificities are necessary. PMID:23752544

  14. Correlation of Foot Posture Index With Plantar Pressure and Radiographic Measurements in Pediatric Flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Su; Jeong, Jin Ook; Kwon, Na Yeon; Jeong, Sang Mi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between the Foot Posture Index (FPI) (including talar head palpation, curvature at the lateral malleoli, inversion/eversion of the calcaneus, talonavicular bulging, congruence of the medical longitudinal arch, and abduction/adduction of the forefoot on the rare foot), plantar pressure distribution, and pediatric flatfoot radiographic findings. Methods Nineteen children with flatfoot (age, 9.32±2.67 years) were included as the study group. Eight segments of plantar pressure were measured with the GaitView platform pressure pad and the FPI was measured in children. The four angles were measured on foot radiographs. We analyzed the correlation between the FPI, plantar pressure characteristics, and the radiographic angles in children with flatfoot. Results The ratio of hallux segment pressure and the second through fifth toe segment pressure was correlated with the FPI (r=0.385, p=0.017). The FPI was correlated with the lateral talo-first metatarsal angle (r=0.422, p=0.008) and calcaneal pitch (r=-0.411, p=0.01). Conclusion Our results show a correlation between the FPI and plantar pressure. The FPI and pediatric flatfoot radiography are useful tools to evaluate pediatric flatfoot. PMID:25750866

  15. The Impact of Elective Active-Learning Courses in Pregnancy/Lactation and Pediatric Pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Koerner, Pamela Hucko; Heasley, Jennifer; Kamal, Khalid M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To implement and evaluate the impact of 2 elective courses, Pregnancy & Lactation and Pediatrics on student acquisition of knowledge and development of lifelong learning skills related to these special populations. Design. Two 3-credit elective courses were implemented using various student-driven learning techniques, such as case-based exercises, group presentations, pro-con debates, and pharmacist “grab bag” questions. Strong emphasis was placed on medication literature retrieval and analysis, and a wiki was used to create an electronic resource for longitudinal use. Assessment. Pre- and post-course tests showed significant improvement in knowledge related to pregnancy, lactation, and pediatrics. Pre- and post-course confidence and ratings on satisfaction survey tools also revealed significant improvement in several domains relating to lifelong-learning skills, knowledge related to medication use within these special populations, use of technology to enhance learning, and overall course design. Conclusion. The combination of student-directed learning techniques used in 2 pediatric-concentration courses is an effective teaching model. PMID:22438598

  16. Modeling radiation dosimetry to predict cognitive outcomes in pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors including medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. . E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org; Kiehna, Erin N.; Li Chenghong; Shukla, Hemant; Sengupta, Saikat; Xiong Xiaoping; Gajjar, Amar; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Model the effects of radiation dosimetry on IQ among pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Pediatric patients with CNS embryonal tumors (n = 39) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before and after treatment with postoperative, risk-adapted craniospinal irradiation (CSI) and conformal primary-site irradiation, followed by chemotherapy. Differential dose-volume data for 5 brain volumes (total brain, supratentorial brain, infratentorial brain, and left and right temporal lobes) were correlated with IQ after surgery and at follow-up by use of linear regression. Results: When the dose distribution was partitioned into 2 levels, both had a significantly negative effect on longitudinal IQ across all 5 brain volumes. When the dose distribution was partitioned into 3 levels (low, medium, and high), exposure to the supratentorial brain appeared to have the most significant impact. For most models, each Gy of exposure had a similar effect on IQ decline, regardless of dose level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that radiation dosimetry data from 5 brain volumes can be used to predict decline in longitudinal IQ. Despite measures to reduce radiation dose and treatment volume, the volume that receives the highest dose continues to have the greatest effect, which supports current volume-reduction efforts.

  17. Pediatric Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Moran, Cassandra; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P Brian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review In immunocompromised hosts, invasive fungal infections are common and fatal. In the past decade, the antifungal armamentarium against invasive mycoses has expanded greatly. The purpose of this report is to review the most recent literature addressing the use of antifungal agents in children. Recent findings Most studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of antifungal agents are limited to adults. However, important progress has been made in describing the pharmacokinetics and safety of newer antifungal agents in children, including the echinocandins. Summary Dosage guidelines for newer antifungal agents are currently based on adult and limited pediatric data. Because important developmental pharmacology changes occur throughout childhood impacting the pharmacokinetics of these agents, antifungal studies specifically designed for children are necessary. PMID:19741525

  18. Moral Hazard in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Brunnquell, Donald; Michaelson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    "Moral hazard" is a term familiar in economics and business ethics that illuminates why rational parties sometimes choose decisions with bad moral outcomes without necessarily intending to behave selfishly or immorally. The term is not generally used in medical ethics. Decision makers such as parents and physicians generally do not use the concept or the word in evaluating ethical dilemmas. They may not even be aware of the precise nature of the moral hazard problem they are experiencing, beyond a general concern for the patient's seemingly excessive burden. This article brings the language and logic of moral hazard to pediatrics. The concept reminds us that decision makers in this context are often not the primary party affected by their decisions. It appraises the full scope of risk at issue when decision makers decide on behalf of others and leads us to separate, respect, and prioritize the interests of affected parties. PMID:27292845

  19. Idiopathic Polydactylous Longitudinal Erythronychia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical features of idiopathic polydactylous longitudinal erythronychia. Introduction: Longitudinal erythronychia presents as a linear red band on the nail plate. Idiopathic polydactylous longitudinal erythronychia is a rarely described manifestation of longitudinal erythronychia in which one or more linear red bands present on the nails of multiple digits without any associated subungual malignant tumor, dermatological condition, or systemic disease. Methods: As part of a total body skin examination, the fingernails and toenails were evaluated for linear red bands. Results: One or more asymptomatic linear red bands (longitudinal erythronychia) was observed on multiple digits of the hands in one percent (3 men of 134 men and 112 women) of patients examined during a period of 75 days. The author also noted similar changes of his own nails. Between 3 to 10 digits were affected. Multiple linear red bands per nail were usually narrow (less than 1mm wide), whereas a single band on a nail often ranged from 4 to 6mm wide. The intensity of an individual wider linear red band was position-dependent in three individuals in whom the distal portion appeared less prominent when the affected digit was held upward above the level of the patient's heart—pseudolongitudinal erythronychia. Other nail changes in these patients included distal subungual hyperkeratosis, fissuring at the free end of the nail, leukonychia, red lunula, and splinter hemorrhages. Discussion: Idiopathic polydactylous longitudinal erythronychia is a benign, usually asymptomatic, condition of undetermined etiology characterized by one or more linear red bands originating at the proximal nail fold or distal lunula and extending to the free edge of the nail. It appears to be more prevalent in men over 50 years of age and its incidence was noted to be one percent of adults attending a dermatology clinic. Patients are either unaware of the nail changes or seek medical attention because

  20. Cross-site evaluation of a comprehensive pediatric asthma project: the Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN).

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Meera; Mansfield, Carol; Smith, Lucia Rojas; Woodell, Carol; Darcy, Niamh; Ohadike, Yvonne U; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2011-11-01

    The Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN) initiative selected five sites that had high asthma burden and established asthma programs but were ready for greater program integration across schools, health care systems, and communities. MCAN supported a community-based approach that was tailored to the needs of each program site. As a result, each site was unique in its combination of interventions, but all sites served common goals of integration of care, incorporation of evidence-based programs, and improvement in knowledge, self-management, health, and quality of life. This case study of the MCAN cross-site evaluation discusses the challenges associated with evaluating interventions involving multiple stakeholders that have been adjusted to fit the unique needs of specific communities. The evaluation triangulates data from site-specific monitoring and evaluation data; site documents, site visits, and cross-site meetings; qualitative assessments of families, organizational partners, and other stakeholders; and quantitative data from a common instrument on health indicators before and after the intervention. The evaluation employs the RE-AIM framework--reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance--to assess the barriers and facilitators of translation from theory into practice. Our experience suggests trade-offs between rigor of evaluation and burden of assessment that have applicability for other community-based translational efforts. PMID:22068358

  1. Pediatric transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Absoud, Michael; Greenberg, Benjamin M; Lim, Ming; Lotze, Tim; Thomas, Terrence; Deiva, Kumaran

    2016-08-30

    Pediatric acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is an immune-mediated CNS disorder and contributes to 20% of children experiencing a first acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS). ATM must be differentiated from other presentations of myelopathy and may be the first presentation of relapsing ADS such as neuromyelitis optica (NMO) or multiple sclerosis (MS). The tenets of the diagnostic criteria for ATM established by the Transverse Myelitis Consortium Working Group can generally be applied in children; however, a clear sensory level may not be evident in some. MRI lesions are often centrally located with high T2 signal intensity involving gray and neighboring white matter. Longitudinally extensive ATM occurs in the majority. Asymptomatic lesions on brain MRI are seen in more than one-third and predict MS or NMO. The role of antibodies such as myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein in monophasic and relapsing ATM and their significance in therapeutic approaches remain unclear. ATM is a potentially devastating condition with variable outcome and presents significant cumulative demands on health and social care resources. Children generally have a better outcome than adults, with one-half making a complete recovery by 2 years. There is need for standardization of clinical assessment and investigation protocols to enable international collaborative studies to delineate prognostic factors for disability and relapse. There are no robust controlled trials in children or adults to inform optimal treatment of ATM, with one study currently open to recruitment. This review provides an overview of current knowledge of clinical features, investigative workup, pathogenesis, and management of ATM and suggests future directions. PMID:27572861

  2. Agreement between Therapists, Parents, Patients, and Independent Evaluators on Clinical Improvement in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Adam B.; Peris, Tara S.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Independent evaluators (IE) are used widely in clinical trials to make unbiased determinations of treatment response. By virtue of being kept blind to treatment condition, however, IEs are also kept unaware of many pertinent clinical details that are relevant for decisions about clinical improvement. In this study, agreement among…

  3. ‘I still don’t know diddly’: a longitudinal qualitative study of patients’ knowledge and distress while undergoing evaluation of incidental pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Donald R; Golden, Sara E; Ganzini, Linda; Hansen, Lissi; Slatore, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hundreds of thousands of incidental pulmonary nodules are detected annually in the United States, and this number will increase with the implementation of lung cancer screening. The lengthy period for active pulmonary nodule surveillance, often several years, is unique among cancer regimens. The psychosocial impact of longitudinal incidental nodule follow-up, however, has not been described. Aims: We sought to evaluate the psychosocial impact of longitudinal follow-up of incidental nodule detection on patients. Methods: Veterans who participated in our previous study had yearly follow-up qualitative interviews coinciding with repeat chest imaging. We used conventional content analysis to explore their knowledge of nodules and the follow-up plan, and their distress. Results: Seventeen and six veterans completed the year one and year two interviews, respectively. Over time, most patients continued to have inadequate knowledge of pulmonary nodules and the nodule follow-up plan. They desired and appreciated more information directly from their primary care provider, particularly about their lung cancer risk. Distress diminished over time for most patients, but it increased around the time of follow-up imaging for some, and a small number reported severe distress. Conclusions: In settings in which pulmonary nodules are commonly detected, including lung cancer screening programmes, resources to optimise patient-centred communication strategies that improve patients’ knowledge and reduce distress should be developed. PMID:26028564

  4. Pediatric dentist density and preventive care utilization for Medicaid children

    PubMed Central

    Heidenreich, James F.; Kim, Amy S.; Scott, JoAnna M.; Chi, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the relationship between county-level pediatric dentist density and dental care utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children in Washington State. Methods This is a cross-sectional analysis of 604,885 children ages 0-17 enrolled in the Washington State Medicaid Program for ≥11 months in 2012. The relationship between county-level pediatric dentist density, defined as the number of pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children, and preventive dental care utilization was evaluated using linear regression models. Results In 2012, 179 pediatric dentists practiced in 16 of the 39 counties in Washington. County-level pediatric dentist density varied from zero to 5.98 pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children. County-level preventive dental care utilization ranged from 32 percent to 81 percent, with 62 percent of Medicaid-enrolled children in Washington utilizing preventive dental services. After adjusting for confounders, county-level density was significantly associated with county-level dental care utilization (β=1.67, 95 percent CI=0.02, 3.32, p=0.047). Conclusions There is a significant relationship between pediatric dentist density and the proportion of Medicaid-enrolled children who utilize preventive dental care services. Policies aimed at improving pediatric oral health disparities should include strategies to increase the number of oral health care providers, including pediatric dentists, in geographic areas with large proportions of Medicaid-enrolled children. PMID:26314606

  5. The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench.

    PubMed

    Quammen, Cory W; Taylor Ii, Russell M; Krajcevski, Pavel; Mitran, Sorin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Superfine, Richard; Davis, Brad; Davis, Stephanie; Zdanski, Carlton

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Pediatric Airways Workbench (VPAW) is a patient-centered surgical planning software system targeted to pediatric patients with airway obstruction. VPAW provides an intuitive surgical planning interface for clinicians and supports quantitative analysis regarding prospective surgeries to aid clinicians deciding on potential surgical intervention. VPAW enables a full surgical planning pipeline, including importing DICOM images, segmenting the airway, interactive 3D editing of airway geometries to express potential surgical treatment planning options, and creating input files for offline geometric analysis and computational fluid dynamics simulations for evaluation of surgical outcomes. In this paper, we describe the VPAW system and its use in one case study with a clinician to successfully describe an intended surgery outcome. PMID:27046595

  6. Collaborative Screening of Psychiatric and Language Disorders in Pediatric Neurology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spratt, Eve G.; Anderson, Deborah; Pagano, Maria; Macias, Michelle

    This study evaluated 102 patients (ages 5 to 13) at the Medical University of South Carolina's Pediatric Neurology Clinic for incidence of psychiatric or language disorders. Parents completed the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC), the Child Behavior Checklist, and the Language Problems Scale; phone interviews were conducted to determine child…

  7. Evaluating the use of Floseal haemostatic matrix in the treatment of epistaxis: a prospective, control-matched longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Lau, Andrew S; Upile, Navdeep S; Lazarova, Lepa; Swift, Andrew C

    2016-09-01

    Epistaxis is a common cause of emergency admissions in ENT. The use of Floseal haemostatic matrix in the treatment of epistaxis has been investigated in a number of studies in North America. We aimed to report a UK-based experience in the context of the current UK management paradigm. The study was designed as a prospective, unrandomised, control-matched longitudinal study. Cases were matched to controls in order to reduce the risk of bias. The overall treatment success rate for Floseal was 75 %, similar to the rates reported by studies based in North America. Nasal packing carried a success rate of 85 % and there was no statistically significant difference between the success rates of both treatments. Anecdotally Floseal can also be used successfully in thrombocyctopenic patients. There was a trend towards a shorter length of stay in the Floseal group, but this was not statistically significant. The 7-day readmission rate was 10 % for both the groups. This controlled study demonstrates that Floseal has a similar treatment success rate to nasal packing and that there may be a trend towards a shorter length of stay. PMID:26920703

  8. Longitudinal Evaluation of Fatty Acid Metabolism in Normal and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat Hearts with Dynamic MicroSPECT Imaging

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Huesman, Ronald H.; Brennan, Kathleen M.; Boutchko, Rostyslav; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop radionuclide molecular imaging technologies using a clinical pinhole SPECT/CT scanner to quantify changes in cardiac metabolism using the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) as a model of hypertensive-related pathophysiology. This paper quantitatively compares fatty acid metabolism in hearts of SHR and Wistar-Kyoto normal rats as a function of age and thereby tracks physiological changes associated with the onset and progression of heart failure in the SHR model. The fatty acid analog, 123 I-labeled BMIPP, was used in longitudinal metabolic pinhole SPECT imaging studies performed every seven months for 21 months. The uniquenessmore » of this project is the development of techniques for estimating the blood input function from projection data acquired by a slowly rotating camera that is imaging fast circulation and the quantification of the kinetics of 123 I-BMIPP by fitting compartmental models to the blood and tissue time-activity curves.« less

  9. Longitudinal evaluation of restricted mouth opening (trismus) in patients following primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Scott, B; D'Souza, J; Perinparajah, N; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2011-03-01

    Trismus is a serious problem for some patients after oral and oropharyngeal cancer, and it has a detrimental impact on quality of life and function. We know of few published papers that include preoperative assessment in reports on the longitudinal outcomes of mouth opening after oral and oropharyngeal surgery. We prospectively measured mouth opening in patients who had primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancer from baseline to six months to find out the characteristics at baseline and at discharge of those who develop trismus at six months. Ninety-eight patients were eligible between February 2007 and March 2008, and 64 (65%) were recruited into the study. The range of mouth opening was measured on three occasions: before operation, on the ward before discharge from hospital, and at follow-up six months after operation. Using a criterion of 35 mm or less as an indication of trismus, 30% (19/63) had trismus before operation, 65% (37/57) at hospital discharge, and 54% (26/48) at six month follow-up. Patients at high risk of trismus were those with T stage 3 or 4 cancers who required free flap reconstruction and adjuvant radiotherapy; radiotherapy was the most significant factor at six months. Trismus at discharge was a prediction of trismus at six months. Interventions such as spatulas or a passive jaw mobiliser should be targeted at patients at high risk early in the postoperative phase. The efficacy of such interventions needs further research. PMID:20236743

  10. Impact of College-Administered Quality Practice Assessments: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Repeat Peer Assessments of Continuing Competence in Physiotherapists

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, Mary Jane; Campbell, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: The College of Physiotherapists of Ontario (CPO) developed its peer practice assessment (PA) process under statutory requirements for quality assurance. Each year, a small percentage of physiotherapists, most selected at random, undergo PA. To shed light on continuing competence, we report outcomes from physiotherapists who have had two PAs. Methods: Records were extracted for physiotherapists with two unrelated PAs. Demographic features, peer assessors' scores, and consequent outcome decisions were examined. Outcomes were examined cross-sectionally (vs. other PAs in the same time period) and longitudinally (within cohort). Results: Between 2004 and 2012, 117 Ontario physiotherapists underwent two unrelated PAs, typically 5–7 years apart. This cohort was representative of Ontario physiotherapists in terms of sex ratios, education, and years in practice. At the first PA (PA1), this cohort's outcomes were similar to those of other physiotherapists; at the second PA (PA2), they were better than others undergoing PA1 in the same period (p=0.02). The cohort's outcomes were better at PA2 than at PA1 (p<0.001). Conclusions: Physiotherapists are likely to meet professional standards in a repeat PA 5–7 years after an initial one. Additional research is required to identify risk factors for not meeting standards. The findings provide empirical evidence to guide ongoing development of the CPO's quality management program. PMID:25931670

  11. Teaching Prevention in Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tina L.; Greenberg, Larrie; Loeser, Helen; Keller, David

    2000-01-01

    Reviews methods of teaching preventive medicine in pediatrics and highlights innovative programs. Methods of teaching prevention in pediatrics include patient interactions, self-directed learning, case-based learning, small-group learning, standardized patients, computer-assisted instruction, the Internet, student-centered learning, and lectures.…

  12. Pediatric Odontogenic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Abrahams, Joshua M; McClure, Shawn A

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric odontogenic tumors are rare, and are often associated with impacted teeth. Although they can develop anywhere in the jaws, odontogenic tumors mainly occur in the posterior mandible. This article discusses the diagnosis and treatment of the most common pediatric odontogenic tumors, such as ameloblastoma, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, odontoma, and cementoblastoma. PMID:26614700

  13. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. PMID:26614703

  14. A flight-test and simulation evaluation of the longitudinal final approach and landing performance of an automatic system for a light wing loading STOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. C.; Hardy, G. H.; Hindson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive flight-test program of STOL operating systems for the terminal area, an automatic landing system was developed and evaluated for a light wing loading turboprop aircraft. The aircraft utilized an onboard advanced digital avionics system. Flight tests were conducted at a facility that included a STOL runway site with a microwave landing system. Longitudinal flight-test results were presented and compared with available (basically CTOL) criteria. These comparisons were augmented by results from a comprehensive simulation of the controlled aircraft which included representations of navigation errors that were encountered in flight and atmospheric disturbances. Acceptable performance on final approach and at touchdown was achieved by the autoland (automatic landing) system for the moderate winds and turbulence conditions encountered in flight. However, some touchdown performance goals were marginally achieved, and simulation results suggested that difficulties could be encountered in the presence of more extreme atmospheric conditions. Suggestions were made for improving performance under those more extreme conditions.

  15. Structural MRI of Pediatric Brain Development: What Have We Learned and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Giedd, Jay N.; Rapoport, Judith L.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows unprecedented access to the anatomy and physiology of the developing brain without the use of ionizing radiation. Over the past two decades, thousands of brain MRI scans from healthy youth and those with neuropsychiatric illness have been acquired and analyzed with respect to diagnosis, sex, genetics, and/or psychological variables such as IQ. Initial reports comparing size differences of various brain components averaged across large age spans have given rise to longitudinal studies examining trajectories of development over time and evaluations of neural circuitry as opposed to structures in isolation. Although MRI is still not of routine diagnostic utility for evaluation of pediatric neuropsychiatric disorders, patterns of typical versus atypical development have emerged that may elucidate pathologic mechanisms and suggest targets for intervention. In this review we summarize general contributions of structural MRI to our understanding of neurodevelopment in health and illness. PMID:20826305

  16. Pediatric Care Online: A Pediatric Point-of-Care Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Care Online is the American Academy of Pediatrics' point-of-care tool designed for health care providers. Pediatric Care Online builds on content from Red Book Online and Pediatric Patient Education and features Quick Reference topic pages for more than 250 pediatric health care topics. The multitude of resources available within Pediatric Care Online will be reviewed in this column, and a sample search will be used to illustrate the type of information available within this point-of-care pediatric resource. PMID:27054536

  17. Flight-Test Evaluation of the Longitudinal Stability and Control Characteristics of 0.5-Scale Models of the Fairchild Lark Pilotless-Aircraft Configuration. Static Longitudinal Stability of Models with Wing Flap Deflections of 0 Deg and 15 Deg, TED No. NACA 2387

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, David G.

    1947-01-01

    From flight tests of 0.5-scale models of the Fairchild Lark pilotless aircraft conducted at the flight test station of the Pilotless Aircraft Research Division at Wallops Island, Va., some evaluations of the static longitudinal stability were obtained by analysis of the short-period oscillations induced by the abrupt movement of the rudder elevators. The analysis shows that for the Lark configuration with wing flap deflections of 0 degrees and 15 degrees the static longitudinal stability decreases slightly up to the critical Mach number and than as the Mach number increases further the stability increases greatly.

  18. Evaluation of longitudinal dispersivity estimates from simulated forced- and natural-gradient tracer tests in heterogeneous aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2004-01-01

    We simulate three types of forced-gradient tracer tests (converging radial flow, unequal strength two well, and equal strength two well) and natural-gradient tracer tests in multiple realizations of heterogeneous two-dimensional aquifers with a hydraulic conductivity distribution characterized by a spherical variogram. We determine longitudinal dispersivities (??L) by analysis of forced-gradient test breakthrough curves at the pumped well and by spatial moment analysis of tracer concentrations during the natural-gradient tests. Results show that among the forced-gradient tests, a converging radial-flow test tends to yield the smallest ??L, an equal strength two-well test tends to yield the largest ??L, and an unequal strength two-well test tends to yield an intermediate value. This finding is qualitatively explained by considering the aquifer area sampled by a particular test. A converging radial-flow test samples a small area, and thus the tracer undergoes a low degree of spreading and mixing. An equal strength two-well test samples a much larger area, so the tracer is spread and mixed to a greater degree. Results also suggest that if the distance between the tracer source well and the pumped well is short relative to the lengths over which velocity is correlated, then the ??L estimate can be highly dependent on local heterogeneities in the vicinity of the wells. Finally, results indicate that ??L estimated from forced-gradient tracer tests can significantly underestimate the ??L needed to characterize solute dispersion under natural-gradient flow. Only a two-well tracer test with a large well separation in an aquifer with a low degree of heterogeneity can yield a value of ??L that characterizes natural-gradient tracer spreading. This suggests that a two-well test with a large well separation is the preferred forced-gradient test for characterizing solute dispersion under natural-gradient flow.

  19. Evaluating geographic imputation approaches for zip code level data: an application to a study of pediatric diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, James D; Liese, Angela D; Lawson, Andrew; Porter, Dwayne E; Puett, Robin C; Standiford, Debra; Liu, Lenna; Dabelea, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Background There is increasing interest in the study of place effects on health, facilitated in part by geographic information systems. Incomplete or missing address information reduces geocoding success. Several geographic imputation methods have been suggested to overcome this limitation. Accuracy evaluation of these methods can be focused at the level of individuals and at higher group-levels (e.g., spatial distribution). Methods We evaluated the accuracy of eight geo-imputation methods for address allocation from ZIP codes to census tracts at the individual and group level. The spatial apportioning approaches underlying the imputation methods included four fixed (deterministic) and four random (stochastic) allocation methods using land area, total population, population under age 20, and race/ethnicity as weighting factors. Data included more than 2,000 geocoded cases of diabetes mellitus among youth aged 0-19 in four U.S. regions. The imputed distribution of cases across tracts was compared to the true distribution using a chi-squared statistic. Results At the individual level, population-weighted (total or under age 20) fixed allocation showed the greatest level of accuracy, with correct census tract assignments averaging 30.01% across all regions, followed by the race/ethnicity-weighted random method (23.83%). The true distribution of cases across census tracts was that 58.2% of tracts exhibited no cases, 26.2% had one case, 9.5% had two cases, and less than 3% had three or more. This distribution was best captured by random allocation methods, with no significant differences (p-value > 0.90). However, significant differences in distributions based on fixed allocation methods were found (p-value < 0.0003). Conclusion Fixed imputation methods seemed to yield greatest accuracy at the individual level, suggesting use for studies on area-level environmental exposures. Fixed methods result in artificial clusters in single census tracts. For studies focusing on

  20. Evaluation of Helicobacter Pylori eradication in pediatric patients by triple therapy plus lactoferrin and probiotics compared to triple therapy alone

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate whether the addition of a probiotic could improve Helicobacter pylori (H.P.) eradication rates and reduce the side effects of treatment in children. Methods Between July 2008 and July 2011 all patients with a clinical, laboratory and endoscopic diagnosis of H.P. positive gastritis referred to our Unit were included in the study. Patients suffering from allergy to any of drugs used in the study, with previous attempts to eradicate H.P. and those who received antibiotics, PPIs or probiotics within 4 weeks were excluded from the present study. Patients were randomized into two therapy regimens (group A and B): both groups received standard triple treatment (omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin) while only group B patients were also given a probiotic (Probinul - Cadigroup). Patients compliance was evaluated at the end of the treatment. Successful eradication was defined as a negative 13 C-urea breath test (C13-ubt) result four weeks after therapy discontinuation. Results A total of 68 histopathologically proven H.P.-infection children (32 male and 36 females) were included in the study. All of the patients in both groups used more than 90% of the therapies and no patients were lost at follow up. All side effects were selflimiting and disappeared once the therapy was terminated. Epigastric pain was observed in 6 (17.6%) group A vs 2 (5.8%) group B patients (P<0.05), nausea in 3 (8.8%) group A vs 1 (2.9%) group B patients (P<0.05); vomiting and diarrhea were observed in 2(5.8%) and 8 (23.5%) group A patients, respectively and never in group B (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of constipation (5.8% in group A and B). Four weeks after the completion of therapy, 56/68 patients (82.3%) tested negative for H.P. on C13-ubt. H.P. was eradicated in 26 patients (76.4%) in group A and in 30 patients (88.2%) in group B. There was no significantly difference in the rate of H.P. eradication between group A and

  1. Evaluation of the Bladder Stimulation Technique to Collect Midstream Urine in Infants in a Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Antoine; Demonchy, Diane; Caci, Hervé; Desmontils, Jonathan; Montaudie-Dumas, Isabelle; Bensaïd, Ronny; Haas, Hervé; Berard, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Objective Midstream clean-catch urine is an accepted method to diagnose urinary tract infection but is impracticable in infants before potty training. We tested the bladder stimulation technique to obtain a clean-catch urine sample in infants. Materials and methods We included 142 infants under walking age who required a urine sample in a cross- sectional study carried out during a 3-months period, from September to November 2014, in the emergency department of the University Children’s Hospital of Nice (France). A technique based on bladder stimulation and lumbar stimulation maneuvers, with at least two attempts, was tested by four trained physicians. The success rate and time to obtain urine sample within 3 minutes were evaluated. Discomfort (EVENDOL score ≥4/15) was measured. We estimated the risk factors in the failure of the technique. Chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test were used to compare frequencies. T-test and Wilcoxon test were used to compare quantitative data according to the normality of the distribution. Risk factors for failure of the technique were evaluated using a multivariate logistic regression model. Results We obtained midstream clean-catch urine in 55.6% of infants with a median time of 52.0 s (10.0; 110.0). The success rate decreased with age from 88.9% (newborn) to 28.6% (>1 y) (p = 0.0001) and with weight, from 85.7% (<4kg) to 28.6% (>10kg) (p = 0.0004). The success rate was 60.8% for infants without discomfort (p<0.0001). Heavy weight and discomfort were associated with failure, with adjusted ORs of 1.47 [1.04–2.31] and 6.65 [2.85–15.54], respectively. Conclusion Bladder stimulation seems to be efficient in obtaining midstream urine with a moderate success rate in our study sample. This could be an alternative technique for infants before potty training but further randomized multicenter studies are needed to validate this procedure. PMID:27031953

  2. Pediatric surgeons on the Internet: a multi-institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Wulkan, M L; Smith, S D; Whalen, T V; Hardin, W D

    1997-04-01

    An estimated 24 million people, or 11% of the North American population over 16 years of age, use the Internet. An estimated 40% of households have computers, and 37 million people have Internet access. The experience of three pediatric surgery Internet sites are reviewed to evaluate current practices and future potential of the Internet to practicing pediatric surgeons. The sites reviewed are the Pediatric Surgery Bulletin Board System (BBS), the Pediatric Surgery List Server, and the Pediatric Surgery Website. Statistics were collected at each site to characterize the number of users, traffic load, topics of interest, and times of peak use. There are currently 79 subscribers to the Pediatric Surgery BBS and 100 subscribers to the Pediatric Surgery List Server. The average user of the BBS is a young man who has placed an average of 52 calls to the BBS since joining. There have been 1413 Internet electronic mail messages sent. Twenty-five percent of the traffic has been related to clinical problems and 5% to research, teaching, and career issues. Traffic at this site has been increasing exponentially with most of the dialogue concentrated on clinical issues and problem cases. In a 3-month period the Pediatric Surgery Website received 16,270 hits. The most commonly accessed areas include an electronic mail directory, case studies, the job board, information on the pediatric surgical residency, and information on upcoming meetings. Pediatric surgeons are exploring the Internet and using available pediatric surgery resources. The scope of professional information available to pediatric surgeons on the Internet is still limited but is increasing rapidly. The Internet will impact the way physicians practice medicine through education and communication. PMID:9126766

  3. Pediatric Cardiovascular Clinical Trials: An Analysis of ClinicalTrials.gov and the Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Drug Labeling Database

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Kevin D.; Henderson, Heather T.; Hornik, Christoph P.; Li, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent regulatory initiatives in the United States and Europe have transformed the pediatric clinical trials landscape by significantly increasing capital investment and pediatric trial volume. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the impact of these initiatives on the pediatric cardiovascular trials landscape when compared to other pediatric sub-specialties. We also evaluate factors that may have contributed to the success or failure of recent major pediatric cardiovascular trials so as to inform the optimal design and conduct of future trials in the field. PMID:26377725

  4. Evaluating complications of local anesthesia administration and reversal with phentolamine mesylate in a portable pediatric dental clinic.

    PubMed

    Boynes, Sean G; Riley, Amah E; Milbee, Sarah; Bastin, Meghan R; Price, Maylyn E; Ladson, Andrea

    2013-08-01

    This study sought to identify and quantify complications with local anesthetic administration and reversal on consecutive patients seen for comprehensive dental care in a school-based, portable dental clinic, and includes data on the patients seen by the participating portable dental providers. In 923 dental visits where local anesthetic was administered, a standardized form was used to gain further information and identify any complications; this was accompanied by a questionnaire for the student's teacher, in order to quantify the student's distraction and disruption ratings following the dental visit. After statistical analysis of the 923 consecutive cases, the overall complication rate was 5.3%. All of the complications were considered to be mild or moderate, and there were no severe event reports. The complications encountered most frequently (n = 49) were associated with self-inflicted soft tissue injury. The results of this study indicate that comprehensive care with local anesthesia delivered by a school-based portable dental clinic has a low risk of complications. Whereas safe administration of dental care is achievable with or without phentolamine mesylate as a local anesthetic reversal agent, its use was determined to improve safety outcomes. Three factors appeared to directly increase the incidence of complications: the administration of an inferior alveolar nerve block, attention deficit disorder, and obesity. Teacher evaluations demonstrated that children receiving care by a portable dental team were able to reorient back to classwork and were not disruptive to classmates. PMID:23928444

  5. Hearing stimulation of the pediatric patient with congenital aural atresia: surgical and audiological evaluation of 38 patients.

    PubMed

    Kuşcu, Oğuz; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Bajin, Münir Demir; Sözen, Tevfik; Ünal, Ömer Faruk; Akyol, Umut

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work is to stress the importance of and discuss the timing and options for the treatment of congenital aural atresia (CAA), including non-surgical alternative treatment modalities and amplification, and to report the audiological and surgical results of a series of patients. Thirty-eight children with CAA were evaluated with regard to hearing and anatomical anomalies accompanying CAA: the state of the ossicles and the facial nerve, postoperative complications and audiological results. The ages of the patients ranged between 4 and 18 years, with a mean of 10 years. All underwent surgical treatment; 32 had unilateral atresia, while 6 had bilateral atresia. The mean follow-up duration was 7 months. The facial canal was dehiscent in 36.8% of cases. In 70.2% cases, the malleus and incus were present as an ossicular mass, fixed and attached to the atretic bone. The stapes was normal in 97.3% of the patients; in 2.7% the suprastructure was deformed. The success rate, defined as an air-bone gap of 20 dB or less, was 63.1% in this series of patients. If atresia is bilateral, very early hearing stimulation to prevent the maldevelopment of children's speech and cognitive skills is of the utmost importance. In unilateral cases, surgery may be postponed until early adulthood, when the patient is able to make his/her own decision and cooperate in the treatment and postoperative aspects. PMID:25818960

  6. Impact Evaluation of Enabling Mothers to Prevent Pediatric Obesity through Web-Based Education and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) Randomized Control Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowlden, Adam P.; Sharma, Manoj; Cottrell, Randall R.; Wilson, Bradley R. A.; Johnson, Marcus Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background. The family and home environment is an influential antecedent of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to pilot test The Enabling Mothers to Prevent Pediatric Obesity through Web-Based Education and Reciprocal Determinism (EMPOWER) intervention; a newly developed, theory-based, online program for prevention of childhood…

  7. Priorities in pediatric epilepsy research

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Christine B.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Vickrey, Barbara G.; Dlugos, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    The Priorities in Pediatric Epilepsy Research workshop was held in the spirit of patient-centered and patient-driven mandates for developing best practices in care, particularly for epilepsy beginning under age 3 years. The workshop brought together parents, representatives of voluntary advocacy organizations, physicians, allied health professionals, researchers, and administrators to identify priority areas for pediatric epilepsy care and research including implementation and testing of interventions designed to improve care processes and outcomes. Priorities highlighted were 1) patient outcomes, especially seizure control but also behavioral, academic, and social functioning; 2) early and accurate diagnosis and optimal treatment; 3) role and involvement of parents (communication and shared decision-making); and 4) integration of school and community organizations with epilepsy care delivery. Key factors influencing pediatric epilepsy care included the child's impairments and seizure presentation, parents, providers, the health care system, and community systems. Care was represented as a sequential process from initial onset of seizures to referral for comprehensive evaluation when needed. We considered an alternative model in which comprehensive care would be utilized from onset, proactively, rather than reactively after pharmacoresistance became obvious. Barriers, including limited levels of evidence about many aspects of diagnosis and management, access to care—particularly epilepsy specialty and behavioral health care—and implementation, were identified. Progress hinges on coordinated research efforts that systematically address gaps in knowledge and overcoming barriers to access and implementation. The stakes are considerable, and the potential benefits for reduced burden of refractory epilepsy and lifelong disabilities may be enormous. PMID:23966254

  8. Plasma substitutes therapy in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, Domenico; De Luca, Daniele; Tosi, Federica; Luca, Ersilia; Cavaliere, Franco; Conti, Giorgio; Piastra, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Hypovolemia is the most common cause of circulatory failure in children and may lead to critical tissue perfusion and eventually multiple-organ failure. Administration of fluids to maintain or restore intravascular volume represents a common intervention after hemorrhagic shock occurring during surgical procedures or in patients with trauma. Notwithstanding, there is uncertainty whether the type of fluid may significantly influence the outcome, especially in pediatrics. Both human albumin and crystalloids are usually administered: the advantages of crystalloids include low cost, lack of effect on coagulation, no risk of anaphylactic reaction or transmission of infectious agents. However, large amount of crystalloid infusion has been correlated with pulmonary oedema, bilateral pleural effusions, intestinal intussusception, excessive bowel edema, impairing closure of surgical wounds and peripheral edema. Moreover, intravascular volume expansion obtained by crystalloids is known to be significantly shorter and less efficacious than colloids. Among synthetic colloids, gelatins have been used for many years in children, also in early infancy, to treat intravascular fluid deficits. Hydroxyethylstarch (HES) preparations have been introduced recently, becoming very popular for vascular loading both in adults and children. However, the number of pediatric studies aimed at evaluating HES efficacy and tolerance is limited. Given the ongoing controversies on the use of colloids in childhood, this review will focus on the pharmacodynamics of synthetic and non synthetic colloids for the treatment of critical blood loss in pediatrics. PMID:22512388

  9. Odontogenic lesions in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fang, Qi-Gen; Shi, Shuang; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-05-01

    The purpose was to evaluate our 20-year experience of pediatric odontogenic lesions. Pediatric patients with a diagnosis of odontogenic lesion were identified. Three hundred ten patients were odontogenic; dentigerous cyst was seen in 62.0% of the cases. Most (70.2%) of them occurred in mixed dentition period, and it had a male preponderance. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor occurred in the permanent dentition period. It had an equal site distribution. Odontoma was seen in 20.0% of the cases. Its site of predilection was the mandible. Ameloblastoma was the most common odontogenic tumor. Most of the cases occurred in the permanent dentition period. It affected the male and female equally. Calcifying epithelioma odontogenic tumor was seen in 11.8% of the cases. All the lesions occurred in the primary dentition period. It had no sex or site preponderance. Myxoma was seen in 3.6% of the cases. It was most common in the permanent dentition period, and it was more frequent in the male. Iliac crest bone graft was successfully performed in 28 patients, postoperative infection occurred in 2 patients, and no donor-site dysfunctions were reported. The observed differences in lesion type and distribution in this study compared with previous researches may be attributable to genetic and geographic variation in the populations studied. Iliac crest bone graft was suggested for pediatric mandible reconstruction. PMID:24785745

  10. Patterns of Pediatric Maxillofacial Injuries.

    PubMed

    Bede, Salwan Yousif Hanna; Ismael, Waleed Khaleel; Al-Assaf, Dhuha

    2016-05-01

    Facial trauma in children and adolescents is reported to range from 1% to 30%. Because of many anatomical, physiological, and psychological characteristics of the pediatric population, maxillofacial injuries in children should be treated with special consideration that is attributable to certain features inherent in facial growth patterns of children. This study evaluated maxillofacial injuries in 726 children in terms of incidence, patterns of injury, causes, and treatment modalities and compared these parameters among 3 pediatric age groups. Intergroup differences were analyzed using Z test for 2 populations' proportion. The results showed that the incidence of pediatric maxillofacial injuries and fractures is higher than that reported elsewhere with male predominance. Soft tissue injuries are more frequently encountered in younger individuals, whereas the incidence of skeletal injuries increases with age. This study also revealed that certain etiologies, namely road traffic accidents, violence, bicycle, missiles, and industrial injures, increase with age; on the other hand, falls and puncture wounds are more common in younger children. PMID:27100637

  11. Evaluation of a Public Child Eye Health Tertiary Facility for Pediatric Cataract in Southern Nigeria I: Visual Acuity Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Roseline E.; Adio, Adedayo; Oparah, Sidney K.; Odey, Friday; Eyo, Okon A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A retrospective study of the outcome of congenital and developmental cataract surgery was conducted in a public child eye health tertiary facility in children <16 years of age in Southern Nigeria, as part of an evaluation. Materials and Method: Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery with or without anterior vitrectomy was performed. The outcome measures were visual acuity (VA) and change (gain) in visual acuity. The age of the child at onset, duration of delay in presentation, ocular co-morbidity, non ocular co-morbidity, gender, and pre operative visual acuity were matched with postoperative visual acuity. A total of 66 children were studied for a period of six weeks following surgery. Results: Forty eight (72.7%) children had bilateral congenital cataracts and 18 (27.3%) children had bilateral developmental cataracts. There were 38(57.6%) males and 28 (42.4%) females in the study. Thirty Five (53%) children had good visual outcome (normal vision range 6/6/ -6/18) post-operatively. The number of children with blindness (vision <3/60) decreased from 61 (92.4%) pre-operatively to 4 (6.1%) post-operatively. Post operative complication occurred in 6.8% of cases six week after surgery. Delayed presentation had an inverse relationship with change (gain) in visual acuity (r = - 0.342; p-value = 0.005). Pre-operative visual acuity had a positive relationship with post operative change (gain) in visual acuity (r = 0.618; p-value = 0.000). Conclusion: Predictors of change in visual acuity in our study were; delayed presentation and pre-operative VA. Cataract surgery in children showed clinical benefit. PMID:27347247

  12. The COMPASS study: a longitudinal hierarchical research platform for evaluating natural experiments related to changes in school-level programs, policies and built environment resources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Few researchers have the data required to adequately understand how the school environment impacts youth health behaviour development over time. Methods/Design COMPASS is a prospective cohort study designed to annually collect hierarchical longitudinal data from a sample of 90 secondary schools and the 50,000+ grade 9 to 12 students attending those schools. COMPASS uses a rigorous quasi-experimental design to evaluate how changes in school programs, policies, and/or built environment (BE) characteristics are related to changes in multiple youth health behaviours and outcomes over time. These data will allow for the quasi-experimental evaluation of natural experiments that will occur within schools over the course of COMPASS, providing a means for generating “practice based evidence” in school-based prevention programming. Discussion COMPASS is the first study with the infrastructure to robustly evaluate the impact that changes in multiple school-level programs, policies, and BE characteristics within or surrounding a school might have on multiple youth health behaviours or outcomes over time. COMPASS will provide valuable new insight for planning, tailoring and targeting of school-based prevention initiatives where they are most likely to have impact. PMID:24712314

  13. Evaluation of survival and success rates of dental implants reported in longitudinal studies with a follow-up period of at least 10 years: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Moraschini, V; Poubel, L A da C; Ferreira, V F; Barboza, E dos S P

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the survival and success rates of osseointegrated implants determined in longitudinal studies that conducted a follow-up of at least 10 years. A broad electronic search was conducted in MEDLINE/PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for relevant publications in indexed journals, evaluating the clinical performance of dental implants. Using inclusion and exclusion criteria, two reviewers analyzed titles, abstracts, and complete articles, prioritizing studies of the randomized clinical trial type. A total of 23 articles were included in this review. Ten prospective studies, nine retrospective studies, and four randomized clinical trials, which evaluated 7711 implants, were selected. The mean follow-up time of the studies included was 13.4 years. All of the studies reported survival rates and mean marginal bone resorption values, with cumulative mean values of 94.6% and 1.3mm, respectively. Fourteen studies related success rates. Taking into consideration the disparate outcome measures employed to assess dental implant performance and within the limitations of this systematic review, we may affirm that osseointegrated implants are safe and present high survival rates and minimal marginal bone resorption in the long term. PMID:25467739

  14. Longitudinal in vivo evaluation of bone regeneration by combined measurement of multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT for tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienemann, Philipp S.; Metzger, Stéphanie; Kiveliö, Anna-Sofia; Blanc, Alain; Papageorgiou, Panagiota; Astolfo, Alberto; Pinzer, Bernd R.; Cinelli, Paolo; Weber, Franz E.; Schibli, Roger; Béhé, Martin; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Over the last decades, great strides were made in the development of novel implants for the treatment of bone defects. The increasing versatility and complexity of these implant designs request for concurrent advances in means to assess in vivo the course of induced bone formation in preclinical models. Since its discovery, micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) has excelled as powerful high-resolution technique for non-invasive assessment of newly formed bone tissue. However, micro-CT fails to provide spatiotemporal information on biological processes ongoing during bone regeneration. Conversely, due to the versatile applicability and cost-effectiveness, single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) would be an ideal technique for assessing such biological processes with high sensitivity and for nuclear imaging comparably high resolution (<1 mm). Herein, we employ modular designed poly(ethylene glycol)-based hydrogels that release bone morphogenetic protein to guide the healing of critical sized calvarial bone defects. By combined in vivo longitudinal multi-pinhole SPECT and micro-CT evaluations we determine the spatiotemporal course of bone formation and remodeling within this synthetic hydrogel implant. End point evaluations by high resolution micro-CT and histological evaluation confirm the value of this approach to follow and optimize bone-inducing biomaterials.

  15. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Y; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory neurologic disease that is challenging to diagnose and treat. Although there are many clinical parallels between pediatric-onset MS and adult-onset MS, there is also accumulating evidence of distinguishing clinical features that may, in part, arise from development-specific, neuroimmune processes governing MS pathogenesis in children. Here the authors describe the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric MS, with a particular focus on describing clinical features and highlighting new developments that promise a better understanding of pediatric MS pathogenesis. An important task that lies ahead for pediatric neurologists is better understanding the early gene-environment interaction that precipitates the first demyelinating event in pediatric MS. This area is of particular importance for understanding the MS etiology and the natural history of pediatric MS. Such understanding should in turn inform new developments in diagnostic tools, long-term therapies, and much-needed biomarkers. Such biomarkers are not only valuable for defining the disease onset, but also for monitoring both the treatment response and a disease evolution that spans multiple decades in children with MS. PMID:27116721

  16. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  17. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  18. Pediatric ventricular assist devices.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Iki; Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-12-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children-HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  19. Pediatric ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-01-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children—HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  20. Pediatric autonomic disorders.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Felicia B; Chelimsky, Gisela G; Weese-Mayer, Debra E

    2006-07-01

    The scope of pediatric autonomic disorders is not well recognized. The goal of this review is to increase awareness of the expanding spectrum of pediatric autonomic disorders by providing an overview of the autonomic nervous system, including the roles of its various components and its pervasive influence, as well as its intimate relationship with sensory function. To illustrate further the breadth and complexities of autonomic dysfunction, some pediatric disorders are described, concentrating on those that present at birth or appear in early childhood. PMID:16818580

  1. Adult Students' Achievement Goal Orientations and Evaluations of the Learning Environment: A Person-Centred Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulkka, Antti-Tuomas; Niemivirta, Markku

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the stability and change in students' achievement goal orientations and whether the students' perceptions of the learning environment vary as a function of their achievement goal orientations. Participants were 169 students of the Finnish National Defense University. The students' goal orientations and their evaluations of…

  2. Clinical characteristics and evaluation of LDL-cholesterol treatment of the Spanish Familial Hypercholesterolemia Longitudinal Cohort Study (SAFEHEART)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients are at high risk for premature coronary heart disease (CHD). Despite the use of statins, most patients do not achieve an optimal LDL-cholesterol goal. The aims of this study are to describe baseline characteristics and to evaluate Lipid Lowering Therapy (L...

  3. A Longitudinal Evaluation of Mathematical Computational Abilities of New Hampshire's Eighth Graders: 1963-1967, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Gilbert R.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of using different mathematics textbooks on the mathematical computational ability of students as a method of assessing the effectiveness of different mathematics instruction. This study resulted from a 1963 report which discussed the results of the New Hampshire Statewide Eighth Grade Testing…

  4. Longitudinal Echocardiographic Evaluation of an Unusual Presentation of X-Linked Myxomatous Valvular Dystrophy Caused by Filamin A Mutation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peter H; Sachdeva, Ritu; Wilson, Elizabeth C; Guzzetta, Nina A

    2016-09-01

    Polyvalvar myxomatous valve degeneration is a clinical pathology rarely encountered during cardiac anesthesia, but, when present, most commonly occurs in the context of a connective tissue disorder. Filamin A mutations have begun to be recognized as a source of progressive myxomatous mitral and tricuspid valve degeneration. These lesions can be diagnosed by echo, but their clinical presentation can be equivocal. We present a patient with significant echocardiographic findings of mitral and tricuspid valvar regurgitation, aortic dilatation, and intraoperative findings of aortic ectasia. In our case, a detailed family history led to a preoperative echocardiogram revealing myxomatous mitral and tricuspid valve degeneration with significant regurgitation and aortic dilatation. Genetic evaluation led to the diagnosis of a Filamin A mutation. Pre- and postrepair echocardiographic assessments of valvar function played a key role in the management of this patient. Continued surveillance of his aortic dilation and evaluation of postrepair valve function warrants close follow-up with a high likelihood for further surgical intervention. PMID:27004951

  5. An evaluation of the use of new Doppler methods for detecting longitudinal function abnormalities in a pacing-induced heart failure model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabata, Tomotsugu; Cardon, Lisa A.; Armstrong, Guy P.; Fukamach, Kiyotaka; Takagaki, Masami; Ochiai, Yoshie; McCarthy, Patrick M.; Thomas, James D.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity have proven useful in evaluating cross-sections of patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, but experience with serial changes is limited. Purpose and methods: We tested their use by evaluating the temporal changes of LV function in a pacing-induced congestive heart failure model. Rapid ventricular pacing was initiated and maintained in 20 dogs for 4 weeks. Echocardiography was performed at baseline and weekly during brief pacing cessation. RESULTS: With rapid pacing, LV volume significantly increased and ejection fraction (57%-28%), stroke volume (37-18 mL), and mitral annulus systolic velocity (16.1-6.6 cm/s) by Doppler tissue echocardiography significantly decreased, with ejection fraction and mitral annulus systolic velocity closely correlated (r = 0.706, P <.0001). In contrast to the mitral inflow velocities, mitral annulus early diastolic velocity decreased steadily (12.3-7.3 cm/s) resulting in a dramatic decrease in mitral annulus early/late (1.22-0.57) diastolic velocity with no tendency toward pseudonormalization. The color M-mode Doppler flow propagation velocity also showed significant steady decrease (57-24 cm/s) throughout the pacing period. Multiple regression analysis chose mitral annulus systolic velocity (r = 0.895, P <.0001) and propagation velocity (r = 0.782, P <.0001) for the most important factor predicting LV systolic and diastolic function, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Doppler tissue echocardiography and color M-mode Doppler flow could evaluate the serial deterioration in LV dysfunction throughout the pacing period. These were more useful in quantifying progressive LV dysfunction than conventional ehocardiographic techniques, and were probably relatively independent of preload. These techniques could be suitable for longitudinal evaluation in addition to the cross-sectional study.

  6. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduced appetite Alternate Names Congenital heart surgery - discharge; Patent ductus arteriosus ligation - discharge; Hypoplastic left heart repair - ... of the aorta Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery Patent ductus arteriosus Pediatric heart surgery Tetralogy of Fallot ...

  7. American Academy of Pediatrics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bright Futures Medical Home Clinical Support Pediatric Care Online Patient Education Online Bright Futures Medical Home Connected Kids Red Book ... Finding a Job Career Support Professional Education PediaLink/Online Education Maintenance of Certification Professional Education Publications MOC | ...

  8. Pediatric oncology in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Shamvil

    2012-03-01

    Pediatric oncology in Pakistan has developed over last decade with substantial increase in the facility for treatment and number of expertise. Though large numbers of children still do not reach treatment center more children have now access to quality cancer treatment. There has been gradual improvement in Pediatric oncology nursing and allied services. Pediatric Palliative care in Pakistan is in initial phase of development. Pediatric Oncology services are largely supported by philanthropists. Children Cancer Hospital a project of Children Cancer Foundation Pakistan Trust is not only providing quality treatment to every child regardless of paying ability but also playing a pivotal role in capacity building and creating awareness about childhood cancer in Pakistan. PMID:22357147

  9. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... to make progress in “immunogenomics” Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  10. Pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Marco; Riva, Silvia; Maggiore, Giuseppe; Cintorino, Davide; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    In previous decades, pediatric liver transplantation has become a state-of-the-art operation with excellent success and limited mortality. Graft and patient survival have continued to improve as a result of improvements in medical, surgical and anesthetic management, organ availability, immunosuppression, and identification and treatment of postoperative complications. The utilization of split-liver grafts and living-related donors has provided more organs for pediatric patients. Newer immunosuppression regimens, including induction therapy, have had a significant impact on graft and patient survival. Future developments of pediatric liver transplantation will deal with long-term follow-up, with prevention of immunosuppression-related complications and promotion of as normal growth as possible. This review describes the state-of-the-art in pediatric liver transplantation. PMID:19222089

  11. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sprue Association/USA Gluten Intoloerance Group of North America NASPGHAN Foundation Supporters Educational support for the NASPGHAN ... NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic Esophagitis Pediatric IBD Nutrition & Obesity Reflux & GERD Research & Grants Our Supporters Site Map © ...

  12. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... after the baby is born. For others, your child may be able to safely wait for months ...

  13. NIH Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic

    MedlinePlus

    ... patients without discrimination on the basis of race, religion, ethnic group, citizenship, or residence. We can provide ... studies to help understand pediatric rheumatic diseases. Natural history studies, for example, are designed to study how ...

  14. Pediatric Arm Function Test

    PubMed Central

    Uswatte, Gitendra; Taub, Edward; Griffin, Angi; Rowe, Jan; Vogtle, Laura; Barman, Joydip

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although there are several validated upper-extremity measures in young children with cerebral palsy (CP), none primarily assess capacity to carry out actions and tasks with the more-affected arm. To address this need, we developed the Pediatric Arm Function Test (PAFT), which involves behavioral observation of how children use their more-affected arm during structured play in the laboratory or clinic. This paper evaluates the reliability and validity of the PAFT Functional Ability scale. Design In Study 1, 20 children between 2–8 years with a wide range of upper-extremity hemiparesis due to CP completed the PAFT on two occasions separated by three weeks. In Study 2, 41 children between 2–6 years with similar characteristics completed the PAFT and received a grade reflecting severity of more-affected arm motor impairment. Results In Study 1, the PAFT test-retest reliability correlation coefficient was 0.74. In Study 2, convergent validity was supported by a strong, inverse correlation (r = −0.6, p < .001) between PAFT scores and grade of impairment. Conclusions The PAFT Functional Ability scale is a reliable and valid measure of more-affected arm motor capacity in children with CP between 2–6 years. It can be employed to measure upper-extremity neurorehabilitation outcome. PMID:23103486

  15. Integrative Nutrition for Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, Jessi; Hall, Amanda; Dean, Amy; Godwin, Bridget; Mascarenhas, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Food is essential for life. Yet, poor food choices may cause poor health. Dietary manipulation is frequently integrated into the management of common chronic pediatric conditions. Parents seek dietary information to have more control over child's condition and to avoid side effects of medicine. This article reviews selected diets for a few common pediatric disorders including eczema, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, headache and migraine, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:26832886

  16. Correlative pediatric imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, I.; Delbeke, D.; Sandler, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear medicine, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are considered ideal imaging modalities for pediatric patients. The future is even more promising for pediatric imaging with the development of newer and improved radiopharmaceuticals, instrumentation and diagnostic modalities such as positron emission tomography, labeled monoclonal antibodies, and faster dynamic and contrast enhanced MRI methods. However, correlation of more conventional imaging modalities with nuclear medicine, ultrasound and MRI remain essential for optimal patient care. 43 references.

  17. Pediatric upper gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Odgren, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal examinations are common procedures in many radiology departments. Performing this examination on pediatric patients requires understanding the formation of the gastrointestinal tract and the various disease processes and anatomical variances that can occur. The examination also requires a thorough patient history. This article discusses embryologic development and anatomy of the small bowel and colon, disease processes and conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and fluoroscopic upper gastrointestinal tract examinations performed on the pediatric and neonatal patient. PMID:24806054

  18. Pediatric genetic disorders of lens

    PubMed Central

    Nihalani, Bharti R.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric genetic disorders of lens include various cataractous and non-cataractous anomalies. The purpose of this review is to help determine the genetic cause based on the lens appearance, ocular and systemic associations. Children with bilateral cataracts require a comprehensive history, ophthalmic and systemic examination to guide further genetic evaluation. With advancements in genetics, it is possible to determine the genetic mutations and assess phenotype genotype correlation in different lens disorders. The genetic diagnosis helps the families to better understand the disorder and develop realistic expectations as to the course of their child's disorder.

  19. Teaching pediatric residents about child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Dubowitz, H; Black, M

    1991-10-01

    Child maltreatment is a growing problem faced by pediatricians; however, there are many deficiencies in pediatricians' relevant knowledge and skills. Residency programs typically have included limited teaching in the area of child maltreatment. Fifty pediatric residents participated in an evaluation of a model educational course in child maltreatment developed by an interdisciplinary faculty. The course resulted in significant short-term improvements in knowledge and skills as well as a greater sense of competence in managing cases of child maltreatment. The importance of teaching pediatric residents about the "new morbidity" is discussed. PMID:1939686

  20. A review of non-cystic fibrosis pediatric bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Boren, Eric J; Teuber, Suzanne S; Gershwin, M Eric

    2008-04-01

    With the implementation of vaccination programs and the use of antibiotics, developed countries have seen a decline in infection-related pediatric bronchiectasis. However, significant morbidity from bronchiectasis is still seen and both infectious and noninfectious causes of bronchiectasis in the pediatric population remain. A review of the literature will be presented including causes of pediatric bronchiectasis, clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory evaluation and imaging, as well as treatment options. This review stresses the importance of early evaluation and treatment in children with recurrent cough, sinusitis, potential foreign-body aspiration, or gastroesophageal reflux to prevent the complications of ongoing respiratory disease and bronchiectasis. PMID:18330730

  1. Common problems in pediatric gynecology: new developments.

    PubMed

    Mroueh, J; Muram, D

    1999-10-01

    Physicians, particularly gynecologists, pediatricians and family practitioners, are often called upon to perform a gynecological evaluation of a child. The following article is a review of current developments in the area of pediatric and adolescent gynecology. It outlines the recent clinical information and offers a review of common gynecological disorders among children and adolescent girls. PMID:10526922

  2. Pediatric Interventions To Promote Picture Book Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Needlman, Robert; And Others

    Pediatricians can play a role in promoting family literacy. Boston City Hospital has developed a model program that integrates family literacy into pediatric primary care, and has designed a program of research to evaluate its effects. The program has three components. In the waiting room, volunteers model for parents how to listen, question,…

  3. Development and in vivo evaluation of child-friendly lopinavir/ritonavir pediatric granules utilizing novel in situ self-assembly nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kevin; Li, Diana; Guo, Shujie; Penzak, Scott; Dong, Xiaowei

    2016-03-28

    The aim of this study was to develop a nanotechnology to formulate a fixed-dose combination of poorly water-soluble drugs in a children-friendly, flexible solid dosage form. For diseases like HIV, pediatric patients are taking multiple drugs for effective treatments. Fixed-dose combinations could reduce pill burdens and costs as well as improving patient adherence. However, development of fixed-dose combinations of poorly water-soluble drugs for pediatric formulations is very challenging. We discovered a novel nanotechnology that produced in situ self-assembly nanoparticles (ISNPs) when the ISNP granules were introduced to water. In this study, antiretroviral drug granules, including lopinavir (LPV) ISNP granules and a fixed-dose combination of LPV/ritonavir (RTV) ISNP granules, were prepared using the ISNP nanotechnology, which spontaneously produced drug-loaded ISNPs in contact with water. Drug-loaded ISNPs had particle size less than 158nm with mono-dispersed distribution, over 95% entrapment efficiency for both LPV and RTV and stability over 8h in simulated physiological conditions. Drug-loaded ISNP granules with about 16% of LPV and 4% of RTV were palatable and stable at room temperature over 6months. Furthermore, LPV/RTV ISNP granules displayed a 2.56-fold increase in bioavailability and significantly increased LPV concentrations in tested tissues, especially in HIV sanctuary sites, as compared to the commercial LPV/RTV tablet (Kaletra®) in rats. Overall, the results demonstrated that the novel ISNP nanotechnology is a promising platform to manufacture palatable, "heat" stable, and flexible pediatric granules for fixed-dose combinations that can be used as sachets and sprinkles. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on this kind of novel nanotechnology for pediatric fixed-dose combinations of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:26849919

  4. Cognitive Development and Learning in the Pediatric Organ Transplant Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Steven A.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating neurocognitive changes following organ transplantation in pediatric end-stage renal and liver disease. Findings suggest possible neurocognitive benefits associated with organ transplantation. Recommendations are made for methodological improvements in future research. (DB)

  5. Are Biodegradable Osteosyntheses Still an Option for Midface Trauma? Longitudinal Evaluation of Three Different PLA-Based Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kolk, Andreas; Köhnke, Robert; Saely, Christoph H.; Ploder, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate three different biodegradable polylactic acid- (PLA-) based osteosynthesis materials (OM). These OM (BioSorb, LactoSorb, and Delta) were used in 64 patients of whom 55 (85.9%) had fractures of the zygoma, five (7.8%) in the LeFort II level, two of the frontal bone (3.1%), and two of the maxillary sinus wall (3.1%). In addition to routine follow-up (FU) at 3, 6, and 12 months (m) (T1, T2, and T3) all patients were finally evaluated at a mean FU after 14.1 m for minor (e.g., nerve disturbances, swelling, and pain) and major (e.g., infections and occlusal disturbances) complications. Out of all 64 patients 38 presented with complications; of these 28 were minor (43.8%) and 10 major (15.6%) resulting in an overall rate of 59.4%. Differences in minor complications regarding sensibility disturbance at T1 and T3 were statistically significant (P = 0.04). Differences between the OM were not statistically significant. Apart from sufficient mechanical stability for clinical use of all tested OM complications mostly involved pain and swelling probably mainly related to the initial bulk reaction attributable to the drop of pH value during the degradation process. This paper includes a review of the current aspects of biodegradable OM. PMID:26491680

  6. Are Biodegradable Osteosyntheses Still an Option for Midface Trauma? Longitudinal Evaluation of Three Different PLA-Based Materials.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Köhnke, Robert; Saely, Christoph H; Ploder, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate three different biodegradable polylactic acid- (PLA-) based osteosynthesis materials (OM). These OM (BioSorb, LactoSorb, and Delta) were used in 64 patients of whom 55 (85.9%) had fractures of the zygoma, five (7.8%) in the LeFort II level, two of the frontal bone (3.1%), and two of the maxillary sinus wall (3.1%). In addition to routine follow-up (FU) at 3, 6, and 12 months (m) (T1, T2, and T3) all patients were finally evaluated at a mean FU after 14.1 m for minor (e.g., nerve disturbances, swelling, and pain) and major (e.g., infections and occlusal disturbances) complications. Out of all 64 patients 38 presented with complications; of these 28 were minor (43.8%) and 10 major (15.6%) resulting in an overall rate of 59.4%. Differences in minor complications regarding sensibility disturbance at T1 and T3 were statistically significant (P = 0.04). Differences between the OM were not statistically significant. Apart from sufficient mechanical stability for clinical use of all tested OM complications mostly involved pain and swelling probably mainly related to the initial bulk reaction attributable to the drop of pH value during the degradation process. This paper includes a review of the current aspects of biodegradable OM. PMID:26491680

  7. Longitudinal Evaluation of Cornea With Swept-Source Optical Coherence Tomography and Scheimpflug Imaging Before and After Lasik.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tommy C Y; Biswas, Sayantan; Yu, Marco; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-07-01

    Swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the latest advancement in anterior segment imaging. There are limited data regarding its performance after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). We compared the reliability of swept-source OCT and Scheimpflug imaging for evaluation of corneal parameters in refractive surgery candidates with myopia or myopic astigmatism. Three consecutive measurements were obtained preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively using swept-source OCT and Scheimpflug imaging. The study parameters included central corneal thickness (CCT), thinnest corneal thickness (TCT), keratometry at steep (Ks) and flat (Kf) axes, mean keratometry (Km), and, anterior and posterior best fit spheres (Ant and Post BFS). The main outcome measures included reliability of measurements before and after LASIK was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and reproducibility coefficients (RC). Association between the mean value of corneal parameters with age, spherical equivalent (SEQ), and residual bed thickness (RBT) and association of variance heterogeneity of corneal parameters and these covariates were analyzed. Twenty-six right eyes of 26 participants (mean age, 32.7 ± 6.9 yrs; mean SEQ, -6.27 ± 1.67 D) were included. Preoperatively, swept-source OCT demonstrated significantly higher ICC for Ks, CCT, TCT, and Post BFS (P ≤ 0.016), compared with Scheimpflug imaging. Swept-source OCT demonstrated significantly smaller RC values for CCT, TCT, and Post BFS (P ≤ 0.001). After LASIK, both devices had significant differences in measurements for all corneal parameters (P ≤ 0.015). Swept-source OCT demonstrated a significantly higher ICC and smaller RC for all measurements, compared with Scheimpflug imaging (P ≤ 0.001). Association of variance heterogeneity was only found in pre-LASIK Ant BFS and post-LASIK Post BFS for swept-source OCT, whereas significant association of variance heterogeneity was noted for all measurements except Ks and

  8. Evaluation of toddler different strategies during the first six-months of independent walking: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Bisi, M C; Stagni, R

    2015-02-01

    Twenty infants (age 10-16 month) were analyzed using inertial sensors over a 6-month period after the onset of independent walking. Changes in gait temporal parameters, coordination and gait strategies were evaluated. Gait temporal parameters showed a developmental shift at 2 months of walking experience: after this period, a change in the developmental trend was present in most of the analyzed parameters. Cadence results showed that the increased velocity is more due to an increase in step length than to an increase in cadence, after the first two months of independent walking. Different gait strategies were identified during the first month of independent gait based on collected data; after one month, characteristics of the pendulum mechanism were present in each examined toddler. PMID:25636708

  9. Pediatric integrative medicine: pediatrics' newest subspecialty?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine is defined as relationship-centered care that focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing, including evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine. Pediatric integrative medicine (PIM) develops and promotes this approach within the field of pediatrics. We conducted a survey to identify and describe PIM programs within academic children’s hospitals across North America. Key barriers and opportunities were identified for the growth and development of academic PIM initiatives in the US and Canada. Methods Academic PIM programs were identified by email and eligible for inclusion if they had each of educational, clinical, and research activities. Program directors were interviewed by telephone regarding their clinical, research, educational, and operational aspects. Results Sixteen programs were included. Most (75%) programs provided both inpatient and outpatient services. Seven programs operated with less than 1 FTE clinical personnel. Credentialing of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers varied substantially across the programs and between inpatient and outpatient services. Almost all (94%) programs offered educational opportunities for residents in pediatrics and/or family medicine. One fifth (20%) of the educational programs were mandatory for medical students. Research was conducted in a range of topics, but half of the programs reported lack of research funding and/or time. Thirty-one percent of the programs relied on fee-for-service income. Conclusions Pediatric integrative medicine is emerging as a new subspecialty to better help address 21st century patient concerns. PMID:22894682

  10. Pediatric Multicenter Evaluation of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Test for Rapid Detection of Inpatient Bacteremia Involving Gram-Negative Organisms, Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases, and Carbapenemases

    PubMed Central

    Deburger, B.; Roundtree, S. S.; Ventrola, C. A.; Blecker-Shelly, D. L.; Mortensen, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the investigational use only (IUO) version of the rapid Verigene Gram-negative blood culture test (BC-GN), a microarray that detects 9 genus/species targets (Acinetobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli/Shigella spp., Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens) and 6 antimicrobial resistance determinants (blaCTX-M, blaKPC, blaNDM, blaVIM, blaIMP, and blaOXA) directly from positive blood cultures. BC-GN was performed on positive BacT/Alert Pediatric FAN and Bactec Peds Plus blood cultures with Gram-negative organisms at two tertiary pediatric centers. Vitek MS (bioMérieux, Durham, NC) was used to assign gold standard organism identification. The Check MDR CT-102 microarray (Check Points B.V., Wageningen, Netherlands) was used as an alternative method for detecting resistance determinants. In total, 104 organisms were isolated from 97 clinical blood cultures. BC-GN correctly detected 26/26 cultures with Acinetobacter spp., P. aeruginosa, and S. marcescens, 5/6 with Citrobacter spp., 13/14 with Enterobacter spp., 23/24 with E. coli, 2/3 with K. oxytoca, 16/17 with K. pneumoniae, and 0/1 with Proteus spp. BC-GN appropriately reported negative BC-GN results in 8/13 blood cultures that grew organisms that were not represented on the microarray but failed to detect targets in 3/5 cultures that grew multiple Gram-negative organisms. BC-GN detected 5/5 and 1/1 clinical blood cultures with blaCTX-M and blaVIM. All 6 results were corroborated by Check MDR CT-102 microarray testing. The Verigene BC-GN test has the potential to expedite therapeutic decision making in pediatric patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Sensitivity was satisfactory but may be suboptimal in mixed Gram-negative blood cultures. PMID:24759724

  11. Longitudinal evaluation of the metabolic response of a tumor xenograft model to single fraction radiation therapy using magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessier, A. G.; Yahya, A.; Larocque, M. P.; Fallone, B. G.; Syme, A.

    2014-09-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to evaluate the metabolic profile of human glioblastoma multiform brain tumors grown as xenografts in nude mice before, and at multiple time points after single fraction radiation therapy. Tumors were grown over the thigh in 16 mice in this study, of which 5 served as untreated controls and 11 had their tumors treated to 800 cGy with 200 kVp x-rays. Spectra were acquired within 24 h pre-treatment, and then at 3, 7 and 14 d post-treatment using a 9.4 T animal magnetic resonance (MR) system. For the untreated control tumors, spectra (1-2 per mouse) were acquired at different stages of tumor growth. Spectra were obtained with the PRESS pulse sequence using a 3  ×  3 × 3 mm3 voxel. Analysis was performed with the LCModel software platform. Six metabolites were profiled for this analysis: alanine (Ala), myo-inositol (Ins), taurine (Tau), creatine and phosphocreatine (Cr + PCr), glutamine and glutamate (Glu + Gln), and total choline (glycerophosphocholine + phosphocholine) (GPC + PCh). For the treated cohort, most metabolite/water concentration ratios were found to decrease in the short term at 3 and 7 d post-treatment, followed by an increase at 14 d post-treatment toward pre-treatment values. The lowest concentrations were observed at 7 d post-treatment, with magnitudes (relative to pre-treatment concentration ratios) of: 0.42  ±  24.6% (Ala), 0.43  ±  15.3% (Ins), 0.68  ±  27.9% (Tau), 0.52  ±  14.6% (GPC+PCh), 0.49  ±  21.0% (Cr + PCr) and 0.78  ±  24.5% (Glu + Gln). Control animals did not demonstrate any significant correlation between tumor volume and metabolite concentration, indicating that the observed kinetics were the result of the therapeutic intervention. We have demonstrated the feasibility of using MRS to follow multiple metabolic markers over time for the purpose of evaluating therapeutic response of tumors to radiation therapy. This study provides

  12. Local dynamic stability as a responsive index for the evaluation of rehabilitation effect on fall risk in patients with multiple sclerosis: a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gait and balance problems are common in patients with multiple sclerosis, leading to high risk for falls. Local Dynamic Stability (LDS), a non-linear gait stability index, has been advocated as an early indicator of risk for falls. With this longitudinal study over three weeks, we aimed to assess the responsiveness of Local Dynamic Stability to a rehabilitation program and to compare it to other measures. Methods Eighteen patients (mean 54 years, median EDSS score: 5) participated. They were admitted to inpatient rehabilitation and received a three weeks individually tailored program. They performed a 3-minute walking test at the beginning and at the end of the stay, as well as pain, wellbeing, fatigue, and balance assessment. The Local Dynamic Stability was computed from the acceleration signals measured with a 3D-accelerometer. Results At the end of the rehabilitation process, patients reported reduced pain (Effect Size: −0.7), fatigue (ES:-0.6), and increased wellbeing (ES: 1.1). A small positive effect on static balance was observed (ES: 0.3). LDS was improved (ES: 0.6), and the effect was higher than walking speed improvement (ES: 0.4). Conclusions The Local Dynamic Stability seemed responsive to assess rehabilitation effects in patients with multiple sclerosis. It could constitute a valuable gait quality index, which could evaluate potential effects of rehabilitation on fall risk. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN69803702. PMID:23835061

  13. Medication dispensing in pediatric office practice. Committee on Practice and Ambulatory Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    1995-02-01

    The changing practice of dispensing medication in pediatric offices needs ongoing evaluation to determine the extent to which patients' and practice's needs are being met. Research should assess the extent to which in-office dispensing enhances patient compliance and patient education or whether it increases or decreases patient medication errors. Pediatricians choosing to dispense medication should monitor such research carefully, review state and federal laws periodically, and evaluate recommendations from professional organizations. The American Academy of Pediatrics holds that the practice of medication dispensing is acceptable and appropriate provided that it is legally permissible and that it is structured primarily to serve the best interests of the patient. PMID:7838654

  14. A Longitudinal Evaluation of Partial Lung Irradiation in Mice by Using a Dedicated Image-Guided Small Animal Irradiator

    SciTech Connect

    Granton, Patrick V.; Dubois, Ludwig; Elmpt, Wouter van; Hoof, Stefan J. van; Lieuwes, Natasja G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In lung cancer radiation therapy, the dose constraints are determined mostly by healthy lung toxicity. Preclinical microirradiators are a new tool to evaluate treatment strategies closer to clinical irradiation devices. In this study, we quantified local changes in lung density symptomatic of radiation-induced lung fibrosis (RILF) after partial lung irradiation in mice by using a precision image-guided small animal irradiator integrated with micro-computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6 adult male mice (n=76) were divided into 6 groups: a control group (0 Gy) and groups irradiated with a single fraction of 4, 8, 12, 16, or 20 Gy using 5-mm circular parallel-opposed fields targeting the upper right lung. A Monte Carlo model of the small animal irradiator was used for dose calculations. Following irradiation, all mice were imaged at regular intervals over 39 weeks (10 time points total). Nonrigid deformation was used to register the initial micro-CT scan to all subsequent scans. Results: Significant differences could be observed between the 3 highest (>10 Gy) and 3 lowest irradiation (<10 Gy) dose levels. A mean difference of 120 ± 10 HU between the 0- and 20-Gy groups was observed at week 39. RILF was found to be spatially limited to the irradiated portion of the lung. Conclusions: The data suggest that the severity of RILF in partial lung irradiation compared to large field irradiation in mice for the same dose is reduced, and therefore higher doses can be tolerated.

  15. Longitudinal evaluation of physician payment reform and team-based care for chronic disease management and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Tara; Kopp, Alexander; Moineddin, Rahim; Glazier, Richard H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We evaluated a large-scale transition of primary care physicians to blended capitation models and team-based care in Ontario, Canada, to understand the effect of each type of reform on the management and prevention of chronic disease. Methods: We used population-based administrative data to assess monitoring of diabetes mellitus and screening for cervical, breast and colorectal cancer among patients belonging to team-based capitation, non–team-based capitation or enhanced fee-for-service medical homes as of Mar. 31, 2011 (n = 10 675 480). We used Poisson regression models to examine these associations for 2011. We then used a fitted nonlinear model to compare changes in outcomes between 2001 and 2011 by type of medical home. Results: In 2011, patients in a team-based capitation setting were more likely than those in an enhanced fee-for-service setting to receive diabetes monitoring (39.7% v. 31.6%, adjusted relative risk [RR] 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18 to 1.25), mammography (76.6% v. 71.5%, adjusted RR 1.06, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.07) and colorectal cancer screening (63.0% v. 60.9%, adjusted RR 1.03, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.04). Over time, patients in medical homes with team-based capitation experienced the greatest improvement in diabetes monitoring (absolute difference in improvement 10.6% [95% CI 7.9% to 13.2%] compared with enhanced fee for service; 6.4% [95% CI 3.8% to 9.1%] compared with non–team-based capitation) and cervical cancer screening (absolute difference in improvement 7.0% [95% CI 5.5% to 8.5%] compared with enhanced fee for service; 5.3% [95% CI 3.8% to 6.8%] compared with non–team-based capitation). For breast and colorectal cancer screening, there were no significant differences in change over time between different types of medical homes. Interpretation: The shift to capitation payment and the addition of team-based care in Ontario were associated with moderate improvements in processes related to diabetes care, but the

  16. Evaluating the impacts of new walking and cycling infrastructure on carbon dioxide emissions from motorized travel: a controlled longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Christian; Goodman, Anna; Ogilvie, David

    2015-01-01

    Walking and cycling is widely assumed to substitute for at least some motorized travel and thereby reduce energy use and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. While the evidence suggests that a supportive built environment may be needed to promote walking and cycling, it is unclear whether and how interventions in the built environment that attract walkers and cyclists may reduce transport CO2 emissions. Our aim was therefore to evaluate the effects of providing new infrastructure for walking and cycling on CO2 emissions from motorised travel. A cohort of 1849 adults completed questionnaires at baseline (2010) and one-year follow-up (2011), before and after the construction of new high-quality routes provided as part of the Sustrans Connect2 programme in three UK municipalities. A second cohort of 1510 adults completed questionnaires at baseline and two-year follow-up (2012). The participants reported their past-week travel behaviour and car characteristics from which CO2 emissions by mode and purpose were derived using methods described previously. A set of exposure measures of proximity to and use of the new routes were derived. Overall transport CO2 emissions decreased slightly over the study period, consistent with a secular trend in the case study regions. As found previously the new infrastructure was well used at one- and two-year follow-up, and was associated with population-level increases in walking, cycling and physical activity at two-year follow-up. However, these effects did not translate into sizeable CO2 effects as neither living near the infrastructure nor using it predicted changes in CO2 emissions from motorised travel, either overall or disaggregated by journey purpose. This lack of a discernible effect on travel CO2 emissions are consistent with an interpretation that some of those living nearer the infrastructure may simply have changed where they walked or cycled, while others may have walked or cycled more but few, if any, may have substituted

  17. Evaluation of serum CEA, CYFRA21-1 and CA125 for the early detection of colorectal cancer using longitudinal preclinical samples

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D S; Fourkala, E-O; Apostolidou, S; Gunu, R; Ryan, A; Jacobs, I; Menon, U; Alderton, W; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Timms, J F

    2015-01-01

    Background: Blood-borne biomarkers for early detection of colorectal cancer (CRC) could markedly increase screening uptake. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), CYFRA21-1 and CA125 for the early detection of CRC in an asymptomatic cohort. Methods: This nested case–control study within UKCTOCS used 381 serial serum samples from 40 women subsequently diagnosed with CRC, 20 women subsequently diagnosed with benign disease and 40 matched non-cancer controls with three to four samples per subject taken annually up to 4 years before diagnosis. CEA, CYFRA21-1 and CA125 were measured using validated assays and performance of markers evaluated for different pre-diagnosis time groups. Results: CEA levels increased towards diagnosis in a third of all cases (half of late-stage cases), whereas longitudinal profiles were static in both benign and non-cancer controls. At a threshold of >5 ng ml−1 the sensitivities for detecting CRC up to 1 and 4 years before clinical presentation were 25% and 13%, respectively, at 95% specificity. At a threshold of >2.5 ng ml−1, sensitivities were 57.5% and 38.4%, respectively, with specificities of 81% and 83.5%. CYFRA21-1 and CA125 had no utility as screening markers and did not enhance CEA performance when used in combination. CEA gave average lead times of 17–24 months for test-positive cases. Conclusions: CEA is elevated in a significant proportion of individuals with preclinical CRC, but would not be useful alone as a screening tool. This work sets a baseline from which to develop panels of biomarkers which combine CEA for improved early detection of CRC. PMID:26035703

  18. Pediatric Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Ahmet; Koca, Çiğdem Firat

    2016-06-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is defined as sudden unilateral or bilateral sensorineural hearing loss with at least 30 dB decrease in threshold in 3 contiguous test frequencies occurring over 72 hours or less. It is rare among children. The mechanism of the process and prognosis of the disorder remains unclear. The current incidence of sudden sensorineural hearing loss among pediatric population is unknown. The authors carried out a retrospective chart analysis of patients under 15 years of age from 2004 to 2015, who consulted to the Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Department of Inonu University Medical Faculty. Age, sex, number of affected ear and side, audiometric evaluations, medical follow-up, treatment method, duration of treatment recovery, associated complaints; tinnitus and/or vertigo, presence of mumps disease were recorded for each patient. A 4-frequency pure-tone average (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) was calculated for each ear. Complete recovery, defined as some hearing level compared with the nonaffected ear, was observed in 3 patients (21.4 %) and there was no partial hearing recovery. The hearing loss of 11 patient remained unchanged after prednisolone treatment. Two of the 11 patients had bilaterally total sensorineural hearing loss and evaluated as appropriate for cochlear implantation. Sex of patient and laterality of hearing loss were not correlated with hearing recovery. Sensorineural hearing loss among pediatrics has been the issue of otolaryngologists. The incidence, etiology, and treatment methods should be more studied. PMID:27171971

  19. Pediatric Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jennifer N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: 1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and pre-excitation, 3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25722754

  20. Longitudinal observation of pediatric hand and wrist ganglia.

    PubMed

    Wang, A A; Hutchinson, D T

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the behavior of ganglia of the hand and wrist in young children treated without surgery. Fourteen consecutive children, less than 10 years of age, who presented with cysts of the hand and wrist were followed up by a single surgeon. The average age of the patient at the time of diagnosis was 38 months (range, 2 months to 9 years 3 months). The masses included 7 retinacular cysts, 5 volar wrist ganglia, and 2 dorsal wrist ganglia. These cysts had been present for an average of 3.3 months (range, 1-12 months) before medical advice was sought. None of the cysts were painful. Follow-up averaged 33 months (range, 9-112 months), with 79% of all cysts spontaneously resolving, the majority within a year. We believe that a child presenting with a benign hand lesion characteristic of a ganglion cyst should initially be treated by observation. PMID:11466631

  1. Toddler self-regulation skills predict risk for pediatric obesity

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Paulo A.; Calkins, Susan D.; Keane, Susan P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of early self-regulation skills, including emotion regulation, sustained attention, and inhibitory control/reward sensitivity, in predicting pediatric obesity in early childhood. Method Participants for this study included 57 children (25 girls) obtained from three different cohorts participating in a larger ongoing longitudinal study. At 2 years of age, participants participated in several laboratory tasks designed to assess their self-regulation abilities. Height and weight measures were collected when children were 2 and 5.5 years of age. Results Self-regulation skills in toddlerhood were predictive of both normal variations in BMI development and pediatric obesity. Specifically, emotion regulation was the primary self-regulation skill involved in predicting normative changes in BMI as no effects were found for sustained attention or inhibitory control/reward sensitivity. However, both emotion regulation and inhibitory control/reward sensitivity predicted more extreme weight problems (i.e., pediatric obesity), even after controlling for 2yr BMI. Thus, toddlers with poorer emotion regulation skills and lower inhibitory control skills/higher reward sensitivity were more likely to be classified as overweight/at risk at 5.5 years of age. Conclusion Early self-regulation difficulties across domains (i.e., behavioral, and emotional) represent significant individual risk factors for the development of pediatric obesity. Mechanisms by which early self-regulation skills may contribute to the development of pediatric obesity are discussed. PMID:20065961

  2. Reported Sildenafil Side Effects in Pediatric Pulmonary Hypertension Patients

    PubMed Central

    Siehr, Stephanie L.; McCarthy, Elisa K.; Ogawa, Michelle T.; Feinstein, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sildenafil, a phosphodiestase type 5 inhibitor, was approved in 2005 for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in adults and is commonly used off-label for pediatric patients. Little is known, however, about sildenafil’s side effects in this population. Methods: Single institution, longitudinal survey-based study performed in an outpatient pediatric cardiology clinic. Pediatric patients on sildenafil [alone or in combination with other pulmonary hypertension (PH) therapies] completed questionnaires regarding frequency of vascular, gastrointestinal, neurologic, and hematologic side effects. Results: Between January 2011 and May 2014, 66 pediatric patients with PH on sildenafil filled out 214 surveys, 32 patients (96 surveys) on monotherapy, and 43 patients (118 surveys) on sildenafil plus an endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA) (bosentan or ambrisentan) and/or a prostacyclin (epoprostenol or treprostinil). Overall, 30% of respondents identified at least one side effect. For all patients on sildenafil, incidence of side effects by system was 37% gastrointestinal, 35% vascular, and 22% neurologic. For patients on sildenafil monotherapy, incidence of side effects by system was 24% gastrointestinal, 21% vascular, and 18% neurologic compared to patients on combination therapy who reported an incidence of 48% gastrointestinal, 45% vascular, and 25% neurologic. Conclusion: Incidence of vascular, gastrointestinal, and neurologic side effect in pediatric patients on sildenafil therapy for PAH was 30%. Side effects were more common in patients on combination therapy with an ERA and/or prostacyclin than in patients on sildenafil monotherapy. PMID:25806361

  3. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... dealing with children and in treating children with endocrine disorders and hormonal problems. If your pediatrician suggests that your child see a pediatric endocrinologist, you can be assured that your child will receive the best possible care. To find a pediatrician or pediatric specialist in ... © Copyright 2016 American Academy of Pediatrics. All rights reserved.

  4. “If I Take My Medicine, I Will Be Strong:” Evaluation of a Pediatric HIV Disclosure Intervention in Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Beima-Sofie, Kristin; Feris, Larissa; Shepard-Perry, Mark; Hamunime, Ndapewa; John-Stewart, Grace; Kaindjee-Tjituka, Francina; Brandt, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite known benefits, only a small proportion of HIV-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa know their status and limited disclosure interventions exist. Namibia's Ministry of Health and Social Services developed and implemented a multipronged intervention to support health care workers (HCWs) and caregivers in the disclosure process. Methods: The intervention included a staged disclosure cartoon book, child and caregiver readiness assessment tools, a monitoring form to track progress over visits, and HCW training curriculum. We conducted qualitative interviews with 35 HCWs and 46 caregivers of HIV-positive children at 4 high volume HIV clinics. Interviews elicited detailed information about intervention uptake and impact. HCWs also participated in a self-efficacy survey. Results: The intervention improved HCW and caregiver confidence and communication skills in pediatric disclosure. The most valuable intervention component was the disclosure cartoon book, which provided structure, language, and guidance for a gradual disclosure process. HCWs reported it greatly reduced caregiver resistance to disclosure. Both caregivers and HCWs reported improved knowledge and ability to support the pediatric patient, improved child understanding of how HIV medications work, increased child hopefulness for their future, and improved child adherence to care and treatment. HCW self-efficacy surveys found that HCWs who received training felt more confident in their ability to engage in the disclosure process. Conclusions: HCWs and caregivers highly endorsed the intervention. Given the urgency to address pediatric HIV disclosure in Africa, and the utility and low cost of the locally-produced disclosure tool, this approach may be useful in other similar settings. PMID:25296096

  5. Evaluation of In Vitro Activity of the Class I PI3K Inhibitor Buparlisib (BKM120) in Pediatric Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer L.; Park, Ann; Akiyama, Ryan; Tap, William D.; Denny, Christopher T.; Federman, Noah

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric bone and soft tissue sarcomas often display increased Akt phosphorylation through up regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF1) signaling. Additionally, Akt signaling has been linked to resistance to IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitors in sarcoma, further demonstrating the role of Akt in tumor survival. This suggests targeting components of the PI3K/Akt pathway may be an effective therapeutic strategy. Here, we investigated the in vitro activity of the pan-class I PI3K inhibitor buparlisib (BKM120) in pediatric bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Buparlisib inhibited activation of Akt and signaling molecules downstream of mTORC1 (mTOR complex 1) in Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines. Anti-proliferative effects were observed in both anchorage dependent and independent conditions and apoptosis was induced within 24 hours of drug treatment. Buparlisib demonstrated cytotoxicity as a single agent, but was found to be more effective when used in combination. Synergy was observed when buparlisib was combined with the IGF1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541 and the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. The addition of NVP-AEW541 also further reduced phospho-Akt levels and more potently induced apoptosis compared to buparlisib treatment alone. Additionally, the combination of buparlisib with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib resulted in synergy in sarcoma cell lines possessing MAPK pathway mutations. Taken together, these data indicate buparlisib could be a novel therapy for the treatment of pediatric bone and soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:26402468

  6. Pediatric Drug Trials: Safety and Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Daniel K.; Smith, P. Brian; Sun, Jessica M.; Murphy, M. Dianne; Avant, Debbie; Mathis, Lisa; Rodriguez, William; Califf, Robert M.; Li, Jennifer S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To quantify the frequency and type of new safety information arising from studies performed under the auspices of the Pediatric Exclusivity Program, to describe the dissemination of these findings in the peer-reviewed literature and compare this with the FDA review, and to describe their effect on pediatric labeling. Design Cohort study of the 365 trials performed for 153 drugs. Setting The Pediatric Exclusivity incentive from December 1997 through September 2007. Participants Food and Drug Administration publicly available records and peer-reviewed literature retrievable by Medline search. Main Exposures New safety findings obtained from the trials completed for exclusivity. Main Outcome Measures Concordance of the information highlighted in the peer-reviewed article abstracts with the information in the FDA labeling and drug reviews. Results There were 137 labeling changes; we evaluated 129 of these (the 8 selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were excluded from review). Thirty-three products (26%) had pediatric safety information added to the labeling. Of these, 12 products had neuropsychiatric safety findings, and 21 had other important safety findings. Only 16/33 (48%) of these trials were reported in the peer-reviewed literature; however, 7/16 of these publications focused on findings substantively different from those highlighted in the FDA reviews and labeling changes. Conclusions Medication adverse events in children often differ from those in adults, particularly those that are neuropsychiatric in nature. Labeling changes for pediatric use demonstrate that pediatric drug studies provide valuable and unique safety data that can guide the use of these drugs in children. Unfortunately, most these articles are not published, and almost half of the published articles focus their attention away from the crucial safety data. PMID:19996043

  7. Problems and preferences in pediatric imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2015-01-01

    Radiological imaging is extremely valuable as a diagnostic tool in the pediatric population, but it comes with a number of distinct challenges as compared to the imaging of adults. This is because of the following: It requires dedicated imaging protocols to acquire the images, there is need for sedation or general anesthesia for longer procedures such as MRI, specific training is required for the healthcare personnel involved, thorough knowledge and expertise should be applied for evaluating the images, and most importantly, it requires consideration for radiation exposure if ionizing radiation is being used. One of the challenges for clinical care personnel is to gain the child's trust and co-operation before and throughout the duration of an examination, which can prove to be difficult in children who may be ill and have pain. This is important to acquire quality images and prevent repeat examinations. Even with a quality examination, the accurate interpretation of images requires a thorough knowledge of the intricate and dynamic face of anatomy and specific pathological presentations in children. The increased radiation sensitivity of growing organs and children's longer expected life spans make them more susceptible to the harmful effects of radiation. Imaging pediatric patients in a dedicated pediatric imaging department with dedicated pediatric CT technologists may result in greater compliance with pediatric protocols and significantly reduced patient dose. In order to prevent the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle should be strictly followed. This article seeks to draw attention to various challenges of pediatric imaging and the ways to overcome them. PMID:26752721

  8. Short stature in children: Pattern and frequency in a pediatric clinic, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jurayyan N, Nasir A.; Mohamed, Sarar H.; Al Otaibi, Hessah M.; Al Issa, Sharifah T.; Omer, Hala G.

    2012-01-01

    Longitudinal growth assessment is essential in child care. Short stature can be promptly recognized only with accurate measurements of growth and critical analysis of growth data. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of short stature among patients referred to an endocrine pediatric clinic, King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and to ascertain the aetiological profile of short stature. This is a retrospective review of patients referred to a pediatric endocrine clinic with short stature during the period January 1990 and December 2009. After a proper detailed medical history, growth analysis and physical examination, followed by a radiological (bone age) and laboratory screening (complete blood count and thyroid function). Growth hormone stimulation tests were performed when indicated. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the pituitary was performed when necessary. As well, celiac screening and small bowel biopsy were performed when appropriate. During the period under review, hundred and ten patients were evaluated for short stature. Their age ranged from 2 years and six months to 4 years. The male to female ratio was 1.3:1. The commonest etiology was genetic short stature found in 57 (51.8%) patients, while in the other 53 (48.2%) patients, variable endocrine and nutritional causes were noted. Short stature was a common referral. A wide variety of etiological diagnosis was noticed with genetic short stature being the commonest. A wide variety of endocrine causes were evident, with growth hormone deficiency, as a results of different etiologies, being the commonest.

  9. Investigation of vibration-induced artifact in clinical diffusion-weighted imaging of pediatric subjects.

    PubMed

    Berl, Madison M; Walker, Lindsay; Modi, Pooja; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Sarlls, Joelle E; Nayak, Amritha; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    It has been reported that mechanical vibrations of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner could produce spurious signal dropouts in diffusion-weighted images resulting in artifactual anisotropy in certain regions of the brain with red appearance in the Directionally Encoded Color maps. We performed a review of the frequency of this artifact across pediatric studies, noting differences by scanner manufacturer, acquisition protocol, as well as weight and position of the subject. We also evaluated the ability of automated and quantitative methods to detect this artifact. We found that the artifact may be present in over 50% of data in certain protocols and is not limited to one scanner manufacturer. While a specific scanner had the highest incidence, low body weight and positioning were also associated with appearance of the artifact for both scanner types evaluated, making children potentially more susceptible than adults. Visual inspection remains the best method for artifact identification. Software for automated detection showed very low sensitivity (10%). The artifact may present inconsistently in longitudinal studies. We discuss a published case report that has been widely cited and used as evidence to set policy about diagnostic criteria for determining vegetative state. That report attributed longitudinal changes in anisotropy to white matter plasticity without considering the possibility that the changes were caused by this artifact. Our study underscores the need to check for the presence of this artifact in clinical studies, analyzes circumstances for when it may be more likely to occur, and suggests simple strategies to identify and potentially avoid its effects. PMID:26350492

  10. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  11. Integrative Pediatrics: Looking Forward

    PubMed Central

    McClafferty, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Increase in the prevalence of disease and illness has dramatically altered the landscape of pediatrics. As a result, there is a demand for pediatricians with new skills and a sharper focus on preventative health. Patient demand and shifting pediatric illness patterns have accelerated research in the field of pediatric integrative medicine. This emerging field can be defined as healing-oriented medicine that considers the whole child, including all elements of lifestyle and family health. It is informed by evidence and carefully weighs all appropriate treatment options. This Special Issue of Children, containing a collection of articles written by expert clinicians, represents an important educational contribution to the field. The goal of the edition is to raise awareness about integrative topics with robust supporting evidence, and to identify areas where more research is needed.

  12. Ethics in pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John B; Makkar, Hanspaul S

    2012-01-01

    The patient-parent-physician relationship is central to studying medical ethics in pediatric dermatology. The rights of children in medical decision making are ambiguous, and parents and physicians will often override the autonomy of a child when a particular treatment is deemed to be in the child's best interest. The use of physical restraint to enforce a treatment should be justified, and a reasonable attempt should be made to ensure the cooperation of the child, if possible. Medical photography is central to the practice of pediatric dermatology in that it allows for serial observation of cutaneous lesions over time. Established guidelines and standards should be followed. Pediatric dermatologists frequently prescribe medications off-label; if following established professional standards, and prescribing with good intention, off-label prescribing can be appropriate and rational. PMID:22902215

  13. Advances in Multidetector CT Diagnosis of Pediatric Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Although pediatric pulmonary thromboembolism is historically believed to be rare with relatively little information available in the medical literature regarding its imaging evaluation, it is more common than previously thought. Thus, it is imperative for radiologists to be aware of the most recent advances in its imaging information, particularly multidetector computed tomography (MDCT), the imaging modality of choice in the pediatric population. The overarching goal of this article is to review the most recent updates on MDCT diagnosis of pediatric pulmonary thromboembolism. PMID:26957904

  14. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  15. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  16. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in

  17. Digital Longitudinal Tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimkus, Daniel Steven

    1985-12-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to investigate the clinical utility of digital longitudinal tomosynthesis in radiology. By acquiring a finite group of digital images during a longitudinal tomographic exposure, and processing these images, tomographic planes, other than the fulcrum plane, can be reconstructed. This process is now termed "tomosynthesis". A prototype system utilizing this technique was developed. Both phantom and patient studies were done with this system. The phantom studies were evaluated by subjective, visual criterion and by quantitative analysis of edge sharpness and noise in the reconstructions. Two groups of patients and one volunteer were studied. The first patient group consisted of 8 patients undergoing intravenous urography (IVU). These patients had digital tomography and film tomography of the abdomen. The second patient group consisted of 4 patients with lung cancer admitted to the hospital for laser resection of endobronchial tumor. These patients had mediastinal digital tomograms to evaluate the trachea and mainstem bronchi. The knee of one volunteer was imaged by film tomography and digital tomography. The results of the phantom studies showed that the digital reconstructions accurately produced images of the desired planes. The edge sharpness of the reconstructions approached that of the acquired images. Adequate reconstructions were achieved with as few as 5 images acquired during the exposure, with the quality of the reconstructions improving as the number of images acquired increased. The IVU patients' digital studies had less contrast and spatial resolution than the film tomograms. The single renal lesion visible on the film tomograms was also visible in the digital images. The digital mediastinal studies were felt by several radiologists to be superior to a standard chest xray in evaluating the airways. The digital images of the volunteer's knee showed many of the same anatomic features as the film tomogram, but the digital

  18. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored. PMID:27265605

  19. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie

    2011-06-01

    Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included. PMID:21628042

  20. Cost-effective pediatric head and body phantoms for computed tomography dosimetry and its evaluation using pencil ion chamber and CT dose profiler

    PubMed Central

    Saravanakumar, A.; Vaideki, K.; Govindarajan, K. N.; Jayakumar, S.; Devanand, B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, a pediatric head and body phantom was fabricated using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at a low cost when compared to commercially available phantoms for the purpose of computed tomography (CT) dosimetry. The dimensions of head and body phantoms were 10 cm diameter, 15 cm length and 16 cm diameter, 15 cm length, respectively. The dose from a 128-slice CT machine received by the head and body phantom at the center and periphery were measured using a 100 mm pencil ion chamber and 150 mm CT dose profiler (CTDP). Using these values, the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) and in turn the volumetric CTDI (CTDIv) were calculated for various combinations of tube voltage and current-time product. A similar study was carried out using standard calibrated phantom and the results have been compared with the fabricated ones to ascertain that the performance of the latter is equivalent to that of the former. Finally, CTDIv measured using fabricated and standard phantoms were compared with respective values displayed on the console. The difference between the values was well within the limits specified by Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB), India. These results indicate that the cost-effective pediatric phantom can be employed for CT dosimetry. PMID:26500404

  1. Approaching a diagnostic point-of-care test for pediatric tuberculosis through evaluation of immune biomarkers across the clinical disease spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Jenum, Synne; Dhanasekaran, S.; Lodha, Rakesh; Mukherjee, Aparna; Kumar Saini, Deepak; Singh, Sarman; Singh, Varinder; Medigeshi, Guruprasad; Haks, Marielle C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Doherty, Timothy Mark; Kabra, Sushil K.; Ritz, Christian; Grewal, Harleen M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) calls for an accurate, rapid, and simple point-of-care (POC) test for the diagnosis of pediatric tuberculosis (TB) in order to make progress “Towards Zero Deaths”. Whereas the sensitivity of a POC test based on detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is likely to have poor sensitivity (70–80% of children have culture-negative disease), host biomarkers reflecting the on-going pathological processes across the spectrum of MTB infection and disease may hold greater promise for this purpose. We analyzed transcriptional immune biomarkers direct ex-vivo and translational biomarkers in MTB-antigen stimulated whole blood in 88 Indian children with intra-thoracic TB aged 6 months to 15 years, and 39 asymptomatic siblings. We identified 12 biomarkers consistently associated with either clinical groups “upstream” towards culture-positive TB on the TB disease spectrum (CD14, FCGR1A, FPR1, MMP9, RAB24, SEC14L1, and TIMP2) or “downstream” towards a decreased likelihood of TB disease (BLR1, CD3E, CD8A, IL7R, and TGFBR2), suggesting a correlation with MTB-related pathology and high relevance to a future POC test for pediatric TB. A biomarker signature consisting of BPI, CD3E, CD14, FPR1, IL4, TGFBR2, TIMP2 and TNFRSF1B separated children with TB from asymptomatic siblings (AUC of 88%). PMID:26725873

  2. The Contributions of Near Work and Outdoor Activity to the Correlation Between Siblings in the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Jones-Jordan, Lisa A.; Sinnott, Loraine T.; Graham, Nicholas D.; Cotter, Susan A.; Kleinstein, Robert N.; Manny, Ruth E.; Mutti, Donald O.; Twelker, J. Daniel; Zadnik, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We determined the correlation between sibling refractive errors adjusted for shared and unique environmental factors using data from the Collaborative Longitudinal Evaluation of Ethnicity and Refractive Error (CLEERE) Study. Methods. Refractive error from subjects' last study visits was used to estimate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) between siblings. The correlation models used environmental factors (diopter-hours and outdoor/sports activity) assessed annually from parents by survey to adjust for shared and unique environmental exposures when estimating the heritability of refractive error (2*ICC). Results. Data from 700 families contributed to the between-sibling correlation for spherical equivalent refractive error. The mean age of the children at the last visit was 13.3 ± 0.90 years. Siblings engaged in similar amounts of near and outdoor activities (correlations ranged from 0.40–0.76). The ICC for spherical equivalent, controlling for age, sex, ethnicity, and site was 0.367 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.304, 0.420), with an estimated heritability of no more than 0.733. After controlling for these variables, and near and outdoor/sports activities, the resulting ICC was 0.364 (95% CI = 0.304, 0.420; estimated heritability no more than 0.728, 95% CI = 0.608, 0.850). The ICCs did not differ significantly between male–female and single sex pairs. Conclusions. Adjusting for shared family and unique, child-specific environmental factors only reduced the estimate of refractive error correlation between siblings by 0.5%. Consistent with a lack of association between myopia progression and either near work or outdoor/sports activity, substantial common environmental exposures had little effect on this correlation. Genetic effects appear to have the major role in determining the similarity of refractive error between siblings. PMID:25205866

  3. Evaluation of e-mail contact to conduct follow-up among adolescent women participating in a longitudinal cohort study of contraceptive use☆

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Sadia; Dodge, Laura E.; Brown, Beth A.; Hacker, Michele R.; Raine, Tina R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to determine whether e-mail contact is a viable method for gathering information from adolescent women about contraceptive use. Study design Adolescent women initiating contraception followed in a prospective longitudinal cohort study and who had access to the Internet were randomized to the control or intervention arm and were contacted at 3, 6 and 12 months after enrollment. The control arm completed follow-up surveys in-person or by telephone. The intervention arm received Web-based surveys via e-mail. Results There were 46 women in each group. Women in both groups were approximately 20 years old, were sexually active minority women, and were in school or employed. While participants in the intervention group initially had lower response rates than those in the control group (59% vs. 91%, respectively), with the addition of traditional follow-up methods, the overall response rates were comparable (94% vs. 91%, respectively). Conclusions E-mail follow-up with Web-based surveys was effective amongst adolescent women at risk for unintended pregnancy. This indicates that e-mail contact could be used as a preliminary follow-up strategy to capture a substantial proportion of participants and that standard follow-up can be used as a second-line approach. A two-pronged approach with initial e-mail contact and traditional follow-up for participants who do not respond may be a viable method when evaluating sensitive areas such as contraceptive use. PMID:23290427

  4. Adherence to a Mediterranean-Style Diet and Effects on Cognition in Adults: A Qualitative Evaluation and Systematic Review of Longitudinal and Prospective Trials.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Roy J; Kennedy, Greg; Macpherson, Helen; Scholey, Andrew B; Pipingas, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) involves substantial intake of fruits, vegetables, and fish, and a lower consumption of dairy, red meat, and sugars. Over the past 15 years, much empirical evidence supports the suggestion that a MedDiet may be beneficial with respect to reducing the incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. A number of cross-sectional studies that have examined the impact of MedDiet on cognition have yielded largely positive results. The objective of this review is to evaluate longitudinal and prospective trials to gain an understanding of how a MedDiet may impact cognitive processes over time. The included studies were aimed at improving cognition or minimizing of cognitive decline. Studies reviewed included assessments of dietary status using either a food frequency questionnaire or a food diary assessment. Eighteen articles meeting our inclusion criteria were subjected to systematic review. These revealed that higher adherence to a MedDiet is associated with slower rates of cognitive decline, reduced conversion to Alzheimer's disease, and improvements in cognitive function. The specific cognitive domains that were found to benefit with improved Mediterranean Diet Score were memory (delayed recognition, long-term, and working memory), executive function, and visual constructs. The current review has also considered a number of methodological issues in making recommendations for future research. The utilization of a dietary pattern, such as the MedDiet, will be essential as part of the armamentarium to maintain quality of life and reduce the potential social and economic burden of dementia. PMID:27500135

  5. Adherence to a Mediterranean-Style Diet and Effects on Cognition in Adults: A Qualitative Evaluation and Systematic Review of Longitudinal and Prospective Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Roy J.; Kennedy, Greg; Macpherson, Helen; Scholey, Andrew B.; Pipingas, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The Mediterranean-style diet (MedDiet) involves substantial intake of fruits, vegetables, and fish, and a lower consumption of dairy, red meat, and sugars. Over the past 15 years, much empirical evidence supports the suggestion that a MedDiet may be beneficial with respect to reducing the incidence of cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and dementia. A number of cross-sectional studies that have examined the impact of MedDiet on cognition have yielded largely positive results. The objective of this review is to evaluate longitudinal and prospective trials to gain an understanding of how a MedDiet may impact cognitive processes over time. The included studies were aimed at improving cognition or minimizing of cognitive decline. Studies reviewed included assessments of dietary status using either a food frequency questionnaire or a food diary assessment. Eighteen articles meeting our inclusion criteria were subjected to systematic review. These revealed that higher adherence to a MedDiet is associated with slower rates of cognitive decline, reduced conversion to Alzheimer’s disease, and improvements in cognitive function. The specific cognitive domains that were found to benefit with improved Mediterranean Diet Score were memory (delayed recognition, long-term, and working memory), executive function, and visual constructs. The current review has also considered a number of methodological issues in making recommendations for future research. The utilization of a dietary pattern, such as the MedDiet, will be essential as part of the armamentarium to maintain quality of life and reduce the potential social and economic burden of dementia. PMID:27500135

  6. Multi-state outcome analysis of treatments (MOAT): application of a new approach to evaluate outcomes in longitudinal studies of bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, C L; Mintz, J; Tohen, M

    2016-01-01

    Survival analyzes are usually based on a single point in time predefined event. Dissatisfied with this approach to evaluating maintenance treatment outcomes, we developed the Multi-state Outcome Analysis of Treatments (MOAT) methodology using a combined database from two FDA registration studies of lamotrigine, lithium and placebo. MOAT partitions total survival time into clinically distinct periods operationally defined by cutpoints on rating scales. For bipolar disorder (BD), the clinical states are remission, subsyndromal and syndromal mania, mixed states or depression. MOAT results can be crossed with information about tolerability and functioning to yield an outcome system integrating efficacy and tolerability. As found in the original analysis, both drugs were associated with longer time in study compared with the placebo. MOAT supplements this by finding that both drugs increased the time remitted compared with placebo. However, a substantial amount of time in all three treatments was spent in subsyndromal depression. Time with manic symptoms was reduced with lithium, but not lamotrigine. Patients on placebo neither benefitted nor had adverse effects from the assignment but experienced more syndromal levels of symptoms and were terminated from the study sooner than either drug treated group. Lithium was associated with both benefit in time manic and worse tolerability compared with placebo. In summary, lamotrigine was associated with limited therapeutic benefit but not harm; lithium with both benefit and harm; and placebo with neither. MOAT describes not only quantity but also quality of time spent in longitudinal studies, providing a more clinically informative picture than Kaplan–Meier survival analysis. PMID:25778474

  7. The future of pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Boat, Thomas F

    2007-11-01

    The future of pediatric research will be enhanced by strengthening traditional biomedical approaches and embracing emerging opportunities. Biomedical discovery and translation of new knowledge, concepts, and devices into better diagnostic and therapeutic options will require more pediatric physician-scientists, rapid adoption of enabling technologies, increased funding for research and research training (including the creation of federally funded pediatric translational research centers), and a broader distribution of research activities across the academic pediatric community. Rapid improvement of child health outcomes also will be realized through robust health services research in pediatrics, including the application of rigorous quality improvement science that documents and disseminates successful interventions, leading to better access and effectiveness of care. Improving the value of pediatric care is a realistic goal. Achieving better outcomes through individually tailored (personalized) care for children should be tested experimentally. The future of pediatrics is bright, but will depend on the recognition of and response to a growing array of exciting opportunities. PMID:17950318

  8. The pediatric vaccine stockpiling problem.

    PubMed

    Truong, Van-Anh

    2012-09-21

    The U.S. has experienced many major interruptions of its pediatric vaccine production in the past decade. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) copes with these shortages by building a national stockpile of pediatric vaccines, which it makes accessible to the public in the event of a shortage. The management of this stockpile is difficult due to limited production capacity and long and unpredictable production interruptions. In this paper, we address policies for managing the stockpile. We provide sufficient conditions for the optimal policy to be a modified state-dependent base-stock policy, with the base-stock level decreasing in the pipeline inventory. Since the optimal policy is in general difficult to evaluate, we derive bounds on the optimal decision in each period. We develop an efficient policy that performs on average within 1% of optimality in simulations. We show that stocking the same supply of vaccine of every type can be over-conservative in some cases, and inadequate in others by large factors. We also quantify the substantial reduction in inventory level that can be achieved when there are multiple suppliers in the market. PMID:22874852

  9. Pediatric microdose and microtracer studies using 14C in Europe.

    PubMed

    Turner, M A; Mooij, M G; Vaes, W H J; Windhorst, A D; Hendrikse, N H; Knibbe, C A J; Kõrgvee, L T; Maruszak, W; Grynkiewicz, G; Garner, R C; Tibboel, D; Park, B K; de Wildt, S N

    2015-09-01

    Important information gaps remain on the efficacy and safety of drugs in children. Pediatric drug development encounters several ethical, practical, and scientific challenges. One barrier to the evaluation of medicines for children is a lack of innovative methodologies that have been adapted to the needs of children. This article presents our successful experience of pediatric microdose and microtracer studies using (14) C-labeled probes in Europe to illustrate the strengths and limitations of these approaches. PMID:26095095

  10. Ethics Consultation in Pediatrics: Long-Term Experience from a Pediatric Oncology Center

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Liza-Marie; Church, Christopher L.; Metzger, Monika; Baker, Justin N.

    2015-01-01

    There is little information about the content of ethics consultations (EC) in pediatrics. We sought to describe the reasons for consultation and ethical principles addressed during EC in pediatrics through retrospective review and directed content analysis of EC records (2000–2011) at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Patient-based EC were highly complex and often involved evaluation of parental decision making, particularly consideration of the risks and benefits of a proposed medical intervention, and the physician’s fiduciary responsibility to the patient. Non-patient consultations provided guidance in the development of institutional policies that would broadly affect patients and families. This is one of the few existing reviews of the content of pediatric EC and indicates the distribution of ethical issues and reasons for moral distress are different than with adults. Pediatric EC often facilitates complex decision-making among multiple stakeholders and further prospective research is needed on the role of ethics consultation in pediatrics. PMID:25970382

  11. Rituximab Desensitization in Pediatric Patients: Results of a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joyce P.; Platt, Craig D.

    2016-01-01

    Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody (mAb) primarily used to treat oncologic and autoinflammatory conditions. Although hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) and desensitization protocols to mAbs have been well described in adults, the experience in the pediatric population is very limited. We sought to determine the safety and efficacy of desensitization to rituximab in the pediatric population at our institution. We retrospectively reviewed the experience with HSRs and desensitization to rituximab during a 5-year period in our tertiary care pediatric center, including reaction evaluation, premedication regimens, and desensitization procedures and protocols. A total of 17 desensitizations to rituximab were performed in three patients. A 14-year-old patient underwent successful desensitization to rituximab using a published adult protocol without incident. Two younger patients (ages 7 years and 23 months) experienced significant reactions during initial desensitization attempts. Therefore, we designed a modified desensitization protocol to rituximab, with particular attention to the rate of infusion as mg/kg/h. This new patient weight-based protocol was successfully used in a total of 13 desensitizations in these two patients. Desensitization to rituximab was a safe and effective procedure in our pediatric population. We present a new patient weight-based desensitization protocol for pediatric patients who develop HSRs to rituximab, with particular usefulness for younger pediatric patients and potential utility in pediatric patients with HSRs to other mAbs.

  12. Simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of pediatric cancer: Preliminary experience and comparison with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pugmire, Brian S; Guimaraes, Alexander R; Lim, Ruth; Friedmann, Alison M; Huang, Mary; Ebb, David; Weinstein, Howard; Catalano, Onofrio A; Mahmood, Umar; Catana, Ciprian; Gee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To describe our preliminary experience with simultaneous whole body 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI) in the evaluation of pediatric oncology patients. METHODS: This prospective, observational, single-center study was Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant, and institutional review board approved. To be eligible, a patient was required to: (1) have a known or suspected cancer diagnosis; (2) be under the care of a pediatric hematologist/oncologist; and (3) be scheduled for clinically indicated 18F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) examination at our institution. Patients underwent PET-CT followed by PET-MRI on the same day. PET-CT examinations were performed using standard department protocols. PET-MRI studies were acquired with an integrated 3 Tesla PET-MRI scanner using whole body T1 Dixon, T2 HASTE, EPI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and STIR sequences. No additional radiotracer was given for the PET-MRI examination. Both PET-CT and PET-MRI examinations were reviewed by consensus by two study personnel. Test performance characteristics of PET-MRI, for the detection of malignant lesions, including FDG maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and minimum apparent diffusion coefficient (ADCmin), were calculated on a per lesion basis using PET-CT as a reference standard. RESULTS: A total of 10 whole body PET-MRI exams were performed in 7 pediatric oncology patients. The mean patient age was 16.1 years (range 12-19 years) including 6 males and 1 female. A total of 20 malignant and 21 benign lesions were identified on PET-CT. PET-MRI SUVmax had excellent correlation with PET-CT SUVmax for both benign and malignant lesions (R = 0.93). PET-MRI SUVmax > 2.5 had 100% accuracy for discriminating benign from malignant lesions using PET-CT reference. Whole body DWI was also evaluated: the mean ADCmin of malignant lesions (780.2 + 326.6) was

  13. Pediatric Low Vision

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Pediatric Low Vision What is Low Vision? Partial vision loss that cannot be corrected causes ... and play. What are the signs of Low Vision? Some signs of low vision include difficulty recognizing ...

  14. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  15. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  16. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  17. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Alexandra L; Lakhani, Saquib A; Hsu, Benson S

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a better understanding of pediatric traumatic brain injury and its management. Within the pediatric age group, ages 1 to 19, injuries are the number one cause of death with traumatic brain injury being involved in almost 50 percent of these cases. This, along with the fact that the medical system spends over $1 billion annually on pediatric traumatic brain injury, makes this issue both timely and relevant to health care providers. Over the course of this article the epidemiology, physiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of pediatric traumatic brain injury will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the early responder and the immediate interventions that should be considered and/or performed. The management discussed in this article follows the most recent recommendations from the 2012 edition of the Guidelines for the Acute Medical Management of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants, Children, and Adolescents. Despite the focus of this article, it is important not to lose sight of the fact that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound--or, to be more precise and use the average human's brain measurements, just above three pounds--of cure. PMID:26630835

  18. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  19. Pediatric Glaucoma: Pharmacotherapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Samant, Monica; Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2016-06-01

    Childhood glaucoma is a major therapeutic challenge for pediatric ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialists worldwide. Management depends on the etiology and age at presentation. A variety of drugs are available for the control of intraocular pressure in children; however, none of these drugs have been licensed by the regulatory agencies for use in children. Furthermore, evidence gained from randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population is sparse, and little is known regarding the use of newer anti-glaucoma preparations. This evidence-based review aims to discuss the available pharmacotherapeutic options for glaucoma in children. Topical adrenoceptor blockers, topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin (PG) analogs, adrenoceptor agonists, parasympathomimetics, and combined preparations are available for use in children, but usually as an off-label indication. Therefore, it is important to recognize that serious side effects have been reported, even with topical drops, and measures to reduce systemic absorption should be taken. Most drugs have been shown to have comparable ocular hypotensive effects, with the lowest occurrence of systemic side effects with PG analogs. Whereas a newly introduced prostaglandin analog, tafluprost, and some other preservative-free preparations have shown promising results in adult glaucoma patients, no pediatric reports are available as yet. Future studies may describe their role in treating pediatric glaucoma. This review also shares some suggested treatment pathways for primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), juvenile open angle glaucoma (JOAG), developmental glaucoma, aphakic/pseudophakic glaucoma, and uveitic glaucoma. PMID:27093864

  20. Pediatric psoriasis: an update

    PubMed Central

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2009-01-01

    Pediatric psoriasis consists broadly of 3 age groups of psoriatic patients: infantile psoriasis, a self-limited disease of infancy, psoriasis with early onset, and pediatric psoriasis with psoriatic arthritis. About one-quarter of psoriasis cases begin before the age of 18 years. A variety of clinical psoriasis types are seen in childhood, including plaque-type, guttate, erythrodermic, napkin, and nail-based disease. Like all forms of auto-immunity, susceptibility is likely genetic, but environmental triggers are required to initiate disease activity. The most common trigger of childhood is an upper respiratory tract infection. Once disease has occurred, treatment is determined based on severity and presence of joint involvement. Topical therapies, including corticosteroids and calcipotriene, are the therapies of choice in the initial care of pediatric patients. Ultraviolet light, acitretin and cyclosporine can clear skin symptoms, while methotrexate and etanercept can clear both cutaneous and joint disease. Concern for psychological development is required when choosing psoriatic therapies. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric psoriasis and a rational approach to therapeutics. PMID:19898649